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Sample records for strength differential effect

  1. An alternative approach for modeling strength differential effect in sheet metals with symmetric yield functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurukuri, Srihari; Worswick, Michael J.

    2013-12-01

    An alternative approach is proposed to utilize symmetric yield functions for modeling the tension-compression asymmetry commonly observed in hcp materials. In this work, the strength differential (SD) effect is modeled by choosing separate symmetric plane stress yield functions (for example, Barlat Yld 2000-2d) for the tension i.e., in the first quadrant of principal stress space, and compression i.e., third quadrant of principal stress space. In the second and fourth quadrants, the yield locus is constructed by adopting interpolating functions between uniaxial tensile and compressive stress states. In this work, different interpolating functions are chosen and the predictive capability of each approach is discussed. The main advantage of this proposed approach is that the yield locus parameters are deterministic and relatively easy to identify when compared to the Cazacu family of yield functions commonly used for modeling SD effect observed in hcp materials.

  2. Differential effects of strength training and testosterone treatment on soluble CD36 in aging men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Christensen, Louise L; Kvorning, Thue

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: We measured soluble CD36 (sCD36) and body composition to determine the effects of testosterone treatment (TT) and/or strength training (ST) on cardiovascular risk in men with low normal testosterone levels. METHODS: Double-blinded, placebo-controlled study in 54 men aged 60-78 years...... with bioavailable testosterone 94 cm randomized to TT (gel, 50-100 mg/day, n = 20), placebo (n = 18) or ST (n = 16) for 6 months. Moreover, the ST group was randomized to TT (ST + TT, n = 7) or placebo (ST + placebo, n = 9) after 3 months. OUTCOMES: sCD36, total and regional fat mass were....... units] vs. TT and vs. placebo (p testosterone and lean body mass. Fat mass measures significantly improved during ST + placebo, ST + TT, and TT vs. placebo. During ST + placebo, delta sCD36 was associated with delta total fat mass (r = 0.81) and delta...

  3. Energy-Based Yield Criteria for Orthotropic Materials, Exhibiting Strength-Differential Effect. Specification for Sheets under Plane Stress State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szeptyński P.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A general proposition of an energy-based limit condition for anisotropic materials exhibiting strength-differential effect (SDE based on spectral decomposition of elasticity tensors and the use of scaling pressure-dependent functions is specified for the case of orthotropic materials. A detailed algorithm (based on classical solutions of cubic equations for the determination of elastic eigenstates and eigenvalues of the orthotropic stiffness tensor is presented. A yield condition is formulated for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases. Explicit formulas based on simple strength tests are derived for parameters of criterion in the plane case. The application of both criteria for the description of yielding and plastic deformation of metal sheets is discussed in detail. The plane case criterion is verified with experimental results from the literature.

  4. Strengths in older adults: differential effect of savoring, gratitude and optimism on well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salces-Cubero, Isabel María; Ramírez-Fernández, Encarnación; Ortega-Martínez, Ana Raquel

    2018-05-21

    Objetive: The present study aimed to compare the efficacy of three separate strengths training-based interventions - Gratitude, Savoring, and Optimism - in older adults. The sample comprised 124 older adults, namely, 74 women and 50 men, non-institutionalized individuals who regularly attend day centers in the provinces of Jaén and Córdoba, southern Spain. Their ages ranged between 60 and 89 years. The measures used were Anxiety, Depression, Life Satisfaction, Positive and Negative Affect, Subjective Happiness, and Resilience. Training in Gratitude and Savoring increased scores in Life Satisfaction, Positive Affect, Subjective Happiness and Resilience, and reduced Negative Affect, whereas training in Optimism failed to produce a significant change in these variables. The Savoring and Optimism interventions decreased scores in Depression but, contrary to hypothesis, this was not the case for Gratitude. These results represent an important step in understanding what type of strengths work best when it comes to enhancing well-being in older adults and consequently helping them tackle the challenges of everyday life and recover as quickly as possible from the adverse situations and events that may arise.

  5. A Direct Test of the Differentiation Mechanism: REM, BCDMEM, and the Strength-Based Mirror Effect in Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starns, Jeffrey J.; White, Corey N.; Ratcliff, Roger

    2010-01-01

    We explore competing explanations for the reduction in false alarm rate observed when studied items are strengthened. Some models, such as Retrieving Effectively from Memory (REM; Shiffrin & Steyvers, 1997), attribute the false alarm rate reduction to differentiation, a process in which strengthening memory traces at study directly reduces the…

  6. Differential Effects of Heavy Versus Moderate Loads on Measures of Strength and Hypertrophy in Resistance-Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Contreras, Bret; Vigotsky, Andrew D; Peterson, Mark

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate muscular adaptations between heavy- and moderate-load resistance training (RT) with all other variables controlled between conditions. Nineteen resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to either a strength-type RT routine (HEAVY) that trained in a loading range of 2-4 repetitions per set (n = 10) or a hypertrophy-type RT routine (MODERATE) that trained in a loading range of 8-12 repetitions per set (n = 9). Training was carried out 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Both groups performed 3 sets of 7 exercises for the major muscle groups of the upper and lower body. Subjects were tested pre- and post-study for: 1 repetition maximum (RM) strength in the bench press and squat, upper body muscle endurance, and muscle thickness of the elbow flexors, elbow extensors, and lateral thigh. Results showed statistically greater increases in 1RM squat strength favoring HEAVY compared to MODERATE. Alternatively, statistically greater increases in lateral thigh muscle thickness were noted for MODERATE versus HEAVY. These findings indicate that heavy load training is superior for maximal strength goals while moderate load training is more suited to hypertrophy-related goals when an equal number of sets are performed between conditions.

  7. Differential Effects of Heavy Versus Moderate Loads on Measures of Strength and Hypertrophy in Resistance-Trained Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad J. Schoenfeld, Bret Contreras, Andrew D. Vigotsky, Mark Peterson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate muscular adaptations between heavy- and moderate-load resistance training (RT with all other variables controlled between conditions. Nineteen resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to either a strength-type RT routine (HEAVY that trained in a loading range of 2-4 repetitions per set (n = 10 or a hypertrophy-type RT routine (MODERATE that trained in a loading range of 8-12 repetitions per set (n = 9. Training was carried out 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Both groups performed 3 sets of 7 exercises for the major muscle groups of the upper and lower body. Subjects were tested pre- and post-study for: 1 repetition maximum (RM strength in the bench press and squat, upper body muscle endurance, and muscle thickness of the elbow flexors, elbow extensors, and lateral thigh. Results showed statistically greater increases in 1RM squat strength favoring HEAVY compared to MODERATE. Alternatively, statistically greater increases in lateral thigh muscle thickness were noted for MODERATE versus HEAVY. These findings indicate that heavy load training is superior for maximal strength goals while moderate load training is more suited to hypertrophy-related goals when an equal number of sets are performed between conditions.

  8. Differential Effects of Heavy Versus Moderate Loads on Measures of Strength and Hypertrophy in Resistance-Trained Men

    OpenAIRE

    Brad J. Schoenfeld, Bret Contreras, Andrew D. Vigotsky, Mark Peterson

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate muscular adaptations between heavy- and moderate-load resistance training (RT) with all other variables controlled between conditions. Nineteen resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to either a strength-type RT routine (HEAVY) that trained in a loading range of 2-4 repetitions per set (n = 10) or a hypertrophy-type RT routine (MODERATE) that trained in a loading range of 8-12 repetitions per set (n = 9). Training was carried out 3 days ...

  9. The 'strength' of a system of differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenselaers, C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of Einstein's concept of ''strength'' of a system of differential equations is given. As an example the strength of the Einstein-Maxwell equations for non-null Maxwell field is calculated and shown to be the same as for the pure vacuum Einstein equations. (auth.)

  10. Differential effects of strength training and testosterone treatment on soluble CD36 in aging men: Possible relation to changes in body composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Christensen, Louise L; Kvorning, Thue

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We measured soluble CD36 (sCD36) and body composition to determine the effects of testosterone treatment (TT) and/or strength training (ST) on cardiovascular risk in men with low normal testosterone levels. Methods. Double-blinded, placebo-controlled study in 54 men aged 60-78 years...... with bioavailable testosterone 94 cm randomized to TT (gel, 50-100 mg/day, n = 20), placebo (n = 18) or ST (n = 16) for 6 months. Moreover, the ST group was randomized to TT (ST + TT, n = 7) or placebo (ST + placebo, n = 9) after 3 months. Outcomes. sCD36, total and regional fat mass were....... units] vs. TT and vs. placebo (p testosterone and lean body mass. Fat mass measures significantly improved during ST + placebo, ST + TT, and TT vs. placebo. During ST + placebo, delta sCD36 was associated with delta total fat mass (r = 0.81) and delta...

  11. Merits of using color and shape differentiation to improve the speed and accuracy of drug strength identification on over-the-counter medicines by laypeople.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellier, Elizabeth; Tucker, Mike; Kenny, Natalie; Rowntree, Anna; Edworthy, Judy

    2010-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the utility of using color and shape to differentiate drug strength information on over-the-counter medicine packages. Medication errors are an important threat to patient safety, and confusions between drug strengths are a significant source of medication error. A visual search paradigm required laypeople to search for medicine packages of a particular strength from among distracter packages of different strengths, and measures of reaction time and error were recorded. Using color to differentiate drug strength information conferred an advantage on search times and accuracy. Shape differentiation did not improve search times and had only a weak effect on search accuracy. Using color to differentiate drug strength information improves drug strength identification performance. Color differentiation of drug strength information may be a useful way of reducing medication errors and improving patient safety.

  12. Anisotropy effect on strengths of metamorphic rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Özbek

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the effect of anisotropy on strengths of several metamorphic rocks of southern (Çine submassif of Menderes metamorphic massif in southwest Turkey. Four different metamorphic rocks including foliated phyllite, schist, gneiss and marble (calcschist were selected and examined. Discontinuity surveys were made along lines for each rock and evaluated with DIPS program. L-type Schmidt hammer was applied in the directions parallel and perpendicular to foliation during the field study. Several hand samples and rock blocks were collected during the field study for measurements of dry and saturated densities, dry and saturated unit weights and porosity, and for petrographic analysis and strength determination in laboratory. L- and N-type Schmidt hammers were applied in the directions perpendicular (anisotropy angle of 0° and parallel (anisotropy angle of 90° to the foliation on selected blocks of phyllite, schist, gneiss and marble (calcschist. The phyllite and schist have higher porosity and lower density values than the other rocks. However, coarse crystalline gneiss and marble (calcschist have higher rebound values and strengths, and they are classified as strong–very strong rocks. Generally, the rebound values in the direction perpendicular to the foliation are slightly higher than that in the direction parallel to foliation. Rebound values of N-type Schmidt hammer are higher than the L-type values except for phyllite. Sometimes, the rebound values of laboratory and field applications gave different results. This may result from variable local conditions such as minerals differentiation, discontinuities, water content, weathering degree and thickness of foliated structure.

  13. Nuclear threshold effects and neutron strength function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hategan, Cornel; Comisel, Horia

    2003-01-01

    One proves that a Nuclear Threshold Effect is dependent, via Neutron Strength Function, on Spectroscopy of Ancestral Neutron Threshold State. The magnitude of the Nuclear Threshold Effect is proportional to the Neutron Strength Function. Evidence for relation of Nuclear Threshold Effects to Neutron Strength Functions is obtained from Isotopic Threshold Effect and Deuteron Stripping Threshold Anomaly. The empirical and computational analysis of the Isotopic Threshold Effect and of the Deuteron Stripping Threshold Anomaly demonstrate their close relationship to Neutron Strength Functions. It was established that the Nuclear Threshold Effects depend, in addition to genuine Nuclear Reaction Mechanisms, on Spectroscopy of (Ancestral) Neutron Threshold State. The magnitude of the effect is proportional to the Neutron Strength Function, in their dependence on mass number. This result constitutes also a proof that the origins of these threshold effects are Neutron Single Particle States at zero energy. (author)

  14. Short-term strength training and the expression of myostatin and IGF-I isoforms in rat muscle and tendon: differential effects of specific contraction types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemeier, K M; Olesen, J L; Schjerling, P; Haddad, F; Langberg, H; Baldwin, K M; Kjaer, M

    2007-02-01

    In skeletal muscle, an increased expression of insulin like growth factor-I isoforms IGF-IEa and mechano-growth factor (MGF) combined with downregulation of myostatin is thought to be essential for training-induced hypertrophy. However, the specific effects of different contraction types on regulation of these factors in muscle are still unclear, and in tendon the functions of myostatin, IGF-IEa, and MGF in relation to training are unknown. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 4 days of concentric, eccentric, or isometric training (n = 7-9 per group) of the medial gastrocnemius, by stimulation of the sciatic nerve during general anesthesia. mRNA levels for myostatin, IGF-IEa, and MGF in muscle and Achilles' tendon were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Muscle myostatin mRNA decreased in response to all types of training (2- to 8-fold) (P effect of eccentric training was greater than concentric and isometric training (P tendon, myostatin mRNA was detected, but no changes were seen after exercise. IGF-IEa and MGF increased in muscle (up to 15-fold) and tendon (up to 4-fold) in response to training (P tendon no difference was seen between training types, but in muscle the effect of eccentric training was greater than concentric training for both IGF-IEa and MGF (P effect than concentric (P tendon to training, and the combined changes in myostatin and IGF-IEa/MGF expression could explain the important effect of eccentric actions for muscle hypertrophy.

  15. Size Effects on the Strength of Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaoxu

    2014-01-01

    The grain size effect and the specimen size effect on the strength of metals are briefly reviewed with respect to their history and current status of research. It is revealed that the fundamental strengthening mechanisms responsible for these two types of size effect are to increase the resistanc...

  16. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  17. Traditional versus functional strength training: Effects on muscle strength and power in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Seiler, Hilde Lohne; Torstveit, Monica Klungland; Anderssen, Sigmund A.

    2013-01-01

    Published versiom of an article in the journal:Journal of Aging and Physical Activity. Also available from Human Kinetics: http://http://journals.humankinetics.com/japa-back-issues/japa-volume-21-issue-1-january/traditional-versus-functional-strength-training-effects-on-muscle-strength-and-power-in-the-elderly The aim was to determine whether strength training with machines vs. functional strength training at 80% of one-repetition maximum improves muscle strength and power among the elderl...

  18. The Effect of Tempering on Strength Properties and Seed Coat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of tempering on seed coat adhesion strength and mechanical strength of sorghum and millet grain kernels was investigated at different tempering durations. Tempering reduced the kernel breaking strength and had significant effect on seed coat adhesion strength. Tempering the grain for 60 minutes at ambient ...

  19. Bidirectional lipid droplet velocities are controlled by differential binding strengths of HCV core DII protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney K Lyn

    Full Text Available Host cell lipid droplets (LD are essential in the hepatitis C virus (HCV life cycle and are targeted by the viral capsid core protein. Core-coated LDs accumulate in the perinuclear region and facilitate viral particle assembly, but it is unclear how mobility of these LDs is directed by core. Herein we used two-photon fluorescence, differential interference contrast imaging, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopies, to reveal novel core-mediated changes to LD dynamics. Expression of core protein's lipid binding domain II (DII-core induced slower LD speeds, but did not affect directionality of movement on microtubules. Modulating the LD binding strength of DII-core further impacted LD mobility, revealing the temporal effects of LD-bound DII-core. These results for DII-core coated LDs support a model for core-mediated LD localization that involves core slowing down the rate of movement of LDs until localization at the perinuclear region is accomplished where LD movement ceases. The guided localization of LDs by HCV core protein not only is essential to the viral life cycle but also poses an interesting target for the development of antiviral strategies against HCV.

  20. The Strength Analysis of Differential Planetary Gears of Gearbox for Concrete Mixer Truck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, M. H.; Bae, T. Y.; Kim, D. J.

    2018-03-01

    The power train of mixer gearbox for concrete mixer truck includes differential planetary gears to get large reduction ratio for operating mixer a drum and simple structure. The planetary gears are very important part of a mixer gearbox where strength problems namely gear bending stress, gear compressive stress and scoring failure are the main concern. In the present study, calculating specifications of the differential planetary gears and analyzing the gear bending and compressive stresses as well as scoring factor of the differential planetary gears gearbox for an optimal design of the mixer gearbox in respect to cost and reliability are investigated. The analyses of actual gear bending and compressive stresses of the differential planetary gears using Lewes & Hertz equation and verifications of the calculated specifications of the differential planetary gears evaluate the results with the data of allowable bending and compressive stress from the Stress-No. of cycles curves of gears. In addition, we also analyze actual gear scoring factor as well as evaluate the possibility of scoring failure of the differential planetary gear.

  1. Effect of insulating concrete forms in concrete compresive strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Jerez, Silvio R.

    The subject presented in this thesis is the effect of Insulating Concrete Forms (ICF's) on concrete compressive strength. This work seeks to identify if concrete cured in ICF's has an effect in compressive strength due to the thermal insulation provided by the forms. Modern construction is moving to energy efficient buildings and ICF's is becoming more popular in new developments. The thesis used a concrete mixture and a mortar mixture to investigate the effects of ICF's on concrete compressive strength. After the experimentations were performed, it was concluded that the ICF's do affect concrete strength. It was found that the forms increase concrete strength without the need for additional curing water. An increase of 50% in strength at 56 days was obtained. It was concluded that the longer concrete cures inside ICF's, the higher strength it reaches, and that ICF's effect on concrete strength is proportional to volume of concrete.

  2. Differential strengths of selection on S-RNases from Physalis and Solanum (Solanaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohn Joshua R

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The S-RNases of the Solanaceae are highly polymorphic self-incompatibility (S- alleles subject to strong balancing selection. Relatively recent diversification of S-alleles has occurred in the genus Physalis following a historical restriction of S-allele diversity. In contrast, the genus Solanum did not undergo a restriction of S-locus diversity and its S-alleles are generally much older. Because recovery from reduced S-locus diversity should involve increased selection, we employ a statistical framework to ask whether S-locus selection intensities are higher in Physalis than Solanum. Because different S-RNase lineages diversify in Physalis and Solanum, we also ask whether different sites are under selection in different lineages. Results Maximum-likelihood and Bayesian coalescent methods found higher intensities of selection and more sites under significant positive selection in the 48 Physalis S-RNase alleles than the 49 from Solanum. Highest posterior densities of dN/dS (ω estimates show that the strength of selection is greater for Physalis at 36 codons. A nested maximum likelihood method was more conservative, but still found 16 sites with greater selection in Physalis. Neither method found any codons under significantly greater selection in Solanum. A random effects likelihood method that examines data from both taxa jointly confirmed higher selection intensities in Physalis, but did not find different proportions of sites under selection in the two datasets. The greatest differences in strengths of selection were found in the most variable regions of the S-RNases, as expected if these regions encode self-recognition specificities. Clade-specific likelihood models indicated some codons were under greater selection in background Solanum lineages than in specific lineages of Physalis implying that selection on sites may differ among lineages. Conclusions Likelihood and Bayesian methods provide a statistical approach to

  3. The effect of Nordic hamstring strength training on muscle architecture, stiffness, and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymore, Kayla D; Domire, Zachary J; DeVita, Paul; Rider, Patrick M; Kulas, Anthony S

    2017-05-01

    Hamstring strain injury is a frequent and serious injury in competitive and recreational sports. While Nordic hamstring (NH) eccentric strength training is an effective hamstring injury-prevention method, the protective mechanism of this exercise is not understood. Strength training increases muscle strength, but also alters muscle architecture and stiffness; all three factors may be associated with reducing muscle injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of NH eccentric strength training on hamstring muscle architecture, stiffness, and strength. Twenty healthy participants were randomly assigned to an eccentric training group or control group. Control participants performed static stretching, while experimental participants performed static stretching and NH training for 6 weeks. Pre- and post-intervention measurements included: hamstring muscle architecture and stiffness using ultrasound imaging and elastography, and maximal hamstring strength measured on a dynamometer. The experimental group, but not the control group, increased volume (131.5 vs. 145.2 cm 3 , p hamstring strength. The NH intervention was an effective training method for muscle hypertrophy, but, contrary to common literature findings for other modes of eccentric training, did not increase fascicle length. The data suggest that the mechanism behind NH eccentric strength training mitigating hamstring injury risk could be increasing volume rather than increasing muscle length. Future research is, therefore, warranted to determine if muscle hypertrophy induced by NH training lowers future hamstring strain injury risk.

  4. Effect of Ionic Strength on Settling of Activated Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    M Ahmadi Moghadam, M Soheili, MM Esfahani

    2005-01-01

    Structural properties of activated sludge flocs were found to be sensitive to small changes in ionic strength. This study investigates the effect of ionic strength on settling of activated sludge. Samples were taken from activated sludge process of Ghazvin Sasan soft drink wastewater treatment plant, then treated with different ionic strengths of KCl and CaCl2 solution, after that the turbidity of supernatant was measured. The results indicated that low ionic strength resulted in a steeper sl...

  5. Effective collision strengths of quasar ultraviolet emission lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterbrock, D.E.; Wallace, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    The best available published collision strengths for excitation of permitted and semiforbidden emission lines of abundant ions observed or expected in quasars have been collected and averaged over Maxwellian velocity distributions. For a few ions for which calculations are not available, extrapolation along isoelectronic sequences or in principal quantum number n was used to estimate values. These collision strengths were used to correct differentially published photoionization models of quasars, and the corrected models compared with published observational data

  6. Double Differential Cross Sections and Generalized Oscillator Strength Distributions of Ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Karin; Nogami, Keisuke; Hino, Yuta; Sakai, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    The absolute double differential cross section (DDCS), the generalized oscillator strength distribution (GOSD), and the ionization efficiency of ammonia (NH 3 ) were investigated from the threshold to 40 eV under the condition of 200 and 400 eV incident electron energies and 6 and 8 degree scattering angles using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron- ion coincidence techniques. To determine the absolute values, we used a mixture of helium (He) and NH 3 and normalized the measured relative DDCS spectrum by the differential cross section for 2 1 P excitation of He. Our results are in close agreement with previous dipole (e, e) spectroscopy, although the incident electron energy is lower. The ionization efficiency curve obtained from coincidence measurements indicated the existence of doubly excited states that cause neutral dissociation.

  7. Short-term Periodization Models: Effects on Strength and Speed-strength Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Hagen; Wirth, Klaus; Keiner, Michael; Mickel, Christoph; Sander, Andre; Szilvas, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Dividing training objectives into consecutive phases to gain morphological adaptations (hypertrophy phase) and neural adaptations (strength and power phases) is called strength-power periodization (SPP). These phases differ in program variables (volume, intensity, and exercise choice or type) and use stepwise intensity progression and concomitant decreasing volume, converging to peak intensity (peaking phase). Undulating periodization strategies rotate these program variables in a bi-weekly, weekly, or daily fashion. The following review addresses the effects of different short-term periodization models on strength and speed-strength both with subjects of different performance levels and with competitive athletes from different sports who use a particular periodization model during off-season, pre-season, and in-season conditioning. In most periodization studies, it is obvious that the strength endurance sessions are characterized by repetition zones (12-15 repetitions) that induce muscle hypertrophy in persons with a low performance level. Strictly speaking, when examining subjects with a low training level, many periodization studies include mainly hypertrophy sessions interspersed with heavy strength/power sessions. Studies have demonstrated equal or statistically significant higher gains in maximal strength for daily undulating periodization compared with SPP in subjects with a low to moderate performance level. The relatively short intervention period and the lack of concomitant sports conditioning call into question the practical value of these findings for competitive athletes. Possibly owing to differences in mesocycle length, conditioning programs, and program variables, competitive athletes either maintained or improved strength and/or speed-strength performance by integrating daily undulating periodization and SPP during off-season, pre-season and in-season conditioning. In high-performance sports, high-repetition strength training (>15) should be

  8. Acute Effects of Partial-Body Cryotherapy on Isometric Strength: Maximum Handgrip Strength Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nardi, Massimo; Pizzigalli, Luisa; Benis, Roberto; Caffaro, Federica; Micheletti Cremasco, Margherita

    2017-12-01

    De Nardi, M, Pizzigalli, L, Benis, R, Caffaro, F, and Cremasco, MM. Acute effects of partial-body cryotherapy on isometric strength: maximum handgrip strength evaluation. J Strength Cond Res 31(12): 3497-3502, 2017-The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of a single partial-body cryotherapy (PBC) session on the maximum handgrip strength (JAMAR Hydraulic Hand dynamometer). Two hundred healthy adults were randomized into a PBC group and a control group (50 men and 50 women in each group). After the initial handgrip strength test (T0), the experimental group performed a 150-second session of PBC (temperature range between -130 and -160° C), whereas the control group stayed in a thermo neutral room (22.0 ± 0.5° C). Immediately after, both groups performed another handgrip strength test (T1). Data underlined that both groups showed an increase in handgrip strength values, especially the experimental group (Control: T0 = 39.48 kg, T1 = 40.01 kg; PBC: T0 = 39.61 kg, T1 = 41.34 kg). The analysis also reported a statistical effect related to gender (F = 491.99, P ≤ 0.05), with women showing lower handgrip strength values compared with men (women = 30.43 kg, men = 52.27 kg). Findings provide the first evidence that a single session of PBC leads to the improvement of muscle strength in healthy people. The results of the study imply that PBC could be performed also before a training session or a sport competition, to increase hand isometric strength.

  9. Effect of microstructure on the high temperature strength of nitride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of microstructure on the high temperature strength of nitride bonded silicon carbide composite. J Rakshit P K Das. Composites Volume ... The effect of these parameters on room temperature and high temperature strength of the composite up to 1300°C in ambient condition were studied. The high temperature flexural ...

  10. Global model for the lithospheric strength and effective elastic thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Magdala Tesauro; Mikhail Kaban; S. A. P. L. Cloetingh

    2013-01-01

    Global distribution of the strength and effective elastic thickness (Te) of the lithosphere are estimated using physical parameters from recent crustal and lithospheric models. For the Te estimation we apply a new approach, which provides a possibility to take into account variations of Young modulus (E) within the lithosphere. In view of the large uncertainties affecting strength estimates, we evaluate global strength and Te distributions for possible end-member ‘hard’ (HRM) and a ‘soft’ (SR...

  11. Effects of strength training on mechanomyographic amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFreitas, Jason M; Beck, Travis W; Stock, Matt S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine if the patterns of mechanomyographic (MMG) amplitude across force would change with strength training. Twenty-two healthy men completed an 8-week strength training program. During three separate testing visits (pre-test, week 4, and week 8), the MMG signal was detected from the vastus lateralis as the subjects performed isometric step muscle actions of the leg extensors from 10–100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). During pre-testing, the MMG amplitude increased linearly with force to 66% MVC and then plateaued. Conversely, weeks 4 and 8 demonstrated an increase in MMG amplitude up to ∼85% of the subject's original MVC before plateauing. Furthermore, seven of the ten force levels (30–60% and 80–100%) showed a significant decrease in mean MMG amplitude values after training, which consequently led to a decrease in the slope of the MMG amplitude/force relationship. The decreases in MMG amplitude at lower force levels are indicative of hypertrophy, since fewer motor units would be required to produce the same absolute force if the motor units increased in size. However, despite the clear changes in the mean values, analyses of individual subjects revealed that only 55% of the subjects demonstrated a significant decrease in the slope of the MMG amplitude/force relationship. (paper)

  12. Effect of simulated pulpal pressure on composite bond strength to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Statistical significance was determined by T-test (p < 0.05). There was a statistically significant difference in the mean microtensile bond strengths between the groups (p < 0.0005). Simulated pulpal pressure had a negative effect on microtensile bond strength of laser ablated dentin when Single Bond adhesive system was ...

  13. Effect of Neem Seed Husk Ash on Concrete Strength Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neem Seed Husk is a by-product obtained during industrial processing of Neem Seed to extract oil and produce fertilizer. Laboratory tests on Neem seed husk ash (NSHA) mixed with cement were conducted to find its effect on concrete strength and workability. Tests including slump test, compressive strength test, concrete ...

  14. Effects of neck strength training on isometric neck strength in rugby union players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Kevin; Green, Brian S; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a neck strengthening program on the isometric neck strength profile of male rugby union players. Controlled laboratory study. Professional rugby union club. Fifteen professional and 10 semiprofessional rugby union players. The 15 professional players undertook a 5-week neck strengthening intervention, which was performed twice per week, whereas the 10 semiprofessional players acted as the control group. Isometric strength of the neck musculature was tested using a hand-held dynamometer, for flexion (F), extension (E), left-side flexion (LSF), and right-side flexion (RSF). Preintervention and postintervention evaluations were undertaken. No significant between-group differences in isometric neck strength were noted preintervention. A significant main effect for time was observed (P isometric neck strength in all planes after the 5-week intervention (F preintervention = 334.45 ± 39.31 N vs F postintervention 396.05 ± 75.55 N; E preintervention = 606.19 ± 97.34 vs E postintervention = 733.88 ± 127.16 N; LSF preintervention = 555.56 ± 88.34 N vs LSF postintervention = 657.14 ± 122.99 N; RSF preintervention = 570.00 ± 106.53 N vs RSF postintervention = 668.00 ± 142.18 N). No significant improvement in neck strength was observed for control group participants. The results of the present study indicate that a 5-week neck strengthening program improves isometric neck strength in rugby union players, which may have implications for injury prevention, screening, and rehabilitation. The strengthening program described in the present study may facilitate rehabilitation specialists in the development of neck injury prevention, screening, and rehabilitation protocols.

  15. THE EFFECT OF DEGREASING ON ADHESIVE JOINT STRENGTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rudawska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the effect of degreasing, a surface preparation methods in adhesive bonding, on adhesive joint strength. 5 types of degreasing agents were used in the study: acetone, extraction naphtha, Ultramyt, Wiko and Loctite 7061. The degreasing operation was performed by three methods: rubbing, spraying and immersion. Strength tests were performed on single-lap adhesive joints of hot-dip galvanized metal sheets made with Loctite 9466 adhesive according to the above variants of surface preparation. The experimental results demonstrate that adhesive joint strength is significantly affected by the applied degreasing agent. Moreover, the method of application of the degreasing agent is crucial, too. The results of strength testing reveal that the most effective degreasing method for hot-dip galvanized metal sheet adhesive joints is spraying using extraction naphtha. Thereby degreased samples have the highest immediate strength and shear strength. The use of extraction naph-tha is also effective in combination with degreasing by rubbing; however, it is not effective when used in combi-nation with immersion, as reflected in the lowest strength results.

  16. Effect of cellulase treatment of long fiber fraction on strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fiber and unbeaten short-fiber fractions. The obtained test results have indicate that the application of enzyme on appropriate fiber fraction have positive effects on the strength properties of the corrugated medium. The short span compression ...

  17. Elastic Resistance Effectiveness on Increasing Strength of Shoulders and Hips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picha, Kelsey J; Almaddah, Muataz R; Barker, Jordan; Ciochetty, Tavis; Black, W Scott; Uhl, Tim L

    2017-09-12

    Elastic resistance is a common training method used to gain strength. Currently, progression with elastic resistance is based on the perceived exertion of the exercise or completion of targeted repetitions; exact resistance is typically unknown. This study's objective is to determine if knowledge of load during elastic resistance exercise will increase strength gains during exercises. Participants were randomized into two strength training groups, elastic resistance only and elastic resistance using a load cell (LC) that displays force during exercise. The LC group used a Smart Handle (Patterson Medical Supply, Chicago, IL) to complete all exercises. Each participant completed the same exercises three times weekly for 8 weeks. The LC group was provided with a set load for exercises whereas the elastic resistance only group was not. Participant's strength was tested at baseline and program completion, measuring isometric strength for shoulder abduction (SAb), shoulder external rotation (SER), hip abduction (HAb), and hip extension (HEx). Independent t-tests were used to compare the normalized torques between groups. No significant differences were found between groups. Shoulder strength gains did not differ between groups (SAb p>0.05; SER p>0.05). Hip strength gains did not differ between groups (HAb p>0.05; HEx p>0.05). Both groups increased strength due to individual supervision, constantly evaluating degree of difficulty associated with exercise and providing feedback while using elastic resistance. Using a LC is as effective as supervised training and could provide value in a clinic setting when patients are working unsupervised.

  18. Effects of etching time on enamel bond strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triolo, P T; Swift, E J; Mudgil, A; Levine, A

    1993-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of etching time on bond strengths of composite to enamel. Proximal surfaces of extracted molars were etched with either a conventional etchant (35% phosphoric acid) or one of two dentin/enamel conditioners, 10% maleic acid (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Etchant), or a solution of oxalic acid, aluminum nitrate, and glycine (Gluma 1 & 2 Conditioner). Each agent was applied for 15, 30, or 60 seconds. Specimens etched with 35% phosphoric acid had the highest mean bond strengths at each etching time. At the manufacturer's recommended application times, the other two agents gave significantly lower shear bond strengths than phosphoric acid.

  19. Effective longitudinal strength of high temperature metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, J.N.; Savvides, I.

    1991-01-01

    Several models for predicting the longitudinal strength of fiber composites are presented, ranging from a simple netting analysis to a model incorporating curvilinear strain hardening for all the components. Results from these models are presented for tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys, FeCrAlY and MARM200. It is shown that a simple elastic limit micromechanical model does not always adequately describe the useful strength of the composites. The methods proposed here are shown to be more appropriate for predicting the effective composite strength. 2 refs

  20. Effect of Water on Coal Strength

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    1. INTRODUCTION. The knowledge of the mechanisms of the interaction of water with rock and its effects on rock properties is of paramount importance in geotechnical engineering. The presence of water at site of large projects such as dams, canals, caverns, highways and underground reservoirs are always a significant ...

  1. Effect of Fluid Dynamic Viscosity on the Strength of Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, K.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    The mechanical strength of high porosity and weakly cemented chalk is affected by the fluid in the pores. In this study, the effect of the dynamic viscosity of non-polar fluids has been measured on outcrop chalk from Sigerslev Quarry, Stevns, Denmark. The outcome is that the measured strength...... of the chalk decreases with increasing dynamic viscosity. The proposed qualitative explanation is that pressure difference supports and enhances the generation of microscopic shear and tensile failures....

  2. Effect of Hand Mixing on the Compressive Strength of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Isiwu AGUWA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effect of hand mixing on the compressive strength of concrete. Before designing the concrete mix, sieve analysis of sharp sand and chippings was carried out and their fineness moduli were determined. Also the dry weight of chippings and the specific gravities of both sand and chippings were determined. A designed concrete mix of 1:2:4 was used and the number of turnings of the mixture over from one end to another by hand mixing was varying from one time up to and including seven times. The strengths were measured at the curing ages of 7, 14, 21 and 28 days respectively using 150mm concrete cubes cast, cured and crushed. The results revealed that the compressive strengths of concrete cubes appreciably increased with increase in number of turnings from one to four times but remained almost constant beyond four times of turning for all the ages tested. For example, at 1, 2, and 3 times turning; the compressive strengths at 28 days were 4.67, 13.37 and 20.28N/mm2 respectively while at 4, 5 and 6 times turning; the compressive strengths at 28 days were 21.15, 21.34 and 21.69N/mm2. From the data, adequate strengths were not developed at turnings below three times of hand mixing, concluding that a minimum of three times turning is required to produce concrete with satisfactory strength.

  3. Constraint effects of model coal pillar geometry on its strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahab Khair, A.; Danqing Xu (West Virgina University, Morgantown, WV (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Coal and rock specimens with various diameter/height ratios (D/H) were subjected to compressive test in the laboratory. The deformation and failure characteristics of specimens were studied. The study showed that the D/H ratio of specimens significantly affects the deformation, failure characteristics, and the strength of material. The results provide a better understanding of the mechanism of D/H ratio effect on the strength of materials. The magnitude and mechanism of D/H ratio effect was compared with the effect of confining pressure, and contrasted to size effect. The application of the study to pillar design is discussed. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Analytical evaluation of the environment effect on creep rupture strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Manabu; Ogawa, Yutaka; Kurata, Yuji; Kondo, Tatsuo

    1982-04-01

    An analytical approach was made in evaluating semi-quantitatively the effect of environment on rupture strength of materials. In the analysis the zone formed in the material by reaction with the environment was assumed to bear the applied load as one of the strength members. In calculations a law of mixtures of creep strength and the linear damage rule were applied. In the modeling of the load bearing by the composite structure of the environment-affected and intact zones, both parallel and series models were considered to formulate the equations. The equation for the parallel-loaded model was properly adopted in explaining semi-quantitatively the case of Incoloy alloy 800 crept in air, which was strengthened with the layer formed by nitrization. The equation for the serially loaded model was more successfully adopted to the evaluation of the rupture strength of dissimilar weld joints. The latter was also considered to be potentially adoptable to the problems of the effect of specimen size and shape on rupture strength, which had been often taken into account in evaluating the environment effect. For application of the developed method, examination was made to the possible decrease in rupture strength of Hastelloy alloy XR in long term tests by the formation of Cr depleted zone due to oxidation in HTGR impure helium, and the results were compared with the values obtained by experiments. (author)

  5. Multistep triaxial strength tests: investigating strength parameters and pore pressure effects on Opalinus Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graesle, W.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The impact of natural variability between rock samples from a single formation is a common problem for the characterisation of THM properties of rocks. Data variation arising from heterogeneity between samples often obscures details of material behaviour. Besides efforts to reduce this statistical noise by careful selection of samples, there are essentially two approaches to overcome this problem: - To generate very large data sets for better statistics. - To avoid the impact of natural variability by yielding an extensive data set from a single sample. The multistep strength test follows the latter approach to characterise the mechanical behaviour of Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri and the possible impact of pore pressure effects. The concept of the multistep strength test comprises three test sections, each focused on the investigation of one mechanical characteristic of Opalinus Clay. Any section is composed of a series of strain controlled load cycles at various levels of confining pressure. 1) The linear elastic limit, i.e. the onset of nonlinearity in the stress-strain-relationship σ dev (ε 1 ) during strain-controlled triaxial loading, is determined in section 1. It defines a lower limit for the onset of damage. Avoiding sample damage is essential during this test section to ensure that all measurements reflect the behaviour of undisturbed material. Therefore, a rather strict and well detectable criterion for the onset of nonlinearity is required to enable a timely termination of any load phase. 2) Section 2 is focused on shear strength. Any load cycle is stopped as soon as peak stress is detected. As progressive damage of the sample is unavoidable during this process, it must be expected that only very few measured peak stresses approximately represent properties of the undamaged material. 3) Test section 3 is a conventional test of residual strength. Tests are carried out on cylindrical samples (100 mm

  6. TCR Signal Strength Regulates Akt Substrate Specificity To Induce Alternate Murine Th and T Regulatory Cell Differentiation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawse, William F; Boggess, William C; Morel, Penelope A

    2017-07-15

    The Akt/mTOR pathway is a key driver of murine CD4 + T cell differentiation, and induction of regulatory T (Treg) cells results from low TCR signal strength and low Akt/mTOR signaling. However, strong TCR signals induce high Akt activity that promotes Th cell induction. Yet, it is unclear how Akt controls alternate T cell fate decisions. We find that the strength of the TCR signal results in differential Akt enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, the Akt substrate networks associated with T cell fate decisions are qualitatively different. Proteomic profiling of Akt signaling networks during Treg versus Th induction demonstrates that Akt differentially regulates RNA processing and splicing factors to drive T cell differentiation. Interestingly, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) L or hnRNP A1 are Akt substrates during Treg induction and have known roles in regulating the stability and splicing of key mRNAs that code for proteins in the canonical TCR signaling pathway, including CD3ζ and CD45. Functionally, inhibition of Akt enzymatic activity results in the dysregulation of splicing during T cell differentiation, and knockdown of hnRNP L or hnRNP A1 results in the lower induction of Treg cells. Together, this work suggests that a switch in substrate specificity coupled to the phosphorylation status of Akt may lead to alternative cell fates and demonstrates that proteins involved with alternative splicing are important factors in T cell fate decisions. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Effect of elevated temperature on the mechanical strength of HEPA filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfawal, M.M.; Eladham, K.A.; Hammed, F.H.; Abdrabbo, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of elevated temperature on the mechanical strength of HEPA filters was studied in order to evaluate and improve their performance under high temperature conditions. As part of this study the mechanical strength of HEPA filter medium which is the limiting factor in terms of the filter strength was experimentally studied at elevated temperature up to 400 degree C, and thermal exposure times ranged from 2 min to 4 h. The failure pressures of HEPA filter units after long exposure to 250 degree C were also investigated. The test results show that the medium strength decreases with increase in temperature challenge and thermal exposure time due to burnout of the organic binder used to improve the strength and flexibility of the medium. The test results also show that the tensile strength of the conventional filter medium drops to about 40 % of the value at room temperature after exposure to 250 degree C for 6 h; therefore, the continuous exposure of the conventional filter medium to this temperature is critical. The average failure differential pressures of all commercial tested filters were found to lie between 9 and 18 kPa at ambient temperature and between 6 and 11 kPa after thermal challenge at 250 degree C for 100 h. It was found that swelling and capture of the ends of individual pleats has led to filter failure.3 fig., 2 tab

  8. Acute effect of different stretching methods on isometric muscle strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Vasconcellos de Lima Costa e Silva

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the acute effect of static stretching methods (SS and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF on the static muscle strength (SMS. Eleven young male subjects with strength training experience, performed 3 tests with a 48h interval between them, randomly selected, where each one subject carried out all procedures: a hand grip without stretching; b hand grip preceded by static stretching of wrist flexors muscles; c hand grip preceded by PNF stretching of wrist flexors muscles. The Shapiro-Wilk test verified the normality of data, and a one-way ANOVA with repeated measures, followed by Tukey’s post hoc test, evaluated the differences between the groups. The significance was set at p 0.05. In conclusion, both stretching methods had caused negative effects on isometric strength, reducing its levels.

  9. Differential effectiveness of placebo treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meissner, Karin; Fässler, Margrit; Rücker, Gerta

    2013-01-01

    IMPORTANCE When analyzing results of randomized clinical trials, the treatment with the greatest specific effect compared with its placebo control is considered to be the most effective one. Although systematic variations of improvements in placebo control groups would have important implications...... relevant sources through February 2012 and contacted the authors to identify randomized clinical trials on the prophylaxis of migraine with an observation period of at least 8 weeks after randomization that compared an experimental treatment with a placebo control group. We calculated pooled random-effects...... and sham surgery are associated with higher responder ratios than oral pharmacological placebos. Clinicians who treat patients with migraine should be aware that a relevant part of the overall effect they observe in practice might be due to nonspecific effects and that the size of such effects might differ...

  10. Effects of strength training, detraining and retraining in muscle strength, hypertrophy and functional tasks in older female adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Cleiton S; Cunha, Giovani; Marques, Nise; Oliveira-Reischak, Ãlvaro; Pinto, Ronei

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies presented different results regarding the maintenance time of muscular adaptations after strength training and the ability to resume the gains on muscular performance after resumption of the training programme. This study aimed to verify the effect of strength training on knee extensors and elbow flexor muscle strength, rectus femoris muscle volume and functional performance in older female adults after 12 weeks of strength training, 1 year of detraining and followed by 12 weeks of retraining. Twelve sedentary older women performed 12 weeks of strength training, 1 year of detraining and 12 weeks of retraining. The strength training was performed twice a week, and the assessment was made four times: at the baseline, after the strength training, after the detraining and after the retraining. The knee extensor and elbow flexor strength, rectus femoris muscle volume and functional task were assessed. Strength of knee extensor and elbow flexor muscles, rectus femoris muscle volume and 30-s sit-to-stand increased from baseline to post-training (respectively, 40%, 70%, 38% and 46%), decreased after detraining (respectively, -36%, -64%, -35% and -43%) and increased again these parameters after retraining (35%, 68%, 36% and 42%). Strength training induces gains on strength and hypertrophy, also increased the performance on functional tasks after the strength training. The stoppage of the strength caused strength loss and reduction of functional performance. The resumption of the strength training promoted the same gains of muscular performance in older female adults. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effects of blood contamination on resin-resin bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiriksson, Sigurdur O; Pereira, Patricia N R; Swift, Edward J; Heymann, Harald O; Sigurdsson, Asgeir

    2004-02-01

    Incremental placement and curing of resin composites has been recommended. However, this requires longer operating time, and therefore, increased risk of contamination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination on microtensile bond strengths (microTBS) between resin interfaces and to determine the best decontamination method to re-establish the original resin-resin bond strength. The top surfaces of 64, 4-mm composite blocks (Z-250, Renew, APX, Pertac II) were untreated as the control, or were treated as follows: blood applied and dried on the surface (Treatment 1), blood applied, rinsed, dried (Treatment 2), blood applied, rinsed, and an adhesive applied (Single Bond, One-Step, Clearfil SE, Prompt L-Pop) (Treatment 3). Fresh composite was applied and light-cured in 2-mm increments. After 24 h storage in water, the specimens were sectioned into 0.7-mm thick slabs, trimmed to a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2), and loaded to failure at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min using an Instron universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test (pcontamination resulted in resin-resin bond strengths of only 1.0-13.1 MPa. Rinsing raised bond strengths to over 40 MPa for each material. Use of an adhesive further increased bond strengths except for Pertac II. Rinsing blood from contaminated surfaces increases the resin-resin bond strength significantly and the application of an appropriate adhesive increases the bond strength to control levels.

  12. Effect of intracanal medicament on bond strength of fibre posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Melike Bayram

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of calcium hydroxide (CH, triple antibiotic paste (TAP and double antibiotic paste (DAP on the push-out bond strengths of three different self-adhesive resin cements. Forty-eight single-rooted human maxillary central incisors were selected. The crowns were removed and the root canals were performed. After the irrigation protocols, the post space was prepared. The teeth were then randomly divided into a control group (no intracanal medicament and three medicament groups (n = 12 for each group. After three weeks, the medicaments were removed using 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and EndoActivator agitation. The teeth were divided into three subgroups according to the fibre-post luting cement: Maxcem Elite, RelyX Unicem and BisCem. The specimens were sectioned and the push-out test was performed. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests were used for statistical analyses. Regarding the type of cement, BisCem had significantly lower bond strength values than Maxcem and RelyX. There was no significant difference between the bond strength values of Maxcem and RelyX (p > 0.05. The TAP-RelyX group had the highest bond strength value and the DAP-BisCem group had the lowest bond strength value. RelyX and Maxcem had higher bond strength to root canal dentin than BisCem. The bond strength of BisCem, RelyX and Maxcem was not negatively affected by the use of DAP, CH and TAP as intracanal medicaments.

  13. The differential susceptibility to media effects model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, P.M.; Peter, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this theoretical article, we introduce the Differential Susceptibility to Media Effects Model (DSMM), a new, integrative model to improve our understanding of media effects. The DSMM organizes, integrates, and extends the insights developed in earlier microlevel media-effects theories. It

  14. Heat treatment effect on impact strength of 40Kh steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubev, V.K.; Novikov, S.A.; Sobolev, Yu.S.; Yukina, N.A.

    1984-01-01

    The paper presents results of studies on the effect of heat treatment on strength and pattern of 40Kh steel impact failure. Loading levels corresponding to macroscopic spalling microdamage initiation in the material are determined for three initial states. Metallographic study on the spalling failure pattern for 40Kh steel in different initial states and data on microhardness measurement are presented

  15. Effect of bitumen emulsion on setting, strength, soundness and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Effect of bitumen emulsion on setting, strength, soundness and moisture resistance of oxychloride cement. M P S CHANDRAWAT†, T N OJHA and R N YADAV*. Department of Chemistry, R N Ruia Government College, Ramgarh-Shekhawati (Sikar) 331 024, India. †Department of Chemistry, R R Government College, ...

  16. Effect of Acidic Water on Strength, Durability and Corrosion of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, specimens of 108 cubes (150 mm x 150 mm x 150 mm), 36 cylinders (300 mm x 150 mm), and 72 cylinders (102 mm x 51 mm) were cast and cured in percentages of NaCl added water to find the workability, strength, durability and corrosion resistance characteristics concrete. The effect of corrosion of steel in ...

  17. Effects of Elevated Temperature on Compressive Strength Of Concrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents the results of investigation of the effects of elevated temperatures on the compressive strength of Grade 40 concrete. A total of thirty cube specimens were cast, cured in water at ambient temperature in the laboratory and subjected to various temperature regimes before testing. A concrete mix of 1:1:3 ...

  18. Global model for the lithospheric strength and effective elastic thickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesauro, M.; Kaban, M.K.; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.

    2013-01-01

    Global distribution of the strength and effective elastic thickness (Te) of the lithosphere are estimated using physical parameters from recent crustal and lithospheric models. For the Te estimation we apply a new approach, which provides a possibility to take into account variations of Young

  19. Effect of electrical pulse on the precipitates and material strength of 2024 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Weichao, E-mail: weichao127@gmail.com; Wang, Yongjun, E-mail: t.s.wu@163.com; Wang, Junbiao, E-mail: wangjunb@nwpu.edu.cn; Wei, Shengmin, E-mail: weism@nwpu.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    The effect of electrical pulse on the metastable precipitates and material strength of Al–Cu–Mg based 2024 aluminum alloy was investigated by means of tensile tests, hardness measurement, transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The experimental results show that the electrical pulse passing through the naturally aged 2024 alloy can cause an electrical pulse retrogression effect which is characterized by the decrease of material strength and the appearance of Portevin–Le Chatelier (PLC) effect. More electrical pulses under higher current densities are more efficient in causing the electrical pulse retrogression effect. TEM and DSC experimental results reveal that, the electrical pulse retrogression effect is owing to the dissolution of the metastable precipitates in naturally aged 2024 alloy. Compared with the traditional retrogression heat treatment that heats the aluminum alloys through bulk heating in furnace for short time to reduce their material strength, the electrical pulse retrogression effect occurs at a much lower temperature and the pulse treated alloy can nearly restore to its original strength at a faster speed at room temperature.

  20. Line pressure effects on differential pressure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, G.G.; Evans, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of differential pressure transducers in experimental pressurized water reactor (PWR) systems was evaluated. Transient differential pressure measurements made using a simple calibration proportionality relating differential pressure to output voltage could have large measurement uncertainties. A more sophisticated calibration equation was derived to incorporate the effects of zero shifts and sensitivity shifts as pressure in the pressure sensing line changes with time. A comparison made between the original calibration proportionality equation and the derived compensation equation indicates that potential measurement uncertainties can be reduced

  1. Effect of symmetry breaking on transition strength distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, G.E.; Shriner, J.F. Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The quantum numbers of over 100 states in 30 P have been determined from the ground state to 8 MeV. Previous measurements had provided complete spectroscopy in 26 Al. For these N=Z=odd nuclei, states of isospin T=0 and T=1 coexist at all energies. These spectra provide a unique opportunity to test the effect of symmetry breaking (of the approximate symmetry isospin) on the level statistics and on the transition strength distributions. The level statistics are strongly affected by the small symmetry breaking and the transition strength distributions differ from the Porter-Thomas distribution

  2. Ionic Strength Differentially Affects the Bioavailability of Neutral and Negatively Charged Inorganic Hg Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzler, Benjamin; Hinz, Aaron; Ruuskanen, Matti; Poulain, Alexandre J

    2017-09-05

    Mercury (Hg) bioavailability to bacteria in marine systems is the first step toward its bioamplification in food webs. These systems exhibit high salinity and ionic strength that will both alter Hg speciation and properties of the bacteria cell walls. The role of Hg speciation on Hg bioavailability in marine systems has not been teased apart from that of ionic strength on cell wall properties, however. We developed and optimized a whole-cell Hg bioreporter capable of functioning under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and exhibiting no physiological limitations of signal production to changes in ionic strength. We show that ionic strength controls the bioavailability of Hg species, regardless of their charge, possibly by altering properties of the bacterial cell wall. The unexpected anaerobic bioavailability of negatively charged halocomplexes may help explain Hg methylation in marine systems such as the oxygen-deficient zone in the oceanic water column, sea ice or polar snow.

  3. Effect of blasting on the strength of a rock mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, L

    1964-01-01

    Although the fact that blasting concussions tend to loosen a rock mass has always been known, the enormous reduction in strength associated with such loosening is not generally recognized. Recent investigations of the effect of blasting on a rock mass have shown that even slight loosening may markedly reduce the strength. This factor introduces a new slant on modern blasting methods, some of which will have to be considered more critically. The sensitivity of the mass to impacts depends on stress concentrations at the end of joints (Kerbspannungen) and on tensile stresses developed in the immediate vicinity of a joint, even in regions where the field stresses are not tensile. Thus, the sensitivity depends on the shape and orientation of the joints and particularly on the degree of separation of the individual joint families. The orientation of the joint families to the strains produced by blasting is just as important as the reduction in overall strength arising from the drop in friction due to the effects of the ''knocking out'' process (Foppl) on the joint body complex. Concussions may critically increase the degree of separation of the joint network thus reducing the tensile and shear strengths of the rock mass. (19 refs.)

  4. Effect of blasting on the strength of a rock mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, L.

    1964-01-01

    Although the fact that blasting concussions tend to loosen a rock mass has always been known, the enormous reduction in strength associated with such loosening is not generally recognized. Recent investigations of the effect of blasting on a rock mass have shown that even slight loosening may markedly reduce the strength. This factor introduces a new slant on modern blasting methods, some of which will have to be considered more critically. The sensitivity of the mass to impacts depends on stress concentrations at the end of joints (Kerbspannungen) and on tensile stresses developed in the immediate vicinity of a joint, even in regions where the field stresses are not tensile. Thus, the sensitivity depends on the shape and orientation of the joints and particularly on the degree of separation of the individual joint families. The orientation of the joint families to the strains produced by blasting is just as important as the reduction in overall strength arising from the drop in friction due to the effects of the ''knocking out'' process (Foppl) on the joint body complex. Concussions may critically increase the degree of separation of the joint network thus reducing the tensile and shear strengths of the rock mass. (19 refs.)

  5. Effect of strength training on orthostatic hypotension in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilla, L R; Stephens, A B; Knutzen, K M; Caine, D

    1998-01-01

    This preliminary study attempted to identify the frequency of orthostatic hypotension (OH) in community dwelling older adults who volunteered to participate in an 8-week, heavy-resistance, strength-training program. It also assessed the effect of the strength-training program on OH. From a larger study (n = 53) on high-resistance strength training in older adults (mean age 71.4 +/- 6.6 years), a subset of subjects (n = 24), mean age 71.0 +/- 5.8 years, was evaluated who met at least one criterion for OH. All subjects were tested for resting blood pressures (BP) and heart rates (HR) in the supine, sitting, and standing positions. Also noted was their response to orthostatism in rising from a cot after 10 minutes and rising from a chair after 5 minutes. The subset was not different from the overall group in gender ratio, age, or effect of medication on BP. The treatment was an 8-week strength-training program at 80% of their one repetition maximum. Significant changes (P response to the orthostatic challenge, significant (P positive adaptation to an orthostatic challenge.

  6. Effect of 8 weeks of free-weight and machine-based strength training on strength and power performance

    OpenAIRE

    Wirth Klaus; Keiner Michael; Hartmann Hagen; Sander Andre; Mickel Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of free-weight and machine-based exercises to increase different strength and speed-strength variables. One hundred twenty male participants (age: 23.8 ? 2.5 years; body height: 181.0 ? 6.8 cm; body mass: 80.2 ? 8.9 kg) joined the study. The 2 experimental groups completed an 8 week periodized strength training program that included 2 training sessions per week. The exercises that were used in the strength training programs were...

  7. The List-Strength Effect in Recall: Relative-Strength Competition and Retrieval Inhibition May both Contribute to Forgetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verde, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    According to the principle of relative-strength competition, stronger items in memory block the retrieval of weaker items. This principle, integral to many theories of forgetting over the years, derives much of its support from the list-strength effect (LSE), in which strengthening some items in a study list makes it more difficult to recall other…

  8. Global model for the lithospheric strength and effective elastic thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Cloetingh, Sierd A. P. L.

    2013-08-01

    Global distribution of the strength and effective elastic thickness (Te) of the lithosphere are estimated using physical parameters from recent crustal and lithospheric models. For the Te estimation we apply a new approach, which provides a possibility to take into account variations of Young modulus (E) within the lithosphere. In view of the large uncertainties affecting strength estimates, we evaluate global strength and Te distributions for possible end-member 'hard' (HRM) and a 'soft' (SRM) rheology models of the continental crust. Temperature within the lithosphere has been estimated using a recent tomography model of Ritsema et al. (2011), which has much higher horizontal resolution than previous global models. Most of the strength is localized in the crust for the HRM and in the mantle for the SRM. These results contribute to the long debates on applicability of the "crème brulée" or "jelly-sandwich" model for the lithosphere structure. Changing from the SRM to HRM turns most of the continental areas from the totally decoupled mode to the fully coupled mode of the lithospheric layers. However, in the areas characterized by a high thermal regime and thick crust, the layers remain decoupled even for the HRM. At the same time, for the inner part of the cratons the lithospheric layers are coupled in both models. Therefore, rheological variations lead to large changes in the integrated strength and Te distribution in the regions characterized by intermediate thermal conditions. In these areas temperature uncertainties have a greater effect, since this parameter principally determines rheological behavior. Comparison of the Te estimates for both models with those determined from the flexural loading and spectral analysis shows that the 'hard' rheology is likely applicable for cratonic areas, whereas the 'soft' rheology is more representative for young orogens.

  9. The effectiveness of development programming strength in primary school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Khudolii

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The problems of optimizing development strength in primary school children. The purpose of the program is to validate the technology development strength abilities in the classroom physical education at school. A program of strength training by taking into account the effects of power loads. Found that the use of the combined method (option I makes it possible to obtain positive results in force readiness school classes 2-4 through 3-9 sessions. The combined method (option II significantly affects the dynamics of the forces of the local group of muscles. The use of mobile gaming allows for a higher level of emotional strength to develop the ability of students. The dynamics of power indices (option II significantly affects operation: dynamic method - 25-45 reps (rest interval between sets 30-60 seconds, the method of maximum effort - 18-30 reps (rest interval between sets 30-60 seconds method of isometric effort - 15-25 reps (rest interval between sets 30-60 seconds, the method of repeated efforts - 36-60 reps (rest interval between sets 30-60 seconds.

  10. Hand Grip Strength Vs. Sprint Effectiveness in Amputee Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Marta; Wiliński, Wojciech; Struzik, Artur; Rokita, Andrzej

    2015-11-22

    Amputee soccer is one of the types of soccer designed for the disabled, especially those who have undergone amputations, as well as those with extremity dysfunction. The objective of the study was to find the relationship between hand grip strength and sprint time in amputee soccer players. Thirteen field amputee soccer players participated in the study. A SAEHAN hydraulic hand dynamometer manufactured by Jamar was used for hand grip strength measurements. The sprint running test was conducted over a distance of 30 m. The Fusion Smart Speed System was employed for running time measurements. No statistically significant relationships were found between hand grip strength of the left or right hand, and sprint times over 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 m. Analysis of the running velocity curve of the subjects showed an interesting profile characterized by a 15 meter-long acceleration phase and a significant velocity increase over a distance of 20 - 25 m. The study suggests that there is no relationship between hand grip strength and sprint effectiveness in amputee soccer players. The specificity of locomotion with the use of elbow crutches among elite Polish amputee soccer players probably accounts for the profile of the sprint velocity curve. Extension of the acceleration phase in the sprint run and a velocity increase in the subsequent part of the run were observed.

  11. Hand Grip Strength Vs. Sprint Effectiveness in Amputee Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek Marta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Amputee soccer is one of the types of soccer designed for the disabled, especially those who have undergone amputations, as well as those with extremity dysfunction. The objective of the study was to find the relationship between hand grip strength and sprint time in amputee soccer players. Thirteen field amputee soccer players participated in the study. A SAEHAN hydraulic hand dynamometer manufactured by Jamar was used for hand grip strength measurements. The sprint running test was conducted over a distance of 30 m. The Fusion Smart Speed System was employed for running time measurements. No statistically significant relationships were found between hand grip strength of the left or right hand, and sprint times over 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 m. Analysis of the running velocity curve of the subjects showed an interesting profile characterized by a 15 meter-long acceleration phase and a significant velocity increase over a distance of 20 – 25 m. The study suggests that there is no relationship between hand grip strength and sprint effectiveness in amputee soccer players. The specificity of locomotion with the use of elbow crutches among elite Polish amputee soccer players probably accounts for the profile of the sprint velocity curve. Extension of the acceleration phase in the sprint run and a velocity increase in the subsequent part of the run were observed.

  12. Effect of plastic strain on fracture strength of cracked components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear power plant components are occasionally subjected to large load by earthquake and may suffer plastic strain. Although the plastic strain induced in materials increases the strength, it may reduce the fracture toughness due to a crack in the components. In this study, the effect of the plastic strain on strength of cracked components was investigated. Firstly, the change in the tensile properties and fracture toughness due to plastic strain were examined for Type 316 stainless steel and carbon steel (SM490). The degree of nominal plastic strain was 5%, 10%, 20% and 40% (only for stainless steel). Secondly, the J-integral values of surface crack on a pipe were evaluated by finite element analyses. Finally, the critical load for fracture of the cracked pipe was evaluated for various pipe and crack geometries using the J-integral values and the fracture toughness obtained. It was concluded that the plastic strain enhances the fracture strength of the cracked components when the induced plastic strain is less than 10%, although the extremely large plastic strain could reduce the strength. (author)

  13. Effect of plastic strain on fracture strength of cracked components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear power plant components are occasionally subjected to excessive load by earthquake and may suffer plastic strain. Although the plastic strain introduced in materials increases the strength, it may reduce the fracture toughness. In this study, the effect of the plastic strain on strength of cracked components was investigated. Firstly, the change in the tensile properties and fracture toughness due to plastic strain were examined for Type 316 stainless steel and carbon steel (SM 490). The degree of nominal plastic strain was 5%, 10%, 20% and 40% (only for stainless steel). Secondly, the J-integral values of surface crack on a pipe were evaluated by finite element analyses. Finally, the critical load for fracture of the cracked pipe was evaluated for various pipe and crack geometries using the J-integral values and the fracture toughness obtained. It was concluded that the plastic strain enhances the fracture strength of the cracked components when the induced plastic strain is less than 10%, although the extremely large plastic strain could reduce the strength. (author)

  14. The effectiveness of development programming strength in primary school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khudolii O.M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The problems of optimizing development strength in primary school children. The purpose of the program is to validate the technology development strength abilities in the classroom physical education at school. A program of strength training by taking into account the effects of power loads. Found that the use of the combined method (option I makes it possible to obtain positive results in force readiness school classes 2-4 through 3-9 sessions. The combined method (option II significantly affects the dynamics of the forces of the local group of muscles. The use of mobile gaming allows for a higher level of emotional strength to develop the ability of students. The dynamics of power indices (option II significantly affects operation: dynamic method - 25-45 reps (rest interval between sets 30-60 seconds, the method of maximum effort - 18-30 reps (rest interval between sets 30-60 seconds method of isometric effort - 15-25 reps (rest interval between sets 30-60 seconds, the method of repeated efforts - 36-60 reps (rest interval between sets 30-60 seconds.

  15. THE EFFECT OF PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS ON THE TENSILE STRENGTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HERROELEN Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available PCM’s need some important properties to have use such as high heat storage capacity, easy availability and low cost and can have different effects such as flavour, softness or exchange of heat. They are put inside of microcapsules, so they can be inbedded inside the strain, otherwise it wouldn’t be so effective. So basically the microcapsules consist of a core that’s the PCM and a polymer shell. This shell needs to be strong enough to hold the PCM and also withstand up to a certain level of heat and mechanical damage. This study investigates the tensile strength of fabrics composed by fibres, some of these fibres have benn inbedded phase change microcapsules (PCM’s. The investigated fabrics are divided by composition and by structure. By knitting the fabrics in different structures you could be able to investigate which knitting way could be the most effective to have a high tensile strength. Tensile strength tests are performed on specimens with different structures but also with different compositions which could indicate that some strains are tougher then others and more specifically if the PCM’s have a different effect on them.

  16. The Effects of Isokinetic Strength Training on Strength at Different Angular Velocities: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğba Kocahan

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: It was shown that angular velocity is important in isokinetic training, and that training at high angular velocities provides strength increases at lower angular velocities, but would not increase strength at angular velocities above the training level. For this reason, it is thought that in the preparation of an isokinetic strength training protocol, angular velocities need to be taken into account. For any athlete, the force at the angular velocity required in her/his sports branch needs to be considered.

  17. Effects of Strength Training on Postpubertal Adolescent Distance Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagrove, Richard C; Howe, Louis P; Cushion, Emily J; Spence, Adam; Howatson, Glyn; Pedlar, Charles R; Hayes, Philip R

    2018-06-01

    Strength training activities have consistently been shown to improve running economy (RE) and neuromuscular characteristics, such as force-producing ability and maximal speed, in adult distance runners. However, the effects on adolescent (training on several important physiological and neuromuscular qualities associated with distance running performance. Participants (n = 25, 13 female, 17.2 ± 1.2 yr) were paired according to their sex and RE and randomly assigned to a 10-wk strength training group (STG) or a control group who continued their regular training. The STG performed twice weekly sessions of plyometric, sprint, and resistance training in addition to their normal running. Outcome measures included body mass, maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max), speed at V˙O2max, RE (quantified as energy cost), speed at fixed blood lactate concentrations, 20-m sprint, and maximal voluntary contraction during an isometric quarter-squat. Eighteen participants (STG: n = 9, 16.1 ± 1.1 yr; control group: n = 9, 17.6 ± 1.2 yr) completed the study. The STG displayed small improvements (3.2%-3.7%; effect size (ES), 0.31-0.51) in RE that were inferred as "possibly beneficial" for an average of three submaximal speeds. Trivial or small changes were observed for body composition variables, V˙O2max and speed at V˙O2max; however, the training period provided likely benefits to speed at fixed blood lactate concentrations in both groups. Strength training elicited a very likely benefit and a possible benefit to sprint time (ES, 0.32) and maximal voluntary contraction (ES, 0.86), respectively. Ten weeks of strength training added to the program of a postpubertal distance runner was highly likely to improve maximal speed and enhances RE by a small extent, without deleterious effects on body composition or other aerobic parameters.

  18. Effect of concrete strength gradation to the compressive strength of graded concrete, a numerical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratama, M. Mirza Abdillah; Aylie, Han; Gan, Buntara Sthenly; Umniati, B. Sri; Risdanareni, Puput; Fauziyah, Shifa

    2017-09-01

    Concrete casting, compacting method, and characteristic of the concrete material determine the performance of concrete as building element due to the material uniformity issue. Previous studies show that gradation in strength exists on building member by nature and negatively influence the load carrying capacity of the member. A pilot research had modeled the concrete gradation in strength with controllable variable and observed that the weakest material determines the strength of graded concrete through uniaxial compressive loading test. This research intends to confirm the recent finding by a numerical approach with extensive variables of strength disparity. The finite element analysis was conducted using the Strand7 nonlinear program. The results displayed that the increase of strength disparity in graded concrete models leads to the slight reduction of models strength. A substantial difference in displacement response is encountered on the models for the small disparity of concrete strength. However, the higher strength of concrete mix in the graded concrete models contributes to the rise of material stiffness that provides a beneficial purpose for serviceability of building members.

  19. Effects of hippotherapy on mobility, strength and balance in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Thais Borges; de Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó; Martins, Wagner Rodrigues; de Moura Pereira, Marcio; Copetti, Fernando; Safons, Marisete Peralta

    2013-01-01

    To assess the chronic effects of hippotherapy on functional mobility, muscle strength and balance in elderly. 28 volunteers, between the age of 60 and 84, were randomly recruited and divided in experimental group (EG), with 12 individuals (8 women and 4 men) and control group (CG), with 16 individuals (14 women and 2 men). The EG group participated in an 8-week hippotherapy program. Before and after the study period functional mobility was assessed and measured by Time Up and Go Test (TUG), muscle strength of the lower limbs was measured by 30s Chair Stand Test (30CST) and performance in balance was measured by the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). A mixed ANOVA model (group×testing time) was applied to establish the effect of the different groups on the functional variables. The functional capacity of the EG group was increased if compared to CG group after the intervention of the BBS (p=0.003) and 30CST (p=0.032), but not of the TUG (p=0.063). The results indicated that hippotherapy improves the lower limb strength and balance in elderly. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of River Indus Sand on Concrete Tensile Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Lakhiar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the development of Pakistan construction industry, the utilization of River Indus sand in concrete as fine aggregate has expanded tremendously. The aim of this research is to study the effect of Indus River sand on the tensile strength of various grades of concrete when it is utilized as fine aggregate. Concrete Samples of M15, M20 and M25 grade concrete were cured for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Based on the results, it is found that concrete became less workable when Indus river sand was utilized. It is recorded that tensile strength of concrete is decreased from 5% up to 20% in comparison with hill sand. The results were derived from various concrete grades.

  1. Effect of Soorh Metakaolin on Concrete Compressive Strength and Durability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Saand

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Concrete durability is a key aspect for forecasting the expected life time of concrete structures. In this paper, the effect of compressive strength and durability of concrete containing metakaolin developed from a local natural material (Soorh of Thatta Distict of Sindh, Pakistan is investigated. Soorh is calcined by an electric furnace at 8000C for 2 hours to produce metakaolin. One mix of ordinary concrete and five mixes of metakaolin concrete were prepared, where cement is replaced by developed metakaolin from 5% to 25% by weight, with 5% increment step. The concrete durability was tested for water penetration, carbonation depth and corrosion resistance. The obtained outcomes demonstrated that, 15% replacement level of local developed metakaolin presents considerable improvements in concrete properties. Moreover, a considerable linear relationship was established between compressive strength and concrete durability indicators like water penetration, carbonation depth and corrosion resistance.

  2. The effect of notches and pits on corrosion fatigue strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatner, Ian

    An investigation has been undertaken to examine the fatigue behaviour of two martensitic steels in air and aggressive environments. The steels studied are, 18% Ni marageing steel and FV520B, the later being a stainless steel turbine blade material and the former being a marageing steel that suffers general corrosion in mild environments. Both steels were heat treated to give similar tensile strength.The design and manufacture of an autoclave allowed push-pull fatigue tests to be conducted in aggressive environments at elevated temperatures.Corrosion potential was monitored using a three electrode cell and was controlled during testing. Base-line fatigue tests were conducted with a range of constant corrosion potentials, using both notched and plain FV520B specimens. In addition fatigue tests with pulsed corrosion potential were performed to asses the effect of transient corrosion conditions on the corrosion fatigue strength. The pulsed tests were designed to simulate service transients in the oxygen content and general chemical hostility in the condensing steam environment during start-up and shut down of the steam turbine.Post test examination of fractured samples was performed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and optical microscope techniques. The fractography results were used to quantify microstructural and fracture features of the steels.A model based on the size and geometry of the initial corrosion pitting has been proposed to asses the fatigue life of FV520B in an aggressive environment.The effect of pitting on the corrosion fatigue strength of FV520B has been modelled using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) type approach. The model has shown a good correlation between predicted fatigue lives with experimental results.The results suggest that the fatigue life is governed by the mechanical stress concentrating effect of the pits rather than the electrochemical damage caused by the environment.Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the notch allowed

  3. Contrast and Strength of Visual Memory and Imagery Differentially Affect Visual Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Saad, Elyana; Silvanto, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) and visual imagery have been shown to modulate visual perception. However, how the subjective experience of VSTM/imagery and its contrast modulate this process has not been investigated. We addressed this issue by asking participants to detect brief masked targets while they were engaged either in VSTM or visual imagery. Subjective experience of memory/imagery (strength scale), and the visual contrast of the memory/mental image (contrast scale) were assessed on...

  4. Contrast and strength of visual memory and imagery differentially affect visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyana Saad

    Full Text Available Visual short-term memory (VSTM and visual imagery have been shown to modulate visual perception. However, how the subjective experience of VSTM/imagery and its contrast modulate this process has not been investigated. We addressed this issue by asking participants to detect brief masked targets while they were engaged either in VSTM or visual imagery. Subjective experience of memory/imagery (strength scale, and the visual contrast of the memory/mental image (contrast scale were assessed on a trial-by-trial basis. For both VSTM and imagery, contrast of the memory/mental image was positively associated with reporting target presence. Consequently, at the sensory level, both VSTM and imagery facilitated visual perception. However, subjective strength of VSTM was positively associated with visual detection whereas the opposite pattern was found for imagery. Thus the relationship between subjective strength of memory/imagery and visual detection are qualitatively different for VSTM and visual imagery, although their impact at the sensory level appears similar. Our results furthermore demonstrate that imagery and VSTM are partly dissociable processes.

  5. Contrast and strength of visual memory and imagery differentially affect visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Elyana; Silvanto, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) and visual imagery have been shown to modulate visual perception. However, how the subjective experience of VSTM/imagery and its contrast modulate this process has not been investigated. We addressed this issue by asking participants to detect brief masked targets while they were engaged either in VSTM or visual imagery. Subjective experience of memory/imagery (strength scale), and the visual contrast of the memory/mental image (contrast scale) were assessed on a trial-by-trial basis. For both VSTM and imagery, contrast of the memory/mental image was positively associated with reporting target presence. Consequently, at the sensory level, both VSTM and imagery facilitated visual perception. However, subjective strength of VSTM was positively associated with visual detection whereas the opposite pattern was found for imagery. Thus the relationship between subjective strength of memory/imagery and visual detection are qualitatively different for VSTM and visual imagery, although their impact at the sensory level appears similar. Our results furthermore demonstrate that imagery and VSTM are partly dissociable processes.

  6. The Effect of Corrosive Environment on Geopolymer Concrete Tensile Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayuaji Ridho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has the purpose to explore the potential of geopolymer concrete tensile strength in particular on the effects of corrosive environments. Geopolymer concrete, concrete technology used no OPC that has advantages, one of which is durability, especially for corrosive seawater environment. In addition, geopolymer concrete with polymerization mechanism does not require large energy consumption or an environmentally friendly concept. Geopolymer concrete in this study is using a type C fly ash from PT. International Power Mitsui Operation & Maintenence Indonesia (IPMOMI Paiton. The type of alkaline activator used NaOH (14 molar and Na2SiO3. Coarse and fine aggregate used are local aggregate. Geopolymer concrete molded test specimen with dimensions of (10 × 20 cm cylinder, further heating and without heating, then maintained at room temperature and seawater up to 28 days. Then to determine the mechanical properties, the tensile strength testing is done with reference. This result of study indicates the curing of geopolymer concrete at 60 ° C for 24 hours to raise the tensile strength of geopolymer concrete.

  7. Effect of composite warming on shear bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Thomas F; Sigrist, Thomas W; Johnson, Gary M

    2018-01-01

    Several manufacturers produce devices designed to warm composite resins used in restorative dentistry. Previous investigators have examined the effects of heating composite restorative resins prior to placement and polymerization. Heating has been reported to reduce viscosity, improve ease of placement, enhance monomer conversion, and reduce microleakage. The aim of the present study was to compare shear bond strengths of room temperature (22°C) and prewarmed (54°C) restorative composite resin. Extracted bovine mandibular incisors were sectioned sagittally and embedded in acrylic cylinders. Enamel was selectively etched with 37% phosphoric acid, rinsed, and dried. Self-etching primer was applied to both enamel and dentin. Self-etching adhesive was then applied and photopolymerized. Composite resin capsules were then divided into prewarmed and room temperature groups. Fourteen composite specimens prewarmed in an incubator were applied to the prepared enamel and dentin and photopolymerized. Fourteen room temperature composite specimens were likewise placed. After storage in water for 24 hours, all composite specimens were subjected to shear stress testing. The resulting data were analyzed with a t test (P = 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the shear bond strengths of the prewarmed and room temperature composite resin specimens. Warming does not appear to affect bond strength of composite resin bonded to both dentin and enamel.

  8. COLLISION STRENGTHS AND EFFECTIVE COLLISION STRENGTHS FOR TRANSITIONS WITHIN THE GROUND-STATE CONFIGURATION OF S III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, C. E.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P., E-mail: c.hudson@qub.ac.uk, E-mail: c.ramsbottom@qub.ac.uk, E-mail: p.scott@qub.ac.uk [Department of Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics, The Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-01

    We have carried out a 29-state R-matrix calculation in order to calculate collision strengths and effective collision strengths for the electron impact excitation of S III. The recently developed parallel RMATRX II suite of codes have been used, which perform the calculation in intermediate coupling. Collision strengths have been generated over an electron energy range of 0-12 Ryd, and effective collision strength data have been calculated from these at electron temperatures in the range 1000-100,000 K. Results are here presented for the fine-structure transitions between the ground-state configurations of 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 23} P{sub 0,1,2}, {sup 1}D{sub 2}, and {sup 1} S{sub 0}, and the values given resolve a discrepancy between two previous R-matrix calculations.

  9. Sink strengths of dislocations taking into account bulk recombination effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, E.

    1988-01-01

    The applicability of the rate theory to describe radiation damage processes is closely associated with the calculation of the various sink strengths. In this connection the effect of bulk recombination is usually neglected, because of the complexity of the problem. For this reason we present in this paper, for the first time, by means of the rigorous elastic-field model of a dislocation embedded in a lossy continuum, analytic expressions for the diffusion flux of irradiation-induced point defects into a dislocation, taking into account the elastic interaction, additional sinks and higher order bulk recombination effects. The resulting self-consistent formulae for the dislocation sink strengths clearly demonstrate the importance of the bulk recombination for the micro-structures of irradiated materials. In conjunction with the Harwell computer code VS5 it became clear that this new dislocation bias also leads to a change in the macrostructural observables. The order of magnitude of this effect emphasizes that neglecting bulk recombination as a general principle is not justified

  10. Effective axial-vector strength and β-decay systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delion, D. S.; Suhonen, J.

    2014-09-01

    We use the weak axial-vector coupling strength g_{\\text{A}} as a key parameter to reproduce simultaneously the available data for both the Gamow-Teller \\beta^- and \\beta^+/\\text{EC} decay rates in nine triplets of isobars with mass numbers A=70,78,100,104,106,110,116,128,130 . We use the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pnQRPA) with schematic dipole interaction containing particle-particle and particle-hole parts with mass-dependent strengths. Our analysis points to a strongly quenched effective value g_{\\text{A}}\\approx 0.3 , with a relative error of 28%. We then perform a systematic computation of 218 experimentally known \\beta^- and \\beta^+/\\text{EC} decays with quite a remarkable success. The presently extracted value of g_{\\text{A}} should be taken as an effective one, specific for a given nuclear theory framework. Present studies suggest that the effective g_{\\text{A}} is suitable for the description of decay transitions to 1^+ states at moderate excitation, below the Gamow-Teller giant resonance region.

  11. Effects of botulinum toxin on strength-duration properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerdelen, Deniz; Koc, Filiz; Sarica, Yakup

    2007-10-01

    Axonal excitability studies have been used in several diseases to investigate the underlying pathophysiology. The threshold tracking technique was developed to measure noninvasively several indices of axonal excitability, such as strength-duration properties. This study investigated the possible effects of botulinum toxin on strength-duration time constant (SDTC) in patients with the symptoms and signs of botulism. The clinical and electrophysiological findings of 13 patients who were admitted to the authors' clinic with botulism signs and symptoms were evaluated in a 5-day period after exposure to the toxin prospectively. After routine diagnostic electroneuromyographic examinations and electromyogram with repetitive nerve stimulation at 20-50 Hz, SDTC was studied. The results were compared with 13 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. The SDTCs were 381 +/- 60 micros and 471 +/- 84 micros in patients and controls, respectively. There was a statistical difference between the two groups (p = .003, Mann Whitney U test). These findings suggest a possible effect of botulinum toxin, known to be effective at neuromuscular junction, on Na(+)/K(+) pump activity, and Na(+) or K(+) conductance.

  12. Effect of Curing Temperature Histories on the Compressive Strength Development of High-Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keun-Hyeok Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relative strength-maturity relationship of high-strength concrete (HSC specifically developed for nuclear facility structures while considering the economic efficiency and durability of the concrete. Two types of mixture proportions with water-to-binder ratios of 0.4 and 0.28 were tested under different temperature histories including (1 isothermal curing conditions of 5°C, 20°C, and 40°C and (2 terraced temperature histories of 20°C for an initial age of individual 1, 3, or 7 days and a constant temperature of 5°C for the subsequent ages. On the basis of the test results, the traditional maturity function of an equivalent age was modified to consider the offset maturity and the insignificance of subsequent curing temperature after an age of 3 days on later strength of concrete. To determine the key parameters in the maturity function, the setting behavior, apparent activation energy, and rate constant of the prepared mixtures were also measured. This study reveals that the compressive strength development of HSC cured at the reference temperature for an early age of 3 days is insignificantly affected by the subsequent curing temperature histories. The proposed maturity approach with the modified equivalent age accurately predicts the strength development of HSC.

  13. Strength training and testosterone treatment have opposing effects on migration inhibitor factor levels in ageing men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, D.; Christensen, L. L.; Kvorning, T.

    2013-01-01

    Strength Training and Testosterone Treatment Have Opposing Effects on Migration Inhibitor Factor Levels in Ageing Men......Strength Training and Testosterone Treatment Have Opposing Effects on Migration Inhibitor Factor Levels in Ageing Men...

  14. Effect of Water on Coal Strength | Singh | Momona Ethiopian Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water content is one of the most important factors influencing the rock strength. The present study has been conducted to see how coal strength changes under dry and water saturated conditions. The study reveals that the strength of coal decreases with increasing moisture. For rock mechanics and rock engineering ...

  15. Intervention strength does not differentially affect memory reconsolidation of strong memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Kevin; van Veen, Suzanne C; Hendriks, Yanniek R; van den Hout, Marcel A; Engelhard, Iris M

    2017-10-01

    Recently, it has become clear that retrieval (i.e., reactivation) of consolidated memories may return these memories into a labile state before they are restored into long-term memory ('reconsolidation'). Using behavioral manipulations, reactivated memories can be disrupted via the mechanism of novel learning. In the present study, we investigated whether changing a strong memory during reconsolidation depends on the strength of novel learning. To test this, participants (N=144) in six groups acquired a relatively strong memory on Day 1 by viewing and recalling a series of pictures three times. On Day 8, these pictures were reactivated in three groups, and they were not reactivated in the other three groups. Then, participants viewed and recalled new pictures once (weak new learning) or three times (strong new learning), or they did not learn any new pictures. On Day 9, participants performed a recognition test in which their memory for Day 1 pictures was assessed. Two main results are noted. First, the groups that reactivated pictures from Day 1 and received weak or strong new learning did not differ in memory performance. Second, these two groups consistently performed similar to groups that controlled for new learning without reactivation. Because these results contradict what was expected based on the reconsolidation hypothesis, we discuss possible explanations and implications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Protein Intake on Strength, Body Composition and Endocrine Changes in Strength/Power Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Jie

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Comparison of protein intakes on strength, body composition and hormonal changes were examined in 23 experienced collegiate strength/power athletes participating in a 12-week resistance training program. Subjects were stratified into three groups depending upon their daily consumption of protein; below recommended levels (BL; 1.0 – 1.4 g·kg-1·day-1; n = 8, recommended levels (RL; 1.6 – 1.8 g·kg-1·day-1; n = 7 and above recommended levels (AL; > 2.0 g·kg-1·day-1; n = 8. Subjects were assessed for strength [one-repetition maximum (1-RM bench press and squat] and body composition. Resting blood samples were analyzed for total testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor. No differences were seen in energy intake (3,171 ± 577 kcal between the groups, and the energy intake for all groups were also below the recommended levels for strength/power athletes. No significant changes were seen in body mass, lean body mass or fat mass in any group. Significant improvements in 1-RM bench press and 1-RM squat were seen in all three groups, however no differences between the groups were observed. Subjects in AL experienced a 22% and 42% greater change in Δ 1-RM squat and Δ 1-RM bench press than subjects in RL, however these differences were not significant. No significant changes were seen in any of the resting hormonal concentrations. The results of this study do not provide support for protein intakes greater than recommended levels in collegiate strength/power athletes for body composition improvements, or alterations in resting hormonal concentrations.

  17. Effect of Silica Fume on two-stage Concrete Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgader, H. S.; El-Baden, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Two-stage concrete (TSC) is an innovative concrete that does not require vibration for placing and compaction. TSC is a simple concept; it is made using the same basic constituents as traditional concrete: cement, coarse aggregate, sand and water as well as mineral and chemical admixtures. As its name suggests, it is produced through a two-stage process. Firstly washed coarse aggregate is placed into the formwork in-situ. Later a specifically designed self compacting grout is introduced into the form from the lowest point under gravity pressure to fill the voids, cementing the aggregate into a monolith. The hardened concrete is dense, homogeneous and has in general improved engineering properties and durability. This paper presents the results from a research work attempt to study the effect of silica fume (SF) and superplasticizers admixtures (SP) on compressive and tensile strength of TSC using various combinations of water to cement ratio (w/c) and cement to sand ratio (c/s). Thirty six concrete mixes with different grout constituents were tested. From each mix twenty four standard cylinder samples of size (150mm×300mm) of concrete containing crushed aggregate were produced. The tested samples were made from combinations of w/c equal to: 0.45, 0.55 and 0.85, and three c/s of values: 0.5, 1 and 1.5. Silica fume was added at a dosage of 6% of weight of cement, while superplasticizer was added at a dosage of 2% of cement weight. Results indicated that both tensile and compressive strength of TSC can be statistically derived as a function of w/c and c/s with good correlation coefficients. The basic principle of traditional concrete, which says that an increase in water/cement ratio will lead to a reduction in compressive strength, was shown to hold true for TSC specimens tested. Using a combination of both silica fume and superplasticisers caused a significant increase in strength relative to control mixes.

  18. Effects of small defects and nonmetallic inclusions on the fatigue strength of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The equation for predicting the effects of artificial small defects on the fatigue strength of metals is introduced, and it is applied to the quantitative evaluation of the effects of nonmetallic inclusions on the fatigue strength of high-strength steels. The importance of the concept that nonmetallic inclusions are virtually equivalent to defects, from the viewpoint of fatigue strength and, more practically, are equivalent to small cracks is emphasized. It is shown that nonmetallic inclusions cause relatively low-fatigue strength and large scatter of the fatigue strength of steels with high static strength or high hardness. The statistics of extreme values is used to estimate the expected maximum size of nonmetallic inclusions contained in a definite number of specimens. The lower limit of scatter in the fatigue strength of a high-strength steel is obtained by using the prediction equation for small defects together with the expected maximum size of nonmetallic inclusions

  19. Effects of different strength training frequencies on maximum strength, body composition and functional capacity in healthy older individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpela, Mari; Häkkinen, Keijo; Haff, Guy Gregory; Walker, Simon

    2017-11-01

    There is controversy in the literature regarding the dose-response relationship of strength training in healthy older participants. The present study determined training frequency effects on maximum strength, muscle mass and functional capacity over 6months following an initial 3-month preparatory strength training period. One-hundred and six 64-75year old volunteers were randomly assigned to one of four groups; performing strength training one (EX1), two (EX2), or three (EX3) times per week and a non-training control (CON) group. Whole-body strength training was performed using 2-5 sets and 4-12 repetitions per exercise and 7-9 exercises per session. Before and after the intervention, maximum dynamic leg press (1-RM) and isometric knee extensor and plantarflexor strength, body composition and quadriceps cross-sectional area, as well as functional capacity (maximum 7.5m forward and backward walking speed, timed-up-and-go test, loaded 10-stair climb test) were measured. All experimental groups increased leg press 1-RM more than CON (EX1: 3±8%, EX2: 6±6%, EX3: 10±8%, CON: -3±6%, Ptraining frequency would induce greater benefit to maximum walking speed (i.e. functional capacity) despite a clear dose-response in dynamic 1-RM strength, at least when predominantly using machine weight-training. It appears that beneficial functional capacity improvements can be achieved through low frequency training (i.e. 1-2 times per week) in previously untrained healthy older participants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of 8 weeks of free-weight and machine-based strength training on strength and power performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Klaus; Keiner, Michael; Hartmann, Hagen; Sander, Andre; Mickel, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of free-weight and machine-based exercises to increase different strength and speed-strength variables. One hundred twenty male participants (age: 23.8 ± 2.5 years; body height: 181.0 ± 6.8 cm; body mass: 80.2 ± 8.9 kg) joined the study. The 2 experimental groups completed an 8 week periodized strength training program that included 2 training sessions per week. The exercises that were used in the strength training programs were the parallel barbell squat and the leg press. Before and after the training period, the 1-repetition-maximum in the barbell squat and the leg press, the squat jump, the countermovement jump and unilateral isometric force (maximal isometric force and the rate of force development) were evaluated. To compare each group pre vs. post-intervention, analysis of variance with repeated measures and Scheffé post-hoc tests were used. The leg press group increased their 1-repetition-maximum significantly (p squat group such variables as 1-repetition-maximum, the squat jump and the countermovement jump increased significantly (p squat group even showed a statistically significant decrease. Differences between the 2 experimental groups were detected for the squat jump and the countermovement jump. In comparison with the leg press, the squat might be a better strength training exercise for the development of jump performance.

  1. Situational Strength Cues from Social Sources at Work: Relative Importance and Mediated Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaybek, Balca; Dalal, Reeshad S; Sheng, Zitong; Morris, Alexander G; Tomassetti, Alan J; Holland, Samantha J

    2017-01-01

    Situational strength is considered one of the most important situational forces at work because it can attenuate the personality-performance relationship. Although organizational scholars have studied the consequences of situational strength, they have paid little attention to its antecedents. To address this gap, the current study focused on situational strength cues from different social sources as antecedents of overall situational strength at work. Specifically, we examined how employees combine situational strength cues emanating from three social sources (i.e., coworkers, the immediate supervisor, and top management). Based on field theory, we hypothesized that the effect of situational strength from coworkers and immediate supervisors (i.e., proximal sources of situational strength) on employees' perceptions of overall situational strength on the job would be greater than the effect of situational strength from the top management (i.e., the distal source of situational strength). We also hypothesized that the effect of situational strength from the distal source would be mediated by the effects of situational strength from the proximal sources. Data from 363 full-time employees were collected at two time points with a cross-lagged panel design. The former hypothesis was supported for one of the two situational strength facets studied. The latter hypothesis was fully supported.

  2. Situational Strength Cues from Social Sources at Work: Relative Importance and Mediated Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balca Alaybek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Situational strength is considered one of the most important situational forces at work because it can attenuate the personality–performance relationship. Although organizational scholars have studied the consequences of situational strength, they have paid little attention to its antecedents. To address this gap, the current study focused on situational strength cues from different social sources as antecedents of overall situational strength at work. Specifically, we examined how employees combine situational strength cues emanating from three social sources (i.e., coworkers, the immediate supervisor, and top management. Based on field theory, we hypothesized that the effect of situational strength from coworkers and immediate supervisors (i.e., proximal sources of situational strength on employees' perceptions of overall situational strength on the job would be greater than the effect of situational strength from the top management (i.e., the distal source of situational strength. We also hypothesized that the effect of situational strength from the distal source would be mediated by the effects of situational strength from the proximal sources. Data from 363 full-time employees were collected at two time points with a cross-lagged panel design. The former hypothesis was supported for one of the two situational strength facets studied. The latter hypothesis was fully supported.

  3. Effect of municipal solid waste ash on comprehensive strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The blocks were moulded in a CINVA-Ram machine by replacing 0%, 2%, 5% and 10% of municipal solid waste ash (MSW ash) as a stabilizing agent. The compressive strengths of individual blocks were obtained after curing for 7, 14 and 28 days. The 2%MSW ash replacement gave the highest compressive strength and ...

  4. 33 Effects of Sodium Chloride Solutions on Compressive Strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arc. Usman A. Jalam

    strength increase at 3 and 7 days over control cubes; at 28 days concrete cubes containing 5%. RHA cured in NaCl solutions recorded higher strength loss compared to control cubes. Keywords: ... chloride in mixing water reported it to cause.

  5. Effect of surface treatment on flexural strength of zirconia bars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aboushelib, M.N.; Wang, H.

    2010-01-01

    Statement of problem Clinical and laboratory processing techniques induce damage to the surface of zirconia frameworks, which significantly lessens their strength. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of 3 surface restoration methods on the flexural strength of zirconia

  6. effect of reinforcements combination on the mechanical strength of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    strength when compared with other metals such as aluminum, copper ... achieved by hand rotation of the wheels as described above. By ratio ... point of the specimen which is recorded by the push-plotter silver liquid indicator. This is the ultimate strength. The Brinnel hardness, Hb is calculated using the Brinnel equation: √.

  7. Effect of curing time on microstructure and mechanical strength ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aim of this paper is to study the influence of curing time on the microstructure and mechanical strength development of alkali activated binders based on vitreous calcium aluminosilicate (VCAS). Mechanical strength of alkali activated mortars cured at 65 °C was assessed for different curing times (4–168 h) using 10 ...

  8. Differential effects of gender on entropy perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satcharoen, Kleddao

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine differences in perception of entropy (color intensity) between male and female computer users. The objectives include identifying gender-based differences in entropy intention and exploring the potential effects of these differences (if any) on user interface design. The research is an effort to contribute to an emerging field of interest in gender as it relates to science, engineering and technology (SET), particularly user interface design. Currently, there is limited evidence on the role of gender in user interface design and in use of technology generally, with most efforts at gender-differentiated or customized design based on stereotypes and assumptions about female use of technology or the assumption of a default position based on male preferences. Image entropy was selected as a potential characteristic where gender could be a factor in perception because of known differences in color perception acuity between male and female individuals, even where there is no known color perception abnormality (which is more common with males). Although the literature review suggested that training could offset differences in color perception and identification, tests in untrained subject groups routinely show that females are more able to identify, match, and differentiate colors, and that there is a stronger emotional and psychosocial association of color for females. Since image entropy is associated with information content and image salience, the ability to identify areas of high entropy could make a difference in user perception and technological capabilities.

  9. Temperature effects in differential mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, Evgeny V.; Coy, Stephen L.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.

    2009-01-01

    Drift gas temperature and pressure influence differential mobility spectrometer (DMS) performance, changing DMS peak positions, heights and widths. This study characterizes the effect of temperature on DMS peak positions. Positive ions of methyl salicylate, DMMP, and toluene, and negative ions of methyl salicylate and the reactant ion peaks were observed in purified nitrogen in the Sionex microDMx planar DMS. Measurements were made at ambient pressure (1 atm) at temperatures from 25 °C to 150 °C in a planar sensor with height 0.5 mm. Peak value of the separation voltage asymmetric waveform was scanned from 500 V to 1500 V. Compensation voltage (DMS peak position) showed a strong variation with temperature for all investigated ions. By generalizing the concept of effective ion temperature to include the effects of inelastic ion-molecular collisions, we have been able to condense peak position dependence on separation field and temperature to dependence on a redefined effective temperature including a smoothly varying inelasticity correction. It allows prediction and correction of the gas temperature effect on DMS peak positions.

  10. Differentiation of molecular chain entanglement structure through laser Raman spectrum measurement of High strength PET fibers under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, D.; Takarada, W.; Kikutani, T.

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism for the improvement of mechanical properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fibers based on the concept of controlling the state of molecular entanglement. For this purpose, five different PET fibers were prepared through either the conventional melt spinning and drawing/annealing process or the high-speed melt spinning process. In both cases, the melt spinning process was designed so as to realize different Deborah number conditions. The prepared fibers were subjected to the laser Raman spectroscopy measurement and the characteristics of the scattering peak at around 1616 cm-1, which corresponds to the C-C/C=C stretching mode of the aromatic ring in the main chain, were investigated in detail. It was revealed that the fibers drawn and annealed after the melt spinning process of lower Deborah number showed higher tensile strength as well as lower value of full width at half maximum (FWHM) in the laser Raman spectrum. Narrow FWHM was considered to represent the homogeneous state of entanglement structure, which may lead to the higher strength and toughness of fibers because individual molecular chains tend to bare similar level of tensile stress when the fiber is stretched. In case of high-speed spun fibers prepared with a high Deborah number condition, the FWHM was narrow presumably because much lower tensile stress in comparison with the drawing/annealing process was applied when the fiber structure was developed, however the value increased significantly upon applying tensile load to the fibers during the laser Raman spectrum measurement. From these results, it was concluded that the Laser Raman spectroscopy could differentiate molecular chain entanglement structure of various fiber samples, in that low FWHM, which corresponds to either homogeneous state of molecular entanglement or lower level of mean residual stress, and small increase of FWTH upon applying tensile stress are considered to be the key

  11. Penetrator strength effect in long-rod critical ricochet angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daneshjou, K.; Shahravi, M.

    2008-01-01

    3D numerical simulations were performed in order to further investigate the role of penetrator strength in the interaction of long-rods and oblique targets. Three distinctive regimes resulting from oblique impact depending on the obliquity, namely simple ricochet, critical ricochet and target perforation, were investigated in detail. Critical ricochet angles were calculated with a full 3D explicit finite element method for various impact velocities and strength of target plates and projectiles. Numerical predictions were compared with existing two-dimensional analytical models and test results. It was predicted that critical ricochet angle increases with decreasing impact velocity and that higher ricochet angles were expected if higher strength target materials are employed. But there are differences between analytical models and 3D numerical simulation results or test results. The causes for these discrepancies are established by numerical simulations which explore the validity of the penetrator strength parameter in the analytical model as a physical entity. As a matter of fact, in this paper we first investigate the role of penetrator dynamic strength using two-dimensional simulation which resulted in different penetrator strengths out of different impact velocities. Next, by applying these amounts for penetrator strength in Rosenberg analytical model the critical ricochet angle is calculated. Finally, a comparison between the present analytical method with the 3D simulation and test results shows that the new analytical approach leads to modified results with respect to Rosenberg ones

  12. Effect of internal stress on the strength of PZT ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, Weon Pil; Yun, Yeo Bum; Kim, Song Hee [Kangwon National Univ., Chunchon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change of bending strength and fatigue strength in the unpolled and poled Pb(Zr, Ti)O ferroelectrics of tetragonal, morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) and rhombohedral composition in terms of internal stress which is measured by XRD method. Before poling treatment the highest bending strength was found in rhombohedral composition. After poling treatment, the bending strength decreased in all compositions but it decreased most remarkably in tetragonal composition. The most prominent decrease of bending strength after poling treatment in tetragonal was attributed to the occurrence of microcracks due to high anisotropic internal stress around grain boundary which was induced by domain alignment toward electric field direction in the microstructure having tetragonality. The decrease of bending strength after poling in MPB and rhombohedral composition was not due to the occurrence of microcracks but to the increase in tensile internal stress perpendicular to the direction of crack propagation by domain alignment. Fatigue strength was higher before poling treatment than after poling treatment for various compositions. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  13. Effects of core instability strength training on trunk muscle strength, spinal mobility, dynamic balance and functional mobility in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granacher, Urs; Lacroix, Andre; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Roettger, Katrin; Gollhofer, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Age-related postural misalignment, balance deficits and strength/power losses are associated with impaired functional mobility and an increased risk of falling in seniors. Core instability strength training (CIT) involves exercises that are challenging for both trunk muscles and postural control and may thus have the potential to induce benefits in trunk muscle strength, spinal mobility and balance performance. The objective was to investigate the effects of CIT on measures of trunk muscle strength, spinal mobility, dynamic balance and functional mobility in seniors. Thirty-two older adults were randomly assigned to an intervention group (INT; n = 16, aged 70.8 ± 4.1 years) that conducted a 9-week progressive CIT or to a control group (n = 16, aged 70.2 ± 4.5 years). Maximal isometric strength of the trunk flexors/extensors/lateral flexors (right, left)/rotators (right, left) as well as of spinal mobility in the sagittal and the coronal plane was measured before and after the intervention program. Dynamic balance (i.e. walking 10 m on an optoelectric walkway, the Functional Reach test) and functional mobility (Timed Up and Go test) were additionally tested. Program compliance was excellent with participants of the INT group completing 92% of the training sessions. Significant group × test interactions were found for the maximal isometric strength of the trunk flexors (34%, p training-related improvements were found for spinal mobility in the sagittal (11%, p velocity (9%, p velocity (31%, p training regimen could be used as an adjunct or even alternative to traditional balance and/or resistance training. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Effect of UV irradiation on the shear bond strength of titanium with segmented polyurethane through gamma-mercapto propyl trimethoxysilane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Harumi; Hirohashi, Yohei; Doi, Hisashi; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Noda, Kazuhiko; Hanawa, Takao

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of UV irradiation on shear bond strength between a titanium (Ti) and a segmented polyurethane (SPU) composite through gamma-mercapto propyl trimethoxysilane (gamma-MPS). To this end, the shear bond strength of Ti/SPU interface of Ti-SPU composite under varying conditions of ultraviolet ray (UV) irradiation was evaluated by a shear bond test. The glass transition temperatures of SPU with and without UV irradiation were also determined using differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that the shear bond strength of Ti/SPU interface increased with UV irradiation. However, excessive UV irradiation decreased the shear bond strength of Ti/SPU interface. Glass transition temperature was found to increase during 40-60 seconds of UV irradiation. In terms of durability after immersion in water at 37 degrees C for 30 days, shear bond strength was found to improve with UV irradiation. In conclusion, UV irradiation to a Ti-SPU composite was clearly one of the means to improve the shear bond strength of Ti/SPU interface.

  15. EFFECT OF SURFACE CONDTIONINGON BOND STRENGTH TO ENAMEL AND DENTIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M MOUSAVINASAB

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Compoglass is a trade mark of dental compomers and because of its partially resinus structure, surface conditioning of dental surfaces is needed for a better bonding process. In this study, the effect of enamel and dentin conditioning procedure on shear bond strength (SBS of compoglass to tooth surfaces was studied. Methods. four groups each one including 11 sound premolars were chosen and their surfaces were prepared as following groups: group1, unconitioned dentin; group 2, dentin conditioning with phosphoric acid 35%; group 3, dentin conditioning with polyacrylic acid 20% group 4, unconditioning enamel; group 5, enamel conditioning with phosphoric acid 35%; and group 6, enamel conditioning with polyacrylic acid 20%. Compoglass was bonded to prepared surfaces and after fixation of the samples in acrylic molds, all samples were tested under shear force of instron testing machine at a rate of 1 mm/min speed. Results. The mean SBS obtained in these 6 groups were 6.207, 8.057, 10.146, 25.939 and 11.827 mpa. the mode of fracture also studied using a streomicroscope. Statistical analysis of the results showed that the maximum SBS obtained in group 5 and the lowest SBS about 6.207 mpa obtained in group 1. Despite increase in SBS group 2 and 3, there was no statistical differncies between group 1, 2 and 3. Discussion. Based on results of this study, conditioning of enamel and dentin surface due to improve SBS is recommeneded.

  16. Effect of Sandblasting on Shear Bond Strength Composite Resin Veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octarina Octarina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Attachment between restoration and enamel surface in indirect resin composite veneer restoration (IRCV is obtained using multi-step (MS resin cement. Recently, a one step self-adhesive dual-cured resin cement (SADRC was introduced. Objective: To determine the effect of sandblasting on shear bond strength (SBS of IRCV to enamel using MS resin cement and SADRC. Methods: Forty specimens of buccal surface of enamel human were light-cured in Solidilite chamber and were divided into two groups: IRCV without sandblasting (n=20 and with sandblasting for 10 seconds (n=20 and then bonded to enamel using MS (n=10 and SADRC (n=10, respectively. After 24h SBS of specimens were tested using a Universal Testing Machine. Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA. Results: The average SBS value of IRCV without SB and bonded with MS was 18.95+7.80MPa and MS with SB was 19.30+ SB (4.85+2.12MPa and SADRC with SB (9.57+3.45MPa(p<0.05. Conclusion: increased SBS VIRK to enamel using MS resin cement than SADRC.  

  17. The effect of fissures on the strength of structural timber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Íñiguez, Guillermo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Detailed measurements of drying fissures were carried out on 28 pieces of gross cross-section structural Scots pine timber. Different parameters have been proposed to measure their magnitude: length, depth, thickness and slope of grain, as well as an index of area in the neutral axis plane (ratio of effective to total surface. The parameters of fissures have been related to bending strength, shear strength, modulus of elasticity and rupture energy obtained from mechanical tests, considering whether rupture is due to bending or shear. All of the fissures observed allows to classify the pieces as MEG according to the UNE 56544 standard. To quantify the magnitude of fissures the index of areas is proposed, while mechanical properties can be quantified by rupture energy. Analysis of the results does not show any relation between the fissures analyzed and the mode of failure, their magnitude and mechanical properties..

    Se han realizado mediciones detalladas de las fendas de secado en 28 piezas de madera de pino silvestre de gran escuadría. Se han propuesto diferentes parámetros para medir su magnitud en longitud, profundidad, grosor e inclinación, así como un índice de áreas en el plano medio de rasante (superficie eficaz respecto a superficie total. Se han relacionado los parámetros de fendas con resistencia a flexión, resistencia a cortante, módulo de elasticidad y energía de rotura obtenidos mediante ensayos mecánicos, teniendo en cuenta si la rotura se produce por flexión o por cortante. Todas las fendas observadas permiten clasificar las piezas como MEG según la norma UNE 56544. Se propone cuantificar las fendas mediante el índice de áreas y las propiedades mecánicas mediante la energía de rotura. El análisis realizado no muestra una relación significativa entre las fendas analizadas, los modos de rotura o las propiedades mecánicas.

  18. investigation of shear strength parameters and effect of different

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    Keywords: Coconut husk ash; Compaction; Lateritic soil; Lime; Shear strength; Stabilization. 1. INTRODUCTION ... the cementation or interlocking of the soil particles [5]. Furthermore, it is ... of its siliceous, aluminous and iron oxide content [8].

  19. Evaluation of size effect on shear strength of reinforced concrete ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the longitudinal and the web reinforcement, shear span-to-depth ratio and the ... A simple equation for predicting the shear strength of reinforced concrete deep ..... AASHTO 2007 LRFD Bridge Design Specifications, American Association of ...

  20. Effect of programmed strength training on explosive strength of lower extremities in children aged 11 to 14 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanasković Andrija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical jumps are an integral part of many sport activities. There are several factors that affect the athlete's jumping ability: strength, force and acceleration that occur when we jump. The jump is a complex and more articulated activity that requires not only strength, but great power as well. The main types of training to increase explosive strength are plyometric training and myogenic training with weight load on the lower extremities. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of myogenic training with weight load on explosive strength of the lower extremities. The first group is the control group (K, while the second group is an experimental group (E, each consisting of eighteen respondents. By Using the Myotest and performing the squat jump (SJ, the Height, Power, Force and Velocity were determined. The programme of power lasted for six weeks, twice a week for up to 60 minutes. We conclude that there is a statistically significant difference between the final and initial measurements in the experimental group, the multivariate level sig = 0.000. Increase in jump height ΔHeight = 3.28 in cm, force ΔForce = 4.68 in N/kg, the strength ΔPower = 6.18 in W/kg, the acceleration ΔVelocity = 21.8 in cm/s. The results of this study show that myogenic training with weight load has a positive impact on the explosive power of the lower extremities. This research was carried out against children aged 11 to 14 years, so we cannot say with certainty that this type of programme can have identical effects on athletes.

  1. The effect of spinal manipulation on imbalances in leg strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilibeck, Philip D; Cornish, Stephen M; Schulte, Al; Jantz, Nathan; Magnus, Charlene R A; Schwanbeck, Shane; Juurlink, Bernhard H J

    2011-09-01

    We hypothesized that spinal manipulation (SM) would reduce strength imbalances between legs. Using an un-blinded randomized design, 28 males and 21 females (54 ± 19y) with at least a 15% difference in isometric strength between legs for hip flexion, extension, abduction, or knee flexion were randomized to treatment or placebo (mock spinal manipulation). Strength of the stronger and weaker legs for hip flexion, extension, abduction, and/or knee flexion was assessed before and after the intervention. SM reduced the relative strength difference between legs for knee flexion (mean ± SD 57 ± 53 to 5 ± 14%) and hip flexion (24 ± 12 to 11 ± 15%) compared to placebo (34 ± 29 to 24 ± 36%, and 20 ± 18 to 22 ± 26%, respectively) (p = 0.05). SM also improved strength in the weak leg for hip abduction (104 ± 43 to 116 ± 43 Nm) compared to placebo (84 ± 24 to 85 ± 31 Nm) (p = 0.03). This study suggests that spinal manipulation may reduce imbalances in strength between legs for knee and hip flexion.

  2. The Effect of Maximal Strength Training on Strength, Walking, and Balance in People with Multiple Sclerosis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herb I. Karpatkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is little literature examining the use of maximal strength training (MST in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS. This pretest-posttest study examined the effects of a MST program on strength, walking, balance, and fatigue in a sample of pwMS. Seven pwMS (median EDSS 3.0, IQR 1.5 participated in a MST program twice weekly for eight weeks. Strength was assessed with 1-repetition maximum (1RM on each leg. Walking and balance were measured with the 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT and Berg Balance Scale (BBS, respectively. Fatigue was measured during each week of the program with the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS. The program was well tolerated, with an attendance rate of 96.4%. Participants had significant improvements in right leg 1RM (t6=-6.032, P=0.001, left leg 1RM (t(6=-5.388, P=0.002, 6MWT distance (t(6=-2.572,P=0.042, and BBS score (Z=-2.371, P=0.018 after the MST intervention. There was no significant change in FSS scores (F(1,3.312=2.411, P=0.092. Participants in the MST program experienced improved balance and walking without an increase in fatigue. This MST program may be utilized by rehabilitation clinicians to improve lower extremity strength, balance, and mobility in pwMS.

  3. А new factor effecting gel strength of pectin polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Kholov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pectin polysaccharides obtained from various raw materials have a different component composition and form gels with water, sugar and acid or calcium. In this study, an experimental approach the gelation properties of different pectin samples, varied from different sources, using new methods of hydrolysis and purification. Samples were obtained by hydrolysis of accelerated extraction of pectin and purified by diaultrfiltration, have a high gel strength. The highest gel strength have been found in series of high methoxyl (HM- pectin samples of apple, peach, orange and low methoxyl (LM- pectin samples of commercial citrus pectin and apple pectin obtained by new method. It is shown that in addition to the basic parameters (the content of galacturonic acid, degree of esterification, molecular weight and hidrodinamic radius macromolecule to affect gel strength pectins aggregation of macromolecules, which is determined by the z-average molecular weight. There were observed a clear pattern of the influence of the molecular weight on hydrodynamic parameters for both HM- and LM- pectin samples on the gel strength. It were shown that a high values of molecular weight, intrinsic viscosity, and radius of gyration of pectin samples can significantly increase gel strength, while the value of Mz oppositely influenced the gel strength. As a result, a systematic analysis of this parameter and its relationship to the average molecular weight found that indeed the ratio Mz/Mw for pectin’s is an crucial to assess the quality of pectin at the study of gel strength for pectin polysaccharides.

  4. Rethinking Differentiation--Using Teachers' Time Most Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The goals of differentiation are laudable, but in recent years, many question whether it is really possible for a teacher to tailor instruction for 20 to 30 different students and whether it's desirable to differentiate by learning styles. Differentiation is just one factor in effective instruction. Supervisors who walk into a classroom looking…

  5. Effect of 8 weeks of free-weight and machine-based strength training on strength and power performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirth Klaus

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of free-weight and machine-based exercises to increase different strength and speed-strength variables. One hundred twenty male participants (age: 23.8 ± 2.5 years; body height: 181.0 ± 6.8 cm; body mass: 80.2 ± 8.9 kg joined the study. The 2 experimental groups completed an 8 week periodized strength training program that included 2 training sessions per week. The exercises that were used in the strength training programs were the parallel barbell squat and the leg press. Before and after the training period, the 1-repetition-maximum in the barbell squat and the leg press, the squat jump, the countermovement jump and unilateral isometric force (maximal isometric force and the rate of force development were evaluated. To compare each group pre vs. post-intervention, analysis of variance with repeated measures and Scheffé post-hoc tests were used. The leg press group increased their 1-repetition-maximum significantly (p < 0.001, while in the squat group such variables as 1-repetition-maximum, the squat jump and the countermovement jump increased significantly (p < 0.001. The maximal isometric force showed no statistically significant result for the repeated measures factor, while the rate of force development of the squat group even showed a statistically significant decrease. Differences between the 2 experimental groups were detected for the squat jump and the countermovement jump. In comparison with the leg press, the squat might be a better strength training exercise for the development of jump performance.

  6. Effect of agglomerate strength on sintered density for yttria powders containing agglomerates of monosize spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftcioglu, M.; Akine, M.; Burkhart, L.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of agglomerate strength on sintered density was determined for several yttria powders made by intentionally agglomerating 0.1-μm, monodisperse yttriuim hydrocarbonate precursor spheres and calcining separate portions of the precursor at different temperatures to vary the strength of the intraaglomeate bonds. In this way, the effects of differences in particle morphology and other characteristics among the powders were minimized and the effect of agglomerate strength could be seen more clearly

  7. Effect of Compaction on Compressive Strength of Unfired Clay Blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakho, N.A.; Zardari, M.A.; Pathan, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the possible use of unfired compacted clay blocks as a substitute of CSEB (Compressed Stabilized Earth Blocks) for the construction of economical houses. Cubes of 150 mm size were cut from the clay blocks which were compacted at various intensities of pressure during the casting. The results show that the compressive strength of the clay cubes increased with the compacting pressure to which the blocks were subjected during casting. The average crushing strength of the cubes, sawed from clay blocks that were subjected to compacting pressure of 7.2 MPa, was found to be 4.4 MPa. This value of compressive strength is about 50 percent more than that of normal CSEB. This study shows that the compacted clay blocks could be used as economical walling material as replacement of CSEB. (author)

  8. Effect of Preparation Methods on Crystallization Behavior and Tensile Strength of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Xiaolong; Wu, Chunrui

    2013-11-21

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes were prepared by non solvent induced phase separation (NIPS), melt spinning and the solution-cast method. The effect of preparation methods with different membrane formation mechanisms on crystallization behavior and tensile strength of PVDF membranes was investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to examine the crystal form of the surface layers and the overall membranes, respectively. Spherulite morphologies and thermal behavior of the membranes were studied by polarized light optical microscopy (PLO) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) separately. It was found that the crystallization behavior of PVDF membranes was closely related to the preparation methods. For membranes prepared by the NIPS method, the skin layers had a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase, and the total crystallinity was 60.0% with no spherulite. For melt spinning membranes, the surface layers also showed a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase. The total crystallinity was 48.7% with perfect spherulites. Whereas the crystallization behavior of solution-cast membranes was related to the evaporation temperature and the additive, when the evaporation temperature was 140 °C with a soluble additive in the dope solution, obvious spherulites appeared. The crystalline morphology of PVDF exerted a great influence on the tensile strength of the membranes, which was much higher with perfect spherulites.

  9. EFFECTS OF EDGE COVERING ON TENSILE STRENGTH OF MDF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın ÖRS

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Dowels, 6, 8 and 10 mm ? diameters were bonded with PVAc adhesive on Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF. Edges were covered with 5, 8 and 12 mm beech wood materials, drilled 25 mm depth. Tensile strength measurments were made on the samples. The highest tensile strength value was given as 6 mm ? dowel and MDF covered with 8 mm thickness beech wood material (2.294 N/mm2, the lowest value was obtained with 10 mm ? dowel and with unprocessed MDF (1.314 N/mm2.

  10. Cellulosic Fibers: Effect of Processing on Fiber Bundle Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Madsen, Bo; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2011-01-01

    A range of differently processed cellulosic fibers from flax and hemp plants were investigated to study the relation between processing of cellulosic fibers and fiber bundle strength. The studied processing methods are applied for yarn production and include retting, scutching, carding, and cotto......A range of differently processed cellulosic fibers from flax and hemp plants were investigated to study the relation between processing of cellulosic fibers and fiber bundle strength. The studied processing methods are applied for yarn production and include retting, scutching, carding...

  11. Effective action for stochastic partial differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochberg, David; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Perez-Mercader, Juan; Visser, Matt

    1999-01-01

    Stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) are the basic tool for modeling systems where noise is important. SPDEs are used for models of turbulence, pattern formation, and the structural development of the universe itself. It is reasonably well known that certain SPDEs can be manipulated to be equivalent to (nonquantum) field theories that nevertheless exhibit deep and important relationships with quantum field theory. In this paper we systematically extend these ideas: We set up a functional integral formalism and demonstrate how to extract all the one-loop physics for an arbitrary SPDE subject to arbitrary Gaussian noise. It is extremely important to realize that Gaussian noise does not imply that the field variables undergo Gaussian fluctuations, and that these nonquantum field theories are fully interacting. The limitation to one loop is not as serious as might be supposed: Experience with quantum field theories (QFTs) has taught us that one-loop physics is often quite adequate to give a good description of the salient issues. The limitation to one loop does, however, offer marked technical advantages: Because at one loop almost any field theory can be rendered finite using zeta function technology, we can sidestep the complications inherent in the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism (the SPDE analog of the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin formalism used in QFT) and instead focus attention on a minimalist approach that uses only the physical fields (this ''direct approach'' is the SPDE analog of canonical quantization using physical fields). After setting up the general formalism for the characteristic functional (partition function), we show how to define the effective action to all loops, and then focus on the one-loop effective action and its specialization to constant fields: the effective potential. The physical interpretation of the effective action and effective potential for SPDEs is addressed and we show that key features carry over from QFT to the case of

  12. Effective action for stochastic partial differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochberg, David [Laboratorio de Astrofisica Espacial y Fisica Fundamental, Apartado 50727, 28080 Madrid, (Spain); Centro de Astrobiologia, INTA, Carratera Ajalvir, Km. 4, 28850 Torrejon, Madrid, (Spain); Molina-Paris, Carmen [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Perez-Mercader, Juan [Laboratorio de Astrofisica Espacial y Fisica Fundamental, Apartado 50727, 28080 Madrid, (Spain); Visser, Matt [Physics Department, Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri 63130-4899 (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) are the basic tool for modeling systems where noise is important. SPDEs are used for models of turbulence, pattern formation, and the structural development of the universe itself. It is reasonably well known that certain SPDEs can be manipulated to be equivalent to (nonquantum) field theories that nevertheless exhibit deep and important relationships with quantum field theory. In this paper we systematically extend these ideas: We set up a functional integral formalism and demonstrate how to extract all the one-loop physics for an arbitrary SPDE subject to arbitrary Gaussian noise. It is extremely important to realize that Gaussian noise does not imply that the field variables undergo Gaussian fluctuations, and that these nonquantum field theories are fully interacting. The limitation to one loop is not as serious as might be supposed: Experience with quantum field theories (QFTs) has taught us that one-loop physics is often quite adequate to give a good description of the salient issues. The limitation to one loop does, however, offer marked technical advantages: Because at one loop almost any field theory can be rendered finite using zeta function technology, we can sidestep the complications inherent in the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism (the SPDE analog of the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin formalism used in QFT) and instead focus attention on a minimalist approach that uses only the physical fields (this ''direct approach'' is the SPDE analog of canonical quantization using physical fields). After setting up the general formalism for the characteristic functional (partition function), we show how to define the effective action to all loops, and then focus on the one-loop effective action and its specialization to constant fields: the effective potential. The physical interpretation of the effective action and effective potential for SPDEs is addressed and we show that key features carry over from

  13. The effect of air thinning on dentin adhesive bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, T J; Schwartz, R S

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if air thinning three dentin adhesives would affect bond strength to dentin. Ninety human molars were mounted in acrylic and the occlusal surfaces ground to expose a flat dentin surface. Thirty teeth were randomly assigned to one of the following dentin bonding agent/composite combinations: A) Universal Bond 3/TPH (Caulk), B) All-Bond 2/Bis-Fil-P (Bisco), and C) Scotchbond Multi-Purpose/Z-100 (3m). The primers were applied following the manufacturers' instructions. The adhesives were applied by two methods. A thin layer of adhesive was applied with a brush to 15 specimens in each group and light cured. Adhesive was brushed on to the remaining 15 teeth in the group, air thinned for 3 seconds, and then polymerized. The appropriate composite was applied in 2 mm increments and light cured utilizing a 5 mm-in-diameter split Teflon mold. Following 3 months of water storage, all groups were shear tested to failure on an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Bond strength was significantly higher in all groups when the dentin bonding agent was painted on without being air thinned. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose had significantly higher bond strength than All-Bond 2, which had significantly higher bond strength than Universal Bond 3.

  14. Effect of elevated temperature on the compressive strength of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on results of tests, partial replacement of cement with 10 % PSMS is recommended for use in concrete production and resistance to elevated temperature. The studies show that at this replacement, the concrete compressive strength is not adversely affected when the elevated temperature reaches 500°C. Keywords: ...

  15. Effects of ultrasonic waves on eggshell strength and hatchability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tarek shafey

    2013-03-13

    Mar 13, 2013 ... eggs (Trial 1), and egg weight loss, embryo weight, hatchability and CHW of ... 5, 10 and 15 minutes in a water bath (W5, W10 and W15) or a ULT bath (ULT5, ... eggshell strength between ULT-treated eggs and the control.

  16. Effect of harvest date and stalk section on selected strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The time required to harvest plant crops is important to the plant properties. It is affected by design of the harvest equipment and the desire for high-quality products with low energy usage. Materials and Methods: Strength characteristics of Origanum onites L., an important medicinal aromatic plant, harvested on ...

  17. Effects of hyperthyroidism on hand grip strength and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkol İnal, Esra; Çarlı, Alparslan Bayram; Çanak, Sultan; Aksu, Oğuzhan; Köroğlu, Banu Kale; Savaş, Serpil

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a pathologic condition in which the body is exposed to excessive amounts of circulating thyroid hormones. Skeletal muscle is one of the major target organs of thyroid hormones. We evaluated hand grip strength and function in patients with overt hyperthyroidism. Fifty-one patients newly diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and 44 healthy controls participated in this study. Age, height, weight, and dominant hand of all participants were recorded. The diagnosis of hyperthyroidism was confirmed by clinical examination and laboratory tests. Hand grip strength was tested at the dominant hand with a Jamar hand dynamometer. The grooved pegboard test (PGT) was used to evaluate hand dexterity. The Duruöz Hand Index (DHI) was used to assess hand function. No significant differences were found in terms of clinical and demographic findings between the patients with hyperthyroidism and healthy controls (p > 0.05). Significant differences were found between the patients with hyperthyroidism and healthy controls regarding PGT and DHI scores (p Hyperthyroidism seemed to affect hand dexterity and function more than hand grip strength and seemed to be associated with reduced physical function more than muscle strength. This may also indicate that patients with hyperthyroidism should be evaluated by multidisplinary modalities.

  18. Damaging Effects of Dieldrex-20 on the Compressive Strength of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of the results showed that as the percentage of aqueous solution of dilclrex-20 increases, the compressive strength of concrete decreases. This decrease is independent of concrete grade and age. It also showed that the 5 per cent aqueous solution of dieldrex-20 recommended dosage should be strictly adhered to ...

  19. the effect of ceramic waste as coarse aggregate on strength

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    1,2 DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF ... The compressive strength at 90 days curing age for the control sample was 24.67 N/mm2. ... wastes has become one of the most pressing issues of our.

  20. The effects of isothermal transformation on the fatigue strength of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing the austenitising temperature to 950°C while maintaining the austempering temperature at 3500C, the fatigue limits of both medium silicon and high silicon alloys increased. The highest fatigue strength 450Nmm-2 was obtained from alloy austenitised at 950°C and austempered at 350°C for 90 minutes.

  1. System effects influencing the bending strength of timber beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Källsner, B.

    1998-01-01

    A stochastic model of hierarchical series system type for the bending strength of spruce beams isdefined from the anticipation that the bending failure takes place at a cross-section with a defect cluster formed by knots or grain irregularities. The parameters of the model are estimated from meas...

  2. Effect of simulated pulpal pressure on composite bond strength to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... Key words: Bond strength, laser treatment, pulpal pressure, resin composite. INTRODUCTION ... bilities for operative and esthetic dentistry (Kato and. Nakabayashi ... E-mail: kimyais@tbzmed.ac.ir. Tel: 0098411- ... pulse repetition rate of 20 pulses per second (20 Hz). ..... Stern RH, Sognnaes RF (1965).

  3. Environmental effect of water absorption and flexural strength of red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present investigation is aimed at processing a composite using jute fiber and epoxy resin as matrix and red mud as a filler material. The degradation of the composite mechanical properties such as flexural strength has been studied when it is subjected to different environmental conditions. To increase the adhesion ...

  4. Effect Of RPC Compositions On: Compressive Strength and Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Sultan Ali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a critical material for the construction of infrastructure facilities throughout the world. A new material known as Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC, or sometimes called Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC, is becoming available that differs significantly from traditional concretes. It is an ultra high strength and high ductility composite material with advanced mechanical properties. It consists of special concrete whose microstructure is optimized by precise gradation of all particles in the mix to yield maximum density. Different RPC mixes in the experimental investigation of the present study the mechanical properties of RPC including compressive strength, density and absorption. The main variables used in the production of the different RPC mixes of the present research are three, namely, type of pozzolanic admixture (metakaolin, micro silica, and silica fume, type of fibers (steel and polypropylene fibers and volume fraction of fibers (1.0,1.5, and 2.0%. The experimental results indicated that RPC mixes with silica fume gave the highest values of compressive strength and density and lowest value of absorption in comparison with RPC using micro silica or metakaolin where metakaolin was the third in such comparisons. However the RPC mixes used in the present investigation gave group compressive strength ranging between 164 -195 MPa. It was also found that the use of steel fibers with high volume fraction (2% in an RPC mix increases the compressive strength by 8% and density of the concrete by 2.5% and reduces its absorption by 13%, unlike an RPC mix using polypropylene fibers of lesser volume fraction.

  5. Effectiveness of Traditional Strength vs. Power Training on Muscle Strength, Power and Speed with Youth: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, David G.; Young, James D.; Whitten, Joseph H. D.; Reid, Jonathan C.; Quigley, Patrick J.; Low, Jonathan; Li, Yimeng; Lima, Camila D.; Hodgson, Daniel D.; Chaouachi, Anis; Prieske, Olaf; Granacher, Urs

    2017-01-01

    Numerous national associations and multiple reviews have documented the safety and efficacy of strength training for children and adolescents. The literature highlights the significant training-induced increases in strength associated with youth strength training. However, the effectiveness of youth strength training programs to improve power measures is not as clear. This discrepancy may be related to training and testing specificity. Most prior youth strength training programs emphasized lower intensity resistance with relatively slow movements. Since power activities typically involve higher intensity, explosive-like contractions with higher angular velocities (e.g., plyometrics), there is a conflict between the training medium and testing measures. This meta-analysis compared strength (e.g., training with resistance or body mass) and power training programs (e.g., plyometric training) on proxies of muscle strength, power, and speed. A systematic literature search using a Boolean Search Strategy was conducted in the electronic databases PubMed, SPORT Discus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar and revealed 652 hits. After perusal of title, abstract, and full text, 107 studies were eligible for inclusion in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed small to moderate magnitude changes for training specificity with jump measures. In other words, power training was more effective than strength training for improving youth jump height. For sprint measures, strength training was more effective than power training with youth. Furthermore, strength training exhibited consistently large magnitude changes to lower body strength measures, which contrasted with the generally trivial, small and moderate magnitude training improvements of power training upon lower body strength, sprint and jump measures, respectively. Maturity related inadequacies in eccentric strength and balance might influence the lack of training specificity with the unilateral

  6. Effectiveness of Traditional Strength vs. Power Training on Muscle Strength, Power and Speed with Youth: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Behm

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous national associations and multiple reviews have documented the safety and efficacy of strength training for children and adolescents. The literature highlights the significant training-induced increases in strength associated with youth strength training. However, the effectiveness of youth strength training programs to improve power measures is not as clear. This discrepancy may be related to training and testing specificity. Most prior youth strength training programs emphasized lower intensity resistance with relatively slow movements. Since power activities typically involve higher intensity, explosive-like contractions with higher angular velocities (e.g., plyometrics, there is a conflict between the training medium and testing measures. This meta-analysis compared strength (e.g., training with resistance or body mass and power training programs (e.g., plyometric training on proxies of muscle strength, power, and speed. A systematic literature search using a Boolean Search Strategy was conducted in the electronic databases PubMed, SPORT Discus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar and revealed 652 hits. After perusal of title, abstract, and full text, 107 studies were eligible for inclusion in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed small to moderate magnitude changes for training specificity with jump measures. In other words, power training was more effective than strength training for improving youth jump height. For sprint measures, strength training was more effective than power training with youth. Furthermore, strength training exhibited consistently large magnitude changes to lower body strength measures, which contrasted with the generally trivial, small and moderate magnitude training improvements of power training upon lower body strength, sprint and jump measures, respectively. Maturity related inadequacies in eccentric strength and balance might influence the lack of training specificity with

  7. EFFECTS OF STRENGTH VS. BALLISTIC-POWER TRAINING ON THROWING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Zaras

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of 6 weeks strength vs. ballistic-power (Power training on shot put throwing performance in novice throwers. Seventeen novice male shot-put throwers were divided into Strength (N = 9 and Power (n = 8 groups. The following measurements were performed before and after the training period: shot put throws, jumping performance (CMJ, Wingate anaerobic performance, 1RM strength, ballistic throws and evaluation of architectural and morphological characteristics of vastus lateralis. Throwing performance increased significantly but similarly after Strength and Power training (7.0-13.5% vs. 6.0-11.5%, respectively. Muscular strength in leg press increased more after Strength than after Power training (43% vs. 21%, respectively, while Power training induced an 8.5% increase in CMJ performance and 9.0 - 25.8% in ballistic throws. Peak power during the Wingate test increased similarly after Strength and Power training. Muscle thickness increased only after Strength training (10%, p < 0.05. Muscle fibre Cross Sectional Area (fCSA increased in all fibre types after Strength training by 19-26% (p < 0.05, while only type IIx fibres hypertrophied significantly after Power training. Type IIx fibres (% decreased after Strength but not after Power training. These results suggest that shot put throwing performance can be increased similarly after six weeks of either strength or ballistic power training in novice throwers, but with dissimilar muscular adaptations

  8. Effects of hyperthyroidism on hand grip strength and function

    OpenAIRE

    Esra Erkol İnal, MD; Alparslan Bayram Çarlı, MD; Sultan Çanak, MD; Oğuzhan Aksu, MD; Banu Kale Köroğlu, MD; Serpil Savaş

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a pathologic condition in which the body is exposed to excessive amounts of circulating thyroid hormones. Skeletal muscle is one of the major target organs of thyroid hormones. We evaluated hand grip strength and function in patients with overt hyperthyroidism. Fifty-one patients newly diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and 44 healthy controls participated in this study. Age, height, weight, and dominant hand of all participants were recorded. The diagnosis of hyperthyroidism w...

  9. Effect of Cement Composition in Lampung on Concrete Strength

    OpenAIRE

    Riyanto, Hery

    2014-01-01

    The strength and durability of concrete depends on the composition of its constituent materials ie fine aggregate, coarse aggregate, cement, water and other additives. The cement composition is about 10% acting as a binder paste material fine and coarse aggregates. In the Lampung market there are several brands of portland cement used by the community to make concrete construction. Although there is a standard of the government of portland cement composition, yet each brand of cement has diff...

  10. Effects of Strength vs. Ballistic-Power Training on Throwing Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaras, Nikolaos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Methenitis, Spyridon; Papadopoulos, Constantinos; Karampatsos, Giorgos; Georgiadis, Giorgos; Stasinaki, Aggeliki; Manta, Panagiota; Terzis, Gerasimos

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of 6 weeks strength vs. ballistic-power (Power) training on shot put throwing performance in novice throwers. Seventeen novice male shot-put throwers were divided into Strength (N = 9) and Power (n = 8) groups. The following measurements were performed before and after the training period: shot put throws, jumping performance (CMJ), Wingate anaerobic performance, 1RM strength, ballistic throws and evaluation of architectural and morphological characteristics of vastus lateralis. Throwing performance increased significantly but similarly after Strength and Power training (7.0-13.5% vs. 6.0-11.5%, respectively). Muscular strength in leg press increased more after Strength than after Power training (43% vs. 21%, respectively), while Power training induced an 8.5% increase in CMJ performance and 9.0 - 25.8% in ballistic throws. Peak power during the Wingate test increased similarly after Strength and Power training. Muscle thickness increased only after Strength training (10%, p ballistic power training in novice throwers, but with dissimilar muscular adaptations. Key pointsBallistic-power training with 30% of 1RM is equally effective in increasing shot put performance as strength training, in novice throwers, during a short training cycle of six weeks.In novice shot putters with relatively low initial muscle strength/mass, short-term strength training might be more important since it can increase both muscle strength and shot put performance.The ballistic type of power training resulted in a significant increase of the mass of type IIx muscle fibres and no change in their proportion. Thus, this type of training might be used effectively during the last weeks before competition, when the strength training load is usually reduced, in order to increase muscle power and shot put performance in novice shot putters.

  11. Effect of strength training with blood flow restriction on muscle power and submaximal strength in eumenorrheic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Ana L S; Neto, Gabriel R; Sousa, Maria S C; Dias, Ingrid; Vianna, Jeferson; Nunes, Rodolfo A M; Novaes, Jefferson S

    2017-03-01

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) training stimulates muscle size and strength by increasing muscle activation, accumulation of metabolites and muscle swelling. This method has been used in different populations, but no studies have evaluated the effects of training on muscle power and submaximal strength (SS) in accounted for the menstrual cycle. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of strength training (ST) with BFR on the muscle power and SS of upper and lower limbs in eumenorrheic women. Forty untrained women (18-40 years) were divided randomly and proportionally into four groups: (i) high-intensity ST at 80% of 1RM (HI), (ii) low-intensity ST at 20% of 1RM combined with partial blood flow restriction (LI + BFR), (iii) low-intensity ST at 20% of 1RM (LI) and d) control group (CG). Each training group performed eight training sessions. Tests with a medicine ball (MB), horizontal jump (HJ), vertical jump (VJ), biceps curls (BC) and knee extension (KE) were performed during the 1st day follicular phase (FP), 14th day (ovulatory phase) and 26-28th days (luteal phase) of the menstrual cycle. There was no significant difference among groups in terms of the MB, HJ, VJ or BC results at any time point (P>0·05). SS in the KE exercise was significantly greater in the LI + BFR group compared to the CG group (P = 0·014) during the LP. Therefore, ST with BFR does not appear to improve the power of upper and lower limbs and may be an alternative to improve the SS of lower limbs of eumenorrheic women. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Effect of a New Surface Treatment Solution on the Bond Strength of Composite to Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Bond Strength of Composite to Enamel " is appropriately acknowledged and, beyond brief excerpts, is with the permission of the copyright owner...Solution on the Bond Strength of Composite to Enamel ABSTRACT Clean & Boost (Apex Dental Materials) is a novel surface treatment solution...designed to be used in place of phosphoric acid to increase the bond strength of self-etch adhesives to enamel and more effectively remove contaminants

  13. Differential Effects of Sodium Butyrate and Lithium Chloride on Rhesus Monkey Trophoblast Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarsini Kumar

    Full Text Available Trophoblast differentiation during early placental development is critical for successful pregnancy and aberrant differentiation causes preeclampsia and early pregnancy loss. During the first trimester, cytotrophoblasts are exposed to low oxygen tension (equivalent to~2%-3% O2 and differentiation proceeds along an extravillous pathway (giving rise to invasive extravillous cytotrophoblasts and a villous pathway (giving rise to multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast. Interstitial extravillous cytotrophoblasts invade the decidua, while endovascular extravillous cytotrophoblasts are involved in re-modelling uterine spiral arteries. We tested the idea that sodium butyrate (an epigenetic modulator induces trophoblast differentiation in early gestation rhesus monkey trophoblasts through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The results show that syncytiotrophoblast formation was increased by butyrate, accompanied by nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, and increased expression of EnvV2 and galectin-1 (two factors thought to be involved in trophoblast fusion. Surprisingly, the expression of GCM1 and syncytin-2 was not affected by sodium butyrate. When trophoblasts were incubated with lithium chloride, a GSK3 inhibitor that mimics Wnt activation, nuclear accumulation of β-catenin also occurred but differentiation into syncytiotrophoblast was not observed. Instead the cells differentiated to mononucleated spindle-shaped cells and showed molecular and behavioral characteristics of endovascular trophoblasts. Another highly specific inhibitor of GSK3, CHIR99021, failed to induce endovascular trophoblast characteristics. These observations suggest that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway correlates with both trophoblast differentiation pathways, but that additional factors determine specific cell fate decisions. Other experiments suggested that the differential effects of sodium butyrate and lithium chloride might be explained by their effects on TNF

  14. The effects of tapering on strength performance in trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibala, M J; MacDougall, J D; Sale, D G

    1994-11-01

    The optimum pre-competition taper procedure for "strength athletes" is not known. We examined voluntary strength and evoked contractile properties of the elbow flexors over a 10 day rest only (ROT) and a 10 day reduced volume taper (RVT) in 8 resistance trained males (23 +/- 2.1 years). Following 3 wks of standardized training of the elbow flexors, subjects were randomly assigned to one of the tapers. Upon completion, they resumed training for 3 wks and completed the other taper. No arm training was performed during the ROT, while high intensity, low volume training was done every second day during the RVT. Maximum isometric (MVC), low (0.52 rad.s-1; LV) and high velocity (3.14 rad.s-1; HV) concentric peak torque, and evoked isometric twitch contractile properties were measured before and after each training phase and every 48 h during each taper. ANOVA comparison of the tapers revealed that MVC increased (p pre-taper values throughout the RVT (measurement days 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10), as did LV at 2, 4, 6, and 8 d. MVC did not change over the ROT but LV was significantly higher on day 2 and lower on days 8 and 10. LV was also greater on days 4, 6, 8 and 10 during the RVT compared to the ROT. The evoked contractile properties remained largely unchanged. The data indicate that resistance-trained athletes can improve low velocity concentric strength for at least 8 days by greatly reducing training volume, but maintaining training intensity.

  15. The Effects of Design Strength, Fly Ash Content and Curing Method on Compressive Strength of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete: A Design of Experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solikin Mochamad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High volume fly ash concrete becomes one of alternatives to produce green concrete as it uses waste material and significantly reduces the utilization of Portland cement in concrete production. Although using less cement, its compressive strength is comparable to ordinary Portland cement (hereafter OPC and the its durability increases significantly. This paper reports investigation on the effect of design strength, fly ash content and curing method on compressive strength of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete. The experiment and data analysis were prepared using minitab, a statistic software for design of experimental. The specimens were concrete cylinder with diameter of 15 cm and height of 30 cm, tested for its compressive strength at 56 days. The result of the research demonstrates that high volume fly ash concrete can produce comparable compressive strength which meets the strength of OPC design strength especially for high strength concrete. In addition, the best mix proportion to achieve the design strength is the combination of high strength concrete and 50% content of fly ash. Moreover, the use of spraying method for curing method of concrete on site is still recommended as it would not significantly reduce the compressive strength result.

  16. A Thermodamage Strength Theoretical Model of Ceramic Materials Taking into Account the Effect of Residual Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A thermodamage strength theoretical model taking into account the effect of residual stress was established and applied to each temperature phase based on the study of effects of various physical mechanisms on the fracture strength of ultrahigh-temperature ceramics. The effects of SiC particle size, crack size, and SiC particle volume fraction on strength corresponding to different temperatures were studied in detail. This study showed that when flaw size is not large, the bigger SiC particle size results in the greater effect of tensile residual stress in the matrix grains on strength reduction, and this prediction coincides with experimental results; and the residual stress and the combined effort of particle size and crack size play important roles in controlling material strength.

  17. Effect of Hybrid Fibers on the Mechanical Properties of High Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid H. Hussein, Saeed K. Rejeb Hayder T. Abd

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, high strength concrete of 75 MPa compressive strength was investigated. The experimental program was designed to study the effect of fibers and hybrid fibers (steel and polypropylene fibers on the fresh (workability and wet density and hardened properties (compressive strength, splitting strength, flexural strength and dry density of high strength concrete. Results show that decreases in slump flow of all concrete mixtures containing steel, polypropylene and hybrid fibers compared with control mix (0% fiber. Hybrid high strength concrete with steel and polypropylene fibers showed superior compressive, splitting, flexural strengths over the others concrete without or with single fibers content. The test results indicate that the maximum increase in compressive and flexural strengths are obtains with the hybridization ratio (70%steel + 30% polypropylene and were equal to 14.54% and 23.34% respectively, compared with the control mix. While, the maximum increase in splitting tensile strength with (100% steel fiber + 0 polypropylene is 21.19%. 

  18. Effect of silicon solar cell processing parameters and crystallinity on mechanical strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, V.A.; Yunus, A.; Janssen, M.; Richardson, I.M. [Delft University of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); Bennett, I.J. [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands, Solar Energy, PV Module Technology, Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Silicon wafer thickness reduction without increasing the wafer strength leads to a high breakage rate during subsequent handling and processing steps. Cracking of solar cells has become one of the major sources of solar module failure and rejection. Hence, it is important to evaluate the mechanical strength of solar cells and influencing factors. The purpose of this work is to understand the fracture behavior of silicon solar cells and to provide information regarding the bending strength of the cells. Triple junctions, grain size and grain boundaries are considered to investigate the effect of crystallinity features on silicon wafer strength. Significant changes in fracture strength are found as a result of metallization morphology and crystallinity of silicon solar cells. It is observed that aluminum paste type influences the strength of the solar cells. (author)

  19. Effect of technological parameters and microstructure on mechanical strength of UO2 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, K.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of various peculiarities of tablet microstructure namely, sammury porosity (tablet density), grain size and pore distribution over sizes on technological parameters, is studied. It is shown that density decrease leads to a fast reduction of UO 2 tablet strength. The maximum effect on strength is produced by pore distribution over sizes, characterized by a median size, and not by the grain size, though a combined effect of those two factors is also observed. The important role of the technology of tablet production manifests itself in the fact that all operations bringing about the increase of pore or grain sizes leads to a reduction of strength. Such factors as powder origin, granule sizes, U 3 O 8 content and the amount of additions do not cause any considerable changes in the strength of tablets. Bend tests under conditions of biaxial loading should be considered as an ideal method of determining fuel tablets strength [ru

  20. The Effects of Design Strength, Fly Ash Content and Curing Method on Compressive Strength of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete: A Design of Experimental

    OpenAIRE

    Solikin Mochamad; Setiawan Budi

    2017-01-01

    High volume fly ash concrete becomes one of alternatives to produce green concrete as it uses waste material and significantly reduces the utilization of Portland cement in concrete production. Although using less cement, its compressive strength is comparable to ordinary Portland cement (hereafter OPC) and the its durability increases significantly. This paper reports investigation on the effect of design strength, fly ash content and curing method on compressive strength of High Volume Fly ...

  1. Effects of Different Environment Temperatures on Some Motor Characteristics and Muscle Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Ergün; Yüksek, Selami; Asma, Bülent; Arslanoglu, Erkal

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was determine the effects of different environment temperatures on motor characteristics and muscle strength. 15 athletes participated to study. Flexibility, vertical jump, hand grip-leg strength, 30m sprint, 20-meter shuttle run and coordination-agility tests were measured in five different environment temperatures. (22°C,…

  2. A Multilevel Analysis of the Effects of Disciplinary Climate Strength on Student Reading Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Siwen; Li, Lingyan; Zhang, Danhui

    2018-01-01

    Climate strength was first conceptualised in the organisational psychology literature as the within-group agreement on the perceptions of climate. In contrast to the deep study of climate level, climate strength has not been clarified by school climate research. The purpose of this cross-cultural study is to identify the main effect of…

  3. Strongwomen® Program Evaluation: Effect of Strength Training Exercises on Physical Fitness of Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anil Kumar; Van Horn, Beth; Corbin, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    The Strongwomen® Program (SWP) is a nationally disseminated group strength-training exercise and nutrition education program delivered by Extension. The study reported here examined the effect of strength training exercises in SWP on improvement in physical fitness of program participants. Senior Fitness Test was used to collect data. Upon…

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging: effects of magnetic field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, L.E.; Arakawa, M.; Hoenninger, J.; McCarten, B.; Watts, J.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images of the head, abdomen, and pelvis of normal adult men were obtained using varying magnetic field strength, and measurements of T1 and T2 relaxations and of signal-to-noise (SN) ratios were determined. For any one spin echo sequence, gray/white matter contrast decreases and muscle/fat contrast increases with field. SN levels rise rapidly up to 3.0 kgauss and then change more slowly, actually dropping for muscle. The optimum field for magnetic resonance imaging depends on tissue type, body part, and imaging sequence, so that it does not have a unique value. Magnetic resonance systems that operate in the 3.0-5.0 kgauss range achieve most or all of the gains that can be achieved by higher magnetic fields

  5. Effect of effective grain size on Charpy impact properties of high-strength bainitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Sang Yong; Han, Seung Youb; Lee, Sung Hak; Hwang, Byoung Chul; Lee, Chang Gil

    2008-01-01

    This study is concerned with the effect of Cu and B addition on microstructure and mechanical properties of high-strength bainitic steels. Six kinds of steels were fabricated by varying alloying elements and hot-rolling conditions, and their microstructures and tensile and Charpy impact properties were investigated. Their effective grain sizes were also characterized by the electron back-scatter diffraction analysis. The tensile test results indicated that the B- or Cu-containing steels had the higher yield and tensile strengths than the B- or Cu-free steels because their volume fractions of bainitic ferrite and martensite were quite high. The B- or Cu-free steels had the higher upper shelf energy than the B- or Cu-containing steels because of their higher volume fraction of granular bainite. In the steel containing 10 ppm B without Cu, the best combination of high strengths, high upper shelf energy, and low energy transition temperature could be obtained by the decrease in the overall effective grain size due to the presence of bainitic ferrite having smaller effective grain size

  6. Effect of Specimen Shape and Size on the Compressive Strength of Foamed Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudin M.A.S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight concrete, in the form of foamed concrete, is a versatile material that primarily consists of a cement based mortar, mixed with at least 20% volume of air. Its dry density is typically below 1600 kg/m3 with a maximum compressive strength of 15MPa. The ASTM standard provision specifies a correction factor for concrete strength of between 14 and 42Mpa, in order to compensate for a reduced strength, when the aspect height-to-diameter ratio of a specimen is less than 2.0. However, the CEB-FIP provision specifically mentions a ratio of 150mm dia. × 300mm cylinder strength to 150 mm cube strength; though, both provision requirements do not specifically clarify the applicability and/or modification of the correction factors for the compressive strength to lightweight concrete (in this case, foamed concrete. The focus of this work is to study the effect of specimen size and shape on the axial compressive strength of concrete. Specimens of various sizes and shapes were cast with square and circular cross-sections i.e., cubes, prisms, and cylinders. Their compression strength behaviours at 7 and 28 days were investigated. The results indicate that, as the CEB-FIP provision specified, even for foamed concrete, 100mm cubes (l/d = 1.0 produce a comparable compressive strength with 100mm dia. × 200mm cylinders (l/d = 2.0.

  7. Monitoring the effect of football match congestion on hamstring strength and lower limb flexibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollin, Martin; Thorborg, Kristian; Pizzari, Tania

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of competitive football match congestion on hamstring strength and lower limb flexibility. DESIGN: Repeated measures. SETTING: Elite male youth football. PARTICIPANTS: Fifteen male elite youth football players from the national football association centre of ....... CONCLUSION: Isometric hamstring strength and pain can be considered for inclusion in-season to monitor player's post-match hamstring recovery characteristics during congested match fixtures.......OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of competitive football match congestion on hamstring strength and lower limb flexibility. DESIGN: Repeated measures. SETTING: Elite male youth football. PARTICIPANTS: Fifteen male elite youth football players from the national football association centre...... of excellence were included (age = 15.81 ±0.65 years, height = 171.95 ±6.89 cm, weight = 65.93 ±7.53 kg). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Hamstring strength and pain, ankle dorsiflexion, hip extension, knee extension and flexion range of motion. RESULTS: Hamstring strength was highest at baseline and significantly...

  8. Fish-oil supplementation enhances the effects of strength training in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodacki, Cintia L N; Rodacki, André L F; Pereira, Gleber; Naliwaiko, Katya; Coelho, Isabela; Pequito, Daniele; Fernandes, Luiz Cléudio

    2012-02-01

    Muscle force and functional capacity generally decrease with aging in the older population, although this effect can be reversed, attenuated, or both through strength training. Fish oil (FO), which is rich in n-3 (omega-3) PUFAs, has been shown to play a role in the plasma membrane and cell function of muscles, which may enhance the benefits of training. The effect of strength training and FO supplementation on the neuromuscular system of the elderly has not been investigated. The objective was to investigate the chronic effect of FO supplementation and strength training on the neuromuscular system (muscle strength and functional capacity) of older women. Forty-five women (aged 64 ± 1.4 y) were randomly assigned to 3 groups. One group performed strength training only (ST group) for 90 d, whereas the others performed the same strength-training program and received FO supplementation (2 g/d) for 90 d (ST90 group) or for 150 d (ST150 group; supplemented 60 d before training). Muscle strength and functional capacity were assessed before and after the training period. No differences in the pretraining period were found between groups for any of the variables. The peak torque and rate of torque development for all muscles (knee flexor and extensor, plantar and dorsiflexor) increased from pre- to posttraining in all groups. However, the effect was greater in the ST90 and ST150 groups than in the ST group. The activation level and electromechanical delay of the muscles changed from pre- to posttraining only for the ST90 and ST150 groups. Chair-rising performance in the FO groups was higher than in the ST group. Strength training increased muscle strength in elderly women. The inclusion of FO supplementation caused greater improvements in muscle strength and functional capacity.

  9. Effective line strengths of trans-nitrous acid near 1275 cm−1 and cis-nitrous acid at 1660 cm−1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.H.; Wood, E.C.; Wormhoudt, J.; Shorter, J.H.; Herndon, S.C.; Zahniser, M.S.; Munger, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    We determined the effective line strengths of the trans conformer of nitrous acid (HONO) near 1275 cm −1 (R-branch of ν 3 mode, N---O---H bend) and of the cis conformer at 1660 cm −1 (R-branch of ν 2 mode, N=O stretch), both at a spectral resolution of 0.001 cm −1 by tunable infrared laser differential absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS) utilizing continuous-wave quantum cascade (cw-QC) lasers. Absorbance of one conformer was measured while simultaneously quantifying the mixing ratio of total HONO by catalytic conversion to nitric oxide (NO) followed by calibrated absorption spectroscopy. Line strengths obtained here are consistent with previously reported band strengths for the trans conformer but are lower by a factor of approximately 2.4 for the cis conformer. -- Highlights: ► Effective line strengths for the cis-HONO at 1660 cm −1 was quantified. ► Effective line strengths for the trans conformer near 1275 cm −1 was also quantified. ► Results for trans-HONO are in agreement with previously published band strength. ► Previous cis band strength is high by factor of 2.4 due to spectral interference.

  10. Effect of drop jump technique on the reactive strength index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzik, Artur; Juras, Grzegorz; Pietraszewski, Bogdan; Rokita, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    The basic drill of plyometric training aimed at improving lower limb power and jump height is a drop jump. This exercise can be performed using different techniques, which substantially affects jump variables. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the values of the reactive strength index (RSI) for countermovement drop jumps (CDJs) and bounce drop jumps (BDJs). The study was carried out in a group of 8 male youth basketball players. The tests were conducted using the AMTI BP600900 force plate to measure ground reaction forces and the Noraxon MyoMotion system to record kinematic data. Each player performed two CDJs and two BDJs from the height of 15, 30, 45 and 60 cm. The RSI was calculated as a ratio of jump height and contact time. Moreover, the RSI was determined for the amortization and take-off phases separately. Significant differences (p jumps from 30, 45 and 60 cm. Differences in RSI values for jumps from 15 cm were not significant. Furthermore, CDJ height values were significantly higher (p jump technique that is commonly performed by basketball players.

  11. Episodic, generalized, and semantic memory tests: switching and strength effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Michael S; Murray, Krista L

    2011-09-01

    We continue the process of investigating the probabilistic paired associate paradigm in an effort to understand the memory access control processes involved and to determine whether the memory structure produced is in transition between episodic and semantic memory. In this paradigm two targets are probabilistically paired with a cue across a large number of short lists. Participants can recall the target paired with the cue in the most recent list (list specific test), produce the first of the two targets that have been paired with that cue to come to mind (generalised test), and produce a free association response (semantic test). Switching between a generalised test and a list specific test did not produce a switching cost indicating a general similarity in the control processes involved. In addition, there was evidence for a dissociation between two different strength manipulations (amount of study time and number of cue-target pairings) such that number of pairings influenced the list specific, generalised and the semantic test but amount of study time only influenced the list specific and generalised test. © 2011 Canadian Psychological Association

  12. Effect of drop jump technique on the reactive strength index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struzik Artur

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The basic drill of plyometric training aimed at improving lower limb power and jump height is a drop jump. This exercise can be performed using different techniques, which substantially affects jump variables. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the values of the reactive strength index (RSI for countermovement drop jumps (CDJs and bounce drop jumps (BDJs. The study was carried out in a group of 8 male youth basketball players. The tests were conducted using the AMTI BP600900 force plate to measure ground reaction forces and the Noraxon MyoMotion system to record kinematic data. Each player performed two CDJs and two BDJs from the height of 15, 30, 45 and 60 cm. The RSI was calculated as a ratio of jump height and contact time. Moreover, the RSI was determined for the amortization and take-off phases separately. Significant differences (p < 0.05 between RSI values for CDJs and BDJs were recorded for jumps from 30, 45 and 60 cm. Differences in RSI values for jumps from 15 cm were not significant. Furthermore, CDJ height values were significantly higher (p < 0.05 than the values recorded for BDJs. Times of contact, amortization and take-off during BDJs were significantly shorter (p < 0.05 than the respective values obtained for CDJs. Therefore, the use of the RSI to monitor plyometric training should be based on the drop jump technique that is commonly performed by basketball players.

  13. Size effect in the strength of concrete structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The fracture mechanics size effect, as opposed to the Weibull statistical size effect, is a .... Solutions for TPB beam and a typical wedge-splitting geometry have been ..... Bazant Z P 1984 Size effect in blunt fracture: Concrete, rock, metal. J. Eng.

  14. The effect of polymer type on electric breakdown strength on a nanosecond time scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Liang; Su Jian-Cang; Pan Ya-Feng; Zhang Xi-Bo

    2012-01-01

    Based on the concepts of fast polarization,effective electric field and electron impact ionization criterion,the effect of polymer type on electric breakdown strength (EBD) on a nanosecond time scale is investigated,and a formula that qualitatively characterizes the relation between the electric breakdown strength and the polymer type is derived.According to this formula,it is found that the electric breakdown strength decreases with an increase in the effective relative dielectric constants of the polymers.By calculating the effective relative dielectric constants for different types of polymers,the theoretical relation for the electric breakdown strengths of common polymers is predicted.To verify the prediction,the polymers of PE (polyethylene),PTFE (polytetrafluoroethelene),PMMA (organic glass) and Nylon are tested with a nanosecond-pulse generator.The experimental result shows EBD (PTFE) > EBD (PMMA) > EBD (Nylon) > EBD (PE).This result is consistent with the theoretical prediction.

  15. Effect of Positive Psychotherapy in Depression Symptoms and Character Strengths in Cancer Affected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Khodabakhash

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to study the effect of positive psychotherapy on depression symptoms and character strengths in cancer affected patients. Based on a quasi-experimental design by available sampling, 58 cancer patients were investigated. 30 patients were assigned in two groups: 15 patients in positive psychotherapy group (treatment and 15 patients as control group. In the present research, Oxford Happiness-Depression Questionnaire (OHDQ and Values In Action Inventory of Strengths (VIA-IS were used. The results showed that the positive psychotherapy was effective in reducing depression, increasing the character strengths and virtues, improving meaningful, pleasant and engaged life of cancer patients.

  16. Effect of osteogenesis imperfecta mutations in tropocollagen molecule on strength of biomimetic tropocollagen-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Devendra K.; Tomar, Vikas

    2010-01-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that affects cellular synthesis of Type-I collagen fibrils and causes extreme bone fragility. This study reports the effects of OI mutations in Tropocollagen (TC) molecules on strength of model Tropocollagen-Hydroxyapatite biomaterials with two different mineral [hydroxyapatite (HAP)] distributions using three dimensional atomistic simulations. Results show that the effect of TC mutations on the strength of TC-HAP biomaterials is insignificant. Instead, change in mineral distribution showed significant impact on the overall strength of TC-HAP biomaterials. Study suggests that TC mutations manifest themselves by changing the mineral distribution during hydroxyapatite growth and nucleation period.

  17. Effects of Lifestyle on Muscle Strength in a Healthy Danish Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Else Marie; Robertson, Samuel; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2018-01-01

    The Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS) and measurements of Isokinetic muscle strength from a sub-study of randomly selected healthy participants from CCHS. Methods: 126 women and 63 men were studied. All participants completed a questionnaire regarding their lifestyle, including physical activity, alcohol intake...... in the lower extremities (p = 0.03) for women, and lower extremities (p = 0.03) and trunk (p = 0.007) for men. Alcohol Intake was in general not correlated to muscle strength. No clear effect of smoking was seen on muscle strength. Conclusion: Our results show that physical activity during leisure...... and smoking habits. Isokinetic muscle strength was measured over the upper extremities (UE), trunk, and lower extremities (LE). Multivariate analyses including all of the variables were carried out. Results: The level of daily physical activity during leisure was positively correlated to muscle strength...

  18. Effects of Lifestyle on Muscle Strength in a Healthy Danish Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Else Marie; Robertson, Samuel; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2018-01-01

    The Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS) and measurements of Isokinetic muscle strength from a sub-study of randomly selected healthy participants from CCHS. Methods: 126 women and 63 men were studied. All participants completed a questionnaire regarding their lifestyle, including physical activity, alcohol intake...... in the lower extremities (p = 0.03) for women, and lower extremities (p = 0.03) and trunk (p = 0.007) for men. Alcohol Intake was in general not correlated to muscle strength. No clear effect of smoking was seen on muscle strength. Conclusions: Our results show that physical activity during leisure...... and smoking habits. Isokinetic muscle strength was measured over the upper extremities (UE), trunk, and lower extremities (LE). Multivariate analyses including all of the variables were carried out. Results: The level of daily physical activity during leisure was positively correlated to muscle strength...

  19. The effects of surface finish and grain size on the strength of sintered silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Y. H.; Kim, Y. W.; Lee, J. G.; Kim, C. H.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of surface treatment and microstructure, especially abnormal grain growth, on the strength of sintered SiC were studied. The surfaces of sintered SiC were treated with 400, 800 and 1200 grit diamond wheels. Grain growth was induced by increasing the sintering times at 2050 C. The beta to alpha transformation occurred during the sintering of beta-phase starting materials and was often accompanied by abnormal grain growth. The overall strength distributions were established using Weibull statistics. The strength of the sintered SiC is limited by extrinsic surface flaws in normal-sintered specimens. The finer the surface finish and grain size, the higher the strength. But the strength of abnormal sintering specimens is limited by the abnormally grown large tabular grains. The Weibull modulus increases with decreasing grain size and decreasing grit size for grinding.

  20. Effects of Kettlebell Swing vs. Explosive Deadlift Training on Strength and Power

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew R. Maulit; David C. Archer; Whitney D. Leyva; Cameron N. Munger; Megan A. Wong; Lee E. Brown; Jared W. Coburn; Andrew J. Galpin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Recent research has compared explosive deadlift to kettlebell training observing their effects on strength. The kettlebell swing is a popular practical exercise as it shares share a hip hinge movement with the explosive deadlift, but the two have not been compared. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of kettlebell swing vs. explosive deadlift training on strength and power. Methods: Thirty-one recreationally resistance-trained men (age = 23.1 ± 2.3 yea...

  1. The effect of increasing strength and approach velocity on triple jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Sam J; Yeadon, M R Fred; King, Mark A

    2016-12-08

    The triple jump is an athletic event comprising three phases in which the optimal phase ratio (the proportion of each phase to the total distance jumped) is unknown. This study used a planar whole body torque-driven computer simulation model of the ground contact parts of all three phases of the triple jump to investigate the effect of strength and approach velocity on optimal performance. The strength and approach velocity of the simulation model were each increased by up to 30% in 10% increments from baseline data collected from a national standard triple jumper. Increasing strength always resulted in an increased overall jump distance. Increasing approach velocity also typically resulted in an increased overall jump distance but there was a point past which increasing approach velocity without increasing strength did not lead to an increase in overall jump distance. Increasing both strength and approach velocity by 10%, 20%, and 30% led to roughly equivalent increases in overall jump distances. Distances ranged from 14.05m with baseline strength and approach velocity, up to 18.49m with 30% increases in both. Optimal phase ratios were either hop-dominated or balanced, and typically became more balanced when the strength of the model was increased by a greater percentage than its approach velocity. The range of triple jump distances that resulted from the optimisation process suggests that strength and approach velocity are of great importance for triple jump performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Immediate Effect of Neuromuscular Joint Facilitation (NJF) Treatment on Hip Muscle Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongdan; Huo, Ming; Huang, Qiuchen; Li, Desheng; Maruyama, Hitoshi

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the change in hip muscle strength of younger persons after neuromuscular joint facilitation (NJF) treatment. [Subjects] The subjects were 45 healthy young people, who were divided into two groups: a NJF group and a proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) group. The NJF group consisted of 21 subjects (11 males, 10 females), and the PNF group consisted of 24 subjects (11 males, 13 females). [Methods] Participants in the NJF group received NJF treatment. We measured the maximal flexor strength and the maximal extensor strength during isokinetic movement of the hip joint before and after intervention in both groups. The angular velocities used were 60°/sec and 180°/sec. [Results] The NJF group showed significant increases in the maximal flexor strength and the maximal extensor strength after the intervention at each angular velocity. In the PNF group, the maximal flexor strength of 60°/sec and the maximal extensor strength of 180°/sec were significant increases. [Conclusion] These results suggest that there is an immediate effect of NJF intervention on hip muscle strength.

  3. Effect of ionic strength on barium transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zi; Prigiobbe, Valentina

    2018-02-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (or fracking) is a well stimulation technique used to extract resources from a low permeability formation. Currently, the most common application of fracking is for the extraction of oil and gas from shale. During the operation, a large volume of brine, rich in hazardous chemicals, is produced. Spills of brine from wells or pits might negatively impact underground water resources and, in particular, one of the major concerns is the migration of radionuclides, such as radium (Ra2+), into the shallow subsurface. However, the transport behaviour of Ra2+ through a reactive porous medium under conditions typical of a brine, i.e., high salinity, is not well understood, yet. Here, a study on the transport behaviour of barium (Ba2+, congener of radium) through a porous medium containing a common mineral such as goethite (FeO(OH)) is presented. Batch and column flood tests were carried out at conditions resembling the produced brine, i.e., large values of ionic strength (I), namely, 1 to 3 mol/kg. The measurements were described with the triple layer surface complexation model coupled with the Pitzer activity coefficient method and a reactive transport model, in the case of the transport tests. The experimental results show that the adsorption of Ba2+ onto FeO(OH) increases with pH but decreases with I and it becomes negligible at the brine conditions. Moreover, even if isotherms show adsorption at large I, at the same conditions during transport, Ba2+ travels without retardation through the FeO(OH) porous medium. The triple layer model agrees very well with all batch data but it does not describe well the transport tests in all cases. In particular, the model cannot match the pH measurements at large I values. This suggests that the chemical reactions at the solid-liquid interface do not capture the mechanism of Ba2+ adsorption onto FeO(OH) at large salinity. Finally, this study suggests that barium, and potentially its congeners, namely, radium

  4. Effect of bentonite addition on residual strength of microwave-hardened waterglass-containing moulding sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stachowicz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of a preliminary research of the effect of bentonite addition on residual strength of microwave-hardened moulding sands, containing sodium waterglass. Strength was determined at ambient temperature, on cylindrical specimens baked in an oven. Moulding sands for examinations were based on high-silica sand with addition of 2.5 % of non-modified, domestic-made waterglass grade 145. The prepared standard cylindrical specimens were hardened using the innovative microwave heating process and next baked for 30 minutes at temperatures between 100 and 1200 °C. Strength parameters of the specimens were determined on the specimens cooled- down to ambient temperature. The obtained results were compared with literature data to evaluate the effect of the applied hardening method and of the special additive on residual strength as a function of baking temperature. A favourable effect was found of both the innovative heating process and the applied bentonite addition.

  5. Effects of Mental Imagery on Muscular Strength in Healthy and Patient Participants: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maamer Slimani, David Tod, Helmi Chaabene, Bianca Miarka, Karim Chamari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present review were to (i provide a critical overview of the current literature on the effects of mental imagery on muscular strength in healthy participants and patients with immobilization of the upper extremity (i.e., hand and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL, (ii identify potential moderators and mediators of the “mental imagery-strength performance” relationship and (iii determine the relative contribution of electromyography (EMG and brain activities, neural and physiological adaptations in the mental imagery-strength performance relationship. This paper also discusses the theoretical and practical implications of the contemporary literature and suggests possible directions for future research. Overall, the results reveal that the combination of mental imagery and physical practice is more efficient than, or at least comparable to, physical execution with respect to strength performance. Imagery prevention intervention was also effective in reducing of strength loss after short-term muscle immobilization and ACL. The present review also indicates advantageous effects of internal imagery (range from 2.6 to 136.3% for strength performance compared with external imagery (range from 4.8 to 23.2%. Typically, mental imagery with muscular activity was higher in active than passive muscles, and imagining “lifting a heavy object” resulted in more EMG activity compared with imagining “lifting a lighter object”. Thus, in samples of students, novices, or youth male and female athletes, internal mental imagery has a greater effect on muscle strength than external mental imagery does. Imagery ability, motivation, and self-efficacy have been shown to be the variables mediating the effect of mental imagery on strength performance. Finally, the greater effects of internal imagery than those of external imagery could be explained in terms of neural adaptations, stronger brain activation, higher muscle excitation, greater somatic

  6. Identification of Bacteria and the Effect on Compressive Strength of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneza L. H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the species of bacteria used in this study as well as the effect of the bacteria on compressive strength of bioconcrete. Bioconcrete is not only more environmentally friendly but it is easy to procure. The objective of this research is to identify the ureolytic bacteria and sulphate reduction bacteria that have been isolated and further use the bacteria in concrete to determine the effect of bacteria on compressive strength. Identification of bacteria is conducted through Polymerase chain reaction (PCR method and DNA sequencing. The DNA of the bacteria was run through BLAST algorithm to determine the bacterial species.The bacteria were added into the concrete mix as a partial replacement of water. 3% of water is replaced by ureolytic bacteria and 5% of water is replaced by sulphate reduction bacteria. After running BLAST algorithm the bacteria were identified as Enterococcus faecalis (ureolytic bacteria and Bacillus sp (sulphate reduction bacteria. The result of the compressive strength for control is 36.0 Mpa. Partial replacement of 3% water by ureolytic bacteria has strength of 38.2Mpa while partial replacement of 5% of water by sulphate reduction bacteria has strength of 42.5Mpa. The significant increase of compressive strength with the addition of bacteria shows that bacteria play a significant role in the improvement of compressive strength.

  7. EFFECTIVENESS OF SWISS BALL VS FLOOR EXERCISES ON CORE MUSCLE STRENGTH IN ELITE CRICKETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sai sudha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cricket is one of the most popular game in India played by men and women of all ages. The increased physical demands on the players may be associated with an increased risk of injuries. Core muscle strength is important to prevent risk of injuries in elite cricketers. The beginners in the cricket must have enough strength of core muscles, as core is the bridge between upper and lower limbs. So, it should be strong enough to prevent low back and lower limb injuries in cricketers. The aim is to determine the effectiveness of swiss ball exercises versus floor exercises on core muscle strength in elite cricketers. The objective is to study and compare the effectiveness of swiss ball exercises and floor exercises in elite cricketers in terms of back strength. Method: The total number of students in this study were 30 eilte cricketers between 16-25 years out of which 15 subjects were included each in floor exercise(n=15 and swiss ball group(n=15. Back strength was measured before and after the intervention of 6 weeks using isokinetic analyser. Results: After the analysis, the results revealed significant improvement of back strength in both the groups(p< 0.00. The swiss ball group showed significant results when compared with floor exercise group. Conclusion: Although the study showed beneficial results in both the groups, the results reflected that swiss ball group had better improvement of core muscle strength than the floor exercise group.

  8. Pulmonary antioxidants exert differential protective effects against ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    PM collections from both urban and industrial sites caused 50% oxidative degradation of DNA in vitro at concentrations as low ... chemical analysis in order that progress can be made in ... One popular hypothesis is that PM exerts toxic effects.

  9. Application of size effect to compressive strength of concrete members

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    (LSM) to obtain parameters for the modified size effect law (MSEL) by Kim and co workers. The results of the ... in tensile failure, because the formation of microcracks in compressive failure is distributed in a wider region ...... Benjamin J R, Cornell C A 1970 Probability, statistics, and decision for civil engineers (New York:.

  10. marine water effect on compressive strength of concrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    (OH-) associated with Alkalis in the cement or concrete [1, 2]. ... alkaline minerals in the aggregate by the hydroxide .... clearly some complex chemical mechanisms involved here. .... [7] Mbadike, E.M and Elinwa, A.U. 'Effect of Salt Water in.

  11. Marine Water Effect on Compressive Strength of Concrete: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, in the case of reinforced concrete, it is recommended that reinforcement be prevented from corrosion by using stainless steels where available and corrosion inhibitors. However, long-term effect of seawater concentration on properties of concrete such as creep and durability were not investigated in this work.

  12. Effect of strength training on muscle function in elderly hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, C; Magnusson, S P; Beyer, N

    2007-01-01

    Immobilization due to hospitalization and major surgery leads to an increased risk of morbidity, disability and a decline in muscle function especially in frail elderly individuals. In fact, many elderly patients fail to regain their level of function and self-care before admission to hospital....... Given that reduced lower limb muscle strength and loss of skeletal muscle mass (i.e. sarcopenia) have been associated with functional impairments and disability with aging, attempts to counteract this process seem highly relevant. In recent years, strength training has emerged as an effective method...... to induce muscle hypertrophy and increase muscle strength and functional performance in frail elderly individuals. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that strength training is an effective method to restore muscle function in post-operative patients and in patients with chronic diseases. Despite this...

  13. Computer-aided model analysis for ionic strength-dependent effective charge of protein in ion-exchange chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Young-il; Jørgensen, Sten Bay; Kim, In-Ho

    2005-01-01

    differential algebraic equation (PDAE) system, a fast and accurate numerical method (i.e., conservation element/solution element (CE/SE) method), is proposed. Sensitivity and elasticity of the model parameters (e.g., steric/shape factors, adsorption heat coefficient, effective protein charge, equilibrium...... constant, mass transfer coefficient, axial dispersion coefficient and bed voidage) are analyzed for a BSA-salt system in a low protein concentration range. Within a low concentration range of bovine serum albumin (BSA) where linear adsorption isotherms are shown, the adsorption heat coefficient, shape...... salt concentrations, it is proposed that the effective protein charge could depend upon the salt concentration (or ionic strength). The reason for this dependence may be a steric hindrance of protein binding sites combined with a salt shielding effect neutralizing the surface charges of the protein. (c...

  14. Effect of Isothermal Bainitic Quenching on Rail Steel Impact Strength and Wear Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Fatih Hayati; Çelik, Osman Nuri

    2017-09-01

    The effect of heat treatment regimes on hardness, impact strength, and wear resistance of rail steel for high-speed tracks (rail quality category R350HT) is studied. Analysis of steel properties with a different structure is compared: pearlitic, and upper and lower bainite. It is shown that the steel with bainitic structure has the best impact strength, but wear resistance is better for steel with a lower bainite structure.

  15. Effect of the conditions of prepreg preparation on the strength of structural plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaborskaya, L. V.; Yurkevich, O. R.

    1995-05-01

    A study is made of the effect of the temperature and duration of heat treatment of polymer composite prepregs on their strength. It is established that heat treatment under conditions ensuring close to maximal adhesive interaction between the components of the prepreg and subsequent shaping makes it possible to more than double the strength of the plastic (Table 1), A new approach is proposed to optimizing the conditions of formation of structural plastics.

  16. Effect of a New Salivary Contaminant Removal Method on Bond Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-31

    was to evaluate the effect of various salivary- contaminant removal methods on the shear bond strength of resin cement to hydrofluoric-acid (HF) etched...mold (Ultradent) to a height of 3mm and light cured . Specimens were stored for 24 hours in 37°C distilled water and then tested in shear in a... contamination which may compromise the bond strength of the resin cement to the ceramic (Aboush, 1998; van Schalkwyk et al., 2003). Saliva affects bond

  17. Accounting sodium effect in calculation of strength of nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, V.I.

    1981-01-01

    Accounting methods of liquid sodium effect on long-term strength and creep of structural materials of nuclear reactors are considered. The decrease of pearlite steel strength at the decarburization expense and the decrease of plasticity of austenitic steels at the expense of carburization are noted. The necessity to account thermal transfer of mass is shown. Values of safety factors are presented, they are recommended for the design of reactor component parts with the thickness not less than 1 mm [ru

  18. Effect of deep stripping massage alone or with eccentric resistance on hamstring length and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Jeffrey; Geertsen, Lisbeth; Rogers, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated the effects of different interventions on hamstring length. However, little research has been conducted on the effects of deep stripping massage strokes (DSMS) alone, or combined with eccentric resistance, on hamstring length and strength. To determine: 1) if DSMS have an effect on hamstring length and strength and 2) if the effects on hamstring length and strength are any different when DSMS are combined with eccentric exercise. 89 Community College students and community members between the ages of 18 and 62 volunteered for the study. Of these, 64 demonstrated tight hamstrings on either one or both sides as defined by supine, passive terminal knee extension of ≤75° and participated in the study. Strength was assessed by pressing the posterior calcaneus into a strain gauge for approximately 5 s while seated with the knee flexed to 90°. On their tighter side, participants were administered longitudinal DSMS during 15, 10-s bouts of eccentric resistance with an elastic resistance band. On their other hamstring, participants were administered 15, 10-s longitudinal DSMS while lying passive. All massage strokes were performed at a depth of 7 out of 10 on a verbal pressure scale index. Afterwards, the hamstring flexibility and strength tests were repeated. Both DSMS with eccentric resistance (10.7%) and DSMS alone (6.3%) resulted in improved (p alone. Strength was not significantly affected by either treatment. These results suggest that DSMS increases hamstring length in less than 3 min but has no affect on strength. Furthermore, combining DSMS with eccentric resistance produces more hamstring flexibility gains than DSMS alone and does not affect strength. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of trapezius muscle strength on three-dimensional scapular kinematics

    OpenAIRE

    Turgut, Elif; Duzgun, Irem; Baltaci, Gul

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of trapezius muscle isometric strength on three-dimensional scapular kinematics in asymptomatic shoulders. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty asymptomatic subjects were included to the study. Isometric strengths of the upper, middle, and lower trapezius muscle were measured using a handheld dynamometer. Three-dimensional scapular kinematics was recorded by an electromagnetic tracking device during frontal and sagittal plane elevation. For each m...

  20. The effect of processing on autohesive strength development in thermoplastic resins and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Jeremy C.; Loos, Alfred C.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.

    1989-01-01

    In the present investigation of processing effects on the autohesive bond strength of neat polysulfone resin and graphite-reinforced polysulfone-matrix composites measured resin bond strength development in precracked compact tension specimens 'healed' by heating over a contact period at a given temperature. The critical strain energy release rate of refractured composite specimens did not exhibit the strong time or temperature dependence of the neat resin tests; only 80-90 percent of the undamaged fracture energy is recoverable.

  1. Effectiveness of Horizontal Rebar on Concrete Block Retaining Wall Strength

    OpenAIRE

    Krishpersad Manohar; Rikhi Ramkissoon

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of including a horizontal rebar compared to only a vertical rebar in concrete filled core interlocking concrete block retaining wall sections was investigated with respect to the horizontal retaining force. Experimental results for three specimens of interlocking blocks with vertical rebar and concrete filled cores showed an average horizontal retaining force of 24546 N ± 5.7% at an average wall deflection of 13.3 mm. Experimental results for three wall specimens of interloc...

  2. Differentiated-effect shims for medium field levels and saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richie, A.

    1976-01-01

    The arrangement of shims on the upstream and downstream ends of magnets may be based on the independent effects of variations in the geometric length and degree of saturation at the edges of the poles. This technique can be used to match the bending strength of an accelerator's magnets at two field levels (medium fields and maximum fields) and thus save special procedures (mixing the laminations, local compensation for errors by arranging the magnets in the appropriate order) and special devices (for instance, correcting dipoles) solely for correcting bending strengths at low field levels. (Auth.)

  3. The Effect of Gap Angle on Tensile Strength of Preceramic Base Metal Solder Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Farnaz; Hashemi Ardakani, Zahra; Hashemi Ardakani, Maryam

    2015-12-01

    Soldering is a process commonly used in fabricating dental prosthesis. Since most soldered prosthesis fail at the solder joints; the joint strength is of utmost importance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of gap angle on the tensile strength of base metal solder joints. A total number of 40 Ni-Cr samples were fabricated according to ADA/ISO 9693 specifications for tensile test. Samples were cut at the midpoint of the bar, and were placed at the considered angles by employing an explicitly designed device. They were divided into 4 groups regarding the gap angle; Group C (control group) with parallel gap on steady distance of 0.2mm, Group 1: 10°, Group 2: 20°, and Group3: 30° gap angles. When soldered, the specimens were all tested for tensile strength using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min with a preload of 10N. Kruskal-Wallis H test was used to compare tensile strength among the groups (ptensile strength values obtained from the study groups were respectively 307.84, 391.50, 365.18, and 368.86 MPa. The tensile strength was not statistically different among the four groups in general (p≤ 0.490). Making the gap angular at the solder joints and the subsequent unsteady increase of the gap distance would not change the tensile strength of the joint.

  4. Effect of wear on the burst strength of l-80 steel casing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irawan, S; Bharadwaj, A M; Temesgen, B; Karuppanan, S; Abdullah, M Z B

    2015-01-01

    Casing wear has recently become one of the areas of research interest in the oil and gas industry especially in extended reach well drilling. The burst strength of a worn out casing is one of the significantly affected mechanical properties and is yet an area where less research is done The most commonly used equations to calculate the resulting burst strength after wear are Barlow, the initial yield burst, the full yield burst and the rupture burst equations. The objective of this study was to estimate casing burst strength after wear through Finite Element Analysis (FEA). It included calculation and comparison of the different theoretical bursts pressures with the simulation results along with effect of different wear shapes on L-80 casing material. The von Misses stress was used in the estimation of the burst pressure. The result obtained shows that the casing burst strength decreases as the wear percentage increases. Moreover, the burst strength value of the casing obtained from the FEA has a higher value compared to the theoretical burst strength values. Casing with crescent shaped wear give the highest burst strength value when simulated under nonlinear analysis. (paper)

  5. The effect of wall thickness distribution on mechanical reliability and strength in unidirectional porous ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuba, Jordi; Deville, Sylvain; Guizard, Christian; Stevenson, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Macroporous ceramics exhibit an intrinsic strength variability caused by the random distribution of defects in their structure. However, the precise role of microstructural features, other than pore volume, on reliability is still unknown. Here, we analyze the applicability of the Weibull analysis to unidirectional macroporous yttria-stabilized-zirconia (YSZ) prepared by ice-templating. First, we performed crush tests on samples with controlled microstructural features with the loading direction parallel to the porosity. The compressive strength data were fitted using two different fitting techniques, ordinary least squares and Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo, to evaluate whether Weibull statistics are an adequate descriptor of the strength distribution. The statistical descriptors indicated that the strength data are well described by the Weibull statistical approach, for both fitting methods used. Furthermore, we assess the effect of different microstructural features (volume, size, densification of the walls, and morphology) on Weibull modulus and strength. We found that the key microstructural parameter controlling reliability is wall thickness. In contrast, pore volume is the main parameter controlling the strength. The highest Weibull modulus (?) and mean strength (198.2 MPa) were obtained for the samples with the smallest and narrowest wall thickness distribution (3.1 ?m) and lower pore volume (54.5%).

  6. Experimental Investigation into Corrosion Effect on Mechanical Properties of High Strength Steel Bars under Dynamic Loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The tensile behaviors of corroded steel bars are important in the capacity evaluation of corroded reinforced concrete structures. The present paper studies the mechanical behavior of the corroded high strength reinforcing steel bars under static and dynamic loading. High strength reinforcing steel bars were corroded by using accelerated corrosion methods and the tensile tests were carried out under different strain rates. The results showed that the mechanical properties of corroded high strength steel bars were strain rate dependent, and the strain rate effect decreased with the increase of corrosion degree. The decreased nominal yield and ultimate strengths were mainly caused by the reduction of cross-sectional areas, and the decreased ultimate deformation and the shortened yield plateau resulted from the intensified stress concentration at the nonuniform reduction. Based on the test results, reduction factors were proposed to relate the tensile behaviors with the corrosion degree and strain rate for corroded bars. A modified Johnson-Cook strength model of corroded high strength steel bars under dynamic loading was proposed by taking into account the influence of corrosion degree. Comparison between the model and test results showed that proposed model properly describes the dynamic response of the corroded high strength rebars.

  7. Effect of silver nano particles on flexural strength of acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodagar, Ahmad; Kassaee, Mohammad Zaman; Akhavan, Azam; Javadi, Negar; Arab, Sepideh; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2012-04-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, is widely used for fabrication of removable orthodontic appliances. Silver nano particles (AgNps) have been added to PMMA because of their antimicrobial properties. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of AgNps on the flexural strength of PMMA. Acrylic liquid containing 0.05% and 0.2% AgNps was prepared for two kinds of acrylic resins: Rapid Repair &Selecta Plus. Two groups without AgNps were used as control groups. For each one, flexural strength was investigated via Three Point Bending method for the 15 acrylic blocks. Two-way ANOVA, one way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis. Rapid Repair without AgNps showed the highest flexural strength. Addition of 0.05% AgNps to Rapid Repair, significantly decreased its flexural strength while, continuing the addition up to 0.2% increased it nearly up to its primary level. In contrast, addition of AgNps to Selecta Plus increased its flexural strength but addition of 0.05% nano particles was more effective than 0.2%. The effect of AgNps on flexural strength of PMMA depends on several factors including the type of acrylics and the concentrations of nano particles. Copyright © 2011 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential Interpolation Effects in Free Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrusic, William M.; Jamieson, Donald G.

    1978-01-01

    Attempts to determine whether a sufficiently demanding and difficult interpolated task (shadowing, i.e., repeating aloud) would decrease recall for earlier-presented items as well as for more recent items. Listening to music was included as a second interpolated task. Results support views that serial position effects reflect a single process.…

  9. Effects of caffeine intake on muscle strength and power: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgic, Jozo; Trexler, Eric T; Lazinica, Bruno; Pedisic, Zeljko

    2018-01-01

    Caffeine is commonly used as an ergogenic aid. Literature about the effects of caffeine ingestion on muscle strength and power is equivocal. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to summarize results from individual studies on the effects of caffeine intake on muscle strength and power. A search through eight databases was performed to find studies on the effects of caffeine on: (i) maximal muscle strength measured using 1 repetition maximum tests; and (ii) muscle power assessed by tests of vertical jump. Meta-analyses of standardized mean differences (SMD) between placebo and caffeine trials from individual studies were conducted using the random effects model. Ten studies on the strength outcome and ten studies on the power outcome met the inclusion criteria for the meta-analyses. Caffeine ingestion improved both strength (SMD = 0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.03, 0.36; p  = 0.023) and power (SMD = 0.17; 95% CI: 0.00, 0.34; p  = 0.047). A subgroup analysis indicated that caffeine significantly improves upper (SMD = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.39; p  = 0.026) but not lower body strength (SMD = 0.15; 95% CI: -0.05, 0.34; p  = 0.147). The meta-analyses showed significant ergogenic effects of caffeine ingestion on maximal muscle strength of upper body and muscle power. Future studies should more rigorously control the effectiveness of blinding. Due to the paucity of evidence, additional findings are needed in the female population and using different forms of caffeine, such as gum and gel.

  10. Simulated weightlessness and synbiotic diet effects on rat bone mechanical strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarper, Hüseyin; Blanton, Cynthia; DePalma, Jude; Melnykov, Igor V.; Gabaldón, Annette M.

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports results on exposure to simulated weightlessness that leads to a rapid decrease in bone mineral density known as spaceflight osteopenia by evaluating the effectiveness of dietary supplementation with synbiotics to counteract the effects of skeletal unloading. Forty adult male rats were studied under four different conditions in a 2 × 2 factorial design with main effects of diet (synbiotic and control) and weight condition (unloaded and control). Hindlimb unloading was performed at all times for 14 days followed by 14 days of recovery (reambulation). The synbiotic diet contained probiotic strains Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactococcus lactis lactis and prebiotic fructooligosaccharide. This paper also reports on the development of a desktop three-point bending device to measure the mechanical strength of bones from rats subjected to simulated weightlessness. The importance of quantifying bone resistance to breakage is critical when examining the effectiveness of interventions against osteopenia resulting from skeletal unloading, such as astronauts experience, disuse or disease. Mechanical strength indices provide information beyond measures of bone density and microarchitecture that enhance the overall assessment of a treatment's potency. In this study we used a newly constructed three-point bending device to measure the mechanical strength of femur and tibia bones from hindlimb-unloaded rats fed an experimental synbiotic diet enriched with probiotics and fermentable fiber. Two calculated outputs for each sample were Young's modulus of elasticity and fracture stress. Bone major elements (calcium, magnesium, and phosphorous) were quantified using ICP-MS analysis. Hindlimb unloading was associated with a significant loss of strength in the femur, and with significant reductions in major bone elements. The synbiotic diet did not protect against these unloading effects. Tibia strength and major elements were not reduced by hindlimb unloading, as was

  11. Enhanced Flexural Strength of Tellurium Nanowires/epoxy Composites with the Reinforcement Effect of Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balguri, Praveen Kumar; Harris Samuel, D. G.; Aditya, D. B.; Vijaya Bhaskar, S.; Thumu, Udayabhaskararao

    2018-02-01

    Investigating the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposite materials has been greatly increased in the last decade. In particular, flexural strength plays a major role in resisting bending and shear loads of a composite material. Here, one dimensional (1D) tellurium nanowires (TeNWs) reinforced epoxy composites have been prepared and the flexural properties of resulted TeNWs/epoxy nanocomposites are studied. The diameter and length of the TeNWs used to make TeNWs/epoxy nanocomposites are 21±2.5 nm and 697±87 nm, respectively. Plain and TeNWs/epoxy nanocomposites are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Furthermore, significant enhancement in the flexural strength of TeNWs/epoxy nanocomposite is observed in comparison to plain epoxy composite, i.e. flexural strength is increased by 65% with the addition of very little amount of TeNWs content (0.05 wt.%) to epoxy polymer. Structural details of plain and TeNWs/epoxy at micrometer scale were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We believe that our results provide a new type of semiconductor nanowires based high strength epoxy polymer nanocomposites.

  12. ZrO2 nanoparticles' effects on split tensile strength of self compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazari

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, split tensile strength of self compacting concrete with different amount of ZrO2 nanoparticles has been investigated. ZrO2 nanoparticles with the average particle size of 15 nm were added partially to cement paste (Portland cement together with polycarboxylate superplasticizer and split tensile strength of the specimens has been measured. The results indicate that ZrO2 nanoparticles are able to improve split tensile strength of concrete and recover the negative effects of polycarboxylate superplasticizer. ZrO2 nanoparticle as a partial replacement of cement up to 4 wt. (% could accelerate C-S-H gel formation as a result of increased crystalline Ca(OH2 amount at the early age of hydration. The increased the ZrO2 nanoparticles' content more than 4 wt. (%, causes the reduced the split tensile strength because of unsuitable dispersion of nanoparticles in the concrete matrix.

  13. Effect of shelf life on compressive strength of type iv gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumastuti, K. S.; Irawan, B.; Damiyanti, M.

    2017-08-01

    Type IV gypsum, as a dental material for an indirect restoration’s working model, should have strength and abrasive-resistant properties. These properties depend on the product’s shelf life and its proper storage, which sometimes are easily missed by sellers. The aim of this research was to observe the effect of shelf life on the compressive strength of type IV gypsum with different production dates. Twenty cylindrical specimens were separated into two groups with different production dates and tested with a universal testing with the crosshead speed of 1 mm per minute and a load of 2,500 kgf. The data were analyzed with independent t-tests. There was a significant difference (p<0.05) in the compressive strength between the two groups with an increase in compressive strength seen in the gypsum that was stored longer.

  14. Combined effects of petrographic and technological parameters on strength of porous coke substance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinel' t, V.M.; Shkoller, M.B.; Stankevich, A.S.; Korchuganova, G.S.

    1983-01-01

    A laboratory study was undertaken to study the combined effects of the basic petrographic characteristics of Kuzbas coal blends and the technological carbonization parameters on the structural strength of the porous coke. Strength tests were carried out on the original coke and the products of partial gasification with carbon dioxide under conditions simulating those inside blast furnaces. Properties of the 14 samples of Kuzbas coals and composition of the four coal blends made from them are listed. It was concluded that the structural strength of coke was most strongly influenced by the average reflectance index and bulk density of the charge. Also, charge compaction can largely offset the adverse influence of petrographic heterogeneity on the strength of the coke. 10 references, 3 tables.

  15. Effect of water curing duration on strength behaviour of portland composite cement (PCC) mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronge, M. A.; Tjaronge, M. W.; Hamada, H.; Irmawaty, R.

    2017-11-01

    Cement manufacturing of Indonesia has been introduced Portland Composite Cement (PCC) to minimize the rising production cost of cement which contains 80% clinker and 20% mineral admixture. A proper curing is very important when the cement contains mineral admixture materials. This paper reports the results of an experimental study conducted to evaluate the effect of water curing duration on strength behaviour of PCC mortar. Mortar specimens with water to cement ratio of (W/C) 0.5 were casted. Compressive strength, flexural strength and concrete resistance were tested at 7, 28 and 91 days cured water. The results indicated that water curing duration is essential to continue the pozzolanic reaction in mortar which contributes to the development of strength of mortar made with PCC.

  16. Effect of hot-humid exposure on static strength of adhesive-bonded aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hot-humid exposure (i.e., 40 °C and 98% R.H. on the quasi-static strength of the adhesive-bonded aluminum alloys was studied. Test results show that the hot-humid exposure leads to the significant decrease in the joint strength and the change of the failure mode from a mixed cohesive and adhesive failure with cohesive failure being dominant to adhesive failure being dominant. Careful analyses of the results reveal that the physical bond is likely responsible for the bond adhesion between L adhesive and aluminum substrates. The reduction in joint strength and the change of the failure mode resulted from the degradation in bond adhesion, which was primarily attributed to the corrosion of aluminum substrate. In addition, the elevated temperature exposure significantly accelerated the corrosion reaction of aluminum, which accelerated the degradation in joint strength.

  17. [Effects of surface treatment and adhesive application on shear bond strength between zirconia and enamel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinghui; Wu, Buling; Sun, Fengyang

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different orthodontic adhesives on shear bond strength between zirconia and enamel. Zirconia ceramic samples were designed and manufactured for 40 extracted human maxillary first premolars with CAD/CAM system. The samples were randomized into 4 groups for surface treatment with sandblasting and non-treated with adhesives of 3M Transbond XT or Jingjin dental enamel bonding resin. After 24 h of bonded fixation, the shear bond strengths were measured by universal mechanical testing machine and analyzed with factorial variance analysis. The shear bond strength was significantly higher in sandblasting group than in untreated group (Padhesives of Transbond XT and dental enamel bonding resin (P>0.05). The shear bond strength between zirconia and enamel is sufficient after sandblasting regardless of the application of either adhesive.

  18. Effect of Differential Item Functioning on Test Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabasakal, Kübra Atalay; Kelecioglu, Hülya

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effect of differential item functioning (DIF) items on test equating through multilevel item response models (MIRMs) and traditional IRMs. The performances of three different equating models were investigated under 24 different simulation conditions, and the variables whose effects were examined included sample size, test…

  19. The Effect of Weight-Bearing Exercise on the Strength of Femur Bone in Ovariectomized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GH Sharifi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Fractures due to osteoporosis after menopause in women is widespread. Osteoporosis may occur in case of inadequate lack of physical activity .The aim of this study was to determine the effect of running training on femur bone strength in ovariectomized rats. Materials & Methods Forty matured Sprague Dawley rats were chosen for this study. A group of 10 were killed randomly to measure their initial femur strength. The remaining rats had ovarian surgery. After three months, in order to reach menopause period, they were randomly divided into 3 groups, including pre test, running training and control groups. The running training program was carried out for one hour a day, five days a week, for eight weeks. Femur bone strength was measured by HOUNSFIELD system. Data was analyzed by using one-way analysis of variance and dependent T- tests by the SPSS software. Results: Results of this study showed that ovariectomy leads to significant decrease of femur bone strength. On the other hand the eight weeks running training lead to significant increase of femur bone strength. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that life style is important factors in preventing of osteoporosis and running training program had an inhibitory or reversal effect on decrease of menopause-induced femur bone strength.

  20. EFFECTS OF WHOLE BODY VIBRATION ON STRENGTH AND JUMPING PERFORMANCE IN VOLLEYBALL AND BEACH VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmijewski, P.; Jimenez-Olmedo, J.M.; Jové-Tossi, M.A.; Martínez-Carbonell, A.; Suárez-Llorca, C.; Andreu-Cabrera, E.

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine the effects of 6-week strength training with whole body vibration (WBV) on leg strength and jumping performance in volleyball and beach volleyball players. Twenty-three sub-elite male volleyball (VB; n=12) and beach volleyball players (BVB; n=11) aged 21.2±3.0 years were divided into two groups and subjected to 6 weeks of strength training (three one-hour sessions per week): (I) 12 players (6 VB and 6 BVB players) underwent training with WBV (30-40 Hz, 1.7-2.5 mm, 3.0-5.7 g), and (II) 11 players (6 VB and 5 BVB players) underwent traditional strength training. Squat jump (SJ) and countermovement squat jump (CMJ) measurements by the Ergo Tester contact platform and maximum leg press test (1RM) were conducted. Three-factor (2 time x 2 WBV use x 2 discipline) analysis of variance for SJ, CMJ and 1RM revealed a significant time main effect (pvolleyball and beach volleyball players increases leg strength more and leads to greater improvement in jump performance than traditional strength training, but greater improvements can be expected in beach volleyball players than in volleyball players. PMID:25187676

  1. Effect of Curing Direction on Microtensile Bond Strength of Fifth and Sixth Generation Dental Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nadaf

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Composite restorative materials and dental adhesives are usually cured with light sources. The light direction may influence the bond strength of dental adhesives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light direction on the microtensile bond strength of fifth and sixth generation dental adhesives.Materials and Methods: Prime & Bond NT and Clearfil SE bond were used with different light directions.Sixty human incisor teeth were divided into 4 groups (n=15. In groups A and C, Clearfil SE bond with light curing direction from buccal was used for bonding a composite resin to dentin. In groups B and D, Prime & Bond NT with light curing direction from composite was used. After thermocycling the specimens were subjected to tensile force until debonding occurred and values for microtensile bond strength were recorded. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test.Results: The findings showed that the bond strength of Clearfil SE bond was significantly higher than that of Prime&Bond NT (P<0.001. There was no significant difference between light curing directions (P=0.132.Conclusion: Light curing direction did not have significant effect on the bond strength. Sixth generation adhesives was more successful than fifth generation in terms of bond strength to dentin.

  2. Effect of pilates method on inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Mendes Tozim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available With aging, the respiratory muscle strength decreases and the pilates method is a technique that uses respiration as one of its principles. The present study has the aim of analyzing the influence of the pilates method on respiratory muscle strength in older women. For the evaluation of respiratory muscle strength (inspiratory and expiratory, manovacuometer was used. Thirty-one older women were divided into two groups: 14 participated in the pilates group and 17 in the control group. Participants of the pilates group performed 16 sessions of pilates method with an hour of training, twice week for eight weeks. The control group participated in four educational lectures for eight weeks. For statistical analysis, Shapiro-Wilk, ANOVA for repeated measures (p <0.05 and Cohen’s D index were performed. The results showed significant difference and the mean effect for the Cohen’s D index expiratory muscle strength of the pilates group when comparing before (69.71 ± 25.48 and after (85.23 ± 22.21 training (p<0.05 with an increase of 23%. The results of inspiratory muscle strength were not significant but presented an average effect for the Cohen’s D index for the pilates group before (69.71 ± 35.46 and after (88.00 ± 34.87 training, with an increase of 27%. The control group did not present significant differences for the variables evaluated. It could be concluded that the pilates method is effective in improving expiratory muscle strength and provides positive effects on the increase in inspiratory muscle strength.

  3. Effects of yoga, strength training and advice on back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brämberg, Elisabeth Björk; Bergström, Gunnar; Jensen, Irene; Hagberg, Jan; Kwak, Lydia

    2017-03-29

    Among the working population, non-specific low-back pain and neck pain are one of the most common reasons for sickness absenteeism. The aim was to evaluate the effects of an early intervention of yoga - compared with strength training or evidence-based advice - on sickness absenteeism, sickness presenteeism, back and neck pain and disability among a working population. A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 159 participants with predominantly (90%) chronic back and neck pain. After screening, the participants were randomized to kundalini yoga, strength training or evidence-based advice. Primary outcome was sickness absenteeism. Secondary outcomes were sickness presenteeism, back and neck pain and disability. Self-reported questionnaires and SMS text messages were completed at baseline, 6 weeks, 6 and 12 months. The results did not indicate that kundalini yoga and strength training had any statistically significant effects on the primary outcome compared with evidence-based advice. An interaction effect was found between adherence to recommendations and sickness absenteeism, indicating larger significant effects among the adherers to kundalini yoga versus evidence-based advice: RR = 0.47 (CI 0.30; 0.74, p = 0.001), strength training versus evidence-based advice: RR = 0.60 (CI 0.38; 0.96, p = 0.032). Some significant differences were also found for the secondary outcomes to the advantage of kundalini yoga and strength training. Guided exercise in the forms of kundalini yoga or strength training does not reduce sickness absenteeism more than evidence-based advice alone. However, secondary analyses reveal that among those who pursue kundalini yoga or strength training at least two times a week, a significantly reduction in sickness absenteeism was found. Methods to increase adherence to treatment recommendations should be further developed and applied in exercise interventions. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01653782, date of registration: June, 28

  4. Effect of low transverse magnetic field on the confinement strength in a quasi-1D wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Thomas, K. J.; Smith, L. W.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Jones, G. A. C.; Griffiths, J.; Pepper, M.

    2013-01-01

    Transport measurements in a quasi-one dimensional (1D) quantum wire are reported in the presence of low transverse magnetic field. Differential conductance shows weak quantised plateaus when the 2D electrons are squeezed electrostatically. Application of a small transverse magnetic field (0.2T) enhances the overall degree of quantisation due to the formation of magneto-electric subbands. The results show the role of magnetic field to fine tune the confinement strength in low density wires when interaction gives rise to double row formation

  5. From Mind to Body: Is Mental Practice Effective on Strength Gains? A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manochio, João Paulo; Lattari, Eduardo; Portugal, Eduardo Matta Mello; Monteiro-Junior, Renato Sobral; Paes, Flávia; Budde, Henning; de Tarso Veras Farinatti, Paulo; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Wegner, Mirko; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Mura, Gioia; Ferreira Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; Almada, Leonardo Ferreira; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Mental practice is an internal reproduction of a motor act (whose intention is to promote learning and improving motor skills). Some studies have shown that other cognitive strategies also increase the strength and muscular resistance in healthy people by the enhancement of the performance during dynamic tasks. Mental training sessions may be primordial to improving muscle strength in different subjects. The aim of this study was to systematically review and meta-analiyze studies that assessed whether mental practice is effective in improving muscular strength. We conducted an electronic-computed search in Pub-Med/Medline and ISI Web of Knowledge, Scielo and manual searchs, searching papers written in English between 1991 and 2014. There were 44 studies in Pub-Med/Medline, 631 in ISI Web of Knowledge, 11 in Scielo and 3 in manual searchs databases. After exclusion of studies for duplicate, unrelated to the topic by title and summary, different samples and methodologies, a meta-analysis of 4 studies was carried out to identify the dose-response relationship. We did not find evidence that mental practice is effective in increasing strength in healthy individuals. There is no evidence that mental practice alone can be effective to induce strength gains or to optimize the training effects.

  6. Investigating Strength and Frequency Effects in Recognition Memory Using Type-2 Signal Detection Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Philip A.; Perfect, Timothy J.; Bruno, Davide

    2009-01-01

    Criterion- versus distribution-shift accounts of frequency and strength effects in recognition memory were investigated with Type-2 signal detection receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, which provides a measure of metacognitive monitoring. Experiment 1 demonstrated a frequency-based mirror effect, with a higher hit rate and lower…

  7. A STUDY OF TRANSVERSE AND LONGITUDINAL SIZE EFFECTS IN HIGH-STRENGTH POLYETHYLENE FIBERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PENNING, JP; DEVRIES, AA; PENNINGS, AJ; HOOGSTRATEN, HW

    The results of an experimental study of the effects of fibre diameter and testing length on the strength of polyethylene fibres prepared by the gel-spinning-hot-drawing process are reported. These size effects have been studied in fibres covering a range of mechanical properties in order to

  8. The Evaluation of Strength Training and Body Plyometric Effects on the Male Basketball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Metin

    2016-01-01

    This research evaluated the effects of resistance training with upper body plyometric effects on the performance of male basketball players. Sixteen males in the physical education and sport science faculty of Ataturk University were randomly determined into two groups. The experimental group performed a combined strength and plyometric training…

  9. Neck/shoulder function in tension-type headache patients and the effect of strength training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bjarne K; Søgaard, Karen; Andersen, Lars L.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Muscle pain has been associated with reduced maximal muscle strength, and reduced rate of force development (RFD). Strength training (ST) has shown an effect in not only normalizing muscle function but also reducing neck muscle pain. Aim: The aims of this study were to compare muscle...... function in terms of strength, force steadiness in neck flexion, as well as extension, and rate of RFD of the shoulder in tension-type headache (TTH) patients and healthy controls and to examine the correlation to tenderness. Furthermore, the aim of the study was to examine the effect of ST on neck...... steadiness (ST: p=0.011 and EP: pfunction, indicated by a lower force steadiness and RFD, compared to the healthy controls. The effect of ST was not larger than EP as both groups of TTH patients showed some improvement in neck and shoulder...

  10. Effects of strength training on endurance capacity in top-level endurance athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Jesper L

    2010-01-01

    The effect of concurrent strength (S) and endurance (E) training on adaptive changes in aerobic capacity, endurance performance, maximal muscle strength and muscle morphology is equivocal. Some data suggest an attenuated cardiovascular and musculoskeletal response to combined E and S training......, while other data show unimpaired or even superior adaptation compared with either training regime alone. However, the effect of concurrent S and E training only rarely has been examined in top-level endurance athletes. This review describes the effect of concurrent SE training on short-term and long......-term endurance performance in endurance-trained subjects, ranging from moderately trained individuals to elite top-level athletes. It is concluded that strength training can lead to enhanced long-term (>30 min) and short-term (...

  11. Effect of resveratrol on proliferation and differentiation of embryonic cardiomyoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, C.-W.; Wong, C.H.; Lao, S.-C.; Leong, Emilia Conceicao; Lao, Iok Fong; Law, Patrick Tik Wan; Fung, Kwok Pui; Tsang, Kam Sze; Waye, Mary Miu-Yee; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing; Wang Yitao; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen

    2007-01-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic compound found largely in the skins of red grapes, has been used as a nutritional supplement or an investigational new drug for prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Previous reports showed that resveratrol had a protective effect against oxidative agent-induced cell injury. Our studies indicate that resveratrol plays a role in the differentiation of cardiomyoblasts. The cardiomyoblast cell line, H9c2, was exposed to 30-120 μM resveratrol for up to 5 days. Resveratrol inhibits cardiomyoblast proliferation without causing cells injury. Moreover, resveratrol treatment modulated the differentiation of morphological characteristics including elongation and cell fusion in cardiomyoblasts. Proliferation and differentiation of H9c2 cells were further revealed by measurement of the mRNA expression of a cell cycle marker (CDK2), a differentiation marker (myogenin), and a contractile apparatus protein (MLC-2). Gene expression analysis revealed that resveratrol promoted entry into cell cycle arrest but extended the myogenic differentiation progress. These results have implications for the role of resveratrol in modulating cell cycle control and differentiation in cardiomyoblasts

  12. A Systematic Review of the Effect of Cognitive Strategies on Strength Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tod, David; Edwards, Christian; McGuigan, Mike; Lovell, Geoff

    2015-11-01

    Researchers have tested the beliefs of sportspeople and sports medicine specialists that cognitive strategies influence strength performance. Few investigators have synthesised the literature. The specific objectives were to review evidence regarding (a) the cognitive strategy-strength performance relationship; (b) participant skill level as a moderator; and (c) cognitive, motivational, biomechanical/physiological, and emotional mediators. Studies were sourced via electronic databases, reference lists of retrieved articles, and manual searches of relevant journals. Studies had to be randomised or counterbalanced experiments with a control group or condition, repeated measures, and a quality control score above 0.5 (out of 1). Cognitive strategies included goal setting, imagery, self-talk, preparatory arousal, and free choice. Dependent variables included maximal strength, local muscular endurance, or muscular power. Globally, cognitive strategies were reliability associated with increased strength performance (results ranged from 61 to 65 %). Results were mixed when examining the effects of specific strategies on particular dependent variables, although no intervention had an overall negative influence. Indeterminate relationships emerged regarding hypothesised mediators (except cognitive variables) and participant skill level as a moderator. Although cognitive strategies influence strength performance, there are knowledge gaps regarding specific types of strength, especially muscular power. Cognitive variables, such as concentration, show promise as possible mediators.

  13. THE EFFECT OF THE STATIC RELATIVE STRENGTH ON THE MAXIMUM RELATIVE RECEIVING OF OXYGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Elezi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on research on the sample of 263 students of age- 18 years, and used batteries of 9 tests for evaluation of the static relative strength and the criterion variable- maximum relative receiving of oxygen (VO2 ml / kg / min based on the Astrand test ,and on regression analysis to determine the influence of the static relative strength on the criterion variable maximum relative oxygen receiving, can be generally concluded that from 9 predictor variables statistically significant partial effect have 2variables. In hierarchical order, they are: the variable of static relative leg strength - endurance of the fingers (the angle of the lower leg and thigh 900 (SRL2 which arithmetic mean is 25.04 seconds and variable ctatic relative strength of arms and shoulders – push-up endurance in the balance beam (angle of the forearm and upper arm 900 ( SRA2 with arithmetic mean of 17.75 seconds. From the statistically influential significant predictor variables on the criterion variable one is from the static relative leg strength (SRL2 and the other is from the static relative strength of arm and shoulder area (SRA2. With the analysis of these relations we can conclude that the isometric contractions of the four headed thigh muscle and the isometric contractions of the three headed upper arm muscle are predominantly responsible for the successful execution of doing actions on a bicycle ergometer and not on the maximum relative receiving of oxygen.

  14. Effect of friction stir lap welding conditions on joint strength of aluminium alloy 6060

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazdanian, S; Chen, Z W

    2009-01-01

    Strength of lap joints made by friction stir welding (FSW) depends strongly on how material flows forming the weld nugget zone during FSW and also on how the joint is loaded during testing. Understanding of this processing-property relationship is currently inadequate. In this study, the effects of pin length, welding speed and rotation rate on weld strength using aluminium alloy 6060 were investigated. It has been found that the pin length needed to be slightly greater than the thickness of the sheet for an adequate joint to be established. However, further increase in pin length did not benefit the joint strength. The major factor affecting joint strength has been found to be the rotation speed. An increase in rotation speed resulted in lowering the joint strength. Various modes of fracture have been observed and these modes relate to the degree of hooking and softening. Explanation of how the speed values relate to heat input and material flow and then to the joint strength is given.

  15. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons: effect of water and saliva contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Gandini, Paola; Scribante, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a) dry, (b) water contamination, and (c) saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive failure rate were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (strength values) and Chi squared test (ARI Scores). Noncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bond strengths for both brackets and buttons. Under water and saliva contamination orthodontic brackets groups showed significantly lower shear strengths than disinclusion buttons groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups under the various enamel surface conditions. Water and saliva contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure lowers bond strength values, more with orthodontic brackets than with disinclusion buttons.

  16. Effect of Enamel and Dentin Surface Treatment on the Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Bond Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushashe, Amanda Mahmmad; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Moro, Alexandre; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of enamel and dentin surface treatment on the micro-shear bond strength of self-adhesive cement. Seventy-two extracted third molars had their crowns embedded in acrylic resin and worn to obtain a flat enamel or dentin surface. The enamel and dentin specimens were randomly assigned to 8 groups (n=12) that were based on surface treatment (11.5% polyacrylic acid solution or no treatment), substrate condition (wet or dry) and storage period (1 day or 90 days), and treated accordingly. Cylinders (1 × 1 mm) were fabricated using self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200) following the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for either 1 day or 90 days and subjected to micro-shear bond strength test (EMIC DL 2000 at 0.5 mm/min). After this, the failure type of the specimens was determined. Data were subjected to statistical analysis (a=0.05). According to the results, the 11.5% polyacrylic acid application decreased the bond strength in both enamel and dentin samples. The moist groups showed higher bond strength than the dry ones, regardless of the substrate and surface treatment. Storage period did not influence bond strength. In conclusion, surface treatment with 11.5% polyacrylic acid and absence of moisture decreased the bond strength of the resin-cement (RelyU200), regardless of the storage period.

  17. Effect of interaction strength on robustness of controlling edge dynamics in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shao-Peng; Hao, Fei

    2018-05-01

    Robustness plays a critical role in the controllability of complex networks to withstand failures and perturbations. Recent advances in the edge controllability show that the interaction strength among edges plays a more important role than network structure. Therefore, we focus on the effect of interaction strength on the robustness of edge controllability. Using three categories of all edges to quantify the robustness, we develop a universal framework to evaluate and analyze the robustness in complex networks with arbitrary structures and interaction strengths. Applying our framework to a large number of model and real-world networks, we find that the interaction strength is a dominant factor for the robustness in undirected networks. Meanwhile, the strongest robustness and the optimal edge controllability in undirected networks can be achieved simultaneously. Different from the case of undirected networks, the robustness in directed networks is determined jointly by the interaction strength and the network's degree distribution. Moreover, a stronger robustness is usually associated with a larger number of driver nodes required to maintain full control in directed networks. This prompts us to provide an optimization method by adjusting the interaction strength to optimize the robustness of edge controllability.

  18. Effects of Growth Hormone Administration on Muscle Strength in Men over 50 Years Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. W. Tavares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH use has been speculated to improve physical capacity in subjects without GH deficiency (GHD through stimulation of collagen synthesis in the tendon and skeletal muscle, which leads to better exercise training and increased muscle strength. In this context, the use of GH in healthy elderly should be an option for increasing muscle strength. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of GH therapy on muscle strength in healthy men over 50 years old. Fourteen healthy men aged 50–70 years were evaluated at baseline for body composition and muscle strength (evaluated by leg press and bench press exercises, which focus primarily on quadriceps—lower body part and pectoralis major—upper body part—muscles, resp.. Subjects were randomised into 2 groups: GH therapy (7 subjects and placebo (7 subjects and reevaluated after 6 months of therapy. Thirteen subjects completed the study (6 subjects in the placebo group and 7 subjects in the GH group. Subjects of both groups were not different at baseline. After 6 months of therapy, muscle strength in the bench press responsive muscles did not increase in both groups and showed a statistically significant increase in the leg press responsive muscles in the GH group. Our study demonstrated an increase in muscle strength in the lower body part after GH therapy in healthy men. This finding must be considered and tested in frail older populations, whose physical incapacity is primarily caused by proximal muscle weakness. The trial was registered with NCT01853566.

  19. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and Disinclusion Buttons: Effect of Water and Saliva Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Gandini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a) dry, (b) water contamination, and (c) saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive failure rate were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (strength values) and Chi squared test (ARI Scores). Results. Noncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bond strengths for both brackets and buttons. Under water and saliva contamination orthodontic brackets groups showed significantly lower shear strengths than disinclusion buttons groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups under the various enamel surface conditions. Conclusions. Water and saliva contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure lowers bond strength values, more with orthodontic brackets than with disinclusion buttons. PMID:23762825

  20. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and Disinclusion Buttons: Effect of Water and Saliva Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francesca Sfondrini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a dry, (b water contamination, and (c saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive failure rate were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (strength values and Chi squared test (ARI Scores. Results. Noncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bond strengths for both brackets and buttons. Under water and saliva contamination orthodontic brackets groups showed significantly lower shear strengths than disinclusion buttons groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups under the various enamel surface conditions. Conclusions. Water and saliva contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure lowers bond strength values, more with orthodontic brackets than with disinclusion buttons.

  1. [The effect of 24 weeks of moderate-to-high intensity strength training on the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solà Serrabou, Marta; López del Amo, José Luis; Valero, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Strength programs have been seen to be useful in minimizing the effects of sarcopenia, although intervention protocols may vary in their content and characteristics. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the influence of a particular strength protocol for the elderly. A total of 35 individuals took part in the study, with 18 in the exercise group (4 men and 14 women), and 17 in the control group (4 men and 13 women). The average age was 73. The exercise group carried out a strength training program at moderate to high intensity over 24 weeks. Strength was evaluated using the chair stand test, 2-minute step and 2 vertical jumps-squat jump (SJ), and countermovement jump (CMJ). Falls in both groups were also compared before and after the intervention, as well as their relationship with the chair stand variable. A tendency towards improvement was observed in all tests, with the exception of CMJ; while the control group showed a tendency in the opposite direction. Contrast between the two groups at the end of the intervention was notable in all the tests. An inverse relationship between the chair stand strength variable and the number of falls was evident. According to the results achieved, the training was perceived to exercise a positive influence on both the strength of the elderly people and a reduction of the number of falls. The gap between the two groups widened towards the end of the intervention. Copyright © 2013 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of weightlifting vs. kettlebell training on vertical jump, strength, and body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, William H; Coburn, Jared W; Brown, Lee E; Spiering, Barry A

    2012-05-01

    Effects of weightlifting vs. kettlebell training on vertical jump, strength, and body composition. J Strength Cond Res 26(5): 1199-1202, 2012-The present study compared the effects of 6 weeks of weightlifting plus traditional heavy resistance training exercises vs. kettlebell training on strength, power, and anthropometric measures. Thirty healthy men were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: (a) weightlifting (n = 13; mean ± SD: age, 22.92 ± 1.98 years; body mass, 80.57 ± 12.99 kg; height, 174.56 ± 5.80 cm) or (b) kettlebell (n = 17; mean ± SD: age, 22.76 ± 1.86 years; body mass, 78.99 ± 10.68 kg; height, 176.79 ± 5.08 cm) and trained 2 times a week for 6 weeks. A linear periodization model was used for training; at weeks 1-3 volume was 3 × 6 (kettlebell swings or high pull), 4 × 4 (accelerated swings or power clean), and 4 × 6 (goblet squats or back squats), respectively, and the volume increased during weeks 4-6 to 4 × 6, 6 × 4, and 4 × 6, respectively. Participants were assessed for height (in centimeters), body mass (in kilograms), and body composition (skinfolds). Strength was assessed by the back squat 1 repetition maximum (1RM), whereas power was assessed by the vertical jump and power clean 1RM. The results of this study indicated that short-term weightlifting and kettlebell training were effective in increasing strength and power. However, the gain in strength using weightlifting movements was greater than that during kettlebell training. Neither method of training led to significant changes in any of the anthropometric measures. In conclusion, 6 weeks of weightlifting induced significantly greater improvements in strength compared with kettlebell training. No between-group differences existed for the vertical jump or body composition.

  3. Size effects in olivine control strength in low-temperature plasticity regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, K. M.; Thom, C.; Wallis, D.; Hansen, L. N.; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Goldsby, D. L.; Warren, J. M.; Wilkinson, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    The strength of the lithospheric mantle during deformation by low-temperature plasticity controls a range of geological phenomena, including lithospheric-scale strain localization, the evolution of friction on deep seismogenic faults, and the flexure of tectonic plates. However, constraints on the strength of olivine in this deformation regime are difficult to obtain from conventional rock-deformation experiments, and previous results vary considerably. We demonstrate via nanoindentation that the strength of olivine in the low-temperature plasticity regime is dependent on the length-scale of the test, with experiments on smaller volumes of material exhibiting larger yield stresses. This "size effect" has previously been explained in engineering materials as a result of the role of strain gradients and associated geometrically necessary dislocations in modifying plastic behavior. The Hall-Petch effect, in which a material with a small grain size exhibits a higher strength than one with a large grain size, is thought to arise from the same mechanism. The presence of a size effect resolves discrepancies among previous experimental measurements of olivine, which were either conducted using indentation methods or were conducted on polycrystalline samples with small grain sizes. An analysis of different low-temperature plasticity flow laws extrapolated to room temperature reveals a power-law relationship between length-scale (grain size for polycrystalline deformation and contact radius for indentation tests) and yield strength. This suggests that data from samples with large inherent length scales best represent the plastic strength of the coarse-grained lithospheric mantle. Additionally, the plastic deformation of nanometer- to micrometer-sized asperities on fault surfaces may control the evolution of fault roughness due to their size-dependent strength.

  4. The effects of sterilization on the tensile strength of orthodontic wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staggers, J A; Margeson, D

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sterilization on the tensile strength of 0.016" beta-titanium, nickel titanium and stainless steel wires. Three common methods of sterilization--autoclaving, dry heat and ethylene oxide--were evaluated in three test trials involving zero, one and five sterilization cycles. For each of the test trials, five pieces each of 0.016" TMA, 0.016" Sentalloy and 0.016" Tru-chrome stainless steel wires were sterilized using a standard autoclave. Five other pieces of each of the same wires were sterilized in a dryclave, while an additional five pieces of each of the three wire types were sterilized using ethylene oxide. The ultimate tensile strengths of the wires were then determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The data were compared for statistical differences using analysis of variance. The results showed that dry heat sterilization significantly increased the tensile strength of TMA wires after one cycle, but not after five cycles. Autoclaving and ethylene oxide sterilization did not significantly alter the tensile strength of TMA wires. Dry heat and autoclave sterilization also significantly increased the tensile strength of Sentalloy wires, but the mean strength after five sterilization cycles was not significantly different than after one cycle. Ethylene oxide sterilization of Sentalloy wires did not significantly alter the tensile strengths of that wire. There were no significant differences in the tensile strengths of the stainless steel wires following zero, one or five cycles for any of the sterilization methods.

  5. Effectiveness of acute in-hospital physiotherapy with knee-extension strength training in reducing strength deficits in patients with a hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Lise; Bandholm, Thomas; Palm, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    QUESTION: Is acute in-hospital physiotherapy with additional progressive knee-extension strength training (ST) of the fractured limb more effective in reducing knee-extension strength deficit at follow-up compared to physiotherapy without strength training in patients with a hip fracture? DESIGN......: Assessor blinded, randomised controlled trial with intention-to-treat analysis. PARTICIPANTS: 90 patients with a hip fracture admitted to an acute orthopaedic Hip Fracture Unit at a university hospital between October 2013 and May 2015. INTERVENTION: Daily physiotherapy with or without progressive knee...... strength training from baseline to follow-up. In the per-protocol analysis of non-missing data, significant between-group improvements by 10.5% (95% CI 0.3; 20.7) were found in favour of additional ST. No significant between-group differences were found in any secondary outcome. CONCLUSION: Physiotherapy...

  6. EFFECTS OF CREATINE, GINSENG, AND ASTRAGALUS SUPPLEMENTATION ON STRENGTH, BODY COMPOSITION, MOOD, AND BLOOD LIPIDS DURING STRENGTH-TRAINING IN OLDER ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Rogers

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of supplemental dietary creatine and a botanical extract consisting of ginseng and astragalus were evaluated in 44 adults aged 55-84 years participating in a 12-week strength-training program. Participants consumed creatine only (Cr, creatine plus botanical extract (CrBE, or placebo (PL, and performed bench press, lat pull down, biceps curl, leg press, knee extension, and knee flexion for 3 sets of 8-12 reps on 3 days per week for 12 weeks. The 1-repetition maximum for each exercise, body composition (full-body DEXA, blood lipids, and mood states were evaluated before and after the intervention. Training improved (p < 0.05 strength and lean mass for all groups, however greater gains were observed with Cr and CrBE compared with placebo (but no difference was found between Cr and CrBE. Only CrBE improved blood lipids and self-reported vigor, and the CrBE group lost significantly more body fat and gained more bench press strength than Cr. These results indicate that strength and lean mass gains achieved by older adults participating in a strength training program can be enhanced with creatine supplementation, and that ginseng and astragalus may provide additional health and psychological benefits. However, these herbs do not appear to have an additive effect on strength and lean mass gains during training

  7. Effects of strength training on blood lipoprotein concentrations in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleiton Silva Correa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Strength training is often identified as a contributing factor in prevention of diseases and as a non-pharmacological treatment for metabolic disorders and for control of body mass. Its protective effects and utility for management of disease are amplified in people at risk of diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemias, and cardiovascular diseases (CVD. Recently the benefits of strength training have been used to reduce the risk of these diseases emerging in postmenopausal women, who are at greater risk of CVD than men of the same age. Notwithstanding, little is known about the effects of strength training on metabolism of blood lipoproteins. The objective of this review was to compare the results of articles that have investigated the effects on lipoprotein concentrations of strength training in postmenopausal women. Current articles dealing with the subject, with publication dates from 1979 to 2012 and large numbers of citations by well-known researchers were identified on the Pubmed, Scopus and EBSCO databases. It was concluded that strength training possibly has an action that affects lipoprotein metabolism and concentrations in postmenopausal women.

  8. Estimation of RC slab-column joints effective strength using neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shah

    Full Text Available The nominal strength of slab-column joints made of highstrength concrete (HSC columns and normal strength concrete (NSC slabs is of great importance in structural design and construction of concrete buildings. This topic has been intensively studied during the last decades. Different types of column-slab joints have been investigated experimentally providing a basis for developing design provisions. However, available data does not cover all classes of concretes, reinforcements, and possible loading cases for the proper calculation of joint stresses necessary for design purposes. New numerical methods based on modern software seem to be effective and may allow reliable prediction of column-slab joint strength. The current research is focused on analysis of available experimental data on different slab-to-column joints with the aim of predicting the nominal strength of slabcolumn joint. Neural networks technique is proposed herein using MATLAB routines developed to analyze available experimental data. The obtained results allow prediction of the effective strength of column-slab joints with accuracy and good correlation coefficients when compared to regression based models. The proposed method enables the user to predict the effective design of column-slab joints without the need for conservative safety coefficients generally promoted and used by most construction codes.

  9. Effect of fluoride mouthwash on tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, D. I.; Anggani, H. S.; Ismah, N.

    2017-08-01

    Patients with orthodontic treatment are commonly recommended to use a fluoride mouthwash for maintaining their oral hygiene and preventing dental caries. However, fluoride may affect the characteristics of stainless steel orthodontic archwires used during treatment. The effect of fluoride mouthwash on the tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires is still unknown. The purpose of this study is to know the effect of fluoride mouthwash on the tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires. Examine the tensile strength of 0.016 inch stainless steel orthodontic archwires after immersion in 0.05%, 100 ml fluoride mouthwash for 30, 60, and 90 min. There is no statistically significant difference in the tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires after immersed in fluoride mouthwash. The p-values on immersion fluoride mouthwash for 30, 60, and 90 min consecutively are 0.790; 0.742; and 0.085 (p > 0.05). The use of fluoride mouthwash did not have an effect on the tensile strength of stainless Steel orthodontic archwires.

  10. Effects of walking and strength training on walking capacity in individuals with claudication: meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra de Souza Miranda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Over the past few years, several clinical trials have been performed to analyze the effects of exercise training on walking ability in patients with intermittent claudication (IC. However, it remains unclear which type of physical exercise provides the maximum benefits in terms of walking ability. OBJECTIVE: To analyze, by means of a meta-analysis, the effects of walking and strength training on the walking capacity in patients with IC. METHODS: Papers analyzing the effects of walking and strength training programs in patients with IC were browsed on the Medline, Lilacs, and Cochrane databases. Randomized clinical trials scoring >4 on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro scale and assessing claudication distance (CD and total walking distance (TWD were included in the review. RESULTS: Walking and strength training yielded increases in CD and TWD (P < 0.05. However, walking training yielded greater increases than strength training (P = 0.02. CONCLUSION: Walking and strength training improve walking capacity in patients with IC. However, greater improvements in TWD are obtained with walking training.

  11. The Effect of Antidepressants on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Jeffrey S; Bermeo, Sandra; Skarratt, Kristen K; Fuller, Stephen J; Duque, Gustavo

    2018-02-01

    Use of antidepressant medications has been linked to detrimental impacts on bone mineral density and osteoporosis; however, the cellular basis behind these observations remains poorly understood. The effect does not appear to be homogeneous across the whole class of drugs and may be linked to affinity for the serotonin transporter system. In this study, we hypothesized that antidepressants have a class- and dose-dependent effect on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation, which may affect bone metabolism. Human MSCs (hMSCs) were committed to differentiate when either adipogenic or osteogenic media was added, supplemented with five increasing concentrations of amitriptyline (0.001-10 µM), venlafaxine (0.01-25 µM), or fluoxetine (0.001-10 µM). Alizarin red staining (mineralization), alkaline phosphatase (osteoblastogenesis), and oil red O (adipogenesis) assays were performed at timed intervals. In addition, cell viability was assessed using a MTT. We found that fluoxetine had a significant inhibitory effect on mineralization. Furthermore, adipogenic differentiation of hMSC was affected by the addition of amitriptyline, venlafaxine, and fluoxetine to the media. Finally, none of the tested medications significantly affected cell survival. This study showed a divergent effect of three antidepressants on hMSC differentiation, which appears to be independent of class and dose. As fluoxetine and amitriptyline, but not venlafaxine, affected both osteoblastogenesis and adipogenesis, this inhibitory effect could be associated to the high affinity of fluoxetine to the serotonin transporter system.

  12. Effects of a Modified German Volume Training Program on Muscular Hypertrophy and Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirthalingam, Theban; Mavros, Yorgi; Wilson, Guy C; Clarke, Jillian L; Mitchell, Lachlan; Hackett, Daniel A

    2017-11-01

    Amirthalingam, T, Mavros, Y, Wilson, GC, Clarke, JL, Mitchell, L, and Hackett, DA. Effects of a modified German volume training program on muscular hypertrophy and strength. J Strength Cond Res 31(11): 3109-3119, 2017-German Volume Training (GVT), or the 10 sets method, has been used for decades by weightlifters to increase muscle mass. To date, no study has directly examined the training adaptations after GVT. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a modified GVT intervention on muscular hypertrophy and strength. Nineteen healthy men were randomly assign to 6 weeks of 10 or 5 sets of 10 repetitions for specific compound resistance exercises included in a split routine performed 3 times per week. Total and regional lean body mass, muscle thickness, and muscle strength were measured before and after the training program. Across groups, there were significant increases in lean body mass measures, however, greater increases in trunk (p = 0.043; effect size [ES] = -0.21) and arm (p = 0.083; ES = -0.25) lean body mass favored the 5-SET group. No significant increases were found for leg lean body mass or measures of muscle thickness across groups. Significant increases were found across groups for muscular strength, with greater increases in the 5-SET group for bench press (p = 0.014; ES = -0.43) and lat pull-down (p = 0.003; ES = -0.54). It seems that the modified GVT program is no more effective than performing 5 sets per exercise for increasing muscle hypertrophy and strength. To maximize hypertrophic training effects, it is recommended that 4-6 sets per exercise be performed, as it seems gains will plateau beyond this set range and may even regress due to overtraining.

  13. Energy landscape, structure and rate effects on strength properties of alpha-helical proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertaud, Jeremie; Hester, Joshua; Jimenez, Daniel D; Buehler, Markus J

    2010-01-01

    The strength of protein domains is crucial to identify the mechanical role of protein domains in biological processes such as mechanotransduction, tissue mechanics and tissue remodeling. Whereas the concept of strength has been widely investigated for engineered materials, the strength of fundamental protein material building blocks and how it depends on structural parameters such as the chemical bonding, the protein filament length and the timescale of observation or deformation velocity remains poorly understood. Here we report a systematic analysis of the influence of key parameters that define the energy landscape of the strength properties of alpha-helical protein domains, including energy barriers, unfolding and refolding distances, the locations of folded and unfolded states, as well as variations of the length and pulling velocity of alpha-helical protein filaments. The analysis is facilitated by the development of a double-well mesoscale potential formulation, utilized here to carry out a systematic numerical analysis of the behavior of alpha-helices. We compare the results against widely used protein strength models based on the Bell model, one of the simplest models used to characterize the strength of protein filaments. We find that, whereas Bell-type models are a reasonable approximation to describe the rupture of alpha-helical protein domains for a certain range of pulling speeds and values of energy barriers, the model ceases to hold for very large energy barriers and for very small pulling speeds, in agreement with earlier findings. We conclude with an application of our mesoscale model to investigate the effect of the length of alpha-helices on their mechanical strength. We find a weakening effect as the length of alpha-helical proteins increases, followed by an asymptotic regime in which the strength remains constant. We compare strand lengths found in biological proteins with the scaling law of strength versus alpha-helix filament length. The

  14. The effect of strength training on the testosterone level in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary objective of this study was to provide the insight into the effects of strength training on the testosterone (TE level in men, as well as the mechanisms of anabolic effects of testosterone on human muscle apparatus, since it is known that one of the ways to increase muscle strength is through the increase of muscle mass (peripheral factor, and the basis of this process is the effect of TE. The collected data summarize the conclusions of a number of previous studies, out of which larger number of recently, and they relate to the effect of different methods of strength training (H - submaximal effort to failure, S - maximal effort, P - dynamic effort with equally applied total volume of load, and the effect of different rest periods in strength training on the level of TE in men. The presented results confirmed the claims that the H method is the most effective and reasonably called 'the method for muscle hypertrophy'. When it comes to rest periods, the ones that last for about 90 seconds proved optimal because this period had most influence on the level of lactic acid and catecholamines in blood which are considered to be the key factors for the increased secretion of TE (this hormone was included in a group of stress hormones as well. However, according to many authors, further examinations in this field are necessary in order to determine the causal link with greater certainty.

  15. Effect of grape seed extract against biodegradation of composite resin-dentin shear bond strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generosa, D. M.; Suprastiwi, E.; Asrianti, D.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of grape seed extract (GSE) on resin-dentin shear bond strength. A group of 48 dentin samples were divided into 6 groups. The six groups, each with eight specimens, included group 1 (control), group 2 (control + NaOCl 10%), group 3 (2.9% GSE application before etching), group 4 (2.9% GSE application before etching + NaOCl 10%), group 5 (2.9% GSE application after etching), and group 6 (2.9% GSE application after etching + NaOCl 10%). Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was done with the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann-Whitney U test. The highest median value was in group 3, and the lowest value was in group 5. GSE can improve the shear bond strength (p = 0.002 and 0.001), but it has no effect on reducing biodegradation (p = 0.141).

  16. Carbon fiber/carbon nanotube reinforced hierarchical composites: Effect of CNT distribution on shearing strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H. W.; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Yi, H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The strength and fracture behavior of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites with carbon nanotube (CNT) secondary reinforcement are investigated experimentally and numerically. Short Beam Shearing tests have been carried out, with SEM observations of the damage evolution in the composites. 3D...... CNT nanoreinforcement into the matrix and/or the sizing of carbon fiber/reinforced composites ensures strong increase of the composite strength. The effect of secondary CNTs reinforcement is strongest when some small addition of CNTs in the polymer matrix is complemented by the fiber sizing with high...... multiscale computational (FE) models of the carbon/polymer composite with varied CNT distributions have been developed and employed to study the effect of the secondary CNT reinforcement, its distribution and content on the strength and fracture behavior of the composites. It is shown that adding secondary...

  17. Effects of densified silica fume on microstructure and compressive strength of blended cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Yajun; Cahyadi, Jong Herman

    2003-01-01

    Some experimental investigations on the microstructure and compressive strength development of silica fume blended cement pastes are presented in this paper. The silica fume replacement varies from 0% to 20% by weight and the water/binder ratio (w/b) is 0.4. The pore structure by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), the micromorphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the compressive strength at 3, 7, 14, 28, 56 and 90 days have been studied. The test results indicate that the improvements on both microstructure and mechanical properties of hardened cement pastes by silica fume replacement are not effective due to the agglomeration of silica fume particles. The unreacted silica fume remained in cement pastes, the threshold diameter was not reduced and the increase in compressive strength was insignificant up to 28 days. It is suggested that the proper measures should be taken to disperse silica fume agglomeration to make it more effective on improving the properties of materials

  18. Effects of Mental Imagery on Muscular Strength in Healthy and Patient Participants: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, Maamer; Tod, David; Chaabene, Helmi; Miarka, Bianca; Chamari, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present review were to (i) provide a critical overview of the current literature on the effects of mental imagery on muscular strength in healthy participants and patients with immobilization of the upper extremity (i.e., hand) and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), (ii) identify potential moderators and mediators of the “mental imagery-strength performance” relationship and (iii) determine the relative contribution of electromyography (EMG) and brain activities, neural and physiological adaptations in the mental imagery-strength performance relationship. This paper also discusses the theoretical and practical implications of the contemporary literature and suggests possible directions for future research. Overall, the results reveal that the combination of mental imagery and physical practice is more efficient than, or at least comparable to, physical execution with respect to strength performance. Imagery prevention intervention was also effective in reducing of strength loss after short-term muscle immobilization and ACL. The present review also indicates advantageous effects of internal imagery (range from 2.6 to 136.3%) for strength performance compared with external imagery (range from 4.8 to 23.2%). Typically, mental imagery with muscular activity was higher in active than passive muscles, and imagining “lifting a heavy object” resulted in more EMG activity compared with imagining “lifting a lighter object”. Thus, in samples of students, novices, or youth male and female athletes, internal mental imagery has a greater effect on muscle strength than external mental imagery does. Imagery ability, motivation, and self-efficacy have been shown to be the variables mediating the effect of mental imagery on strength performance. Finally, the greater effects of internal imagery than those of external imagery could be explained in terms of neural adaptations, stronger brain activation, higher muscle excitation, greater somatic and

  19. Effect of silver nanoparticles on human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Sengstock

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP are one of the fastest growing products in nano-medicine due to their enhanced antibacterial activity at the nanoscale level. In biomedicine, hundreds of products have been coated with Ag-NP. For example, various medical devices include silver, such as surgical instruments, bone implants and wound dressings. After the degradation of these materials, or depending on the coating technique, silver in nanoparticle or ion form can be released and may come into close contact with tissues and cells. Despite incorporation of Ag-NP as an antibacterial agent in different products, the toxicological and biological effects of silver in the human body after long-term and low-concentration exposure are not well understood. In the current study, we investigated the effects of both ionic and nanoparticulate silver on the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs into adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages and on the secretion of the respective differentiation markers adiponectin, osteocalcin and aggrecan.Results: As shown through laser scanning microscopy, Ag-NP with a size of 80 nm (hydrodynamic diameter were taken up into hMSCs as nanoparticulate material. After 24 h of incubation, these Ag-NP were mainly found in the endo-lysosomal cell compartment as agglomerated material. Cytotoxicity was observed for differentiated or undifferentiated hMSCs treated with high silver concentrations (≥20 µg·mL−1 Ag-NP; ≥1.5 µg·mL−1 Ag+ ions but not with low-concentration treatments (≤10 µg·mL−1 Ag-NP; ≤1.0 µg·mL−1 Ag+ ions. Subtoxic concentrations of Ag-NP and Ag+ ions impaired the adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas chondrogenic differentiation was unaffected after 21 d of incubation. In contrast to aggrecan, the inhibitory effect of adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by a decrease in the secretion of

  20. Energy dependence of the ratio of isovector effective interaction strengths |JστJτ| from 0° (p,n) cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeucci, T. N.; Rapaport, J.; Bainum, D. E.; Goodman, C. D.; Foster, C. C.; Gaarde, C.; Larsen, J.; Goulding, C. A.; Horen, D. J.; Masterson, T.; Sugarbaker, E.

    1982-02-01

    Information concerning the ratio of the isovector effective interaction strengths |JστJτ| may be obtained from the ratio of (p,n) Gamow-Teller and isobaric analog state 0° differential cross sections. We have examined 0° (p,n) data for the energy range 5-200 MeV and find that for energies larger than 50 MeV and for targets with A=7-42 the product of the interaction-strength and distortion-factor ratios |JστJτ|(NστNτ)12 appears to be mass independent and linear as a function of bombarding energy. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 7Li, 13, 14C, 26Mg, 37Cl, 41Ca(p,n), measured σ(θ=0°), GT, IAS transitions, Ep=60-200 MeV. Deduced energy dependence, interaction strength ratio |JστJτ|.

  1. The effects of pilates on balance, mobility and strength in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Citaker, Seyit; Irkec, Ceyla; Nazliel, Bijen; Batur-Caglayan, Hale Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    Although there are evidences as to Pilates developing dynamic balance, muscle strength and flexibility in healthy people, evidences related to its effects on Multiple Sclerosis patients are insufficient. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of Pilates on balance, mobility, and strength in ambulatory patients with Multiple Sclerosis. Twenty six patients were divided into two groups as experimental (n = 18) and control (n = 8) groups for an 8-week treatment program. The experimental group underwent Pilates and the control group did abdominal breathing and active extremity exercises at home. Balance and mobility were measured with Berg Balance Scale and Timed up and go test, upper and lower muscle strength with hand-held dynamometer. Confidence in balance skills while performing daily activities was evaluated with Activities Specific Balance Confidence Scale. Improvements were observed in balance, mobility, and upper and lower extremity muscle strength in the Pilates group (p 0.05). Due to its structure which is made up of balance and strengthening exercises, Pilates training may develop balance, mobility and muscle strength of MS patients. For this reason, we think that, Pilates exercises which are appropriate for the disability level of the patient may be suggested.

  2. Effect of Two-minute Application of 35% Sodium Ascorbate on Composite Bond Strength following Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Eman H; Kilinc, Evren; Hardigan, Patrick C; Rothrock, James K; Thompson, Jeffrey Y; Garcia-Godoy, Cristina

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effect of 35% sodium ascorbate on microtensile bond strength of dentin immediately after bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide. A total of 25 sound human 3 rd molars were collected. Teeth were randomly divided into five groups for different treatments: Group I [bleaching + immediate bonding (i.e., restoration)], group II (bleaching + delayed bonding), group III (bleaching + sodium ascorbate + immediate bonding), group IV (bleaching + sodium ascorbate + delayed bonding), and group V (bonding only). After bleaching, but before bonding, groups II and IV were stored for 1 week in deionized water at 37°C. All samples were bonded using OptiBoned FL (Kerr) and Filtek Supreme (3M/ESPE). Teeth were sectioned into 1 × 1 mm 2 bars, and microtensile bond strength was tested with a universal testing machine (Instron 8841) at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Microtensile bond strength differed significantly across the five groups, with a significant reduction in microtensile bond strength observed for samples in group I relative to samples in any of the other treatment groups (p bleaching on composite bonding strength to dentin. The negative effects of bleaching on composite bonding can be neutralized by the application of the reversing agent sodium ascorbate thus, increasing the efficiency of clinic chair time. This is clinically relevant for those patients requiring restorative treatment immediately after in-office bleaching.

  3. Acute effect of caffeine supplementation on performance of muscular strength and cardiovascular changes during resistance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Materko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the acute effect of caffeine on the muscular strength performance in addition to the possible hemodynamic changes during a strength training session. Thirteen strength training experienced male subjects were submitted to a protocol of three sets of 10RM for bench press (BP, pull press (PP, leg extension (LE and leg curl (LC, according to three conditions: no supplementation (C; 250 mg of caffeine supplementation (S; placebo (P. All subjects were submitted to an anthropometric evaluation, followed by a 10RM familiarization test. Hemodynamic measurements – heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP – were carried out before, during and after each session. Holding 48 hours time intervals, participants were submitted to three randomly presented 10RM tests according to C, S and P conditions. For conditions S and C, significant differences were found in BP and LE. No significant differences in HR and BP were found. Results seem to suggest an ergogenic effect of caffeine on submaximal muscle strength during a session of strength training.

  4. Effect of newer antioxidants on the bond strength of composite on bleached enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Manoharan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study aims to evaluate the effect of the application of two antioxidants on the bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: Eighty enamel surfaces were obtained from forty human extracted premolars. Specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n = 20. Group 1: No bleaching (control; Group 2a: Bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide gel; Group 2b: Bleaching, followed by application of 10% sodium ascorbate gel; Group 2c: Bleaching, followed by application of 5% proanthocyanidin agent. Surfaces were etched followed by application of total etch bonding system, and composite resin cylinders were bonded. Specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way analysis of variance was used for multiple group comparison and post hoc Tukey′s test for individual group-wise comparison. Results: Significantly higher shear bond strength values were observed in Group 2c and 2b as compared with Group 1 and 2a (P < 0.05. Among the antioxidants, Group 2c showed significantly higher shear bond strength values than Group 2b (P < 0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the use of antioxidant before bonding procedures on bleached enamel completely neutralizes the deleterious effects of bleaching and increases the bond strength significantly.

  5. Effect of Quaternary Ammonium Salt on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannaneh Ghadirian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study sought to assess the effect of quaternary ammonium salt (QAS on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to enamel.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro experimental study, 0, 10, 20 and 30% concentrations of QAS were added to Transbond XT primer. Brackets were bonded to 60 premolar teeth using the afore-mentioned adhesive mixtures, and the shear bond strength of the four groups (n=15 was measured using a universal testing machine. After debonding, the adhesive remnant index (ARI score was determined under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.Results: The mean and standard deviation of shear bond strength of the control and 10%, 20% and 30% groups were 23.54±6.31, 21.81±2.82, 20.83±8.35 and 22.91±5.66 MPa, respectively. No significant difference was noted in shear bond strength of the groups (P=0.83. Study groups were not different in terms of ARI scores (P=0.80.Conclusions: The results showed that addition of QAS to Transbond XT primer had no adverse effect on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  6. Boron effects on creep rupture strength of W containing advanced ferritic creep resistant steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mito, N.; Hasegawa, Y. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    The creep strength in ferritic creep resistant steels is increased by boron addition. However, the strengthening mechanisms have not yet been studied. This study clarifies the strengthening mechanism of 9% chromium steels with 10{proportional_to}100ppm boron and 0.5{proportional_to}2.0mass% tungsten in the laboratory. The strengthening effect of simultaneous addition of boron and tungsten was analyzed by hardenability, room-temperature strength and creep tests at 650 C. Changes in the microstructure as a result of the addition of boron and tungsten were also examined by optical microscope and transmission electron microscope (TEM). In addition, Alpha-ray Track Etching (ATE) method was used to detect the boron distribution and analyze the mechanisms change in the mechanical properties. Boron addition did not affect room-temperature strength, however, simultaneous addition of boron and tungsten increased room-temperature and high-temperature strength. According to ATE analysis, boron exists at the grain boundary. Therefore, synergistic effects of boron and tungsten on the creep strength suggest the tungsten precipitates stabilization by boron at the grain boundary. (orig.)

  7. Differentiating Performance Approach Goals and Their Unique Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ordene V.

    2014-01-01

    The study differentiates between two types of performance approach goals (competence demonstration performance approach goal and normative performance approach goal) by examining their unique effects on self-efficacy, interest, and fear of failure. Seventy-nine students completed questionnaires that measure performance approach goals,…

  8. Effect of differentiated instructional strategies on students' retention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of differentiated instructional strategies on students' retention in geometry in senior secondary schools was examined. The study employed experimental research design of pretest, posttest control group. The area of this study is Abuja Municipal Area Council, the Federal Capital Territory. The target population ...

  9. Differential effects of aluminium on the seedling parameters of wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Differential effects of aluminium on the seedling parameters of wheat. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... and Maroon (Al tolerant) were grown on hydroponic solution (non modified Hoagland) containing AlCl3 (0-100-200-300 μM). Factorial ...

  10. Effects of Strength Training Combined with Specific Plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump height and lower limb strength development in elite male handball players: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Alberto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to identify the effects of a strength training program combined with specific plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump (VJ height and strength development of lower limbs in elite male handball players. A 12-week program with combined strength and specific plyometric exercises was carried out for 7 weeks. Twelve elite male handball players (age: 21.6 ± 1.73 competing in the Portuguese Major League participated in the study. Besides the anthropometric measurements, several standardized jump tests were applied to assess VJ performance together with the strength development of the lower limbs in an isokinetic setting. No significant changes were found in body circumferences and diameters. Body fat content and fat mass decreased by 16.4 and 15.7% respectively, while lean body mass increased by 2.1%. Despite small significance, there was in fact an increase in squat jump (SJ, counter movement jump (CMJ and 40 consecutive jumps after the training period (6.1, 3.8 and 6.8%, respectively. After the applied protocol, peak torque increased in lower limb extension and flexion in the majority of the movements assessed at 90°s-1. Consequently, it is possible to conclude that combining general strength-training with plyometric exercises can not only increase lower limb strength and improve VJ performance but also reduce body fat content.

  11. Effects of Strength Training Combined with Specific Plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump height and lower limb strength development in elite male handball players: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Alberto; Mourão, Paulo; Abade, Eduardo

    2014-06-28

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the effects of a strength training program combined with specific plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump (VJ) height and strength development of lower limbs in elite male handball players. A 12-week program with combined strength and specific plyometric exercises was carried out for 7 weeks. Twelve elite male handball players (age: 21.6 ± 1.73) competing in the Portuguese Major League participated in the study. Besides the anthropometric measurements, several standardized jump tests were applied to assess VJ performance together with the strength development of the lower limbs in an isokinetic setting. No significant changes were found in body circumferences and diameters. Body fat content and fat mass decreased by 16.4 and 15.7% respectively, while lean body mass increased by 2.1%. Despite small significance, there was in fact an increase in squat jump (SJ), counter movement jump (CMJ) and 40 consecutive jumps after the training period (6.1, 3.8 and 6.8%, respectively). After the applied protocol, peak torque increased in lower limb extension and flexion in the majority of the movements assessed at 90ºs-1. Consequently, it is possible to conclude that combining general strength-training with plyometric exercises can not only increase lower limb strength and improve VJ performance but also reduce body fat content.

  12. Differential Effects of Tacrolimus versus Sirolimus on the Proliferation, Activation and Differentiation of Human B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opas Traitanon

    Full Text Available The direct effect of immunosuppressive drugs calcineurin inhibitor (Tacrolimus, TAC and mTOR inhibitor (Sirolimus, SRL on B cell activation, differentiation and proliferation is not well documented. Purified human B cells from healthy volunteers were stimulated through the B Cell Receptor with Anti-IgM + anti-CD40 + IL21 in the absence / presence of TAC or SRL. A variety of parameters of B cell activity including activation, differentiation, cytokine productions and proliferation were monitored by flow cytometry. SRL at clinically relevant concentrations (6 ng/ml profoundly inhibited CD19(+ B cell proliferation compared to controls whereas TAC at similar concentrations had a minimal effect. CD27(+ memory B cells were affected more by SRL than naïve CD27- B cells. SRL effectively blocked B cell differentiation into plasma cells (CD19(+CD138(+ and Blimp1(+/Pax5(low cells even at low dose (2 ng/ml, and totally eliminated them at 6 ng/ml. SRL decreased absolute B cell counts, but the residual responding cells acquired an activated phenotype (CD25(+/CD69(+ and increased the expression of HLA-DR. SRL-treated stimulated B cells on a per cell basis were able to enhance the proliferation of allogeneic CD4(+CD25(- T cells and induce a shift toward the Th1 phenotype. Thus, SRL and TAC have different effects on B lymphocytes. These data may provide insights into the clinical use of these two agents in recipients of solid organ transplants.

  13. Effects of trichostatins on differentiation of murine erythroleukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, M.; Nomura, S.; Beppu, T.

    1987-01-01

    The fungistatic antibiotics trichostatins (TS) A and C were isolated from culture broth of Streptomyces platensis No. 145 and were found to be potent inducers of differentiation in murine erythroleukemia (Friend and RV133) cells at concentrations of 1.5 X 10(-8) M for TSA and 5 X 10(-7) M for TSC. Differentiation induced by TS was cooperatively enhanced by UV irradiation but not by treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide. This enhanced activity was completely inhibited by adding cycloheximide to the culture medium 2 h after exposure to TS, suggesting that TS are dimethyl sulfoxide-type inducers of erythroid differentiation. No inhibitory effect of TS was observed on macromolecular synthesis in cultured cells

  14. Effect of ecological surface treatment method on friction strength properties of nettle (urtica dioica) fibre yarns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şansal, S.; Mıstık, S. I.; Fettahov, R.; Ovalı, S.; Duman, M.

    2017-10-01

    Over the last few decades, more attention is given to lignocellulose based fibres as reinforcement material in the polymer composites owing to the environmental pollution caused by the extensive usage of synthetic and inorganic fibres. Developing new natural fibre reinforced composites is the focus of many researches nowadays. They are made from renewable resources and they have less environmental effect in comparison to inorganic fibre reinforced composites. The interest of consumers in eco-friendly natural fibres and textiles has increased in recent years. Unlike inorganic fibres, natural fibres present light weight, high strength/density ratio and are readily available, environmentally friendly and biodegradable. Many different types of natural fibres are exploited for the production of biodegradable polymer composites. The nettle (Urtica dioica L.) is a well-known plant growing on rural sites of Europe, Asia, and North America. Nettle plant contains fibre similar to hemp and flax. However, similar to other natural fibres, nettle fibres are poorly compatible with the thermoplastic matrix of composites, due to their hydrophilic character which reduces mechanical properties of nettle fibre reinforced thermoplastics. In order to improve the fibrematrix adhesion of the natural fibre reinforced composites, surface treatment processes are applied to the lignocellulose fibres. In this study nettle (urtica dioica) fibre yarns were treated with NaOH by using conventional, ultrasonic and microwave energy methods. After treatment processes tensile strength, elongation, friction strength and SEM observations of the nettle fibre yarns were investigated. All treatment processes were improved the tensile strength, elongation and friction strength properties of the nettle fibre yarns. Also higher tensile strength, elongation and friction strength properties were obtained from treated nettle fibre yarns which treated by using microwave energy method.

  15. Effect of Nd: YAG laser irradiation on surface properties and bond strength of zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Liu, Suogang; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhu, Qingping; Zhang, Wei

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd: YAG) laser irradiation on surface properties and bond strength of zirconia ceramics. Specimens of zirconia ceramic pieces were divided into 11 groups according to surface treatments as follows: one control group (no treatment), one air abrasion group, and nine laser groups (Nd: YAG irradiation). The laser groups were divided by applying with different output power (1, 2, or 3 W) and irradiation time (30, 60, or 90 s). Following surface treatments, the morphological characteristics of ceramic pieces was observed, and the surface roughness was measured. All specimens were bonded to resin cement. After, stored in water for 24 h and additionally aged by thermocycling, the shear bond strength was measured. Dunnett's t test and one-way ANOVA were performed as the statistical analyses for the surface roughness and the shear bond strength, respectively, with α = .05. Rougher surface of the ceramics could be obtained by laser irradiation with higher output power (2 and 3 W). However, cracks and defects were also found on material surface. The shear bond strength of laser groups was not obviously increased, and it was significantly lower than that of air abrasion group. No significant differences of the shear bond strength were found among laser groups treated with different output power or irradiation time. Nd: YAG laser irradiation cannot improve the surface properties of zirconia ceramics and cannot increase the bond strength of the ceramics. Enhancing irradiation power and extending irradiation time cannot induce higher bond strength of the ceramics and may cause material defect.

  16. Effect of a Hippotherapy Intervention Program on Static Balance and Strength in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Arabatzi, Fotini; Dipla, Konstantina; Liga, Maria; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a hippotherapy program on static balance and strength in adolescents with intellectual disability (ID). Nineteen adolescents with moderate ID were assigned either an experimental group (n = 10) or a control group (n = 9). The experimental group attended a 10-week hippotherapy program. To assess…

  17. Effect of a re‑wetting agent on bond strength of an adhesive to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study investigated the effect of a re‑wetting agent on the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) of primary and permanent dentin after acid or laser etching. Materials and Methods: Twelve permanent and 12 primary molar teeth were ground to expose an occlusal dentin surface. Each group teeth were randomly ...

  18. Effect of chlorhexidine on the shear bond strength of self-etch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chlorhexidine on shear bond strength of self-etch adhesives to dentin. The crowns of 60 sound human premolars were horizontally sectioned to expose the coronal dentin. Dentin surfaces were polished with 320 grit silicon carbide papers, and were randomly divided into 4 ...

  19. Effects of Strength of Accent on an L2 Interactive Lecture Listening Comprehension Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockey, Gary J.; Papageorgiou, Spiros; French, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study which aimed to determine the effect of strength of accent on listening comprehension of interactive lectures. Test takers (N = 21,726) listened to an interactive lecture given by one of nine speakers and responded to six comprehension items. The test taker responses were analyzed with the Rasch computer program…

  20. Size effect model for the edge strength of glass with cut and ground edge finishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandebroek, M.; Louter, C.; Caspeele, R.; Ensslen, F.; Belis, J.L.I.F.

    2014-01-01

    The edge strength of glass is influenced by the size of the surface (near the edge) which is subjected to tensile stresses. To quantify this size effect, 8 series of single layer annealed glass beam specimens (as-received glass) were subjected to in-plane four-point bending with linearly increased

  1. Effects of Age, Gender and Educational Background on Strength of Motivation for Medical School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusurkar, Rashmi; Kruitwagen, Cas; ten Cate, Olle; Croiset, Gerda

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of selection, educational background, age and gender on strength of motivation to attend and pursue medical school. Graduate entry (GE) medical students (having Bachelor's degree in Life Sciences or related field) and Non-Graduate Entry (NGE) medical students (having only completed high school),…

  2. The use of laser technology to investigate the effect of railway ballast roundness on shear strength

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mvelase, GM

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available of roundness. Triaxial tests were conducted to determine the effect of the roundness on the shear strength properties of the materials. A Mohr-Coulomb failure model was successfully developed from the results to represent individual materials tested...

  3. Effect of Ultrasonic Versus Manual Cementation on the Fracture Strength of Resin Composite Laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Mese, A.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of conventional versus ultrasonic cementation techniques on the fracture strength of resin composite laminates. In addition, the failure modes were assessed. Window-type preparations I mm above the cemento-enamel junction were made on intact human maxillary central

  4. Effect of surface treatment of titanium posts on the tensile bond strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmage, P; Sohn, J; Ozcan, M; Nergiz, [No Value

    Objectives. Retention of composite resins to metal can be improved when metal surfaces are conditioned. The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the effect of two conditioning treatments on the tensile bond strength of four resin-based luting cements and zinc phosphate cement to titanium

  5. Effects of drought stress on seed sink strength and leaf protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assimilate availability and the capacity to utilise them in the reproductive structures to a large extent determine reproductive sink establishment and yield of crops under drought stress. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of drought stress imposed at early pod-fill stage on seed sink strength of common bean ...

  6. Incorporating the effect of ionic strength in free energy calculations using explicit ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donnini, S; Mark, AE; Juffer, AH; Villa, Alessandra

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of explicit ions to mimic the effect of ionic strength or to neutralize the overall charge on a system in free energy calculations using molecular dynamics simulations is investigated. The difference in the free energy of hydration between two triosephosphate isomerase inhibitors

  7. Mechanical and thermal cycling effects on the flexural strength of glass ceramics fused to titanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasquez, Vanessa; Ozcan, Mutlu; Nishioka, Renato; Souza, Rodrigo; Mesquita, Alfredo; Pavanelli, Carlos

    This study evaluated the effects of mechanical and thermal cycling on the flexural strength (ISO 9693) of three brands of ceramics fused to commercially pure titanium (cpTi). Metallic frameworks of 25 x 3 x 0.5 mm dimensions (N = 84) were cast in cpTi, followed by 150-mu m aluminum oxide airborne

  8. Analytical Solution of Interface Effect on the Strength of Combined Model Composed of Different Geologic Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-hui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the special combined structure of surrounding rock in western mining area of China, a micromechanical model with variable parameters containing contact interface was proposed firstly. Then, the derived stresses in coal and rock near the interface were analyzed on the basis of the harmonized strain relation, and the analytical solutions with respect to stress states near the interface were drawn up. The triaxial compressive strength of coal and rock was further determined in case the contact interface was in the horizontal position. Moreover, effects of stiffness ratio, interface angle, and stress level on the strength of two bodies near the contact area were expounded in detail. Results indicate that additional stresses which have significant effect on the strength of combined model are derived due to the adhesive effect of contact interface and lithological differences between geologic bodies located on both sides. The interface effect on the strength of combined body is most associated with the stiffness, interface angle, and the stress level. These conclusions are also basically valid for three-body model and even for the multibody model and lay important theory foundation to guide the stability study of soft strata composed of different geologic bodies.

  9. Effect of whole-body vibration on muscle strength, spasticity, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CP) and is characterized by spasticity and muscle weakness of both lower limbs resulting in decreased walking ability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) training on muscle strength, spasticity, and ...

  10. Effect of Strength Training on Rate of Force Development in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjao, Andre Luiz Demantova; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken; Carneiro, Nelson Hilario; Goncalves, Raquel; Ferreira de Moura, Rodrigo; Cyrino, Edilson Serpeloni; Altimari, Leandro Ricardo; Gobbi, Sebastiao

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the effect of an 8-week strength training (ST) program on the rate of force development (RFD) and electromyographic activity (EMG) in older women. Seventeen women (M age = 63.4 years, SD = 4.9) without previous ST experience were randomly assigned to either a control (n = 7) or training (n = 10) group. A leg-press isometric test was…

  11. Effects of Balance Training on Postural Sway, Leg Extensor Strength, and Jumping Height in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granacher, Urs; Gollhofer, Albert; Kriemler, Susi

    2010-01-01

    Deficits in strength of the lower extremities and postural control have been associated with a high risk of sustaining sport-related injuries. Such injuries often occur during physical education (PE) classes and mostly affect the lower extremities. Thus, the objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of balance training on postural…

  12. Tensile Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits: Effect of the Temperature Gradient and Ash Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Nair, Akhilesh Balachandran; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2018-01-01

    Replacing coal with biomass in power plants is a viable option for reducing net CO2 emissions and combating climate change. However, biomass combustion in boilers may exacerbate problems related to ash deposition and corrosion, demanding effective deposit removal. The tensile adhesion strength...

  13. Thermal Inertia of near-Earth Asteroids and Strength of the Yarkovsky Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delbo, Marco; Dell'Oro, A.; Harris, A. W.; Mottola, S.; Mueller, M.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal inertia is the physical parameter that controls the temperature distribution over the surface of an asteroid. It affects the strength of the Yarkovsky effect, which causes orbital drift of km-sized asteroids and is invoked to explain the delivery of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) from the main

  14. The effect of thermal loads on buckling strength of cylindrical shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Y.; Kodama, T.; Matsuura, S.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear power plant components must be designed taking account of strong seismic loads in countries with frequent earthquakes like Japan. When designing such thin-walled shell components as a main vessel of a fast breeder reactor (FBR), one should consider the possibility that buckling might occur. In Japan, a series of buckling research has been conducted under contract with the Ministry of International Trade and Industry to develop the aseismic design method for a demonstration FBR. This study has been also done as a part of them. The problem of thermal loads on buckling strength is one of the important problems in the buckling research for FBR because axial temperature gradient is produced in a main vessel and the significant thermal stress is shown. Some studies on the effect of thermal loads on buckling strength were carried out (Brochard, 1987), (Nakamura, 1987), but its effect in the actual vessel has not been evaluated quantitatively. We have already reported the effect of thermal loads on buckling strength of a pool-type reactor vessel. (Kawamoto ,1989) In this paper, we focus on a loop-type reactor vessel and investigate the effect of thermal loads accompanying with axial temperature change near the sodium level. And the reduction of buckling strength due to the thermal loads is quantitatively evaluated

  15. Effect of Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Self-adhesive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-05

    Feb 5, 2016 ... changes in the crystalline structure of dental hard tissues. Keywords: Bond strength, irradiation, self-adhesive luting cement. Effect of Irradiation on the .... The metal ring was connected with the cross-head and loaded (speed 1 ...

  16. Bonding polycarbonate brackets to ceramic: : Effects of substrate treatment on bond strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Peltomäki, Timo; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Kalk, Warner

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of 5 different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of polycarbonate brackets bonded to ceramic surfaces with resin based cement. Six disc-shaped ceramic specimens (feldspathic porcelain) with glazed surfaces were used for each group. The specimens were

  17. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradabadi, Ashkan [Department of Electrochemistry, Universität Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet [Department of Optoelectonics, Universität Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari [School of Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahbar, Nima, E-mail: nrahbar@wpi.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30 × magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. - Highlights: • Understanding the dominant mechanism of bonding

  18. Combined effects of petrographic and technological parameters on strength of porous coke substance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinel' t, V.M.; Shkoller, M.B.; Stankevich, A.S.; Korchuganova, G.S.

    1983-09-01

    The proportion of coke in modern blast furnaces has been reduced and at the same time ore burdens have increased. The coke itself now derives from a much wider range of coals. Laboratory tests related to the structural strength of cokes were carried out with charges composed of 14 representative coals. Results showed that vitrinite reflectance and bulk density were the critical parameters, followed by petrographic composition. Increasing bulk density of the charge from 0.6 to 0.9 g/cm/sup 3/ produces coke with a structural strength which counteracts the effects of increasing diversity in both petrography and reflectance in any one charge.

  19. THE EFFECTS OF ISOKINETIC KNEE STRENGTH ON THE PROMPTNESS OF SOCCER PLAYERS

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Kerim Yilmaz; Menderes Kabadayi; Muhammet Hakan Mayda; Murşit Ceyhun Birinci; Mustafa Özdal

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of isokinetic knee strength on promptness. 15 soccer players with an average age of 22,80±2,14 years and 15 controls with an average age of 21,60±1,40 years participated in the study. Body composition, isokinetic knee strength measurement at angular speeds of 60o, 180o, 240o and 10 m sprint test were conducted respectively in the study. General warm-up procedure was carried out on the groups before measurements. In statistical analyses, Shap...

  20. The effect of microstructure of low-alloy spheroidal cast iron on impact strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Szykowny

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presents an evaluation of the effect of microstructure of low-alloy spheroidal cast iron on impact strength within the temperature range from –60 to 100°C. Analyses were conducted on one type of cast iron containing 0.51% Cu and 0.72% Ni. Cast iron was austempered or normalized. Values of KCV and static mechanical properties were determined. Structural and fractographic analyses were based on light and scanning microscopy as well as X-ray diffraction. It was found that thermal processing considerably improves impact strength in relation to cast iron after casting. At the same time static mechanical properties are enhanced.

  1. Short- and Long-Term Effects of Concurrent Strength and HIIT Training in Octogenarians with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Aznar-Laín, Susana; Mañas, Asier; Castellanos, Juan; Alcázar, Julián; Ara, Ignacio; Mata, Esmeralda; Daimiel, Rosa; García-García, Francisco José

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the short- and long-term effects of concurrent strength and high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on octogenarian COPD patients, nine males (age = 84.2 ± 2.8 years, BMI = 29.3 ± 2.3) with low to severe COPD levels (2.1 ± 1.5 BODE index) underwent a supervised 9-week strength and HIIT exercise program. Training had a significant (p HIIT training increases physical fitness in the oldest-old COPD patients, and has potential long-term benefits.

  2. Effects of ionic strength and ion pairing on (plant-wide) modelling of anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solon, Kimberly; Flores Alsina, Xavier; Mbamba, Christian Kazadi

    2015-01-01

    Plant-wide models of wastewater treatment (such as the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 or BSM2) are gaining popularity for use in holistic virtual studies of treatment plant control and operations. The objective of this study is to show the influence of ionic strength (as activity corrections....... The paper describes: 1) how the anaerobic digester performance is affected by physico-chemical corrections; 2) the effect on pH and the anaerobic digestion products (CO2, CH4 and H2); and, 3) how these variations are propagated from the sludge treatment to the water line. Results at high ionic strength...

  3. Effect of tempering time on the ballistic performance of a high strength armour steel

    OpenAIRE

    Jena, Pradipta Kumar; Senthil P., Ponguru; K., Siva Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The investigation describes and analyses the effect of tempering time on the mechanical and ballistic performance of a high strength armour steel. The steel is subjected to tempering at 300 °C for 2, 24 and 48 h. A marginal variation in strength and hardness is observed with increase in tempering time, whereas ductility and Charpy impact values are found to be decreasing. Ballistic performance of the samples are evaluated by impacting 7.62 mm and 12.7 mm armour piercing projectiles at 0° angl...

  4. Effect of confinement on bond strength of hot-dip galvanized lap splices in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhran, Mazen

    2004-01-01

    Galvanizing the reinforcing steel is one of the methods used to protect bars against corrosion. Galvanizing is a hot dip process where the reinforcing bars are immersed in an aqueous pre flux solution of zinc ammonium chloride at a controlled temperature between 840 and 850 degrees F. In 2001, a research program was started at AUB to evaluate experimentally the effect of hot dip galvanizing on the bond capacity of tension lap splices anchored in full-scale beam specimens designed to fail in bond splitting mode. The test results indicated that the use of galvanized bars had a negligible effect on bond strength of reinforcement in normal strength. However, galvanizing caused an average of 20 percent decrease in bond strength of reinforcement in high strength concrete. The primary objective of research reported in this thesis, is the need to find a solution to eliminate the bond reduction of galvanized bars in high strength concrete. It is significant to evaluate the positive effect of the addition of transverse reinforcement in the splice region. The hypothesis to be tested is that such transverse reinforcement will insure uniform bond stress distribution over the entire splice region, thus mobilizing all bar lugs along the splice in the stress transfer mechanism between the bar and the surrounding concrete. Such mechanism might reduce the significant decrease in bond strength in high strength concrete due to galvanizing. To achieve this objective, eighteen full-scale beam specimens were tested in positive bending. Each beam was reinforced with bars spliced in a constant moment region at midspam. The splice length was chosen in such a way that the beams failed in bond splitting of the concrete cover in the splice region. The main variables were type of coating (black or galvanized bars), bar size (20, 25 and 32 mm), and amount of transverse reinforcement in the splice region (0, 2 or 4 stirrups). The test results indicated that confinement did not have a significant

  5. Effect of football or strength training on functional ability and physical performance in untrained old men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard Andersen, Thomas; Schmidt, Jakob Friis; Nielsen, Jens Jung

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 16 weeks of football or strength training on performance and functional ability were investigated in 26 (68.2 ± 3.2 years) untrained men randomized into a football (FG; n = 9), a strength training (ST; n = 9), or a control group (CO; n = 8). FG and ST trained 1.6 ± 0.1 and 1.5 ± 0......% lower (P training for old men improves functional ability and physiological response to submaximal exercise, while football...... additionally elevates maximal aerobic fitness and exhaustive exercise performance....

  6. Eight Weeks of Phosphatidic Acid Supplementation in Conjunction with Resistance Training Does Not Differentially Affect Body Composition and Muscle Strength in Resistance-Trained Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Andre, Joshua J. Gann, Sarah K. McKinley-Barnard, Joon J. Song, Darryn S. Willoughby

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to determine the effects of eight weeks of resistance training (RT combined with phosphatidic acid (PA supplementation at a dose of either 250 mg or 375 mg on body composition and muscle size and strength. Twenty-eight resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to ingest 375 mg [PA375 (n = 9] or 250 mg [PA250 (n = 9] of PA or 375 mg of placebo [PLC (n = 10] daily for eight weeks with RT. Supplements were ingested 60 minutes prior to RT and in the morning on non-RT days. Participants’ body composition, muscle size, and lower-body muscle strength were determined before and after training/supplementation. Separate group x time ANOVAs for each criterion variable were used employing an alpha level of ≤ 0.05. Magnitude- based inferences were utilized to determine the likely or unlikely impact of PA on each criterion variable. A significant main effect for time was observed for improvements in total body mass (p = 0.003, lean mass (p = 0.008, rectus femoris cross-sectional area [RF CSA (p = 0.011], and lower-body strength (p 0.05. Collectively, magnitude-based inferences determined both doses of PA to have a likely impact of increasing body mass (74.2%, lean mass (71.3%, RF CSA (92.2%, and very likely impact on increasing lower-body strength (98.1% beneficial. When combined with RT, it appears that PA has a more than likely impact on improving lower-body strength, whereas a likely impact exists for increasing muscle size and lean mass.

  7. Effects of humidity and interlayer cations on the frictional strength of montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsuka, Hiroshi; Katayama, Ikuo; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Tamura, Kenji

    2018-04-01

    We developed a humidity control system in a biaxial friction testing machine to investigate the effect of relative humidity and interlayer cations on the frictional strength of montmorillonite. We carried out the frictional experiments on Na- and Ca-montmorillonite under controlled relative humidities (ca. 10, 30, 50, 70, and 90%) and at a constant temperature (95 °C). Our experimental results show that frictional strengths of both Na- and Ca-montmorillonite decrease systematically with increasing relative humidity. The friction coefficients of Na-montmorillonite decrease from 0.33 (at relative humidity of 10%) to 0.06 (at relative humidity of 93%) and those of Ca-montmorillonite decrease from 0.22 (at relative humidity of 11%) to 0.04 (at relative humidity of 91%). Our results also show that the frictional strength of Na-montmorillonite is higher than that of Ca-montmorillonite at a given relative humidity. These results reveal that the frictional strength of montmorillonite is sensitive to hydration state and interlayer cation species, suggesting that the strength of faults containing these clay minerals depends on the physical and chemical environment.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Effect of tension lap splice on the behavior of high strength concrete (HSC beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed El-Azab

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, many research efforts have been carried out on the bond strength between normal strength concrete (NSC and reinforcing bars spliced in tension zones in beams. Many codes gave a minimum splice length for tension and compression reinforcement as a factor of the bar diameter depending on many parameters such as concrete strength, steel yield stress, shape of bar end, shape of bar surface and also bar location. Also, codes gave another restriction about the percentage of total reinforcement to be spliced at the same time. Comparatively limited attention has been directed toward the bond between high strength concrete (HSC and reinforcing bars spliced in tension zones in beams. HSC has high modulus of elasticity, high density and long-term durability. This research presents an experimental study on the bond between high strength concrete (HSC and reinforcing bars spliced in tension zones in beams. It reports the influence of several parameters on bond in splices. The parameters covered are casting position, splice length as a factor of bar diameter, bar diameter and reinforcement ratio. The research involved tests on sixteen simply-supported beams of 1800 mm span, 200 mm width and 400 mm thickness made of HSC. In each beam, the total tensile steel bars were spliced in the constant moment zone. Crack pattern, crack propagation, cracking load, failure load and mi span deflection were recorded and analyzed to study the mentioned parameters effect.

  9. The effect of ultrafast fiber laser application on the bond strength of resin cement to titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Sabit Melih; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Caglar, Ipek Satıroglu; Duymus, Zeynep Yeşil; Turgut, Sedanur; Bagis, Elif Arslan

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrafast fiber laser treatment on the bond strength between titanium and resin cement. A total of 60 pure titanium discs (15 mm × 2 mm) were divided into six test groups (n = 10) according to the surface treatment used: group (1) control, machining; group (2) grinding with a diamond bur; group (3) ultrafast fiber laser application; group (4) resorbable blast media (RBM) application; group (5) electro-erosion with copper; and group (6) sandblasting. After surface treatments, resin cements were applied to the treated titanium surfaces. Shear bond strength testing of the samples was performed with a universal testing machine after storing in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test were used to analyse the data (P < 0.05). The highest bond strength values were observed in the laser application group, while the lowest values were observed in the grinding group. Sandblasting and laser application resulted in significantly higher bond strengths than control treatment (P < 0.05). Ultrafast fiber laser treatment and sandblasting may improve the bond strength between resin cement and titanium.

  10. Temperature and moisture content effects on compressive strength parallel to the grain of paricá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Jesús Manríquez Figueroa

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of the temperature and moisture content on the compressive strength parallel to the grain of paricá (Schizolobium amazonicum Huber ex. Ducke from cultivated forests. The experiments were carried out on 3 timber samples under different conditions: heated (HT, thermal treatment (TT and water saturated (WS. The HT sample consisted of 105 clear specimens assembled in 15 groups, the TT consisted of 90 clear specimens assembled in 15 groups and the WS consisted of 90 clear specimens assembled in 9 groups. The specimens from HT and WS samples were tested at a temperature range from 20 to 230 ºC and 20 to 100 ºC, respectively. The HT specimens were tested at ambient temperature, but after being submitted to thermal treatment. The HT, TT and WS samples present a decrease in the compressive strength, reaching 65%, 76% and 59% of the compressive strength at room temperature, respectively. The decrease in the compressive strength of the HT and WS samples can be associated to the thermal degradation of wood polymers and the moisture content. For the TT sample, the strength increased for a pre-heating temperature of up to 170 °C due to the reduction in the moisture content of the specimens.

  11. Effect of blood contamination on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Gatti, Sara; Scribante, Andrea

    2011-07-01

    Our aim was to assess the effect of blood contamination on the shear bonding strength and sites of failure of orthodontic brackets and bondable buttons. We randomly divided 160 bovine permanent mandibular incisors into 8 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets (Step brackets, Leone, Sesto Fiorentino, Italy) and bondable buttons (Flat orthodontic buttons, Leone, Sesto Fiorentino, Italy) were tested on four different enamel surfaces: dry; contamination with blood before priming; after priming; and before and after priming. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bonding strength and the rate of adhesive failures were recorded. Data were analysed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA), Scheffè tests, and the chi-square test. Uncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bonding strengths for both brackets and buttons. When they were contaminated with blood, orthodontic brackets had significantly lower shear strengths than bondable buttons (P=0.0001). There were significant differences in sites of failure among the groups for the various enamel surfaces (P=0.001). Contamination of enamel by blood during bonding lowers the strength of the bond, more so with orthodontic brackets than with bondable buttons. Copyright © 2010 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Effects of education and strength training on functional tests among older people with osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez S, Christian Edgardo; Fernández G, Rubén; Zurita O, Félix; Linares G, Daniel; Farías M, Ariel

    2014-04-01

    Hip and knee osteoarthritis are important causes of pain and disability among older people. Education and strength training can alleviate symptoms and avoid functional deterioration. To assess muscle strength, fall risk and quality of life of older people with osteoarthritis and the effects of physiotherapy education and strength training on these variables. Thirty participants aged 78 ± 5 years (63% women) were randomly assigned to receive physiotherapy (Controls), physiotherapy plus education (Group 1) and physiotherapy plus strength training (group 2). At baseline and after 16 weeks of intervention, patients were evaluated with the Senior Fitness Test, Timed Up and Go and Quality of Life score short form (SF-36). During the intervention period, Senior Fitness Test and Timed Up and Go scores improved in all groups and SF-36 did not change. The improvement in Senior Fitness Test and Timed Up and Go was more marked in Groups 1 and 2 than in the control group. Education and strength training improve functional tests among older people with osteoarthritis.

  13. Effect of surface treatment of FRC-Post on bonding strength to resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Hyun Park,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatment of FRC-Post on bonding strength to resin cements. Materials and Methods Pre-surface treated LuxaPost (DMG, Rely-X Fiber Post (3M ESPE and self adhesive resin cement Rely-X Unicem (3M ESPE, conventional resin cement Rely-X ARC (3M ESPE, and Rely-X Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE were used. After completing the surface treatments of the posts, posts and resin cement were placed in clear molds and photo-activation was performed. The specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the FRC-Post into 2 mm-thick segments, and push-out strength were measured. The results of bond strength value were statistically analyzed using independent samples t-test and one-way ANOVA with multiple comparisons using Scheffe's test. Results Silanization of posts affect to the bond strength in LuxaPost, and did not affect in Rely-X Fiber Post. Rely-X ARC showed higher value than Rely-X Unicem. Conclusions Silanization is needed to enhance the bond strength between LuxaPost and resin cements.

  14. Effect of Pressure and Heat Treatments on the Compressive Strength of Reactive Powder Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmi Masdar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the corresponding compressive strength of RPC with variable pressure combined with heating rate, heating duration, and starting time of heating. The treatments applied were 8 MPa static pressure on fresh RPC prims and heat curing at 240 °C in an oven. The compressive strength test was conducted at 7-d and 28-d. The images of RPC morphology were captured on the surface of a fractured specimen using Scanning Electron Microscopy in Secondary Electron detector mode to describe pore filing mechanism after treatments. The results show that a heating rate at 50 °C/hr resulted in the highest compressive strength about 40 % more than those at 10 or 100 °C/hr. A heating duration of 48 hours led to the maximum compressive strength. Heat curing applied 2 days after casting resulted in the maximum compressive. Heat curing had a signicant effect on the compresssive strength due to the acceleration of both reactions (hydration and pozzolanic and the degree of transformation from tobermorite to xonotlite. It is concluded that the optimum condition of treatments is both pressure and heat curing at 2-day after casting with a rate of 50 °C/hr for 48 hours.

  15. Effects of functional training on pain, leg strength, and balance in women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre Román, Pedro Ángel; Santos E Campos, María Aparecida; García-Pinillos, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of 18-week functional training (FT) program consisting in two sessions a week of in-water exercise and one of on-land exercise on pain, strength, and balance in women with fibromyalgia. A sample consisting of 36 fibromyalgia patients was included in the study. The patients were allocated randomly into the experimental group (EG, n = 20), and control group (CG, n = 16). Standardized field-based fitness tests were used to assess muscle strength (30-s chair stand and handgrip strength) and agility/dynamic balance and static balance. Fibromyalgia impact and pain were analyzed by Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), tender points (TPs), visual analog scale (VAS). We observed a significant reduction in the FIQ (p = 0.042), the algometer scale of TP (p = 0.008), TP (p < 0.001), and VAS (p < 0.001) in the EG. The EG shows better results in leg strength (p < 0.001), handgrip strength (p = 0.025), agility/dynamic balance (p = 0.032) and balance (p = 0.006). An 18-week intervention consisting in two sessions of in-water exercise and one session of on-land exercise of FT reduces pain and improves functional capacity in FM patients. These results suggested that FT could play an important role in maintaining an independent lifestyle in patients with FM.

  16. Effect of Different Peat Size and Pre-Consolidation Pressure of Reconstituted Peat on Effective Undrained Shear Strength Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, ATS; Norhaliza, W.; Ismail, B.; Ezree, AM; Nizam, ZM

    2017-08-01

    Shear strength of the soil is one of the most important parameters in engineering design, especially during the pre- or post-construction periods, since it is mainly used to measure and evaluate the foundation or slope stability of soil. Peat normally known as a soil that has a very low value of shear strength, and in order to determine and understand the shear strength of the peat, it is a difficult task in geotechnical engineering due to several factors such as types of fabrics, the origin of the soil, water content, organic matter and the degree of humification. The aim of this study is to determine the effective undrained shear strength properties of reconstituted peat of different sizes. All the reconstituted peat samples were formed with the size that passed the opening sieve of 0.425 mm (effective undrained shear strength properties for reconstituted peat effective shear strength properties for the reconstituted peat effective undrained shear strength properties result obtained from the tests show that the reconstituted peat pore pressure, Δu, show both of strength.

  17. Effect of test temperature on the fatigue strength of the 12GN2MFAYu tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goritskij, V.M.; Terent'ev, V.F.; Bobyleva, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The cyclic strength, variation of dislocation structure and fractography of specimen fractures were investigated depending on testing temperature. The specimens were tested at temperatures of 20, 350, 450, 550 deg C. The increase of testing temperature, according to the experimental data obtained, is accompanied by an insignificant reduction of fatigue strength. The testing temperature in the range from 350 to 550 deg C has a weak effect on the fatigue strength of the quenched and tempered steel. A change in the dislocation structure occurs under all tested temperatures in the 12 GN2MFAYu steel during fatigue. The intensity of the rearrangement of dislocation structure increases as the testing temperature increases to 550 deg C causing a decrease of the limited life-time at increased stress amplitudes

  18. Effect of strength training on regional hypertrophy of the elbow flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Marcos D M; Szmuchrowski, Leszek A; Goulart, Karine N O; Couto, Bruno P

    2016-10-01

    Muscle hypertrophy is the main structural adaptation to strength training. We investigated the chronic effects of strength training on muscle hypertrophy in different regions of the elbow flexor muscles. Eleven untrained men (21.8 ± 1.62 years) underwent magnetic resonance imaging to determine the proximal, medial, distal, and mean cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the elbow flexors. The volunteers completed 12 weeks of strength training. The training protocol consisted of 4 sets of 8-10 maximum repetitions of unilateral elbow flexion. The interval between sets was 120 s. The training frequency was 3 sessions per week. The magnetic resonance images verified the presence of significant and similar hypertrophy in the distal, medial, and proximal portions of the elbow flexor muscles. Muscle hypertrophy may be assessed using only the medial CSA. We should not expect different degrees of hypertrophy among the regions of the elbow flexor muscles. Muscle Nerve 54: 750-755, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The effects of shelf life on the compressive strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajong, K. H.; Damiyanti, M.; Irawan, B.

    2017-08-01

    Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) is a restoration material composed of powder and liquid whose stability is affected by its shelf life. This is an issue that has not been taken into consideration by customers or sellers. To observe the effects of shelf life on the compressive strength of RMGIC, 30 cylindrical (d = 4mm and t = 6mm) specimens of RMGIC (Fuji II LC, GC, Tokyo, Japan) were divided into three groups with different storage times and their compressive strength was tested with a universal testing machine. Results were statistically analyzed with the one-way ANOVA test. There were significant differences (p<0.05) between the three groups of RMGIC. There is a decrease in the compressive strength value along with the duration of storage time.

  20. Effect of whole body vibration exercise on muscle strength and proprioception in females with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trans, T; Aaboe, J; Henriksen, M

    2009-01-01

    status was measured using WOMAC. It was found that muscle strength increased significantly (pIsometric knee-extension significantly increased (p=0.021) in VibM compared to Con. TDPM was significantly improved (p=0.033) in VibF compared to Con, while there was a tendency......The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) exercise on muscle strength and proprioception in female patients with osteoarthritis in the knee (knee-OA). A single blinded, randomised, controlled trial was performed in an outpatient clinic on 52 female patients...... groups trained twice a week for 8 weeks, with a progressively increasing intensity. The WBV groups performed unloaded static WBV exercise. The following were measured: knee muscle strength (extension/flexion) and proprioception (threshold for detection of passive movement (TDPM)). Self-reported disease...

  1. Effects of functional exercise training on performance and muscle strength after meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ericsson, Y B; Dahlberg, L E; Roos, E M

    2008-01-01

    Muscular deficits and functional limitations have been found years after meniscectomy of the knee. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to examine the effect of functional exercise training on functional performance and isokinetic thigh muscle strength in middle-aged patients...... subsequent to meniscectomy for a degenerative tear. Four years after meniscectomy, 45 patients (29 men, 16 women) were randomized to functional exercise training, supervised by a physical therapist, three times weekly for 4 months or to no intervention. The exercise program comprised of postural stability...... training and functional strength and endurance exercises for leg and trunk muscles. Outcomes were three functional performance tests and isokinetic muscle strength. Thirty patients (16 exercisers/14 controls) completed the study. Compared with control patients, the exercise group showed significant...

  2. Effect of mixing methods and aggregate type on strength of hardened concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhadi, S.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the research contained in this paper is to study the effect on strength of concrete which can be caused by changing method of concrete mix with or without changing aggregate crushing value under hand or mechanical compaction, and to compare results obtained when nondestructive testing techniques are used. It has been found that all methods of mix design are nearly identical in predicting the strength under a known value of w/c ratio. Up to strength of about 30 N/mm 2 , hand and mechanical compaction seems to be identical in all methods of concrete mixing. Important results regarding destructive and non-destructive testing has been drawn from the study.(Author)

  3. The effect of polyimide imidization conditions on adhesion strength of thin metal films on polyimide substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, S H

    1999-01-01

    The effects of Ar sup + RF plasma precleaning and polyimide curing conditions on the peel strength between Al thin films and polyimides have been studied. The BPDA-PDA polyimide precursor of PI-2611 (Du pont) was spin-coated and cured under various imidization conditions. The cured polyimide substrates were in-situ AR sup + RF plasma cleaned prior to metal deposition. Al-1 % Si-0.5 % Cu thin films were deposited onto the polyimide substrates by using DC magnetron sputtering. The peel strength was enhanced by Ar sup + RF plasma precleaning. The Al/modified PI specimen failed cohesively in the polyimide. The polyimide curing conditions strongly affect the peel strength in the Al/modified PI system.

  4. Effect of dispersion hardening process on change of Rm tensile strength of EN AC-46000 alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pezda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat treatment of aluminum alloys is performed mainly to increase mechanical properties of the alloys. Very important issue, from improvement of mechanical properties point of view as well as economical aspects of performed treatment, is selection of a suitable parameters of solutioning and ageing operations. The paper presents results of the investigations concerning effect of the performed heat treatment on change of tensile strength of the EN AC-46000 (AlSi9Cu3 alloy. Investigated alloy was melted in electric resistance furnace. Run of crystallization is presented with making use of the thermal derivative method (ATD. This method was also implemented to determination of heat treatments’ temperature range of the alloy. Performed heat treatment resulted in growth of the Rm tensile strength. Performed tests have enabled determination of temperature and duration of solutioning and ageing operations of the investigated alloy, which would condition obtainment of improved Rm tensile strength. The tests were performed in laboratory conditions.

  5. Investigation on the Effect of Drained Strength when Designing Sheet Pile Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kirsten Malte; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    that the height, anchor force, and the maximum bending moment in the wall can be lowered significantly when the effective cohesion is increased above zero. However, as the cohesion increases, the drop in the moment levels off, which implies that the benefit obtained from investigations increasing the cohesion......Long sheet pile walls are constructed in the cities as an integrated part of deep excavations for e.g. parking lots, pumping stations, reservoirs, and cut and cover tunnels. To minimise costs, the strength of the soil needs to be determined in the best possible way. The drained strength of clay...... expressed by c and ϕ is often estimated as c 10% = 10%・cu, and found by estimations based on the soil describtion, respectively. However, due to possible slicken slides and tension cracks, c = 0 is used on the back side of the sheet pile wall. This reduces the strength significantly. A parametric study...

  6. Effect of water absorption by the aggregate on properties of high-strength lightweight concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punkki, J

    1996-12-31

    Recently, high-strength lightweight concrete has become an interesting building material for the offshore oil industry. This doctoral thesis presents an experimental investigation of the effect of water absorption by three different types of lightweight aggregates. One type did not show any water absorption ability at all and so represented no problem to the concrete production. For the two other high-strength aggregates, which were of more conventional types, the water absorption depended not only on the properties of the aggregates, but also on the concrete mixing procedure and the properties of the fresh cement paste. When water absorbing lightweight aggregate was used in a dry condition, the workability of the concrete was significantly reduced by the water absorption of the aggregate. This effect was not present when prewetted aggregate was used. The water absorption by the lightweight aggregate also affected the early compressive strength of concrete. After one day, dry aggregate gave on the average 10 MPa higher compressive strength than did prewetted aggregate. The strength-density ratio was affected by the moisture condition of the aggregate. Dry lightweight aggregate gave 9 MPa higher compressive strength at a density of 2000 kg/m{sup 3} compared to that of prewetted aggregate. The water absorption by the lightweight also affected the microstructure of the hardened concrete. Dry lightweight aggregate gave a slightly better microstructure than normal weight aggregate. The results indicate that the use of prewetted aggregate adversely affected the transition zone between the aggregate and the cement paste. 69 refs., 58 figs., 42 tabs.

  7. Effect of gas release in hot molding on flexural strength of composite friction brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusdja, Andy Permana; Surojo, Eko; Muhayat, Nurul; Raharjo, Wijang Wisnu

    2018-02-01

    Composite friction brake is a vital part of braking system which serves to reduce the speed of vehicle. To fulfill the requirement of brake performance, composite friction brake must have friction and mechanical characteristic as required. The characteristics of composite friction brake are affected by brake material formulation and manufacturing parameter. In the beginning of hot molding, intermittent hot pressing was carried out to release the gases that consist of ammonia gas and water vapor. In composite friction brake, phenolic resin containing hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) is often used as a binder. During hot molding, the reaction of phenolic resin and HMTA forms ammonia gas. Hot molding also generates water vapor because raw materials absorb moisture from environment when they are placed in storage. The gas release in hot molding is supposed affecting mechanical properties because it avoid entrapped gas in composite, so that this research investigated effect of gas release on flexural strength. Manufacturing of composite specimen was carried out as follow: mixing of raw materials, cold molding, and hot molding. In this research, duration of intermittent hot pressing and number of gas release were varied. The flexural strength of specimen was measured using three point bending test. The results showed that flexural strength specimens that were manufactured without gas release, using 4 times gas release with intermittent hot pressing for 5 and 10 seconds were not remarkably different. Conversely, hot molding using 4 times gas release with intermittent hot pressing for 15 seconds decreased flexural strength of composite. Hot molding using 2, 4, and 8 times gas release with intermittent hot pressing for 10 seconds also had no effect on increasing flexural strength. Increasing of flexural strength of composite was obtained only by using 6 times gas release with intermittent hot pressing for 10 seconds.

  8. Comparison of the Effect of two Denture Cleansers on Tensile bond Strength of a Denture Liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzin, M; Bahrani, F; Adelpour, E

    2013-09-01

    One of the most clinical challenging issues in prosthodontics is debonding of soft liners from the denture base. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare tensile bond strength between soft liner and heat-cured acrylic resin when immersed in two different types of denture cleanser and distilled water, at different period of times. In this experimental in vivo study, 238 heat-cured acrylic blocks were made. A soft liner was embedded between the acrylic blocks. Samples were divided into four groups: 17 samples were in the control group and were not soaked in any solution .The remaining samples were divided into 3 groups (Distilled water, Calgon and Fittydent). Each group was then subdivided into two subcategories, regarding the immersion time variable; 15 and 45 minutes. All samples were placed in tension force and tensile bond strength was recorded with the testing machine. One- way ANOVA and Tucky HSD post-hoc test were adopted to analyze the yielded data (α> 0.05). Specimens which were immersed in two denture cleansers (Fittydent and Calgon) and in distilled water showed significant difference (p= 0.001) in bonding strength when compared to the control group. The subjects immersed in denture cleanser solutions and distilled water did not reveal any significant difference (p= 0.90). For all groups; most of the bonding failures (72%) were cohesive type. The effect of the denture cleansers and distilled water on the bond strength was not statistically different; however, the difference was significant between the immersed groups with the non-immersed group. Moreover, type of the denture cleanser did not show any effect on the tensile strength. The tensile strength increases with time of immersion.

  9. Effect of a whitening agent application on enamel bond strength of self-etching primer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Sato, Hikaru; Sato, Tomomi; Moore, B Keith; Platt, Jeffrey A

    2004-06-01

    Though reduction in bond strength after tooth whitening has been reported, little is known about it's effect on enamel bond strength of two-step bonding systems that exclude phosphoric acid etching prior to bonding agent application. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of whitening procedure using an in-office whitening agent on enamel bond strength of self-etching primer systems. Three self-etching primer systems, Imperva Fluoro Bond, Mac Bond II, Clearfil SE Bond, and a one-bottle adhesive system Single Bond as a control material, were used. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and the facial enamel or dentin surfaces were ground wet on 600-grit SiC paper. An in-office whitening agent, Hi-Lite was applied on the tooth surface according to the manufacturer's instruction. Bonding procedures were done soon after rinsing off the whitening agent or after 24 hours storage in distilled water. Specimens without whitening procedure were prepared as controls. Fifteen specimens per test group were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 24 hours, then shear tested at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. One-way ANOVA followed by Duncan multiple range test were used for statistical analysis of the results. For the specimens made soon after rinsing off the whitening agent, a significant decrease in enamel bond strength was observed for all the bonding systems used. For the specimens made after 24 hours storage in water, a small decrease in enamel bond strength was observed and no significant differences were found compared to those of controls (without whitening). From the results of this study, enamel bond strengths of the self-etching primer systems might be affected to a lesser degree after rinsing with water followed by 24 hours storage in water.

  10. Effect of cavity preparation on the flexural strengths of acrylic resin repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ELHADIRY, Safa Salim; YUNUS, Norsiah; ARIFFIN, Yusnidar Tajul

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of cavity preparation on the flexural strength of heat-curing denture resin when repaired with an auto-curing resin. Material and methods Ninety-six rectangular specimens (64x10x2.5 mm) prepared from heat-curing denture base resin (Meliodent) were randomly divided into four groups before repair. One group was left intact as control. Each repair specimen was sectioned into two; one group was repaired using the conventional repair method (Group 1). Two groups had an additional transverse cavity (2x3.5x21.5 mm) prepared prior to the repair; one repaired with (Group 2) and one without glass-fiber reinforcement (Group 3). A three-point flexural bending test according to the ISO 1567:1999 specification8 for denture base polymers was carried out on all groups after 1, 7 and 30 days of water immersion. Statistical analysis was carried out using two-way ANOVA, Kruskal Wallis and post-hoc Mann Whitney tests. Results The highest flexural strength was observed in the control group. Control and conventional repairs group (Group 1) showed reduction in the flexural strength 30 days after water immersion. No significant change in the strength was observed for Groups 2 and 3 where the repair joints were similarly prepared with additional transverse cavity. Conclusion Repaired specimens showed lower flexural strength values than intact heat-curing resin. Cavity preparation had no significant effect on the flexural strength of repair with water immersion. PMID:21308283

  11. Effect of heating palladium-silver alloys on ceramic bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie-yin; Li, Rui-nan; Chang, Shao-hai; Zhuang, Pei-lin; Liao, Juan-kun; Ye, Xiu-hua; Ye, Jian-tao

    2015-11-01

    The effects of different heat treatments on the internal oxidation and metal-ceramic bond in Pd-Ag alloys with different trace elements require further documentation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether heat treatment affects the metal-ceramic bond strength of 2 Pd-Ag alloys containing different trace elements. Thirteen cast specimens (25×3×0.5 mm) from each of 2 Pd-Ag alloy groups (W-1 and Argelite 61+3) were allocated to heat treatments before porcelain application: heating under reduced atmospheric pressure of 0.0014 MPa and 0.0026 MPa and heating under normal atmospheric pressure. Bond strengths were evaluated using a 3-point bending test according to ISO9693. Results were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α=.05). Visual observation was used to determine the failure types of the fractured specimens. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study morphologies, elemental compositions, and distributions in the specimens. The W-1 group had a mean bond strength significantly higher than that of Argelite 61+3 (PHeating under reduced atmospheric pressures of 0.0014 MPa and 0.0026 MPa resulted in similar bond strengths (P=.331), and both pressures had significantly higher bond strengths than that of heating under normal atmospheric pressure (P=.002, PHeating under different air pressures resulted in Pd-Ag alloys that contained either Sn or In and Ga, with various degrees of internal oxidation and different quantities of metallic nodules. Heating under reduced atmospheric pressure effectively improved the bond strength of the ceramic-to-Pd-Ag alloys. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Pelvic and Core Strength Training on High School Cross-Country Race Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Anne W; Goedeke, Maggie K; Cunningham, Saengchoy R; Rockwell, Derek E; Lehecka, Bryan J; Manske, Robert C; Smith, Barbara S

    2017-08-01

    Clark, AW, Goedeke, MK, Cunningham, SR, Rockwell, DE, Lehecka, BJ, Manske, RC, and Smith, BS. Effects of pelvic and core strength training on high school cross-country race times. J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2289-2295, 2017-There is only limited research examining the effect of pelvic and core strength training on running performance. Pelvic and core muscle fatigue is believed to contribute to excess motion along frontal and transverse planes which decreases efficiency in normal sagittal plane running motions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether adding a 6-week pelvic and core strengthening program resulted in decreased race times in high school cross-country runners. Thirty-five high school cross-country runners (14-19 years old) from 2 high schools were randomly assigned to a strengthening group (experimental) or a nonstrengthening group (control). All participants completed 4 standardized isometric strength tests for hip abductors, adductors, extensors, and core musculature in a test-retest design. The experimental group performed a 6-week pelvic and core strengthening program along with their normal training. Participants in the control group performed their normal training without additional pelvic and core strengthening. Baseline, 3-week, and 6-week race times were collected using a repeated measures design. No significant interaction between experimental and control groups regarding decreasing race times and increasing pelvic and core musculature strength occurred over the 6-week study period. Both groups increased strength and decreased overall race times. Clinically significant findings reveal a 6-week pelvic and core stability strengthening program 3 times a week in addition to coach led team training may help decrease race times.

  13. Effect of tooth whitening strips on fatigue resistance and flexural strength of bovine dentin in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Tam

    Full Text Available To determine the effects of whitening strips on bovine dentin fatigue resistance and flexural strength in vitro.A total of eighty bovine dentin specimens (2x2x17mm were treated with either: control glycerine gel on plastic film wrap or whitening strips containing 9.5% hydrogen peroxide. Treatment was applied for 30 minutes, twice a day, for 1- or 4-weeks. After the last treatment, ten specimens per group were randomly selected to undergo fatigue testing (106 cycles, 3Hz, 20N while the other ten were subjected to flexural strength testing after ten days of storage in artificial saliva. Kaplan-Meier method with a log rank test, Wilcoxon test and Cox regression were used to assess fatigue test results (p<0.05. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests were used to compare the flexural strength results (p<0.05.There were significant differences in survival during the fatigue test among the groups (p<0.001. Treatment (control or bleach was a significant factor for specimen survival (p<0.001, Exp(B = 33.45. There were significant differences in mean flexural strength (p<0.001. No significant difference was found between "1-wk control" and "4-wk control". The mean flexural strength and fatigue resistance of the "4-wk bleach" were significantly lower than all the other groups.The use of whitening strips reduced the fatigue resistance and flexural strength of bovine dentin in vitro. Until the effect of whitening strips on mechanical properties of human dentin is fully elucidated, it remains prudent to advise patients to avoid excessive direct use of whitening strips on dentin.

  14. Effect of water absorption by the aggregate on properties of high-strength lightweight concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punkki, J.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, high-strength lightweight concrete has become an interesting building material for the offshore oil industry. This doctoral thesis presents an experimental investigation of the effect of water absorption by three different types of lightweight aggregates. One type did not show any water absorption ability at all and so represented no problem to the concrete production. For the two other high-strength aggregates, which were of more conventional types, the water absorption depended not only on the properties of the aggregates, but also on the concrete mixing procedure and the properties of the fresh cement paste. When water absorbing lightweight aggregate was used in a dry condition, the workability of the concrete was significantly reduced by the water absorption of the aggregate. This effect was not present when prewetted aggregate was used. The water absorption by the lightweight aggregate also affected the early compressive strength of concrete. After one day, dry aggregate gave on the average 10 MPa higher compressive strength than did prewetted aggregate. The strength-density ratio was affected by the moisture condition of the aggregate. Dry lightweight aggregate gave 9 MPa higher compressive strength at a density of 2000 kg/m{sup 3} compared to that of prewetted aggregate. The water absorption by the lightweight also affected the microstructure of the hardened concrete. Dry lightweight aggregate gave a slightly better microstructure than normal weight aggregate. The results indicate that the use of prewetted aggregate adversely affected the transition zone between the aggregate and the cement paste. 69 refs., 58 figs., 42 tabs.

  15. Effect of ionic strength on the kinetics of ionic and micellar reactions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dung, M.H.; Kozak, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of electrostatic forces on the rate of reaction between ions in aqueous solutions of intermediate ionic strength is studied in this paper. We consider the kinetics of reactions involving simple ionic species (1--1 and 2--2 electrolyte systems) as well as kinetic processes mediated by the presence of micellar ions (or other charged organizates). In the regime of ionic strength considered, dielectric saturation of the solvent in the vicinity of the reacting ions must be taken into account and this is done by introducing several models to describe the recovery of the solvent from saturation to its continuum dielectric behavior. To explore the effects of ion size, charge number, and ionic strength on the overall rate constant for the process considered, we couple the traditional theory of ionic reactions in aqueous solution with calculations of the electrostatic potential obtained via solution of the nonlinear Poisson--Boltzmann equation. The great flexibility of the nonlinear Poisson--Boltzmann theory allows us to explore quantitatively the influence of each of these effects, and our simulations show that the short-range properties of the electrostatic potential affect primarily kinetically controlled processes (to varying degrees, depending on the ionic system considered) whereas the down-range properties of the potential play a (somewhat) greater role in influencing diffusion-controlled processes. A detailed examination is made of ionic strength effects over a broad range of ionic concentrations. In the regime of low ionic strength, the limiting slope and intercept of the curve describing the dependence of log k/sub D/ on I/sup 1/2//(1+I/sup 1/2/) may differ considerably from the usual Debye--Hueckel limiting relations, depending on the particular model chosen to describe local saturation effects

  16. Stimulatory effect of undecylenic acid on mouse osteoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung Hee; Shim, Ki Shuk; Lee, Su-Ui; Kim, Young Sup; Min, Yong Ki; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2010-04-01

    Natural compounds with bone-forming (or anabolic) activity have been recently focused on in bone research. The present study investigated the effect of undecylenic acid (UA) on osteoblast differentiation in mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 subclone 4 cells and primary mouse calvarial cells. Low concentrations of UA (up to 5 microM) exhibited no cytotoxicity and significantly increased the expression and activity of alkaline phosphatase (early differentiation marker of osteoblast) and calcium deposition with the induction of expression of the osteocalcin gene in both cells. Interestingly, at low concentration of UA, the induction of NF-kappaB p65 translocation into nucleus and the up-regulation of AP-1 and NFATc1 transcript levels were also observed, suggesting that the stimulatory effect of UA on osteoblast differentiation could be mediated through the activation of transcription factors. Additionally, although the patterns of UA-induced activation of MAP kinases (JNK and p38) were not completely consistent with the increase of both ALP activity and calcium deposition by UA, MAP kinases might be partially involved in the biological function of UA during the early and late stages of osteoblast differentiation. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. The electric strength of high-voltage transformers insulation at effect of partial dischargers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoshravan, E.; Zeraatparvar, A.; Gashimov, A.M.; Mehdizadeh, R.N.

    2001-01-01

    Full text : In paper the change of electric strength of high-voltage transformers insulation at the effect of partial discharges with space charge accumulation was investigated. It is revealed that the effect of partial discharges of insulation materials results the reduction of their pulsing electric strength which can restore the own initial value at releasing of saved charge the volume of a material under condition of absence the ineversible structural changes in it. Researches of high-voltage transformers insulation's non-failure operation conditions show, that at increasing of insulation work time in a strong electrical field the reduction of average breakdown voltages with simultaneous increasing of spread in discharge voltage values takes place. It authentically testifies to reduction of short-time discharge voltage of insulation materials during their electrical aging. As the basic reason of insulation electrical aging the partial discharges occurring in gas cavities inside insulation were considered. It is known that the space charges will be formed in insulation elements of high-voltage devices which effects in dielectrical property of these elements including the electric strength and the space charge formation can occur also at partial discharges in an alternating voltage while the service of high-voltage transformers. In the given work the experiments in revealing separate influence partial discharges in pulsing electric strength of insulation materials at presence and at absence inside them the space charge were spent

  18. Fissure formation in coke. 2: Effect of heating rate, shrinkage and coke strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.R. Jenkins; M.R. Mahoney [CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Mathematical and Information Sciences

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the effects of the heating rate, coke shrinkage and coke breakage strength upon the fissure pattern developed in a coke oven charge during carbonisation. This is done principally using a mechanistic model of the formation of fissures, which considers them to be an array of equally spaced fissures, whose depth follows a 'period doubling' pattern based upon the time history of the fissures. The model results are compared with pilot scale coke oven experiments. The results show that the effect of heating rate on the fissure pattern is different to the effect of coke shrinkage, while the effect of coke breakage strength on the pattern is less pronounced. The results can be seen in both the shape and size of resulting coke lumps after stabilisation. The approach gives the opportunity to consider means of controlling the carbonisation process in order to tune the size of the coke lumps produced. 7 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. High-intensity intermittent exercise and its effects on heart rate variability and subsequent strength performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Leme Gonçalves Panissa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available PRUPOSE: To investigate the effects of a 5-km high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE on heart rate variability (HRV and subsequent strength performance. METHODS: nine trained males performed a control session composed of a half-squat strength exercise (4 x 80% of one repetition maximum – 1RM in isolation and 30-min, 1-, 4-, 8- and 24-h after an HIIE (1-min at the velocity peak:1-min passive recovery. All experimental sessions were performed on different days. The maximum number of repetitions and total weight lifted during the strength exercise were registered in all conditions; in addition, prior to each session, HRV were assessed [beat-to-beat intervals (RR and log-transformed of root means square of successive differences in the normal-to-normal intervals (lnRMSSD]. RESULTS: Performance in the strength exercise dropped at 30-min (31% and 1-h (19% post-HIIE concomitantly with lower values of RR (781±79 ms; 799±134 ms, respectively in the same recovery intervals compared to the control (1015±197 ms. Inferential analysis did not detect any effect of condition on lnRMSSD, however, values were lower after 30-min (3.5±0.4 ms and 1-h (3.3±0.5 ms with moderate and large effect sizes (0.9 and 1.2, respectively compared with the control condition (3.9±0.4 ms. CONCLUSION: Both RR and lnRMSSD seem to be associated with deleterious effects on strength performance, although further studies should be conducted to clarify this association.

  20. Lasting effects of workplace strength training for neck/shoulder/arm pain among laboratory technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter; Larsen, Anders I; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study investigated long-term effects and implementation processes of workplace strength training for musculoskeletal disorders. Methods. 333 and 140 laboratory technicians from private and public sector companies, respectively, replied to a 3-year follow-up questionnaire subseque...... be implemented successfully at different companies during working hours on a long-term basis with lasting effects on pain in neck, shoulder, and arm....

  1. Differential effects of arousal in positive and negative autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jaclyn Hennessey; Addis, Donna Rose; Giovanello, Kelly S

    2012-01-01

    Autobiographical memories are characterised by a range of emotions and emotional reactions. Recent research has demonstrated that differences in emotional valence (positive vs. negative emotion) and arousal (the degree of emotional intensity) differentially influence the retrieved memory narrative. Although the mnemonic effects of valence and arousal have both been heavily studied, it is currently unclear whether the effects of emotional arousal are equivalent for positive and negative autobiographical events. In the current study, multilevel models were used to examine differential effects of emotional valence and arousal on the richness of autobiographical memory retrieval both between and within subjects. Thirty-four young adults were asked to retrieve personal autobiographical memories associated with popular musical cues and to rate the valence, arousal and richness of these events. The multilevel analyses identified independent influences of valence and intensity upon retrieval characteristics at the within- and between-subject levels. In addition, the within-subject interactions between valence and arousal highlighted differential effects of arousal for positive and negative memories. These findings have important implications for future studies of emotion and memory, highlighting the importance of considering both valence and arousal when examining the role emotion plays in the richness of memory representation.

  2. Effects of a 16-week Pilates exercises training program for isometric trunk extension and flexion strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliziene, Irina; Sipaviciene, Saule; Vilkiene, Jovita; Astrauskiene, Audrone; Cibulskas, Gintautas; Klizas, Sarunas; Cizauskas, Ginas

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of Pilates exercises designed to improve isometric trunk extension and flexion strength of muscles in women with chronic low back pain (cLBP). Female volunteers with cLBP were divided into an experimental group (EG; n = 27) and a control group (CG; n = 27). Pilates exercises were performed twice per week by the EG; the duration of each session was 60 min. The program lasted for 16 weeks; thus patients underwent a total of 32 exercise sessions. The maximum isometric waist bending strength of the EG had improved significantly (p = 0.001) after 16 weeks of the Pilates program. The results of trunk flexion muscle endurance tests significantly depended on the trunk extension muscle endurance before the intervention, and at 1 month (r = 0.723, p Pilates exercise program. At the end of the 16-week exercise program, cLBP intensity decreased by 2.01 ± 0.8 (p Pilates exercise program the pain intensified and the functional state deteriorated much faster than the maximum trunk muscle strength. Therefore, it can be concluded that, to decrease pain and improve functional condition, regular exercise (and not only improved strength and endurance) is required. We established that, although the 16-week lumbar stabilization exercise program increased isometric trunk extension and flexion strength and this increase in strength persisted for 2 months, decreased LBP and improved functional condition endured for only 1 month. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of silane application on the shear bond strength of ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinandi Sri Pudyani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fixed orthodontic appliances with ceramic brackets are used frequently to fulfill the aesthetic demand of patient through orthodontic treatment. Ceramic brackets have some weaknesses such as bond strength and enamel surface damage. In high bond strength the risk of damage in enamel surfaces increases after debonding. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the effect of silane on base of bracket and adhesive to shear bond strength and enamel structure of ceramic bracket. Method: Sixteen extracted upper premolars were randomly divided into four groups based on silane or no silane on the bracket base and on the adhesive surface. Design of the base on ceramic bracket in this research was microcrystalline to manage the influence of mechanical interlocking. Samples were tested in shear mode on a universal testing machine after attachment. Following it, adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were used to assess bond failure site. Statistical analysis was performed using a two-way Anova and the Mann-Whitney test. A scanning electron microscope (SEM with a magnification of 2000x was used to observe enamel structure after debonding. Result: Shear bond strength was increased between group without silane and group with silane on the base of bracket (p<0,05. There was no significance different between group without silane and group with silane on adhesive (p<0,05. Conclusion: Application of silane on base of bracket increases shear bond strength, however, application of silane on adhesive site does not increase shear bond strength of ceramic bracket. Most bonding failure occurred at the enamel adhesive interface and damage occurred on enamel structure in group contains silane of ceramic bracket.

  4. Strength of evidence for the effects of feral cats on insular wildlife: The Club Med Syndrome Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Various types of evidence have been promulgated as proof for the effects of feral cats on wildlife, typically including numerous studies on predation inferred from diet, mortality attributed to pathogens, and photographic or videographic documentation. The strength of these types of evidence is often short of conclusive. For example, studies of predation inferred from diet provide weak evidence for two reasons: 1) they cannot differentiate depredation from scavenging by feral cats, and 2) they cannot address population-level effects on wildlife because it is rarely understood if mortality acts in compensatory or additive manner. Likewise, pathogens may cause mortality of individuals, but population-level effects of pathogens are rarely known. Photographic or videographic documentation provides direct ‘smoking gun’ evidence that may be useful for positive identification of depredation by cats, or identification of prey designated as threatened or endangered species. However, the most direct and compelling evidence comes from examples where feral cats have been entirely removed from islands. In many cases, several species of seabirds as well as other wildlife have recovered after the complete removal of cats. Where possible, the experimental removal of cats would provide the most conclusive proof of effects on wildlife populations. In other cases where cat removal is not feasible, modeling based on predation rates and life history parameters of species may be the only means of assessing population-level effects on wildlife. Understanding population-level effects of feral cats on wildlife will ultimately be necessary to resolve long-standing wildlife management issues.

  5. The effect of various pozzolanic additives on the concrete strength index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitola, L.; Sahmenko, G.; Erdmane, D.; Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.

    2017-10-01

    The concrete industry is searching continuously for new effective mineral additives to improve the concrete properties. Replacing cement with the pozzolanic additives in most cases has resulted not only in positive impact on the environment but also has improved strength and durability of the concrete. Effective pozzolanic additives can be obtained from natural resources such as volcanic ashes, kaolin and other sediments as well as from different production industries that create various by-products with high pozzolanic reactivity. Current research deals with effectiveness evaluation of various mineral additives/wastes, such as coal combustion bottom ash, barley bottom ash, waste glass and metakaolin containing waste as well as calcined illite clays as supplementary cementitious materials, to be used in concrete production as partial cement replacement. Most of the examined materials are used as waste stream materials with potential reactive effect on the concrete. Milling time and fineness of the tested supplementary material has been evaluated and effectiveness was detected. Results indicate that fineness of the tested materials has crucial effect on the concrete compressive strength index. Not in all cases the prolonged milling time can increase fineness and reactivity of the supplementary materials; however the optimal milling time and fineness of the pozolanic additives increased the strength index of concrete up to 1.16 comparing to reference, even in cases when cement was substituted by 20 w%.

  6. The Goals and Effects of Music Listening and Their Relationship to the Strength of Music Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Individual differences in the strength of music preference are among the most intricate psychological phenomena. While one person gets by very well without music, another person needs to listen to music every day and spends a lot of temporal and financial resources on listening to music, attending concerts, or buying concert tickets. Where do these differences come from? The hypothesis presented in this article is that the strength of music preference is mainly informed by the functions that music fulfills in people's lives (e.g., to regulate emotions, moods, or physiological arousal; to promote self-awareness; to foster social relatedness). Data were collected with a diary study, in which 121 respondents documented the goals they tried to attain and the effects that actually occurred for up to 5 music-listening episodes per day for 10 successive days. As expected, listeners reporting more intense experience of the functional use of music in the past (1) had a stronger intention to listen to music to attain specific goals in specific situations and (2) showed a larger overall strength of music preference. It is concluded that the functional effectiveness of music listening should be incorporated in existing models and frameworks of music preference to produce better predictions of interindividual differences in the strength of music preference. The predictability of musical style/genre preferences is also discussed with regard to the present results.

  7. The Effect of Polymer-Cement Stabilization on the Unconfined Compressive Strength of Liquefiable Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ateş

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil stabilization has been widely used as an alternative to substitute the lack of suitable material on site. The use of nontraditional chemical stabilizers in soil improvement is growing daily. In this study a laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of waterborne polymer on unconfined compression strength and to study the effect of cement grout on pre-venting of liquefiable sandy soils. The laboratory tests were performed including grain size of sandy soil, unit weight, ultrasonic pulse velocity, and unconfined compressive strength test. The sand and various amounts of polymer (1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% and cement (10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% were mixed with all of them into dough using mechanical kneader in laboratory conditions. Grouting experiment is performed with a cylindrical mould of  mm. The samples were subjected to unconfined compression tests to determine their strength after 7 and 14 days of curing. The results of the tests indicated that the waterborne polymer significantly improved the unconfined compression strength of sandy soils which have susceptibility of liquefaction.

  8. Effect of surface finishing and heat treatments on the mechanical strength of sintered alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lino, U.R.A.

    1982-04-01

    The effect of surface finishing on the mechanical strength of two pure aluminas, one of self-production and another a commercial one, is studied. Three types of finishings: as-sintered, as machined and as-machined with thermal treatment were studied. It was verified that the as-machined alumina is about 50 percent stronger than the as-sintered one, and that a thermal treatment increases even more the mechanical strength of the sintered alumina. The effect of the volume and pressing direction on mechanical strength was studied. The kinetics of crack healing was determined from a series of systematically selected thermal treatments with annealing temperatures between 1200 0 C and 1600 0 C. It was verified that a recently developed theoretical model for crack healing can describe the experimental results; using this model a value for the activation energy of the process of 715 kJ/mcl was obtained, which suggests that crack healing is promoted by volume diffusion. The material behavior under subcritical crack growth action was also studied, and a value of about 40 for the subcritical crack growth exponent N from dynamic loading tests in water was found. A fractographic study intended to localize and measure the flaws that originated the fracture of the tested specimens was performed; the measured flaw sizes were compared with the flaw size calculated from the values of the measured mechanical strength; in this comparison an excellent agreement was observed. (Author) [pt

  9. Effects of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Masahiro; Gomi, Masahiro; Katoh, Munenori

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting by performing simultaneous measurements with a handheld dynamometer (HHD) and an isokinetic dynamometer (IKD) in the same seated condition. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 healthy volunteers. Isometric knee extension muscle strength was simultaneously measured with a HHD and an IKD by using an IKD-specific chair. The measurement was performed twice. Measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were examined by using the analysis of variance and correlation tests. [Results] The measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were not significantly different. The correlation coefficients between the HHD and IKD measurements were ≥0.96. [Conclusion] Isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement using the HHD in the sitting position resulted in a lower value than that using the IKD, presumably because of the effect of trunk stability on the measurement. In the same seated posture with trunk stability, no significant difference in measurement values was observed between the HHD and IKD. The present findings suggest that trunk stability while seated during isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement influenced the HHD measurement.

  10. The Goals and Effects of Music Listening and Their Relationship to the Strength of Music Preference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schäfer

    Full Text Available Individual differences in the strength of music preference are among the most intricate psychological phenomena. While one person gets by very well without music, another person needs to listen to music every day and spends a lot of temporal and financial resources on listening to music, attending concerts, or buying concert tickets. Where do these differences come from? The hypothesis presented in this article is that the strength of music preference is mainly informed by the functions that music fulfills in people's lives (e.g., to regulate emotions, moods, or physiological arousal; to promote self-awareness; to foster social relatedness. Data were collected with a diary study, in which 121 respondents documented the goals they tried to attain and the effects that actually occurred for up to 5 music-listening episodes per day for 10 successive days. As expected, listeners reporting more intense experience of the functional use of music in the past (1 had a stronger intention to listen to music to attain specific goals in specific situations and (2 showed a larger overall strength of music preference. It is concluded that the functional effectiveness of music listening should be incorporated in existing models and frameworks of music preference to produce better predictions of interindividual differences in the strength of music preference. The predictability of musical style/genre preferences is also discussed with regard to the present results.

  11. Effects of replacement of binder content on bond strength of mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. C. Costa

    Full Text Available The reduction of binder content in cementitious systems is an effective way to mitigate environmental impacts without increasing costs. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of content binder on bond strength of mortar-brick interface. For thus, it was studied mortars produced with two limestone fines with different particle size distribution. The limestone fines were added at rates of 0% to 60% at increments of 15% as partial volume replacement of binder. Mortars were prepared in proportion of 1:3 (binder + limestone: sand in volume. The water content was kept constant and equal to 18% in relation to total weight of solids. The mechanical property of mortars was evaluated by tensile strength and the performance of interface by bond strength tests at 14 days. Results indicate that is possible make mortars with 45% less than binder without reducing bond strength. Thus, the use of appropriate particles of limestone can produce more environmentally friendly concrete and rendering mortars by reducing its binder factor without affecting its performance.

  12. EFFECT OF ECCENTRIC EXERCISE PROGRAMME ON PAIN AND GRIP STRENGTH FOR SUBJECTS WITH MEDIAL EPICONDYLITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Prashant Akhilesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Therapeutic eccentric exercise may provide both a structural and functional benefit during tendinopathy rehabilitation. The objective is to find the effect of eccentric exercises on improvement of pain and grip strength for subjects with Medial Epicondylitis. Method: Pre to post test experimental study design randomized thirty subjects with medial epicondylitis, 15 each into Group A and Group B. Group B subjects were treated with conventional therapy and Eccentric exercises. Group A subjects were treated with conventional therapy. Results: When means of post intervention were compared using Independent ‘t’ between groups there was no statistically significant difference in improvements obtained in VAS scores and grip strength. There was a statistically significant change in means of VAS score and Grip strength when means were analyzed by using Paired‘t’ test and Wilcoxon signed rank test within the groups with positive percentage of change. Conclusion: It is concluded that four weeks of Eccentric Exercise Programme combined with conventional therapy shown significant effect on improving pain and Grip strength, however the improvement obtained has no difference when compared with control conventional treatment for Subjects with Medial Epicondylitis.

  13. The Goals and Effects of Music Listening and Their Relationship to the Strength of Music Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Individual differences in the strength of music preference are among the most intricate psychological phenomena. While one person gets by very well without music, another person needs to listen to music every day and spends a lot of temporal and financial resources on listening to music, attending concerts, or buying concert tickets. Where do these differences come from? The hypothesis presented in this article is that the strength of music preference is mainly informed by the functions that music fulfills in people’s lives (e.g., to regulate emotions, moods, or physiological arousal; to promote self-awareness; to foster social relatedness). Data were collected with a diary study, in which 121 respondents documented the goals they tried to attain and the effects that actually occurred for up to 5 music-listening episodes per day for 10 successive days. As expected, listeners reporting more intense experience of the functional use of music in the past (1) had a stronger intention to listen to music to attain specific goals in specific situations and (2) showed a larger overall strength of music preference. It is concluded that the functional effectiveness of music listening should be incorporated in existing models and frameworks of music preference to produce better predictions of interindividual differences in the strength of music preference. The predictability of musical style/genre preferences is also discussed with regard to the present results. PMID:26985998

  14. Effects of residual stress on fatigue strength of small diameter welded pipe joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Tetsuo; Hattori, Takahiro; Nomoto, Toshiharu; Iida, Kunihiro; Sato, Masanobu

    1996-01-01

    A power plant consists of many welded components, therefore, it is essential in establishing the reliability of the power plant to maintain the reliability of all welded components. The fatigue failure caused by mechanical vibrations of small diameter welded joints, which is represented by socket welded joints, is one of the major causes of trouble for the welded parts of the power plant. Here, bending fatigue tests were conducted to investigate the fatigue strength of small diameter socket welded pipe joints. In the most cases of large diameter socket joints, a fatigue crack started from the root of the fillet weld though the stress amplitude at the root was smaller than that at the toe of fillet weld. Additionally, the fatigue strength was affected by the weld bead sequence. The residual stress was considered to be one of the important parameters governing fatigue strength, therefore, its effects were investigated. In several types of pipe joints, the local stress and residual stress distributions were calculated by finite element analysis. The residual stresses were compressive at the toe and tensile at the root of the socket welded joints. Based on these results, the effects of residual stresses on the fatigue strength are discussed for small diameter welded pipe joints in the present work

  15. Sterilisation of allograft cortical bone using gamma irradiation: effect on strength and material ultrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.; Walters, M.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The use of allograft bone in revision joint and limb salvage surgery is widespread and increasing (Buck B.E. et al, Clin Orthop 303: 8-17, 1994). To reduce the risk of disease transmission from donor graft contamination (particularly HIV and hepatitis) sterilisation is practiced worldwide. Gamma (γ)-irradiation using a dose of 1.5 - 2.5 Mrads is common. However, γ-irradiation is known to reduce bone strength, though the extent and mechanisms are controversial (eg Bright RW et al, Trans Orthop Res Soc 3: 210, 1978). We measured the effect of γ-irradiation on bone strength and properties reflecting bone material ultrastructure. Diaphyseal bone was obtained from the femur of a 47 year-old male would-be donor with suspicious hepatitis serology. Beams of cortical bone (long axes parallel to the femur) were cut using a low speed diamond saw bathed in Ringer's solution. Four groups were irradiated with γ-rays (0, 1.5, 2.5 and 5.0±0.5[SD] Mrads). Blinded investigations were performed: Ultimate stress (Ult Stress, N= 16 replicates in each dose group). Each beam was loaded at its midpoint at a rate of 25 mm/min until failure, while its ends were supported 40 mms apart. Ult stress was calculated from 3-point bending theory using the load vs displacement curve and the cross-sectional area of the break (Power RA et al, submitted to J Bone and Joint Surg). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was performed over the range -15 to +5 deg C. Samples were demineralized and small (7-10 mg) blocks were cut and sealed in stainless steel calorimetry capsules. The enthalpy (reflecting the normalised free water content) was calculated from the sample mass plus area under the heat capacity curve. Pyridinoline collagen (acid-insoluble) crosslinks (Pyrid, N=10) (Randall D et al, JBone and Min Res, 1996, in press) were determined from 5-mm 3 demineralised, freeze dried samples. Small and medium angle X-ray diffraction (XRD, N=5). Demineralised bone was sliced into thin

  16. Planning to break unwanted habits: habit strength moderates implementation intention effects on behaviour change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Thomas L; Sheeran, Paschal; Luszczynska, Aleksandra

    2009-09-01

    Implementation intention formation promotes effective goal striving and goal attainment. However, little research has investigated whether implementation intentions promote behaviour change when people possess strong antagonistic habits. Experiment 1 developed relatively habitual responses that, after a task switch, had a detrimental impact on task performance. Forming an if-then plan reduced the negative impact of habit on performance. However, the effect of forming implementation intentions was smaller among participants who possessed strong habits as compared to participants who had weaker habits. Experiment 2 provided a field test of the role of habit strength in moderating the relationship between implementation intentions and behaviour in the context of smoking. Implementation intentions reduced smoking among participants with weak or moderate smoking habits, but not among participants with strong smoking habits. In summary, habit strength moderates the effectiveness of if-then plan formation in breaking unwanted habits.

  17. On the Da Vinci size effect in tensile strengths of nanowires: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ziyu; Liu, Jinxing; Soh, Ai Kah

    2018-01-01

    In recent decades, size effects caused by grain size, strain gradient, typical defects etc., have been widely investigated. Nevertheless, the dependence of tensile strength on the specimen length, addressed by Da Vinci around 500 hundred years ago, has received rather limited attention, even though it is one unavoidable question to answer if people attempt to bring materials' amazing nano-scale strengths up to macro-level. Therefore, we make efforts to study tensile behaviors of copper nanowires with a common cross-section and various lengths by employing the molecular dynamics simulations. Surprisingly, a strong size effect of Da Vinci type indeed arises. We have shown the influences of lattice orientation, temperature and prescribed notch on such a Da Vinci size effect. Two different theoretical explanations are briefly proposed for a qualitative understanding. Finally, a simple scaling rule is summarized to cover the tendencies observed.

  18. On the Da Vinci size effect in tensile strengths of nanowires: A molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyu Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, size effects caused by grain size, strain gradient, typical defects etc., have been widely investigated. Nevertheless, the dependence of tensile strength on the specimen length, addressed by Da Vinci around 500 hundred years ago, has received rather limited attention, even though it is one unavoidable question to answer if people attempt to bring materials’ amazing nano-scale strengths up to macro-level. Therefore, we make efforts to study tensile behaviors of copper nanowires with a common cross-section and various lengths by employing the molecular dynamics simulations. Surprisingly, a strong size effect of Da Vinci type indeed arises. We have shown the influences of lattice orientation, temperature and prescribed notch on such a Da Vinci size effect. Two different theoretical explanations are briefly proposed for a qualitative understanding. Finally, a simple scaling rule is summarized to cover the tendencies observed.

  19. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECT OF NATIONAL VS. REGIONAL CELEBRITIES ON CONSUMER ATTITUDES

    OpenAIRE

    Varsha JAIN; Subhadip ROY; Abhishek KUMAR; Anusha KABRA

    2010-01-01

    The present study explores the differential effects of having a National/Regional celebrity in an advertisement/ endorsement. More specifically the study intends to find out whether a National celebrity would have a more favorable impact on consumer attitudes than a Regional celebrity when endorsing the same product. Experimental design was used as the research methodology. A 3 (National Celebrity/Regional Celebrity/No Celebrity) X 2 (High/Low Involvement Product) design was conducted on stud...

  20. Effect of Various Surface Treatment on Repair Strength of Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Alizade

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: In some clinical situations, repair of composite restorations is treatment of choice. Improving the bond strength between one new and old composite usually requires increased surface roughness to promote mechanical interlocking sincechemical bonding might not be adequate. Similarly, the treatment of a laboratory fabricated resin composite restoration involves the same procedures, and there is a need to create the strongest possible bond of a resin cement to a previously polymerized composite.Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of various surface treatments on the shear bond strength of repaired to aged composite resin.Materials and Methods: Eighty four cylindrical specimens of a composite resin were fabricated and stored in distilled water for 100 days prior to surface treatment. Surface treatment of old composite was done in 6 groups as follow:1- Air abrasion with CoJet sand particles with micoretcher + silane + dentin bonding agent2- Air abrasion with 50μm Al2O3 particles+ phosphoric acid+ silane+ dentin bonding agent3- Air abrasion with 50μm Al2O3 particles + phosphoric acid + dentin bonding agent4- Diamond bur + phosphoric acid + silane + dentin bonding agent5- Diamond bur + phosphoric acid + dentin bonding agent6- Diamond bur + phosphoric acid + composite activator + dentin bonding agentThen fresh composite resin was bonded to treated surfaces. Twelve specimens were also fabricated as control group with the same diameter but with the height twice as much as other specimens. All of the specimens were thermocycled prior to testing for shear bondstrength. The bond strength data were analyzed statistically using one way ANOVA test, t test and Duncan's grouping test.Results: One-way ANOVA indicated no significant difference between 7 groups (P=0.059. One-way ANOVA indicated significant difference between the three diamond bur groups (P=0.036. Silane had a significant effect on the repair bond

  1. Effectiveness of acute in-hospital physiotherapy with knee-extension strength training in reducing strength deficits in patients with a hip fracture: A randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Kronborg

    Full Text Available Is acute in-hospital physiotherapy with additional progressive knee-extension strength training (ST of the fractured limb more effective in reducing knee-extension strength deficit at follow-up compared to physiotherapy without strength training in patients with a hip fracture?Assessor blinded, randomised controlled trial with intention-to-treat analysis.90 patients with a hip fracture admitted to an acute orthopaedic Hip Fracture Unit at a university hospital between October 2013 and May 2015.Daily physiotherapy with or without progressive knee-extension strength training (10RM, 3 x 10 repetitions, of the fractured limb using ankle weight cuffs conducted by ward physical therapists during hospital stay.Primary outcome was the change in maximal isometric knee-extension strength in the fractured limb in percentage of the non-fractured limb from inclusion to postoperative day 10 or discharge (follow-up. Secondary outcome was Timed Up and Go test measured early after surgery and at follow-up.In the intention-to-treat analysis of between-group differences, the primary outcome improved 8.1% (95% CI -2.3; 18.4 by additional strength training from baseline to follow-up. In the per-protocol analysis of non-missing data, significant between-group improvements by 10.5% (95% CI 0.3; 20.7 were found in favour of additional ST. No significant between-group differences were found in any secondary outcome.Physiotherapy with addition of 5 sessions of ST yielded no additional improvements compared to physiotherapy without strength training in reducing the knee-extension strength deficit at follow-up in patients with a hip fracture. It is debatable whether larger improvements than the observed 8-10% can be expected given that only five exercise sessions, on average, were completed. In fragile patients with a hip fracture in the acute phase, where the ability to participate in functional exercise is compromised, we still consider early strength training a

  2. Category-length and category-strength effects using images of scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Oliver; Vromen, Joyce M G; Boddy, Adam C; Crawshaw, Eloise; Humphreys, Michael S

    2018-06-21

    Global matching models have provided an important theoretical framework for recognition memory. Key predictions of this class of models are that (1) increasing the number of occurrences in a study list of some items affects the performance on other items (list-strength effect) and that (2) adding new items results in a deterioration of performance on the other items (list-length effect). Experimental confirmation of these predictions has been difficult, and the results have been inconsistent. A review of the existing literature, however, suggests that robust length and strength effects do occur when sufficiently similar hard-to-label items are used. In an effort to investigate this further, we had participants study lists containing one or more members of visual scene categories (bathrooms, beaches, etc.). Experiments 1 and 2 replicated and extended previous findings showing that the study of additional category members decreased accuracy, providing confirmation of the category-length effect. Experiment 3 showed that repeating some category members decreased the accuracy of nonrepeated members, providing evidence for a category-strength effect. Experiment 4 eliminated a potential challenge to these results. Taken together, these findings provide robust support for global matching models of recognition memory. The overall list lengths, the category sizes, and the number of repetitions used demonstrated that scene categories are well-suited to testing the fundamental assumptions of global matching models. These include (A) interference from memories for similar items and contexts, (B) nondestructive interference, and (C) that conjunctive information is made available through a matching operation.

  3. Temperature effect compensation for fast differential pressure decay testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yan; Tong, Xiaomeng; Cai, Maolin

    2014-01-01

    To avoid the long temperature recovery period with differential pressure decay for leak detection, a novel method with temperature effect compensation is proposed to improve the testing efficiency without full stabilization of temperature. The mathematical model of conventional differential pressure decay testing is established to analyze the changes of temperature and pressure during the measuring period. Then the differential pressure is divided into two parts: the exponential part caused by temperature recovery and the linear part caused by leak. With prior information obtained from samples, parameters of the exponential part can be identified precisely, and the temperature effect will be compensated before it fully recovers. To verify the effect of the temperature compensated method, chambers with different volumes are tested under various pressures and the experiments show that the improved method is faster with satisfactory precision, and an accuracy less than 0.25 cc min −1  can be achieved when the compensation time is proportional to four times the theoretical thermal-time constant. (paper)

  4. Real parameter optimization by an effective differential evolution algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Wagdy Mohamed

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an Effective Differential Evolution (EDE algorithm for solving real parameter optimization problems over continuous domain. The proposed algorithm proposes a new mutation rule based on the best and the worst individuals among the entire population of a particular generation. The mutation rule is combined with the basic mutation strategy through a linear decreasing probability rule. The proposed mutation rule is shown to promote local search capability of the basic DE and to make it faster. Furthermore, a random mutation scheme and a modified Breeder Genetic Algorithm (BGA mutation scheme are merged to avoid stagnation and/or premature convergence. Additionally, the scaling factor and crossover of DE are introduced as uniform random numbers to enrich the search behavior and to enhance the diversity of the population. The effectiveness and benefits of the proposed modifications used in EDE has been experimentally investigated. Numerical experiments on a set of bound-constrained problems have shown that the new approach is efficient, effective and robust. The comparison results between the EDE and several classical differential evolution methods and state-of-the-art parameter adaptive differential evolution variants indicate that the proposed EDE algorithm is competitive with , and in some cases superior to, other algorithms in terms of final solution quality, efficiency, convergence rate, and robustness.

  5. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Strength and Balance in Patients after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Nazari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common method for improving the quality of life especially in chronic heart disease is rehabilitation. For increasing the level of knowledge about effect of rehabilitation and its' impression on improving the quality of life in patients. This study evaluates effect of one month cardiac rehabilitation on lower limb strength and the static and dynamic balance of CABG patients. Materials and Methods: This study is based on clinical trial before and after rehabilitation. the exercise protocol lasted for one month, three times per week, each session lasting 1 hour, on 30 male patients in two groups in control (N=15 and experimental group (N=15 after CABG in the centre of rehabilitation in Javad-Alaeme Heart Hospital, Mashhad. The strength of lower limb by chair standing test, the static balance by standing on one leg and dynamic balance by time up and go (TUG test, was evaluated before and after 1 month rehabilitation in training group and detraining in control group. Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 and used t-test analysis (p≤0.054T. Results: The strength of lower limb (p=0.001, static balance (p=0.023 and dynamic balance (p=0.037 increased significantly after one month of cardiac rehabilitation4T. Conclusion: The result of this study indicates that cardiac rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass surgery causes significant increase in strength of lower limb and balance in patients, the more muscle strength is associated with an increase in ability of performing daily activities and so it causes improved quality of life4T.

  6. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Strength and Balance in Patients after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Nazari

    Full Text Available Background: The most common method for improving the quality of life especially in chronic heart disease is rehabilitation. For increasing the level of knowledge about effect of rehabilitation and its' impression on improving the quality of life in patients. This study evaluates effect of one month cardiac rehabilitation on lower limb strength and the static and dynamic balance of CABG patients. Materials and Methods: This study is based on clinical trial before and after rehabilitation. the exercise protocol lasted for one month, three times per week, each session lasting 1 hour, on 30 male patients in two groups in control (N=15 and experimental group (N=15 after CABG in the centre of rehabilitation in Javad-Alaeme Heart Hospital, Mashhad. The strength of lower limb by chair standing test, the static balance by standing on one leg and dynamic balance by time up and go (TUG test, was evaluated before and after 1 month rehabilitation in training group and detraining in control group. Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 and used t-test analysis (p≤0.05.Results: The strength of lower limb (p=0.001, static balance (p=0.023 and dynamic balance (p=0.037 increased significantly after one month of cardiac rehabilitation.Conclusion: The result of this study indicates that cardiac rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass surgery causes significant increase in strength of lower limb and balance in patients, the more muscle strength is associated with an increase in ability of performing daily activities and so it causes improved quality of life.

  7. Effects of age, gender and educational background on strength of motivation for medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusurkar, Rashmi; Kruitwagen, Cas; ten Cate, Olle; Croiset, Gerda

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of selection, educational background, age and gender on strength of motivation to attend and pursue medical school. Graduate entry (GE) medical students (having Bachelor's degree in Life Sciences or related field) and Non-Graduate Entry (NGE) medical students (having only completed high school), were asked to fill out the Strength of Motivation for Medical School (SMMS) questionnaire at the start of medical school. The questionnaire measures the willingness of the medical students to pursue medical education even in the face of difficulty and sacrifice. GE students (59.64 ± 7.30) had higher strength of motivation as compared to NGE students (55.26 ± 8.33), so did females (57.05 ± 8.28) as compared to males (54.30 ± 8.08). 7.9% of the variance in the SMMS scores could be explained with the help of a linear regression model with age, gender and educational background/selection as predictor variables. Age was the single largest predictor. Maturity, taking developmental differences between sexes into account, was used as a predictor to correct for differences in the maturation of males and females. Still, the gender differences prevailed, though they were reduced. Pre-entrance educational background and selection also predicted the strength of motivation, but the effect of the two was confounded. Strength of motivation appears to be a dynamic entity, changing primarily with age and maturity and to a small extent with gender and experience.

  8. The effect of basketball training on the muscle strength of adults with mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimaras, Vasilios K; Samara, Christina A; Kotzamanidou, Marianna C; Bassa, Eleni I; Fotiadou, Eleni G; Kotzamanidis, Christos M

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of basketball training on the muscle strength of adults with mental retardation (MR). Twenty-four adults with and without MR were separated into 3 groups. Eight adults (mean age 25.4 years) with normal IQ constituted the control group (NIQ). Eight adults (mean age 26.5 years) with MR and all participating in a 4-year systematic basketball exercise program constituted the trained group (MR-T), and 8 adults (mean age 25.3 years) with MR exercised occasionally for recreational reasons formed the MR-R group. Parameters measured were isometric and isokinetic concentric and eccentric muscle strength. All subjects performed a leg strength test on a Cybex Norm isokinetic dynamometer. Analysis of variance was used to examine mean differences between the values of the 3 groups. A significance level of 0.05 was used for all tests. The NIQ group showed a statistically significant difference in all measured values compared to the MR groups. The MR-T group presented higher absolute and relative torque scores for both knee extensors and flexors than the MR-R group, whereas the MR-R group presented statistically higher antagonistic activity for both knee extensors and flexors than the MR-T group. In addition, both MR groups presented statistically higher antagonistic activity for both knee extensors and flexors compared to the NIQ group. Data support participation on a systematic and well-designed basketball training program to improve muscle strength levels of adults with MR. Participation in basketball without necessarily focusing on developing specific fitness components may be an effective training strategy for the promotion of strength of adults with MR.

  9. Seemingly irrational driving behavior model: The effect of habit strength and anticipated affective reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yi-Shih

    2015-09-01

    An increasing amount of evidence suggests that aberrant driving behaviors are not entirely rational. On the basis of the dual-process theory, this study postulates that drivers may learn to perform irrational aberrant driving behaviors, and these behaviors could be derived either from a deliberate or an intuitive decision-making approach. Accordingly, a seemingly irrational driving behavior model is proposed; in this model, the theory of planned behavior (TPB) was adopted to represent the deliberate decision-making mechanism, and habit strength was incorporated to reflect the intuitive decision process. A multiple trivariate mediation structure was designed to reflect the process through which driving behaviors are learned. Anticipated affective reactions (AARs) were further included to examine the effect of affect on aberrant driving behaviors. Considering the example of speeding behaviors, this study developed scales and conducted a two-wave survey of students in two departments at a university in Northern Taiwan. The analysis results show that habit strength consists of multiple aspects, and frequency of past behavior cannot be a complete repository for accumulating habit strength. Habit strength appeared to be a crucial mediator between intention antecedents (e.g., attitude) and the intention itself. Including habit strength in the TPB model enhanced the explained variance of speeding intention by 26.7%. In addition, AARs were different from attitudes; particularly, young drivers tended to perform speeding behaviors to reduce negative feelings such as regret. The proposed model provides an effective alternative approach for investigating aberrant driving behaviors; corresponding countermeasures are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Longitudinal analysis of the strengths and difficulties questionnaire scores of the Millennium Cohort Study children in England using M-quantile random-effects regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzavidis, Nikos; Salvati, Nicola; Schmid, Timo; Flouri, Eirini; Midouhas, Emily

    2016-02-01

    Multilevel modelling is a popular approach for longitudinal data analysis. Statistical models conventionally target a parameter at the centre of a distribution. However, when the distribution of the data is asymmetric, modelling other location parameters, e.g. percentiles, may be more informative. We present a new approach, M -quantile random-effects regression, for modelling multilevel data. The proposed method is used for modelling location parameters of the distribution of the strengths and difficulties questionnaire scores of children in England who participate in the Millennium Cohort Study. Quantile mixed models are also considered. The analyses offer insights to child psychologists about the differential effects of risk factors on children's outcomes.

  11. Lower limb explosive strength capacity in elderly women: effects of resistance training and healthy diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edholm, Peter; Strandberg, Emelie; Kadi, Fawzi

    2017-07-01

    The effects of 24 wk of resistance training combined with a healthy diet on lower limb explosive strength capacity were investigated in a population of healthy elderly women. Participants ( n = 63; 67.5 ± 0.4 yr) were randomized into three groups; resistance training (RT), resistance training and healthy diet (RT-HD), and control (CON). Progressive resistance training was performed at a load of 75-85% one-repetition maximum. A major adjustment in the healthy dietary approach was an n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio below 2. Lower limb maximal strength, explosive force capacity during dynamic and isometric movements, whole body lean mass, and physical function were assessed. Whole body lean mass significantly increased by 1.5 ± 0.5% in RT-HD only. Isometric strength performance during knee extension as well as the performance in the five sit-to-stand and single-leg-stance tests increased similarly in RT and RT-HD. Improvements in dynamic peak power and time to reach peak power (i.e shorter time) during knee extension occurred in both RT (+15.7 ± 2.6 and -11.0 ± 3.8%, respectively) and RT-HD (+24.6 ± 2.6 and -20.3 ± 2.7%, respectively); however, changes were significantly larger in RT-HD. Similarly, changes in peak force and rate of force development during squat jump were higher in RT-HD (+58.5 ± 8.4 and +185.4 ± 32.9%, respectively) compared with RT (+35.7 ± 6.9 and +105.4 ± 22.4%, respectively). In conclusion, a healthy diet rich in n-3 PUFA can optimize the effects of resistance training on dynamic explosive strength capacity during isolated lower limb movements and multijoint exercises in healthy elderly women. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Age-related decline in lower limb explosive strength leads to impaired ability to perform daily living tasks. The present randomized controlled trial demonstrates that a healthy diet rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) enhances resistance training-induced gains in dynamic explosive strength

  12. Effect of humidity and interlayer cation on frictional strength of montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsuka, H.; Katayama, I.; Sakuma, H.; Tamura, K.

    2016-12-01

    Smectite has been ubiquitously seen in fault gouge (Schleicher et al., 2006; Kuo et al., 2009; Si et al., 2014; Kameda, 2015) and is characteristic by low frictional coefficient (Saffer et al., 2001; Ikari et al., 2007); consequently, it has a key role in fault dynamics. The frictional strength of montmorillonite (a typical type of smectite) is affected by mainly two factors, 1) hydration state and 2) interlayer cation. Previous laboratory experiments have shown that the frictional strength of montmorillonite changes with hydration state (Ikari et al., 2007) and with interlayer cation (Behnsen and Faulkner, 2013). However, experimental study for frictional strengths of interlayer cation-exchanged montmorillonite under controlled hydration state has not been reported. We are developing humidity control system in biaxial friction testing machine and try to investigate the effect of relative humidity and interlayer cation on frictional strength of montmorillonite. The humidity control system consists of two units, 1) the pressure vessel (core holder) unit controlled by a constant temperature and 2) the vapor generating unit controlled by variable temperature. We control relative humidity around sample, which is calculated from the temperature around sample and the vapor pressure at vapor generating unit. Preliminary experiments under controlled humidity show frictional coefficient of montmorillonite decrease with increasing relative humidity. In the meeting, we will report the systematic study of frictional coefficient as function of relative humidity and interlayer cation species.

  13. The Effect of Corrective Exercises on Flexibility and Strength in Postural Scoliosis of Adolescent Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboube Karbalaaie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of corrective exercises on flexibility and strength in Postural Scoliosis of adolescent girls. Materials & Methods: This quasi experimental research was applied as a clinical trial and had done on 40 girls with postural scoliosis those were selected by convenient sampling and assigned to control (n=20 and experimental (n=20 group by simple randomized method. The experimental group received corrective exercises for 30 days and the control group was given no intervention. Flexibility and strength was measured before and after 30 days in all subjects. Data were analyzed by use of Paired T and Independent T tests. Results: There was statistically significant difference in Flexibility and Strength of experimental group between before and after intervention (P<0/001, but There was no significant difference between groups after intervention (P=0.6. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that corrective exercises can lead to improvement of flexibility and strength in scoliosis girls.

  14. Effect of different dispersants in compressive strength of carbon fiber cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, Yulinda; Bahri, Saiful; Sugiarti, Eni; Ramadhan, Gilang; Akbar, Ari Yustisia; Martides, Erie; Khaerudini, Deni S.

    2013-09-01

    Carbon Fiber Cementitious Composites (CFCC) is one of the most important materials in smart concrete applications. CFCC should be able to have the piezoresistivity properties where its resistivity changes when there is applied a stress/strain. It must also have the compressive strength qualification. One of the important additives in carbon fiber cementitious composites is dispersant. Dispersion of carbon fiber is one of the key problems in fabricating piezoresistive carbon fiber cementitious composites. In this research, the uses of dispersants are methylcellulose, mixture of defoamer and methylcellulose and superplasticizer based polycarboxylate. The preparation of composite samples is similar as in the mortar technique according to the ASTM C 109/109M standard. The additives material are PAN type carbon fibers, methylcellulose, defoamer and superplasticizer (as water reducer and dispersant). The experimental testing conducts the compressive strength and resistivity at various curing time, i.e. 3, 7 and 28 days. The results obtained that the highest compressive strength value in is for the mortar using superplasticizer based polycarboxylate dispersant. This also shown that the distribution of carbon fiber with superplasticizer is more effective, since not reacting with the cementitious material which was different from the methylcellulose that creates the cement hydration reaction. The research also found that the CFCC require the proper water cement ratio otherwise the compressive strength becomes lower.

  15. Effect of a step-training program on muscle strength in older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Coelho Zazá

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Step-training is associated with strength improvement of the lower limbs. Muscle strength is a critical component for the maintenance of functional capacity. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of 6 weeks of step-training on work and power of the lower limbs in older women. Thirteen healthy and active women volunteered to participate in the study. All subjects underwent step-training classes three times per week for 60 min. Strength variables of the knee extensor and flexor muscles were measured with a Biodex System 3 Pro isokinetic dynamometer. Muscle work and power were assessed at an angular velocity of 60 and 180°/s. A significant difference (p<0.05 in knee flexor muscle work was observed between pre- and post-test at 60 and 180°/s. There was a significant difference (p<0.05 in knee extensor muscle work between pre- and post-test at 60°/s. Significant differences were observed between pre- and post-test values of knee flexor muscle power at 60°/s (p<0.05 and knee extensor muscle power at 60 and 180°/s (p<0.05. In conclusion, step-training can be recommended as an alternative physical activity to increase strength performance (work and power of the knee extensor and flexor muscles in older subjects.

  16. Nuclear Deformation and Neutron Excess as Competing Effects for Dipole Strength in the Pygmy Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Dönau, F.; Frauendorf, S.; Anders, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Beyer, R.; Bhatia, C.; Birgersson, E.; Butterling, M.; Elekes, Z.; Ferrari, A.; Gooden, M. E.; Hannaske, R.; Junghans, A. R.; Kempe, M.; Kelley, J. H.; Kögler, T.; Matic, A.; Menzel, M. L.; Müller, S.; Reinhardt, T. P.; Röder, M.; Rusev, G.; Schilling, K. D.; Schmidt, K.; Schramm, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Wagner, A.

    2014-02-01

    The electromagnetic dipole strength below the neutron-separation energy has been studied for the xenon isotopes with mass numbers A =124, 128, 132, and 134 in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments using the γELBE bremsstrahlung facility at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the HIγS facility at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory Durham. The systematic study gained new information about the influence of the neutron excess as well as of nuclear deformation on the strength in the region of the pygmy dipole resonance. The results are compared with those obtained for the chain of molybdenum isotopes and with predictions of a random-phase approximation in a deformed basis. It turned out that the effect of nuclear deformation plays a minor role compared with the one caused by neutron excess. A global parametrization of the strength in terms of neutron and proton numbers allowed us to derive a formula capable of predicting the summed E1 strengths in the pygmy region for a wide mass range of nuclides.

  17. Effect of Mg and Si co-substitution on microstructure and strength of tricalcium phosphate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Páez, Ismael H; Carrodeguas, Raúl García; De Aza, Antonio H; Baudín, Carmen; Pena, Pilar

    2014-02-01

    Magnesium and silicon co-doped tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramics with compositions corresponding to 0, 5 and 10wt% CaMg(SiO3)2 in the system Ca3(PO4)2-CaMg(SiO3)2 were obtained by conventional sintering of compacted mixtures of Ca3(PO4)2, MgO, SiO2 and CaCO3 powders at temperatures between 1100 and 1450°C. Microstructural analyses were performed by X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy. Major phases in the obtained ceramics were β- or α+β-tricalcium phosphate containing Mg and Si in solid solution. Certain amounts of liquid were formed during sintering depending on composition and temperature. There were found significant differences in distributions of strength determined by the diametral compression of disc tests (DCDT). Failure strengths were controlled by microstructural defects associated with phase development. Mg and Si additions were found to be effective to improve densification and associated strength of TCP bioceramics due to the enhancement of sintering by the low viscosity liquids formed. The highest density and strength were obtained for the TCP ceramic containing 5wt% CaMg(SiO3)2 sintered at 1300°C. Cracking and porosity increased at higher temperatures due to grain growth and swelling. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Effects of instability versus traditional resistance training on strength, power and velocity in untrained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté-Muñoz, José Luis; Monroy, Antonio J Antón; Jodra Jiménez, Pablo; Garnacho-Castaño, Manuel V

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was compare the effects of a traditional and an instability resistance circuit training program on upper and lower limb strength, power, movement velocity and jumping ability. Thirty-six healthy untrained men were assigned to two experimental groups and a control group. Subjects in the experimental groups performed a resistance circuit training program consisting of traditional exercises (TRT, n = 10) or exercises executed in conditions of instability (using BOSU® and TRX®) (IRT, n = 12). Both programs involved three days per week of training for a total of seven weeks. The following variables were determined before and after training: maximal strength (1RM), average (AV) and peak velocity (PV), average (AP) and peak power (PP), all during bench press (BP) and back squat (BS) exercises, along with squat jump (SJ) height and counter movement jump (CMJ) height. All variables were found to significantly improve (p velocity and jumping ability. Key PointsSimilar adaptations in terms of gains in strength, power, movement velocity and jumping ability were produced in response to both training programs.Both the stability and instability approaches seem suitable for healthy, physically-active individuals with or with limited experience in resistance training.RPE emerged as a useful tool to monitor exercise intensity during instability strength training.

  19. Effect of a surface oxide-dispersion-strengthened layer on mechanical strength of zircaloy-4 tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Il Jung

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available An oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS layer was formed on Zircaloy-4 tubes by a laser beam scanning process to increase mechanical strength. Laser beam was used to scan the yttrium oxide (Y2O3–coated Zircaloy-4 tube to induce the penetration of Y2O3 particles into Zircaloy-4. Laser surface treatment resulted in the formation of an ODS layer as well as microstructural phase transformation at the surface of the tube. The mechanical strength of Zircaloy-4 increased with the formation of the ODS layer. The ring-tensile strength of Zircaloy-4 increased from 790 to 870 MPa at room temperature, from 500 to 575 MPa at 380°C, and from 385 to 470 MPa at 500°C. Strengthening became more effective as the test temperature increased. It was noted that brittle fracture occurred at room temperature, which was not observed at elevated temperatures. Resistance to dynamic high-temperature bursting improved. The burst temperature increased from 760 to 830°C at a heating rate of 5°C/s and internal pressure of 8.3 MPa. The burst opening was also smaller than those in fresh Zircaloy-4 tubes. This method is expected to enhance the safety of Zr fuel cladding tubes owing to the improvement of their mechanical properties. Keywords: Laser Surface Treatment, Microstructure, Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloy, Tensile Strength, Zirconium Alloy

  20. THE EFFECTS OF AREA CONTRACTION ON SHOCK WAVE STRENGTH AND PEAK PRESSURE IN SHOCK TUBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Mohsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation into the effects of area contraction on shock wave strength and peak pressure in a shock tube. The shock tube is an important component of the short duration, high speed fluid flow test facility, available at the Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN, Malaysia. The area contraction was facilitated by positioning a bush adjacent to the primary diaphragm section, which separates the driver and driven sections. Experimental measurements were performed with and without the presence of the bush, at various diaphragm pressure ratios, which is the ratio of air pressure between the driver (high pressure and driven (low pressure sections. The instantaneous static pressure variations were measured at two locations close to the driven tube end wall, using high sensitivity pressure sensors, which allow the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure to be analysed. The results reveal that the area contraction significantly reduces the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure. At a diaphragm pressure ratio of 10, the shock wave strength decreases by 18%, the peak pressure decreases by 30% and the shock wave speed decreases by 8%.

  1. Effect of glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on shear bond strength of adhesives to primary dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of alternative pulpotomy agents such as glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on the shear bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems to dentin of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Eighty human primary molar teeth were sectioned in a mesiodistal direction and divided into experimental and control groups. Lingual dentin specimens in experimental groups were treated with glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate. Buccal surfaces soaked in water served as control group. Each group was then divided into two groups based on the adhesive system used: Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Prompt L-Pop. A teflon mold was used to build the composite (Filtek Z-250 cylinders on the dentinal surface of all the specimens. Shear bond strength was tested for all the specimens with an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The failure mode analysis was performed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Results: The results revealed that glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate significantly reduced the shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin. Clearfil SE Bond showed much higher shear bond strength than Adper Prompt L Pop to primary dentin. SEM analysis revealed a predominant cohesive failure mode for both adhesive systems. Conclusion: This study revealed that the pulpotomy medicaments glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate adversely affected the bonding of self-etch adhesive systems to primary dentin.

  2. Effect of presaturation and seawater on strength and durability of lightweight concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, M.N.

    2009-01-01

    The internal curing is provided, usually, by the use of some proprietary fine aggregates which provide sufficient water from within to promote the ongoing hydration of cement and hence result in a relatively high performance concrete. Two concretes, one total lightweight concrete (TLWC) and the second sand lightweight concrete (SLWC) of 28 day cube strength of approximately 40 MPa (5800 psi) were designed. A total of six mixes were cast out of these two concretes, 4-TLWC's and 2-SLWC's. The variation in the mixes was due to moisture condition of the aggregates and the use of seawater in mixing and curing of the concretes. The effect of these variations on the cube compressive strength, water permeability, sulphate and chloride content, depth of carbonation and shrinkage of these six concretes was studied. The presaturation of the lightweight aggregates (LWA's used do not seem to have improved the compressive strength, and water permeability of these concretes. The drying shrinkage strains of the concrete using pre saturated aggregates decreased considerably. The application of seawater in making and curing these LWC's increased the compressive strength by about 15%. (author)

  3. Effect of light aging on silicone-resin bond strength in maxillofacial prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzois, Gregory; Pantopoulos, Antonis; Papadopoulos, Triantafillos; Hatamleh, Muhanad

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of accelerated light aging on bond strength of a silicone elastomer to three types of denture resin. A total of 60 single lap joint specimens were fabricated with auto-, heat-, and photopolymerized (n = 20) resins. An addition-type silicone elastomer (Episil-E) was bonded to resins treated with the same primer (A330-G). Thirty specimens served as controls and were tested after 24 hours, and the remaining were aged under accelerated exposure to daylight for 546 hours (irradiance 765 W/m(2) ). Lap shear joint tests were performed to evaluate bond strength at 50 mm/min crosshead speed. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test were carried out to detect statistical significance (p Accelerated light aging for 546 hours affects the bond strength of an addition-type silicone elastomer to three different denture resins. The bond strength significantly increased after aging for photo- and autopolymerized resins. All the bonds failed adhesively. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. The Effects of Different Curing Methods on the Compressive Strength of Terracrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Alake

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This research evaluated the effects of different curing methods on the compressive strength of terracrete. Several tests that included sieve analysis were carried out on constituents of terracrete (granite and laterite to determine their particle size distribution and performance criteria tests to determine compressive strength of terracrete cubes for 7 to 35 days of curing. Sand, foam-soaked, tank and open methods of curing were used and the study was carried out under controlled temperature. Sixty cubes of 100 × 100 × 100mm sized cubes were cast using a mix ratio of 1 part of cement, 1½ part of latrite, and 3 part of coarse aggregate (granite proportioned by weight and water – cement ratio of 0.62. The result of the various compressive strengths of the cubes showed that out of the four curing methods, open method of curing was the best because the cubes gained the highest average compressive strength of 10.3N/mm2 by the 35th day.

  5. Assessing the effects of hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrighetto, Augusto Ricardo; de Leão Withers, Eduardo Henrique; Grando, Karlos Giovani; Ambrosio, Aldrieli Regina; Shimizu, Roberto Hideo; Melo, Ana Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Tooth bleaching is, today, one of the most widespread cosmetic treatments in dental practice,  so it is important to determine whether it can interfere with orthodontic bonding or not. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Forty-five upper bicuspids were divided into three groups (n = 15). In the control Group (C), the brackets were bonded without previous bleaching treatment. Group 1 (G1) was treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent 24 h before bracket bonding. Group 2 was also bleached, and the brackets were bonded after 30 days. The shear bond strength of the brackets was measured using an EMIC machine, and the results were analyzed by ANOVA. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups (P > 0.05), with Group C showing a mean bond strength of 9.72 ± 2.63 MPa, G1 of 8.09 ± 2.63 MPa, and G2 of 11.15 ± 4.42 MPa. It was possible to conclude that 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent does not affect the shear strength of orthodontic brackets bonded 24 h and 30 days after bleaching.

  6. Effect of silica fume on compressive strength of oil-polluted concrete in different marine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrabadi, Hamid; Sayareh, Sina; Sarkardeh, Hamed

    2017-12-01

    In the present research, effect of silica fume as an additive and oil polluted sands as aggregates on compressive strength of concrete were investigated experimentally. The amount of oil in the designed mixtures was assumed to be constant and equal to 2% of the sand weight. Silica fume accounting for 10%, 15% and 20% of the weight is added to the designed mixture. After preparation and curing, concrete specimens were placed into the three different conditions: fresh, brackish and saltwater environments (submerged in fresh water, alternation of exposed in air & submerged in sea water and submerged in sea water). The result of compressive strength tests shows that the compressive strength of the specimens consisting of silica fume increases significantly in comparison with the control specimens in all three environments. The compressive strength of the concrete with 15% silica fume content was about 30% to 50% higher than that of control specimens in all tested environments under the condition of using polluted aggregates in the designed mixture.

  7. Effects of Nintendo Wii Fit Plus training on ankle strength with functional ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Heo, Myoung

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a training program using the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus on the ankle muscle strengths of subjects with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted using subjects in their 20s who had functional ankle instability. They were randomized to a strengthening training group and a balance training group with 10 subjects in each, and they performed an exercise using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus for 20 minutes. In addition, every participant completed preparation and finishing exercises for 5 minutes, respectively. [Results] The muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion and dorsiflexion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the strengthening training group. Furthermore, the muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, eversion, and inversion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the balance training group. [Conclusion] The balance training group using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus showed better results than the strengthening training group. Consequently, it is recommended to add the balance training program of the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus to conventional exercise programs to improve ankle muscle strength in functional ankle instability at a low cost.

  8. Effect of transition metal impurities on the strength of grain boundaries in vanadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xuebang; Kong, Xiang-Shan; You, Yu-Wei; Liu, Wei; Liu, C. S., E-mail: csliu@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-09-07

    Effects of 3d (Ti-Ni), 4d (Zr-Pd), and 5d (Hf-Pt) transition metal impurities on strength of two representative vanadium grain boundaries (GBs), symmetric Σ3(111) and asymmetric Σ5(210), were studied by first-principles calculations within the framework of the Rice-Wang thermodynamic model and within the computational tensile test. The desirable elements to increase the GB cohesion were predicted based on their segregation and strengthening behaviors across the different GB sites. It reveals that the elements Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb, and Ta are good choices for the GB cohesion enhancers. In addition, the GB strengthening by solutes is sensitive to the GB structures. The elements Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni decrease the GB strength of the Σ3(111) GB but they can increase the cohesion of the Σ5(210) GB. Furthermore, the origin of Ti-induced change of the GB strength was uncovered by analyzing the atomic bonds and electronic structures as well as the tensile strength. This work provides a theoretical guidance to screen promising alloying elements in V-based materials with improved resistance to GB decohesion and also helps us to understand the formation mechanism of Ti-rich precipitates in the V-Cr-Ti alloys under neutron or ion irradiation environments.

  9. Nuclear deformation and neutron excess as competing effects for dipole strength in the pygmy region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarczyk, R; Schwengner, R; Dönau, F; Frauendorf, S; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Beyer, R; Bhatia, C; Birgersson, E; Butterling, M; Elekes, Z; Ferrari, A; Gooden, M E; Hannaske, R; Junghans, A R; Kempe, M; Kelley, J H; Kögler, T; Matic, A; Menzel, M L; Müller, S; Reinhardt, T P; Röder, M; Rusev, G; Schilling, K D; Schmidt, K; Schramm, G; Tonchev, A P; Tornow, W; Wagner, A

    2014-02-21

    The electromagnetic dipole strength below the neutron-separation energy has been studied for the xenon isotopes with mass numbers A=124, 128, 132, and 134 in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments using the γELBE bremsstrahlung facility at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the HIγS facility at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory Durham. The systematic study gained new information about the influence of the neutron excess as well as of nuclear deformation on the strength in the region of the pygmy dipole resonance. The results are compared with those obtained for the chain of molybdenum isotopes and with predictions of a random-phase approximation in a deformed basis. It turned out that the effect of nuclear deformation plays a minor role compared with the one caused by neutron excess. A global parametrization of the strength in terms of neutron and proton numbers allowed us to derive a formula capable of predicting the summed E1 strengths in the pygmy region for a wide mass range of nuclides.

  10. Effect of provisional cements on shear bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each tooth. Restorations were fixed with one of three different provisional cements: eugenol-free provisional cement (Cavex), calcium hydroxide (Dycal), and light-cured provisional cement (Tempond Clear). Provisional restorations were removed with either a dental explorer and air-water spray, or a cleaning bur (Opticlean). In the control group, provisional restorations were not used on the surfaces of specimens. IPS Empress 2 ceramic discs were luted with a dual-cured resin cement (Panavia F). Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey's HSD and Dunnett tests. Surfaces were examined by scanning electronic microscopy. Significant differences were found between the control group and both the light-cured provisional cement groups and the eugenol-free provisional cement-cleaning bur group (Pprovisional cement showed the lowest bond strength values. Selection of the provisional cement is an important factor in the ultimate bond strength of the final restoration. Calcium hydroxide provisional cement and cleaning with a dental explorer are advisable.

  11. [Effects of magnetron sputtered ZrN on the bonding strength of titanium porcelain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shu; Zhang, Wen-yan; Guang, Han-bing; Xia, Yang; Zhang, Fei-min

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the effect of magnetron sputtered ZrN on the bonding strength between a low-fusing porcelain (Ti/Vita titankeramik system) and commercially pure cast titanium. Sixteen specimens were randomly assigned to test group and control group (n=8). The control group received no surface treated. Magnetron sputtered ZrN film was deposited on the surface of specimens in the test group. Then the sixteen titanium-porcelain specimens were prepared in a rectangular shape and went through three-point bending test on a universal test machine. The bond strength of Ti/porcelain was recorded. The phase composition of the specimens was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The interface at titanium and porcelain and the titanium surface after debonding were observed with a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and analyzed using energy depressive spectrum (EDS). New phase of ZrN was found with XRD in the test group. Statistical analysis showed higher bond strength following ZrN surface treatment in the test group [(45.991+/-0.648) MPa] than that in the control group [(29.483+/-1.007) MPa] (P=0.000). Bonded ceramic could be observed in test group, the amount of bonded ceramic was more than that in the control group. No obvious bonded ceramic in control group was found. Magnetron sputtered ZrN can improve bond strength of Ti/Vita titankeramik system significantly.

  12. Effect of roughness and material strength on the mechanical properties of fracture replicas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibowo, J.; Amadei, B.; Sture, S.

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the results of 11 rotary shear tests conducted on replicas of three hollow cylinders of natural fractures with JRC values of 7.7, 9.4 and 12.0. The JRC values were determined from the results of laser profilometer measurements. The replicas were created from gypsum cement. By varying the water-to-gypsum cement ratio from 30 to 45%, fracture replicas with different values of compressive strength (JCS) were created. The rotary shear experiments were performed under constant normal (nominal) stresses ranging between 0.2 and 1.6 MPa. In this report, the shear test results are compared with predictions using Barton's empirical peak shear strength equation. observations during the experiments indicate that only certain parts of the fracture profiles influence fracture shear strength and dilatancy. Under relatively low applied normal stresses, the JCS does not seem to have a significant effect on shear behavior. As an alternative, a new procedure for predicting the shear behavior of fractures was developed. The approach is based on basic fracture properties such as fracture surface profile data and the compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and Poisson's ratio of the fracture walls. Comparison between predictions and actual shear test results shows that the alternative procedure is a reliable method

  13. Effect of mix proportion of high density concrete on compressive strength, density and radiation absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor Azreen Masenwat; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Suhairy Sani; Ismail Mustapha; Nasharuddin Isa; Mohamad Haniza Mahmud; Mohammad Shahrizan Samsu

    2014-01-01

    To prevent radiation leaks at nuclear reactors, high-density concrete is used as an absorbent material for radiation from spreading into the environment. High-density concrete is a mixture of cement, sand, aggregate (usually high-density minerals) and water. In this research, hematite stone is used because of its mineral density higher than the granite used in conventional concrete mixing. Mix concrete in this study were divided into part 1 and part 2. In part 1, the concrete mixture is designed with the same ratio of 1: 2: 4 but differentiated in terms of water-cement ratio (0.60, 0.65, 0.70, 0.75, 0.80 ). Whereas, in part 2, the concrete mixture is designed to vary the ratio of 1: 1: 2, 1: 1.5: 3, 1: 2: 3, 1: 3: 6, 1: 2: 6 with water-cement ratio (0.7, 0.8, 0.85, 0.9). In each section, the division has also performed in a mixture of sand and fine sand hematite. Then, the physical characteristics of the density and the compressive strength of the mixture of part 1 and part 2 is measured. Comparisons were also made in terms of absorption of radiation by Cs-137 and Co-60 source for each mix. This paper describes and discusses the relationship between the concrete mixture ratio, the relationship with the water-cement ratio, compressive strength, density, different mixture of sand and fine sand hematite. (author)

  14. Masked and unmasked priming effects as a function of semantic relatedness and associative strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Casas, Rosa; Ferré, Pilar; Demestre, Josep; García-Chico, Teófilo; García-Albea, José E

    2012-11-01

    The study presented in this paper aimed to investigate the pattern of semantic priming effects, under masked and unmasked conditions, in the lexical decision task, manipulating type of semantic relation and associative strength. Three different kinds of word relations were examined in two experiments: only-semantically related words [e.g., codo (elbow)-rodilla (knee)] and semantic/associative related words with strong [e.g., mesa (table)-silla (chair) and weak association strength [e.g., sapo (toad)-rana (frog)]. In Experiment 1 a masked priming procedure was used with a prime duration of 56 ms, and in Experiment 2, the prime was presented unmasked for 150 ms. The results showed that there were masked priming effects with strong associates, but no evidence of these effects was found with weak associates or only-semantic related word pairs. When the prime was presented unmasked, the three types of relations produced significant priming effects and they were not influenced by association strength.

  15. Effects of Strength Training Using Unstable Surfaces on Strength, Power and Balance Performance Across the Lifespan: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, David G; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Kibele, Armin; Granacher, Urs

    2015-12-01

    The effectiveness of strength training on unstable surfaces (STU) versus stable surfaces (STS) or a control condition (CON; i.e., no training or regular training only) for strength, power and balance performance across the lifespan has not yet been investigated in a systematic review and meta-analysis. The aims of this systematic review and meta-analysis were to determine the general effects of STU versus STS or CON on muscle strength, power and balance in healthy individuals across the lifespan and to investigate whether performance changes following STU are age specific. A computerized systematic literature search was performed in the electronic databases PubMed and Web of Science from January 1984 up to February 2015. Initially, 209 articles were identified for review. Only controlled trials were included if they investigated STU in healthy individuals and tested at least one measure of maximal strength, strength endurance, muscle power, or static/dynamic balance. In total, 22 studies met the inclusion criteria. The included studies were coded for the following criteria: age, sex, training status, training modality, exercise and test modality. Effect size measures included within-subject standardized mean differences (SMDw) and weighted between-subject standardized mean differences (SMDb). Heterogeneity between studies was assessed using I2 and χ2 statistics. The methodological quality of each study was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) Scale. Our search failed to identify studies that examined the effects of STU versus STS or CON in children and middle-aged adults. However, four studies were identified that investigated the effects of STU versus CON or STS in adolescents, 15 studies were identified in young adults and three studies were identified in old adults. Compared with CON, STU produced medium effects on maximal strength in young adults and no effects to medium effects in old adults. In addition, large effects were detected on

  16. Effect of bar sealing parameters on OPP/MCPP heat seal strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bar sealing parameters on the heat seal strength of oriented polypropylene (OPP/metallic cast polypropylene (MCPP laminate film was investigated. Based on the results obtained from the parametric study, a bar sealing process window was developed. All points drop within the process window are combinations of platen temperature and dwell time that produce acceptable heat seal. Optimum combinations are indicated by the lower border of the window. The plateau initiation temperature, Tpi of OPP/MCPP laminate film used in the present study occurred before the final melting temperature, Tmf of the sealant material. The highest achievable heat seal strength was at the plateau region, and the corresponding failure modes were delaminating, tearing or combine failure modes (delaminating and tearing. Minimum pressure level of 1.25 bars is necessary to bring the laminate interface into intimate contact in order to effect sealing.

  17. Effect of Cement Replacement with Carbide Waste on the Strength of Stabilized Clay Subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntohar A.S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cement is commonly used for soil stabilization and many other ground improvement techniques. Cement is believed to be very good to improve the compressive and split-tensile strength of clay subgrades. In some application cement could be partly or fully replaced with carbide waste. This research is to study the effectiveness of the cement replacement and to find the maximum carbide waste content to be allowed for a clay subgrade. The quantities of cement replaced with the carbide waste were 30, 50, 70, 90, and 100% by its mass. The results show that replacing the cement with carbide waste decreased both the compressive and split tensile strength. Replacing cement content with carbide waste reduced its ability for stabilization. The carbide waste content should be less than 70% of the cement to provide a sufficient stabilizing effect on a clay subgrade.

  18. Effects of strength and neuromuscular training on functional performance in athletes after partial medial meniscectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Hu, Min; Lou, Zhen; Liao, Bagen

    2017-02-01

    The aims of this study were to determine an effective knee function rehabilitation program for athletes undergoing partial medial meniscectomy. Participants were randomly assigned to neuromuscular training (NT) or strength training (ST) group and subjected to functional assessments before surgery and again at 4, and 8 weeks post hoc . Functional knee assessment, such as Lysholm knee scoring, star excursion balance, and BTE PrimusRS isokinetic performance tests were evaluated in each group. All postoperational symptoms were significantly improved after 4 and 8 weeks of NT and ST. Both NT and ST programs showed effective knee function recovery seen as an increase in muscular strength and endurance. However, the NT program showed the most significant functional improvement of dynamic balance and coordination.

  19. Theory of the negative differential conductivity effect in semiconductor superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo Hong Anh; Nguyen Hong Shon; Le Vu Ky

    1990-01-01

    A new mechanism of the negative differential conductivity (NDC) effect in semiconductor superlattices (SL) is proposed and analysed that is due to the conduction electron trapping by donor centers. It is shown that the NDC effect occurs for sufficently high (but reasonable) impurity concentration and not too large value of the τ ε /τ c ratio (where τ ε is the electron energy relaxation time and τ c the electron life time in the conduction band) when the applied d.c. electric field reaches certain critical value defined by the physical parameters of the sample. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs

  20. Schwinger effect and negative differential conductivity in holographic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankhadeep Chakrabortty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of the Schwinger effect for conductivity are computed for strong coupling systems using holography. The one-loop diagram on the flavor brane introduces an O(λNc imaginary part in the effective action for a Maxwell flavor gauge field. This in turn introduces a real conductivity in an otherwise insulating phase of the boundary theory. Moreover, in certain regions of parameter space the differential conductivity is negative. This is computed in the context of the Sakai–Sugimoto model.

  1. Perceptual differentiation and category effects in normal object recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Christian; Law, I; Gade, A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present PET study was (i) to investigate the neural correlates of object recognition, i.e. the matching of visual forms to memory, and (ii) to test the hypothesis that this process is more difficult for natural objects than for artefacts. This was done by using object decision...... tasks where subjects decided whether pictures represented real objects or non-objects. The object decision tasks differed in their difficulty (the degree of perceptual differentiation needed to perform them) and in the category of the real objects used (natural objects versus artefacts). A clear effect...... be the neural correlate of matching visual forms to memory, and the amount of activation in these regions may correspond to the degree of perceptual differentiation required for recognition to occur. With respect to behaviour, it took significantly longer to make object decisions on natural objects than...

  2. Effects of Internet Sales Promotion on a Differential Advertising Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Jiang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Advertising and sales promotion are two important specific marketing communications tools. In this paper, Internet sales promotion is introduced into a differential advertising model and investigated quantitatively. The conditions for the existence and stability of periodic solutions are obtained. Flip bifurcation of periodic solution is investigated analytically. The results show that the sales promotion parameter can modify the stability of the differential advertising model and lead to chaos through flip bifurcation, the sales level will eventually be no less than a given value by adjusting the value of the sales promotion parameter, and the optimal sales promotion strategy can lead to maximum profit. Numerical results for periodic solutions, bifurcation diagrams, and the effects of sales promotion strategies, which are illustrated with an example, are in good agreement with the theoretical analysis. These results have certain significant theoretical and practical value in related markets.

  3. Effects of contract-relax vs static stretching on stretch-induced strength loss and length-tension relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, S S; Magnusson, S P; McHugh, M P

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the acute effects of contract-relax stretching (CRS) vs static stretching (SS) on strength loss and the length-tension relationship. We hypothesized that there would be a greater muscle length-specific effect of CRS vs SS. Isometric hamstring strength wa...

  4. The effect of protein timing on muscle strength and hypertrophy: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenfeld, Brad Jon; Aragon, Alan Albert; Krieger, James W

    2013-01-01

    Protein timing is a popular dietary strategy designed to optimize the adaptive response to exercise. The strategy involves consuming protein in and around a training session in an effort to facilitate muscular repair and remodeling, and thereby enhance post-exercise strength- and hypertrophy-related adaptations. Despite the apparent biological plausibility of the strategy, however, the effectiveness of protein timing in chronic training studies has been decidedly mixed. The purpose of this pa...

  5. Interactive effects of music tempi and intensities on grip strength and subjective affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorghis, C I; Cheek, P; Simpson, S D; Bigliassi, M

    2018-03-01

    Pretask music is widely used by athletes albeit there is scant empirical evidence to support its use. The present study extended a line of work into pretask music by examining the interactive effects of music tempo and intensity (volume) on the performance of a simple motor skill and subjective affect. A 2 × 2 within-subjects factorial design was employed with an additional no-music control, the scores from which were used as a covariate. A sample of 52 male athletes (M age  = 26.1 ± 4.8 years) was exposed to five conditions: fast/loud (126 bpm/80 dBA), fast/quiet (126 bpm/70 dBA), slow/loud (87 bpm/80 dBA), slow/quiet (87 bpm/70 dBA) music, and a no-music control. Dependent variables were grip strength, measured with a handgrip dynamometer, and subjective affect, assessed by use of the Affect Grid. The tempo and intensity components of music had interactive effects for grip strength but only main effects for subjective affect. Fast-tempo music played at a high intensity yielded the highest grip strength, while fast-tempo music played at a low-intensity resulted in much lower grip strength (M diff.  = -1.11 Force kg). For affective valence, there were main effects of tempo and intensity, with fast and loud music yielding the highest scores. For affective arousal, there was no difference between tempi although there was between intensities, with the high-intensity condition yielding higher scores. The present findings indicate the utility of fast/loud pretask music in enhancing affective valence and arousal in preparation for a simple or gross motor task. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Spreading effects on the isovector dipole strength distribution in 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, S.; Nguyen van Giai

    1984-01-01

    There is seemingly a difficulty with all Hartree-Fock RPA calculations to describe correctly the distribution of dipole strength in heavy nuclei above the giant dipole region. We investigate in a consistent framework the effects of damping into more complex configurations. We show that in 208 Pb, this damping leads to a smooth distribution at higher energies while it gives a satisfactory description of the spreading width of the giant dipole resonance. (orig.)

  7. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and Disinclusion Buttons: Effect of Water and Saliva Contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Gandini, Paola; Scribante, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a) dry, (b) water contamination, and (c) saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons...

  8. The Effect of Renal Transplantation on Respiratory Muscle Strength in Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tavana, Sasan; Mirzaei, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is evidence of musculoskeletal and respiratory involvement in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This is attributed to protein calorie imbalance that is caused by the disease process, and hemodialysis and is generally referred to as uremic myopathy. This results in calcification of respiratory muscles such as diaphragm and intercostal muscles. There are limited data about respiratory muscle strength in patients with CKD. We intended to evaluate the effect of kidney ...

  9. Effect of Provisional Cements on Shear Bond Strength of Porcelain Laminate Veneers

    OpenAIRE

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. Methods: The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each to...

  10. Deflection and Flexural Strength Effects on the Roughness of Aesthetic-Coated Orthodontic Wires

    OpenAIRE

    Albuquerque, Cibele Gonçalves de; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Venezian, Giovana Cherubini; Santamaria Jr, Milton; Tubel, Carlos Alberto; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia Scudeler

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim was to evaluate the flexural strength and the effects of deflection on the surface roughness of esthetic orthodontic wires. The sample consisted of 70 archwire 0.014-inch: polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE)-coated Nickel-Titanium (Niti) archwires (Titanol Cosmetic-TC, Flexy Super Elastic Esthetic-FSE, esthetic Nickel Titanium Wire-ANT); epoxy resin-coated Niti archwires (Spectra-S, Niticosmetic-TEC); gold and rhodium coated Niti (Sentalloy-STC) and a control group (superelastic Ni...

  11. Sol-gel derived bioactive coating on zirconia: Effect on flexural strength and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahramian, Khalil; Leminen, Heidi; Meretoja, Ville; Linderbäck, Paula; Kangasniemi, Ilkka; Lassila, Lippo; Abdulmajeed, Aous; Närhi, Timo

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sol-gel derived bioactive coatings on the biaxial flexural strength and fibroblast proliferation of zirconia, aimed to be used as an implant abutment material. Yttrium stabilized zirconia disc-shaped specimens were cut, ground, sintered, and finally cleansed ultrasonically in each of acetone and ethanol for 5 minutes. Three experimental groups (n = 15) were fabricated, zirconia with sol-gel derived titania (TiO 2 ) coating, zirconia with sol-gel derived zirconia (ZrO 2 ) coating, and non-coated zirconia as a control. The surfaces of the specimens were analyzed through images taken using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and a non-contact tapping mode atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to record the surface topography and roughness of the coated specimens. Biaxial flexural strength values were determined using the piston-on-three ball technique. Human gingival fibroblast proliferation on the surface of the specimens was evaluated using AlamarBlue assay™. Data were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's post-hoc test. Additionally, the biaxial flexural strength data was also statistically analyzed with the Weibull distribution. The biaxial flexural strength of zirconia specimens was unaffected (p > 0.05). Weibull modulus of TiO 2 coated and ZrO 2 coated groups (5.7 and 5.4, respectively) were lower than the control (8.0). Specimens coated with ZrO 2 showed significantly lower fibroblast proliferation compared to other groups (p sol-gel derived coatings have no influence on the flexural strength of zirconia. ZrO 2 coated specimens showed significantly lower cell proliferation after 12 days than TiO 2 coated or non-coated control. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2401-2407, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The effects of strength training on cognitive performance in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarek, André de Camargo; Ferreira, Luis Henrique Boiko; Mascarenhas, Luis Paulo Gomes; McAnulty, Steven R; Varela, Karla Daniele; Dangui, Mônica C; de Barros, Marcelo Paes; Utter, Alan C; Souza-Junior, Tácito P

    2016-01-01

    Aging is a degenerative process marked by recognized functional, physiological, and metabolic impairments, such as dynapenia and diminished cognitive capacity. Therefore, the search for innovative strategies to prevent/delay these physiological and cognitive disorders is essential to guarantee the independence and life quality of an elderly population. The aim of this work is to verify the effect of a 12-week resistance exercise program on the general physical aptitude and cognitive capacities of elderly and sedentary women. Twenty-nine women (65.87±5.69 years) were divided into two groups. The control group was composed of eight elderly women who met the same inclusion criteria of the study and the strength training group was composed of 29 elderly women who were subjected to a resistance exercise program defined by 12 upper and lower limb exercises combined in 3×10 repetitions with 1-minute interval between repetitions and two resting minutes between exercises (three times/week). Weight loads were fixed between 60% and 75% of the apparent 1 repetition maximum, which was estimated by the test of 10 maximum repetitions. The direct curl was performed for upper body strength evaluation with 2.3 kg dumbbells for 30 seconds, whereas the chair test was used for lower body evaluation (total sit-stand movements in 30 seconds). The cognitive capacities of subjects were evaluated by "The Montreal Cognitive Assessment" questionnaire. After 12 weeks, the elderly group showed significant increases in the average upper body strength (58%), lower body strength (68%), and cognitive capacity (19%). The present study demonstrated that regular resistance exercises could provide significant gains on the upper and lower body strength concomitant to positive improvements on cognitive capacities of elderly women, bringing enhanced life quality.

  13. Effect of gap distance on tensile strength of preceramic base metal solder joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Farnaz; Motamedi, Milad

    2011-01-01

    In order to fabricate prostheses with high accuracy and durability, soldering techniques have been introduced to clinical dentistry. However, these prostheses always fail at their solder joints. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of gap distance on the tensile strength of base metal solder joints. Based on ADA/ISO 9693 specifications for tensile test, 40 specimens were fabricated from a Ni-Cr alloy and cut at the midpoint of 3-mm diameter bar and placed at desired positions by a specially designed device. The specimens were divided into four groups of 10 samples according to the desired solder gap distance: Group1: 0.1mm; Group2: 0.25mm; Group3: 0.5mm; and Group4: 0.75mm. After soldering, specimens were tested for tensile strength by a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5mm/min with a preload of 10N. The mean tensile strength values of the groups were 162, 307.8, 206.1 and 336.7 MPa, respectively. The group with 0.75-mm gap had the highest and the group with 0.1-mm gap had the lowest tensile strength. Bonferroni test showed that Group1 and Group4 had statistically different values (P=0.023), but the differences between other groups were not sig-nificant at a significance level of 0.05. There was no direct relationship between increasing soldering gap distance and tensile strength of the solder joints.

  14. The effects of silver coating on friction coefficient and shear bond strength of steel orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Valiollah; Anoush, Keivan; Rabiee, Sayed Mahmood; Rahmatei, Manuchehr; Tavanafar, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Aims of the present study was to measure frictional resistance between silver coated brackets and different types of arch wires, and shear bond strength of these brackets to the tooth. In an experimental clinical research 28 orthodontic brackets (standard, 22 slots) were coated with silver ions using electroplate method. Six brackets (coated: 3, uncoated: 3) were evaluated with Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy. The amount of friction in 15 coated brackets was measured with three different kinds of arch wires (0.019 × 0.025-in stainless steel [SS], 0.018-in stainless steel [SS], 0.018-in Nickel-Titanium [Ni-Ti]) and compared with 15 uncoated steel brackets. In addition, shear bond strength values were compared between 10 brackets with silver coating and 10 regular brackets. Universal testing machine was used to measure shear bond strength and the amount of friction between the wires and brackets. SPSS 18 was used for data analysis with t-test. SEM and AFM results showed deposition of a uniform layer of silver, measuring 8-10 μm in thickness on bracket surfaces. Silver coating led to higher frictional forces in all the three types of arch wires, which was statistically significant in 0.019 × 0.025-in SS and 0.018-in Ni-Ti, but it did not change the shear bond strength significantly. Silver coating with electroplating method did not affect the bond strength of the bracket to enamel; in addition, it was not an effective method for decreasing friction in sliding mechanics. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Ceramic Inlays: Effect of Mechanical Cycling and Ceramic Type on Restoration-dentin Bond Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, F Z; Kleverlaan, C J; da Silva, L H; Feilzer, A J; Cesar, P F; Bottino, M A; Valandro, L F

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between dentin and five different ceramic inlays in permanent maxillary premolars, with and without mechanical cycling. One hundred permanent maxillary premolars were prepared and divided into 10 groups (n=10) according to the ceramic system (IPS e.Max Press; IPS e.Max CAD; Vita PM9; Vita Mark II; and Vita VM7) and the mechanical cycling factor (with and without [100 N, 2 Hz, 1.2×10(6) cycles]). The inlays were adhesively cemented, and all of the specimens were cut into microbars (1×1 mm, nontrimming method), which were tested under microtensile loading. The failure mode was classified and contact angle, roughness, and microtopographic analyses were performed on each ceramic surface. The mechanical cycling had a significant effect (p=0.0087) on the bond strength between dentin and IPS e.max Press. The Vita Mark II group had the highest bond strength values under both conditions, with mechanical cycling (9.7±1.8 MPa) and without (8.2±1.9 MPa), while IPS e.Max CAD had the lowest values (2.6±1.6 and 2.2±1.4, respectively). The adhesive failure mode at the ceramic/cement interface was the most frequent. Vita Mark II showed the highest value of average roughness. IPS e.max Press and Vita Mark II ceramics presented the lowest contact angles. In conclusion, the composition and manufacturing process of ceramics seem to have an influence on the ceramic surface and resin cement bond strength. Mechanical cycling did not cause significant degradation on the dentin and ceramic bond strength under the configuration used.

  16. Effect of magnetic water on strength and workability of high performance concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosa Mazloom

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, concrete is one of the most important and widely used human product. Improving concrete characteristics have always been one of the fundamental subjects for engineers. Improve the physical properties of water, as one of the main elements of concrete, is one way to improve the characteristics of the concrete. When water passes through the magnetic field, its physical quality has changed, it is called Magnetic water. This study examines the effect of the use of magnetized water (MW with a solenoid current-carrying, on the compressive strength and workability of high performance concrete. The variables of this study were the intensity of magnetic field, the silica fume replacement level and water to cement ratio in different mixes. The results show that using MW increases the workability of concrete about 36% in average.MW in combination with superplasticizer is more effective than MW on workability and compressive strength of concrete. MW had more positive effects on the samples without silica fume. Increasing the intensity of magnetic field improved the workability, 28 and 90 days compressive strength concrete.

  17. Effect of Pre-heating on Microtensile Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Dentin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrahim Davari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Direct composite resin restorations are widely used and the impact of different storage temperatures on composites is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of composite to dentin after different pre-curing temperatures.Occlusal surfaces of 44 human molars were ground with diamond burs under water coolant and polished with 600 grit silicon carbide papers to obtain flat dentin surfaces. The dentin was etched with 37% phosphoric acid and bonded with Adper Single Bond 2 according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (n=22 according to the composite resin applied: FiltekP60 and Filtek Z250. Each group included three subgroups of composite resin pre-curing temperatures (4°C, 23°C and 37°C. Composite resins were applied to the dentin surfaces in a plastic mold (8mm in diameter and 4mm in length incrementally and cured. Twenty-two composite-to-dentin hour-glass sticks with one mm(2 cross-sectional area per group were prepared. Microtensile bond strength measurements were made using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of one mm/min. For statistical analysis, t-test, one-way and two-way ANOVA were used. The level of significance was set at P<0.05.Filtek P60 pre-heated at 37ºC had significantly higher microtensile bond strength than Filtek Z250 under the same condition. The microtensile bond strengths were not significantly different at 4ºC, 23ºC and 37ºC subgroups of each composite resin group.Filtek P60 and Filtek Z250 did not have significantly different microtensile bond strengths at 4ºC and 23ºC but Filtek P60 had significantly higher microtensile bond strength at 37 ºC. Composite and temperature interactions had significant effects on the bond strength.

  18. Effects of Plyometric and Cluster Resistance Training on Explosive Power and Maximum Strength in Karate Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Aminaei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of plyometric and cluster resistance training on explosive power and maximum strength in karate players. Eighteen women, karate players (age mean ± SD 18.22 ± 3.02 years, mean height 163 ± 0.63cm, and mean body mass 53.25 ± 7.34 kg were selected as volunteer samples. They were divided into two groups with respect to their recorded one repetition maximum squat exercise: [1] plyometric training (PT=9 and [2] Cluster training (CT=9 groups and performed a 9-week resistance training protocol that included three stages; [1] General fitness (2 weeks, [2] Strength (4 weeks and [3] Power (3 weeks. Each group performed strength and power trainings for 7 weeks in stage two and three with owned protocol. The subjects were evaluated three times before stage one and after two and three stages for maximum strength and power. Data was analyzed using two way Repeated Measures (ANOVA at a significance level of (P≤0.05. The statistical analysis showed that training stages on all research variables had a significant impact. The maximum strength of the pre-test, post-test strength and post-test power were in cluster group: 29.05 ± 1.54; 32.89 ± 2.80 and 48.74 ± 4.33w and in plyometric group were 26.98 ± 1.54; 38.48 ± 2.80 and 49.82 ± 4.33w respectively. The explosive power of the pre-test, post-test strength and post-test power in cluster group were 359.32±36.20; 427.91±34.56 and 460.55±36.80w and in plyometric group were 333.90±36.20; 400.33±34.56 and 465.20±36.80w respectively. However, there were not statistically significant differences in research variables between resistance cluster and plyometric training groups after 7 weeks. The results indicated both cluster and plyometric training program seems to improve physical fitness elements at the same levels.

  19. Effect of shallow angles on compressive strength of biaxial and triaxial laminates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hongli; Yang, Hyun-Ik

    2016-01-01

    Biaxial (BX) and triaxial (TX) composite laminates with ±45° angled plies have been widely used in wind turbine blades. As the scale of blades increases, BX and TX laminates with shallow-angled plies (i.e. off-axis ply angle shallow-angled BX and TX laminates are critical considering their locations in a wind turbine blade, and therefore in this study, the uniaxial static compression tests were conducted using BX and TX laminates with angled-plies of ±45°, ±35°, and ±25°, for the purpose of evaluation. On the other hand, Mori-Tanaka mean field homogenization method was employed to predict elastic constants of plies in BX and TX laminates involved in tests; linear regression analyses of experimentally measured ply strengths collected from various sources were then performed to estimate strengths of plies in BX and TX laminates; finally, Tsai-Wu, Hashin, and Puck failure criteria were chosen to predict compressive strengths of BX and TX laminates. Comparison between theoretical predictions and test results were carried out to illustrate the effectiveness of each criterion. The compressive strength of BX laminate decreases as ply angle increases, and the trend was successfully predicted by all three failure criteria. For TX laminates, ±35° angled plies rather than ±45° angled plies led to the lowest laminate compressive strength. Hashin and Puck criteria gave good predictions at certain ply angles for TX laminates, but Tsai-Wu criterion was able to capture the unexpected strength variation of TX laminates with ply angle. It was concluded that the transverse tensile stress in 0° plies of TX laminates, which attains its maximum when the off-axis ply angle is 35°, is the dominant factor in failure determination if using Tsai-Wu criterion. This explains the unexpected strength variation of TX laminates with ply angle, and also indicates that proper selection of ply angle is the key to fully utilizing the advantages of shallow-angled laminates.

  20. The effect of dexamethasone and triiodothyronine on terminal differentiation of primary bovine chondrocytes and chondrogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randau, Thomas M; Schildberg, Frank A; Alini, Mauro; Wimmer, Matthias D; Haddouti, El-Mustapha; Gravius, Sascha; Ito, Keita; Stoddart, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    The newly evolved field of regenerative medicine is offering solutions in the treatment of bone or cartilage loss and deficiency. Mesenchymal stem cells, as well as articular chondrocytes, are potential cells for the generation of bone or cartilage. The natural mechanism of bone formation is that of endochondral ossification, regulated, among other factors, through the hormones dexamethasone and triiodothyronine. We investigated the effects of these hormones on articular chondrocytes and chondrogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cells, hypothesizing that these hormones would induce terminal differentiation, with chondrocytes and differentiated stem cells being similar in their response. Using a 3D-alginate cell culture model, bovine chondrocytes and chondrogenically differentiated stem cells were cultured in presence of triiodothyronine or dexamethasone, and cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production were investigated. Collagen mRNA expression was measured by real-time PCR. Col X mRNA and alkaline phosphatase were monitored as markers of terminal differentiation, a prerequisite of endochondral ossification. The alginate culture system worked well, both for the culture of chondrocytes and for the chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Dexamethasone led to an increase in glycosaminoglycan production. Triiodothyronine increased the total collagen production only in chondrocytes, where it also induced signs of terminal differentiation, increasing both collagen X mRNA and alkaline phosphatase activity. Dexamethasone induced terminal differentiation in the differentiated stem cells. The immature articular chondrocytes used in this study seem to be able to undergo terminal differentiation, pointing to their possible role in the onset of degenerative osteoarthritis, as well as their potential for a cell source in bone tissue engineering. When chondrocyte-like cells, after their differentiation, can indeed be moved on towards terminal

  1. Effects of high NH4+ on K+ uptake, culm mechanical strength and grain filling in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingan eKong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that a high external NH4+ concentration depresses many processes in plant development, but the underlying mechanisms are still not well understood. To determine whether the negative effects of high levels of NH4+ are related to competitive cation uptake, wheat was grown in a field with moderate (18 g N m-2 and high (30 g N m-2 supplies of NH4+ in the presence or absence of additional K+ (6 g K2O m-2 to examine culm mechanical strength, the main components of the vascular bundle, nitrogen (N remobilization and the grain-filling rate. The results indicated that an excessive supply of NH4+ significantly decreased culm mechanical strength, the cellulose and lignin contents of vascular bundles, the N remobilization efficiency (NRE and the grain-filling rate compared with a moderate level of NH4+. The additional provision of K+ considerably alleviated these negative effects of high NH4+, resulting in a 19.41%-26.95% increase in culm mechanical strength during grain filling and a 34.59% increase in the NRE. An assay using the scanning ion-selective electrode technique (SIET showed that the net rate of transmembrane K+ influx decreased by 84.62%, and measurements using flame photometry demonstrated that the K+ content decreased by 36.13% in wheat plants subjected to high NH4+. This study indicates that the effects of high NH4+ on culm mechanical strength, cellulose and lignin contents, the NRE and the grain-filling rate are probably associated with inhibition of K+ uptake in wheat.

  2. Effects of In-Season Explosive Strength Training on Maximal Leg Strength, Jumping, Sprinting, and Intermittent Aerobic Performance in Male Handball Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermassi, Souhail; Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel; Fieseler, Georg; Bartels, Thomas; Schulze, Stephan; Delank, Karl-Stefan; Shephard, Roy J; Schwesig, René

    2017-09-01

    Background  Team handball is an intense ball sport with specific requirements on technical skills, tactical understanding, and physical performance. The ability of handball players to develop explosive efforts (e. g. sprinting, jumping, changing direction) is crucial to success. Objective  The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effects of an in-season high-intensity strength training program on the physical performance of elite handball players. Materials and methods  Twenty-two handball players (a single national-level Tunisian team) were randomly assigned to a control group (CG; n = 10) or a training group (TG; n = 12). At the beginning of the pilot study, all subjects performed a battery of motor tests: one repetition maximum (1-RM) half-squat test, a repeated sprint test [6 × (2 × 15 m) shuttle sprints], squat jumps, counter movement jumps (CMJ), and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1. The TG additionally performed a maximal leg strength program twice a week for 10 weeks immediately before engaging in regular handball training. Each strength training session included half-squat exercises to strengthen the lower limbs (80 - 95 % of 1-RM, 1 - 3 repetitions, 3 - 6 sets, 3 - 4 min rest between sets). The control group underwent no additional strength training. The motor test battery was repeated at the end of the study interventions. Results  In the TG, 3 parameters (maximal strength of lower limb: η² = 0.74; CMJ: η² = 0.70, and RSA best time: η² = 0.25) showed significant improvements, with large effect sizes (e. g. CMJ: d = 3.77). A reduction in performance for these same 3 parameters was observed in the CG (d = -0.24). Conclusions  The results support our hypothesis that additional strength training twice a week enhances the maximal strength of the lower limbs and jumping or repeated sprinting performance. There was no evidence of shuttle sprints ahead of regular

  3. Effects of interface roughness on cohesive strength of self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chen [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Awasthi, Amnaya P. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, 32611 (United States); Geubelle, Philippe H., E-mail: geubelle@illinois.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Grady, Martha E.; Sottos, Nancy R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Highlights: • Self-assembled monolayer/transfer-printed gold interface modeled using continuum-level simulation. • Initial deformed film profile analyzed and instability assessed. • Effective cohesive response of SAM-enhanced interface extracted from spallation model. • Reduction of up to 70% cohesive strength of the interface from incorporation of roughness demonstrated. - Abstract: Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are aggregates of small molecular chains that have the property to form highly ordered assemblies. The choice of terminal groups on the chains makes them excellent contenders of molecular-level tailoring. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experimental observations of spallation of two SAM-enhanced gold-film/silicon-substrate interfaces have shown that the cohesive strength of SAM-enriched transfer-printed interfaces is strongly dependent on the choice of terminal groups. Though the MD results of perfectly ordered atomistic surfaces show the same qualitative trend as the experiments, they over-predict the interfacial cohesive strengths by a factor of about 50. Results from AFM studies have revealed that the roughness of these interfaces is of the same order (∼1 nm) as the range of atomistic interactions. Hence, surface roughness is a key contributor in significantly reducing interfacial cohesive strength in these systems. In this manuscript, a continuum-level study is performed to investigate the influence of surface roughness on the cohesive strength of the interface between a Si/SAM substrate and a transfer-printed gold film. We approximate the film as a deformable continuum interacting with a rough substrate of SAMs represented by a harmonic function. Using a cohesive law derived from MD, spallation is simulated to evaluate the effective traction-separation characteristics for the rough SAM–gold interface. Our analysis shows that incorporating roughness may reduce the interfacial cohesive strength by an order of magnitude depending

  4. What Is the Effect of Strength Training on Pain and Sleep in Patients With Fibromyalgia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Alexandro; Vilarino, Guilherme Torres; Bevilacqua, Guilherme Guimarães

    2017-12-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of an 8-wk structured strength training program on pain and sleep quality in patients with fibromyalgia. Fifty-two patients with fibromyalgia were evaluated; 31 submitted to strength training and 21 comprised the control group. The instruments used were the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. The questionnaires were applied before the first training session, at 12 sessions, and after 24 sessions. Descriptive statistics (mean, SD, and frequency) and inferential tests were used. After 8 wks of intervention, significant differences were found between groups in subjective quality of sleep (P = 0.03), sleep disturbance (P = 0.02), daytime dysfunction (P = 0.04), and total sleep score (P < 0.01). The correlation analysis using Spearman's test indicated a positive relationship between the variables of pain intensity and sleep quality (P < 0.01); when pain intensity increased in patients with fibromyalgia, sleep quality worsened. Strength training is safe and effective in treating people with fibromyalgia, and a significant decrease in sleep disturbances occurs after 8 wks of intervention.

  5. Hygrothermal effects on the tensile strength of carbon/epoxy laminates with molded edges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândido Geraldo Maurício

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The interlaminar stresses are confined to a region near the free edge. Therefore, the laminate stacking sequence and the free edge finishing are some of the factors that affect the strength of the laminate and limit its life. The use of molded edges eliminates the need for trimming and machining the laminates edges thus improving productivity. However, this fabrication technique may have a detrimental effect on the laminate strength for certain stacking sequences. This effect in the presence of moisture has not been characterized. This work presents the results of a comparative study of the resistance to delamination of laminates with machined edges and molded edges. Additionally, two environmental conditions were considered: dry laminates and laminates saturated with moisture. The tensile strength of the laminates were measured and micrographs were used to analyze the microstructure of the laminates near the free edges. It is concluded that the mechanical properties of advanced composites depend on the environmental conditions and the fabrication techniques used to produce the laminates. Therefore, it is necessary to account for these factors when experimentally determining the design allowables.

  6. Effect of Dentin Wetness on the Bond Strength of Universal Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Na Choi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of dentin wetness on the bond strength and adhesive interface morphology of universal adhesives have been investigated using micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS testing and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Seventy-two human third molars were wet ground to expose flat dentin surfaces. They were divided into three groups according to the air-drying time of the dentin surfaces: 0 (without air drying, 5, and 10 s. The dentin surfaces were then treated with three universal adhesives: G-Premio Bond, Single Bond Universal, and All-Bond Universal in self-etch or etch-and-rinse mode. After composite build up, a μTBS test was performed. One additional tooth was prepared for each group by staining the adhesives with 0.01 wt % of Rhodamine B fluorescent dye for CLSM analysis. The data were analyzed statistically using ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc tests (α = 0.05. Two-way ANOVA showed significant differences among the adhesive systems and dentin moisture conditions. An interaction effect was also observed (p < 0.05. One-way ANOVA showed that All-Bond Universal was the only material influenced by the wetness of the dentin surfaces. Wetness of the dentin surface is a factor influencing the micro-tensile bond strength of universal adhesives.

  7. Effects of Calcined clay minerals and Silica fume on the compressive strength of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Soltani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pozzolanic materials are well known as potential replacements for cement manufacturing in order to increase compressive strength and improve durability of concrete in different environments and leading to save energy particularly reducing global warming effect. The present study reveals the effect of calcined clay minerals as natural pozzolanic material, separately and in combination with and without silica fume. To achieve this aim, 15 mixed designs with a constant water to cementitious ratio of  0.38 is made. In six mixed designs only metakaolin, zeolite or silica fume  and in eight other designs metakaolin and silica fume or zeolite and silica fume have been combined. Mixes containing metakaolin or zeolite with ratio of 10 or 20 percent and silica fume with 7 or 10 percent show significant increasing in compressive strength and improving durability, being valuable replacement for cement (in percentages. In particular, the best practice is attributed to the age of 28 days for compressive strength the replacement of the composition is 10% zeolite with 7% of silica fume and for electrical resistance the replacement of the composition is 10% zeolite with 7% of silica fume.

  8. Effects of the Charge Ions Strength on the Swelling of Organic-Inorganic Nanogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Qin; Lu, Xiangguo; Wang, Jing; Guo, Qi; Niu, Liwei [Northeast Petroleum University, Daqing (China)

    2016-07-15

    The swelling behavior and swelling mechanism of hydrogels can be greatly affected by the charge strength of ions in them. To investigate such effects, we prepared two gels: a carboxylic acid gel (CAG) and a poly (2-acrylamide–methyl propane sulfonic acid) gel (SAG) based on starchy polyacrylamide (PAM) nanocomposite gels, both with montmorillonite, which underwent in situ intercalation, and used them as probes in swelling experiments. The equilibrium swelling rates (ESRs) of the hydrogels in both salt water and acidic water strongly depended on the charge strength of the ions in the chains. SAG had a higher ESR than CAG at the same mole ratio of polymer/water, which is attributed to the greater electrostatic repulsion between the strong electrolyte ions of SAG. Both water salinity and hydrogen ion contact of the hydrogels weakened ESR with the enhancement of charge ionic strength. The downward trend of ESR with increasing concentration of salt or hydrogen ions became weaker in SAG compared to CAG, which is attributed to the shielding and deprotonation effects of the strong electrolyte ions. Regarding the swelling mechanism, the chain relaxation occurred in neutral and acidic solutions for SAG and in neutral and weak acidic solutions for CAG, but water diffusion dominated in strong acidic solutions for CAG, leading to different swelling behaviors.

  9. Effects of endodontic tri-antibiotic paste on bond strengths of dentin adhesives to coronal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Mirzakoucheki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tri-antibiotic paste (TAP on microtensile bond strengths (MTBS of dental adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods Sixty extracted molars had their occlusal surfaces flattened to expose dentin. They were divided into two groups, i.e., control group with no dentin treatment and experimental group with dentin treatment with TAP. After 10 days, specimens were bonded using self-etch (Filtek P90 adhesive or etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond Plus adhesives and restored with composite resin. Teeth were sectioned into beams, and the specimens were subjected to MTBS test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Results There was a statistically significant interaction between dentin treatment and adhesive on MTBS to coronal dentin (p = 0.003. Despite a trend towards worse MTBS being noticed in the experimental groups, TAP application showed no significant effect on MTBS (p = 0.064. Conclusions The etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond Plus presented higher mean bond strengths than the self-etch adhesive Filtek P90, irrespective of the group. The superior bond performance for Adper Single Bond when compared to Filtek P90 adhesive was confirmed by a fewer number of adhesive failures. The influence of TAP in bond strength is insignificant.

  10. Effect of the bur grit size on the flexural strength of a glass-ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Kist

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of the present study was to determine the biaxial flexural strength (BFS of a CAD/CAM leucite reinforced glass-ceramic ground by diamond burs of different grit sizes and the influence of surface roughness on the BFS. For this, 104 plates were obtained from CAD/CAM ceramic blocks and divided into 4 groups (n = 26, according to bur grit size: extra-fine, fine, medium and coarse. Roughness parameters (Ra, RyMax were measured, and plates were kept dry for 7 days. The flexural test was carried out and BFS was calculated. Ra, RyMax and BFS data were subjected to analysis of variance and post-hoc test. Weibull analysis was used to compare characteristic strength and Weibull modulus. Regression analysis was performed for BFS vs. Ra and RyMax. When burs with coarse grit were used, higher surface roughness values were found, causing a negative effect on the ceramic BFS (117 MPa for extra-fine, and 83 MPa for coarse. Correlation (r between surface roughness and BFS was 0.78 for RyMax and 0.73 for Ra. Increases in diamond grit size have a significant negative effect on the BFS of leucite-reinforced glass-ceramics, suggesting that grinding of sintered glass-ceramic should be performed using burs with the finest grit possible in order to minimize internal surface flaws and maximize flexural strength.

  11. Effect of Water-Cement Ratio on Pore Structure and Strength of Foam Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwei Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Foam concrete with different dry densities (400, 500, 600, 700, and 800 kg/m3 was prepared from ordinary Portland cement (P.O.42.5R and vegetable protein foaming agent by adjusting the water-cement ratio through the physical foaming method. The performance of the cement paste adopted, as well as the structure and distribution of air pores, was characterized by a rheometer, scanning electron microscope, vacuum water saturation instrument, and image analysis software. Effects of the water-cement ratio on the relative viscosity of the cement paste, as well as pore structure and strength of the hardened foam concrete, were discussed. Results showed that water-cement ratio can influence the size, distribution, and connectivity of pores in foam concrete. The compressive strength of the foam concrete showed an inverted V-shaped variation law with the increase in water-cement ratio.

  12. The effects of cold immersion and hand protection on grip strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, M J; Tipton, M J

    1988-08-01

    The maximal voluntary grip strength (MVGS) of male volunteers was examined following a series of five intermittent 2 min cold water (5 degrees C) immersions of the unprotected hand or forearm. MVGS changes due to wearing a protective glove were also investigated. The surface electrical activity over the hand flexor muscles was recorded, as was the skin temperature of the hand and forearm. MVGS decreased significantly (p less than 0.01) following hand immersions (16%) and forearm immersion (13%). The majority of these reductions occurred during the first 2-min period of immersion. The effect of wearing a glove after unprotected hand cooling also produced significant (p less than 0.01) MVGS reductions which averaged 14%. These reductions were in addition to those caused by hand cooling. We conclude that both hand and forearm protection are important for the maintenance of hand-grip strength following cold water immersion.

  13. Effect of grain size and cold working on high temperature strength of Hastelloy X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, J.; Murase, H.; Matsuda, S.

    1980-01-01

    Effect of grain size and cold working on creep, creep rupture, low cycle fatigue and tensile strengths of Hastelloy X were studied at temperatures ranging from 800 to 1000 0 C. In order to apply these data to design, the allowable design stresses were estimated by expanding the criteria of ASME Code Case 1592 to such a high temperature range. The allowable design stress increased, on the other hand, the low cycle fatigue life decreased with increasing grain size. Cold working up to a ratio of 5 per cent may not be a serious problem in design, because the allowable design stress and the fatigue life were little affected. The cause of these variations in strength was discussed by examining the initiation and growth of cracks, and the microstructures. (author)

  14. Effect of some types of machining processes on beryllium fatigue strength properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, M.

    1977-01-01

    The aim of this work, which is sponsored by the French D.G.R.S.T., is to determine a machining process giving both the highest tensile strength and the highest fatigue limit to beryllium parts. A comparison is made of the effects of : mechanical machining, electro discharge machining, electro-chemical machining, electrolytical and chemical polishing, glass shot peening, on the mechanical strength and fatigue limits of samples taken from hot pressed and extruded rods and from cast ingot sheets, either notched or not as required. Complementary examinations are performed principally by fractographic study. The results show that for beryllium, electrochemical machining followed by glass shot peening gives the best results; however mechanical machining with electrolytical polishing followed by glass shot peening are also satisfactory. (author)

  15. Effects of smartphone overuse on hand function, pinch strength, and the median nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnal, Esra Erkol; Demİrcİ, kadİr; Çetİntürk, Azİze; Akgönül, Mehmet; Savaş, Serpİl

    2015-08-01

    In this study we investigated the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon and median nerve in smartphone users by ultrasonography to assess the effects of smartphone addiction on the clinical and functional status of the hands. One hundred two students were divided into 3 groups: non-users, and high or low smartphone users. Smartphone Addiction Scale (SAS) scores and grip and pinch strengths were recorded. Pain in thumb movement and rest and hand function were evaluated on the visual analog scale (VAS) and the Duruöz Hand Index (DHI), respectively. The cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the median nerve and the FPL tendon were calculated bilaterally using ultrasonography. Significantly higher median nerve CSAs were observed in the dominant hands of the high smartphone users than in the non-dominant hands (PSmartphone overuse enlarges the median nerve, causes pain in the thumb, and decreases pinch strength and hand functions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Biological effects of high strength electric fields. Second interim progress report, September 1976--March 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, R.D.; Kaune, W.T.

    1977-05-01

    This report describes progress made on the Project during the period of September 9, 1976 to March 31, 1977 towards the determination of the biological effects of high strength electric fields on small laboratory animals. The efforts to date can be divided into five categories: (1) the design, construction, and testing of a prototype and special studies exposure system; (2) the design and construction of exposure systems for rats and mice; (3) dosimetry; (4) experiments to determine the maximum field strength which does not produce corona discharge, ozone formation, shocks to the animal, hair stimulation, or a behavioral preference by rats to avoid exposure to the field; and (5) preparations for the biological screening experiments.

  17. Effect of PVA fiber content on creep property of fiber reinforced high-strength concrete columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zongnan; Wang, Tao; Wang, Weilun

    2018-04-01

    The effect of PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) fiber content on the creep property of fiber reinforced high-strength concrete columns was investigated. The correction factor of PVA fiber content was proposed and the creep prediction model of ACI209 was modified. Controlling the concrete strength as C80, changing the content of PVA fiber (volume fraction 0%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% respectively), the creep experiment of PVA fiber reinforced concrete columns was carried out, the creep coefficient of each specimen was calculated to characterize the creep property. The influence of PVA fiber content on the creep property was analyzed based on the creep coefficient and the calculation results of several frequently used creep prediction models. The correction factor of PVA fiber content was proposed to modify the ACI209 creep prediction model.

  18. Effects of ion strength and ion pairing on (plant-wide) modelling of anaerobic digestion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Mbamba, Christian Kazadi; Solon, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    the effects that an improved physico-chemical description will have on the predicted effluent quality (EQI) and operational cost (OCI) indices. The acid-base equilibria implemented in the Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1 (ADM1) are modified to account for non-ideal aqueous-phase chemistry. The model corrects......The objective of this study is to show the influence of ionic strength (as activity corrections) andion pairing on (plant-wide) modelling of anaerobic digestion processes in wastewater treatment plants(WWTPs). Using the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2) as a case study, this paper presents...... for ionic strength via the Davies approach to consider chemical activities instead of molar concentrations. Also, a speciation sub-routine based on a multi-dimensional Newton-Raphson iteration method accounts for the formation of some of the ion pairs playing an important role in wastewater treatment...

  19. Effect of training supervision on effectiveness of strength training for reducing neck/shoulder pain and headache in office workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Bibi; Andersen, Christoffer; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of workplace neck/shoulder strength training with and without regular supervision on neck/shoulder pain and headache among office workers. Method. A 20-week cluster randomized controlled trial among 351 office workers was randomized into three groups: two trai...

  20. The Effect of CuO Nanoparticles on Antimicrobial Effects and Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toodehzaeim, Mohammad Hossein; Zandi, Hengameh; Meshkani, Hamidreza; Hosseinzadeh Firouzabadi, Azadeh

    2018-03-01

    Orthodontic appliances facilitate microbial plaque accumulation and increase the chance of white spot lesions. There is a need for new plaque control methods independent of patient's cooperation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles on antimicrobial properties and bond strength of orthodontic adhesive. CuO nanoparticles were added to the composite transbond XT at concentrations of 0.01, 0.5 and 1 wt.%. To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of composites containing nanoparticles, the disk agar diffusion test was used. For this purpose, 10 discs from each concentration of nano-composites (totally 30 discs) and 10 discs from conventional composite (as the control group) were prepared. Then the diameter of streptococcus mutans growth inhibition around each disc was determined in blood agar medium. To evaluate the shear bond strength, with each concentration of nano-composites as well as the control group (conventional composite), 10 metal brackets were bonded to the human premolars and shear bond strength was determined using a universal testing machine. Nano-composites in all three concentrations showed significant antimicrobial effect compared to the control group ( p nano-composites compared to control group ( p = 0.695). Incorporating CuO nanoparticles into adhesive in all three studied concentrations added antimicrobial effects to the adhesive with no adverse effects on shear bond strength.

  1. The Effects of Eccentric Contraction Duration on Muscle Strength, Power Production, Vertical Jump, and Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike, Jonathan N; Cole, Nathan; Herrera, Chris; VanDusseldorp, Trisha; Kravitz, Len; Kerksick, Chad M

    2017-03-01

    Mike, JN, Cole, N, Herrera, C, VanDusseldorp, T, Kravitz, L, and Kerksick, CM. The effects of eccentric contraction duration on muscle strength, power production, vertical jump, and soreness. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 773-786, 2017-Previous research has investigated the effects of either eccentric-only training or comparing eccentric and concentric exercise on changes related to strength and power expression, but no research to date has investigated the impact of altering the duration of either the concentric or the eccentric component on these parameters. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the duration of eccentric (i.e., 2-second, 4-second vs. 6-second) muscle contractions and their effect on muscle strength, power production, vertical jump, and soreness using a plate-loaded barbell Smith squat exercise. Thirty college-aged men (23 ± 3.5 years, 178 ± 6.8 cm, 82 ± 12 kg, and 11.6 ± 5.1% fat) with 3.0 ± 1.0 years of resistance training experience and training frequency of 4.3 ± 0.9 days per week were randomized and assigned to 1 of 3 eccentric training groups that incorporated different patterns of contraction. For every repetition, all 3 groups used 2-second concentric contractions and paused for 1 second between the concentric and eccentric phases. The control group (2S) used 2-second eccentric contractions, whereas the 4S group performed 4-second eccentric contractions and the 6S group performed 6-second eccentric contractions. All repetitions were completed using the barbell Smith squat exercise. All participants completed a 4-week training protocol that required them to complete 2 workouts per week using their prescribed contraction routine for 4 sets of 6 repetitions at an intensity of 80-85% one repetition maximum (1RM). For all performance data, significant group × time (G × T) interaction effects were found for average power production across all 3 sets of a squat jump protocol (p = 0.04) while vertical jump did not reach

  2. Effects of Kettlebell Swing vs. Explosive Deadlift Training on Strength and Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Maulit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent research has compared explosive deadlift to kettlebell training observing their effects on strength. The kettlebell swing is a popular practical exercise as it shares share a hip hinge movement with the explosive deadlift, but the two have not been compared. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of kettlebell swing vs. explosive deadlift training on strength and power. Methods: Thirty-one recreationally resistance-trained men (age = 23.1 ± 2.3 years, height = 175.5 ± 6.6 cm, mass = 83.9 ± 13.8 kg, 1RM deadlift = 159.9 ± 31.7 kg were randomly assigned to one of two groups [kettlebell swing group (KBG n = 15, or explosive deadlift group (EDLG n = 16]. Vertical jump height, isometric mid-thigh pull (MTP, and 1RM deadlift were measured pre and post training. Both groups trained twice per week for 4 weeks. Volume and load were increased after the first 2 weeks of training. Results: A 2 (time x 2 (group mixed factor ANOVA revealed a significant (P<0.05 increase in deadlift 1RM (pre: 159.9 ± 31.7 kg, post: 168.9 ± 31.8 kg and vertical jump height (pre: 56.6 ± 9.9 cm, post: 57.9 ± 9.7 cm for both groups, but were not significantly different between groups. There were no significant changes in MTP. Conclusions: Strength and conditioning professionals may use both kettlebell swings and explosive deadlifts to increase deadlift strength and vertical jump power.

  3. Effect of isokinetic training on strength, functionality and proprioception in athletes with functional ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekir, Ufuk; Yildiz, Yavuz; Hazneci, Bulent; Ors, Fatih; Aydin, Taner

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of isokinetic exercise on strength, joint position sense and functionality in recreational athletes with functional ankle instability (FAI). Strength, proprioception and balance of 24 recreational athletes with unilateral FAI were evaluated by using isokinetic muscle strength measurement, ankle joint position sense and one leg standing test. The functional ability was evaluated using five different tests. These were; single limb hopping course (SLHC), one legged and triple legged hop for distance (OLHD-TLHD), and six and cross six meter hop for time (SMHT-CSMHT). Isokinetic peak torque of the ankle invertor and evertor muscles were assessed eccentrically and concentrically at test speeds of 120 degrees /s. Isokinetic exercise protocol was carried out at an angular velocity of 120 degrees /s. The exercise session was repeated three times a week and lasted after 6 weeks. At baseline, concentric invertor strength was found to be significantly lower in the functionally unstable ankles compared to the opposite healthy ankles (p 0.05). Ankle joint position sense in the injured ankles declined significantly from 2.35 +/- 1.16 to 1.33 +/- 0.62 degrees for 10 degrees of inversion angle (p isokinetic exercise. One leg standing test score decreased significantly from 15.17 +/- 8.50 to 11.79 +/- 7.81 in the injured ankles (p isokinetic exercise protocol, all of the worsened functional test scores in the injured ankles as compared to the opposite healthy ankles displayed a significant improvement (p isokinetic exercise program used in this study had a positive effect on these parameters.

  4. Identification of Differentially Methylated Sites with Weak Methylation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Tran

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA methylation is an epigenetic alteration crucial for regulating stress responses. Identifying large-scale DNA methylation at single nucleotide resolution is made possible by whole genome bisulfite sequencing. An essential task following the generation of bisulfite sequencing data is to detect differentially methylated cytosines (DMCs among treatments. Most statistical methods for DMC detection do not consider the dependency of methylation patterns across the genome, thus possibly inflating type I error. Furthermore, small sample sizes and weak methylation effects among different phenotype categories make it difficult for these statistical methods to accurately detect DMCs. To address these issues, the wavelet-based functional mixed model (WFMM was introduced to detect DMCs. To further examine the performance of WFMM in detecting weak differential methylation events, we used both simulated and empirical data and compare WFMM performance to a popular DMC detection tool methylKit. Analyses of simulated data that replicated the effects of the herbicide glyphosate on DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana show that WFMM results in higher sensitivity and specificity in detecting DMCs compared to methylKit, especially when the methylation differences among phenotype groups are small. Moreover, the performance of WFMM is robust with respect to small sample sizes, making it particularly attractive considering the current high costs of bisulfite sequencing. Analysis of empirical Arabidopsis thaliana data under varying glyphosate dosages, and the analysis of monozygotic (MZ twins who have different pain sensitivities—both datasets have weak methylation effects of <1%—show that WFMM can identify more relevant DMCs related to the phenotype of interest than methylKit. Differentially methylated regions (DMRs are genomic regions with different DNA methylation status across biological samples. DMRs and DMCs are essentially the same

  5. Investigating the Effects of Typical Rowing Strength Training Practices on Strength and Power Development and 2,000 m Rowing Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Gee Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effects of a short-term, strength training intervention, typically undertaken by club-standard rowers, on 2,000 m rowing performance and strength and power development. Twenty-eight male rowers were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. All participants performed baseline testing involving assessments of muscle soreness, creatine kinase activity (CK, maximal voluntary contraction (leg-extensors (MVC, static-squat jumps (SSJ, counter-movement jumps (CMJ, maximal rowing power strokes (PS and a 2,000 m rowing ergometer time-trial (2,000 m with accompanying respiratory-exchange and electromyography (EMG analysis. Intervention group participants subsequently performed three identical strength training (ST sessions, in the space of five days, repeating all assessments 24 h following the final ST. The control group completed the same testing procedure but with no ST. Following ST, the intervention group experienced significant elevations in soreness and CK activity, and decrements in MVC, SSJ, CMJ and PS (p < 0.01. However, 2,000 m rowing performance, pacing strategy and gas exchange were unchanged across trials in either condition. Following ST, significant increases occurred for EMG (p < 0.05, and there were non-significant trends for decreased blood lactate and anaerobic energy liberation (p = 0.063 – 0.086. In summary, club-standard rowers, following an intensive period of strength training, maintained their 2,000 m rowing performance despite suffering symptoms of muscle damage and disruption to muscle function. This disruption likely reflected the presence of acute residual fatigue, potentially in type II muscle fibres as strength and power development were affected.

  6. Sensing line effects on PWR-based differential pressure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.P.; Neff, G.G.

    1982-01-01

    An incorrrect configuration of the fluid-filled pressure sensing lines connecting differential pressure transducers to the pressure taps in a pressurized water reactor system can cause errors in the measurement and, during rapid pressure transients, could cause the transducer to fail. Testing was performed in both static and dynamic modes to experimentally determine the effects of sensing lines of various lengths, diameters, and materials. Testing was performed at ambient temperature with absolute line pressures at about 17 MPa using water as the pressure transmission fluid

  7. Effect of Abrasion-Induced Contact Damage on the Optical Properties and Strength of Float Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-06-07

    in glass. J Am Ceram Soc. 1969;52(6):338–339. 2. Mecholsky JJ Jr, Freiman SW, Rice RW. Effect of grinding on flaw geometry and fracture of glass. J...Am Ceram Soc. 1977;60(3–4):114–117. 3. Rice RW, Mecholsky JJ Jr. The nature of strength controlling machining flaws in ceramics. In: Hockey BJ, Rice...National Bureau of Standards; 1979. p. 351–378. 4. Rice RW, Mecholsky JJ Jr, Becher PF. The effect of grinding direction on flaw character and

  8. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated teeth on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Cumerlato, Marina; Lima, Eduardo Martinelli de; Osorio, Leandro Berni; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Menezes, Luciane Macedo de; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of grinding, drilling, sandblasting, and ageing prefabricated teeth (PfT) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets, as well as the effects of surface treatments on the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Methods: One-hundred-ninety-two PfT were divided into four groups (n = 48): Group 1, no surface treatment was done; Group 2, grinding was performed with a cylindrical diamond bur; Group 3,...

  9. The Isolated Effect of Adductor Canal Block on Quadriceps Femoris Muscle Strength After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Johan Kløvgaard; Jæger, Pia; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2016-01-01

    TKA. METHODS: We included 64 patients on the first postoperative day. Group A received an ACB with 30 mL ropivacaine 0.75% at t0 and with 30 mL saline 60 minutes later (t60). Group B received the treatment in the opposite order. The primary end point was the difference between groups in MVIC at t60......, expressed as a percentage of postoperative preblock values. In this manner, the effect of the ACB could be isolated from the detrimental effect on muscle strength caused by the surgery. Secondary end points were differences between groups in mobility and pain scores. We planned a subgroup analysis dividing...

  10. Differential Radiosensitizing Effect of Valproic Acid in Differentiation Versus Self-Renewal Promoting Culture Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debeb, Bisrat G.; Xu Wei; Mok, Henry; Li Li; Robertson, Fredika; Ueno, Naoto T.; Reuben, Jim; Lucci, Anthony; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that valproic acid (VA) enhances the proliferation and self-renewal of normal hematopoietic stem cells and that breast cancer stem/progenitor cells can be resistant to radiation. From these data, we hypothesized that VA would fail to radiosensitize breast cancer stem/progenitor cells grown to three-dimensional (3D) mammospheres. Methods and Materials: We used the MCF7 breast cancer cell line grown under stem cell-promoting culture conditions (3D mammosphere) and standard nonstem cell monolayer culture conditions (two-dimensional) to examine the effect of pretreatment with VA on radiation sensitivity in clonogenic survival assays and on the expression of embryonic stem cell transcription factors. Results: 3D-cultured MCF-7 cells expressed higher levels of Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2. The 3D passage enriched self-renewal and increased radioresistance in the 3D mammosphere formation assays. VA radiosensitized adherent cells but radioprotected 3D cells in single-fraction clonogenic assays. Moreover, fractionated radiation sensitized VA-treated adherent MCF7 cells but did not have a significant effect on VA-treated single cells grown to mammospheres. Conclusion: We have concluded that VA might preferentially radiosensitize differentiated cells compared with those expressing stem cell surrogates and that stem cell-promoting culture is a useful tool for in vitro evaluation of novel cancer therapeutic agents and radiosensitizers.

  11. The effects of strength training on cognitive performance in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolarek AC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available André de Camargo Smolarek,1,2 Luis Henrique Boiko Ferreira,1,2 Luis Paulo Gomes Mascarenhas,1 Steven R McAnulty,3 Karla Daniele Varela,4 Mônica C Dangui,4 Marcelo Paes de Barros,5 Alan C Utter,3 Tácito P Souza-Junior2,3 1Department of Physical Education, Biochemistry of the Exercise Laboratory, Centro Oeste University State, Irati, Parana, 2Research Group on Metabolism, Nutrition and Strength Training, Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Brazil; 3Department of Health and Exercise Science, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, USA; 4Physical Education Department, Faculty Guairaca, Guarapuava, Parana, 5Institute of Physical Activity and Sports Science (ICAFE, Cruzeiro do Sul University, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Aging is a degenerative process marked by recognized functional, physiological, and metabolic impairments, such as dynapenia and diminished cognitive capacity. Therefore, the search for innovative strategies to prevent/delay these physiological and cognitive disorders is essential to guarantee the independence and life quality of an elderly population. The aim of this work is to verify the effect of a 12-week resistance exercise program on the general physical aptitude and cognitive capacities of elderly and sedentary women. Twenty-nine women (65.87±5.69 years were divided into two groups. The control group was composed of eight elderly women who met the same inclusion criteria of the study and the strength training group was composed of 29 elderly women who were subjected to a resistance exercise program defined by 12 upper and lower limb exercises combined in 3×10 repetitions with 1-minute interval between repetitions and two resting minutes between exercises (three times/week. Weight loads were fixed between 60% and 75% of the apparent 1 repetition maximum, which was estimated by the test of 10 maximum repetitions. The direct curl was performed for upper body strength evaluation with 2

  12. Effects of quadriceps strength after static and dynamic whole-body vibration exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Jill A; Blog, Gabriel L; Kang, Jie; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Ratamess, Nicholas A

    2015-05-01

    Numerous studies have shown performance benefits including whole-body vibration (WBV) as a training modality or an acute exercise protocol when used as a component of the resistance training program. Some studies have indicated that performing dynamic exercises as compared with static position exercises while exposed to WBV might be beneficial; however, evidence is lacking. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine if an acute bout of dynamic versus static squats performed during WBV results in increase in quadriceps force production by means of dynamic isokinetic knee extension and flexion exercise. Nonresistance-trained healthy young men and women (N = 21) of 18-25 years participated in 4 protocols with 2-week rest in-between. Protocol 1 consisted of 5 sets of 10 dynamic squats without vibration; Protocol 2: 5 sets of 30-second static squats without vibration; Protocol 3: 5 sets of 10 dynamic squats with 30-Hz WBV for a total of 2.5 minutes; and Protocol 4: 5 sets of 30-second static squats with 30-Hz WBV for a total of 2.5 minutes. Prestrength tests (1 set of 4 repetitions at 100° · s(-1) for the knee extension exercise) was performed within 5 minutes of starting each protocol, and poststrength testing was performed within 1 minute of completing each protocol. Strength outcomes were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance with a significance level set at p ≤ 0.05. A significant decrease in strength was observed after dynamic and static squats without WBV (p = 0.002); an increase in strength after dynamic squats with WBV (p = 0.003); and a decrease in strength after static squats with WBV (p = 0.003). The inclusion of WBV to dynamic resistance exercise can be an added modality to increase strength. Whole-body vibration can have varied effects in altering muscle strength in untrained individuals according to the type of resistance training performed. As a dynamic squat with WBV seems to immediately potentiate neuromuscular functioning, the

  13. Thermal Processing Effects on the Adhesive Strength of PS304 High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Edmonds, Brian J.; Benoy, Patricia A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the effects of post deposition heat treatments on the cohesive and adhesive strength properties of PS304, a plasma sprayed nickel-chrome based, high temperature solid lubricant coating deposited on stainless steel, are studied. Plasma spray deposited coating samples were exposed in air at temperatures from 432 to 650 C for up to 500 hr to promote residual stress relief, enhance particle to particle bonding and increase coating to substrate bond strength. Coating pull-off strength was measured using a commercial adhesion tester that utilizes 13 mm diameter aluminum pull studs attached to the coating surface with epoxy. Pull off force was automatically recorded and converted to coating pull off strength. As deposited coating samples were also tested as a baseline. The as-deposited (untreated) samples either delaminated at the coating-substrate interface or failed internally (cohesive failure) at about 17 MPa. Samples heat treated at temperatures above 540 C for 100 hr or at 600 C or above for more than 24 hr exhibited strengths above 31 MPa, nearly a two fold increase. Coating failure occurred inside the body of the coating (cohesive failure) for nearly all of the heat-treated samples and only occasionally at the coating substrate interface (adhesive failure). Metallographic analyses of heat-treated coatings indicate that the Nickel-Chromium binder in the PS304 appears to have segregated into two phases, a high nickel matrix phase and a high chromium precipitated phase. Analysis of the precipitates indicates the presence of silicon, a constituent of a flow enhancing additive in the commercial NiCr powder. The exact nature and structure of the precipitate phase is not known. This microstructural change is believed to be partially responsible for the coating strength increase. Diffusion bonding between particles may also be playing a role. Increasing the heat treatment temperature, exposure time or both accelerate the heat treatment process. Preliminary

  14. [Effects of different surface treatments on the zirconia-resin cement bond strength].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Y; Liu, X Q; Chen, L; Zhou, J F; Tan, J G

    2018-02-18

    To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength between zirconia and resin cement. Forty zirconia discs were randomly divided into four groups (10 discs in each group) for different surface treatments: control, no surface treatment; sandblast, applied air abrasion with aluminum oxide particles; ultraviolet (UV), the zirconia sample was placed in the UV sterilizer at the bottom of the UV lamp at 10 mm, and irradiated for 48 h; cold plasma, the discs were put in the cold plasma cabinet with the cold plasma generated from the gas of He for 30 s. Specimens of all the groups were surface treated prior to cementation with Panavia F 2.0 cement. The surface morphology and contact angle of water were measured. The shear bond strengths were tested and the failure modes were examined with a stereomicroscope. Surface morphology showed no difference between the UV/cold plasma group and the control group. Sandblasted zirconia displayed an overall heterogeneous distribution of micropores. The contact angle of the control group was 64.1°±2.0°. After sandblasting, UV irradiation and cold plasma exposure, the values significantly decreased to 48.8°±2.6°, 27.1°±3.6° and 32.0°±3.3°. The values of shear bond strength of the specimens with sandblasted (14.82±2.01) MPa were higher than those with no treatment (9.41±1.07) MPa with statistically significant difference (Pbond strength of the specimens with UV irradiation (10.02±0.64) MPa were higher than those with no treatment (9.41±1.07) MPa, but without statistically significant difference (P>0.05). The values of cold plasma group (18.34±3.05) MPa were significantly higher than those of control group (9.41±1.07) MPa, even more than those with sandblast(14.82±2.01) MPa (PUV and cold plasma treatment. The surface C/O ratio also decreased after UV and cold plasma treatment. Zirconia specimens treated with UV and cold plasma could significantly improve the hydrophilicity. The surface

  15. Effects of Agar Gel Strength and Fat on Oral Breakdown, Volatile Release, and Sensory Perception Using in Vivo and in Vitro Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Damian; Eyres, Graham T; Piyasiri, Udayasika; Cochet-Broch, Maeva; Delahunty, Conor M; Lundin, Leif; Appelqvist, Ingrid M

    2015-10-21

    The density and composition of a food matrix affect the rates of oral breakdown and in-mouth flavor release as well as the overall sensory experience. Agar gels of increasing concentration (1.0, 1.7, 2.9, and 5% agarose) with and without added fat (0, 2, 5, and 10%) were spiked with seven aroma volatiles. Differences in oral processing and sensory perception were systematically measured by a trained panel using a discrete interval time intensity method. Volatile release was measured in vivo and in vitro by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. Greater oral processing was required as agar gel strength increased, and the intensity of flavor-related sensory attributes decreased. Volatile release was inversely related to gel strength, showing that physicochemical phenomena were the main mechanisms underlying the perceived sensory changes. Fat addition reduced the amount of oral processing and had differential effects on release, depending on the fat solubility or lipophilicity of the volatiles.

  16. The effect of rules on differential reinforcement of other behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Amanda C; Wilder, David A; Gregory, Meagan K; Leon, Yanerys; Ditzian, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    Previous research on the treatment of problem behavior has shown differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) to be an effective behavior-reduction procedure. However, the extent to which presession descriptions of the DRO contingency enhance intervention effects has not been examined. In the current study, we compared a condition in which a presession rule that described the DRO contingency was given to a condition in which no rule was given for 4 participants. The target behavior was toy play, which served as an analogue to problem behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement. Results showed that DRO was more efficient for 1 participant and more effective for 2 participants when a rule was given. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  17. Suction pressure, yield strength and effective stress of partially saturated unbound granular pavement layers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theyse, HL

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available to the ratio of the imposed stress over the shear strength of the material. Conventionally, the shear strength of the material was characterised with the Mohr-Coulomb shear strength parameters. This paper further develops a recent yield strength model...

  18. Well-Being on Campus: Testing the Effectiveness of an Online Strengths-Based Intervention for First Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koydemir, Selda; Sun-Selisik, Z. Eda

    2016-01-01

    The present research examined the effectiveness of an 8-week online strengths-based intervention in promoting subjective and psychological well-being of first year university students. The intervention was composed of five modules pertaining to (a) finding and cultivating on character strengths, (b) regulation of emotions and increasing positive…

  19. Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention Using Process-Based Mental Simulations in Promoting Muscular Strength in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koka, Andre

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a brief theory-based intervention on muscular strength among adolescents in a physical education setting. The intervention adopted a process-based mental simulation technique. The self-reported frequency of practising for and actual levels of abdominal muscular strength/endurance as one component of…

  20. Investigating strength and frequency effects in recognition memory using type-2 signal detection theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Philip A; Perfect, Timothy J; Bruno, Davide

    2009-01-01

    Criterion- versus distribution-shift accounts of frequency and strength effects in recognition memory were investigated with Type-2 signal detection receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, which provides a measure of metacognitive monitoring. Experiment 1 demonstrated a frequency-based mirror effect, with a higher hit rate and lower false alarm rate, for low frequency words compared with high frequency words. In Experiment 2, the authors manipulated item strength with repetition, which showed an increased hit rate but no effect on the false alarm rate. Whereas Type-1 indices were ambiguous as to whether these effects were based on a criterion- or distribution-shift model, the two models predict opposite effects on Type-2 distractor monitoring under some assumptions. Hence, Type-2 ROC analysis discriminated between potential models of recognition that could not be discriminated using Type-1 indices alone. In Experiment 3, the authors manipulated Type-1 response bias by varying the number of old versus new response categories to confirm the assumptions made in Experiments 1 and 2. The authors conclude that Type-2 analyses are a useful tool for investigating recognition memory when used in conjunction with more traditional Type-1 analyses.

  1. Degree of saturation effect on the grout-soil interface shear strength of soil nailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the grouted soil nailing system, the bonding strength of cement grout-soil interface offers the required resistance to maintain the stability of whole structure. In practice, soil nailing applications are often placed at unsaturated conditions, such as soil slopes, shallow foundations, retaining walls and pavement structures. In these cases, the water content in the soil nail zone may increase or decrease due to rain water or dry weather, and even cannot become saturated during their design service life. In this study, the effect of water content (degree of saturation on the shear strength of interface between cement grout and sand are experimentally investigated by means of direct shear test. Meanwhile the water retention curve was determined and interface microstructure was observed. Experimental results show that the shear strength of interface changes non-monotonously with degree of saturation when the interface was prepared, due to the non-monotonousness of the cohesiveness between soil particles. The less the cohesiveness between sand particles, the more grout was observed been penetrated into the voids, and thus the larger the interface shear stress.

  2. Effects of Hybrid Coat on shear bond strength of five cements: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yue; Zhou, Hou-De; Feng, Yun-Zhi

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the sealing performance of Hybrid Coat and its influence on the shear bond strength of five dentin surface cements. Six premolars were pretreated to expose the dentin surface prior to the application of Hybrid Coat. The microscopic characteristics of the dentinal surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Then, 40 premolars were sectioned longitudinally, and 80 semi-sections were divided into a control group (untreated) and a study group (treated by Hybrid Coat). Alloy restoration was bonded to the teeth specimen using five different cements. Shear bond strength was measured by the universal testing machine. The fracture patterns and the adhesive interface were observed using astereomicroscope. SEM revealed that the lumens of dentinal tubules were completely occluded by Hybrid Coat. The Hybrid Coat significantly improved the shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) and resin cement (RC) but weakened the performance of zinc phosphate cement (ZPC), zinc polycarboxylate cement (ZPCC) and glass ionomer cement (GIC). Hybrid Coat is an effective dentinal tubule sealant, and therefore its combined use with resin or resin-modified glass ionomer cements can be applied for the prostheses attachment purpose.

  3. Effects of egg white protein supplementation on muscle strength and serum free amino acid concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Azumi; Hasegawa, Yuko; Mekata, Yuko; Usuda, Mika; Masuda, Yasunobu; Kawano, Hitoshi; Kawano, Yukari

    2012-10-19

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of egg white protein compared to carbohydrate intake prior to exercise on fat free mass (FFM), one repetition maximum (1RM) muscle strength and blood biochemistry in female athletes. Thirty healthy female collegiate athletes were recruited for this study and matched by sport type, body fat percentage and 1RM leg curl muscle strength. Participants were randomly divided into two groups: protein group (15.0 g egg white protein; 75 kcal) and carbohydrate group (17.5 g maltodextrin, 78 kcal). Supplements were administered daily at the same time in a double-blind manner prior to training during an 8-week period. Measurements were performed before and after the 8-week regimen. The mean dietary energy intake did not change throughout the study period. FFM and 1RM assessments (i.e., leg curl, leg extension, squat, and bench press) increased in both groups. Furthermore, serum urea and serum citrulline levels after the 8-week regimen increased significantly only in the protein group. Our findings indicated that compared to the carbohydrate supplement, the protein supplement was associated with some changes in protein metabolites but not with changes in body composition or muscle strength.

  4. Effects of Egg White Protein Supplementation on Muscle Strength and Serum Free Amino Acid Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Kawano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of egg white protein compared to carbohydrate intake prior to exercise on fat free mass (FFM, one repetition maximum (1RM muscle strength and blood biochemistry in female athletes. Thirty healthy female collegiate athletes were recruited for this study and matched by sport type, body fat percentage and 1RM leg curl muscle strength. Participants were randomly divided into two groups: protein group (15.0 g egg white protein; 75 kcal and carbohydrate group (17.5 g maltodextrin, 78 kcal. Supplements were administered daily at the same time in a double-blind manner prior to training during an 8-week period. Measurements were performed before and after the 8-week regimen. The mean dietary energy intake did not change throughout the study period. FFM and 1RM assessments (i.e., leg curl, leg extension, squat, and bench press increased in both groups. Furthermore, serum urea and serum citrulline levels after the 8-week regimen increased significantly only in the protein group. Our findings indicated that compared to the carbohydrate supplement, the protein supplement was associated with some changes in protein metabolites but not with changes in body composition or muscle strength.

  5. Effect of cavity disinfectants on antibacterial activity and microtensile bond strength in class I cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo-Ram; Oh, Man-Hwan; Shin, Dong-Hoon

    2017-05-31

    This study was performed to compare the antibacterial activities of three cavity disinfectants [chlorhexidine (CHX), NaOCl, urushiol] and to evaluate their effect on the microtensile bond strength of Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (3M-ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) in class I cavities. In both experiments, class I cavities were prepared in dentin. After inoculation with Streptococcus mutans, the cavities of control group were rinsed and those of CHX, NaOCl and urushiol groups were treated with each disinfectant. Standardized amounts of dentin chips were collected and number of S. mutans was determined. Following the same cavity treatment, same adhesive was applied in etch-and-rinse mode. Then, microtensile bond strength was evaluated. The number of S. mutans was significantly reduced in the cavities treated with CHX, NaOCl, and urushiol compared with control group (p<0.05). However, there was a significant bond strength reduction in NaOCl group, which showed statistical difference compared to the other groups (p<0.05).

  6. Effect of Pin Geometry on the Mechanical Strength of Friction-Stir-Welded Polypropylene Composite Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordestani, F.; Ashenai Ghasemi, F.; Arab, N. B. M.

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state welding process, which has successfully been applied in aerospace and automotive industries for joining materials. The friction stir tool is the key element in the FSW process. In this study, the effect of four different tool pin geometries on the mechanical properties of two types of polypropylene composite plates, with 30% glass and carbon fiber, respectively, were investigated. For this purpose, four pins of different geometry, namely, a threaded-tapered pin, square pin, four-flute threaded pin, and threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer were made and used to carry out the butt welding of 5-mm-thick plates. The standard tensile and Izod impact tests were performed to evaluate the tensile strength and impact toughness of welded specimens. The results indicated that the threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer produced welds with a better surface appearance and higher tensile and impact strengths. The tests also showed that, with the threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer, the impact strength of the glass- and carbon-fiber composite welds were about 40 and 50%, respectively, of that of the base materials.

  7. Measurements of Bauschinger effect and transient behavior of a quenched and partitioned advanced high strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Shun-lai; Sun, Li; Niu, Chao

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, the needs for new advanced high strength steels (AHSS) with high ductility and strength have rapidly increased to achieve the targets of more fuel-efficient and safer vehicles in automotive industry. However, several undesirable phenomena are experimentally observed during the forming of such materials, particularly with complex loading and large plastic deformation. Springback is one of the most important problems that should be compensated in sheet metal forming process. In this paper, we investigated the hardening behavior of a Q and P (quench and partitioning) steel designated by QP980CR, which is a new third generation advance high strength steel, from the Baosteel Group Corp. in Shanghai, China. The uni-axial tensile and cyclic simple shear tests were conducted. The uni-axial tensile tests were performed on the specimens at 0°, 45° and 90° to rolling direction (RD). The flow stress and transverse strain evolution were obtained in view of the digital image correlation (DIC) measurement. The plastic anisotropy was optimized from the uni-axial tensile tests and thereafter incorporated into the simulations of cyclic simple shear tests. The cyclic simple shear tests were conducted with three prestrains to measure the Bauschinger effect, transient behavior and permanent softening, and to determine the material parameters of the combined isotropic-kinematic hardening model

  8. Measurements of Bauschinger effect and transient behavior of a quenched and partitioned advanced high strength steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Shun-lai, E-mail: shawn@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Sun, Li [Manufacturing Process Research, General Motors China Science Lab, No. 56, Jinwan Road, Shanghai (China); Niu, Chao [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2013-12-01

    In recent decades, the needs for new advanced high strength steels (AHSS) with high ductility and strength have rapidly increased to achieve the targets of more fuel-efficient and safer vehicles in automotive industry. However, several undesirable phenomena are experimentally observed during the forming of such materials, particularly with complex loading and large plastic deformation. Springback is one of the most important problems that should be compensated in sheet metal forming process. In this paper, we investigated the hardening behavior of a Q and P (quench and partitioning) steel designated by QP980CR, which is a new third generation advance high strength steel, from the Baosteel Group Corp. in Shanghai, China. The uni-axial tensile and cyclic simple shear tests were conducted. The uni-axial tensile tests were performed on the specimens at 0°, 45° and 90° to rolling direction (RD). The flow stress and transverse strain evolution were obtained in view of the digital image correlation (DIC) measurement. The plastic anisotropy was optimized from the uni-axial tensile tests and thereafter incorporated into the simulations of cyclic simple shear tests. The cyclic simple shear tests were conducted with three prestrains to measure the Bauschinger effect, transient behavior and permanent softening, and to determine the material parameters of the combined isotropic-kinematic hardening model.

  9. Effect on Compressive Strength of Concrete Using Treated Waste Water for Mixing and Curing of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Kanwal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective utilization of the available resources is imperative approach to achieve the apex of productivity. The modern world is focusing on the conditioning, sustainability and recycling of the assets by imparting innovative techniques and methodologies. Keeping this in view, an experimental study was conducted to evaluate the strength of concrete made with treated waste water for structural use. In this study ninetysix cylinders of four mixes with coarse aggregates in combination with FW (Fresh Water, WW (Wastewater, TWW (Treated Wastewater and TS (Treated Sewagewere prepared. The workability of fresh concrete was checked before pouring of cylinders. The test cylinders were left for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days for curing. After curing, the compressive strength was measured on hardened concrete cylinders accordingly. Test results showed that workability of all the four mixes were between 25-50mm but ultimate compressive strength of concrete with WW was decreased and with TWW, TS at the age of 28 days do not change significantly. This research will open a new wicket in the horizon of recycling of construction materials. The conditioning and cyclic utilization will reduce the cost of the construction and building materials as well as minimize the use of natural resources. This novelty and calculating approach will save our natural assets and resources.

  10. Effects of oil palm shell coarse aggregate species on high strength lightweight concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Ming Kun; Bin Mahmud, Hilmi; Ang, Bee Chin; Yew, Ming Chian

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different species of oil palm shell (OPS) coarse aggregates on the properties of high strength lightweight concrete (HSLWC). Original and crushed OPS coarse aggregates of different species and age categories were investigated in this study. The research focused on two OPS species (dura and tenera), in which the coarse aggregates were taken from oil palm trees of the following age categories (3-5, 6-9, and 10-15 years old). The results showed that the workability and dry density of the oil palm shell concrete (OPSC) increase with an increase in age category of OPS species. The compressive strength of specimen CD3 increases significantly compared to specimen CT3 by 21.8%. The maximum achievable 28-day and 90-day compressive strength is 54 and 56 MPa, respectively, which is within the range for 10-15-year-old crushed dura OPS. The water absorption was determined to be within the range for good concrete for the different species of OPSC. In addition, the ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) results showed that the OPS HSLWC attain good condition at the age of 3 days.

  11. Effect of metal chloride solutions on coloration and biaxial flexural strength of yttria-stabilized zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Gye-Jeong; Lee, Kwangmin; Lee, Doh-Jae; Lim, Hyun-Pil; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Ban, Jae-Sam; Lee, Kyung-Ku; Fisher, John G.; Park, Sang-Won

    2012-10-01

    The effect of three kinds of transition metal dopants on the color and biaxial flexural strength of zirconia ceramics for dental applications was evaluated. Presintered zirconia discs were colored through immersion in aqueous chromium, molybdenum and vanadium chloride solutions and then sintered at 1450 °C. The color of the doped specimens was measured using a digital spectrophotometer. For biaxial flexural strength measurements, specimens infiltrated with 0.3 wt% of each aqueous chloride solution were used. Uncolored discs were used as a control. Zirconia specimens infiltrated with chromium, molybdenum and vanadium chloride solutions were dark brown, light yellow and dark yellow, respectively. CIE L*, a*, and b* values of all the chromium-doped specimens and the specimens infiltrated with 0.1 wt% molybdenum chloride solution were in the range of values for natural teeth. The biaxial flexural strengths of the three kinds of metal chloride groups were similar to the uncolored group. These results suggest that chromium and molybdenum dopants can be used as colorants to fabricate tooth colored zirconia ceramic restorations.

  12. Lithospheric flexural strength and effective elastic thicknesses of the Eastern Anatolia (Turkey) and surrounding region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruç, Bülent; Gomez-Ortiz, David; Petit, Carole

    2017-12-01

    The Lithospheric structure of Eastern Anatolia and the surrounding region, including the northern part of the Arabian platform is investigated via the analysis and modeling of Bouguer anomalies from the Earth Gravitational Model EGM08. The effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere (EET) that corresponds to the mechanical cores of the crust and lithospheric mantle is determined from the spectral coherence between Bouguer anomalies and surface elevation data. Its average value is 18.7 km. From the logarithmic amplitude spectra of Bouguer anomalies, average depths of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), Moho, Conrad and basement in the study area are constrained at 84 km, 39 km, 16 km and 7 km, respectively. The geometries of the LAB and Moho are then estimated using the Parker-Oldenburg inversion algorithm. We also present a lithospheric strength map obtained from the spatial variations of EET determined by Yield Stress Envelopes (YSE). The EET varies in the range of 12-23 km, which is in good agreement with the average value obtained from spectral analysis. Low EET values are interpreted as resulting from thermal and flexural lithospheric weakening. According to the lithospheric strength of the Eastern Anatolian region, the rheology model consists of a strong but brittle upper crust, a weak and ductile lower crust, and a weak lower part of the lithosphere. On the other hand, lithosphere strength corresponds to weak and ductile lower crust, a strong upper crust and a strong uppermost lithospheric mantle for the northern part of the Arabian platform.

  13. Effect of Strain Rate on Joint Strength and Failure Mode of Lead-Free Solder Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Lei, Yongping; Fu, Hanguang; Guo, Fu

    2018-03-01

    In surface mount technology, the Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder joint has a shorter impact lifetime than a traditional lead-tin solder joint. In order to improve the impact property of SnAgCu lead-free solder joints and identify the effect of silver content on tensile strength and impact property, impact experiments were conducted at various strain rates on three selected SnAgCu based solder joints. It was found that joint failure mainly occurred in the solder material with large plastic deformation under low strain rate, while joint failure occurred at the brittle intermetallic compound layer without any plastic deformation at a high strain rate. Joint strength increased with the silver content in SnAgCu alloys in static tensile tests, while the impact property of the solder joint decreased with increasing silver content. When the strain rate was low, plastic deformation occurred with failure and the tensile strength of the Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder joint was higher than that of Sn-0.3Ag-0.7Cu; when the strain rate was high, joint failure mainly occurred at the brittle interface layer and the Sn-0.3Ag-0.7Cu solder joint had a better impact resistance with a thinner intermetallic compound layer.

  14. Effect of saliva decontamination procedures on shear bond strength of a one-step adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ülker, E; Bilgin, S; Kahvecioğlu, F; Erkan, A I

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of different saliva decontamination procedures on the shear bond strength of a one-step universal adhesive system (Single Bond™ Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA). The occlusal surfaces of 75 human third molars were ground to expose dentin. The teeth were divided into the following groups: Group 1 (control group): Single Bond™ Universal Adhesive was applied to the prepared tooth according to the manufacturer's recommendations and light cured; no contamination procedure was performed. Group 2: Bonding, light curing, saliva contamination, and dry. Group 3: Bonding, light curing, saliva contamination, rinse, and dry. Group 4: After the procedure performed in Group 2, reapplication of bonding. Group 5: After the procedure performed in Group 3, reapplication of bonding. Then, composite resins were applied with cylindrical-shaped plastic matrixes and light cured. For shear bond testing, a notch-shaped force transducer apparatus was applied to each specimen at the interface between the tooth and composite until failure occurred. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA. One-way ANOVA revealed significant differences in shear bond strength between the control group and experimental Groups 2 and 4 (P 0.05). The present in vitro study showed that water rinsing is necessary if cured adhesive resin is contaminated with saliva to ensure adequate bond strength.

  15. Effect of Fiber Volume Fraction and Water Absorption toward Bending Strength of Coconut Filters/ Polyester Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Putu Lokantara

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The variation of fibre volume and the duration of water soaking take influence on the mechanical properties of composite. This research aim is to know the influence of fraction volume fibre and soaking duration on the mineral watertoward the tensile strength and flexural of polyester-coconut-tapis composite. This research used coconut-tapis fibre which is cut 1 cm in length with 0%, 5%, 7,5%, and 10% fiber volume fraction, unsaturated-polyester (UPRs matrix resin type Yucalac 157 BQTN-EX, and MEKPO hardener. The flexure specimen are made by press hand lay-up method and cut according ASTM D790-03 for the flexure test. The result of flexure test shows that the duration of soaking and the fiber volume fraction give a significant effect on the flexural strength of composite. The highest strength are reached by composite with 10% fibre volume on 48 hour soaking time equal to 41.994 MPa. The flexure modulus happenend shows increasing until 24 hour soaking time. The highest modulus are reached by composite with 10% fibre volume equal to 7.114 GPa while the lowest are reached by composite with 0% fibre volume equal to 3,023 GPa.

  16. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  17. Effect of elevated temperature on the tensile strength of Napier/glass-epoxy hybrid reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridzuan, M. J. M.; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Afendi, M.; Firdaus, A. Z. Ahmad; Azduwin, K.

    2017-11-01

    The effects of elevated temperature on the tensile strength of Napier/glass-epoxy hybrid reinforced composites and its morphology of fractured surfaces are discussed. Napier/glass-epoxy hybrid reinforced composites were fabricated by using vacuum infusion method by arranging Napier fibres in between sheets of woven glass fibres. Napier and glass fibres were laminated with estimated volume ratios were 24 and 6 vol. %, respectively. The epoxy resin was used as matrix estimated to 70 vol. %. Specimens were tested to failure under tension at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min using Universal Testing Machine (Instron) with a load cell 100 kN at four different temperatures of RT, 40°C, 60°C and 80°C. The morphology of fractured surface of hybrid composites was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The result shows reduction in tensile strength at elevated temperatures. The increase in the temperature activates the process of diffusion, and generates critical stresses which cause the damage at first-ply or at the centre of the hybrid plate, as a result lower the tensile strength. The observation of FESEM images indicates that the fracture mode is of evolution of localized damage, from fibre/matrix debonding, matric cracking, delamination and fibre breakage.

  18. Effectiveness of Strengths-Based Case Management for People with Mental Health Problems in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Y. C. Hui

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effectiveness of a 6-month strengths-based case management intervention with 45 Chinese participants with mental health problems in Hong Kong. Social workers provided service according to the strengths-based case management (SCM model developed at the University of Kansas. Changes in participants’ recovery components (Stage of Recovery Scale, mental health symptoms (GHQ, and satisfaction with life were assessed using a single group pretest and posttest design. Results suggest that participants had some improvement in their autonomy, hope, and overall well-being as well as satisfaction with life after receiving services. No significant improvements in the other recovery components and GHQ score were found. Significantly, a number of participants progressed from stages of being overwhelmed or struggling with disability to stages of living with or beyond disability. Strengths-based practice helped participants develop a transformed self which sees hope and possibility despite the vulnerabilities caused by their illness. Though further refinement and testing are vital, adoption of SCM in Hong Kong mental health services is promising.

  19. Effects of Egg White Protein Supplementation on Muscle Strength and Serum Free Amino Acid Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Azumi; Hasegawa, Yuko; Mekata, Yuko; Usuda, Mika; Masuda, Yasunobu; Kawano, Hitoshi; Kawano, Yukari

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of egg white protein compared to carbohydrate intake prior to exercise on fat free mass (FFM), one repetition maximum (1RM) muscle strength and blood biochemistry in female athletes. Thirty healthy female collegiate athletes were recruited for this study and matched by sport type, body fat percentage and 1RM leg curl muscle strength. Participants were randomly divided into two groups: protein group (15.0 g egg white protein; 75 kcal) and carbohydrate group (17.5 g maltodextrin, 78 kcal). Supplements were administered daily at the same time in a double-blind manner prior to training during an 8-week period. Measurements were performed before and after the 8-week regimen. The mean dietary energy intake did not change throughout the study period. FFM and 1RM assessments (i.e., leg curl, leg extension, squat, and bench press) increased in both groups. Furthermore, serum urea and serum citrulline levels after the 8-week regimen increased significantly only in the protein group. Our findings indicated that compared to the carbohydrate supplement, the protein supplement was associated with some changes in protein metabolites but not with changes in body composition or muscle strength. PMID:23201768

  20. Effect of Shot Peening on the Fatigue Strength of Automotive Tubular Stabilizer Bars DC 218

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittek A.M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns issues related to the development of designs of stabilizer bars for new motor vehicle models. It involves not only the designing of a stabilizer bar with the shape required by the manufacturer, but also the preparation of bending and heat treatment processes as well as the performance of strength and fatigue tests. In the prototype development phase, the simulations techniques (FEM may be used to assess the design. The article contains a detailed analysis of a stabilizer bar designated with the DC 218 VA symbol. Performed numerical strength and fatigue calculations showed that the developed stabilizer bar design with the desired shape did not achieve the required number of fatigue cycles. It was also proven at the test stand by testing a prototype stabilizer bar. Therefore, it was suggested to supplement the technological process with an additional shot peening operation whose main aim was to reduce the length of microcracks on the stabilizer bar’s surface. This effect was confirmed during comparative metallographic tests of not shot – peened and shot – peened stabilizer bars. After shot peening, the analysed stabilizer bar reached a fatigue strength which exceeded the limits set by the manufacturer.

  1. Effect of high ionic strength on the extraction of uranium(VI ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Nazal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preparation and characterization of didodecylphosphoric acid (HDDPA as an extractant in toluene was carried. Mass spectroscopy showed that the monomer peak at 457.4 amu [M–Na+] is double that of the dimer at 891.9 amu [M–M–Na+] and the monomer molecules concentration dominate the dimer molecules in toluene. HDDPA was used as an extractant for the extraction of U(VI ion from perchlorate and nitrate media that have ionic strength (1.00, 3.00, 5.00, 7.00 M. The effect of HDDPA concentration, pcH, ionic strength of supporting electrolytes, and temperature in the range 15–45 °C on the extraction process have been studied. The stoichiometry of the extraction of U(VI ion, the free energy change (ΔG, the enthalpy change (ΔH, the entropy change (ΔS, and Kex at different ionic strength have been calculated. The formula of the complexes, which were formed has been established to be UO2(X(R2(HR2 at pcH equal 2.00 and UO2(X(R2(HR2 and UO2(X(R2 at pcH = 1.00, where (X isClO4- orNO3- and (HR2 is didodecylphosphoric acid monomer, (R2 is the deprotonated didodecylphosphoric acid, where R is the dodecyl group.

  2. Effect of Aggregate Mineralogy and Concrete Microstructure on Thermal Expansion and Strength Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwoo An

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate type and mineralogy are critical factors that influence the engineering properties of concrete. Temperature variations result in internal volume changes could potentially cause a network of micro-cracks leading to a reduction in the concrete’s compressive strength. The study specifically studied the effect of the type and mineralogy of fine and coarse aggregates in the normal strength concrete properties. As performance measures, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE and compressive strength were tested with concrete specimens containing different types of fine aggregates (manufactured and natural sands and coarse aggregates (dolomite and granite. Petrographic examinations were then performed to determine the mineralogical characteristics of the aggregate and to examine the aggregate and concrete microstructure. The test results indicate the concrete CTE increases with the silicon (Si volume content in the aggregate. For the concrete specimens with higher CTE, the micro-crack density in the interfacial transition zone (ITZ tended to be higher. The width of ITZ in one of the concrete specimens with a high CTE displayed the widest core ITZ (approx. 11 µm while the concrete specimens with a low CTE showed the narrowest core ITZ (approx. 3.5 µm. This was attributed to early-age thermal cracking. Specimens with higher CTE are more susceptible to thermal stress.

  3. The Effects of Individualized Resistance Strength Programs on Knee Muscular Imbalances in Junior Elite Soccer Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwowski, Robert; Jadczak, Łukasz; Hejna, Rafał; Wieczorek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a resistance training program on the muscular strength of soccer players’ knees that initially presented unilateral and bilateral differences. For this study, a team of 24 male well-trained junior soccer players was divided into two strength program training groups: a Resistance Training Control Group (RTCG) composed of 10 players that did not have muscular imbalances and a Resistance Training Experimental Group (RTEG) composed of 14 players that had muscular imbalances. All players followed a resistance training program for six weeks, two times per week, during the transition period. The program of individualized strength training consisted of two parts. The first part, which was identical in terms of the choice of training loads, was intended for both training groups and contained two series of exercises including upper and lower body exercises. The second part of the program was intended only for RTEG and consisted of two additional series for the groups of muscles that had identified unilateral and bilateral differences. The applied program showed various directions in the isokinetic profile of changes. In the case of RTCG, the adaptations related mainly to the quadriceps muscle (the peak torque (PT) change for the dominant leg was statistically significant (p soccer players. PMID:26630271

  4. Effects of Oil Palm Shell Coarse Aggregate Species on High Strength Lightweight Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Kun Yew

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different species of oil palm shell (OPS coarse aggregates on the properties of high strength lightweight concrete (HSLWC. Original and crushed OPS coarse aggregates of different species and age categories were investigated in this study. The research focused on two OPS species (dura and tenera, in which the coarse aggregates were taken from oil palm trees of the following age categories (3–5, 6–9, and 10–15 years old. The results showed that the workability and dry density of the oil palm shell concrete (OPSC increase with an increase in age category of OPS species. The compressive strength of specimen CD3 increases significantly compared to specimen CT3 by 21.8%. The maximum achievable 28-day and 90-day compressive strength is 54 and 56 MPa, respectively, which is within the range for 10–15-year-old crushed dura OPS. The water absorption was determined to be within the range for good concrete for the different species of OPSC. In addition, the ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV results showed that the OPS HSLWC attain good condition at the age of 3 days.

  5. Effect of adhesive resin cements on bond strength of ceramic core materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, M; Aladag, L I

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements on the shear bond strength of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin. Extracted, caries-free, human central maxillary incisor teeth were selected, and the vestibule surfaces were cut flat to obtain dentin surfaces. Ceramic core materials (IPS e.max Press and Prettau Zirconia) were luted to the dentin surfaces using three self-etch adhesive systems (Duo-Link, Panavia F 2.0, and RelyX Ultimate Clicker) and two self-adhesive resin systems (RelyX U200 Automix and Maxcem Elite). A shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope, and bonding interfaces between the adhesive resin cements and the teeth were evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The type of adhesive resin cement significantly affected the shear bond strengths of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin (P materials when the specimens were luted with self-adhesive resin cements (P materials.

  6. Chronic effects of strength training vs. Hydro aerobics on functional and cardiorespiratory ability in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Giovanni S; Novaes, Jefferson S; Vilaça-Alves, José; Silva, Gabriel Costa E; Garrido, Nuno D; Furtado, Hélio; Reis, Victor M

    2014-09-29

    The current study aimed to compare the effects of two exercise programs (Strength Training and Hydro Gymnastics) on the functional and cardiorespiratory abilities of Portuguese postmenopausal women. The study population consisted of 38 volunteers (age: 66.9 ± 6.1 years, body mass: 73.70 ± 10.38 kg, and body height: 1.55 ± 0.10 m). Subjects were randomly divided into two experimental groups and one control group: one group performed 24 weeks of strength training (GST; n = 14), another performed 24 weeks of hydro gymnastics (GH; n = 17) and a control group (CG; n = 7), where the subjects continued with their regular daily activities without involvement in any physical exercise program. Three assessments were performed: before the beginning of the program, 12 weeks after the start of the training program and 24 weeks after the start of the program. To assess the functional ability of the participants, several tests proposed by Jones and Rikli (2002) were performed. To evaluate the cardiorespiratory ability of the participants, a modified treadmill Bruce test was applied. Significant differences (ptraining methods in the tests, which primarily demanded muscular strength. Body mass and the body mass index showed significant differences during the three stages of assessment in the GST group (pfunctional and cardiorespiratory abilities of Portuguese postmenopausal women.

  7. Effects of resistance training, detraining, and retraining on strength and functional capacity in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakugawa, Raphael Luiz; Moura, Bruno Monteiro; Orssatto, Lucas Bet da Rosa; Bezerra, Ewertton de Souza; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Diefenthaeler, Fernando

    2018-05-17

    The interruption of training (detraining) results in loss of the gains acquired. Partial retention could occur after detraining, and variation in training stimuli may optimize retraining adaptations. To evaluate the effect of a resistance-retraining program on strength and functional capacity performance after a detraining period. Ten elderly men and women (63-68 years) completed 12 weeks of training, 16 weeks of detraining, and 8 weeks of retraining. One-repetition maximum (1-RM) at 45° leg press, maximum isometric knee extension torque, rate of torque development (RTD), 30-s sit-to-stand, timed up and go, and stair ascent and descent tests were assessed. The 1-RM increased after training (p training (p training period (p > 0.05). For RTD and 30-s sit-to-stand, there was an increase after retraining when compared to pre-training values (p training and post-training periods (p functional capacity at the same level obtained after a detraining period. The inclusion of an explosive strength session in retraining period improves RTD and 30-s sit-to-stand performance and can accelerate the recovery of strength after a detraining period.

  8. Effects of complex training on explosive strength in adolescent male basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Eduardo J A M; Janeira, Manuel A A S

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a complex training program, a combined practice of weight training and plyometrics, on explosive strength development of young basketball players. Twenty-five young male athletes, aged 14-15 years old, were assessed using squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), Abalakov test (ABA), depth jump (DJ), mechanical power (MP), and medicine ball throw (MBT), before and after a 10-week in-season training program. Both the control group (CG; n = 10) and the experimental group (EG; n = 15) kept up their regular sports practice; additionally, the EG performed 2 sessions per week of a complex training program. The EG significantly improved in the SJ, CMJ, ABA, and MBT values (p training to improve the upper and lower body explosivity levels in young basketball players. In conclusion, this study showed that more strength conditioning is needed during the sport practice season. Furthermore, we also conclude that complex training is a useful working tool for coaches, innovative in this strength-training domain, equally contributing to a better time-efficient training.

  9. Effect of Delayed Bonding and Antioxidant Application on the Bond Strength to Enamel after Internal Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılınç, Halil İbrahim; Aslan, Tuğrul; Kılıç, Kerem; Er, Özgür; Kurt, Gökmen

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of delayed bonding and antioxidant application (AA, 10% sodium ascorbate) after internal bleaching (35% carbamide peroxide) on the shear bond strength of an adhesive cement to enamel. Eighty-four human maxillary central incisors were endodontically treated. The control group remained unbleached with no AA. Experimental groups were all internally bleached. The buccal enamel was finished and polished with metallographic paper to a refinement of #600, in order to obtain a 5-mm(2) flat bonding area. An adhesive cement (Clearfil Esthetic) was placed into a plastic tube with internal diameter of 3 mm and a 3-mm height and cured on the enamel. Bonding occurred either immediately after bleaching (group Im), a 7-day delay (group 7), or a 14-day delay (group 14), and half the specimens were treated with antioxidant application (groups Im-AA, 7-AA, and 14-AA). Shear bond strength testing was performed on a universal testing machine, and data were analyzed with ANOVA and Fisher test (5%). Delaying of bonding is a useful factor for enhancing shear bond strength (p adhesive cementation to enamel is recommended only when delayed 14 days, or delayed 7 days with sodium ascorbate application. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  10. The effect of enamel bleaching on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztaş, E; Bağdelen, G; Kiliçoğlu, H; Ulukapi, H; Aydin, I

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching and delayed bonding on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with light and chemically cure composite resin to human enamel. One hundred and twenty extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 40 each. The first two groups were bleached with 20 per cent carbamide peroxide (CP) at-home bleaching agent. No bleaching procedures were applied to the third group and served as control. The first two and control groups were divided into equal subgroups according to different adhesive-bracket combinations. Specimens in group 1 (n = 40) were bonded 24 hours after bleaching process was completed while the specimens in group 2 (n = 40) were bonded 14 days after. The specimens in all groups were debonded with a Universal testing machine while the modified adhesive remnant index was used to evaluate fracture properties. No statistically significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to bleached enamel after 24 hours, 14 days, and unbleached enamel with light or chemical cure adhesives (P > 0.05). The mode of failure was mostly at the bracket/adhesive interface and cohesive failures within the resin were also observed. Our findings indicated that at-home bleaching agents that contain 20 per cent CP did not significantly affect the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel when bonding is performed 24 hours or 14 days after bleaching.

  11. Electrohydrodynamics in nanochannels coated by mixed polymer brushes: effects of electric field strength and solvent quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qianqian; Tian, Xiu; You, Hao

    2018-04-01

    We examine the electrohydrodynamics in mixed polymer brush-coated nanochannels and the conformational dynamics of grafted polymers using molecular dynamics simulations. Charged (A) and neutral polymers (B) are alternately grafted on the channel surfaces. The effects of the electric field strength and solvent quality are addressed in detail. The dependence of electroosmotic flow characteristics and polymer conformational behavior on the solvent quality is influenced due to the change of the electric field strength. The enhanced electric field induces a collapse of the neutral polymer chains which adopt a highly extended conformation along the flow direction. However, the thickness of the charged polymer layer is affected weakly by the electric field, and even a slight swelling is identified for the A-B attraction case, implying the conformational coupling between two polymer species. Furthermore, the charged polymer chains incline entirely towards the electric field direction oppositely to the flow direction. More importantly, unlike the neutral polymer chains, the shape factor of the charged polymer chains, which is used to describe the overall shape of polymer chains, is reduced significantly with increasing the electric field strength, corresponding to a more coiled structure.

  12. Effect of steam corrosion on core post strength loss: I. Low, chronic steam ingress rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichner, R.P.

    1976-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of chronic, low levels of steam ingress into the primary system of the HTGR on the corrosion, and consequent strength loss of the core support posts. The assessment proceeded through the following three steps: (1) The impurity composition in the primary system was estimated as a function of a range of steady ingress rates of from 0.001 to 1.0 g/sec, both by means of an analysis of the Dragon steam ingress experiment and a computer code, TIMOX, which treats the primary system as a well-mixed pot. (2) The core post burnoffs which result from 40-year exposures to these determined impurity atmospheres were then estimated using a corrosion rate expression derived from published ATJ-graphite corrosion rate data. Burnoffs were determined for both the core posts at the nominal and the maximum sustained temperature, estimated to be 90 0 C above nominal. (3) The final step involved assessment of the degree of strength loss resulting from the estimated burnoffs. An empirical equation was developed for this purpose which compares reasonably well with strength loss data for a number of different graphites and specimen geometries

  13. Effect of heat treatment operations on the Rm tensile strength of silumins

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    J. Pezda

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Owing to good technological properties, low weight and good corrosion resistance, aluminum-silicon alloys are widely used as a material for cast machinery components. State of macro- and microstructure of a castings manufactured from Al-Si alloys, which is determined by a shape and distribution of hardening phases, segregation of alloying constituents and impurities, as well as distribution of porosity, create conditions to obtainment of proper mechanical properties. These properties can be improved through modification of the alloy and performed heat treatment operations. The paper presents effect of modification and heat treatment process on the Rm tensile strength of a selected silumins (EN AB-AlSi9Cu3(Fe, EN AB-AlSi12CuNiMg, EN AB-AlSi17Cu1Ni1Mg. Investigated alloys were put to treatments of refining and modification, and next to heat treatment. Temperature range of the heat treatment operations was determined on base of curves from the ATD method. Obtained results illustrate registered curves of melting and solidification from the ATD method and strength tests. On base of performed initial tests one determined parameters of the heat treatment process (temperature and duration of solutionig and ageing treatments enabling obtainment of improved Rm tensile strength of the investigated alloys.

  14. An Effect Size Measure for Raju's Differential Functioning for Items and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Keith D.; Oshima, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study established an effect size measure for differential functioning for items and tests' noncompensatory differential item functioning (NCDIF). The Mantel-Haenszel parameter served as the benchmark for developing NCDIF's effect size measure for reporting moderate and large differential item functioning in test items. The effect size of…

  15. Effect of LASER Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramic Surface to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Shahabi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Reliable bonding between tooth substrate and zirconia-based ceramic restorations is always of great importance. The laser might be useful for treatment of ceramic surfaces. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic surface to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 40 Cercon zirconia ceramic blocks were fabricated. The surface treatment was performed using sandblasting with 50-micrometer Al2O3, CO2 laser, or Nd:YAG laser in each test groups. After that, the specimens were cemented to human dentin with resin cement. The shear bond strength of ceramics to dentin was determined and failure mode of each specimen was analyzed by stereo-microscope and SEM investigations. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparisons. The surface morphology of one specimen from each group was investigated under SEM. Results: The mean shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to dentin was 7.79±3.03, 9.85±4.69, 14.92±4.48 MPa for CO2 irradiated, Nd:YAG irradiated, and sandblasted specimens, respectively. Significant differences were noted between CO2 (P=0.001 and Nd:YAG laser (P=0.017 irradiated specimens with sandblasted specimens. No significant differences were observed between two laser methods (P=0.47. The mode of bond failure was predominantly adhesive in test groups (CO2 irradiated specimens: 75%, Nd:YAG irradiated: 66.7%, and sandblasting: 41.7%. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the present study, surface treatment of zirconia ceramics using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers was not able to produce adequate bond strength with dentin surfaces in comparison to sandblasting technique. Therefore, the use of lasers with the mentioned parameters may not be recommended for the surface treatment of Cercon ceramics.

  16. Effect of Incorporation of Antifungal Agents on the Ultimate Tensile Strength of Temporary Soft Denture Liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Lima, Jozely Francisca Mello; Hotta, Juliana; Galitesi, Lucas Lulo; Almeida, Ana Lucia Pompéia Fraga; Urban, Vanessa Migliorini

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the ultimate tensile strength of temporary soft denture liners modified by minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antifungal agents for Candida albicans biofilm (SC5314) determined in previous microbiological research. Dumbbell-shaped specimens (n = 7) with a central cross-sectional area of 6 × 3 × 33 mm were produced by Softone and Trusoft, without (control) or with incorporation of drugs in powder form at MICs for C. albicans biofilm (per g of material powder): nystatin (0.032 g), chlorhexidine diacetate (0.064 g), ketoconazole (0.128 g), miconazole (0.256 g), and itraconazole (0.256 g). After plasticization, specimens were immersed in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, 7 or 14 days, and then tested in tension in a universal testing machine at 40 mm/min. Data of tensile strength (MPa) and elongation percentage (%) were submitted to 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). At the end of 14 days, the tensile strength for both materials was significantly lower in the groups modified by miconazole and itraconazole compared to the other groups (p 0.05). After 7 and 14 days in water, miconazole and itraconazole added into both materials resulted in significantly lower elongation percentages compared to the other antifungal agents and control (p 0.05). The addition of the nystatin, chlorhexidine, and ketoconazole at MICs for C. albicans biofilm resulted in no harmful effects on the tensile strength and elongation percentage of the temporary soft denture liner materials up to 14 days. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  17. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazaleh Ahmadizenouz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1; air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2; irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3; roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4; and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5. Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6. A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05. Results. One-way ANOVA indicated significant differences between the groups (P < 0.05. SBS of controls was significantly lower than the other groups; differences between groups 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were not significant. Surface treatment with diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid resulted in the highest bond strength. Conclusion. All the surface treatments used in this study improved the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite resin used.

  18. Silanated Surface Treatment: Effects on the Bond Strength to Lithium Disilicate Glass-Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratto, Samantha Schaffer Pugsley; Spina, Denis Roberto Falcão; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Baratto Filho, Flares; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silanization protocols on the bond strength of two resin cements to a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. Thirty-two ceramic discs were assigned to 2 groups (n=16): G1 - dual-cured resin cement and G2 - light-cured resin cement. Four subgroups were evaluated according to the used silanization protocol. The glass-ceramic was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 s and silane was applied for 1 min, as follows: CTL - according to the manufacturer's instructions; HA - dried with hot air; NWA - washed and dried with water and air at room temperature; HWA - washed and dried with hot water and hot air. Thereafter, adhesive was applied and light-cured for 20 s. Silicon molds were used to prepare resin cement cylinders (1x1 mm) on the ceramic surface. The specimens were stored in deionized water at 37 °C for 48 h and subjected to a micro-shear test. The data were submitted to statistical analysis (?#61537;=0.05). Group G1 showed higher bond strengths than G2, except for the CTL and NWA subgroups. Differences as function of the silanization protocol were only observed in G1: HWA (25.13±6.83)≥HA (22.95±7.78)≥CTL(17.44±7.24) ≥NWA(14.63±8.76). For G2 there was no difference among the subgroups. In conclusion, the silanization protocol affected the resin cement/ceramic bond strengths, depending on the material. Washing/drying with hot water and/or hot air increased only the bond strength of the dual-cured resin cement.

  19. Preserving Subjective Wellbeing in the Face of Psychopathology: Buffering Effects of Personal Strengths and Resources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth H Bos

    Full Text Available Many studies on resilience have shown that people can succeed in preserving mental health after a traumatic event. Less is known about whether and how people can preserve subjective wellbeing in the presence of psychopathology. We examined to what extent psychopathology can co-exist with acceptable levels of subjective wellbeing and which personal strengths and resources moderate the association between psychopathology and wellbeing.Questionnaire data on wellbeing (Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life/Happiness Index, psychological symptoms (Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, and personal strengths and resources (humor, Humor Style questionnaire; empathy, Empathy Quotient questionnaire; social company; religion; daytime activities, Living situation questionnaire were collected in a population-based internet study (HowNutsAreTheDutch; N = 12,503. Data of the subset of participants who completed the above questionnaires (n = 2411 were used for the present study. Regression analyses were performed to predict wellbeing from symptoms, resources, and their interactions.Satisfactory levels of wellbeing (happiness score 6 or higher were found in a substantial proportion of the participants with psychological symptoms (58% and 30% of those with moderate and severe symptom levels, respectively. The association between symptoms and wellbeing was large and negative (-0.67, P < .001, but less so in persons with high levels of self-defeating humor and in those with a partner and/or pet. Several of the personal strengths and resources had a positive main effect on wellbeing, especially self-enhancing humor, having a partner, and daytime activities.Cultivating personal strengths and resources, like humor, social/animal company, and daily occupations, may help people preserve acceptable levels of wellbeing despite the presence of symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress.

  20. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on regional bond strengths of compomers to dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L; Pereira, P N; Somphone, P; Nikaido, T; Tagami, J

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the regional bond strengths of compomers to dentine. Thirty freshly extracted molars were ground flat to expose the dentine and randomly divided into two groups for bonding: no hydrostatic pressure and hydrostatic pressure of 15cm H(2)O. Xeno CF, Dyract AP and F 2000 were applied to dentine surfaces pretreated by the respective bonding systems following the manufactures' instructions, and then restored with Clearfil AP-X. After 24h storage in water, the teeth were sectioned into 0.7-mm thick slabs and visually divided into three regional subgroups: the region communicating with the pulp through dentinal tubules (pulp horn); the region between the pulp horns (center); and the region between the pulp horn and DEJ (periphery). The specimens were trimmed to a cross-sectional area of 1mm(2) and subjected to the micro-tensile bond test. The data were analyzed by one- and three-way ANOVA, and Fisher's PLSD (p0.05). However, hydrostatic pressure significantly decreased the bond strength of F 2000 to all regions (phydrostatic pressure (p>0.05). For Dyract AP and F 2000, the fracture modes were affected by hydrostatic pressure, while, for Xeno CF, there were no significant differences between the fracture modes with non- or positive hydrostatic pressure. Simulated pulpal pressure of 15cm H(2)O had a greater influence on the bond strengths of compomers to dentine than did dentine regions. Therefore, when measuring the bond strengths of compomers to dentine under the simulated in vivo conditions, the wetness of the dentine surface, as well as the intrinsic properties of each material should be seriously considered.