WorldWideScience

Sample records for stream-aquifer interaction research

  1. Optimizing Reservoir-Stream-Aquifer Interactions for Conjunctive Use and Hydropower Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Fayad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Conjunctive management of water resources involves coordinating use of surface water and groundwater resources. Very few simulation/optimization (S-O models for stream-aquifer system management have included detailed interactions between groundwater, streams, and reservoir storage. This paper presents an S-O model doing that via artificial neural network simulators and genetic algorithm optimizer for multiobjective conjunctive water use problems. The model simultaneously addresses all significant flows including reservoir-stream-diversion-aquifer interactions in a more detailed manner than previous models. The model simultaneously maximizes total water provided and hydropower production. A penalty function implicitly poses constraints on state variables. The model effectively finds feasible optimal solutions and the Pareto optimum. Illustrated is application for planning water resource and minihydropower system development.

  2. Use of computer programs STLK1 and STWT1 for analysis of stream-aquifer hydraulic interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desimone, Leslie A.; Barlow, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    Quantifying the hydraulic interaction of aquifers and streams is important in the analysis of stream base fow, flood-wave effects, and contaminant transport between surface- and ground-water systems. This report describes the use of two computer programs, STLK1 and STWT1, to analyze the hydraulic interaction of streams with confined, leaky, and water-table aquifers during periods of stream-stage fuctuations and uniform, areal recharge. The computer programs are based on analytical solutions to the ground-water-flow equation in stream-aquifer settings and calculate ground-water levels, seepage rates across the stream-aquifer boundary, and bank storage that result from arbitrarily varying stream stage or recharge. Analysis of idealized, hypothetical stream-aquifer systems is used to show how aquifer type, aquifer boundaries, and aquifer and streambank hydraulic properties affect aquifer response to stresses. Published data from alluvial and stratifed-drift aquifers in Kentucky, Massachusetts, and Iowa are used to demonstrate application of the programs to field settings. Analytical models of these three stream-aquifer systems are developed on the basis of available hydrogeologic information. Stream-stage fluctuations and recharge are applied to the systems as hydraulic stresses. The models are calibrated by matching ground-water levels calculated with computer program STLK1 or STWT1 to measured ground-water levels. The analytical models are used to estimate hydraulic properties of the aquifer, aquitard, and streambank; to evaluate hydrologic conditions in the aquifer; and to estimate seepage rates and bank-storage volumes resulting from flood waves and recharge. Analysis of field examples demonstrates the accuracy and limitations of the analytical solutions and programs when applied to actual ground-water systems and the potential uses of the analytical methods as alternatives to numerical modeling for quantifying stream-aquifer interactions.

  3. Field Investigation of Stream-Aquifer Interactions: A Case Study in Coastal California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard-Peterson, D.; Malama, B.

    2017-12-01

    We report here results of a detailed investigation of the dynamic interaction between a stream and an alluvial aquifer at Swanton Pacific Ranch in the Scotts Creek watershed, Santa Cruz County, California. The aquifer is an important source of groundwater for cropland irrigation and for aquatic ecosystem support. Low summer base flows in Scotts Creek are a source of serious concern for land managers, fisheries biologists, and regulatory agencies due to the presence of federally protected steelhead trout and coho salmon. An understanding of the interaction between the stream and pumped aquifer will allow for assessment of the impacts of groundwater extraction on stream flows and is essential to establishing minimum flow requirements. This will aid in the development of sustainable riparian groundwater pumping practices that meet agricultural and ecological needs. Results of extensive direct-push sampling of the subsurface, laboratory falling-head permeameter tests and particle size analysis of aquifer sediments, multi-day pumping tests, long-term passive monitoring of aquifer hydraulic heads and stream stage and discharge, and electrical resistivity interrogation of the subsurface are reported here. Findings indicate that the permeable subsurface formation tapped by irrigation wells is a leaky semi-confined aquifer, overlain by a thin low permeability layer of silt and clay above which lies Scotts Creek. These results are particularly useful to land managers responsible for groundwater abstraction from wells that tap into the aquifer. Additionally, an index of stream-aquifer connectivity is proposed that would allow land managers to conveniently modify groundwater abstraction practices, minimizing concerns of stream depletion.

  4. Consideration of Transient Stream/Aquifer Interaction with the Nonlinear Boussinesq Equation using HPM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganji, S. S.; Barari, Amin; Sfahani, M. G.

    2011-01-01

    of time. The differential equations were solved using the method of Homotopy Perturbation. The simplicity and accuracy of the approximation are compared with “exact” solution and illustrated numerically and graphically. The results reveal that the HPM is very effective and simple and provides highly...... accurate solutions for nonlinear differential equations.......The phenomenon of stream–aquifer interaction was investigated via mathematical modeling using the Boussinesq equation. A new approximate solution of the one-dimensional Boussinesq equation is presented for a semi-infinite aquifer when the hydraulic head at the source is an arbitrary function...

  5. Characterizing the Impact of River Barrage Construction on Stream-Aquifer Interactions, Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Yeong Oh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated changes in stream–aquifer interactions during the period shortly after the construction of the Changnyeong-Haman River barrage (CHRB on the Nakdong River in South Korea. The hydraulic diffusivity (α and river resistance (R values at the semipervious stream–aquifer interface were estimated by using a one-dimensional (1-D analytical solution with Fourier transform (FT. Prior to the application of the 1-D analytical solution, the noise effects on the groundwater levels were removed by using fast Fourier transform and low-pass filtering techniques. Sinusoidal variation of the river stages was applied to the 1-D analytical solution. For the study period, the R values showed a decreasing trend, while the α values showed an increasing trend, and results showed that the average of the median values of flood duration times (td and flood amplitudes were reduced to 78% and 59%, respectively. Moreover, the ratio of flood peak time to td demonstrated a decreasing tendency after the construction of the CHRB. Hence, it is concluded that the dredging and increase of river-water storage due to CHRB construction enhanced stream–aquifer interactions during the period shortly after the construction of the CHRB.

  6. The Contribution of the Future SWOT Mission to Improve Simulations of River Stages and Stream-Aquifer Interactions at Regional Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Firas; Filipo, Nicolas; Biancamaria, Sylvain; Habets, Florence; Rodriguez, Enersto; Mognard, Nelly

    2013-09-01

    The main objective of this study is to provide a realistic simulation of river stage in regional river networks in order to improve the quantification of stream-aquifer exchanges and better assess the associated aquifer responses that are often impacted by the magnitude and the frequency of the river stage fluctuations. This study extends the earlier work to improve the modeling of the Seine basin with a focus on simulating the hydrodynamics behavior of the Bassée alluvial wetland, a 120 km reach of the Seine River valley located south- east of Paris. The Bassée is of major importance for the drinking-water supply of Paris and surroundings, in addition to its particular hydrodynamic behavior due to the presence of a number of gravels. In this context, the understanding of stream-aquifer interactions is required for water quantity and quality preservation. A regional distributed process-based hydro(geo)logical model, Eau-Dyssée, is used. It aims at the integrated modeling of the hydrosystem to manage the various elements involved in the quantitative and qualitative aspects of water resources. Eau-Dyssée simulates pseudo 3D flow in aquifer systems solving the diffusivity equation with a finite difference numerical scheme. River flow is simulated with a Muskingum model. In addition to the in-stream discharge, a river stage estimate is needed to calculate the water exchange at the stream-aquifer interface using a conductance model. In this context, the future SWOT mission and its high-spatial resolution imagery can provide surface water level measurements at the regional scale that will permit to better characterize the Bassée complex hydro(geo)logical system and better assess soil water content. Moreover, the Bassée is considered as a potential target for the framework of the AirSWOT airborne campaign in France, 2013.

  7. A New Streamflow-Routing (SFR1) Package to Simulate Stream-Aquifer Interaction with MODFLOW-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudic, David E.; Konikow, Leonard F.; Banta, Edward R.

    2004-01-01

    The increasing concern for water and its quality require improved methods to evaluate the interaction between streams and aquifers and the strong influence that streams can have on the flow and transport of contaminants through many aquifers. For this reason, a new Streamflow-Routing (SFR1) Package was written for use with the U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW-2000 ground-water flow model. The SFR1 Package is linked to the Lake (LAK3) Package, and both have been integrated with the Ground-Water Transport (GWT) Process of MODFLOW-2000 (MODFLOW-GWT). SFR1 replaces the previous Stream (STR1) Package, with the most important difference being that stream depth is computed at the midpoint of each reach instead of at the beginning of each reach, as was done in the original Stream Package. This approach allows for the addition and subtraction of water from runoff, precipitation, and evapotranspiration within each reach. Because the SFR1 Package computes stream depth differently than that for the original package, a different name was used to distinguish it from the original Stream (STR1) Package. The SFR1 Package has five options for simulating stream depth and four options for computing diversions from a stream. The options for computing stream depth are: a specified value; Manning's equation (using a wide rectangular channel or an eight-point cross section); a power equation; or a table of values that relate flow to depth and width. Each stream segment can have a different option. Outflow from lakes can be computed using the same options. Because the wetted perimeter is computed for the eight-point cross section and width is computed for the power equation and table of values, the streambed conductance term no longer needs to be calculated externally whenever the area of streambed changes as a function of flow. The concentration of solute is computed in a stream network when MODFLOW-GWT is used in conjunction with the SFR1 Package. The concentration of a solute in a

  8. Sustainable Capture: Concepts for Managing Stream-Aquifer Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Jeffrey C; Mehl, Steffen W

    2015-01-01

    Most surface water bodies (i.e., streams, lakes, etc.) are connected to the groundwater system to some degree so that changes to surface water bodies (either diversions or importations) can change flows in aquifer systems, and pumping from an aquifer can reduce discharge to, or induce additional recharge from streams, springs, and lakes. The timescales of these interactions are often very long (decades), making sustainable management of these systems difficult if relying only on observations of system responses. Instead, management scenarios are often analyzed based on numerical modeling. In this paper we propose a framework and metrics that can be used to relate the Theis concepts of capture to sustainable measures of stream-aquifer systems. We introduce four concepts: Sustainable Capture Fractions, Sustainable Capture Thresholds, Capture Efficiency, and Sustainable Groundwater Storage that can be used as the basis for developing metrics for sustainable management of stream-aquifer systems. We demonstrate their utility on a hypothetical stream-aquifer system where pumping captures both streamflow and discharge to phreatophytes at different amounts based on pumping location. In particular, Capture Efficiency (CE) can be easily understood by both scientists and non-scientist alike, and readily identifies vulnerabilities to sustainable stream-aquifer management when its value exceeds 100%. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  9. Coupling a three-dimensional subsurface flow and transport model with a land surface model to simulate stream-aquifer-land interactions (CP v1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Gautam; Huang, Maoyi; Zhou, Tian; Chen, Xingyuan; Dai, Heng; Hammond, Glenn E.; Riley, William J.; Downs, Janelle L.; Liu, Ying; Zachara, John M.

    2017-12-01

    A fully coupled three-dimensional surface and subsurface land model is developed and applied to a site along the Columbia River to simulate three-way interactions among river water, groundwater, and land surface processes. The model features the coupling of the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) and a massively parallel multiphysics reactive transport model (PFLOTRAN). The coupled model, named CP v1.0, is applied to a 400 m × 400 m study domain instrumented with groundwater monitoring wells along the Columbia River shoreline. CP v1.0 simulations are performed at three spatial resolutions (i.e., 2, 10, and 20 m) over a 5-year period to evaluate the impact of hydroclimatic conditions and spatial resolution on simulated variables. Results show that the coupled model is capable of simulating groundwater-river-water interactions driven by river stage variability along managed river reaches, which are of global significance as a result of over 30 000 dams constructed worldwide during the past half-century. Our numerical experiments suggest that the land-surface energy partitioning is strongly modulated by groundwater-river-water interactions through expanding the periodically inundated fraction of the riparian zone, and enhancing moisture availability in the vadose zone via capillary rise in response to the river stage change. Meanwhile, CLM4.5 fails to capture the key hydrologic process (i.e., groundwater-river-water exchange) at the site, and consequently simulates drastically different water and energy budgets. Furthermore, spatial resolution is found to significantly impact the accuracy of estimated the mass exchange rates at the boundaries of the aquifer, and it becomes critical when surface and subsurface become more tightly coupled with groundwater table within 6 to 7 meters below the surface. Inclusion of lateral subsurface flow influenced both the surface energy budget and subsurface transport processes as a result of river-water intrusion into the

  10. Using SWAT-MODFLOW to simulate groundwater flow and groundwater-surface water interactions in an intensively irrigated stream-aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, X.; Bailey, R. T.

    2017-12-01

    Agricultural irrigated watersheds in semi-arid regions face challenges such as waterlogging, high soil salinity, reduced crop yield, and leaching of chemical species due to extreme shallow water tables resulting from long-term intensive irrigation. Hydrologic models can be used to evaluate the impact of land management practices on water yields and groundwater-surface water interactions in such regions. In this study, the newly developed SWAT-MODFLOW, a coupled surface/subsurface hydrologic model, is applied to a 950 km2 watershed in the Lower Arkansas River Valley (southeastern Colorado). The model accounts for the influence of canal diversions, irrigation applications, groundwater pumping, and earth canal seepage losses. The model provides a detailed description of surface and subsurface flow processes, thereby enabling detailed description of watershed processes such as runoff, infiltration, in-streamflow, three-dimensional groundwater flow in a heterogeneous aquifer system with sources and sinks (e.g. pumping, seepage to subsurface drains), and spatially-variable surface and groundwater exchange. The model was calibrated and tested against stream discharge from 5 stream gauges in the Arkansas River and its tributaries, groundwater levels from 70 observation wells, and evapotranspiration (ET) data estimated from satellite (ReSET) data during the 1999 to 2007 period. Since the water-use patterns within the study area are typical of many other irrigated river valleys in the United States and elsewhere, this modeling approach is transferable to other regions.

  11. Impact of river stage prediction methods on stream-aquifer exchanges in a hydro(geo)logical model at the regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, F.; Flipo, N.; de Fouquet, C.

    2012-04-01

    for taking into account river stage fluctuations in regional distributed process-based hydro(geo)logical models. It is an efficient way to improve the physics of the stream-aquifer interactions and better assess soil water content at the regional scale when high resolution morphological data is not available. This study offers several perspectives such as simulating the hydrodynamic behavior of alluvial wetlands and assessing the pollutants removal or release by biogeochemical processes at regional scale such as nitrate contamination. Keywords: Stream-aquifer interactions, Regional scale, Quantitative Hydrology, Hydrogeology, River stage simulations, Hydrosystem modeling

  12. Hydrogeologic data for the Big River-Mishnock River stream-aquifer system, central Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogeology, ground-water development alternatives, and water quality in the BigMishnock stream-aquifer system in central Rhode Island are being investigated as part of a long-term cooperative program between the Rhode Island Water Resources Board and the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate the ground-water resources throughout Rhode Island. The study area includes the Big River drainage basin and that portion of the Mishnock River drainage basin upstream from the Mishnock River at State Route 3. This report presents geologic data and hydrologic and water-quality data for ground and surface water. Ground-water data were collected from July 1996 through September 1998 from a network of observation wells consisting of existing wells and wells installed for this study, which provided a broad distribution of data-collection sites throughout the study area. Streambed piezometers were used to obtain differences in head data between surface-water levels and ground-water levels to help evaluate stream-aquifer interactions throughout the study area. The types of data presented include monthly ground-water levels, average daily ground-water withdrawals, drawdown data from aquifer tests, and water-quality data. Historical water-level data from other wells within the study area also are presented in this report. Surface-water data were obtained from a network consisting of surface-water impoundments, such as ponds and reservoirs, existing and newly established partial-record stream-discharge sites, and synoptic surface-water-quality sites. Water levels were collected monthly from the surface-water impoundments. Stream-discharge measurements were made at partial-record sites to provide measurements of inflow, outflow, and internal flow throughout the study area. Specific conductance was measured monthly at partial-record sites during the study, and also during the fall and spring of 1997 and 1998 at 41 synoptic sites throughout the study area. General geologic data, such as

  13. Continental hydrosystem modelling: the concept of nested stream-aquifer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipo, N.; Mouhri, A.; Labarthe, B.; Biancamaria, S.; Rivière, A.; Weill, P.

    2014-08-01

    Coupled hydrological-hydrogeological models, emphasising the importance of the stream-aquifer interface, are more and more used in hydrological sciences for pluri-disciplinary studies aiming at investigating environmental issues. Based on an extensive literature review, stream-aquifer interfaces are described at five different scales: local [10 cm-~10 m], intermediate [~10 m-~1 km], watershed [10 km2-~1000 km2], regional [10 000 km2-~1 M km2] and continental scales [>10 M km2]. This led us to develop the concept of nested stream-aquifer interfaces, which extends the well-known vision of nested groundwater pathways towards the surface, where the mixing of low frequency processes and high frequency processes coupled with the complexity of geomorphological features and heterogeneities creates hydrological spiralling. This conceptual framework allows the identification of a hierarchical order of the multi-scale control factors of stream-aquifer hydrological exchanges, from the larger scale to the finer scale. The hyporheic corridor, which couples the river to its 3-D hyporheic zone, is then identified as the key component for scaling hydrological processes occurring at the interface. The identification of the hyporheic corridor as the support of the hydrological processes scaling is an important step for the development of regional studies, which is one of the main concerns for water practitioners and resources managers. In a second part, the modelling of the stream-aquifer interface at various scales is investigated with the help of the conductance model. Although the usage of the temperature as a tracer of the flow is a robust method for the assessment of stream-aquifer exchanges at the local scale, there is a crucial need to develop innovative methodologies for assessing stream-aquifer exchanges at the regional scale. After formulating the conductance model at the regional and intermediate scales, we address this challenging issue with the development of an

  14. Impact of lateral flow on the transition from connected to disconnected stream-aquifer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Yang; Jin, Menggui; Liu, Yanfeng; Si, Aonan

    2017-05-01

    deep. Furthermore, in heterogeneous streambed systems, two or three pathways can simultaneously occur and various parts of the IWT occur at distinct positions relative to the IBSA. This challenges the commonly held assumption that streambed under a disconnected stream is always fully saturated, and limits the methods which introduce a negative or atmospheric pressure value at the IBSA to calculate seepage rate or assess stream-aquifer connectivity.

  15. Identifying Stream/Aquifer Exchange by Temperature Gradient in a Guarani Aquifer System Outcrop Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendland, E.; Rosa, D. M. S.; Anache, J. A. A.; Lowry, C.; Lin, Y. F. F.

    2017-12-01

    Recharge of the Guarani Aquifer System (GAS) in South America is supposed to occur mainly in the outcrop zones, where the GAS appears as an unconfined aquifer (10% of the 1.2 Million km2 aquifer extension). Previous evaluations of recharge are based essentially on water balance estimates for the whole aquifer area or water table fluctuations in monitoring wells. To gain a more detailed understanding of the recharge mechanisms the present work aimed to study the stream aquifer interaction in a watershed (Ribeirão da Onça) at an outcrop zone. Two Parshall flumes were installed 1.3 km apart for discharge measurement in the stream. Along this distance an optic fiber cable was deployed to identify stretches with gaining and losing behavior. In order to estimate groundwater discharge in specific locations, 8 temperature sticks were set up along the stream reach to measure continuously the vertical temperature gradient. A temperature probe with 4 thermistors was also used to map the shallow streambed temperature gradient manually along the whole distance. The obtained results show a discharge difference of 250 m3/h between both flumes. Since the last significant rainfall (15 mm) in the watershed occurred 3 months ago, this value can be interpreted as the base flow contribution to the stream during the dry season. Given the temperature difference between groundwater ( 24oC) and surface water ( 17oC) the fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) allowed the identification of stretches with gaining behavior. Temperature gradients observed at the streambed varied between 0.67 and 14.33 oC/m. The study demonstrated that heat may be used as natural tracer even in tropical conditions, where the groundwater temperature is higher than the surface water temperature during the winter. The obtained results show that the discharge difference between both flumes can not be extrapolated without detailed analysis. Gaining and loosing stretches have to be identified on order

  16. Estimating energy fluxes within the stream-aquifer interface of the Avenelles basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrhouma, Asma; Rivière, Agnès; Goblet, Patrick; Cucchi, Karina; Rubin, Yoram; Baudin, Aurélien; Ansart, Patrick; Flipo, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    The understanding of water temperature evolution and its associated energy fluxes is important to follow the aquatic habitats evolution and to predict future modifications induced by climate change. The spatio-temporal energy balance dynamics within the stream-aquifer interface is complex because of the multitude of physical, morphological and meteorological parameters on which it depends. This critical interface is involving numerous physical and bio-geochemical processes which are taking place at different time and spatial scales. The energy balance estimation at this interface depends mainly on the direction, magnitude and variability of water exchanges and the temporal variation of river and aquifer temperatures as well as the thermal porous media properties. In this work, a combined numerical and experimental approach is used to study the temporal and spatial evolution of the energy budget along 6 km of the stream network of the Avenelles watershed. With an area of 46 km2, the Avenelles watershed is located 70 km east from Paris. The Avenelles river presents different types of connectivity with the underlying aquifers. Five Local Monitoring Stations (LOMOS) have been deployed along the hydraulic corridor to monitor the water and thermal exchanges between the stream and aquifer over years, based on continuous pressure and temperature measurements in the river, the hyporheic zone (HZ) and the underlying aquifer. A 2D finite element thermo-hydrogeological model (METIS) coupled with a parameters screening script is used to determine the hydrogeological and thermal properties of the HZ and of the underlying aquifers by inversion at five LOMOS. Once the local models are calibrated, water and heat fluxes through the stream - aquifer interface are assessed over years (2012-2015) along the stream network. This work offers a new understanding of the stream-aquifer interface functioning, shifting from a pure hydrological characterizing toward a more subtle view that

  17. Arsenic transport in groundwater, surface water, and the hyporheic zone of a mine-influenced stream-aquifer system

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Brendan

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the transport of dissolved arsenic in groundwater, surface water and the hyporheic zone in a stream-aquifer system influenced by an abandoned arsenopyrite mine. Mine tailing piles consisting of a host of arsenic-bearing minerals including arsenopyrite and scorodite remain adjacent to the stream and represent a continuous source of arsenic. Arsenic loads from the stream, springs, and groundwater were quantified at the study reach on nine dates from January to August 2005 and ...

  18. Action Research and Interactive Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, lennart; Nielsen, Kurt Aagaard

    2006-01-01

    The authors present trends in Nordic action research. They ask critical questions in the development towards mode 2 and points out alternative roads for a scientific consolidation of action research and interactive research.......The authors present trends in Nordic action research. They ask critical questions in the development towards mode 2 and points out alternative roads for a scientific consolidation of action research and interactive research....

  19. Spatio-temporal variation of stream-aquifer interaction: Effect of a weir construction in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeonju; Koo, Min-Ho; Kim, Kisu; Kim, Yongcheol

    2015-04-01

    The Four Major Rivers Restoration Project was conducted to secure sufficient water resources, introduce comprehensive flood control measures, and improve water quality while restore the river ecosystem in Korea. The dredging of river bed and the installation of 16 weirs were done in Han, Geum, Yeongsan, and Nakdong rivers from late 2010 to early 2012 as a part of the project. Groundwater data obtained from 213 groundwater monitoring wells near the four major rivers were used to analyze the impacts of weir construction on the nearby groundwater flow system. The groundwater level and chemical characteristics were analyzed to investigate how the groundwater flow system and water quality changed after the weir construction. The results showed that groundwater level rose immediately following the rise of stream stage after the weir construction. Also, the hydrologic condition of the stream in some upland of the weirs was changed from a gaining to a losing stream. Consequently, the direction of groundwater flow was changed from perpendicular to parallel to the stream, and it swapped the groundwater in the downstream of the weir for the water recharged from the stream. Considering the results, some groundwater quality is expected to be changed and become similar to that of the stream, although the change has been not observed yet. Therefore, both further monitoring of the groundwater quality and hydrogeochemical analysis are required for quantitatively evaluating the effect of the weir.

  20. Succeeding with interactive research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Andreas Hagedorn; Nielsen, Morten Velsing

    2017-01-01

    the capacity for critique and ensuring that scientific standards are met. Based on our own experience and theories of interactive governance, network management and collaborative leadership, as well as on existing methodological literature, we provide guidance and suggest concrete tools and methods......Increasingly, social science research is carried out in collaboration with partners outside universities, yet research methodology is lacking on how to manoeuvre in a terrain where multiple actors set expectations for research. This article conceptualizes interactive research as research...

  1. Succeeding with interactive research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Andreas Hagedorn; Nielsen, Morten Velsing

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, social science research is carried out in collaboration with partners outside universities, yet research methodology is lacking on how to manoeuvre in a terrain where multiple actors set expectations for research. This article conceptualizes interactive research as research...... the capacity for critique and ensuring that scientific standards are met. Based on our own experience and theories of interactive governance, network management and collaborative leadership, as well as on existing methodological literature, we provide guidance and suggest concrete tools and methods...

  2. Action Research and Interactive Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    First part of the book is written by senior researchers on specific issues like validity, gender, new forms of organisations, methodologies and methods, earlier and new trends. - The second part of the book is written by doctoral students reporting experiences doing action research in their PhD-projects....

  3. Stream-aquifer relations and the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the lower Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River basin in parts of Georgia, Florida, and Alabama, 1999-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosner, Melinda S.

    2002-01-01

    The Upper Floridan aquifer is the principal source of water for domestic and agricultural use in the lower Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin. Recent drought and increased water use have made understanding surface- and ground-water relations a priority for water-resource managers in the region. From July 1999 through August 2000, less than normal precipitation reduced streamflow in the area to less than 12 percent of average mean-daily streamflow and ground-water levels reached record or near-record lows. Effects of drought on stream-aquifer interactions in the basin were evaluated using baseflow estimation, ground-water seepage calculations, and potentiometric-surface maps. Ground-water discharge to streams, or baseflow, was estimated using three methods: field measurements, hydrograph separation, and linear regression analysis. Results were evaluated seasonally -- October 1999, April 2000, and August 2000 -- and for the period of record at four surface-water stations located on Kinchafoonee, Spring, Muckalee, and Turkey Creeks. Estimates of baseflow also were compared annually; ground-water discharge during the drought years, 1999 - 2000, was compared with ground-water discharge during a relatively wet year, 1994. Hydrograph separation indicated decreased base-flow of streams as the water level in the Upper Floridan aquifer declined. Mean-annual baseflow for Kinchafoonee, Spring, Muckalee, and Turkey Creeks ranged from 36 to 71 percent of total streamflow during the period of record. In 1994 baseflow accounted for only 37 to 56 percent of total streamflow, in 1999 baseflow comprised from 60 to 73 percent of total streamflow, and in 2000 baseflow comprised from 56 to 76 percent of streamflow. The percentage of total streamflow attributed to ground water increased during the drought, whereas other components of streamflow decreased (overland flow, interflow, and channel precipitation). Even though relative ground-water contributions were increased

  4. New methodology to investigate potential contaminant mass fluxes at the stream-aquifer interface by combining integral pumping tests and streambed temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalbus, E.; Schmidt, C.; Bayer-Raich, M.; Leschik, S.; Reinstorf, F.; Balcke, G.U.; Schirmer, M.

    2007-01-01

    The spatial pattern and magnitude of mass fluxes at the stream-aquifer interface have important implications for the fate and transport of contaminants in river basins. Integral pumping tests were performed to quantify average concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in an unconfined aquifer partially penetrated by a stream. Four pumping wells were operated simultaneously for a time period of 5 days and sampled for contaminant concentrations. Streambed temperatures were mapped at multiple depths along a 60 m long stream reach to identify the spatial patterns of groundwater discharge and to quantify water fluxes at the stream-aquifer interface. The combined interpretation of the results showed average potential contaminant mass fluxes from the aquifer to the stream of 272 μg m -2 d -1 MCB and 71 μg m -2 d -1 DCB, respectively. This methodology combines a large-scale assessment of aquifer contamination with a high-resolution survey of groundwater discharge zones to estimate contaminant mass fluxes between aquifer and stream. - We provide a new methodology to quantify the potential contaminant mass flux from an aquifer to a stream

  5. Researching patient-professional interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Mike

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the nature and future of social research on patient-professional interactions. It first sketches the historical background to such research and notes that in the UK and US this was characterised by a focus on the doctor-patient relationship. This research embodied a sceptical view of the power of the medical profession in sustaining and promoting social inequalities, and a critique of 'medical dominance' over other health care professionals and patients. The paper then goes on to outline changes occurring in the nature of professional practice that suggest a fundamental shift in the social relations of health care and the role of medicine. These include a putative loss of public confidence in the medical profession and the authority of science, an increased role of the media in informing patients, and a change in the state's relationship with health care professionals. Finally, the paper outlines some items for a future research agenda, including the need to understand better patient preferences about changes in health care delivery, including a willingness to engage in 'partnership', and the possibilities and barriers to change in professional practice.

  6. Development of a stream-aquifer numerical flow model to assess river water management under water scarcity in a Mediterranean basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Pla, Josep; Font, Eva; Astui, Oihane; Menció, Anna; Rodríguez-Florit, Agustí; Folch, Albert; Brusi, David; Pérez-Paricio, Alfredo

    2012-12-01

    Stream flow, as a part of a basin hydrological cycle, will be sensible to water scarcity as a result of climate change. Stream vulnerability should then be evaluated as a key component of the basin water budget. Numerical flow modeling has been applied to an alluvial formation in a small mountain basin to evaluate the stream-aquifer relationship under these future scenarios. The Arbúcies River basin (116 km(2)) is located in the Catalan Inner Basins (NE Spain) and its lower reach, which is related to an alluvial aquifer, usually becomes dry during the summer period. This study seeks to determine the origin of such discharge losses whether from natural stream leakage and/or induced capture due to groundwater withdrawal. Our goal is also investigating how discharge variations from the basin headwaters, representing potential effects of climate change, may affect stream flow, aquifer recharge, and finally environmental preservation and human supply. A numerical flow model of the alluvial aquifer, based on MODFLOW and especially in the STREAM routine, reproduced the flow system after the usual calibration. Results indicate that, in the average, stream flow provides more than 50% of the water inputs to the alluvial aquifer, being responsible for the amount of stored water resources and for satisfying groundwater exploitation for human needs. Detailed simulations using daily time-steps permit setting threshold values for the stream flow entering at the beginning of the studied area so surface discharge is maintained along the whole watercourse and ecological flow requirements are satisfied as well. The effects of predicted rainfall and temperature variations on the Arbúcies River alluvial aquifer water balance are also discussed from the outcomes of the simulations. Finally, model results indicate the relevance of headwater discharge management under future climate scenarios to preserve downstream hydrological processes. They also point out that small mountain basins

  7. EPRI research on soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.T.

    1986-01-01

    The paper briefly discusses the background of soil-structure interaction research and identifies the nuclear industry's need for a realistic, experimentally qualified soil-structure interaction analysis methodology for nuclear power plant design to reduce excessive conservatism and stabilize the licensing process. EPRI research and joint research efforts between EPRI and Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, Taiwan Power Company, and the Japanese Century Research Institute for Electric Power Industry are outlined. As a result of these and other research efforts, improvement in soil-structure interactions methodologies is being realized

  8. Interaction Modeling at PROS Research Center

    OpenAIRE

    Panach , José ,; Aquino , Nathalie; PASTOR , Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Part 1: Long and Short Papers; International audience; This paper describes how the PROS Research Center deals with interaction in the context of a model-driven approach for the development of information systems. Interaction is specified in a conceptual model together with the structure and behavior of the system. Major achievements and current research challenges of PROS in the field of interaction modeling are presented.

  9. Contextual Interaction Design Research: Enabling HCI

    OpenAIRE

    Murer , Martin; Meschtscherjakov , Alexander; Fuchsberger , Verena; Giuliani , Manuel; Neureiter , Katja; Moser , Christiane; Aslan , Ilhan; Tscheligi , Manfred

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) has always been about humans, their needs and desires. Contemporary HCI thinking investigates interactions in everyday life and puts an emphasis on the emotional and experiential qualities of interactions. At the Center for Human-Computer Interaction we seek to bridge meandering strands in the field by following a guiding metaphor that shifts focus to what has always been the core quality of our research field: Enabling HCI, as a leitmo...

  10. Research achievements and commercial interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, H.M.

    2001-01-01

    ANSTO, in partnership with Australian and overseas organisations, continues to make significant contributions to selected fields of research and development. Major revenue for ANSTO is generated through sales of radiopharmaceuticals and radioisotopes for medical, industrial, environmental and research purposes and through neutron irradiation services. Further, ANSTO is actively trying to generate maximum value from its knowledge and know-how through protection and exploitation of its intellectual property. Strategic alliances have been developed to further the commercial utilisation of ANSTO know-how in, for example, delivery systems for tumour treatments, commercial waste remediation and applications of plasma implantation. The 2000-2001 financial year saw the establishment of an ANSTO business unit called Sulfide Solutions targeted at better management of environmental issues arising from mining operations. Overall, ANSTO's capacity to generate value from the application of its knowledge and know-how is being increasingly acknowledged, the organisation attaining credibility as an international leader in the application of nuclear science and technology in targeted areas

  11. Accounting for intracell flow in models with emphasis on water table recharge and stream-aquifer interaction: 1. Problems and concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Donald G.; Signor, Donald C.; Imes, Jeffrey L.

    1989-01-01

    Intracell flow is important in modeling cells that contain both sources and sinks. Special attention is needed if recharge through the water table is a source. One method of modeling multiple sources and sinks is to determine the net recharge per cell. For example, for a model cell containing both a sink and recharge through the water table, the amount of recharge should be reduced by the ratio of the area of influence of the sink within the cell to the area of the cell. The reduction is the intercepted portion of the recharge. In a multilayer model this amount is further reduced by a proportion factor, which is a function of the depth of the flow lines from the water table boundary to the internal sink. A gaining section of a stream is a typical sink. The aquifer contribution to a gaining stream can be conceptualized as having two parts; the first part is the intercepted lateral flow from the water table and the second is the flow across the streambed due to differences in head between the water level in the stream and the aquifer below. The amount intercepted is a function of the geometry of the cell, but the amount due to difference in head across the stream bed is largely independent of cell geometry. A discharging well can intercept recharge through the water table within a model cell. The net recharge to the cell would be reduced in proportion to the area of influence of the well within the cell. The area of influence generally changes with time. Thus the amount of intercepted recharge and net recharge may not be constant with time. During periods when the well is not discharging there will be no intercepted recharge even though the area of influence from previous pumping may still exist. The reduction of net recharge per cell due to internal interception of flow will result in a model-calculated mass balance less than the prototype. Additionally the “effective transmissivity” along the intercell flow paths may be altered when flow paths are occupied by intercepted recharge.

  12. Symbolic Interaction and Applied Social Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotarba, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    In symbolic interaction, a traditional yet unfortunate and unnecessary distinction has been made between basic and applied research. The argument has been made that basic research is intended to generate new knowledge, whereas applied research is intended to apply knowledge to the solution of practical (social and organizational) problems. I will argue that the distinction between basic and applied research in symbolic interaction is outdated and dysfunctional. The masters of symbolic interactionist thought have left us a proud legacy of shaping their scholarly thinking and inquiry in response to and in light of practical issues of the day (e.g., Znaniecki, and Blumer). Current interactionist work continues this tradition in topical areas such as social justice studies. Applied research, especially in term of evaluation and needs assessment studies, can be designed to serve both basic and applied goals. Symbolic interaction provides three great resources to do this. The first is its orientation to dynamic sensitizing concepts that direct research and ask questions instead of supplying a priori and often impractical answers. The second is its orientation to qualitative methods, and appreciation for the logic of grounded theory. The third is interactionism’s overall holistic approach to interfacing with the everyday life world. The primary illustrative case here is the qualitative component of the evaluation of an NIH-funded, translational medical research program. The qualitative component has provided interactionist-inspired insights into translational research, such as examining cultural change in medical research in terms of changes in the form and content of formal and informal discourse among scientists; delineating the impact of significant symbols such as "my lab" on the social organization of science; and appreciating the essence of the self-concept "scientist" on the increasingly bureaucratic and administrative identities of medical researchers. This

  13. [Research in elementary particles and interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adair, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Schmidt, M.

    1992-05-01

    Research of the Yale University groups in the areas of elementary particles and their interactions are outlined. Work on the following topics is reported: development of CDF trigger system; SSC detector development; study of heavy flavors at TPL; search for composite objects produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions; high-energy polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; rare K + decays; unpolarized high-energy muon scattering; muon anomalous magnetic moment; theoretical high-energy physics including gauge theories, symmetry breaking, string theory, and gravitation theory; study of e + e - interactions with the SLD detector at SLAC; and the production and decay of particles containing charm and beauty quarks

  14. 2010 Atomic & Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd Martinez

    2010-07-23

    The Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Conferences is justifiably recognized for its broad scope, touching on areas ranging from fundamental gas phase and gas-condensed matter collision dynamics, to laser-molecule interactions, photophysics, and unimolecular decay processes. The meeting has traditionally involved scientists engaged in fundamental research in gas and condensed phases and those who apply these concepts to systems of practical chemical and physical interest. A key tradition in this meeting is the strong mixing of theory and experiment throughout. The program for 2010 conference continues these traditions. At the 2010 AMI GRC, there will be talks in 5 broadly defined and partially overlapping areas of intermolecular interactions and chemical dynamics: (1) Photoionization and Photoelectron Dynamics; (2) Quantum Control and Molecules in Strong Fields; (3) Photochemical Dynamics; (4) Complex Molecules and Condensed Phases; and (5) Clusters and Reaction Dynamics. These areas encompass many of the most productive and exciting areas of chemical physics, including both reactive and nonreactive processes, intermolecular and intramolecular energy transfer, and photodissociation and unimolecular processes. Gas phase dynamics, van der Waals and cluster studies, laser-matter interactions and multiple potential energy surface phenomena will all be discussed.

  15. Human-Robot Interaction Directed Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlis, Jennifer; Ezer, Neta; Sandor, Aniko

    2011-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is about understanding and shaping the interactions between humans and robots (Goodrich & Schultz, 2007). It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces and command modalities affect the human s ability to perform tasks accurately, efficiently, and effectively (Crandall, Goodrich, Olsen Jr., & Nielsen, 2005) It is also critical to evaluate the effects of human-robot interfaces and command modalities on operator mental workload (Sheridan, 1992) and situation awareness (Endsley, Bolt , & Jones, 2003). By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed that support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for design. Because the factors associated with interfaces and command modalities in HRI are too numerous to address in 3 years of research, the proposed research concentrates on three manageable areas applicable to National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) robot systems. These topic areas emerged from the Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 work that included extensive literature reviews and observations of NASA systems. The three topic areas are: 1) video overlays, 2) camera views, and 3) command modalities. Each area is described in detail below, along with relevance to existing NASA human-robot systems. In addition to studies in these three topic areas, a workshop is proposed for FY12. The workshop will bring together experts in human-robot interaction and robotics to discuss the state of the practice as applicable to research in space robotics. Studies proposed in the area of video overlays consider two factors in the implementation of augmented reality (AR) for operator displays during teleoperation. The first of these factors is the type of navigational guidance provided by AR symbology. In the proposed

  16. Research on Interaction-oriented Gesture Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This thesis designs a series of gesture interaction with the features of the natural human-machine interaction; besides, it utilizes the 3D acceleration sensors as interactive input. Afterwards, it builds the Discrete Hidden Markov Model to make gesture recognition by introducing the collection proposal of gesture interaction based on the acceleration sensors and pre-handling the gesture acceleration signal obtained in the collection. In the end, the thesis proofs the design proposal workable and effective according to the experiments.

  17. Human-Robot Interaction Directed Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Aniko; Cross, Ernest V., II; Chang, Mai Lee

    2014-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is a discipline investigating the factors affecting the interactions between humans and robots. It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces and command modalities affect the human's ability to perform tasks accurately, efficiently, and effectively when working with a robot. By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed to appropriately support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for the design of robotic systems. This DRP concentrates on three areas associated with interfaces and command modalities in HRI which are applicable to NASA robot systems: 1) Video Overlays, 2) Camera Views, and 3) Command Modalities. The first study focused on video overlays that investigated how Augmented Reality (AR) symbology can be added to the human-robot interface to improve teleoperation performance. Three types of AR symbology were explored in this study, command guidance (CG), situation guidance (SG), and both (SCG). CG symbology gives operators explicit instructions on what commands to input, whereas SG symbology gives operators implicit cues so that operators can infer the input commands. The combination of CG and SG provided operators with explicit and implicit cues allowing the operator to choose which symbology to utilize. The objective of the study was to understand how AR symbology affects the human operator's ability to align a robot arm to a target using a flight stick and the ability to allocate attention between the symbology and external views of the world. The study evaluated the effects type of symbology (CG and SG) has on operator tasks performance and attention allocation during teleoperation of a robot arm. The second study expanded on the first study by evaluating the effects of the type of

  18. Interaction Analysis: Theory, Research and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, Edmund J., Ed.; Hough, John J., Ed.

    This volume of selected readings developed for students and practitioners at various levels of sophistication is intended to be representative of work done to date on interaction analysis. The contents include journal articles, papers read at professional meetings, abstracts of doctoral dissertations, and selections from larger monographs, plus 12…

  19. UZIG USGS research: Advances through interdisciplinary interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, J.R.; Andraski, Brian J.; Rafael, M.-C.

    2009-01-01

    BBecause vadose zone research relates to diverse disciplines, applications, and modes of research, collaboration across traditional operational and topical divisions is especially likely to yield major advances in understanding. The Unsaturated Zone Interest Group (UZIG) is an informal organization sponsored by the USGS to encourage and support interdisciplinary collaboration in vadose or unsaturated zone hydrologic research across organizational boundaries. It includes both USGS and non-USGS scientists. Formed in 1987, the UZIG operates to promote communication, especially through periodic meetings with presentations, discussions, and field trips. The 10th meeting of the UZIG at Los Alamos, NM, in August 2007 was jointly sponsored by the USGS and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Presentations at this meeting served as the initial basis for selecting papers for this special section of Vadose Zone Journal, the purpose of which is to present noteworthy cutting-edge unsaturated zone research promoted by, facilitated by, or presented in connection with the UZIG.

  20. The IRIS network of excellence : Integrating research in interactive storytelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavazza, Marc; Donikian, Stéphane; Christie, Marc; Spierling, Ulrike; Szilas, Nicolas; Vorderer, Peter; Hartmann, Tilo; Klimmt, Christoph; André, Elisabeth; Champagnat, Ronan; Petta, Paolo; Olivier, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Interactive Storytelling is a major endeavour to develop new media which could offer a radically new user experience, with a potential to revolutionise digital entertainment. European research in Interactive Storytelling has played a leading role in the development of the field, and this creates a

  1. Human-Computer Interaction and Information Management Research Needs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — In a visionary future, Human-Computer Interaction HCI and Information Management IM have the potential to enable humans to better manage their lives through the use...

  2. Research and Development Issues for Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ricci, Katrina

    2002-01-01

    ... technologies to support Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals (IETMs). A workshop was conducted at the NAVAIR Orlando, Training Systems Division to discuss the domain and to present current research in this area...

  3. Research of Ve current charge interactions in the NOMAD experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manola-Poggioli, E.

    1996-01-01

    Written during the two first years of the NOMAD experiment working, this thesis is divided into two parts. In the first part, a partly equipped detector gives the 1994's results. It allows to identify and to select the NOMAD main interactions (muon neutrino charging current (CC) interactions) in the target. Thank to a events selection, the origin of the produced electrons is studied to better understand simulation's programs. In the second part, neutrino-electron CC interactions represent the main background noise to the oscillations research in the electronic mode. Electrons identification's algorithms are developed and inelastic interactions kinematic properties of electron neutrinos are discussed. (TEC). 57 refs., 72 figs., 18 tabs

  4. Construction of ion accelerator for ion-surface interaction research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Kenziro; Ohtsuka, Hidewo; Yamada, Rayji; Abe, Tetsuya; Sone, Kazuho

    1977-09-01

    A Cockcroft-Walton type ion accelerator for ion-surface interaction research was installed at Plasma Engineering Laboratory, Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research, JAERI, in March 1977. Its maximum accelerating voltage is 400 kV. The accelerator has some outstanding features compared with the conventional type. Described are setup of the accelerator specification of the major components, safety system and performance. (auth.)

  5. Designing interaction, voice, and inclusion in AAC research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullin, Graham; Treviranus, Jutta; Patel, Rupal; Higginbotham, Jeff

    2017-09-01

    The ISAAC 2016 Research Symposium included a Design Stream that examined timely issues across augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), framed in terms of designing interaction, designing voice, and designing inclusion. Each is a complex term with multiple meanings; together they represent challenging yet important frontiers of AAC research. The Design Stream was conceived by the four authors, researchers who have been exploring AAC and disability-related design throughout their careers, brought together by a shared conviction that designing for communication implies more than ensuring access to words and utterances. Each of these presenters came to AAC from a different background: interaction design, inclusive design, speech science, and social science. The resulting discussion among 24 symposium participants included controversies about the role of technology, tensions about independence and interdependence, and a provocation about taste. The paper concludes by proposing new directions for AAC research: (a) new interdisciplinary research could combine scientific and design research methods, as distant yet complementary as microanalysis and interaction design, (b) new research tools could seed accessible and engaging contextual research into voice within a social model of disability, and (c) new open research networks could support inclusive, international and interdisciplinary research.

  6. 2004 Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Paul J. Dagdigian

    2004-01-01

    The 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Atomic and Molecular Interactions was held July 11-16 at Colby-Sawyer College, New London, New Hampshire. This latest edition in a long-standing conference series featured invited talks and contributed poster papers on dynamics and intermolecular interactions in a variety of environments, ranging from the gas phase through surfaces and condensed media. A total of 90 conferees participated in the conference

  7. 2004 Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Paul J. Dagdigian

    2004-10-25

    The 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Atomic and Molecular Interactions was held July 11-16 at Colby-Sawyer College, New London, New Hampshire. This latest edition in a long-standing conference series featured invited talks and contributed poster papers on dynamics and intermolecular interactions in a variety of environments, ranging from the gas phase through surfaces and condensed media. A total of 90 conferees participated in the conference.

  8. Contemporary state of spacecraft/environment interaction research

    CERN Document Server

    Novikov, L S

    1999-01-01

    Various space environment effects on spacecraft materials and equipment, and the reverse effects of spacecrafts and rockets on space environment are considered. The necessity of permanent updating and perfection of our knowledge on spacecraft/environment interaction processes is noted. Requirements imposed on models of space environment in theoretical and experimental researches of various aspects of the spacecraft/environment interaction problem are formulated. In this field, main problems which need to be solved today and in the nearest future are specified. The conclusion is made that the joint analysis of both aspects of spacecraft/environment interaction problem promotes the most effective solution of the problem.

  9. The embodied turn in research on language and social interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    I use the term the embodied turn to mean the point when interest in the body became established among researchers on language and social interaction, exploiting the greater ease of video-recording. This review paper tracks the growth of "embodiment" in over 400 papers published in Research...... on Language and Social Interaction from 1987-2013. I consider closely two areas where analysts have confronted challenges, and how they have responded: settling on precise and analytically helpful terminology for the body; and transcribing and representing the body, particularly its temporality and manner....

  10. Assess program: Interactive data management systems for airborne research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, R. M.; Reller, J. O., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Two data systems were developed for use in airborne research. Both have distributed intelligence and are programmed for interactive support among computers and with human operators. The C-141 system (ADAMS) performs flight planning and telescope control functions in addition to its primary role of data acquisition; the CV-990 system (ADDAS) performs data management functions in support of many research experiments operating concurrently. Each system is arranged for maximum reliability in the first priority function, precision data acquisition.

  11. Exploring Action Research as an Approach to Interactive (Participatory) Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudary, Imran Anjum; Imran, Shahida

    2012-01-01

    This investigation seeks to understand "action research" as an approach to "interactive form of evaluation". The first half of the investigation illuminates the approach with the help of the selective body of literature and the second half draws attention to its application in the field with the help of an authentic evaluation…

  12. Educational Technology Research Journals: "Interactive Learning Environments," 2004-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Steven S.; Andrews, Carolyn; Harris, Scott P.; Lloyd, Adam; Turley, Chad; West, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the journal "Interactive Learning Environments" to discover trends from 2004-2013. The authors looked at trends in article topics, research methods, authorship, citations, keyword frequencies, phrase counts of article abstracts, and article citations according to Google Scholar. Evidence is provided of the journal's…

  13. Research-practice interactions as reported in recent design research studies: Still promising, still hazy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, Bart; Pareja Roblin, Natalie; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke; Pieters, Jules

    2012-01-01

    Ormel, B., Pareja Roblin, N., McKenney, S., Voogt, J., & Pieters, J. (2012). Research-practice interactions as reported in recent design research studies: Still promising, still hazy. Educational Technology Research & Development, 60(6), 967-986. doi:10.1007/s11423-012-9261-6

  14. Assessment of the condition of a consumer market: interactive research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Yevgenyevna Sudakova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of an assessment of a condition of the consumer market are presented in the article on the basis of official statistics data. At the heart of an assessment, the method of the indicative analysis lies. The technique includes five modules: quality of consumer goods, works, services; food security, nonfood safety; safety of services; security of participants of the consumer market. Also results of interactive Internet research of the condition of the ultimate consumer are presented in the article, by means of the carried out research. Interactive research is presented by 3 blocks: the general block (allows to make the respondent’s portrait; the special block (allows to estimate the changes in price, quality and the range of consumer goods and services; the additional block (allows respondents to leave comments. On the basis of the conducted research, it is possible to draw a conclusion that the assessment of the state received on the basis of methodical tools, shows positive dynamics, nevertheless, the condition of the consumer market remains unsatisfactory that also is confirmed by results of interactive research. The recommendations, allowing to lower the rise in prices and increase the quality of consumer goods and services are presented in the article

  15. Nuclear Fusion Research Understanding Plasma-Surface Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Robert E.H

    2005-01-01

    It became clear in the early days of fusion research that the effects of the containment vessel (erosion of "impurities") degrade the overall fusion plasma performance. Progress in controlled nuclear fusion research over the last decade has led to magnetically confined plasmas that, in turn, are sufficiently powerful to damage the vessel structures over its lifetime. This book reviews current understanding and concepts to deal with this remaining critical design issue for fusion reactors. It reviews both progress and open questions, largely in terms of available and sought-after plasma-surface interaction data and atomic/molecular data related to these "plasma edge" issues.

  16. Creating Research Impact: The Roles of Research Users in Interactive Research Mobilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    An impact assessment of research into children's concerns about their families and relationships found many ways research had been used in different sectors by different actors. Specific impacts from the research were harder to identify. However, instances where there were clear impacts highlighted the ways research users had adapted research to…

  17. Handling interactions among SDGs: a critical role for research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford Smith, M.

    2015-12-01

    At Rio+20, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were conceived mainly as a mechanism to integrate and coordinate among the many multilateral agreements that already exist at the global level, as well as to identify any gaps among them. In Sep 2015 nations signed off on 17 goals with 169 targets, which had been developed through the most open process of consultation the United Nations has ever run. Agreement on a reasonably concise set of goals for achieving global sustainability and human development is an existential step forward, and to be applauded. However, the process led to much fragmented lobbying which is reflected in a loss of focus on the original objective of integration. There are many areas of the goals where interactions lead to trade-offs that need managing, and synergies which should be captured capturing. A few trade-offs, such as that between more energy use and less greenhouse gas emissions, are explicit in a target to double the rate of improvement in energy efficiency by 2030 (target 7.3). But there are many other interactions which are characterised poorly or not at all. In some cases integrative indicators are known; in others we do not necessarily know what to focus on to manage the interaction. Furthermore, the package of SDGs will be implemented at both global and national levels. Integrated thinking will be needed in this process of implementation, for example to assist developing countries to leapfrog western development pathways, and to promote a systems view on how environmental, social and economic outcomes are deeply integrated in the effecting of country development plans. Existing research can inform many of these interactions, whilst in other areas there in fact profound and fascinating new research needed to help decision makers. I will discuss this framing and highlight research, both existing and needed, that could speed up the world's ability to deliver on its SDG commitment.

  18. Experimental research on crossing shock wave boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, G. S.; Garrison, T. J.

    1994-10-01

    An experimental research effort of the Penn State Gas Dynamics Laboratory on the subject of crossing shock wave boundary layer interactions is reported. This three year study was supported by AFOSR Grant 89-0315. A variety of experimental techniques were employed to study the above phenomena including planar laser scattering flowfield visualization, kerosene lampblack surface flow visualization, laser-interferometer skin friction surveys, wall static pressure measurements, and flowfield five-hole probe surveys. For a model configuration producing two intersecting shock waves, measurements were made for a range of oblique shock strengths at freestream Mach numbers of 3.0 and 3.85. Additionally, measurements were made at Mach 3.85 for a configuration producing three intersecting waves. The combined experimental dataset was used to formulate the first detailed flowfield models of the crossing-shock and triple-shock wave/boundary layer interactions. The structure of these interactions was found to be similar over a broad range of interaction strengths and is dominated by a large, separated, viscous flow region.

  19. Interactive Voice/Web Response System in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruikar, Vrishabhsagar

    2016-01-01

    Emerging technologies in computer and telecommunication industry has eased the access to computer through telephone. An Interactive Voice/Web Response System (IxRS) is one of the user friendly systems for end users, with complex and tailored programs at its backend. The backend programs are specially tailored for easy understanding of users. Clinical research industry has experienced revolution in methodologies of data capture with time. Different systems have evolved toward emerging modern technologies and tools in couple of decades from past, for example, Electronic Data Capture, IxRS, electronic patient reported outcomes, etc.

  20. Interaction Matrices as a Tool for Prioritizing Radioecology Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, J.C.; Robles, Beatriz [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas - CIEMAT (Spain); Bradshaw, Clare; Stark, Karolina [Stockholm University (Sweden); Sweeck, Liev; Vives i Batlle, Jordi [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Beresford, Nick [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology - CEH (United Kingdom); Thoerring, Havard; Dowdall, Mark [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority - NRPA (Norway); Outola, Iisa; Turtiainen, Tuukka; Vetikko, Virve [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland); Steiner, Martin [Federal Office for Radiation Protection - BfS (Germany); Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Fevrier, Laureline; Hurtevent, Pierre; Boyer, Patrick [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - IRSN (France)

    2014-07-01

    Interaction Matrices as a Tool for Prioritizing Radioecology Research J.C. Mora CIEMAT In 2010 the Strategy for Allied Radioecology (STAR) was launched with several objectives aimed towards integrating the radioecology research efforts of nine institutions in Europe. One of these objectives was the creation of European Radioecology Observatories. The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ) and the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (USCB), a coal mining area in Poland, have been chosen after a selection process. A second objective was to develop a system for improving and validating the capabilities of predicting the behaviour of the main radionuclides existing at these observatories. Interaction Matrices (IM) have been used since the 1990's as a tool for developing ecological conceptual models and have also been used within radioecology. The Interaction Matrix system relies on expert judgement for structuring knowledge of a given ecosystem at the conceptual level and was selected for use in the STAR project. A group of experts, selected from each institution of STAR, designed two matrices with the main compartments for each ecosystem (a forest in CEZ and a lake in USCB). All the features, events and processes (FEPs) which could affect the behaviour of the considered radionuclides, focusing on radiocaesium in the Chernobyl forest and radium in the Rontok-Wielki lake, were also included in each IM. Two new sets of experts were appointed to review, improve and prioritize the processes included in each IM. A first processing of the various candidate interaction matrices produced a single interaction matrix for each ecosystem which incorporated all experts combined knowledge. During the prioritization of processes in the IMs, directed towards developing a whole predictive model of radionuclides behaviour in those ecosystems, raised interesting issues related to the processes and parameters involved, regarding the existing knowledge in them. This exercise revealed several processes

  1. Symbolic Interaction and Applied Social Research: A FOCUS ON TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE RESEARCH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotarba, Joseph A

    2014-08-01

    In symbolic interaction, a traditional yet unfortunate and unnecessary distinction has been made between basic and applied research. The argument has been made that basic research is intended to generate new knowledge, whereas applied research is intended to apply knowledge to the solution of practical (social and organizational) problems. I will argue that the distinction between basic and applied research in symbolic interaction is outdated and dysfunctional. The masters of symbolic interactionist thought have left us a proud legacy of shaping their scholarly thinking and inquiry in response to and in light of practical issues of the day (e.g., Znaniecki, and Blumer). Current interactionist work continues this tradition in topical areas such as social justice studies. Applied research, especially in term of evaluation and needs assessment studies, can be designed to serve both basic and applied goals. Symbolic interaction provides three great resources to do this. The first is its orientation to dynamic sensitizing concepts that direct research and ask questions instead of supplying a priori and often impractical answers. The second is its orientation to qualitative methods, and appreciation for the logic of grounded theory. The third is interactionism's overall holistic approach to interfacing with the everyday life world. The primary illustrative case here is the qualitative component of the evaluation of an NIH-funded, translational medical research program. The qualitative component has provided interactionist-inspired insights into translational research, such as examining cultural change in medical research in terms of changes in the form and content of formal and informal discourse among scientists; delineating the impact of significant symbols such as "my lab" on the social organization of science; and appreciating the essence of the self-concept "scientist" on the increasingly bureaucratic and administrative identities of medical researchers. This

  2. Theoretical & Experimental Research in Weak, Electromagnetic & Strong Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Satyanarayan [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Babu, Kaladi [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Rizatdinova, Flera [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Khanov, Alexander [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Haley, Joseph [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2015-09-17

    The conducted research spans a wide range of topics in the theoretical, experimental and phenomenological aspects of elementary particle interactions. Theory projects involve topics in both the energy frontier and the intensity frontier. The experimental research involves energy frontier with the ATLAS Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In theoretical research, novel ideas going beyond the Standard Model with strong theoretical motivations were proposed, and their experimental tests at the LHC and forthcoming neutrino facilities were outlined. These efforts fall into the following broad categories: (i) TeV scale new physics models for LHC Run 2, including left-right symmetry and trinification symmetry, (ii) unification of elementary particles and forces, including the unification of gauge and Yukawa interactions, (iii) supersummetry and mechanisms of supersymmetry breaking, (iv) superworld without supersymmetry, (v) general models of extra dimensions, (vi) comparing signals of extra dimensions with those of supersymmetry, (vii) models with mirror quarks and mirror leptons at the TeV scale, (viii) models with singlet quarks and singlet Higgs and their implications for Higgs physics at the LHC, (ix) new models for the dark matter of the universe, (x) lepton flavor violation in Higgs decays, (xi) leptogenesis in radiative models of neutrino masses, (xii) light mediator models of non-standard neutrino interactions, (xiii) anomalous muon decay and short baseline neutrino anomalies, (xiv) baryogenesis linked to nucleon decay, and (xv) a new model for recently observed diboson resonance at the LHC and its other phenomenological implications. The experimental High Energy Physics group has been, and continues to be, a successful and productive contributor to the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Members of the group performed search for gluinos decaying to stop and top quarks, new heavy gauge bosons decaying to top and bottom quarks, and vector-like quarks

  3. Visualization and Interaction in Research, Teaching, and Scientific Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammon, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Modern computing provides many tools for exploring observations, numerical calculations, and theoretical relationships. The number of options is, in fact, almost overwhelming. But the choices provide those with modest programming skills opportunities to create unique views of scientific information and to develop deeper insights into their data, their computations, and the underlying theoretical data-model relationships. I present simple examples of using animation and human-computer interaction to explore scientific data and scientific-analysis approaches. I illustrate how valuable a little programming ability can free scientists from the constraints of existing tools and can facilitate the development of deeper appreciation data and models. I present examples from a suite of programming languages ranging from C to JavaScript including the Wolfram Language. JavaScript is valuable for sharing tools and insight (hopefully) with others because it is integrated into one of the most powerful communication tools in human history, the web browser. Although too much of that power is often spent on distracting advertisements, the underlying computation and graphics engines are efficient, flexible, and almost universally available in desktop and mobile computing platforms. Many are working to fulfill the browser's potential to become the most effective tool for interactive study. Open-source frameworks for visualizing everything from algorithms to data are available, but advance rapidly. One strategy for dealing with swiftly changing tools is to adopt common, open data formats that are easily adapted (often by framework or tool developers). I illustrate the use of animation and interaction in research and teaching with examples from earthquake seismology.

  4. Research progress in neuro-immune interactions in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-ling CAI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune response may be activated quickly once the organism is invaded by exotic pathogens. An excessive immune response may result in inflammation and tissue damage, whereas an insufficient immune response may result in infection. Nervous system may regulate the intensity of innate immune responses by releasing neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Compared with the complicated neuro-immune system in mammals, it is much simpler in Caenorhabditis elegans. Besides, C. elegans is accessible to genetic, molecular biology and behavioral analyses, so it has been used in studies on neuro-immune interactions. It has been revealed recently in the studies with C. elegans that the neuronal pathways regulating innate immune responses primarily include a transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β pathway, an insulin/insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF pathway and dopaminergic neurotransmission. Since these pathways are evolutionally conservative, so it might be able to provide some new ideas for the research on neuro-immune interactions at molecular levels. The recent progress in this field has been reviewed in present paper.

  5. Environmental Research Translation: Enhancing Interactions with Communities at Contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Andreotta, Monica D.; Brusseau, Mark L.; Artiola, Janick F.; Maier, Raina M.; Gandolfi, A. Jay

    2014-01-01

    The characterization and remediation of contaminated sites are complex endeavors fraught with numerous challenges. One particular challenge that is receiving increased attention is the development and encouragement of full participation by communities and community members affected by a given site in all facets of decision-making. Many disciplines have been grappling with the challenges associated with environmental and risk communication, public participation in environmental data generation, and decision-making and increasing community capacity. The concepts and methods developed by these disciplines are reviewed, with a focus on their relevance to the specific dynamics associated with environmental contamination sites. The contributions of these disciplines are then synthesized and integrated to help develop Environmental Research Translation (ERT), a proposed framework for environmental scientists to promote interaction and communication among involved parties at contaminated sites. This holistic approach is rooted in public participation approaches to science, which includes: a transdisciplinary team, effective collaboration, information transfer, public participation in environmental projects, and a cultural model of risk communication. Although there are challenges associated with the implementation of ERT, it is anticipated that application of this proposed translational science method could promote more robust community participation at contaminated sites. PMID:25173762

  6. Environmental Research Translation: Enhancing Interactions with Communities at Contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Andreotta, M.; Brusseau, M. L. L.; Artiola, J. F.; Maier, R. M.; Gandolfi, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization and remediation of contaminated sites are complex endeavors fraught with numerous challenges. One particular challenge that is receiving increased attention is the development and encouragement of full participation by communities and community members affected by a given site in all facets of decision-making. Many disciplines have been grappling with the challenges associated with environmental and risk communication, public participation in environmental data generation and decision-making, and increasing community capacity. The concepts and methods developed by these disciplines are reviewed, with a focus on their relevance to the specific dynamics associated with contaminated sites. The contributions of these disciplines are then synthesized and integrated to help develop Environmental Research Translation (ERT), a proposed framework for environmental scientists to promote interaction and communication among involved parties at contaminated sites. This holistic approach is rooted in public participation approaches to science, which includes: a transdisciplinary team, effective collaboration, information transfer, public participation in environmental projects, and a cultural model of risk communication. Although there are challenges associated with the implementation of ERT, it is anticipated that application of this proposed translational science method could promote more robust community participation at contaminated sites.

  7. A Commentary on Parent-Child Cognitive Interaction Research: What Have we Learned From Two Decades of Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette Renee Harris

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of family influences on preschool and school age cognitive development has received considerable empirical attention from cognitive developmental psychology researchers in the last few decades. As a result of the interest, investigators have focused their attention on developing coding/observational systems to capture the interactions occurring between mothers and their young children. This paper reviews a select body of research on parent child cognitive learning interactions with the goal of determining how the researchers have operationalized the behaviors that occur within learning interactions. The paper concludes with a discussion of the suggestions on next steps for conducting parent child cognitive learning interaction research in the future.

  8. The Institutional Embedding of Interactive Policy Making. Insights from a comparative research based on eight interactive projects in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelenbos, J.; Klok, P.J.; Tatenhove, van J.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors address citizen involvement at the central government level in the Netherlands. Through comparative research in which they systematically analyze eight interactive projects in three governmental departments, the authors especially pay attention to the relation between

  9. The Institutional Embedding of Interactive Policy Making Insights From a Comparative Research Based on Eight Interactive Projects in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelenbos, Jurian; Klok, Pieter J.; van Tatenhove, Jan

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors address citizen involvement at the central government level in the Netherlands. Through comparative research in which they systematically analyze eight interactive projects in three governmental departments, the authors especially pay attention to the relation between

  10. Research and realization of key technology in HILS interactive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Che; Lu, Huiming; Wang, Fankai

    2018-03-01

    This paper designed HILS (Hardware In the Loop Simulation) interactive system based on xPC platform . Through the interface between C++ and MATLAB engine, establish the seamless data connection between Simulink and interactive system, complete data interaction between system and Simulink, realize the function development of model configuration, parameter modification and off line simulation. We establish the data communication between host and target machine through TCP/IP protocol to realize the model download and real-time simulation. Use database to store simulation data, implement real-time simulation monitoring and simulation data management. Realize system function integration by Qt graphic interface library and dynamic link library. At last, take the typical control system as an example to verify the feasibility of HILS interactive system.

  11. Basic Research in Human–Computer–Biosphere Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Hiroki Kobayashi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present a vision of how a human–computer–biosphere interaction (HCBI can facilitate a sustainable society. HCBI extends and transforms the subject of human–computer interaction from countable people, objects, pets, and plants into an auditory biosphere that is an uncountable, a complex, and a non-linguistic soundscape. As an example, utilizing HCBI to experience forest soundscapes can help us feel one with nature, without physically being present in nature. The goal of HCBI is to achieve ecological interactions between humans and nature through computer systems without causing environmental destruction. To accomplish this, information connectivity must be created despite the physical separation between humans and the environment. This combination should also ensure ecological neutrality. In this paper, we present an overview of an HCBI concept, related work, methodologies, and developed interfaces. We used pre-recorded animal calls to enable a bio-acoustical feedback from the target wildlife. In this study, we primarily focus on the design and evaluation of a bio-acoustic interaction system utilizing tracking collars, microphones, speakers, infrared cameras, infrared heat sensors, micro-climate sensors, radio-tracking devices, GPS devices, radio clocks, embedded Linux boards, high-capacity batteries, and high-speed wireless communication devices. Our experiments successfully demonstrated bio-acoustic interactions between wildlife—more specifically, an endangered species of a wild cat—and human beings via a computer system, thus validating the HCBI concept.

  12. Industry interactions of the electronic structure research community in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Goldbeck, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    This report explores the interactions of the academic Psi-k community with industry. The evidence presented is mainly based on a semi-quantitative survey and interviews of network members. All Psi-k board, working group and advisory group members, a total of about 120 people were invited to take part in the study, and 40 people responded, representing more than 400 scientists from 33 different institutions in 12 European countries. 90% of respondents work with industry. Main industry sectors ...

  13. Research of the punch interaction with composite protective panel

    OpenAIRE

    Kulakov, N.; Lyubin, A.

    2008-01-01

    The work examines the structure of a protection composite panel consisting of a crushing layer (ceramic discrete elements of a cylindrical shape) and a restraining layer below (metallic leaf). This protection panel can be used for an armour-piercing bullet protection of the car. Here is the strength calculation of ceramic elements and metallic protective layer dynamic interaction under bullet impact. The problem was solved under a variety of protection panel parameters in order to define thei...

  14. Interaction in research and the importance of exercising hospitality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jane.b

    Applied Sciences in Leeuwarden, Netherlands, researchers from several countries ... effective welcoming of the ideas of others, in the promotion of a positive level of ... which new references, new parameters and new ground are created by ...

  15. Research and Development Issues for Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ricci, Katrina

    2002-01-01

    .... While there is a wide range of research issues associated with technical manuals, the focus of the Intelligent Performance Support and Training effort is the development and evaluation of various...

  16. 2012 Gordon Research Conference, Electron donor-acceptor interactions, August 5-10 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCusker, James [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2012-08-10

    The upcoming incarnation of the Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions will feature sessions on classic topics including proton-coupled electron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells, and biological electron transfer, as well as emerging areas such as quantum coherence effects in donor-acceptor interactions, spintronics, and the application of donor-acceptor interactions in chemical synthesis.

  17. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  18. Research on Goods and the Ship Interaction Based on ADAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Fangzhen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The equivalent method of the relative movement goods on board is discussed in details. This method is to establish dynamic model based on moving trajectory of gravity-center for goods and to take rigid body geometric model with the trajectory as constraints in ADAMS. The difference of simulation methods for the different goods in carrier rolling is compared. The interact of relative moving objects with bulk carrier is discussed by using the ADAMS model. It is verified that the ballast water can maintain the ship’s stability by means of the ADAMS model.

  19. Interactions of severe accident research and regulatory positions (ISARRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.

    2001-12-01

    The work Programme of the ISARRP Project was divided into several work packages. The work was conducted in the form of presentations and discussions, held during several meetings whose character was that of workshops. Short reports were prepared by the partners assigned to each task. Work Package 1: Critical review of the SA phenomenological research. The objective of this work package was to consider the progress made world-wide in research on the resolution of the outstanding phenomenological issues posed by severe accidents. Work Package 2: Relevance of severe accident research to SAMG requirements and implementation. The objective of this work package was to relate the progress made in the resolution of the SA issues to the practical matter of what results are required or have been used for the management of severe accidents. Clearly, the SAMG is the most important avenue employed by the regulatory organizations to assure themselves of the safe (from public perspective) performance of a nuclear plant in a postulated severe accident event. Work Package 3: Relevance of severe accident research to PSA and the risk informed regulatory approach. The objectives of this work package is to relate the results obtained by the severe accident research to the requirements of a PSA and of the new trend of employing the risk informed approach in promulgating regulations. Clearly a PSA identifies vulnerabilities in the knowledge base, however, their importance is decidedly plant specific. Nevertheless the uncertainties in the phenomenology or in resolution of issues lead to uncertainties in the PSA conclusions and in the adoption of the risk informed approach. Work Package 4: Questionnaire and the evaluation of responses to the questions. The purpose of this work package is to solicit the views of the regulatory organizations towards the results of the SA research and the benefits they have derived from it in terms of regulatory actions, or in the confidence they have gained

  20. Interactions of severe accident research and regulatory positions (ISARRP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R. (comp.) [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Nuclear Power Safety

    2001-12-01

    The work Programme of the ISARRP Project was divided into several work packages. The work was conducted in the form of presentations and discussions, held during several meetings whose character was that of workshops. Short reports were prepared by the partners assigned to each task. Work Package 1: Critical review of the SA phenomenological research. The objective of this work package was to consider the progress made world-wide in research on the resolution of the outstanding phenomenological issues posed by severe accidents. Work Package 2: Relevance of severe accident research to SAMG requirements and implementation. The objective of this work package was to relate the progress made in the resolution of the SA issues to the practical matter of what results are required or have been used for the management of severe accidents. Clearly, the SAMG is the most important avenue employed by the regulatory organizations to assure themselves of the safe (from public perspective) performance of a nuclear plant in a postulated severe accident event. Work Package 3: Relevance of severe accident research to PSA and the risk informed regulatory approach. The objectives of this work package is to relate the results obtained by the severe accident research to the requirements of a PSA and of the new trend of employing the risk informed approach in promulgating regulations. Clearly a PSA identifies vulnerabilities in the knowledge base, however, their importance is decidedly plant specific. Nevertheless the uncertainties in the phenomenology or in resolution of issues lead to uncertainties in the PSA conclusions and in the adoption of the risk informed approach. Work Package 4: Questionnaire and the evaluation of responses to the questions. The purpose of this work package is to solicit the views of the regulatory organizations towards the results of the SA research and the benefits they have derived from it in terms of regulatory actions, or in the confidence they have gained

  1. Technology and Teacher-Student Interactions: A Review of Empirical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Ben

    2018-01-01

    As technology becomes ubiquitous in education, it is critical to understand the ways in which technology influences interactions between teachers and their students. The overarching research question that guided this systematic review was: What does research tell us about how technology influences interactions between teachers and students in K-12…

  2. Innovations in concrete technology: Interaction between research, codes and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, D.A.; Grosse, Christian U.

    2007-01-01

    For all new applications there is an area of tension between research, code work and practice. For a new technology practice always asks for guidelines, while on the other hand for writing codes or guidelines there is always the demand for experience from practice. Being active in practice as well

  3. Research on tactical information display technology for interactive virtual cockpit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongyun; Tian, Tao; Su, Feng

    2018-04-01

    Based on a fact that traditional tactical information display technology suffers from disadvantages of a large number of data to be transferred and low plotting efficiency in an interactive virtual cockpit, a GID protocol-based simulation has been designed. This method dissolves complex tactical information screens into basic plotting units. The indication of plotting units is controlled via the plotting commands, which solves the incompatibility between the tactical information display in traditional simulation and the desktop-based virtual simulation training system. Having been used in desktop systems for helicopters, fighters, and transporters, this method proves to be scientific and reasonable in design and simple and efficient in usage, which exerts a significant value in establishing aviation equipment technology support training products.

  4. Category Learning Research in the Interactive Online Environment Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jan; Livingston, Ken; Sturm, Joshua; Bliss, Daniel; Hawthorne, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The interactive online environment Second Life allows users to create novel three-dimensional stimuli that can be manipulated in a meaningful yet controlled environment. These features suggest Second Life's utility as a powerful tool for investigating how people learn concepts for unfamiliar objects. The first of two studies was designed to establish that cognitive processes elicited in this virtual world are comparable to those tapped in conventional settings by attempting to replicate the established finding that category learning systematically influences perceived similarity . From the perspective of an avatar, participants navigated a course of unfamiliar three-dimensional stimuli and were trained to classify them into two labeled categories based on two visual features. Participants then gave similarity ratings for pairs of stimuli and their responses were compared to those of control participants who did not learn the categories. Results indicated significant compression, whereby objects classified together were judged to be more similar by learning than control participants, thus supporting the validity of using Second Life as a laboratory for studying human cognition. A second study used Second Life to test the novel hypothesis that effects of learning on perceived similarity do not depend on the presence of verbal labels for categories. We presented the same stimuli but participants classified them by selecting between two complex visual patterns designed to be extremely difficult to label. While learning was more challenging in this condition , those who did learn without labels showed a compression effect identical to that found in the first study using verbal labels. Together these studies establish that at least some forms of human learning in Second Life parallel learning in the actual world and thus open the door to future studies that will make greater use of the enriched variety of objects and interactions possible in simulated environments

  5. The required interactions among institutions involved with Research and Development in the power sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira Filho, X; Medeiros, J C; Szechtman, M [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica (CEPEL), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the form which CEPEL (Brazilian Federal Research Center in Electric Energy) works for the Brazilian electric system, the interaction with associates, especially with ELETROBRAS (the Federal holding company in Brazil), the modern way of CEPEL operation and interactions with clients, the partnership in Research and Development, the CEPEL philosophy of transferring technology to its clients, and the cost-benefit analysis of Research and Development activities. (author) 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Restriction of Variance Interaction Effects and Their Importance for International Business Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortina, Jose M.; Köhler, Tine; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    A recent Journal of International Business Studies editorial on interaction effects within and across levels highlighted the importance of and difficulty associated with justifying and reporting of such interaction effects. The purpose of this editorial is to describe a type of interaction...... hypothesis that is very common in international business (IB) research: the restricted variance (RV) hypothesis. Specifically, we describe the nature of an RV interaction and its evidentiary requirements. We also offer several IB examples involving interactions that could have been supported with RV...

  7. Replication in Interaction and Working Memory Research: Révész (2012) and Goo (2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, Susan; Valmori, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    This paper argues for the replication of two studies, both of which consider feedback and working memory. In the first part of this paper, we discuss the role of interaction-based research and working memory research in second language acquisition research. We then describe two studies that have unified these two areas in recent published articles…

  8. Summary report on first research coordination meeting on heavy charged-particle interaction data for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmans, H.; Noy, R.C.

    2008-04-01

    A summary is given of the First Research Coordination Meeting on Heavy Charged-Particle Interaction Data for Radiotherapy. A programme to compile and evaluate charged-particle nuclear data for therapeutic applications was proposed. Detailed coordinated research proposals were also agreed. Technical discussions and the resulting work plan of the Coordinated Research Project are summarized, along with actions and deadlines. (author)

  9. Influence of benefits, results and obstacles’ perceptions by research groups on interactions with companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veneziano de Castro Araujo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate how expected perceptions of academic research groups about results, benefits and obstacles influence the number of interactions with firms, based on a survey of university-industry interactions in Brazil. For this purpose, by means of a nonparametric Item Response Theory (NIRT, non ad hoc clusters were created from patterns of survey answers related with the analyzed perceptions. Using these clusters, a model was estimated to identify how perceptions influence the number of interactions of research groups. The results indicate that research groups that perceive intangible benefits and knowledge results as more important tend to have more interactions with firms. In addition, transactional obstacles imply in less interactions with firms. Finally, some implications on public policies are presented.

  10. Exploration of Textual Interactions in CALL Learning Communities: Emerging Research and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) has greatly enhanced the realm of online social interaction and behavior. In language classrooms, it allows the opportunity for students to enhance their learning experiences. "Exploration of Textual Interactions in CALL Learning Communities: Emerging Research and Opportunities" is an ideal…

  11. Research-practice interactions as reported in recent design studies: Still promising, still hazy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, Bart; Pareja Roblin, Natalie; McKenney, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Ormel, B., Pareja, N., & McKenney, S. (2011, 8-10 June). Research-practice interactions as reported in recent design studies: Still promising, still hazy. Paper presentation at the ORD annual meeting, Maastricht.

  12. How Design-based Research, Action Research and Interaction Design Contributes to the Development of Designs for Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Gunver; Misfeldt, Morten; Nielsen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    This article explores how action research, design based research and interaction design can be combined and used in the development of educational robotic tools. Our case study is the development of Number Blocks and it combines physical interaction, learning, and immediate feedback. Number Blocks...... supports the children's understanding of place value in the sense that it allows them to experiment with creating large numbers. The development was done in collaboration with a class of 7-8 year old children and their mathematics teacher. The article argues that elements from different research methods...... allowed a structured approach to projects that combines educational research and innovation of new learning technologies. Key elements of this approach is acknowledging the users input, developing a theoretical pre-analysis and using an iterative approach....

  13. A STUDY ON THE INTERACTION BETWEEN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTING PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula Batista da Silva; Ernani Ott

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the interaction between scientific research and professional accounting practice. In this exploratory study, as it examines a theme that has been little explored in Brazil, a quantitative approach was adopted and a survey was used as the data collection technique, supported by a research instrument with questions on aspects like: interest in and use of research; study and development of themes; means to disseminate the research; and causes of the gap betwe...

  14. USING RESEARCH METHODS IN HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION TO DESIGN TECHNOLOGY FOR RESILIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Arminda Guerra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Research in human computer interaction (HCI) covers both technological and human behavioural concerns. As a consequence, the contributions made in HCI research tend to be aware to either engineering or the social sciences. In HCI the purpose of practical research contributions is to reveal unknown insights about human behaviour and its relationship to technology. Practical research methods normally used in HCI include formal experiments, field experiments, field studies, interviews, ...

  15. Research progress in machine learning methods for gene-gene interaction detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhe-Ye; Tang, Zi-Jun; Xie, Min-Zhu

    2018-03-20

    Complex diseases are results of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. However, the detection of high-dimensional gene-gene interactions is computationally challenging. In the last two decades, machine-learning approaches have been developed to detect gene-gene interactions with some successes. In this review, we summarize the progress in research on machine learning methods, as applied to gene-gene interaction detection. It systematically examines the principles and limitations of the current machine learning methods used in genome wide association studies (GWAS) to detect gene-gene interactions, such as neural networks (NN), random forest (RF), support vector machines (SVM) and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), and provides some insights on the future research directions in the field.

  16. Research Techniques Made Simple: Emerging Methods to Elucidate Protein Interactions through Spatial Proximity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yonglu; Khavari, Paul A

    2017-12-01

    Interactions between proteins are essential for fundamental cellular processes, and the diversity of such interactions enables the vast variety of functions essential for life. A persistent goal in biological research is to develop assays that can faithfully capture different types of protein interactions to allow their study. A major step forward in this direction came with a family of methods that delineates spatial proximity of proteins as an indirect measure of protein-protein interaction. A variety of enzyme- and DNA ligation-based methods measure protein co-localization in space, capturing novel interactions that were previously too transient or low affinity to be identified. Here we review some of the methods that have been successfully used to measure spatially proximal protein-protein interactions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Interactive Research on Innovations in Vocational Education and Training (VET): Lessons from Dutch and German Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchert, Joanna; Hoeve, Aimée; Kämäräinen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on two examples of interactive research (IR) in vocational education and training. IR is a process which brings together practitioners and researchers with the aim to implement an innovation. This innovation in the first project meant to create a hybrid learning environment; in the second it supported introducing digital media…

  18. Secondary Students' Perceptions of an Interactive Mathematics Review Program: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingard, Crystal Burroughs

    2017-01-01

    The present action research study describes an Interactive Mathematics Review Program (IMRP) developed by the participant-researcher to enable remedial algebra students to learn in a cooperative classroom with pedagogy that promoted collaboration and hands-on, active learning. Data are comprised of surveys, field notes, semi-structured interviews,…

  19. The Global Interaction Research Initiative at the IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bjørn, Pernille; Glenstrup, Arne John

    2011-01-01

    This showcase paper describes the Global Interaction Research Initiative – GIRI – recently inaugurated at the IT University of Copenhagen. It presents the motivation for this initiative, namely that the use of information technology is the core enabling factor for global collaboration and business...... initiative, and we invite other researchers to join....

  20. Researching Classroom Interaction in the light of social justice. : [paper presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolina Montesano-Montessori; Prof.Dr. Petra Ponte

    2010-01-01

    A research into classroom interaction (behaviour and communication) between teachers and pupils in the light of social justice. The research is based on the concern that educational praxis, defined as 'practice which implies a conscious awareness of the practitioners that their actions are morally

  1. The Effect Of Beryllium Interaction With Fast Neutrons On the Reactivity Of ETRR-2 Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, M.; El Messiry, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of beryllium interactions with fast neutrons is studied for Etrr 2 research reactors. Isotope build up inside beryllium blocks is calculated under different irradiation times. a new model for the Etrr 2 research reactor is designed using MCNP code to calculate the reactivity and flux change of the reactor due to beryllium poison

  2. Video elicitation interviews: a qualitative research method for investigating physician-patient interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Stephen G; Fetters, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    We describe the concept and method of video elicitation interviews and provide practical guidance for primary care researchers who want to use this qualitative method to investigate physician-patient interactions. During video elicitation interviews, researchers interview patients or physicians about a recent clinical interaction using a video recording of that interaction as an elicitation tool. Video elicitation is useful because it allows researchers to integrate data about the content of physician-patient interactions gained from video recordings with data about participants' associated thoughts, beliefs, and emotions gained from elicitation interviews. This method also facilitates investigation of specific events or moments during interactions. Video elicitation interviews are logistically demanding and time consuming, and they should be reserved for research questions that cannot be fully addressed using either standard interviews or video recordings in isolation. As many components of primary care fall into this category, high-quality video elicitation interviews can be an important method for understanding and improving physician-patient interactions in primary care.

  3. Video Elicitation Interviews: A Qualitative Research Method for Investigating Physician-Patient Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Stephen G.; Fetters, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the concept and method of video elicitation interviews and provide practical guidance for primary care researchers who want to use this qualitative method to investigate physician-patient interactions. During video elicitation interviews, researchers interview patients or physicians about a recent clinical interaction using a video recording of that interaction as an elicitation tool. Video elicitation is useful because it allows researchers to integrate data about the content of physician-patient interactions gained from video recordings with data about participants’ associated thoughts, beliefs, and emotions gained from elicitation interviews. This method also facilitates investigation of specific events or moments during interactions. Video elicitation interviews are logistically demanding and time consuming, and they should be reserved for research questions that cannot be fully addressed using either standard interviews or video recordings in isolation. As many components of primary care fall into this category, high-quality video elicitation interviews can be an important method for understanding and improving physician-patient interactions in primary care. PMID:22412003

  4. INTERINSTITUTIONAL COOPERATION: RESULTS INDICATORS OF INTERACTIONS OF VISITING RESEARCHERS IN HIGHER EDUCATION AND RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio Baron Mussi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to define a proposition for a characterization of indicators applicable to evaluate joint research results. In order to do that, literature on interinstitutional cooperation, exchange programs and indicators was assessed, and its guidelines, adopted. Ten cases were selected for evaluation, and the following procedures undertaken: visits to receptor institutions in several cities; visits to workplace where the subjected projects were being developed; interviews with project managers and visiting researchers; interviews with other personnel; review of the approved projects' official documentation collected during the previous steps; and a new contact with the respondents to clarify eventual doubts. Theoretically, this research contributes to the development of a proposal of a set of indicators to characterize and evaluate interdisciplinary cooperation between researchers from universities and distinct research institutes. Practical contributions to be mentioned are the information gathered that can help promotion agencies to improve their supporting edicts offered to scientific and technological development, as well as upgrading their evaluation systems regarding such actions.

  5. Characterising groundwater-dominated lowland catchments: the UK Lowland Catchment Research Programme (LOCAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a major UK initiative to address deficiencies in understanding the hydro-ecological response of groundwater-dominated lowland catchments. The scope and objectives of this national programme are introduced and focus on one of three sets of research basins – the Pang/Lambourn Chalk catchments, tributaries of the river Thames in southern England. The motivation for the research is the need to support integrated management of river systems that have high ecological value and are subject to pressures that include groundwater abstraction for water supply, diffuse pollution, and land use and climate change. An overview of the research programme is provided together with highlights of some current research findings concerning the hydrological functioning of these catchments. Despite the importance of the Chalk as a major UK aquifer, knowledge of the subsurface movement of water and solutes is poor. Solute transport in the dual porosity unsaturated zone depends on fracture/matrix interactions that are difficult to observe; current experimental and modelling research supports the predominance of matrix flow and suggests that slow migration of a time-history of decades of nutrient loading is occurring. Groundwater flows are complex; catchments vary seasonally and are ill-defined and karst features are locally important. Groundwater flow pathways are being investigated using natural and artificial geochemical tracers based on experimental borehole arrays; stream-aquifer interaction research is using a combination of geophysics, borehole array geochemistry and longitudinal profiles of stream flow and solutes. A complex picture of localised subsurface inflows, linked to geological controls and karst features, and significant longitudinal groundwater flow below the river channel is emerging. Management implications are discussed. Strategies to control surface application of nutrients are expected to have little effect on groundwater

  6. A qualitative analysis of an interactive online discussion by health professions educators on education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodar, Komaladevi S; Lingaraj, Jayalakshmi; Kumar, Latha R; Chacko, Thomas V

    2012-01-01

    In view of increasing demand for reforms in medical education in India, it is important to generate evidence through education research to increase the relevance and improve the quality of medical education. Education research is still at a nascent stage in India for a number of reasons. This study elicited health professions educators' views about the dearth of education research in Southeast Asia and what is needed to improve it. Qualitative content analysis of an interactive, online discussion on 'education research' between PSG-FAIMER Regional Institute fellows and faculty was carried out. Forty-four health professionals exchanged approximately 492 email messages during the discussion. One main concern expressed within the group was that the medical curriculum was not in tune with the health care needs of the society and reforms in the curriculum should be based on research. Most fellows felt that their work in education research was not appreciated in their schools. Participants felt that education research was done for altruistic reasons and only by self-motivated faculty. Participants also said that regulatory bodies were not concerned about the quality of education and its related research. Measures that could improve education research also emerged during the discussions. Interactive online discussions elicited important issues about education research in India. Participants noted that there is no recognition or rewards to encourage faculty to conduct education research. They also said that there is need to educate faculty about changes elsewhere in medical education and to make them more aware of education research generally.

  7. You talkin' to me? Interactive playback is a powerful yet underused tool in animal communication research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stephanie L

    2015-07-01

    Over the years, playback experiments have helped further our understanding of the wonderful world of animal communication. They have provided fundamental insights into animal behaviour and the function of communicative signals in numerous taxa. As important as these experiments are, however, there is strong evidence to suggest that the information conveyed in a signal may only have value when presented interactively. By their very nature, signalling exchanges are interactive and therefore, an interactive playback design is a powerful tool for examining the function of such exchanges. While researchers working on frog and songbird vocal interactions have long championed interactive playback, it remains surprisingly underused across other taxa. The interactive playback approach is not limited to studies of acoustic signalling, but can be applied to other sensory modalities, including visual, chemical and electrical communication. Here, I discuss interactive playback as a potent yet underused technique in the field of animal behaviour. I present a concise review of studies that have used interactive playback thus far, describe how it can be applied, and discuss its limitations and challenges. My hope is that this review will result in more scientists applying this innovative technique to their own study subjects, as a means of furthering our understanding of the function of signalling interactions in animal communication systems. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Using Psycho-Physiological Interaction Analysis with fMRI-Data in IS Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Marco; Linzmajer, Marc; Riedl, René

    2017-01-01

    The integration of neuroscientific methods in Information Systems (IS) research to better understand how the brain interacts with IS-relevant context has gained in importance. Many papers that highlight the potential of neuroIS and that discuss methodological issues associated with using functional...... brain imaging already exist. However, neuroIS researchers have to keep in mind that the emergence of complex mental processes such as trust in IS contexts is based on activity in a network of brain regions rather than on activity in one area alone. Accordingly, we introduce psycho......-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis, a technique that one can use to analyze fMRI data. Specifically, we review how one can conduct PPI analysis, provide a concrete research example, and show how this analysis can inform IS trust research. Thus, we introduce neuroIS researchers working in the domain of functional...

  9. Development and use of interactive displays in real-time ground support research facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, Donald C.; Hammons, Kvin R.; Malone, Jacqueline C.; Nesel, Michael C.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) is one of the world's most advanced aeronautical research flight test support facilities. A variety of advanced and often unique real-time interactive displays has been developed for use in the mission control centers (MCC) to support research flight and ground testing. These dispalys consist of applications operating on systems described as real-time interactive graphics super workstations and real-time interactive PC/AT compatible workstations. This paper reviews these two types of workstations and the specific applications operating on each display system. The applications provide examples that demonstrate overall system capability applicable for use in other ground-based real-time research/test facilities.

  10. A STUDY ON THE INTERACTION BETWEEN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTING PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Batista da Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the interaction between scientific research and professional accounting practice. In this exploratory study, as it examines a theme that has been little explored in Brazil, a quantitative approach was adopted and a survey was used as the data collection technique, supported by a research instrument with questions on aspects like: interest in and use of research; study and development of themes; means to disseminate the research; and causes of the gap between research and practice. Considering the objectives, it is classified as descriptive, since it was described how this interaction occurs. Data were analyze through factor analysis in R, resuming them in factors for further analysis, validated through the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO test and Bartlett’s sphericity yet. In conclusion, due to their different characteristics, it is natural that some distancing exists between research and accounting practice. This can be minimized though, among other factors, through professionals’ great interest in knowing and applying the research results in practice, and also by confirming that the most researched themes in accountancy are the themes of greatest interest in accounting professionals’ opinion. These results suggest that greater attention is due to the interaction and communication between the academy and accounting professionals, with a view to greater efficacy.

  11. New Module to Simulate Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions in Small-Scale Alluvial Aquifer System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, L.

    2017-12-01

    Streamflow depletion can occur when groundwater pumping wells lower water table elevations adjacent to a nearby stream. Being able to accurately model the severity of this process is of critical importance in semi-arid regions where groundwater-surface water interactions affect water rights and the sustainability of water resource practices. The finite-difference flow model MODFLOW is currently the standard for estimating groundwater-surface water interactions in many regions in the western United States. However, certain limitations of the model persist when highly-resolved spatial scales are used to represent the stream-aquifer system, e.g. when the size of computational grid cells is much less than the river width. In this study, an external module is developed and linked with MODFLOW that (1) allows for multiple computational grid cells over the width of the river; (2) computes streamflow and stream stage along the length of the river using the one-dimensional (1D) steady (over a stress period) shallow water equations, which allows for more accurate stream stages when normal flow cannot be assumed or a rating curve is not available; and (3) incorporates a process for computing streamflow loss when an unsaturated zone develops under the streambed. Use of the module not only provides highly-resolved estimates of streamflow depletion, but also of streambed hydraulic conductivity. The new module is applied to the stream-aquifer alluvial system along the South Platte River south of Denver, Colorado, with results tested against field-measured groundwater levels, streamflow, and streamflow depletion.

  12. Education Program for Doctoral Researchers by Industrial-Government-Academic Cooperation and Interaction between Different Research Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Kazuya; Sawaragi, Tetsuo; Hasebe, Shinji; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    New education program to train graduate students and postdoctoral researchers who can be good leaders in a variety of social fields by cooperation of graduate school of engineering and pharmaceutical sciences is conducted as an advanced activity in Kyoto University. This program consists of four sub-programs and the educational effect by the collaboration of industry-government-academic and the interaction between dissimilar research fields is described in this paper. Trainees in this program acquire the ability to understand objectively one’ s research from comprehensive point of view and to debate with researchers in different fields. This program supports them to become ‘Global Leaders’ who play an important role internationally in advanced technology.

  13. Neuroplasticity of selective attention: Research foundations and preliminary evidence for a gene by intervention interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Courtney; Pakulak, Eric; Hampton Wray, Amanda; Bell, Theodore A.; Neville, Helen J.

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the trajectory of our research program on selective attention, which has moved from basic research on the neural processes underlying selective attention to translational studies using selective attention as a neurobiological target for evidence-based interventions. We use this background to present a promising preliminary investigation of how genetic and experiential factors interact during development (i.e., gene × intervention interactions). Our findings provide evidence on how exposure to a family-based training can modify the associations between genotype (5-HTTLPR) and the neural mechanisms of selective attention in preschool children from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds. PMID:28819066

  14. Neuroplasticity of selective attention: Research foundations and preliminary evidence for a gene by intervention interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbell, Elif; Stevens, Courtney; Pakulak, Eric; Hampton Wray, Amanda; Bell, Theodore A; Neville, Helen J

    2017-08-29

    This article reviews the trajectory of our research program on selective attention, which has moved from basic research on the neural processes underlying selective attention to translational studies using selective attention as a neurobiological target for evidence-based interventions. We use this background to present a promising preliminary investigation of how genetic and experiential factors interact during development (i.e., gene × intervention interactions). Our findings provide evidence on how exposure to a family-based training can modify the associations between genotype (5-HTTLPR) and the neural mechanisms of selective attention in preschool children from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds.

  15. Using Interactive Technology to Disseminate Research Findings to a Diverse Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Stockley

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates how case stories can be used to disseminate the findings of several case studies on negotiating accommodations in the workplace. It highlights the power of interactive technology and of the partnership between the researchers and the Canadian Council for Rehabilitation and Work (CCRW. The paper describes the process of designing an interactive web-based case story for the purpose of disseminating research findings. The interactive case story is an extension of both the case study and the narrative case story. As part of a larger research project, it is our goal to use interactive case stories to investigate the impact of essential skills training on workers with disabilities who negotiate with employers for workplace accommodations. Résumé Le présent article montre comment les histoires de cas peuvent être utilisées pour diffuser les conclusions de plusieurs études de cas sur la négociation entourant l’aménagement du milieu de travail. Il met en évidence le pouvoir de la technologie interactive et du partenariat entre les chercheurs et le Conseil canadien de la réadaptation et du travail (CCRT. L’article décrit le processus de conception d’une histoire de cas interactive en ligne visant à diffuser des résultats de recherche. L’histoire de cas interactive est un prolongement à la fois de l’étude de cas et du récit de l’histoire de cas. Dans le cadre d’un plus vaste projet de recherche, notre but est d’utiliser des histoires de cas interactives pour étudier l’impact de la formation sur les compétences essentielles chez les travailleurs handicapés qui négocient avec leur employeur pour l’aménagement de leur milieu de travail.

  16. Data on the interaction between thermal comfort and building control research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, June Young; Nagy, Zoltan

    2018-04-01

    This dataset contains bibliography information regarding thermal comfort and building control research. In addition, the instruction of a data-driven literature survey method guides readers to reproduce their own literature survey on related bibliography datasets. Based on specific search terms, all relevant bibliographic datasets are downloaded. We explain the keyword co-occurrences of historical developments and recent trends, and the citation network which represents the interaction between thermal comfort and building control research. Results and discussions are described in the research article entitled "Comprehensive analysis of the relationship between thermal comfort and building control research - A data-driven literature review" (Park and Nagy, 2018).

  17. Human machine interaction research experience and perspectives as seen from the OECD Halden Reactor Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oewre, F.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a short review is given on important safety issues in the field of human machine interaction as expressed by important nuclear organisations such as USNRC, IAEA and the OECD NEA. Further on, a presentation is offered of research activities at the OECD Halden Reactor Project in the field of human machine interaction aiming to clarify some of the issues outlined by the above mentioned organisations. The OECD Halden Reactor Project is a joint undertaking of national nuclear organisations in 19 countries sponsoring a jointly financed research programme under the auspices of the OECD - Nuclear Energy Agency. One of the research areas is the man-machine systems research addressing the operator tasks in a control room environment. The overall objective is to provide a basis for improving today's control rooms through introduction of computer-based solutions for effective and safe execution of surveillance and control functions in normal as well as off-normal plant situations. (author)

  18. A new research trend in social neuroscience: Towards an interactive-brain neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Pelowski, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    The ability to flexibly modulate our behaviors in social contexts and to successfully interact with other persons is a fundamental, but pivotal, requirement for human survival. Although previous social neuroscience research with single individuals has contributed greatly to our understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying social perception and social emotions, much of the dynamic nature of interactions between persons remains beyond the reach of single-brain studies. This has led to a growing argument for a shift to the simultaneous measurement of the brain activity of two or more individuals in realistic social interactions-an approach termed "hyperscanning." Although this approach offers important promise in unlocking the brain's role in truly social situations, there are multiple procedural and theoretical questions that require review and analysis. In this paper we discuss this research trend from four aspects: hyperscanning apparatus, experimental task, quantification method, and theoretical interpretation. We also give four suggestions for future research: (a) electroencephalography and near-infrared spectroscopy are useful tools by which to explore the interactive brain in more ecological settings; (b) games are an appropriate method to simulate daily life interactions; (c) transfer entropy may be an important method by which to quantify directed exchange of information between brains; and (d) more explanation is needed of the results of interbrain synchronization itself. © 2014 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Terminology for the body in social interaction, as appearing in papers published in the journal 'Research on Language and Social Interaction', 1987-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard

    2016-01-01

    This is a list of terms referring generally to the body in descriptions and analyses of social interaction, as used by authors in papers published in ROLSI. The list includes over 200 items, grouped according to common phrasing and within alphabetical order. The list was compiled in preparation...... for the review paper: Nevile, M. (2015) The embodied turn in research on language and social interaction. Research on Language and Social Interaction,48(2): 121-151....

  20. TECHNIQUES AND ALGORITHMS OF INTERACTIVE AUGMENTED REALITY VISUALIZATION: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Kravtsov A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The author performed a research with the purpose of improving visualization of three-dimensional objects by means of augmented reality technology with the use of massively available mobile devices as a platform. This article summarizes the main results and provides suggestions for future research. Since graphical user interfaces made it to the consumer market about 30 years ago, interaction with the computer has not changed significantly. The focus of current user interface techniques is only...

  1. How Do Interaction Experiences Influence Doctoral Students’ Academic Pursuits in Biomedical Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiaoqing; Chakraverty, Devasmita; Jeffe, Donna B.; Andriole, Dorothy A.; Wathington, Heather D.; Tai, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study investigated how doctoral students reported their personal and professional interaction experiences that they believed might facilitate or impede their academic pursuits in biomedical research. We collected 19 in-depth interviews with doctoral students in biomedical research from eight universities, and we based our qualitative analytic approach on the work of Miles and Huberman. The results indicated that among different sources and types of interaction, academic and emotional interactions from family and teachers in various stages essentially affected students’ persistence in the biomedical science field. In addition, co-mentorship among peers, departmental environment, and volunteer experiences were other essential factors. This study also found related experiences among women and underrepresented minority students that were important to their academic pursuit. PMID:26166928

  2. How Do Interaction Experiences Influence Doctoral Students' Academic Pursuits in Biomedical Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiaoqing; Chakraverty, Devasmita; Jeffe, Donna B; Andriole, Dorothy A; Wathington, Heather D; Tai, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study investigated how doctoral students reported their personal and professional interaction experiences that they believed might facilitate or impede their academic pursuits in biomedical research. We collected 19 in-depth interviews with doctoral students in biomedical research from eight universities, and we based our qualitative analytic approach on the work of Miles and Huberman. The results indicated that among different sources and types of interaction, academic and emotional interactions from family and teachers in various stages essentially affected students' persistence in the biomedical science field. In addition, co-mentorship among peers, departmental environment, and volunteer experiences were other essential factors. This study also found related experiences among women and underrepresented minority students that were important to their academic pursuit.

  3. Report of the 1991 workshop on particle-material interactions for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The Annual Workshop on Particle-Material Interactions in the Working Group of the Research Committee on A and M Data was held at the head-quarters of JAERI, Tokyo, on December 12-13, 1991. The purpose of the Workshop was to obtain future prospects for the activities of the Working Group, by discussing current states and problems in the research on particle-material interactions relevant to the thermocontrolled fusion. The present report contains 16 papers presented at the Workshop, which are mainly concerned with plasma-facing materials in ITER, radiation damage in carbon materials, trapping, emission and permeation of hydrogen in metals, and heavy ion-solid surface interactions. (author)

  4. Visualisation and research strategy for computational spatial and structural design interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeten, D.; Hofmeyer, H.; Thabet, W

    2010-01-01

    A research engine is under development for studying the interaction of spatial and structural design processes. The design processes are being implemented as two separate configurable transformation steps; a conversion step and an optimisation step. A significant part of the spatial-to-structural

  5. Interactive Poster Survey Study of ACS Members' Knowledge and Needs on Research Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrouk, Patricia Ann; Schelble, Susan M.

    2018-01-01

    An interactive poster exhibited at two poster sessions at the Fall 2016 American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meeting was used as a vehicle to learn about ACS members' concerns and needs related to research ethics and to identify opportunities for engagement of the Society by the Committee on Ethics (ETHX) and others in terms of ethics…

  6. Effective Online Interaction: Mapping Course Design to Bridge from Research to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative research of a case study course confirmed that the course achieved a highly interactive learning experience, associated with more effective student support and high student retention. Computer conferencing achieved high participation from the beginning and evidence of dialogue and argumentation within online tutor…

  7. Soil fauna-microbe interactions: towards a conceptual framework for research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassall, M.; Adl, S.; Berg, M.P.; Griffiths, B.; Scheu, S.

    2006-01-01

    We explore the potential for applying broad ecological theories to interactions between soil animals and micro-organisms to generate a predictive framework within which more hypothesis led research can be undertaken. The paper stems from discussions during a workshop at the XIVth International

  8. Researching Online Foreign Language Interaction and Exchange: Theories, Methods and Challenges. Telecollaboration in Education. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooly, Melinda; O'Dowd, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book provides an accessible introduction to some of the methods and theoretical approaches for investigating foreign language (FL) interaction and exchange in online environments. Research approaches which can be applied to Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) are outlined, followed by discussion of the way in which tools and techniques for…

  9. Using Interactive "Shiny" Applications to Facilitate Research-Informed Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Lee

    2018-01-01

    In this article we discuss our attempt to incorporate research-informed learning and teaching activities into a final year undergraduate Statistics course. We make use of the Shiny web-based application framework for R to develop "Shiny apps" designed to help facilitate student interaction with methods from recently published papers in…

  10. The Representation of Human-Environment Interactions in Land Change Research and Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg, P.H.; Manfredo, M.J.; Vaske, J.J.; Rechkemmer, A.; Duke, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Land change is the result of multiple human-environment interactions operating across different scales. Land change research needs to account for processes ranging from global trade of food and energy to the local management of land resources at farm and landscape level. Land change has a pronounced

  11. A Study of Interactional Metadiscourse in English Abstracts of Chinese Economics Research Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Huang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    This study adopts the revised interpersonal model of metadiscourse to discover whether and to what extent Chinese authors employ a varying amount of Interactional Metadiscourse (IM) in the past decade in English abstracts of economics Research Articles (RAs). The data was drawn from a prestigious economics journal in China to compose a corpus of…

  12. The Relationship between Passibility, Agency and Social Interaction and Its Relevance for Research and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, Susan A.; Ma, Jasmine Y.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction analysis presented by Kim and Roth examines nine students, their teachers, the learning task and materials in a mixed second and third grade science classroom during the school day. In the research narrative readers are introduced to two resourceful and creative groups of students as they work on a task assigned by their…

  13. 40 Years of research at Risoe: A platform for the future - interacting with industry and society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosendahl, Lis; Lading, Lars [eds.

    1998-08-01

    Risoe`s 40th anniversary was celebrated June 3, 1998 by a symposium held at Risoe. The interaction of research at Risoe with academia and industry was presented in both national and international perspective. Most of the presentations are in English, a few in Danish. (au)

  14. Augmented reality as a tool for linguistic research: Intercepting and manipulating multimodal interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Pitsch, Karola; Neumann, Alexander; Schnier, Christian; Hermann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We suggest that an Augmented Reality (AR) system for coupled interaction partners provides a new tool for linguistic research that allows to manipulate the coparticipants’ real-time perception and action. It encompasses novel facilities for recording heterogeneous sensor-rich data sets to be accessed in parallel with qualitative/manual and quantitative/computational methods.

  15. Parent-child mediated learning interactions as determinants of cognitive modifiability: recent research and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzuriel, D

    1999-05-01

    The main objectives of this article are to describe the effects of mediated learning experience (MLE) strategies in mother-child interactions on the child's cognitive modifiability, the effects of distal factors (e.g., socioeconomic status, mother's intelligence, child's personality) on MLE interactions, and the effects of situational variables on MLE processes. Methodological aspects of measurement of MLE interactions and of cognitive modifiability, using a dynamic assessment approach, are discussed. Studies with infants showed that the quality of mother-infant MLE interactions predict later cognitive functioning and that MLE patterns and children's cognitive performance change as a result of intervention programs. Studies with preschool and school-aged children showed that MLE interactions predict cognitive modifiability and that distal factors predict MLE interactions but not the child's cognitive modifiability. The child's cognitive modifiability was predicted by MLE interactions in a structured but not in a free-play situation. Mediation for transcendence (e.g., teaching rules and generalizations) appeared to be the strongest predictor of children's cognitive modifiability. Discussion of future research includes the consideration of a holistic transactional approach, which refers to MLE processes, personality, and motivational-affective factors, the cultural context of mediation, perception of the whole family as a mediational unit, and the "mediational normative scripts."

  16. The importance of symbolic interaction in grounded theory research on women's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, D L

    2001-01-01

    A variety of grounded theory studies are presented in this issue of Health Care for Women International that attend to different factors and situations impacting women's health. In this paper I will provide the basic principles of symbolic interactionism (SI) for the reader unfamiliar with the conceptual underpinnings of the grounded theory research method. I will discuss why SI is a fitting perspective for use in the study of women, women's perspectives, and women's health. I will conclude with a brief discussion of challenges to researchers maintaining the symbolic interaction perspective in grounded theory research.

  17. Study on interaction of swift cluster ion beam with matter and irradiation effect (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yuichi; Shibata, Hiromi

    2010-07-01

    This review covers results of the 'Study of interaction on swift cluster ion beam with matter and irradiation effect' supported by the Interorganization Atomic Energy Research Program from 2006FY to 2008FY. It is composed of a research abstract for each sub-group with viewgraphs which were presented at the group meeting held on March 2009 or 'Meeting of High LET radiation -From fundamental study among physics, chemistry and biology to medical applications-' sponsored by Japan Society of Radiation Chemistry, cosponsored by this research group. (author)

  18. Active Learning in PhysicsTechnology and Research-based Techniques Emphasizing Interactive Lecture Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    Physics education research has shown that learning environments that engage students and allow them to take an active part in their learning can lead to large conceptual gains compared to traditional instruction. Examples of successful curricula and methods include Peer Instruction, Just in Time Teaching, RealTime Physics, Workshop Physics, Scale-Up, and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs). An active learning environment is often difficult to achieve in lecture sessions. This presentation will demonstrate the use of sequences of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs) that use real experiments often involving real-time data collection and display combined with student interaction to create an active learning environment in large or small lecture classes. Interactive lecture demonstrations will be done in the area of mechanics using real-time motion probes and the Visualizer. A video tape of students involved in interactive lecture demonstrations will be shown. The results of a number of research studies at various institutions (including international) to measure the effectiveness of ILDs and guided inquiry conceptual laboratories will be presented.

  19. Plant Virus–Insect Vector Interactions: Current and Potential Future Research Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzgen, Ralf G.; Mann, Krin S.; Johnson, Karyn N.

    2016-01-01

    Acquisition and transmission by an insect vector is central to the infection cycle of the majority of plant pathogenic viruses. Plant viruses can interact with their insect host in a variety of ways including both non-persistent and circulative transmission; in some cases, the latter involves virus replication in cells of the insect host. Replicating viruses can also elicit both innate and specific defense responses in the insect host. A consistent feature is that the interaction of the virus with its insect host/vector requires specific molecular interactions between virus and host, commonly via proteins. Understanding the interactions between plant viruses and their insect host can underpin approaches to protect plants from infection by interfering with virus uptake and transmission. Here, we provide a perspective focused on identifying novel approaches and research directions to facilitate control of plant viruses by better understanding and targeting virus–insect molecular interactions. We also draw parallels with molecular interactions in insect vectors of animal viruses, and consider technical advances for their control that may be more broadly applicable to plant virus vectors. PMID:27834855

  20. FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES WORKSHOP ON PLASMA MATERIALS INTERACTIONS: Report on Science Challenges and Research Opportunities in Plasma Materials Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maingi, Rajesh [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Zinkle, Steven J. [University of Tennessee – Knoxville; Foster, Mark S. [U.S. Department of Energy

    2015-05-01

    The realization of controlled thermonuclear fusion as an energy source would transform society, providing a nearly limitless energy source with renewable fuel. Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, the Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) program management recently launched a series of technical workshops to “seek community engagement and input for future program planning activities” in the targeted areas of (1) Integrated Simulation for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences, (2) Control of Transients, (3) Plasma Science Frontiers, and (4) Plasma-Materials Interactions aka Plasma-Materials Interface (PMI). Over the past decade, a number of strategic planning activities1-6 have highlighted PMI and plasma facing components as a major knowledge gap, which should be a priority for fusion research towards ITER and future demonstration fusion energy systems. There is a strong international consensus that new PMI solutions are required in order for fusion to advance beyond ITER. The goal of the 2015 PMI community workshop was to review recent innovations and improvements in understanding the challenging PMI issues, identify high-priority scientific challenges in PMI, and to discuss potential options to address those challenges. The community response to the PMI research assessment was enthusiastic, with over 80 participants involved in the open workshop held at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory on May 4-7, 2015. The workshop provided a useful forum for the scientific community to review progress in scientific understanding achieved during the past decade, and to openly discuss high-priority unresolved research questions. One of the key outcomes of the workshop was a focused set of community-initiated Priority Research Directions (PRDs) for PMI. Five PRDs were identified, labeled A-E, which represent community consensus on the most urgent near-term PMI scientific issues. For each PRD, an assessment was made of the scientific challenges, as well as a set of actions

  1. PERSUASION, INTERACTION AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF KNOWLEDGE: REPRESENTING SELF AND OTHERS IN RESEARCH WRITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Hyland

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available It is now increasingly accepted that academic knowledge is closely related to the social practices of academic communities, and particularly to their discourses. Texts are persuasive only when they employ rhetorical conventions that colleagues find convincing, and in recent years corpus analyses have helped to underpin this social constructivist position and to reveal some of the ways this is achieved. In this paper I discuss the role of interaction in this process. Based on an analysis of 240 published research papers from eight disciplines and insider informant interviews, I explore the nature of interactive persuasion in this genre. I show here the importance of interaction in academic argument, suggest some of the ways this is achieved, and indicate how these choices reflect and construct disciplinary communities.

  2. Seven Years after the Manifesto: Literature Review and Research Directions for Technologies in Animal Computer Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyena Hirskyj-Douglas

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available As technologies diversify and become embedded in everyday lives, the technologies we expose to animals, and the new technologies being developed for animals within the field of Animal Computer Interaction (ACI are increasing. As we approach seven years since the ACI manifesto, which grounded the field within Human Computer Interaction and Computer Science, this thematic literature review looks at the technologies developed for (non-human animals. Technologies that are analysed include tangible and physical, haptic and wearable, olfactory, screen technology and tracking systems. The conversation explores what exactly ACI is whilst questioning what it means to be animal by considering the impact and loop between machine and animal interactivity. The findings of this review are expected to form the first grounding foundation of ACI technologies informing future research in animal computing as well as suggesting future areas for exploration.

  3. Integrating Micro-level Interactions with Social Network Analysis in Tie Strength Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torre, Osku; Gupta, Jayesh Prakash; Kärkkäinen, Hannu

    2017-01-01

    of tie strength based on reciprocal interaction from publicly available Facebook data, and suggest that this approach could work as a basis for further tie strength studies. Our approach makes use of weak tie theory, and enables researchers to study micro-level interactions (i.e. discussions, messages......A social tie is a target for ongoing, high-level scientific debate. Measuring the tie strength in social networks has been an important topic for academic studies since Mark Granovetter's seminal papers in 1970's. However, it is still a problematic issue mainly for two reasons: 1) existing tie...... strengthening process in online social networks. Therefore, we suggest a new approach to tie strength research, which focuses on studying communication patterns (edges) more rather than actors (nodes) in a social network. In this paper we build a social network analysis-based approach to enable the evaluation...

  4. Web-based (HTML5) interactive graphics for fusion research and collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, E.N., E-mail: kimny@fusion.gat.com [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA (United States); Schissel, D.P.; Abla, G.; Flanagan, S.; Lee, X. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interactive data visualization is supported via the Web without a browser plugin and provides users easy, real-time access to data of different types from various locations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crosshair, zoom, pan as well as toggling dimensionality and a slice bar for multi-dimensional data are available. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Data with PHP API can be applied: MDSplus and SQL have been tested. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modular in design, this has been deployed to support both the experimental and the simulation research arenas. - Abstract: With the continuing development of web technologies, it is becoming feasible for websites to operate a lot like a scientific desktop application. This has opened up more possibilities for utilizing the web browser for interactive scientific research and providing new means of on-line communication and collaboration. This paper describes the research and deployment for utilizing these enhanced web graphics capabilities on the fusion research tools which has led to a general toolkit that can be deployed as required. It allows users to dynamically create, interact with and share with others, the large sets of data generated by the fusion experiments and simulations. Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP), a general-purpose scripting language for the Web, is used to process a series of inputs, and determine the data source types and locations to fetch and organize the data. Protovis, a Javascript and SVG based web graphics package, then quickly draws the interactive graphs and makes it available to the worldwide audience. This toolkit has been deployed to both the simulation and experimental arenas. The deployed applications will be presented as well as the architecture and technologies used in producing the general graphics toolkit.

  5. Web-based (HTML5) interactive graphics for fusion research and collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.N.; Schissel, D.P.; Abla, G.; Flanagan, S.; Lee, X.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Interactive data visualization is supported via the Web without a browser plugin and provides users easy, real-time access to data of different types from various locations. ► Crosshair, zoom, pan as well as toggling dimensionality and a slice bar for multi-dimensional data are available. ► Data with PHP API can be applied: MDSplus and SQL have been tested. ► Modular in design, this has been deployed to support both the experimental and the simulation research arenas. - Abstract: With the continuing development of web technologies, it is becoming feasible for websites to operate a lot like a scientific desktop application. This has opened up more possibilities for utilizing the web browser for interactive scientific research and providing new means of on-line communication and collaboration. This paper describes the research and deployment for utilizing these enhanced web graphics capabilities on the fusion research tools which has led to a general toolkit that can be deployed as required. It allows users to dynamically create, interact with and share with others, the large sets of data generated by the fusion experiments and simulations. Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP), a general-purpose scripting language for the Web, is used to process a series of inputs, and determine the data source types and locations to fetch and organize the data. Protovis, a Javascript and SVG based web graphics package, then quickly draws the interactive graphs and makes it available to the worldwide audience. This toolkit has been deployed to both the simulation and experimental arenas. The deployed applications will be presented as well as the architecture and technologies used in producing the general graphics toolkit.

  6. Interactions of Forests, Climate, Water Resources, and Humans in a Changing Environment: Research Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Ge; Segura, Catalina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the special issue “Interactions of Forests, Climate, Water Resources, and Humans in a Changing Environment” is to present case studies on the influences of natural and human disturbances on forest water resources under a changing climate. Studies in this collection of six papers cover a wide range of geographic regions from Australia to Nigeria with spatial research scale spanning from a tree leaf, to a segment of forest road, and large basins with mixed land uses. T...

  7. How do we interact online? An approach to researching multidimensionality of online communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available If different dimensions of online interaction are neglected and/or unknowingly combined in a research study there is a risk of misleading results due to compensatory effect. With respect to the multidimensionality of online interaction, two substantially different types of online communication are defined - procreative and transmissional. The procreative online communication is understood as a person's tendency to use the internet as a space for social interaction, which essentially differs from using the internet transmissionally, as a peer-to-peer communication channel between people who are familiar with one another. The aim of this paper is to explore more deeply the procreative dimensions of online communication. Based on our conceptual framework, we defined three procreativity dimensions and developed an Online Procreativity Scale (OPS to measure them. The OPS has been validated through EFA and CFA and the three-dimensional structure has been confirmed. Using the OLS regression analyses we found that gender and psychological characteristics and social network sites (SNS use have diverse influence depending on the procreativity dimension under observation. Gender, city size, share of unfamiliar SNS friends and loneliness predicted willingness to interact with strangers, while the time spent on SNS predicted only the tendency to participate in public online interaction.

  8. Designing interactive systems to support and augment creativity - a roadmap for research and design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Peter; Halskov, Kim; Frich Pedersen, Jonas

    2018-01-01

    and developments, exemplary cases, and future initiatives to study and design systems and tools to augment creative practices. Participation in the workshop requires participants to contribute with a position paper on one of the above topics, and to read and comment on co-participants contributions before......The aims of the workshop are to examine and discuss the current state of research in designing interactive systems to support and augment creative work, and to outline a roadmap for future research initiatives. The workshop will explore methodological issues and approaches, overarching trends...

  9. Large-scale seismic test for soil-structure interaction research in Hualien, Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueshima, T.; Kokusho, T.; Okamoto, T.

    1995-01-01

    It is important to evaluate dynamic soil-structure interaction more accurately in the aseismic design of important facilities such as nuclear power plants. A large-scale model structure with about 1/4th of commercial nuclear power plants was constructed on the gravelly layers in seismically active Hualien, Taiwan. This international joint project is called 'the Hualien LSST Project', where 'LSST' is short for Large-Scale Seismic Test. In this paper, research tasks and responsibilities, the process of the construction work and research tasks along the time-line, main results obtained up to now, and so on in this Project are described. (J.P.N.)

  10. Using video-based observation research methods in primary care health encounters to evaluate complex interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asan, Onur; Montague, Enid

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of video-based observation research methods in primary care environment and highlight important methodological considerations and provide practical guidance for primary care and human factors researchers conducting video studies to understand patient-clinician interaction in primary care settings. We reviewed studies in the literature which used video methods in health care research, and we also used our own experience based on the video studies we conducted in primary care settings. This paper highlighted the benefits of using video techniques, such as multi-channel recording and video coding, and compared "unmanned" video recording with the traditional observation method in primary care research. We proposed a list that can be followed step by step to conduct an effective video study in a primary care setting for a given problem. This paper also described obstacles, researchers should anticipate when using video recording methods in future studies. With the new technological improvements, video-based observation research is becoming a promising method in primary care and HFE research. Video recording has been under-utilised as a data collection tool because of confidentiality and privacy issues. However, it has many benefits as opposed to traditional observations, and recent studies using video recording methods have introduced new research areas and approaches.

  11. The Ethics of Translational Science: Imagining Public Benefit in Gene-Environment Interaction Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L. Ackerman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical research is increasingly informed by expectations of “translation,” which call for the production of scientific knowledge that can be used to create services and products that improve health outcomes. In this paper, we ask how translation, in particular the idea of social responsibility, is understood and enacted in the post-genomic life sciences. Drawing on theories examining what constitutes “good science,” and interviews with 35 investigators who study the role of gene-environment interactions in the etiology of cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, we describe the dynamic and unsettled ethics of translational science through which the expected social value of scientific knowledge about complex disease causation is negotiated. To describe how this ethics is formed, we first discuss the politics of knowledge production in interdisciplinary research collectives. Researchers described a commitment to working across disciplines to examine a wide range of possible causes of disease, but they also pointed to persistent disciplinary and ontological divisions that rest on the dominance of molecular conceptions of disease risk. The privileging of molecular-level causation shapes and constrains the kinds of knowledge that can be created about gene-environment interactions. We then turn to scientists’ ideas about how this knowledge should be used, including personalized prevention strategies, targeted therapeutics, and public policy interventions. Consensus about the relative value of these anticipated translations was elusive, and many scientists agreed that gene-environment interaction research is part of a shift in biomedical research away from considering important social, economic, political and historical causes of disease and disease disparities. We conclude by urging more explicit engagement with questions about the ethics of translational science in the post-genomic life sciences. This would include a consideration

  12. Organizational Influences on Interdisciplinary Interactions during Research and Design of Large-Scale Complex Engineered Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Seifert, Colleen M.; Papalambros, Panos Y.

    2012-01-01

    The design of large-scale complex engineered systems (LaCES) such as an aircraft is inherently interdisciplinary. Multiple engineering disciplines, drawing from a team of hundreds to thousands of engineers and scientists, are woven together throughout the research, development, and systems engineering processes to realize one system. Though research and development (R&D) is typically focused in single disciplines, the interdependencies involved in LaCES require interdisciplinary R&D efforts. This study investigates the interdisciplinary interactions that take place during the R&D and early conceptual design phases in the design of LaCES. Our theoretical framework is informed by both engineering practices and social science research on complex organizations. This paper provides preliminary perspective on some of the organizational influences on interdisciplinary interactions based on organization theory (specifically sensemaking), data from a survey of LaCES experts, and the authors experience in the research and design. The analysis reveals couplings between the engineered system and the organization that creates it. Survey respondents noted the importance of interdisciplinary interactions and their significant benefit to the engineered system, such as innovation and problem mitigation. Substantial obstacles to interdisciplinarity are uncovered beyond engineering that include communication and organizational challenges. Addressing these challenges may ultimately foster greater efficiencies in the design and development of LaCES and improved system performance by assisting with the collective integration of interdependent knowledge bases early in the R&D effort. This research suggests that organizational and human dynamics heavily influence and even constrain the engineering effort for large-scale complex systems.

  13. Researching Primary Teachers' Professional Agency: Employing Interactive Ethnography to Overcome Reluctance to Teach Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jenny

    2017-09-01

    This paper provides a report of a case study on the professional agency of an experienced early years teacher, Sarah, who successfully embedded a chemical science program of teaching-learning for her students aged between 6 and 8. Interactive ethnography informs the research design, and discursive psychology provides the tools for the analysis of Sarah's speech acts for her positioning as a responsible agent. Reframing the problem of primary teacher reluctance to teach science in terms of primary teachers' professional agency using discursive psychology, this ontological study provides new insight into issues related to the provision of science education in primary schools and asks: How do primary teachers position themselves and others in relation to science curriculum and education? The research calls for research methodologies and reform efforts in primary science that are better grounded in the local moral orders of primary schools.

  14. Research on the Design of Visually Impaired Interactive Accessibility in Large Urban Public Transport System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiru

    2017-12-01

    In medieval times, due to people’s reliance on belief, public space of Christianity came into being. With the rise of secularization, religion gradually turned into private belief, and accordingly public space returned to private space. In the 21st century, due to people’s reliance on intelligent devices, information-interactive public space emerges, and as information interaction is constantly constraining the visually impaired, public space regressed to the exclusive space of limited people[1]. Modernity is marked by technical rationality, but an ensuing basic problem lies in the separation between human action, ethics and public space. When technology fails to overcome obstacles for a particular group, the gap between the burgeoning intelligent phenomena and the increasing ratio of visually impaired is also expanding, ultimately resulting in a growing number of “blind spots” in information-interactive space. Technological innovation not only promotes the development of the information industry, but also promotes the rapid development of the transportation industry. Traffic patterns are diversifying and diverging nowadays, but it’s a fatal blow for people with visually disabilities, Because they still can only experience the most traditional mode of transportation, sometimes even not go out. How to guarantee their interactive accessibility in large urban public transport system right, currently, is a very important research direction.

  15. Anthropology and Geosciences: Training and Collaboration Advancing Interdisciplinary Research of Human-environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondizio, E.; Moran, E.

    2005-05-01

    Over the past thirteen years the Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change (ACT) at Indiana University has pioneered the use of anthropological and environmental research approaches to address issues of land use change, and population-environment interaction, particularly in the Amazon. Our research and training objectives focus on how particular local populations manage resources and how those activities may be studied by integrating time-tested ethnographic methods, survey instruments, ecological field studies, and the spatial and temporal perspectives of remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems. The globalization of the environment crisis bears the risk of the research and training at universities being purely global or large scale in nature. This would fail to take into account the highly variable local causes of human activities or to discover sustainable solutions to the use, conservation, and restoration of human ecosystems. Our approach combines institutional and international collaboration, formal and hands-on laboratory and field activities developed within an interdisciplinary environment, but based on the strength of disciplinary programs. Over the past years, we have particularly emphasized collaboration between American and Brazilian scholars and students and intense work with local farmers and communities both during data collection and field research, as well as in returning data and results using different formats. In this paper, we address our experience, the challenges and advantages of theoretical and methodological development for students approaching interdisciplinary problems, innovations in linking levels of analysis, and new opportunities for international and collaborative training and research on human-environment interaction.

  16. Synthesis of qualitative linguistic research--a pilot review integrating and generalizing findings on doctor-patient interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Peter

    2011-03-01

    There is a broad range qualitative linguistic research (sequential analysis) on doctor-patient interaction that had only a marginal impact on clinical research and practice. At least in parts this is due to the lack of qualitative research synthesis in the field. Available research summaries are not systematic in their methodology. This paper proposes a synthesis methodology for qualitative, sequential analytic research on doctor-patient interaction. The presented methodology is not new but specifies standard methodology of qualitative research synthesis for sequential analytic research. This pilot review synthesizes twelve studies on German-speaking doctor-patient interactions, identifies 45 verbal actions of doctors and structures them in a systematics of eight interaction components. Three interaction components ("Listening", "Asking for information", and "Giving information") seem to be central and cover two thirds of the identified action types. This pilot review demonstrates that sequential analytic research can be synthesized in a consistent and meaningful way, thus providing a more comprehensive and unbiased integration of research. Future synthesis of qualitative research in the area of health communication research is very much needed. Qualitative research synthesis can support the development of quantitative research and of educational materials in medical training and patient training. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Frontiers of torenia research: innovative ornamental traits and study of ecological interaction networks through genetic engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Advances in research in the past few years on the ornamental plant torenia (Torenia spps.) have made it notable as a model plant on the frontier of genetic engineering aimed at studying ornamental characteristics and pest control in horticultural ecosystems. The remarkable advantage of torenia over other ornamental plant species is the availability of an easy and high-efficiency transformation system for it. Unfortunately, most of the current torenia research is still not very widespread, because this species has not become prominent as an alternative to other successful model plants such as Arabidopsis, snapdragon and petunia. However, nowadays, a more global view using not only a few selected models but also several additional species are required for creating innovative ornamental traits and studying horticultural ecosystems. We therefore introduce and discuss recent research on torenia, the family Scrophulariaceae, for secondary metabolite bioengineering, in which global insights into horticulture, agriculture and ecology have been advanced. Floral traits, in torenia particularly floral color, have been extensively studied by manipulating the flavonoid biosynthetic pathways in flower organs. Plant aroma, including volatile terpenoids, has also been genetically modulated in order to understand the complicated nature of multi-trophic interactions that affect the behavior of predators and pollinators in the ecosystem. Torenia would accordingly be of great use for investigating both the variation in ornamental plants and the infochemical-mediated interactions with arthropods. PMID:23803155

  18. Blogging in a biostatistics and research design graduate dental course: for learning or interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Tantawi, Maha M A

    2010-04-01

    The use of the Internet in health professions education has markedly increased in recent years. There is a need to understand the methods used by students to benefit from Internet-based teaching methods, especially those initially designed to promote social interaction such as blogs. This study describes how students used a blog in a biostatistics and research design graduate dental course. The aims of the blog were to offer exercises to train students for the exam and to enhance interaction among students and between students and instructor. Some features of the blog were modified to suit the course. Posts and comments were counted and classified by type, and their time statistics were analyzed. Students filled out a questionnaire to indicate whether and how exactly they used the blog or reasons for not using it. The relation between final exam scores and different methods of using the blog was assessed. Most of the posts were by the instructor offering exercises and model answers, whereas most of the comments were by students answering the exercises. Students were significantly more satisfied with blog uses related to interaction than with uses related to exercises (9.15+/-1.19, 8.73+/-1.34, P=0.001). The most frequently cited reason for not using the blog was lack of time. The most frequently reported method of using the blog was reading exercises and answers without actively contributing to the blog. Methods of using the blog significantly associated with higher scores in the final exam were actively contributing to the blog by posts or comments and interacting with colleagues. The main advantage of using the blog was promoting interaction between students and instructor, which is essential for the success of online learning in particular and adult learning in general.

  19. Present status of plasma-wall interactions research and materials development activities in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-08-01

    It is well known in the fusion engineering community that the plasma confinement performance in magnetic fusion devices is strongly affected by edge-plasma interactions with surface components. These plasma-material interactions (PMI) include fuel particle recycling and impurity generation both during normal and off-normal operation. To understand and then to control PMI effects, considerable effort has been made, particularly over the last decade in US, supported by Department of Energy, Division of Development and Technology. Also, because plasma-facing components are generally expected to receive significant amount of heat due to plasma bombardment and run-away electrons, materials must tolerate high-heat fluxes (HHF). The HHF-component research has been conducted in parallel with PMI research. One strong motivation for these research activities is that DT-burning experiments are currently planned in the Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor (TFTR) in early 1990s. Several different but mutually complementary approaches have been taken in the PMI+HHF research. The first approach is to conduct PMI experiments using toroidal fusion devices such as TFTR. The second one is to simulate elemental processes involved in PMI using ion beams and electron beams, etc. The last one but not least is to use non-tokamak plasma facilities. Along with these laboratory activities, new materials have been developed and evaluated from the PMI+HHF point of view. In this paper, several major PMI+HHF research facilities in US and their activities are briefly reviewed. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  20. A new research project on the interaction of the solid Earth and the Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Y.; Nishijima, J.; Kazama, T.; Nakamura, K.; Doi, K.; Suganuma, Y.; Okuno, J.; Araya, A.; Kaneda, H.; Aoyama, Y.

    2017-12-01

    A new research project of "Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas" funded by JSPS (Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) has recently been launched. The title of the project is "Giant reservoirs of heat/water/material: Global environmental changes driven by Southern Ocean and Antarctic Ice Sheet", and as a five years project, is aiming to establish a new research area for Antarctic environmental system science. The project consists of 7 research topics, including Antarctic ice sheet and Southern ocean sciences, new observation methodology, modeling and other interdisciplinary topics, and we are involved in the topic A02-2, "Interaction of the solid Earth and the Antarctic Ice Sheet". The Antarctic ice sheet, which relates to the global climate changes through the sea level rise and ocean circulation, is an essential element of the Earth system for predicting the future environment changes. Thus many studies of the ice sheet changes have been conducted by means of geomorphological, geological, geodetic surveys, as well as satellite gravimetry and satellite altimetry. For these studies, one of the largest uncertainties is the effects of GIA. Therefore, GIA as a key to investigate the interaction between the solid Earth and the ice sheet changes, we plan to conduct geomorphological, geological and geodetic surveys in the inland mountain areas and the coastal areas including the surrounding areas of a Japanese station Syowa in East Antarctica, where the in-situ data for constraining GIA models are very few. Combining these new observations with other in-site data, various satellite data and numerical modeling, we aim to estimating a precise GIA model, constructing a reliable ice melting history after the last glacial maximum and obtaining the viscoelastic structure of the Earth's interior. In the presentation, we also show the five years research plans as well. This study was partially supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 17H06321.

  1. Computational psychotherapy research: scaling up the evaluation of patient-provider interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imel, Zac E; Steyvers, Mark; Atkins, David C

    2015-03-01

    In psychotherapy, the patient-provider interaction contains the treatment's active ingredients. However, the technology for analyzing the content of this interaction has not fundamentally changed in decades, limiting both the scale and specificity of psychotherapy research. New methods are required to "scale up" to larger evaluation tasks and "drill down" into the raw linguistic data of patient-therapist interactions. In the current article, we demonstrate the utility of statistical text analysis models called topic models for discovering the underlying linguistic structure in psychotherapy. Topic models identify semantic themes (or topics) in a collection of documents (here, transcripts). We used topic models to summarize and visualize 1,553 psychotherapy and drug therapy (i.e., medication management) transcripts. Results showed that topic models identified clinically relevant content, including affective, relational, and intervention related topics. In addition, topic models learned to identify specific types of therapist statements associated with treatment-related codes (e.g., different treatment approaches, patient-therapist discussions about the therapeutic relationship). Visualizations of semantic similarity across sessions indicate that topic models identify content that discriminates between broad classes of therapy (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy vs. psychodynamic therapy). Finally, predictive modeling demonstrated that topic model-derived features can classify therapy type with a high degree of accuracy. Computational psychotherapy research has the potential to scale up the study of psychotherapy to thousands of sessions at a time. We conclude by discussing the implications of computational methods such as topic models for the future of psychotherapy research and practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) phenomena in reactor safety. Current understanding and future research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speis, T.P. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States); Basu, S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an account of the current understanding of fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) phenomena in the context of reactor safety. With increased emphasis on accident management and with emerging in-vessel core melt retention strategies for advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, recent interest in FCI has broadened to include an evaluation of potential threats to the integrity of reactor vessel lower head and ex-vessel structural support, as well as the role of FCI in debris quenching and coolability. The current understanding of FCI with regard to these issues is discussed, and future research needs to address the issues from a risk perspective are identified. (author)

  3. Frontal affinity chromatography: A unique research tool for biospecific interaction that promotes glycobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    KASAI, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Combination of bioaffinity and chromatography gave birth to affinity chromatography. A further combination with frontal analysis resulted in creation of frontal affinity chromatography (FAC). This new versatile research tool enabled detailed analysis of weak interactions that play essential roles in living systems, especially those between complex saccharides and saccharide-binding proteins. FAC now becomes the best method for the investigation of saccharide-binding proteins (lectins) from viewpoints of sensitivity, accuracy, and efficiency, and is contributing greatly to the development of glycobiology. It opened a door leading to deeper understanding of the significance of saccharide recognition in life. The theory is also concisely described. PMID:25169774

  4. Twenty Years of Creativity Research in Human-Computer Interaction: Current State and Future Directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich Pedersen, Jonas; Biskjaer, Michael Mose; Dalsgaard, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Creativity has been a growing topic within the ACM community since the 1990s. However, no clear overview of this trend has been offered. We present a thorough survey of 998 creativity-related publications in the ACM Digital Library collected using keyword search to determine prevailing approaches......, topics, and characteristics of creativity-oriented Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research. . A selected sample based on yearly citations yielded 221 publications, which were analyzed using constant comparison analysis. We found that HCI is almost exclusively responsible for creativity......-oriented publications; they focus on collaborative creativity rather than individual creativity; there is a general lack of definition of the term ‘creativity’; empirically based contributions are prevalent; and many publications focus on new tools, often developed by researchers. On this basis, we present three...

  5. Interaction of radiation with matter. Research progress report, November 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The mechanisms of dissipation of energy in organic and inorganic materials, and the application of the technique developed to a study of selected problems of environmental concern in the production of energy from fossil fuels were studied. In the Inorganic Phase of the work the research involves (1) measurements of cross-sections for K and L-shell ionization processes for heavy projectiles in the low velocity region, (2) experimental tests of target dependence of the effective-charge theory for light projectiles, (3) theoretical studies on the energy loss of swift particles in plasmas over a broad density and temperature range. The organic phase of the work falls into a series of closely related areas, all derived from a study of the interaction of radiation with matter. (1) New techniques for the study of small particulates (approx. 1μ); composition, mass (to +-1 pg) and charge (+-1 electron) can be determined. (2) External photoelectric effects as a tool in arriving at the electronic structure of organic crystals. (3) The interaction of water with charge carriers in organic crystals, producing reactive chemical species, such as Oh and HSO 3 radicals. (4) Mechanisms of interaction of air-pollutant polycyclic aromatic carcinogens with DNA and the study of the conformation of the adducts

  6. Interaction of radiation with matter. Research progress report, November 1, 1980-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    The project is concerned with the mechanism of dissipation of energy in organic and inorganic materials, and with the application of the techniques developed to a study of selected problems of environmental concern in the production of energy from fossil fuels. In the inorganic phase of this work the research involves: (1) measurements of cross-section for K and L-shell ionization processes for heavy projectiles in the low velocity region; (2) experimental tests of target dependence of the effective-stopping-power charge theory for light projectiles; and (3) theoretical studies on the energy loss of swift particles in plasmas over a broad density and temperature range. The organic phase of this work falls into a series of closely related areas, all derived from a study of the interaction of radiation with matter: (1) new techniques for the study of small particulates (1 μ); composition, mass (to +- 1 pg) and charge (+- 1 electron) can be determined; (2) external photoelectric effects as a tool in arriving at the electronic structure of organic crystals; (3) the interaction of water with charge carriers in organic crystals, producing reactive chemical species, such as OH and HSO 3 radicals; and (4) mechanisms of interaction of air-pollutant polycyclic aromatic carcinogens with DNA and the study of the conformation of the adducts

  7. Collaborative Research. Fundamental Science of Low Temperature Plasma-Biological Material Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David Barry [Univ. California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Oehrlein, Gottlieb [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Low temperature plasma (LTP) treatment of biological tissue is a promising path toward sterilization of bacteria due to its versatility and ability to operate under well-controlled and relatively mild conditions. The present collaborative research of an interdisciplinary team of investigators at University of Maryland, College Park (UMD), and University of California, Berkeley (UCB) focused on establishing our knowledge based with regard to low temperature plasma-induced chemical modifications in biomolecules that result in inactivation due to various plasma species, including ions, reactive radicals, and UV/VUV photons. The overall goals of the project were to identify and quantify the mechanisms by which low and atmospheric pressure plasma deactivates endotoxic biomolecules. Additionally, we wanted to understand the mechanism by which atmospheric pressure plasmas (APP) modify surfaces and how these modifications depend on the interaction of APP with the environment. Various low pressure plasma sources, a vacuum beam system and several atmospheric pressure plasma sources were used to accomplish this. In our work we elucidated for the first time the role of ions, VUV photons and radicals in biological deactivation of representative biomolecules, both in a UHV beam system and an inductively coupled, low pressure plasma system, and established the associated atomistic biomolecule changes. While we showed that both ions and VUV photons can be very efficient in deactivation of biomolecules, significant etching and/or deep modification (~200 nm) accompanied these biological effects. One of the most important findings in this work is the significant radical-induced deactivation and surface modification can occur with minimal etching. However, if radical fluxes and corresponding etch rates are relatively high, for example at atmospheric pressure, endotoxic biomolecule film inactivation may require near-complete removal of the film. These findings motivated further work at

  8. Few-Nucleon Research at TUNL: Probing Two- and Three-Nucleon Interactions with Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, C. R.; Tornow, W.; Witała, H.

    2016-03-01

    The central goal of few-nucleon research at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) is to perform measurements that contribute to advancing ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure and reactions. The program aims include evaluating theoretical treatments of few-nucleon reaction dynamics through strategically comparing theory predictions to data, determining properties of the neutron-neutron interaction that are not accessible in two-nucleon reactions, and searching for evidence of longrange features of three-nucleon interactions, e.g., spin and isospin dependence. This paper will review studies of three- and four-nucleon systems at TUNL conducted using unpolarized and polarized neutron beams. Measurements of neutron-induced reactions performed by groups at TUNL over the last six years are described in comparison with theory predictions. The results are discussed in the context of the program goals stated above. Measurements of vector analyzing powers for elastic scattering in A=3 and A=4 systems, differential cross sections for neutron-deuteron elastic scattering and neutrondeuteron breakup in several final-state configurations are described. The findings from these studies and plans for the coming three years are presented in the context of worldwide activities in this front, in particular, research presented in this session.

  9. Interactive Data Visualization for HIV Cohorts: Leveraging Data Exchange Standards to Share and Reuse Research Tools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meridith Blevins

    Full Text Available To develop and disseminate tools for interactive visualization of HIV cohort data.If a picture is worth a thousand words, then an interactive video, composed of a long string of pictures, can produce an even richer presentation of HIV population dynamics. We developed an HIV cohort data visualization tool using open-source software (R statistical language. The tool requires that the data structure conform to the HIV Cohort Data Exchange Protocol (HICDEP, and our implementation utilized Caribbean, Central and South America network (CCASAnet data.This tool currently presents patient-level data in three classes of plots: (1 Longitudinal plots showing changes in measurements viewed alongside event probability curves allowing for simultaneous inspection of outcomes by relevant patient classes. (2 Bubble plots showing changes in indicators over time allowing for observation of group level dynamics. (3 Heat maps of levels of indicators changing over time allowing for observation of spatial-temporal dynamics. Examples of each class of plot are given using CCASAnet data investigating trends in CD4 count and AIDS at antiretroviral therapy (ART initiation, CD4 trajectories after ART initiation, and mortality.We invite researchers interested in this data visualization effort to use these tools and to suggest new classes of data visualization. We aim to contribute additional shareable tools in the spirit of open scientific collaboration and hope that these tools further the participation in open data standards like HICDEP by the HIV research community.

  10. Few-Nucleon Research at TUNL: Probing Two- and Three-Nucleon Interactions with Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howell C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The central goal of few-nucleon research at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL is to perform measurements that contribute to advancing ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure and reactions. The program aims include evaluating theoretical treatments of few-nucleon reaction dynamics through strategically comparing theory predictions to data, determining properties of the neutron-neutron interaction that are not accessible in two-nucleon reactions, and searching for evidence of longrange features of three-nucleon interactions, e.g., spin and isospin dependence. This paper will review studies of three- and four-nucleon systems at TUNL conducted using unpolarized and polarized neutron beams. Measurements of neutron-induced reactions performed by groups at TUNL over the last six years are described in comparison with theory predictions. The results are discussed in the context of the program goals stated above. Measurements of vector analyzing powers for elastic scattering in A=3 and A=4 systems, differential cross sections for neutron-deuteron elastic scattering and neutrondeuteron breakup in several final-state configurations are described. The findings from these studies and plans for the coming three years are presented in the context of worldwide activities in this front, in particular, research presented in this session.

  11. Interaction of radiation with matter. Research progress report, January 1, 1982-December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    The project is concerned with the mechanisms of dissipation of energy in organic and inorganic materials, and with the application of the technique developed to a study of selected problems of environmental concern in the production of energy from fossil fuels. The organic phase of this work falls into a series of closely related areas, all derived from a study of the interaction of radiation with matter. These are: (1) New techniques for the study of small particulates (approx. 1μ); composition, mass (to +- 1 pg) and charge (+- 1 electron) can be determined. (2) External photoelectric effects as a tool in arriving at the electronic structure of organic crystals. (3) The interaction of water with radical cations in organic crystals, producing reactive chemical species, such as OH and HSO 3 , NH 2 , and NO 3 radicals. (4) Mechanisms of interaction of air-pollutant polycyclic aromatic carcinogens with DNA and the study of the conformation of the adducts. (5) High excitation densities in organic systems and other photophysical phenomena, such as triplet exciton dynamics, and exoemission. (6) The interaction of #betta#-rays with protein solutions. In the inorganic phase of this work the research involves (1) measurements of cross-sections for K and L-shell ionization processes for heavy projectiles in the low velocity region, (2) experimental tests of target dependence of the effective-charge theory for light projectiles, (3) theoretical studies on the energy loss of swift particles in plasmas over a broad density and temperature range, and (4) studies of geminate recombination in alkane liquids as a function of alkane chain length

  12. Research of interaction between technological and material parameters during densification of sunflower hulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Križan, Peter; Matúš, Miloš; Beniak, Juraj; Šooš, Ľubomír

    2018-01-01

    During the biomass densification can be recognized various technological variables and also material parameters which significantly influences the final solid biofuels (pellets) quality. In this paper, we will present the research findings concerning relationships between technological and material variables during densification of sunflower hulls. Sunflower hulls as an unused source is a typical product of agricultural industry in Slovakia and belongs to the group of herbaceous biomass. The main goal of presented experimental research is to determine the impact of compression pressure, compression temperature and material particle size distribution on final biofuels quality. Experimental research described in this paper was realized by single-axis densification, which was represented by experimental pressing stand. The impact of mentioned investigated variables on the final briquettes density and briquettes dilatation was determined. Mutual interactions of these variables on final briquettes quality are showing the importance of mentioned variables during the densification process. Impact of raw material particle size distribution on final biofuels quality was also proven by experimental research on semi-production pelleting plant.

  13. Interacting with the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) via the LONI Pipeline workflow environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgerson, Carinna M; Quinn, Catherine; Dinov, Ivo; Liu, Zhizhong; Petrosyan, Petros; Pelphrey, Kevin; Haselgrove, Christian; Kennedy, David N; Toga, Arthur W; Van Horn, John Darrell

    2015-03-01

    Under the umbrella of the National Database for Clinical Trials (NDCT) related to mental illnesses, the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) seeks to gather, curate, and make openly available neuroimaging data from NIH-funded studies of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). NDAR has recently made its database accessible through the LONI Pipeline workflow design and execution environment to enable large-scale analyses of cortical architecture and function via local, cluster, or "cloud"-based computing resources. This presents a unique opportunity to overcome many of the customary limitations to fostering biomedical neuroimaging as a science of discovery. Providing open access to primary neuroimaging data, workflow methods, and high-performance computing will increase uniformity in data collection protocols, encourage greater reliability of published data, results replication, and broaden the range of researchers now able to perform larger studies than ever before. To illustrate the use of NDAR and LONI Pipeline for performing several commonly performed neuroimaging processing steps and analyses, this paper presents example workflows useful for ASD neuroimaging researchers seeking to begin using this valuable combination of online data and computational resources. We discuss the utility of such database and workflow processing interactivity as a motivation for the sharing of additional primary data in ASD research and elsewhere.

  14. Productive interactions for societal impact: Developing a research information system for agriculture (RIS-Agric) at Stellenbosch University, South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boshoff, N.; Esterhuyse, H.

    2016-07-01

    Assessments of the societal impact of research rely on primary data as input to the relevant indicators. In the current project, the data collection for indicator construction is guided by the SIAMPI approach to societal impact assessment. According to SIAMPI, the achievement of societal impact involves two elements: stakeholders and productive interactions. The latter includes three kinds of interactions: direct personal interactions; indirect interactions where contact is mediated by a material or human ‘carrier’; and financial interactions that refer to the economic exchanges between researchers and stakeholders. The question to be explored is whether the assessment of the societal impact of research can be facilitated by capturing any direct, indirect and financial interactions between researchers and societal stakeholders in a research information system. CREST/SciSTIP is developing such a system, called RIS-Agric, in cooperation with the Faculty of AgriSciences at Stellenbosch University and four agricultural research funders in South Africa that represent different agricultural commodities. A RIS with productive interactions at its core – and the funded research project as the unit of observation – will produce the necessary data for indicators linked to the societal impact of research, in addition to generating insights about the ‘pathway’ from research to societal impact. The indicators need to be ‘socially robust’ in the sense that their validation processes should include the research beneficiaries and their representatives. In doing so, RIS-Agric will produce a useful, standardised measurement mechanism that is aligned across the different commodities. The focus on productive interactions will be supplemented by other methods in order to enable the quantification of societal impact in the form of ‘impact scores’. (Author)

  15. Patient preferences toward an interactive e-consent application for research using electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harle, Christopher A; Golembiewski, Elizabeth H; Rahmanian, Kiarash P; Krieger, Janice L; Hagmajer, Dorothy; Mainous, Arch G; Moseley, Ray E

    2017-12-19

    The purpose of this study was to assess patient perceptions of using an interactive electronic consent (e-consent) application when deciding whether or not to grant broad consent for research use of their identifiable electronic health record (EHR) information. For this qualitative study, we conducted a series of 42 think-aloud interviews with 32 adults. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed using a modified grounded theory approach. We identified themes related to patient preferences, reservations, and mixed attitudes toward consenting electronically; low- and high-information-seeking behavior; and an emphasis on reassuring information, such as data protections and prohibitions against sharing data with pharmaceutical companies. Participants expressed interest in the types of information contained in their EHRs, safeguards protecting EHR data, and specifics on studies that might use their EHR data. This study supports the potential value of interactive e-consent applications that allow patients to customize their consent experience. This study also highlights that some people have concerns about e-consent platforms and desire more detailed information about administrative processes and safeguards that protect EHR data used in research. This study contributes new insights on how e-consent applications could be designed to ensure that patients' information needs are met when seeking consent for research use of health record information. Also, this study offers a potential electronic approach to meeting the new Common Rule requirement that consent documents contain a "concise and focused" presentation of key information followed by more details. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. 2010 Electron Donor-Acceptor Interactions Gordon Research Conference, August 8 - 13, 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Meyer

    2010-08-18

    The Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions (GRC EDAI) presents and advances the current frontiers in experimental and theoretical studies of Electron Transfer Processes and Energy Conversion. The fundamental concepts underpinning the field of electron transfer and charge transport phenomena are understood, but fascinating experimental discoveries and novel applications based on charge transfer processes are expanding the discipline. Simultaneously, global challenges for development of viable and economical alternative energy resources, on which many researchers in the field focus their efforts, are now the subject of daily news headlines. Enduring themes of this conference relate to photosynthesis, both natural and artificial, and solar energy conversion. More recent developments include molecular electronics, optical switches, and nanoscale charge transport structures of both natural (biological) and man-made origin. The GRC EDAI is one of the major international meetings advancing this field, and is one of the few scientific meetings where fundamental research in solar energy conversion has a leading voice. The program includes sessions on coupled electron transfers, molecular solar energy conversion, biological and biomimetic systems, spin effects, ultrafast reactions and technical frontiers as well as electron transport in single molecules and devices. In addition to disseminating the latest advances in the field of electron transfer processes, the conference is an excellent forum for scientists from different disciplines to meet and initiate new directions; for scientists from different countries to make contacts; for young scientists to network and establish personal contacts with other young scientists and with established scientists who, otherwise, might not have the time to meet young people. The EDAI GRC also features an interactive atmosphere with lively poster sessions, a few of which are selected for oral presentations.

  17. A Research-Informed, School-Based Professional Development Workshop Programme to Promote Dialogic Teaching with Interactive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Sara; Dragovic, Tatjana; Warwick, Paul

    2018-01-01

    The study reported in this article investigated the influence of a research-informed, school-based, professional development workshop programme on the quality of classroom dialogue using the interactive whiteboard (IWB). The programme aimed to develop a dialogic approach to teaching and learning mediated through more interactive uses of the IWB,…

  18. Interactive design of farm conversion : linking agricultural research and farmer learning for sustainable small scale horticulture production in Colombia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    Key words: interactive conversion design / vegetable production / small farms / sustainable farming / Colombia / learning processes / facilitation / agricultural research methods

  19. Comments on the current status and possible future directions of research on heavy-ion interactions near the Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satchler, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper contains comments on the current status and possible future directions of research on heavy-ion interactions near the Coulomb barrier. Fusion reactions, elastic and inelastic scattering and transfer reactions are discussed

  20. Future research needs on material interaction and relocation in LMFR safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper firstly classify the principles in the reactor safety area in future liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors (LMFRs) in order to clarify fundamental objectives of the reactor safety research. Further reduction of the occurrence frequency and also reduction of the consequences of core disruptive accidents should be recognized as the fundamental objectives. Secondary objectives and key R and D issues are developed under these fundamental objectives. This structure of the objectives and R and D issues is proposed as a fundamental framework of the safety researches aiming at development of commercialized large-scale LMFRs. Secondly, we will summarize future experimental research needs in the reactor safety area referring to the fundamental framework mentioned above. Our interest is focused rather on in-pile experiments. Finally, another objective is proposed, that is how to reduce or eliminate the recriticality event by design, utilizing the current knowledge on material motion and interaction which has been accumulated thus far. In this report, we will show an basic approach by means of discharging fuel out of the core. We also propose a measure for discharging fuel to eliminate the recriticality concerns. Experimental needs are also addressed. (author)

  1. SmartR: an open-source platform for interactive visual analytics for translational research data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzinger, Sascha; Gu, Wei; Satagopam, Venkata; Eifes, Serge; Rege, Kavita; Barbosa-Silva, Adriano; Schneider, Reinhard

    2017-07-15

    In translational research, efficient knowledge exchange between the different fields of expertise is crucial. An open platform that is capable of storing a multitude of data types such as clinical, pre-clinical or OMICS data combined with strong visual analytical capabilities will significantly accelerate the scientific progress by making data more accessible and hypothesis generation easier. The open data warehouse tranSMART is capable of storing a variety of data types and has a growing user community including both academic institutions and pharmaceutical companies. tranSMART, however, currently lacks interactive and dynamic visual analytics and does not permit any post-processing interaction or exploration. For this reason, we developed SmartR , a plugin for tranSMART, that equips the platform not only with several dynamic visual analytical workflows, but also provides its own framework for the addition of new custom workflows. Modern web technologies such as D3.js or AngularJS were used to build a set of standard visualizations that were heavily improved with dynamic elements. The source code is licensed under the Apache 2.0 License and is freely available on GitHub: https://github.com/transmart/SmartR . reinhard.schneider@uni.lu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Virtual interactive musculoskeletal system (VIMS in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida Hiroaki

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System. Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation.

  3. Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System (VIMS) in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Edmund Y S; Armiger, Robert S; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Lim, Jonathan; Haraguchi, Naoki

    2007-03-08

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation.

  4. An interactive visualization tool for multi-channel confocal microscopy data in neurobiology research

    KAUST Repository

    Yong Wan,

    2009-11-01

    Confocal microscopy is widely used in neurobiology for studying the three-dimensional structure of the nervous system. Confocal image data are often multi-channel, with each channel resulting from a different fluorescent dye or fluorescent protein; one channel may have dense data, while another has sparse; and there are often structures at several spatial scales: subneuronal domains, neurons, and large groups of neurons (brain regions). Even qualitative analysis can therefore require visualization using techniques and parameters fine-tuned to a particular dataset. Despite the plethora of volume rendering techniques that have been available for many years, the techniques standardly used in neurobiological research are somewhat rudimentary, such as looking at image slices or maximal intensity projections. Thus there is a real demand from neurobiologists, and biologists in general, for a flexible visualization tool that allows interactive visualization of multi-channel confocal data, with rapid fine-tuning of parameters to reveal the three-dimensional relationships of structures of interest. Together with neurobiologists, we have designed such a tool, choosing visualization methods to suit the characteristics of confocal data and a typical biologist\\'s workflow. We use interactive volume rendering with intuitive settings for multidimensional transfer functions, multiple render modes and multi-views for multi-channel volume data, and embedding of polygon data into volume data for rendering and editing. As an example, we apply this tool to visualize confocal microscopy datasets of the developing zebrafish visual system.

  5. [Research Progress on the Interaction Effects and Its Neural Mechanisms between Physical Fatigue and Mental Fatigue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixin; Zhang, Chuncui; He, Feng; Zhao, Xin; Qi, Hongzhi; Wan, Baikun; Ming, Dong

    2015-10-01

    Fatigue is an exhaustion state caused by prolonged physical work and mental work, which can reduce working efficiency and even cause industrial accidents. Fatigue is a complex concept involving both physiological and psychological factors. Fatigue can cause a decline of concentration and work performance and induce chronic diseases. Prolonged fatigue may endanger life safety. In most of the scenarios, physical and mental workloads co-lead operator into fatigue state. Thus, it is very important to study the interaction influence and its neural mechanisms between physical and mental fatigues. This paper introduces recent progresses on the interaction effects and discusses some research challenges and future development directions. It is believed that mutual influence between physical fatigue and mental fatigue may occur in the central nervous system. Revealing the basal ganglia function and dopamine release may be important to explore the neural mechanisms between physical fatigue and mental fatigue. Future effort is to optimize fatigue models, to evaluate parameters and to explore the neural mechanisms so as to provide scientific basis and theoretical guidance for complex task designs and fatigue monitoring.

  6. RADIONUCLIDE STUDIES IN PEDIATRIC PRACTICE: INTERACTION OF RESEARCHER, CHILD AND PARENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.K. Fomin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the issues interaction between a doctor and a child during the radionuclide study. They also give recommendations of the pediatric council under auspices of the European society of the nuclear medicine to carry on the scintigraphic studies among the children. The article high lights the basic moments as to the psychoprophylactic preparation of the children for the radionuclide study with regard to their age and character peculiarities. The researchers offer approaches to define the psychic and emotional status of the child, degree of anxiety before the study and methods to eliminate it, allowing for considerable quality improvement of the performed procedure.Key words: children, radionuclide diagnostics, pediatric radiology, psychoprophylactic preparation.

  7. Chemical Atmosphere-Snow-Sea Ice Interactions: defining future research in the field, lab and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The air-snow-sea ice system plays an important role in the global cycling of nitrogen, halogens, trace metals or carbon, including greenhouse gases (e.g. CO2 air-sea flux), and therefore influences also climate. Its impact on atmospheric composition is illustrated for example by dramatic ozone and mercury depletion events which occur within or close to the sea ice zone (SIZ) mostly during polar spring and are catalysed by halogens released from SIZ ice, snow or aerosol. Recent field campaigns in the high Arctic (e.g. BROMEX, OASIS) and Antarctic (Weddell sea cruises) highlight the importance of snow on sea ice as a chemical reservoir and reactor, even during polar night. However, many processes, participating chemical species and their interactions are still poorly understood and/or lack any representation in current models. Furthermore, recent lab studies provide a lot of detail on the chemical environment and processes but need to be integrated much better to improve our understanding of a rapidly changing natural environment. During a 3-day workshop held in Cambridge/UK in October 2013 more than 60 scientists from 15 countries who work on the physics, chemistry or biology of the atmosphere-snow-sea ice system discussed research status and challenges, which need to be addressed in the near future. In this presentation I will give a summary of the main research questions identified during this workshop as well as ways forward to answer them through a community-based interdisciplinary approach.

  8. Report of the 2nd workshop on particle material interactions for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Kunio; Gesi, Kazuo; Iwata, Tadao

    1984-02-01

    The plenary session of the sub-committee for the data-banking of particle-material interactions in the Research Committee of A M Data Center was held at the JAERI Headquarters, Tokyo, February 24 and 25, 1982. The subsequent local meeting was held in Osaka branch office of JAERI, June 10, 1982. The aim of this workshop has been not only to make clear the present status in the A M data banking and the material science relevant to fusion research, but also to obtain an overview of the approaches that should be developed for solving the problems. In these workshops, 16 papers on the specified fields were presented by the committee members. This report contains these papers, and the investigation report in 1982 fiscal year on Diffusional Behaviour of Hydrogen and it's Isotope in Iron and Steel is added supplementarily. The contents of this report are composed of 4 chapters which are connected with each other concerning A M activities of hydrogen recycling: 1) Perspective review, 2) Re-emission and Retention, 3) Desorption and Diffusion, and 4) Radiation effects of neutron and ions on hydrogen recycling process. (author)

  9. Interactive and Hands-on Methods for Professional Development of Undergraduate Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, S. N.; LeBeau, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    Professional development workshops for undergraduate research programs can range from communicating science (i.e. oral, technical writing, poster presentations), applying for fellowships and scholarships, applying to graduate school, and learning about careers, among others. Novel methods of presenting the information on the above topics can result in positive outcomes beyond the obvious of transferring knowledge. Examples of innovative methods to present professional development information include 1) An interactive session on how to write an abstract where students are given an opportunity to draft an abstract from a short technical article, followed by discussion amongst a group of peers, and comparison with the "published" abstract. 2) Using the Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) method to evaluate and critique a research poster. 3) Inviting "experts" such as a Fulbright scholar graduate student to present on applying for fellowships and scholarships. These innovative methods of delivery provide more hands-on activities that engage the students, and in some cases (abstract writing) provide practice for the student. The methods also require that students develop team work skills, communicate amongst their peers, and develop networks with their cohort. All of these are essential non-technical skills needed for success in any career. Feedback from students on these sessions are positive and most importantly, the students walk out of the session with a smile on their face saying how much fun it was. Evaluating the impact of these sessions is more challenging and under investigation currently.

  10. Anniversary Article--Interactional Feedback in Second Language Teaching and Learning: A Synthesis and Analysis of Current Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassaji, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    The role of interactional feedback has long been of interest to both second language acquisition researchers and teachers and has continued to be the object of intensive empirical and theoretical inquiry. In this article, I provide a synthesis and analysis of recent research and developments in this area and their contributions to second language…

  11. Driving biofuels in Europe. A research on the interaction between external regulation and value chain governance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aantjes, J.C.

    2007-05-01

    To explain the unforeseen ascendancy of biofuels in the transport sector, a thorough understanding of the biofuel industry (i.e. the value chain) is crucial. Next to the industry structure, it seems that the regulatory framework surrounding the chain also contributes to the formation and structure of the biofuel industry in Europe. This assumption rests on the 2003 European Union (EU) biofuel directives for the promotion of biofuels in EU member states. With tax exemptions and reference values, the European Commission (EC) achieves to raise the amount of biofuels in transportation. The hypothesis in this thesis is that the European biofuel industry reflects a correlation between external regulation and value chain structure. More specifically, it is expected to be a mutual relation. The proposition is that value chain actors not only anticipate to the regulatory environment, they are also likely to influence decision-making on regulations in their advantage. Simply stated, value chain actors are concerned with the regulatory framework in order to enhance their position in the chain. From an empirical and theoretical point of view, this is an interesting proposition since the interaction between regulations and value chain governance receive little attention in theory. For the food industry, this approach contributes to understand the development in biofuel regulations and the European biofuel industry. Chapter Two reports the theoretical foundation of this study. The research framework rests on two rather independent streams of literature. The first part discusses 'value chain theory' and enables to examine how the biofuel value chains in Europe looks like. Among the analytical instruments of this research tradition, the role of powerful actors in controlling the value chain is elaborated in depth. The second stream is rooted in political theory and is characterized as 'political decision-making theory'. Its focus is on the formulation of governmental regulation. A

  12. The Role of Student-Advisor Interactions in Apprenticing Undergraduate Researchers into a Scientific Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, Heather; Laursen, Sandra L.

    2011-12-01

    Among science educators, current interest in undergraduate research (UR) is influenced both by the traditional role of the research apprenticeship in scientists' preparation and by concerns about replacing the current scientific workforce. Recent research has begun to demonstrate the range of personal, professional, and intellectual benefits for STEM students from participating in UR, yet the processes by which student-advisor interactions contribute to these benefits are little understood. We employ situated learning theory (Lave and Wenger, Situated learning: legitimate peripheral participation, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge in 1991) to examine the role of student-advisor interactions in apprenticing undergraduate researchers, particularly in terms of acculturating students to the norms, values, and professional practice of science. This qualitative study examines interviews with a diverse sample of 73 undergraduate research students from two research-extensive institutions. From these interviews, we articulate a continuum of practices that research mentors employed in three domains to support undergraduate scientists-in-training: professional socialization, intellectual support, and personal/emotional support. The needs of novice students differed from those of experienced students in each of these areas. Novice students needed clear expectations, guidelines, and orientation to their specific research project, while experienced students needed broader socialization in adopting the traits, habits, and temperament of scientific researchers. Underrepresented minority students, and to a lesser extent, women, gained confidence from their interactions with their research mentors and broadened their future career and educational possibilities. Undergraduate research at research-extensive universities exemplifies a cycle of scientific learning and practice where undergraduate researchers are mentored by graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, who are

  13. Buyer–supplier interaction in business-to-business services : A typology test using case research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, W.; Wynstra, F.

    2012-01-01

    We empirically test a theory specifying distinct ideal interaction patterns for four business-to-business service types, which differ with regard to how they are used by the buying company. The ideal interaction patterns are conceptualised as configurations of five different interaction dimensions:

  14. Buyer-supplier interaction in business-to-business services : a typology test using case research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, van der W.; Wynstra, J.Y.F.

    2012-01-01

    We empirically test a theory specifying distinct ideal interaction patterns for four business-to-business service types, which differ with regard to how they are used by the buying company. The ideal interaction patterns are conceptualised as configurations of five different interaction dimensions:

  15. Wave-current interactions at the FloWave Ocean Energy Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Donald; Davey, Thomas; Steynor, Jeffrey; Bruce, Tom; Smith, Helen; Kaklis, Panagiotis

    2015-04-01

    Physical scale model testing is an important part of the marine renewable energy development process, allowing the study of forces and device behaviour in a controlled environment prior to deployment at sea. FloWave is a new state-of-the-art ocean energy research facility, designed to provide large scale physical modelling services to the tidal and wave sector. It has the unique ability to provide complex multi-directional waves that can be combined with currents from any direction in the 25m diameter circular tank. The facility is optimised for waves around 2s period and 0.4m height, and is capable of generating currents upwards of 1.6m/s. This offers the ability to model metocean conditions suitable for most renewable energy devices at a typical scale of between 1:10 and 1:40. The test section is 2m deep, which can be classed as intermediate-depth for most waves of interest, thus the full dispersion equation must be solved as the asymptotic simplifications do not apply. The interaction between waves and currents has been studied in the tank. This has involved producing in the tank sets of regular waves, focussed wave groups, and random sea spectra including multi-directional sea states. These waves have been both inline-with and opposing the current, as well as investigating waves at arbitrary angles to the current. Changes in wave height and wavelength have been measured, and compared with theoretical results. Using theoretical wave-current interaction models, methods have been explored to "correct" the wave height in the central test area of the tank when combined with a steady current. This allows the wave height with current to be set equal to that without a current. Thus permitting, for example, direct comparison of device motion response between tests with and without current. Alternatively, this would also permit a specific wave height and current combination to be produced in the tank, reproducing recorded conditions at a particular site of interest. The

  16. Multi-purpose mid-plane manipulator for plasma surface interaction research in KSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, S.H., E-mail: ssh0609@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, S.-H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, HanYang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Accelerator and Nuclear Fusion Physics and Engineering, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Junghee [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Young [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Accelerator and Nuclear Fusion Physics and Engineering, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H.S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Ding, F.; Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 1126 (China); Németh, J.; Zoletnik, S. [Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics (RMI), Wigner RCP, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Fenyvesi, A. [Institute for Nuclear Physis (MTA Atomki), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Devrecent (Hungary); Pitts, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-surVerdon, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A multi-purpose mid-plane manipulator system has been developed and installed at the mid-plane of the KSTAR vacuum vessel. • It presents mechanial structure and function for multi-purpose manipulator system. • The changeable head part allows change the samples and probe during inter-shot/day without breaking vacuum system in KSTAR which gives flexibility for various PSI studies in a campaign. - Abstract: A multi-purpose mid-plane manipulator system has been developed and installed at the mid-plane of the KSTAR vacuum vessel. The system serves as user facility which allows to cover various topics of researches in plasma-surface interaction (PSI) including material sample test and PSI diagnostic. The multi-purpose mid-plane manipulator system has a 4 m long cantilever structure with a 3 m long moving shaft. The system is equipped with a differential pumping system for the independent installation and removal of samples and diagnostic without vacuum break of KSTAR. The sample mounting head at the end of the shaft can reach the position of the outer boundary of ∼10 cm away from the last closed flux surface (LCFS). In this paper, selected PSI related experiments by using the manipulator are introduced.

  17. Research of leaching of disseminated copper-nickel ores in their interaction with mine waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlov A. V.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A great amount of mine waste creates serious problems for economy and ecology in mining regions. Keeping of dumps and tailings storages requires huge capital costs and material inputs. Removal of overburden volumes cause ecological disequilibrium, ingress of chemical agents and heavy metals in ground and surface water have an adverse influence on eco-systems and human health. These hazards are particularly high under extreme climatic conditions, when mines create vast desert lands around themselves. Foreign researchers use the terms "acid mine drainage" (AМD and "acid rock drainage" (ARD when speaking on mine water oxidation and contamination of the environment with heavy metals. AMD is induced by underground mine drainage, natural sulfide-bearing rock exposures, etc. The processes occurring in the interaction the mine water with fine dust particles, as well as water filtering through the thick sulfide rocks have been studied. It has been shown that the reduction in potential environmental hazard of mine water of JSC "Kola MMC" is achieved through precipitation of heavy metals by iron hydroxide and magnesium hydrosilicate. Preliminary assessment of the feasibility of hydrometallurgical processing of disseminated copper-nickel ores has been made

  18. Multi-purpose mid-plane manipulator for plasma surface interaction research in KSTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, S.H.; Hong, S.-H.; Kim, Junghee; Kim, Jun Young; Kim, H.S.; Ding, F.; Luo, G.-N.; Németh, J.; Zoletnik, S.; Fenyvesi, A.; Pitts, R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A multi-purpose mid-plane manipulator system has been developed and installed at the mid-plane of the KSTAR vacuum vessel. • It presents mechanial structure and function for multi-purpose manipulator system. • The changeable head part allows change the samples and probe during inter-shot/day without breaking vacuum system in KSTAR which gives flexibility for various PSI studies in a campaign. - Abstract: A multi-purpose mid-plane manipulator system has been developed and installed at the mid-plane of the KSTAR vacuum vessel. The system serves as user facility which allows to cover various topics of researches in plasma-surface interaction (PSI) including material sample test and PSI diagnostic. The multi-purpose mid-plane manipulator system has a 4 m long cantilever structure with a 3 m long moving shaft. The system is equipped with a differential pumping system for the independent installation and removal of samples and diagnostic without vacuum break of KSTAR. The sample mounting head at the end of the shaft can reach the position of the outer boundary of ∼10 cm away from the last closed flux surface (LCFS). In this paper, selected PSI related experiments by using the manipulator are introduced.

  19. New "Field" of Vocal Music Teaching and Research: Research on the Construction of a Novel Interaction Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Donglan

    2015-01-01

    This paper, as an attempt to find a solution to the problem of "Identity Crisis" brought about by the traditional spoon-feeding Education Mode, explores to construct a new mode of vocal music teaching characterized by an interaction on an equal and democratic footing between learners and the teacher in light of Habermas' Communicative…

  20. Development of interactive hypermedia software for high school biology: A research and development study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alturki, Uthman T.

    The goal of this research was to research, design, and develop a hypertext program for students who study biology. The Ecology Hypertext Program was developed using Research and Development (R&D) methodology. The purpose of this study was to place the final "product", a CD-ROM for learning biology concepts, in the hands of teachers and students to help them in learning and teaching process. The product was created through a cycle of literature review, needs assessment, development, and a cycle of field tests and revisions. I applied the ten steps of R&D process suggested by Borg and Gall (1989) which, consisted of: (1) Literature review, (2) Needs assessment, (3) Planning, (4) Develop preliminary product, (5) Preliminary field-testing, (6) Preliminary revision, (7) Main field-testing, (8) Main revision, (9) Final field-testing, and (10) Final product revision. The literature review and needs assessment provided a support and foundation for designing the preliminary product---the Ecology Hypertext Program. Participants in the needs assessment joined a focus group discussion. They were a group of graduate students in education who suggested the importance for designing this product. For the preliminary field test, the participants were a group of high school students studying biology. They were the potential user of the product. They reviewed the preliminary product and then filled out a questionnaire. Their feedback and suggestions were used to develop and improve the product in a step called preliminary revision. The second round of field tasting was the main field test in which the participants joined a focus group discussion. They were the same group who participated in needs assessment task. They reviewed the revised product and then provided ideas and suggestions to improve the product. Their feedback were categorized and implemented to develop the product as in the main revision task. Finally, a group of science teachers participated in this study by reviewing

  1. “So, it is about how negative it is?!” Understanding researcher/researched interactions as relations between intersectional social positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sune Qvotrup Jensen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article argues that interactions in qualitative interviews and ethnography can be analyzed as relations between intersectional social positions. It draws attention to the importance of class and geographical location in such analysis. It further argues that such interactions work through typifications, that they have a power dimension and that they entail processes of identity formation. The identities being offered through these processes can, however, be negotiated or resisted. The article then analyses such interactions as they were experienced in two research projects the author participated in: His PhD project about young marginalized ethnic minority men, and the collective project INTERLOC which focused on the interplay between gender, class, ethnicity and ‘race’ in an underprivileged Danish suburb. It is demonstrated that relationality influences the assumptions research participants have about the researcher. It is also demonstrated that the research encounter entails powerful mechanism of identity formation. The informants, however, sometimes resist these processes resulting in blurred and unstable, sometimes antagonistic, power relations. It is finally argued that analyses of such interactions can provide central insight into the subject studied.

  2. Communications between volunteers and health researchers during recruitment and informed consent: qualitative content analysis of email interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Anne; Amarsi, Zubin; Backman, Catherine L; Cox, Susan M; Li, Linda C

    2011-10-13

    While use of the Internet is increasingly widespread in research, little is known about the role of routine electronic mail (email) correspondence during recruitment and early volunteer-researcher interactions. To gain insight into the standpoint of volunteers we analyzed email communications in an early rheumatoid arthritis qualitative interview study. The objectives of our study were (1) to understand the perspectives and motivations of individuals who volunteered for an interview study about the experiences of early rheumatoid arthritis, and (2) to investigate the role of emails in volunteer-researcher interactions during recruitment. Between December 2007 and December 2008 we recruited 38 individuals with early rheumatoid arthritis through rheumatologist and family physician offices, arthritis Internet sites, and the Arthritis Research Centre of Canada for a (face-to-face) qualitative interview study. Interested individuals were invited to contact us via email or telephone. In this paper, we report on email communications from 12 of 29 volunteers who used email as their primary communication mode. Emails offered insights into the perspective of study volunteers. They provided evidence prospectively about recruitment and informed consent in the context of early rheumatoid arthritis. First, some individuals anticipated that participating would have mutual benefits, for themselves and the research, suggesting a reciprocal quality to volunteering. Second, volunteering for the study was strongly motivated by a need to access health services and was both a help-seeking and self-managing strategy. Third, volunteers expressed ambivalence around participation, such as how far participating would benefit them, versus more general benefits for research. Fourth, practical difficulties of negotiating symptom impact, medical appointments, and research tasks were revealed. We also reflect on how emails documented volunteer-researcher interactions, illustrating typically

  3. Research on interactive genetic-geological models to evaluate favourability for undiscovered uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, W.I.; Granger, H.C.; Lupe, R.; McCammon, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    Current methods of evaluating favourability for undiscovered uranium resources are unduly subjective, quite possibly inconsistent and, as a consequence, of questionable reliability. This research is aimed at reducing the subjectivity and increasing the reliability by designing an improved method that depends largely on geological data and their statistical frequency of occurrence. This progress report outlines a genetic approach to modelling the geological factors that controlled uranium mineralization in order to evaluate the favourability for the occurrence of undiscovered uranium deposits of the type modelled. A genetic model is constructed from all the factors that describe the processes, in chronological sequence, that formed uranium deposits thought to have a common origin. The field and laboratory evidence for the processes constitute a geologic-occurrence base that parallels the chronological sequence of events. The genetic model and the geologic-occurrence base are portrayed as two columns of an interactive matrix called the ''genetic-geologic model''. For each column, eight chronological stages are used to describe the overall formation of the uranium deposits. These stages consist of (1) precursor processes; (2) host-rock formation; (3) preparation of host-rock; (4) uranium-source development; (5) transport of uranium; (6) primary uranium deposition; (7) post-deposition modification; and (8) preservation. To apply the genetic-geological model to evaluate favourability, a question is posed that determines the presence or absence of each attribute listed under the geologic-occurrence base. By building a logic circuit of the attributes according to either their essential or non-essential nature, the resultant match between a well-documented control area and the test area may be determined. The degree of match is a measure of favourability for uranium occurrence as hypothesized in the genetic model

  4. Interaction in the Research Interview and Drug-Related Disclosures among Respondents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Vincent

    1979-01-01

    Interviewers and respondents judged interview interactions during a survey of drug-related sentiments. Pronounced variability in interviewer-respondent judgements occurred in unanticipated ways related to gender, role, and ethnicity of participants. Positive interaction yielded different respondent cognitions and reports of illicit drug ingestion…

  5. Atomic data for controlled fusion research. Volume III. Particle interactions with surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, E.W.

    1985-02-01

    This report provides a handbook of data concerning particle solid interactions that are relevant to plasma-wall interactions in fusion devices. Published data have been collected, assessed, and represented by a single functional relationship which is presented in both tabular and graphical form. Mechanisms reviewed here include sputtering, secondary electron emission, particle reflection, and trapping

  6. Communications Between Volunteers and Health Researchers during Recruitment and Informed Consent: Qualitative Content Analysis of Email Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend, Anne; Amarsi, Zubin; Backman, Catherine L; Cox, Susan M; Li, Linda C

    2011-01-01

    Background While use of the Internet is increasingly widespread in research, little is known about the role of routine electronic mail (email) correspondence during recruitment and early volunteer?researcher interactions. To gain insight into the standpoint of volunteers we analyzed email communications in an early rheumatoid arthritis qualitative interview study. Objectives The objectives of our study were (1) to understand the perspectives and motivations of individuals who volunteered for ...

  7. Vocal Production of Young Children with Disabilities during Child-Robot Interactions. Social Robots Research Reports, Number 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Carl J.; Hamby, Deborah W.; Trivette, Carol M.; Prior, Jeremy; Derryberry, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The effects of a socially interactive robot on the vocalization production of five children with disabilities (4 with autism, 1 with a sensory processing disorder) were the focus of the intervention study described in this research report. The interventions with each child were conducted over 4 or 5 days in the children's homes and involved…

  8. Research of Technical Knowledge and Creativity Development of Children in Pre-Primary Education through Interactive Whiteboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecka, Peter; Cervenanská, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    The introduced study represents methodology and results of research focused on utilization of interactive whiteboard as didactic technology mediating information through multimedia worksheets applied in education process in pre-primary education. Its aim was to determine whether it can significantly increase the level of children's acquired…

  9. Social Capital and Entrepreneurial Behaviour Advancing Innovativeness in Interaction between Small Rural Entrepreneurs and Researchers: A Phenomenographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iivonen, Sari; Kyro, Paula; Mynttinen, Sinikka; Sarkka-Tirkkonen, Marjo; Kahiluoto, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Innovation processes between entrepreneurs and researchers are activated by interaction. Social capital increases the efficiency of action, for example, information dissemination by minimising redundancy. To learn more about how to build and develop social capital assumes that we understand how entrepreneurs behave and what their expectations of…

  10. Facilitating practitioner research into strategies for improving communication in classroom groups: Action research and interaction analysis — A reconciliation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Jo; Fawns, Rod

    1993-12-01

    This study involved collaborative classroom-based observation of student communication and cognition in small groups after the implementation of two management strategies in science departments in several schools. The paper presents the data and provides insights into the conduct of research and teacher development in the midst of educational change.

  11. Research in particles and fields and their interactions: Technical progress report, November 1986--December 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildiz, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains information on the following topics: Weak interactions; Field theories; Particle phenomenology; and Cosmology and particle physics. In particular, vector mesons, superstring cosmology, quarkonia systems, and CP-violation are some specific topics discussed. (FL)

  12. The relationship between passibility, agency and social interaction and its relevance for research and pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, Susan A.; Ma, Jasmine Y.

    2016-12-01

    The interaction analysis presented by Kim and Roth examines nine students, their teachers, the learning task and materials in a mixed second and third grade science classroom during the school day. In the research narrative readers are introduced to two resourceful and creative groups of students as they work on a task assigned by their teacher—to cantilever a pizza box over the edge of a student desk. Readers are given glimpses (through images and transcripts) of the inventive ways each group solved the cantilever problem. Sometimes the children disregarded the design constraints, but even after compliance they managed to successfully solve the problem. The point of the learning task was not clearly stated, but readers are told the unit focused on investigating forces, forces in equilibrium, and structures as well as different forces (push, pull, etc.), properties of materials, and the relations between weight and balance while building structures. Kim and Roth were specifically interested in using this session to investigate and resolve the problem of learning as described by socio-cultural theorists as, how does a learner orient toward a learning outcome when they cannot do that until they have learned it? To answer this question Kim and Roth argued that learners (in engineering design) learn when and because: (1) they are open to be affected by the responses of materials to student action (i.e. student and material agency and physical touch) (2) their bodies are endowed with the capacity to be affected (i.e. passibility), and (3) knowledge and understanding emerge as and in social relations first. In their analysis, Kim and Roth argued that knowledge and knowing-how depend on these three universal processes. The authors further theorized the concept of passibility. Included in their theory of passibility was the claim that passibility is necessary for agency. After reading this paper we found we had many questions about Kim and Roth's analysis, context, and

  13. Evaluation of the Humanity Research Paradigms based on Analysis of Human – Environment Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Sameh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As claimed by many behavioral scientists, designing should be based on the knowledge of interaction between human and environment. Environmental quality is also created in the context in which humans interact with their environment. To achieve such quality, designers should develop appropriate models for explaining this relationship, and this requires an understanding of human nature and the environment. Criticisms on the Modern Movement have shown that architects have often used incomplete and simplistic models in this regard, while most of design ideas are based on the definitions of human and environment and the interaction between them. However, the most important question that is raised is that how understanding of human nature and the environment and their interaction, which depends on foundations of different views, can affect the pursuit of quality in designing? Therefore, the present paper, in addition to introduction and comparison of common paradigms in humanities as the and methodological foundation of human sciences, aims to deal with the relationship of human and the environment from the perspective of objectivist, relativist, and critical paradigms in order to identify the characteristics and differences in their views on the analysis of the quality of this interaction. This is the most important step that paves the way for understanding the qualitative foundations of the environment and human life quality and also the quality of interaction between them.

  14. The development of mini project interactive media on junior statistical materials (developmental research in junior high school)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauziah, D.; Mardiyana; Saputro, D. R. S.

    2018-05-01

    Assessment is an integral part in the learning process. The process and the result should be in line, regarding to measure the ability of learners. Authentic assessment refers to a form of assessment that measures the competence of attitudes, knowledge, and skills. In fact, many teachers including mathematics teachers who have implemented curriculum based teaching 2013 feel confuse and difficult in mastering the use of authentic assessment instruments. Therefore, it is necessary to design an authentic assessment instrument with an interactive mini media project where teacher can adopt it in the assessment. The type of this research is developmental research. The developmental research refers to the 4D models development, which consist of four stages: define, design, develop and disseminate. The research purpose is to create a valid mini project interactive media on statistical materials in junior high school. The retrieved valid instrument based on expert judgment are 3,1 for eligibility constructions aspect, and 3,2 for eligibility presentation aspect, 3,25 for eligibility contents aspect, and 2,9 for eligibility didactic aspect. The research results obtained interactive mini media projects on statistical materials using Adobe Flash so it can help teachers and students in achieving learning objectives.

  15. Spring Research Festival Theme Explores Host­–Microbe Interactions | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer The 18th annual Spring Research Festival (SRF) will take place May 5–8 at the NCI Campus at Frederick and Fort Detrick.  This is the second year that the event is sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), an interagency committee made up of various research entities located within Fort Detrick.

  16. Analysis of soil-structure interaction and floor response spectrum of reactor building for China advanced research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Feng; Wang Jiachun; He Shuyan

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) and calculation of Floor Response Spectrum (FRS) is substantial for anti-seismic design for China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) project. The article uses direct method to analyze the seismic reaction of the reactor building in considering soil-structure interaction by establishing two-dimensional soil-structure co-acting model for analyzing and inputting of seismic waves from three directions respectively. The seismic response and floor response spectrum of foundation and floors of the building under different cases have been calculated. (authors)

  17. Research on the Operation Mode of Intelligent-town Energy Internet Based on Source-Load Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Li, Wen; Miao, Bo; Li, Bin; Liu, Chang; Lv, Zhipeng

    2018-01-01

    On the background of the rise of intelligence and the increasing deepening of “Internet +”application, the energy internet has become the focus of the energy research field. This paper, based on the fundamental understanding on the energy internet of the intelligent town, discusses the mode of energy supply in the source-load interactive region, and gives an in-depth study on the output characteristics of the energy supply side and the load characteristics of the demand side, so as to derive the law of energy-load interaction of the intelligent-town energy internet.

  18. An interactive, multitask computer system for heavy-ion physics research with the spin spectrometer: [Progress report, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    The scope of this proposal is to assemble an interactive off-line data analysis system based on a DEC VAX 11/780 computer interfaced with an array processor, which is capable of meeting the needs of modern heavy-ion physics experiments involving data of large dimensionality as created in the Spin Spectrometer at the Holifield Heavy-ion Research Facility, to adapt the existing PDP 11 software for the Spin Spectrometer for this computer system in a form completely compatible with other laboratories with VAX 11 computers, and to develop new general and efficient software for automatic but fully interactive data analysis making use of an attach array processor

  19. Effects of a dolphin interaction program on children with autism spectrum disorders – an exploratory research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salgueiro Emílio

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interaction programs involving dolphins and patients with various pathologies or developmental disorders (e.g., cerebral palsy, intellectual impairment, autism, atopic dermatitis, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression have stimulated interest in their beneficial effects and therapeutic potential. However, the true effects observed in different clinical and psycho-educational setups are still controversial. Results An evaluation protocol consisting of the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS, Psychoeducational Profile-Revised (PEP-R, Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC, Theory of Mind Tasks (ToM Tasks and a custom-made Interaction Evaluation Grid (IEG to evaluate behavioural complexity during in-pool interactions was applied to 10 children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders. The ATEC, ToM Tasks and CARS results show no benefits of the dolphin interaction program. Interestingly, the PEP-R suggests some statistically significant effects on ‘Overall development score’, as well as on their ‘Fine motor development’, ‘Cognitive performance’ and ‘Cognitive verbal development’. Also, a significant evolution in behavioural complexity was shown by the IEG. Conclusions This study does not support significant developmental progress resulting from the dolphin interaction program.

  20. Electron and pion interactions with nuclei. Progress report and research plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, J.S.

    1982-08-01

    A series of electron scattering experiments is proposed for a quantitative investigation of the structure and dynamics of nuclei. The information developed from the electromagnetic interaction will be used as complement to a series of experiments at LAMPF in which a systematic investigation of the reaction dynamics of pion-nucleus interactions is carried out. Pion induced reactions can supply information on inelastic channels of the nucleon-nucleon interaction which are not as readily available to an electromagnetic probe. Pion absorption experiments designed to measure the off-shell behavior are complemented with a program on pion elastic and inelastic scattering to pursue the on-shell aspect of the π + N interaction. The single (SCE) and double charge exchange (DCE) reactions are unique aspects of π interactions in nuclei. The complementarity of information from different reactions is emphasized in our studies of (e,e'), (p,p'), (π,p) and (p,d) reactions at large momentum transfers (Q greater than or equal to 0.5 GeV/c). Along with the search for the reaction dynamics, the question of new nuclear structure is pursued. We now plan to start a series of experiments that will detect hadrons in the final state along with the scattered electrons. The present success of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) gives increased impetus to pursue experiments that can result in a synthesis of nuclear structure within the framework of the elementary quark; carrying the charge and weak currents within hadrons

  1. Gender discrimination may be worse than you think: testing ordinal interactions in power research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Steven M; Cropanzano, Russell

    2006-04-01

    The authors reanalyze the data of a study by S. M. Elias and R. J. Loomis (2004), which aimed to determine how an instructor's gender may influence his or her ability to gain student compliance. S. M. Elias and R. J. Loomis observed few significant gender effects using traditional multivariate analyses of variance. The authors reanalyze this data using the more appropriate statistical techniques for detecting ordinal interactions recommended by M. J. Strube and P. Bobko (1989) and S. M. Elias (2004). An ordinal interaction occurs when 1 cell of a 2 x 2 design is responsible for a significant interaction (e.g., female instructors suffering only when rated by male students). Reanalysis of the data resulted in more robust findings.

  2. Methods of dichotic listening as a research methodology for hemispheric interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovyazina M.S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Experimental data was obtained from a dichotic listening test by patients with unilateral brain lesions and corpus callosum pathology (agenesis, cysts, degenerative changes, etc. Efficiency index analysis shows that interhemispheric interaction in the audioverbal sphere depends to a greater extent on the right hemisphere state. The dichotic listening technique is not an informative means of studying hemispheric interaction, since it does not allow a clear distinction between hemispheric symptoms and symptoms of pathology of the corpus callosum. Thus, violations of hemispheric relations caused by disorders of the corpus callosum and cerebral hemispheres change worth more right hemisphere activity.

  3. Proceedings of the 5th Danish Human-Computer Interaction Research Symposium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Torkil; Nielsen, Lene

    2005-01-01

    Lene Nielsen DEALING WITH REALITY - IN THEORY Gitte Skou PetersenA NEW IFIP WORKING GROUP - HUMAN WORK INTERACTION DESIGN Rikke Ørngreen, Torkil Clemmensen & Annelise Mark-Pejtersen CLASSIFICATION OF DESCRIPTIONS USED IN SOFTWARE AND INTERACTION DESIGN Georg Strøm OBSTACLES TO DESIGN IN VOLUNTEER BASED...... for the symposium, of which 14 were presented orally in four panel sessions. Previously the symposium has been held at University of Aarhus 2001, University of Copenhagen 2002, Roskilde University Center 2003, Aalborg University 2004. Torkil Clemmensen & Lene Nielsen Copenhagen, November 2005 CONTENT INTRODUCTION...

  4. Research on odor interaction between aldehyde compounds via a partial differential equation (PDE) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Luchun; Liu, Jiemin; Qu, Chen; Gu, Xingye; Zhao, Xia

    2015-01-28

    In order to explore the odor interaction of binary odor mixtures, a series of odor intensity evaluation tests were performed using both individual components and binary mixtures of aldehydes. Based on the linear relation between the logarithm of odor activity value and odor intensity of individual substances, the relationship between concentrations of individual constituents and their joint odor intensity was investigated by employing a partial differential equation (PDE) model. The obtained results showed that the binary odor interaction was mainly influenced by the mixing ratio of two constituents, but not the concentration level of an odor sample. Besides, an extended PDE model was also proposed on the basis of the above experiments. Through a series of odor intensity matching tests for several different binary odor mixtures, the extended PDE model was proved effective at odor intensity prediction. Furthermore, odorants of the same chemical group and similar odor type exhibited similar characteristics in the binary odor interaction. The overall results suggested that the PDE model is a more interpretable way of demonstrating the odor interactions of binary odor mixtures.

  5. Research of Environmental and Economic Interactions of Coke And By-Product Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, Vladimir; Kiseleva, Tamara; Bugrova, Svetlana; Muromtseva, Alina; Mikhailova, Yana

    2017-11-01

    The issues of showing relations between environmental and economic indicators (further - environmental and economic interactions) of coke and by-product process are considered in the article. The purpose of the study is to reveal the regularities of the functioning of the local environmental and economic system on the basis of revealed spectrum of environmental and economic interactions. A simplified scheme of the environmental and economic system "coke and by-product process - the environment" was developed. The forms of the investigated environmental-economic interactions were visualized and the selective interpretation of the tightness of the established connection was made. The main result of the work is modeling system of environmental and economic interactions that allows increasing the efficiency of local ecological and economic system management and optimizing the "interests" of an industrial enterprise - the source of negative impact on the environment. The results of the survey can be recommended to government authorities and industrial enterprises with a wide range of negative impact forms to support the adoption of effective management decisions aimed at sustainable environmental and economic development of the region or individual municipalities.

  6. Interacting with the Reader: Politeness Strategies in Engineering Research Article Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salom, Luz Gil; Monreal, Carmen Soler

    2009-01-01

    The writer's strategy to combine the exposition of factual information with personal judgement and interaction with the reader has been analysed in a number of studies (Hunston, 1994; Hyland, 1998a, 1998b; Latour and Woolgar, 1979; Skelton, 1997). Myers' studies (1989, 1992) on the pragmatics of politeness in scientific articles analyse politeness…

  7. IMPLICATIONS FOR TEACHER EDUCATION OF INTERACTION ANALYSIS RESEARCH IN STUDENT TEACHING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AMIDON, EDMUND; SIMON, ANITA

    TO DETERMINE THE EXTENT OF USE OF INTERACTION ANALYSIS, MORE THAN 400 QUESTIONNAIRES WERE SENT TO PROFESSIONAL EDUCATORS. OF 186 RETURNS (46 PERCENT), 85 WERE UNANSWERED BECAUSE OF UNFAMILIARITY WITH THE METHOD. OF THE REMAINING 101, 69 COLLEGE TEACHERS, PRINCIPALS, SUPERVISORS, AND ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY TEACHERS STATED THAT THEY HAD HAD…

  8. Customer-to-customer interactions : Broadening the scope of word of mouth research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Libai, B.; Bolton, R.; Bügel, M.S.; de Ruyter, K.; Götz, O.; Risselada, H.; Stephen, A.T.

    The increasing emphasis on understanding the antecedents and consequences of customer-to-customer (C2C) interactions is one of the essential developments of customer management in recent years. This interest is driven much by new online environments that enable customers to be connected in numerous

  9. Research progress from the SCI Model Systems (SCIMS): An interactive discussion on future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boninger, Michael L; Field-Fote, Edelle C; Kirshblum, Steven C; Lammertse, Daniel P; Dyson-Hudson, Trevor A; Hudson, Lesley; Heinemann, Allen W

    2018-03-01

    To describe current and future directions in spinal cord injury (SCI) research. The SCI Model Systems (SCIMS) programs funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) during the 2011 to 2016 cycle provided abstracts describing findings from current research projects. Discussion among session participants generated ideas for research opportunities. Pre-conference workshop before the 2016 American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) annual meeting. A steering committee selected by the SCIMS directors that included the moderators of the sessions at the ASIA pre-conference workshop, researchers presenting abstracts during the session, and the audience of over 100 attending participants in the pre-conference workshop. Group discussion followed presentations in 5 thematic areas of (1) Demographics and Measurement; (2) Functional Training; (3) Psychosocial Considerations; (4) Assistive Technology; and (5) Secondary Conditions. The steering committee reviewed and summarized discussion points on future directions for research and made recommendations for research based on the discussion in each of the five areas. Significant areas in need of research in SCI remain, the goal of which is continued improvement in the quality of life of individuals with SCI.

  10. Research-Practice Interactions as Reported in Recent Design Studies: Still Promising, Still Hazy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormel, Bart J. B.; Pareja Roblin, Natalie N.; McKenney, Susan E.; Voogt, Joke M.; Pieters, Jules M.

    2012-01-01

    This study portrays recent research-practice connections found in 18 design research reports focusing on the creation of instructional solutions. Solutions in different stages of development varied greatly in duration, ranging from one lesson to a whole year curriculum, spanned all levels of education, many subjects (science, math, language,…

  11. Re-Inventing Researcher Identity: When the Individual Interacts with the Contextual Power Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertkan, Sefika; Bayrakli, Hatice

    2018-01-01

    This article is about being and becoming a qualitative researcher in Turkey, a context with a distinctive quantitative tradition shaped by the post-positivist paradigm where qualitative research has not yet reached the mature stage it enjoys elsewhere. Exploring the challenges of swimming against the tide unattended and keeping going, it argues…

  12. The Interaction between Multimedia Data Analysis and Theory Development in Design Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nes, Fenna; Doorman, Michiel

    2010-01-01

    Mathematics education researchers conducting instruction experiments using a design research methodology are challenged with the analysis of often complex and large amounts of qualitative data. In this paper, we present two case studies that show how multimedia analysis software can greatly support video data analysis and theory development in…

  13. Development of high power KrF laser for fundamental research of ICF driver and laser plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Naiyan; Shan Yusheng; Ma Weiyi; Yao Gang; Zhou Chuangzhi; Tang Xiuzhang; Tang Zhihong; Gao Junsi; Wang Ganchang.

    1994-01-01

    A high power KrF laser system is under development in China Institute of Atomic Energy. The system consists of a front end, two-stage KrF amplifiers and two-stage Raman amplifiers, providing 100J, 1ns KrF laser with maximum average power density about 10 14 W/cm 2 on target for laser plasma interaction research. Some important technologies, such as front-end system, Angular Multiplexer, and injection locked oscillator are discussed. (author)

  14. Wine and Grape Tannin Interactions with Salivary Proteins and Their Impact on Astringency: A Review of Current Research

    OpenAIRE

    James A. Kennedy; Jacqui M. McRae

    2011-01-01

    Astringency is an important characteristic of red wine quality. The sensation is generally thought to be produced by the interaction of wine tannins with salivary proteins and the subsequent aggregation and precipitation of protein-tannin complexes. The importance of wine astringency for marketability has led to a wealth of research on the causes of astringency and how tannins impact the quality of the sensation, particularly with respect to tannin structure. Ultimately, the understanding of ...

  15. A review of over three decades of research on cat-human and human-cat interactions and relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Dennis C

    2017-08-01

    This review article covers research conducted over the last three decades on cat-human and human-cat interactions and relationships, especially from an ethological point of view. It includes findings on cat-cat and cat-human communication, cat personalities and cat-owner personalities, the effects of cats on humans, and problems caused by cats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Proceedings of study meeting on microscopic and phenomenological research of interaction for light heavy-ion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The Research Center for Nuclear Physics study meeting 'Microscopic and phenomenological research of interaction for light heavy-ion systems was held on March 7-9, 1990 as the study meeting in the second half of 1990, and 25 researchers took part in it. As the background of holding this study meeting, the fact that recently the rainbow scattering due to nuclear force was discovered experimentally in 16 O- 16 O system, and phenomenologically it was explained only by deep inter-nucleus potential. This should be evaluated as an important foothold for the research on the interaction for light heavy-ion systems and nuclear reaction mechanism. Accordingly, most of the papers presented this time were those related to the inter-nucleus potential and nuclear reaction mechanism. Also the development of theoretical analysis method was carried out and reported. Further, recently the experimental study on the structure and reaction of the neutron rich nucleus has advanced, and the theoretical research related to this topic was reported. (K.I.)

  17. Solitons: interactions, theoretical and experimental challenges and perspectives (physics research and technology)

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    In mathematics and physics, a soliton is a self-reinforcing solitary wave (a wave packet or pulse) that maintains its shape while it travels at constant speed. Solitons are caused by a cancellation of non-linear and dispersive effects in the medium. In this book, the authors discuss the interactions and theoretical and experimental challenges of solitons. Topics include soliton motion of electrons and its physical properties in coupled electron-phonon systems and ionic crystals; soliton excitations and its experimental evidence in molecular crystals; shapes and dynamics of semi-discrete solitons in arrayed and stacked waveguiding systems; ion-acoustic super solitons in plasma; diamond-controlled solitons and turbulence in extracellular matrix and lymphatic dynamics; and non-linear waves in strongly interacting relativistic fluids.

  18. Research Update: Density functional theory investigation of the interactions of silver nanoclusters with guanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon B. Dale

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bare and guanine-complexed silver clusters Ag n z (n = 2-6; z = 0-2 are examined using density functional theory to elucidate the geometries and binding motifs that are present experimentally. Whereas the neutral systems remain planar in this size range, a 2D-3D transition occurs at Ag 5 + for the cationic system and at Ag 4 2 + for the dicationic system. Neutral silver clusters can bind with nitrogen 3 or with the pi system of the base. However, positively charged clusters interact with nitrogen 7 and the neighboring carbonyl group. Thus, the cationic silver-DNA clusters present experimentally may preferentially interact at these sites.

  19. Research on the potential use of interactive materials on astronomy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Macedo, Josue

    2016-07-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potentialities of the use of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. An advanced training course with involved learning activities about basic concepts of astronomy was offered to thirty-two Licenciate students in Physics, Mathematics and Biological Sciences, using the mixed methodology, combined with the three pedagogical moments. Among other aspects, the viability of the use of resources was noticed, involving digital technologies and interactive materials on teaching of astronomy, which may contribute to the broadening of methodological options for future teachers and meet their training needs.

  20. Concept-Driven Interaction Design Research in the domain of attractive aging: the example of Walky

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazzi, Elena; Bagalkot, Naveen L.; Nagargoje, Arun

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we answer the call for “designing for an attractive ageing” by designing for social interaction of senior citizens within their local community. In this vein, we present Walky, a design exploration through which we explored if, and how, augmenting the rollator that senior citizens u...... the example of Walky and its compositional whole as a demonstration of how we explored abstract theoretical perspectives in particular design situations leading to three concrete designed artefacts....

  1. Interactions of forests, climate, water resources, and humans in a changing environment: research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge Sun; Catalina Segura

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the special issue “Interactions of Forests, Climate, Water Resources, and Humans in a Changing Environment” is to present case studies on the influences of natural and human disturbances on forest water resources under a changing climate. Studies in this collection of six papers cover a wide range of geographic regions from Australia to Nigeria with spatial...

  2. TOWARD TUNGSTEN PLASMA-FACING COMPONENTS IN KSTAR: RESEARCH ON PLASMA-METAL WALL INTERACTION

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hong, S.-H.; Kim, K.M.; Song, J.-H.; Bang, E.-N.; Kim, H.-T.; Lee, K.-S.; Litnovsky, A.; Hellwig, M.; Seo, D.C.; Lee, H.H.; Kang, C.S.; Lee, H.-Y.; Hong, J.-H.; Bak, J.-G.; Kim, H.-S.; Juhn, J.-W.; Son, S.-H.; Kim, H.-K.; Douai, D.; Grisolia, C.; Wu, J.; Luo, G.-N.; Choe, W.-H.; Komm, Michael; van den Berg, M.; De Temmerman, G.; Pitts, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 1 (2015), s. 36-43 ISSN 1536-1055. [International Conference on Open Magnetic Systems for Plasma Confinement (OS 2014)/10./. Daejeon, 26.08.2014-29.08.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Plasma-metal wall interaction * Tungsten technology Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.799, year: 2015 http://dx.doi.org/10.13182/FST14-897

  3. Mössbauer spectroscopy research of interaction of alumosilicic reagent and iron dissolved in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feklistov, D Y; Filippov, V P; Kurchatov, I M; Laguntsov, N I; Salomasov, V A; Permyakov, Yu V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to reveal the results of alumosilicic reagent interaction with iron compounds contained in the water. This reagent is simultaneously coagulant-flocculant and adsorbent. The iron atoms state is studied in the reagent and in reacted sediment. The valence state of iron atoms are determined in the reagents and sediments. The existence of iron containing superparamagnetic particles in the sediment is shown. (paper)

  4. Proceedings of the topical meeting on advances in human factors research on man/computer interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: expert systems and knowledge engineering-I; verification and validation of software; methods for modeling UMAN/computer performance; MAN/computer interaction problems in producing procedures -1-2; progress and problems with automation-1-2; experience with electronic presentation of procedures-2; intelligent displays and monitors; modeling user/computer interface; and computer-based human decision-making aids

  5. Embracing interactions in ocean acidification research: confronting multiple stressor scenarios and context dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeker, Kristy J; Kordas, Rebecca L; Harley, Christopher D G

    2017-03-01

    Changes in the Earth's environment are now sufficiently complex that our ability to forecast the emergent ecological consequences of ocean acidification (OA) is limited. Such projections are challenging because the effects of OA may be enhanced, reduced or even reversed by other environmental stressors or interactions among species. Despite an increasing emphasis on multifactor and multispecies studies in global change biology, our ability to forecast outcomes at higher levels of organization remains low. Much of our failure lies in a poor mechanistic understanding of nonlinear responses, a lack of specificity regarding the levels of organization at which interactions can arise, and an incomplete appreciation for linkages across these levels. To move forward, we need to fully embrace interactions. Mechanistic studies on physiological processes and individual performance in response to OA must be complemented by work on population and community dynamics. We must also increase our understanding of how linkages and feedback among multiple environmental stressors and levels of organization can generate nonlinear responses to OA. This will not be a simple undertaking, but advances are of the utmost importance as we attempt to mitigate the effects of ongoing global change. © 2017 The Authors.

  6. Interactive-cut: Real-time feedback segmentation for translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Jan; Lüddemann, Tobias; Schwarzenberg, Robert; Freisleben, Bernd; Nimsky, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    In this contribution, a scale-invariant image segmentation algorithm is introduced that "wraps" the algorithm's parameters for the user by its interactive behavior, avoiding the definition of "arbitrary" numbers that the user cannot really understand. Therefore, we designed a specific graph-based segmentation method that only requires a single seed-point inside the target-structure from the user and is thus particularly suitable for immediate processing and interactive, real-time adjustments by the user. In addition, color or gray value information that is needed for the approach can be automatically extracted around the user-defined seed point. Furthermore, the graph is constructed in such a way, so that a polynomial-time mincut computation can provide the segmentation result within a second on an up-to-date computer. The algorithm presented here has been evaluated with fixed seed points on 2D and 3D medical image data, such as brain tumors, cerebral aneurysms and vertebral bodies. Direct comparison of the obtained automatic segmentation results with costlier, manual slice-by-slice segmentations performed by trained physicians, suggest a strong medical relevance of this interactive approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. MODELING HOST-PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS: COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY AND BIOINFORMATICS FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE RESEARCH (Session introduction)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, Jason E.; Braun, Pascal; Bonneau, Richard A.; Hyduke, Daniel R.

    2011-12-01

    Pathogenic infections are a major cause of both human disease and loss of crop yields and animal stocks and thus cause immense damage to the worldwide economy. The significance of infectious diseases is expected to increase in an ever more connected warming world, in which new viral, bacterial and fungal pathogens can find novel hosts and ecologic niches. At the same time, the complex and sophisticated mechanisms by which diverse pathogenic agents evade defense mechanisms and subvert their hosts networks to suit their lifestyle needs is still very incompletely understood especially from a systems perspective [1]. Thus, understanding host-pathogen interactions is both an important and a scientifically fascinating topic. Recently, technology has offered the opportunity to investigate host-pathogen interactions on a level of detail and scope that offers immense computational and analytical possibilities. Genome sequencing was pioneered on some of these pathogens, and the number of strains and variants of pathogens sequenced to date vastly outnumbers the number of host genomes available. At the same time, for both plant and human hosts more and more data on population level genomic variation becomes available and offers a rich field for analysis into the genetic interactions between host and pathogen.

  8. From advance exploration to real time steering of TBMs: A review on pertinent research in the Collaborative Research Center “Interaction Modeling in Mechanized Tunneling”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Meschke

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on planning and construction related results from research performed at the Collaborative Research Center “Interaction Modeling in Mechanized Tunneling” at Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany. Research covers a broad spectrum of topics relevant for mechanized tunneling in soft soil conditions. This includes inverse numerical methods for advance exploration and models for the characterization of the in situ ground conditions, the interaction of the face support and the tail gap grouting with the porous soil, multi-scale models for the design of fiber reinforced segmental linings with enhanced robustness, computational methods for the numerical simulation of the tunnel advancement, the soil excavation and the material transport in the pressure chamber, logistics processes and risk analysis in urban tunneling. Targeted towards the continuous support of the construction process, a concept for real-time steering support of tunnel boring machines in conjunction with model update procedures and methods of uncertainty quantification is addressed. Keywords: Mechanized tunneling, Computational simulation, Tunnel reconnaissance, Tunnel linings, Face support, Tail void grouting, Real-time analysis, Abrasion, Process simulation

  9. Employing Creative Practice as a Research Method in the Field of Wearable and Interactive Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankjær, Raune; Flanagan, Patricia; Gilgen, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    for creative practitioners to extend their artistic expression, but a method applicable within research and development. Creative practitioners generally approach their sub- ject matter intuitively and holistically and are therefore capable of facilitating insights where rational approaches may not. Working...

  10. 2012 Gordon Research Conference and Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Interactions - Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwier, Timothy S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2012-07-20

    The Gordon Research Conference on ATOMIC & MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS was held at Stonehill College Easton, Massachusetts, July 15-20, 2012. The Conference was well-attended with 121 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Of the 121 attendees, 64 voluntarily responded to a general inquiry regarding ethnicity which appears on our registration forms. Of the 64 respondents, 11% were Minorities – 2% Hispanic, 9% Asian and 0% African American. Approximately 20% of the participants at the 2012 meeting were women. The Gordon Research SEMINAR on ATOMIC & MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS was held at Stonehill College Easton, Massachusetts, July 14 - 15, 2012. The Conference was well-attended with 42 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Of the 42 attendees, 20 voluntarily responded to a general inquiry regarding ethnicity which appears on our registration forms. Of the 20 respondents, 10% were Minorities – 0% Hispanic, 10% Asian and 0% African American. Approximately 29% of the participants at the 2012 meeting were women. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to

  11. Understanding societal impact through productive interactions: ICT research as a case

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan de Jong; Katharine Barker; Deborah Cox; Thordis Sveinsdottir; Peter Van den Besselaar

    2014-01-01

    Universities are increasingly expected to fulfill a third mission in addition to those of research and education. Universities must demonstrate engagement with society through the application and exploitation of knowledge. As societal impact of research is uncertain, long term and always dependent on other factors, we argue here that evaluation should focus on the conditions under which societal impact is generated rather than on the impact itself. Here we focus on a specific set of those con...

  12. Co-ordinated experimental research into PV power interaction with the supply network - Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, R.; Thornycroft, J.; Munro, D.; Rudkin, E.

    1999-07-01

    This report summarises the findings of a study examining the integration of photovoltaic systems into the UK electricity supply network. Details of research and development in the UK, and the participants in the research project are given. Information on photovoltaics as embedded generators, power conditioner design and performance, and the effects of photovoltaics on the network are outlined, and AC modules, standards, testing and approval schemes are considered. (UK)

  13. Structural zooming research and development of an interactive computer graphical interface for stress analysis of cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstle, Walter

    1989-01-01

    Engineering problems sometimes involve the numerical solution of boundary value problems over domains containing geometric feature with widely varying scales. Often, a detailed solution is required at one or more of these features. Small details in large structures may have profound effects upon global performance. Conversely, large-scale conditions may effect local performance. Many man-hours and CPU-hours are currently spent in modeling such problems. With the structural zooming technique, it is now possible to design an integrated program which allows the analyst to interactively focus upon a small region of interest, to modify the local geometry, and then to obtain highly accurate responses in that region which reflect both the properties of the overall structure and the local detail. A boundary integral equation analysis program, called BOAST, was recently developed for the stress analysis of cracks. This program can accurately analyze two-dimensional linear elastic fracture mechanics problems with far less computational effort than existing finite element codes. An interactive computer graphical interface to BOAST was written. The graphical interface would have several requirements: it would be menu-driven, with mouse input; all aspects of input would be entered graphically; the results of a BOAST analysis would be displayed pictorially but also the user would be able to probe interactively to get numerical values of displacement and stress at desired locations within the analysis domain; the entire procedure would be integrated into a single, easy to use package; and it would be written using calls to the graphic package called HOOPS. The program is nearing completion. All of the preprocessing features are working satisfactorily and were debugged. The postprocessing features are under development, and rudimentary postprocessing should be available by the end of the summer. The program was developed and run on a VAX workstation, and must be ported to the SUN

  14. Cancer Center Clinic and Research Team Perceptions of Identity and Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Torsten; Lee, Simon J Craddock; Garcia, Sandra; Gill, Mary; Duncan, Tobi; Williams, Erin L; Gerber, David E

    2017-12-01

    Conduct of cancer clinical trials requires coordination and cooperation among research and clinic teams. Diffusion of and confusion about responsibility may occur if team members' perceptions of roles and objectives do not align. These factors are critical to the success of cancer centers but are poorly studied. We developed a survey adapting components of the Adapted Team Climate Inventory, Measure of Team Identification, and Measure of In-Group Bias. Surveys were administered to research and clinic staff at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t tests, and analyses of variance. Responses were received from 105 staff (clinic, n = 55; research, n = 50; 61% response rate). Compared with clinic staff, research staff identified more strongly with their own group ( P teams, we also identified key differences, including perceptions of goal clarity and sharing, understanding and alignment with cancer center goals, and importance of outcomes. Future studies should examine how variation in perceptions and group dynamics between clinic and research teams may impact function and processes of cancer care.

  15. Research on three-phase traffic flow modeling based on interaction range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jun-Wei; Yang, Xu-Gang; Qian, Yong-Sheng; Wei, Xu-Ting

    2017-12-01

    On the basis of the multiple velocity difference effect (MVDE) model and under short-range interaction, a new three-phase traffic flow model (S-MVDE) is proposed through careful consideration of the influence of the relationship between the speeds of the two adjacent cars on the running state of the rear car. The random slowing rule in the MVDE model is modified in order to emphasize the influence of vehicle interaction between two vehicles on the probability of vehicles’ deceleration. A single-lane model which without bottleneck structure under periodic boundary conditions is simulated, and it is proved that the traffic flow simulated by S-MVDE model will generate the synchronous flow of three-phase traffic theory. Under the open boundary, the model is expanded by adding an on-ramp, the congestion pattern caused by the bottleneck is simulated at different main road flow rates and on-ramp flow rates, which is compared with the traffic congestion pattern observed by Kerner et al. and it is found that the results are consistent with the congestion characteristics in the three-phase traffic flow theory.

  16. Research on interactions of plasma streams with CFC targets in the Rod Plasma Injector facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaloga Dobromil R.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper present results of optical spectroscopy studies of interactions of intense plasma streams with a solid target made of carbon fibre composite (CFC. The experiments were carried out within the Rod Plasma Injector (RPI IBIS facility. The optical measurements were performed first for a freely propagating plasma stream in order to determine the optimal operational parameters of this facility. Optical emission spectra (OES were recorded for different operational modes of the RPI IBIS device, and spectral lines were identified originating from the working gas (deuterium as well as some lines from the electrode material (molybdenum. Subsequently, optical measurements of plasma interacting with the CFC target were performed. In the optical spectra recorded with the irradiated CFC samples, in addition to deuterium and molybdenum lines, many carbon lines, which enabled to estimate erosion of the investigated targets, were recorded. In order to study changes in the irradiated CFC samples, their surfaces were analysed (before and after several plasma discharges by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS techniques. The analysis of the obtained SEM images showed that the plasma irradiation induces noticeable changes in the surface morphology, for example vaporisation of some carbon fibres and formation of microcracks. The obtained EDS images showed that upon the irradiated target surface, some impurity ions are also deposited, particularly molybdenum ions from the applied electrodes.

  17. Gene-Environment Interaction Research and Transgenic Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chouliaras

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of the sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease (AD remains largely unknown. Recent evidence has suggested that gene-environment interactions (GxE may play a crucial role in its development and progression. Whereas various susceptibility loci have been identified, like the apolipoprotein E4 allele, these cannot fully explain the increasing prevalence of AD observed with aging. In addition to such genetic risk factors, various environmental factors have been proposed to alter the risk of developing AD as well as to affect the rate of cognitive decline in AD patients. Nevertheless, aside from the independent effects of genetic and environmental risk factors, their synergistic participation in increasing the risk of developing AD has been sparsely investigated, even though evidence points towards such a direction. Advances in the genetic manipulation of mice, modeling various aspects of the AD pathology, have provided an excellent tool to dissect the effects of genes, environment, and their interactions. In this paper we present several environmental factors implicated in the etiology of AD that have been tested in transgenic animal models of the disease. The focus lies on the concept of GxE and its importance in a multifactorial disease like AD. Additionally, possible mediating mechanisms and future challenges are discussed.

  18. Soil structure interaction analysis for the US NRC seismic safety margins research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    The soil structure interaction project is described. The initial portion of this task concentrates on defining the state-of-the-art in the analysis of the soil structure interaction phenomenon, an assessment of those aspects of the phenomenon which significantly affect structural response, and recommendations for future development of analytical techniques and their verification. A series of benchmark analytical and test problems for which analytical techniques may be evaluated are also sought. This assessment is to be performed in the context of nuclear power plant structures; i.e., massive stiff structures arranged functionally on a particular site. The best estimate methodology will be utilized to develop transfer functions for the overall systems model. These transfer functions will operate on the free-field ground motion yielding the structural base mat response and selected in-structure response quantities for the particular site being analyzed. The transfer functions will depend on a number of parameters, e.g., soil configuration, soil material properties, frequency of the excitation, structural properties, etc. A limited comparison of alternative methods of analysis including a nonlinear analysis will be performed

  19. A State-of-the-Art Experimental Laboratory for Cloud and Cloud-Aerosol Interaction Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremaux, Charles M.; Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2011-01-01

    The state of the art for predicting climate changes due to increasing greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere with high accuracy is problematic. Confidence intervals on current long-term predictions (on the order of 100 years) are so large that the ability to make informed decisions with regard to optimum strategies for mitigating both the causes of climate change and its effects is in doubt. There is ample evidence in the literature that large sources of uncertainty in current climate models are various aerosol effects. One approach to furthering discovery as well as modeling, and verification and validation (V&V) for cloud-aerosol interactions is use of a large "cloud chamber" in a complimentary role to in-situ and remote sensing measurement approaches. Reproducing all of the complex interactions is not feasible, but it is suggested that the physics of certain key processes can be established in a laboratory setting so that relevant fluid-dynamic and cloud-aerosol phenomena can be experimentally simulated and studied in a controlled environment. This report presents a high-level argument for significantly improved laboratory capability, and is meant to serve as a starting point for stimulating discussion within the climate science and other interested communities.

  20. Critical survey of research on human factors and the man-machine interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    A case is developed for placing a high priority on research into human factors in the nuclear power industry. This is based essentially on the fact that human error is a significant factor in plant reliability and the assurance of safety. Control of human error can therefore produce benefits in the reduction of both operational costs and public risk. Descriptions are given of activities initiated by the Commission of the European Communities in conjunction with institutes within the Member States. These include: a comprehensive survey and analysis of current relevant work; considerations of classification schemes for human factors activities; the use of simulators for human factors research; and a proposed European collaborative research programme. (author)

  1. Adding Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research to Health Intervention Studies: Interacting With Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R Burke; Schoonenboom, Judith

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain how to improve intervention designs, such as randomized controlled trials (RCTs), in health science research using a process philosophy and theory known as dialectical pluralism (DP). DP views reality as plural and uses dialectical, dialogical, and hermeneutical approaches to knowledge construction. Using DP and its "both/and" logic, and its attempt to produce new creative syntheses, researchers on heterogeneous teams can better dialogue with qualitative and mixed methods approaches, concepts, paradigms, methodologies, and methods to improve their intervention research studies. The concept of reflexivity is utilized but is expanded when it is a component of DP. Examples of strategies for identifying, inviting, and creating divergence and integrative strategies for producing strong mixed methods intervention studies are provided and illustrated using real-life examples. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Revisiting violent videogames research: Game studies perspectives on aggression, violence, immersion, interaction, and textual analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Kontour

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Thus far, the bulk of effects research on violent video games demon-strates troubling correlations between playing violent video games and increases in (or primers for aggressive behavior, which suggests that overall, violent video games may be detrimental to society. However, there may be significant weaknesses in this body of research, concerning not only methodological issues such as study design and the ways in which ‘aggression’ or ‘violence’ are conceptualized, but also containing fundamental misunderstandings of games as text, apparatus, or cultural artifact. Because these studies may not have a sophisticated enough un-derstanding of games as objects or gaming as an activity, we must there-fore reconsider the conclusions and implications thus far arrived at in this research and look for new ways forward for assessing violence in/and video games.

  3. Modelling stream aquifer seepage in an alluvial aquifer: an improved loosing-stream package for MODFLOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Yassin Z.; Bruen, Michael P.

    2002-07-01

    Seepage from a stream, which partially penetrates an unconfined alluvial aquifer, is studied for the case when the water table falls below the streambed level. Inadequacies are identified in current modelling approaches to this situation. A simple and improved method of incorporating such seepage into groundwater models is presented. This considers the effect on seepage flow of suction in the unsaturated part of the aquifer below a disconnected stream and allows for the variation of seepage with water table fluctuations. The suggested technique is incorporated into the saturated code MODFLOW and is tested by comparing its predictions with those of a widely used variably saturated model, SWMS_2D simulating water flow and solute transport in two-dimensional variably saturated media. Comparisons are made of both seepage flows and local mounding of the water table. The suggested technique compares very well with the results of variably saturated model simulations. Most currently used approaches are shown to underestimate the seepage and associated local water table mounding, sometimes substantially. The proposed method is simple, easy to implement and requires only a small amount of additional data about the aquifer hydraulic properties.

  4. Simulating selenium and nitrogen fate and transport in coupled stream-aquifer systems of irrigated regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Christopher D.; Bailey, Ryan T.; Gates, Timothy K.; Heesemann, Brent E.; Morway, Eric D.

    2018-01-01

    Elevated levels of selenium (Se) in aqueous environments can harm aquatic life and endanger livestock and human health. Although Se occurs naturally in the rocks and soils of many alluvial aquifers, mining and agricultural activities can increase its rate of mobilization and transport to surface waters. Attention is given here to regions where nonpoint source return flows from irrigated lands carry pollutant loads to aquifers and streams, contributing to concentrations that violate regulatory and performance standards. Of particular concern is the heightened level and mobilization of Se influenced by nitrate (NO3), a harmful pollutant in its own right. We present a numerical model that simulates the reactive transport of Se and nitrogen (N) species in a coupled groundwater-surface water system. Building upon a conceptual model that incorporates the major processes affecting Se and NO3 transport in an irrigated watershed, the model links the finite-difference models MODFLOW, UZF-RT3D, and OTIS, to simulate flow and reactive transport of multiple chemical species in both the aquifer and a stream network, with mass exchange between the two. The capability of the new model is showcased by calibration, testing, and application to a 500 km2 region in Colorado’s Lower Arkansas River Valley using a rich data set gathered over a 10-yr period. Simulation of spatial and temporal distributions of Se concentration reveals conditions that exceed standards in groundwater for approximately 20% of the area. For the Arkansas River, standards are exceeded by 290%–450%. Simulation indicates that river concentrations of NO3 alone are near the current interim standard for the total of all dissolved N species. These results indicate the need for future use of the developed model to investigate the prospects for land and water best management practices to decrease pollutant levels.

  5. Implications of Kali–Hindon inter-stream aquifer water balance for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    evaporation from the water table, discharge from the aquifer to rivers and horizontal subsurface outflows were also ... and their future supply potential in order to predict possible conflicts ..... losses via evaporation losses and horizontal subsur-.

  6. Simulating selenium and nitrogen fate and transport in coupled stream-aquifer systems of irrigated regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Christopher D.; Bailey, Ryan T.; Gates, Timothy K.; Heesemann, Brent E.; Morway, Eric D.

    2018-05-01

    Elevated levels of selenium (Se) in aqueous environments can harm aquatic life and endanger livestock and human health. Although Se occurs naturally in the rocks and soils of many alluvial aquifers, mining and agricultural activities can increase its rate of mobilization and transport to surface waters. Attention is given here to regions where nonpoint source return flows from irrigated lands carry pollutant loads to aquifers and streams, contributing to concentrations that violate regulatory and performance standards. Of particular concern is the heightened level and mobilization of Se influenced by nitrate (NO3), a harmful pollutant in its own right. We present a numerical model that simulates the reactive transport of Se and nitrogen (N) species in a coupled groundwater-surface water system. Building upon a conceptual model that incorporates the major processes affecting Se and NO3 transport in an irrigated watershed, the model links the finite-difference models MODFLOW, UZF-RT3D, and OTIS, to simulate flow and reactive transport of multiple chemical species in both the aquifer and a stream network, with mass exchange between the two. The capability of the new model is showcased by calibration, testing, and application to a 500 km2 region in Colorado's Lower Arkansas River Valley using a rich data set gathered over a 10-yr period. Simulation of spatial and temporal distributions of Se concentration reveals conditions that exceed standards in groundwater for approximately 20% of the area. For the Arkansas River, standards are exceeded by 290%-450%. Simulation indicates that river concentrations of NO3 alone are near the current interim standard for the total of all dissolved N species. These results indicate the need for future use of the developed model to investigate the prospects for land and water best management practices to decrease pollutant levels.

  7. Man-Computer Symbiosis Through Interactive Graphics: A Survey and Identification of Critical Research Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Patricia A.

    The purpose of this report was to determine the research areas that appear most critical to achieving man-computer symbiosis. An operational definition of man-computer symbiosis was developed by: (1) reviewing and summarizing what others have said about it, and (2) attempting to distinguish it from other types of man-computer relationships. From…

  8. Dynamic Framing in the Communication of Scientific Research: Texts and Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Pryce R.; Russ, Rosemary S.

    2015-01-01

    The fields of science education and science communication share the overarching goal of helping non-experts and non-members of the professional science community develop knowledge of the content and processes of scientific research. However, the specific audiences, methods, and aims employed in the two fields have evolved quite differently and as…

  9. Magic-Mirror-Spiral: Looking into the role of 'design ideal' in interaction design research projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagalkot, Naveen L.; Nazzi, Elena; Sokoler, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    the dialectic during a research practice are missing. In order to embrace this dialectic, in this paper we suggest the formulation of a Design Ideal as the interface between theoretical concept and situation. We support our suggestion by a retrospection of our ongoing exploration of MagicMirrorSpiral...

  10. Mobile Technology and Mathematics Learning in the Early Grades. Interactive STEM Research + Practice Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presser, Ashley Lewis; Busey, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This research brief describes the value of using mobile technologies in and out of elementary mathematics classrooms, and investigates the view that teachers may not be getting the guidance they need to best leverage those technologies. The authors explore three areas of concern: How can teachers use technology in developmentally appropriate ways…

  11. More Like Jazz than Classical: Reciprocal Interactions among Educational Researchers and Respondents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dance, L. Janelle; Gutierrez, Rochelle; Hermes, Mary

    2010-01-01

    In this article, educational scholars L. Janelle Dance, Rochelle Gutierrez, and Mary Hermes share insights from their lived experience as qualitative researchers trying to work in collaboration with diverse populations. They refer to these insights as "improvisations on conventional qualitative methods," reminding readers that their…

  12. Understanding Societal Impact in Research and Technology Organisations using Productive Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dorp, Aad; Löwik, Sandor; de Weerd-Nederhof, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Research organisations receiving at least partly public funding are increasingly required to show their societal impact. Assessing societal impact is a complex task, because it involves very different aspects, is prone to bias from the assessor and even may be contradictory. Using the process and

  13. Participatory Dark Sky Quality Monitoring from Italy: Interactions Between Awareness Raising and Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Giacomelli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on light pollution and its effects developed in Italy through a peculiar path. After originating seminal work in the late Nineties, above all the first world atlas of night sky brightness, the academic system apparently did not leverage this asset to a wider set of studies. In parallel, some activities which are prerequisites to research and analysis, such as measurement campaigns or development of calibration tests, were initiated in a “grassroots mode” by other sectors of society, such as non-governmental associations. One of the relevant example of this process is the BuioMetria Partecipativa project which was started in 2008 in Italy with the aim of encouraging non-professionals to collect data on light pollution as a strategy for environmental awareness raising. The BMP project conjugates this component with a scientific approach, allowing the collection of valuable quantitative environmental data, using a low-cost device, called Sky Quality Meter (SQM, provided to citizens. The measurements are loaded to a database on the project web site, and are published in a variety of formats. In 2011 the system was extended to collect data from fixed SQM stations for continuous monitoring, with the development of automated data harvesting procedures and leading to complement the citizen science measures with more high-quality time series of light pollution data. At the national level, the project obtained considerable recognition, in terms of citizen participation and media coverage. Most interestingly from a research perspective, the project acted as a trigger to initiate light pollution studies by Italian experts, namely in the areas of biometeorology and marine ecology. The article will review the process which led the authors to escalate their operations from awareness raising to research, and will provide an overview of the models and of the first tests conducted in the context of our research studies.

  14. Gestalt Processing in Human-Robot Interaction: A Novel Account for Autism Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Dimitrova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a novel analysis focused on showing that education is possible through robotic enhancement of the Gestalt processing in children with autism, which is not comparable to alternative educational methods such as demonstration and instruction provided solely by human tutors. The paper underlines the conceptualization of cognitive processing of holistic representations traditionally named in psychology as Gestalt structures, emerging in the process of human-robot interaction in educational settings. Two cognitive processes are proposed in the present study - bounding and unfolding - and their role in Gestalt emergence is outlined. The proposed theoretical approach explains novel findings of autistic perception and gives guidelines for design of robot-assistants to the rehabilitation process.

  15. Fluid-Structure Interaction for Coolant Flow in Research-type Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Franklin G.; Ekici, Kivanc; Freels, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is scheduled to undergo a conversion of the fuel used and this proposed change requires an extensive analysis of the flow through the reactor core. The core consists of 540 very thin and long fuel plates through which the coolant (water) flows at a very high rate. Therefore, the design and the flow conditions make the plates prone to dynamic and static deflections, which may result in flow blockage and structural failure which in turn may cause core damage. To investigate the coolant flow between fuel plates and associated structural deflections, the Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) module in COMSOL will be used. Flow induced flutter and static deflections will be examined. To verify the FSI module, a test case of a cylinder in crossflow, with vortex induced vibrations was performed and validated.

  16. Research Using the Roter Method of Interaction Process Analysis (RIAS) for Communication Education in the Pharmaceutical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Etsuko

    2017-01-01

    The ability to communicate effectively as a healthcare professional has come into greater focus as the role of pharmacists expands from "medicine-based" to "client-based" (e.g., working with patients, their families, and in multidisciplinary interactions). The ability to communicate cannot be acquired solely in the classroom; a large part of acquiring such skill is based on practical experience. Role-playing with simulated patients has already been implemented in pharmaceutical education; in that sense, opportunities to receive education in practical communication are increasing. However, in order to assure that these educational opportunities are more than "experiences" in theory alone, aspects of communications training that are satisfactory or need improvement must be clarified through empirical studies. While data used in pharmaceutical studies have mainly been quantitative in nature, data required for medical communication studies is generally more qualitative. Only recently the importance of qualitative research has been recognized in pharmaceutical studies, a field in which any aspect difficult to express numerically has been considered subjective, and thus less acceptable. Against this backdrop, this report introduces an aspect of communication research that employs the Roter method of interaction process analysis (RIAS), a medical communication analyzing method by Professor Debra Roter at Johns Hopkins University. RIAS is a quantitative analysis of qualitative data. I want to discuss the significance of using results of research based on qualitative data to improve the quality of communication.

  17. The Jupyter/IPython architecture: a unified view of computational research, from interactive exploration to communication and publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan-Kelley, M.; Perez, F.; Granger, B.; Kluyver, T.; Ivanov, P.; Frederic, J.; Bussonnier, M.

    2014-12-01

    IPython has provided terminal-based tools for interactive computing in Python since 2001. The notebook document format and multi-process architecture introduced in 2011 have expanded the applicable scope of IPython into teaching, presenting, and sharing computational work, in addition to interactive exploration. The new architecture also allows users to work in any language, with implementations in Python, R, Julia, Haskell, and several other languages. The language agnostic parts of IPython have been renamed to Jupyter, to better capture the notion that a cross-language design can encapsulate commonalities present in computational research regardless of the programming language being used. This architecture offers components like the web-based Notebook interface, that supports rich documents that combine code and computational results with text narratives, mathematics, images, video and any media that a modern browser can display. This interface can be used not only in research, but also for publication and education, as notebooks can be converted to a variety of output formats, including HTML and PDF. Recent developments in the Jupyter project include a multi-user environment for hosting notebooks for a class or research group, a live collaboration notebook via Google Docs, and better support for languages other than Python.

  18. Creating Learning Experiences that Promote Informal Science Education: Designing Conservation-Focused Interactive Zoo Exhibits through Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenda, Peter

    Research on exhibit design over the past twenty years has started to identify many different methods to increase the learning that occurs in informal education environments. This study utilized relevant research on exhibit design to create and study the effectiveness of a mobile interactive exhibit at the Seneca Park Zoo that promotes socialization, engagement in science, and conservation-related practices among guests. This study will serve as one component of a major redesign project at the Seneca Park Zoo for their Rocky Coasts exhibit. This action research study targeted the following question, "How can interactive exhibits be designed to promote socialization, engagement in science, and real-world conservation-related practices (RCPs) among zoo guests?" Specific research questions included: 1. In what ways did guests engage with the exhibit? 2. In what ways were guests impacted by the exhibit? a) What evidence exists, if any, of guests learning science content from the exhibit? b) What evidence exists, if any, of guests being emotionally affected by the exhibit? c) What evidence exists, if any, of guests changing their RCPs after visiting the exhibit? Data were collected through zoo guest surveys completed by zoo guests comparing multiple exhibits, interviews with guests before and after they used the prototype exhibit, observations and audio recordings of guests using the prototype exhibit, and follow-up phone interviews with guests who volunteered to participate. Data were analyzed collaboratively with members of the zoo's exhibit Redesign Team using grounded theory qualitative data analysis techniques to find patterns and trends among data. Initial findings from data analysis were used to develop shifts in the exhibit in order to increase visitor engagement and learning. This process continued for two full action research spirals, which resulted in three iterations of the prototype exhibit. The overall findings of this study highlight the ways in which

  19. The Cerefy Atlas of brain anatomy. An interactive reference tool for students, teachers and researchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowinski, W.L.; Thirunavuukarasuu, A.; Bryan, R.N.

    2002-01-01

    The Cerefy registered Atlas of Brain Anatomy is a remarkable accomplishment combining the best of current neuroanatomical methodology with the amazing capability of the modern personal computer. This CD-ROM not only demonstrates the power of digital technology, but also provides a view of the future of medical education. Through the use of magnetic resonance images (MRI) combined with interactive image labeling it is possible to use this CD-ROM to rapidly name any structure within the brain in three planes of section presented simultaneously. With the simple click of a mouse of most intricate of brain structures can be identified in sagittal, axial, and coronal planes. By selecting the ''label'' function, whatever brain structure the cursor is placed upon is named in real time. It is possible to literally browse across the brain and watch every structure that is touched be named on the screen as fast as you can move the cursor. This incredible functionality is further enhanced by the ability to select the test mode and provide a self-guided quiz of neuroanatomy. This atlas is perfect for preparing teaching materials as it also contains a ''save'' function to preserve labeled images. This low-cost CD-ROM will no doubt be used by those who study and/or teach neuroanatomy, neurology, neurosurgery, neuroradiology, neuroscience, neuropsychology, and psychiatry. This unique contribution to the field of neuroanatomy is a most impressive accomplishment. (orig.)

  20. Kameleon Live: An Interactive Cloud Based Analysis and Visualization Platform for Space Weather Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pembroke, A. D.; Colbert, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) provides hosting for many of the simulations used by the space weather community of scientists, educators, and forecasters. CCMC users may submit model runs through the Runs on Request system, which produces static visualizations of model output in the browser, while further analysis may be performed off-line via Kameleon, CCMC's cross-language access and interpolation library. Off-line analysis may be suitable for power-users, but storage and coding requirements present a barrier to entry for non-experts. Moreover, a lack of a consistent framework for analysis hinders reproducibility of scientific findings. To that end, we have developed Kameleon Live, a cloud based interactive analysis and visualization platform. Kameleon Live allows users to create scientific studies built around selected runs from the Runs on Request database, perform analysis on those runs, collaborate with other users, and disseminate their findings among the space weather community. In addition to showcasing these novel collaborative analysis features, we invite feedback from CCMC users as we seek to advance and improve on the new platform.

  1. The Cerefy Atlas of brain anatomy. An interactive reference tool for students, teachers and researchers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowinski, W.L.; Thirunavuukarasuu, A.; Bryan, R.N.

    2002-07-01

    The Cerefy {sup registered} Atlas of Brain Anatomy is a remarkable accomplishment combining the best of current neuroanatomical methodology with the amazing capability of the modern personal computer. This CD-ROM not only demonstrates the power of digital technology, but also provides a view of the future of medical education. Through the use of magnetic resonance images (MRI) combined with interactive image labeling it is possible to use this CD-ROM to rapidly name any structure within the brain in three planes of section presented simultaneously. With the simple click of a mouse of most intricate of brain structures can be identified in sagittal, axial, and coronal planes. By selecting the ''label'' function, whatever brain structure the cursor is placed upon is named in real time. It is possible to literally browse across the brain and watch every structure that is touched be named on the screen as fast as you can move the cursor. This incredible functionality is further enhanced by the ability to select the test mode and provide a self-guided quiz of neuroanatomy. This atlas is perfect for preparing teaching materials as it also contains a ''save'' function to preserve labeled images. This low-cost CD-ROM will no doubt be used by those who study and/or teach neuroanatomy, neurology, neurosurgery, neuroradiology, neuroscience, neuropsychology, and psychiatry. This unique contribution to the field of neuroanatomy is a most impressive accomplishment. (orig.)

  2. Wine and grape tannin interactions with salivary proteins and their impact on astringency: a review of current research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Jacqui M; Kennedy, James A

    2011-03-11

    Astringency is an important characteristic of red wine quality. The sensation is generally thought to be produced by the interaction of wine tannins with salivary proteins and the subsequent aggregation and precipitation of protein-tannin complexes. The importance of wine astringency for marketability has led to a wealth of research on the causes of astringency and how tannins impact the quality of the sensation, particularly with respect to tannin structure. Ultimately, the understanding of how tannin structure impacts astringency will allow the controlled manipulation of tannins via such methods as micro-oxygenation or fining to improve the quality of wines.

  3. Wine and Grape Tannin Interactions with Salivary Proteins and Their Impact on Astringency: A Review of Current Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Kennedy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Astringency is an important characteristic of red wine quality. The sensation is generally thought to be produced by the interaction of wine tannins with salivary proteins and the subsequent aggregation and precipitation of protein-tannin complexes. The importance of wine astringency for marketability has led to a wealth of research on the causes of astringency and how tannins impact the quality of the sensation, particularly with respect to tannin structure. Ultimately, the understanding of how tannin structure impacts astringency will allow the controlled manipulation of tannins via such methods as micro-oxygenation or fining to improve the quality of wines.

  4. The Neurobiology of Emotion-Cognition Interactions: Fundamental Questions and Strategies for Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadas eOkon-Singer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed the emergence of powerful new tools for assaying the brain and a remarkable acceleration of research focused on the interplay of emotion and cognition. This work has begun to yield new insights into fundamental questions about the nature of the mind and important clues about the origins of mental illness. In particular, this research demonstrates that stress, anxiety, and other kinds of emotion can profoundly influence key elements of cognition, including selective attention, working memory, and cognitive control. Often, this influence persists beyond the duration of transient emotional challenges, partially reflecting the slower molecular dynamics of catecholamine and hormonal neurochemistry. In turn, circuits involved in attention, executive control, and working memory contribute to the regulation of emotion. The distinction between the ‘emotional’ and the ‘cognitive’ brain is fuzzy and context-dependent. Indeed, there is compelling evidence that brain territories and psychological processes commonly associated with cognition, such as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and working memory, play a central role in emotion. Furthermore, putatively emotional and cognitive regions influence one another via a complex web of connections in ways that jointly contribute to adaptive and maladaptive behavior. This work demonstrates that emotion and cognition are deeply interwoven in the fabric of the brain, suggesting that widely held beliefs about the key constituents of ‘the emotional brain’ and ‘the cognitive brain’ are fundamentally flawed. We conclude by outlining several strategies for enhancing future research. Developing a deeper understanding of the emotional-cognitive brain is important, not just for understanding the mind but also for elucidating the root causes of its disorders.

  5. How to define 'best practice' for use in Knowledge Translation research: a practical, stepped and interactive process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Marije; Tavender, Emma; Bragge, Peter; Gruen, Russell; Green, Sally

    2013-10-01

    Defining 'best practice' is one of the first and crucial steps in any Knowledge Translation (KT) research project. Without a sound understanding of what exactly should happen in practice, it is impossible to measure the extent of existing gaps between 'desired' and 'actual' care, set implementation goals, and monitor performance. The aim of this paper is to present a practical, stepped and interactive process to develop best practice recommendations that are actionable, locally applicable and in line with the best available research-based evidence, with a view to adapt these into process measures (quality indicators) for KT research purposes. Our process encompasses the following steps: (1) identify current, high-quality clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) and extract recommendations; (2) select strong recommendations in key clinical management areas; (3) update evidence and create evidence overviews; (4) discuss evidence and produce agreed 'evidence statements'; (5) discuss the relevance of the evidence with local stakeholders; and (6) develop locally applicable actionable best practice recommendations, suitable for use as the basis of quality indicators. Actionable definitions of local best practice are a prerequisite for doing KT research. As substantial resources go into rigorously synthesizing evidence and developing CPGs, it is important to make best use of such available resources. We developed a process for efficiently developing locally applicable actionable best practice recommendations from existing high-quality CPGs that are in line with current research evidence. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Integrated analysis of particle interactions at hadron colliders Report of research activities in 2010-2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadolsky, Pavel M. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-08-31

    The report summarizes research activities of the project ”Integrated analysis of particle interactions” at Southern Methodist University, funded by 2010 DOE Early Career Research Award DE-SC0003870. The goal of the project is to provide state-of-the-art predictions in quantum chromodynamics in order to achieve objectives of the LHC program for studies of electroweak symmetry breaking and new physics searches. We published 19 journal papers focusing on in-depth studies of proton structure and integration of advanced calculations from different areas of particle phenomenology: multi-loop calculations, accurate long-distance hadronic functions, and precise numerical programs. Methods for factorization of QCD cross sections were advanced in order to develop new generations of CTEQ parton distribution functions (PDFs), CT10 and CT14. These distributions provide the core theoretical input for multi-loop perturbative calculations by LHC experimental collaborations. A novel ”PDF meta-analysis” technique was invented to streamline applications of PDFs in numerous LHC simulations and to combine PDFs from various groups using multivariate stochastic sampling of PDF parameters. The meta-analysis will help to bring the LHC perturbative calculations to the new level of accuracy, while reducing computational efforts. The work on parton distributions was complemented by development of advanced perturbative techniques to predict observables dependent on several momentum scales, including production of massive quarks and transverse momentum resummation at the next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD.

  7. Experimental research on the interactions between some anxiolytics and dietary sodium monoglutamate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buzescu Anca

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Monosodium glutamate, the salt of glutamic acid, is largely used as a flavour enhancer (E621. In this study, we determine if monosodium glutamate, after repeated oral administration, can induce any degree of anxiety. Taking into account the interdependence between glutamate and GABA neurotransmissions, we studied the possible interactions of monosodium glutamate with some representatives belonging to benzodiazepines therapeutical class, diazepam and alprazolam, used as first line therapy for the treatment of anxiety. Methods: For determining the degree of anxiety, the specific cross-labyrinth test was used. The medium time spent in the closed-arms of the crosslabyrinth is correlated with increased anxiety and the medium time spent in the opened arms is correlated with a low degree anxiety. NMRI adult mice received 300 mg/kg monosodium glutamate for 21 days, dose representing 1/50 from mice LD50 (15000mg/kg and twice the maximum admitted dose/ day for human. Results: When compared to control group, the group receiving monosodium glutamate, showed a not statistically significant slight increase in the degree of anxiety. The groups receiving benzodiazepines presented a significant reduction of the degree of anxiety, proving their anxiolytic effect. The groups receiving glutamate and diazepam or alprazolam, showed a lower reduction of the degree of anxiety, than group receiving only benzodiazepines, phenomenon which proves an antagonism between glutamate and the anxiolytics used in this study. Conclusions: The oral administration of monosodium glutamate increases slightly, not statistically significant, the degree of anxiety in mice and significantly alters the response to the benzodiazepines therapy, reducing the effect for both alprazolam and diazepam.

  8. Co-ordinated experimental research into PV power interaction with the supply network - Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, R.; Thornycroft, J.; Knight, J.

    2000-07-01

    This report describes the development of a procedure for type testing photovoltaic inverters that are suitable for connecting to the UK public distribution system based on experimental research and consultation within the industry. Phase 1 of the project investigated the performance of the inverters and the cumulative effect of multiple installation on a section of distributed network, and Phase 2 concentrated on the requirements for PV inverters that would allow them to be connected to the grid without further investigation and to develop a type test procedure. The production of the 'UK Technical Guidelines for Inverter Connected Single Phase Photovoltaic (PV) Generators up to 5kVA' based on the project results and its adoption by the Electricity Association as draft Engineering Recommendations G77 are reported.

  9. A new research journal to understand the interactions of xenobiotics with living organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Gagné

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Since its creation in January 2011, the Journal of Xenobiotics (published by PAGEPress, Italy is devoted to the publication of novel research articles in the fields of the occurrence and biochemical effects of xenobiotics on all living organisms. Although xenobiotics are defined firstly as compounds that are foreign to life, compounds of natural origins occuring at concentrations that are not usually found, could also be considered as foreigners since their enhanced occurrence may affect non-target organisms. In this sense, products derived from natural products are well known to have either a beneficial (natural products used as food additives and many pharmaceuticals or detrimental (cyanotoxins impact on the health of an organism. The journal recognizes that these compounds could be either harmful or beneficial to organisms and the interplay between these two aspects is of particular interest...

  10. Interaction of mathematical modeling and social and behavioral HIV/AIDS research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassels, Susan; Goodreau, Steven M

    2011-03-01

    HIV is transmitted within complex biobehavioral systems. Mathematical modeling can provide insight to complex population-level outcomes of various behaviors measured at an individual level. HIV models in the social and behavioral sciences can be categorized in a number of ways; here, we consider two classes of applications common in the field generally, and in the past year in particular: those models that explore significant behavioral determinants of HIV disparities within and between populations; and those models that seek to evaluate the potential impact of specific social and behavioral interventions. We discuss two overarching issues we see in the field: the need to further systematize effectiveness models of behavioral interventions, and the need for increasing investigation of the use of behavioral data in epidemic models. We believe that a recent initiative by the National Institutes of Health will qualitatively change the relationships between epidemic modeling and sociobehavioral prevention research in the coming years.

  11. Research of fluid-induced pressure fluctuation due to impeller-volute interaction in a centrifugal pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Q Z; Yang, K; Li, D Y; Gong, R Z

    2013-01-01

    The fluid pressure fluctuation generated by unsteady flow is a very important factor to induce vibration of the centrifugal pump. The relative movement between impeller and volute generates an unsteady interaction which affects not only the overall pump performance, but is also responsible for pressure fluctuations. Pressure fluctuations interact with the volute casing or even with the circuit and give rise to dynamic effects over the mechanical parts, which are one of the most important sources of vibration and hydraulic noise. To investigate the flow characteristic in the centrifugal pump, the unsteady flow is simulated by CFD methods in this paper. Unsteady flow characteristic in the centrifugal pump is obtained considering the impeller-volute interaction in the whole flow field. Based on the unsteady flow simulation, amplitude-frequency characteristics of the pressure fluctuation in the centrifugal pump are obtained through setting up monitoring point at the impeller outlet. The research shows that the frequency component include the blade passing frequency as the main component, the multiplication of blade passing frequency, and the harmonic interference due to the unsteady flow

  12. Using Research-Based Interactive Video Vignettes to Enhance Out-of-Class Learning in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Priscilla W.; Willis, Maxine C.; Jackson, David P.; Koenig, Kathleen; Teese, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Ever since the first generalized computer-assisted instruction system (PLATO1) was introduced over 50 years ago, educators have been adding computer-based materials to their classes. Today many textbooks have complete online versions that include video lectures and other supplements. In the past 25 years the web has fueled an explosion of online homework and course management systems, both as blended learning and online courses. Meanwhile, introductory physics instructors have been implementing new approaches to teaching based on the outcomes of Physics Education Research (PER). A common theme of PER-based instruction has been the use of active-learning strategies designed to help students overcome alternative conceptions that they often bring to the study of physics.2 Unfortunately, while classrooms have become more active, online learning typically relies on passive lecture videos or Kahn-style3 tablet drawings. To bring active learning online, the LivePhoto Physics Group has been developing Interactive Video Vignettes (IVVs) that add interactivity and PER-based elements to short presentations. These vignettes incorporate web-based video activities that contain interactive elements and typically require students to make predictions and analyze real-world phenomena.

  13. Neuregulin 1: a prime candidate for research into gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia? Insights from genetic rodent models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eKarl

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a multi-factorial disease characterized by a high heritability and environmental risk factors. In recent years, an increasing number of researchers worldwide have started investigating the ‘two-hit hypothesis’ of schizophrenia predicting that genetic and environmental risk factors (GxE interactively cause the development of the disorder. This work is starting to produce valuable new animal models and reveal novel insights into the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. This mini review will focus on recent advancements in the field made by challenging mutant and transgenic rodent models for the schizophrenia candidate gene neuregulin 1 (NRG1 with particular environmental factors. It will outline results obtained from mouse and rat models for various Nrg1 isoforms/isoform types (e.g. transmembrane domain Nrg1, Type II Nrg1, which have been exposed to different forms of stress (acute versus chronic, restraint versus social and housing conditions (standard laboratory versus minimally enriched housing. These studies suggest Nrg1 as a prime candidate for GxE interactions in schizophrenia rodent models and that the use of rodent models will enable a better understanding of GxE interactions and the underlying mechanisms.

  14. Aerosol-Water Cycle Interaction: A New Challenge in Monsoon Climate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2006-01-01

    Long recognized as a major environmental hazard, aerosol is now known to have strong impacts on both regional and global climate. It has been estimated that aerosol may reduce by up to 10% of the seasonal mean solar radiation reaching the earth surface, producing a global cooling effect that opposes global warming (Climate Change 2001). This means that the potential perils that humans have committed to global warming may be far greater than what we can detect at the present. As a key component of the Earth climate system, the water cycle is profoundly affected by the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere. Through the so-called "direct effect", aerosol scatters and/or absorbs solar radiation, thus cooling the earth surface and changing the horizontal and vertical radiational heating contrast in the atmosphere. The heating contrast drives anomalous atmospheric circulation, resulting in changes in convection, clouds, and rainfall. Another way aerosol can affect the water cycle is through the so-called "indirect effects", whereby aerosol increases the number of cloud condensation nuclei, prolongs life time of clouds, and inhibits the growth of cloud drops to raindrops. This leads to more clouds, and increased reflection of solar radiation, and further cooling at the earth surface. In monsoon regions, the response of the water cycle to aerosol forcing is especially complex, not only because of presence of diverse mix of aerosol species with vastly different radiative properties, but also because the monsoon is strongly influenced by ocean and land surface processes, land use, land change, as well as regional and global greenhouse warming effects. Thus, sorting out the impacts of aerosol forcing, and interaction with the monsoon water cycle is a very challenging problem. In this talk, I will offer some insights into how aerosols may impact the Asian monsoon based on preliminary results from satellite observations and climate model experiments. Specifically, I will

  15. Progress Report [2. Research Coordination Meeting on Heavy Charged-Particle Interaction Data for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Geant4 is a general purpose toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter. Primary focus of Geant4 was on preparation of experiments for CERN Large Hadron Collider. Other areas of application are growing and include high energy, nuclear and accelerator physics, studies in hadronic therapy, tomography, space dosimetry, and others. Geant4 physics includes different models for simulation of interactions of hadrons with nuclei. For the simulation of reactions of interest in hadrontherapy, the Bertini-style cascade (BERT) and the binary cascade (BIC) models are available. Both of them include, as final stages after the kinetic cascade regime, sequential pre-equilibrium and de-excitation phases. Nevertheless, the high degree of accuracy required for practical applications needed for an overall improvement of the performance of the Geant4 hadronic models. In particular, our work has been concentrated in the pre-equilibrium and de-excitation models included in the binary cascade physics list. New physics has been included mainly through the implementation of more realistic inverse reaction cross sections for nucleons and light charged particles. An intensive bug-fixing effort has been made, which very much improved the description of charged particle emissions and fission. These achievements favoured the participation of Geant4 into the IAEA benchmark of spallation models. Low energy region of the benchmark (below 200 MeV) and some materials of interest are common to hadrontherapy (structural materials for shielding, collimators, etc.), which justifies its inclusion in the present brief report. For neutrons below 20 MeV, Geant4 High Precision parameterized model is recommended, although there is no direct access in Geant-4 to evaluated data in ENDF format; it uses some specific libraries which contain, in principle, the same type of information as the ENDF-6 format files, but they do not cover all presently evaluated nuclei and reactions

  16. A Bridge Over Turbulent Waters: Illustrating the Interaction Between Managerial Leaders and Facilitators When Implementing Research Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zijpp, Teatske Johanna; Niessen, Theo; Eldh, Ann Catrine; Hawkes, Claire; McMullan, Christel; Mockford, Carole; Wallin, Lars; McCormack, Brendan; Rycroft-Malone, Jo; Seers, Kate

    2016-02-01

    Emerging evidence focuses on the importance of the role of leadership in successfully transferring research evidence into practice. However, little is known about the interaction between managerial leaders and clinical leaders acting as facilitators (internal facilitators [IFs]) in this implementation process. To describe the interaction between managerial leaders and IFs and how this enabled or hindered the facilitation process of implementing urinary incontinence guideline recommendations in a local context in settings that provide long-term care to older people. Semistructured interviews with 105 managers and 22 IFs, collected for a realist process evaluation across four European countries informed this study. An interpretive data analysis unpacks interactions between managerial leaders and IFs. This study identified three themes that were important in the interactions between managerial leaders and IFs that could hinder or support the implementation process: "realising commitment"; "negotiating conditions"; and "encouragement to keep momentum going." The findings revealed that the continuous reciprocal relationships between IFs and managerial leaders influenced the progress of implementation, and could slow the process down or disrupt it. A metaphor of crossing a turbulent river by the "building of a bridge" emerged as one way of understanding the findings. Our findings illuminate a neglected area, the effects of relationships between key staff on implementing evidence into practice. Relational aspects of managerial and clinical leadership roles need greater consideration when planning guideline implementation and practice change. In order to support implementation, staff assigned as IFs as well as stakeholders like managers at all levels of an organisation should be engaged in realising commitment, negotiating conditions, and keeping momentum going. Thus, communication is crucial between all involved. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  17. Multi-Sensory-Motor Research: Investigating Auditory, Visual, and Motor Interaction in Virtual Reality Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Kluss

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Perception in natural environments is inseparably linked to motor action. In fact, we consider action an essential component of perceptual representation. But these representations are inherently difficult to investigate: Traditional experimental setups are limited by the lack of flexibility in manipulating spatial features. To overcome these problems, virtual reality (VR experiments seem to be a feasible alternative, but these setups typically lack ecological realism due to the use of “unnatural” interface-devices (joystick. Thus, we propose an experimental apparatus which combines multisensory perception and action in an ecologically realistic way. The basis is a 10-foot hollow sphere (VirtuSphere placed on a platform that allows free rotation. A subject inside can walk in any direction for any distance immersed into virtual environment. Both the rotation of the sphere and movement of the subject's head are tracked to process the subject's view within the VR-environment presented on a head-mounted display. Moreover, auditory features are dynamically processed taking greatest care of exact alignment of sound-sources and visual objects using ambisonic-encoded audio processed by a HRTF-filterbank. We present empirical data that confirm ecological realism of this setup and discuss its suitability for multi-sensory-motor research.

  18. Using Psychodynamic Interaction as a Valuable Source of Information in Social Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Schmidt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article will address the issue of using understandings of psychodynamic interrelations as a means to grasp how social and cultural dynamics are processed individually and collectively in narratives. I apply the two theoretically distinct concepts of inter- and intrasubjectivity to gain insight into how social and cultural dynamics are processed as subjective experiences and reflected in the interrelational space created in narrative interviews with trainee social educators. By using a combination of interactionist theory and psychosocial theory in the analysis of an interview with a student of social education, I demonstrate how the often conflicting demands and expectations are being played out in the interrelational tension between the researcher (myself and the interviewee or narrator. In a confrontation with “inner” expectations and concerns regarding a future profession and one’s ability to cope, and the “outer” socially and culturally embedded discourses as they are played out in the objectives of self-development and education, the narrative about a forthcoming internship is filled with tension and contradiction. In this article I will demonstrate how such tensions and contradictions are valuable sources of information in understanding the process of becoming a social educator.

  19. Scientific research and regulatory control: An interaction that must be reviewed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouailhetas, Y.; Mezrahi, A.; Bonacossa Almeida, C.E. de; Xavier, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The control of radiological impact, in Brazil, at nuclear facilities is based on radiological protection guidelines adopted by the Nuclear Energy National Commission (CNEN), following recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), Publication 26. ICRP adopted ''prudently'', for radiological protection purposes, the hypothesis, in case of stochastic effects, of linearity dose/effect, without dose threshold, based on absence of conclusive data concerning the real behaviour of dose/effect curve. Additionally, the position of ICRP is not sustained specially considering as non existent individually accumulated doses, accumulated doses through generations and origin of radiation, either natural or anthropogenic. Brazil follows ICRP recommendations despite existing high background radiation areas. In absence of a definitive position, professionals of different areas, such as jurists and psychologists infer on ''effects of radiation'', no matter it exists. ICRP should: clarify as being just operational linearity hypothesis; consider that an excess of prudence can cause a non-sense public rejection to nuclear applications; incentive participation of different fields scientists to elaborate radiological protection procedures and radiological protection scientists to develop researches based on realistic data. Finally, it would be possible to achieve a new philosophy for public protection considering real risks associated with exposure to radiation. (author)

  20. Human–environment interactions in urban green spaces — A systematic review of contemporary issues and prospects for future research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabisch, Nadja; Qureshi, Salman; Haase, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Scientific papers on landscape planning underline the importance of maintaining and developing green spaces because of their multiple environmental and social benefits for city residents. However, a general understanding of contemporary human–environment interaction issues in urban green space is still incomplete and lacks orientation for urban planners. This review examines 219 publications to (1) provide an overview of the current state of research on the relationship between humans and urban green space, (2) group the different research approaches by identifying the main research areas, methods, and target groups, and (3) highlight important future prospects in urban green space research. - Highlights: • Reviewed literature on urban green pins down a dearth of comparative studies. • Case studies in Africa and Russia are marginalized – the Europe and US dominate. • Questionnaires are used as major tool followed by GIS and quantitative approaches. • Developing countries should contribute in building an urban green space agenda. • Interdisciplinary, adaptable and pluralistic approaches can satiate a knowledge gap

  1. Human–environment interactions in urban green spaces — A systematic review of contemporary issues and prospects for future research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabisch, Nadja, E-mail: nadja.kabisch@geo.hu-berlin.de [Institute of Geography, Humboldt-University Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin (Germany); Department of Urban and Environmental Sociology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Qureshi, Salman [Institute of Geography, Humboldt-University Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin (Germany); School of Architecture, Birmingham Institute of Art and Design, Birmingham City University, The Parkside Building, 5 Cardigan Street, Birmingham B4 7BD (United Kingdom); Haase, Dagmar [Institute of Geography, Humboldt-University Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin (Germany); Department of Computational Landscape Ecology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Scientific papers on landscape planning underline the importance of maintaining and developing green spaces because of their multiple environmental and social benefits for city residents. However, a general understanding of contemporary human–environment interaction issues in urban green space is still incomplete and lacks orientation for urban planners. This review examines 219 publications to (1) provide an overview of the current state of research on the relationship between humans and urban green space, (2) group the different research approaches by identifying the main research areas, methods, and target groups, and (3) highlight important future prospects in urban green space research. - Highlights: • Reviewed literature on urban green pins down a dearth of comparative studies. • Case studies in Africa and Russia are marginalized – the Europe and US dominate. • Questionnaires are used as major tool followed by GIS and quantitative approaches. • Developing countries should contribute in building an urban green space agenda. • Interdisciplinary, adaptable and pluralistic approaches can satiate a knowledge gap.

  2. Current millennium biotechniques for biomedical research on parasites and host-parasite interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira Antonio RL

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of biotechnology in the last three decades has generated the feeling that the newest scientific achievements will deliver high standard quality of life through abundance of food and means for successfully combating diseases. Where the new biotechnologies give access to genetic information, there is a common belief that physiological and pathological processes result from subtle modifications of gene expression. Trustfully, modern genetics has produced genetic maps, physical maps and complete nucleotide sequences from 141 viruses, 51 organelles, two eubacteria, one archeon and one eukaryote (Saccharomices cerevisiae. In addition, during the Centennial Commemoration of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute the nearly complete human genome map was proudly announced, whereas the latest Brazilian key stone contribution to science was the publication of the Shillela fastidiosa genomic sequence highlythed on a Nature cover issue. There exists a belief among the populace that further scientific accomplishments will rapidly lead to new drugs and methodological approaches to cure genetic diseases and other incurable ailments. Yet, much evidence has been accumulated, showing that a large information gap exists between the knowledge of genome sequence and our knowledge of genome function. Now that many genome maps are available, people wish to know what are we going to do with them. Certainly, all these scientific accomplishments will shed light on many more secrets of life. Nevertheless, parsimony in the weekly announcements of promising scientific achievements is necessary. We also need many more creative experimental biologists to discover new, as yet un-envisaged biotechnological approaches, and the basic resource needed for carrying out mile stone research necessary for leading us to that "promised land"often proclaimed by the mass media.

  3. Exploratory Research on Simulation of CO2-Brine-Mineral Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Zhu; Shiao hung Chiang

    2005-11-01

    Application of many carbon sequestration strategies requires knowledge of thermodynamic properties for the extremely complex chemical system of CO{sub 2}-SO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl-CaCl{sub 2}-MgCl{sub 2}. This University Coal Research Phase I program has been successful and highly productive in exploring an approach to develop an equation of state (EOS) to describe thermodynamic properties in the above chemical system. We have compiled available laboratory experimental data and thermodynamic models, and evaluated their appropriateness for the carbon sequestration process. Based on this literature review, we provided an improved CO{sub 2} solubility model for the CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl system, which incorporates newly available experimental measurements funded by DOE, and is valid in temperature range from 273 to 533 K, pressure from 0 to 2000 bar, and salinity from 0 to 4.5 molality of NaCl equivalent. The improved model also greatly improves the computational efficiency of CO{sub 2} solubility calculations and thus is better suited to be incorporated into large computer simulation models (e.g., reservoir simulation models). The literature review and model development provided insights of the data needs and directions for future work. Synergetic collaboration with DOE scientists has resulted in simulations of injected CO{sub 2} fate in sandstone aquifer with a one-dimensional numerical coupled reactive transport model. We evaluated over 100 references on CO{sub 2} solubility and submitted two manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals. One paper has been accepted for publication in ''Environmental Geosciences''.

  4. Vulnerability or Sensitivity to the Environment? Methodological Issues, Trends, and Recommendations in Gene–Environment Interactions Research in Human Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Leighton

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Research on the potential role of gene–environment interactions (GxE in explaining vulnerability to psychopathology in humans has witnessed a shift from a diathesis-stress perspective to differential susceptibility approaches. This paper critically reviews methodological issues and trends in this body of research. Databases were screened for studies of GxE in the prediction of personality traits, behavior, and mental health disorders in humans published between January 2002 and January 2015. In total, 315 papers were included. Results showed that 34 candidate genes have been included in GxE studies. Independent of the type of environment studied (early or recent life events, positive or negative environments, about 67–83% of studies have reported significant GxE interactions, which is consistent with a social susceptibility model. The percentage of positive results does not seem to differ depending on the gene studied, although publication bias might be involved. However, the number of positive findings differs depending on the population studied (i.e., young adults vs. older adults. Methodological considerations limit the ability to draw strong conclusions, particularly as almost 90% (n = 283/315 of published papers are based on samples from North America and Europe, and about 70% of published studies (219/315 are based on samples that were also used in other reports. At the same time, there are clear indications of methodological improvements over time, as is shown by a significant increase in longitudinal and experimental studies as well as in improved minimum genotyping. Recommendations for future research, such as minimum quality assessment of genes and environmental factors, specifying theoretical models guiding the study, and taking into account of cultural, ethnic, and lifetime perspectives, are formulated.

  5. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Approach to Equilibrium in Strongly Interacting Matter. Volume 118

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Venugopalan, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berges, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaizot, J. -P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gelis, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-04-09

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory*. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The purpose of this Workshop is to critically review the recent progress on the theory and phenomenology of early time dynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions from RHIC to LHC energies, to examine the various approaches on thermalization and existing issues, and to formulate new research efforts for the future. Topics slated to be covered include Experimental evidence for equilibration/isotropization, comparison of various approaches, dependence on the initial conditions and couplings, and turbulent cascades and Bose-Einstein condensation.

  6. Why and how to use virtual reality to study human social interaction: The challenges of exploring a new research landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xueni; Hamilton, Antonia F de C

    2018-03-05

    As virtual reality (VR) technology and systems become more commercially available and accessible, more and more psychologists are starting to integrate VR as part of their methods. This approach offers major advantages in experimental control, reproducibility, and ecological validity, but also has limitations and hidden pitfalls which may distract the novice user. This study aimed to guide the psychologist into the novel world of VR, reviewing available instrumentation and mapping the landscape of possible systems. We use examples of state-of-the-art research to describe challenges which research is now solving, including embodiment, uncanny valley, simulation sickness, presence, ethics, and experimental design. Finally, we propose that the biggest challenge for the field would be to build a fully interactive virtual human who can pass a VR Turing test - and that this could only be achieved if psychologists, VR technologists, and AI researchers work together. © 2018 The Authors British Journal of Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Psychological Society.

  7. Conceptualising forensic science and forensic reconstruction. Part II: The critical interaction between research, policy/law and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R M

    2017-11-01

    This paper builds on the FoRTE conceptual model presented in part I to address the forms of knowledge that are integral to the four components of the model. Articulating the different forms of knowledge within effective forensic reconstructions is valuable. It enables a nuanced approach to the development and use of evidence bases to underpin decision-making at every stage of a forensic reconstruction by enabling transparency in the reporting of inferences. It also enables appropriate methods to be developed to ensure quality and validity. It is recognised that the domains of practice, research, and policy/law intersect to form the nexus where forensic science is situated. Each domain has a distinctive infrastructure that influences the production and application of different forms of knowledge in forensic science. The channels that can enable the interaction between these domains, enhance the impact of research in theory and practice, increase access to research findings, and support quality are presented. The particular strengths within the different domains to deliver problem solving forensic reconstructions are thereby identified and articulated. It is argued that a conceptual understanding of forensic reconstruction that draws on the full range of both explicit and tacit forms of knowledge, and incorporates the strengths of the different domains pertinent to forensic science, offers a pathway to harness the full value of trace evidence for context sensitive, problem-solving forensic applications. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Taking peer victimization research to the next level: complex interactions among genes, teacher attitudes/behaviors, peer ecologies, & classroom characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espelage, Dorothy L

    2015-01-01

    This commentary reviews research findings of the five papers in the special entitled "School-related Factors in the Development of Bullying Perpetration and Victimization", which represent critical areas that are often overlooked in the literature. First, one paper points to the complex interaction between a genetic disposition for aggression and classroom norms toward aggression. Second, an intervention paper unpacks the underlying mechanisms of an efficacious school-wide bully prevention program by opening the "black box" and testing for mediators. Third, the remaining studies employ a wide range of rigorous designs to identify how teachers' attitudes, behaviors, and classroom practices play a critical role in the prevalence of victimization and bullying in the classroom. Further, teachers' attitudes and behaviors are shown to be predictive of youth's willingness to intervene to assist a peer who is being victimized. Results are situated in what is known about bullying prevention, and how the findings from these studies could maximize the sensitivity of future prevention efforts.

  9. Improving Interactive Health Literacy Skills of Older Adults: Lessons Learned From Formative Organizational Research With Community Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmer, John; Furtado, Debra; Rubin, Donald L; Freimuth, Vicki; Kaley, Terry; Okundaye, Mumbi

    2015-01-01

    Meals on Wheels (MOW) organizations are ideal community partners for delivering social support relating to health information exchange for vulnerable and home-bound older adults. This article illustrates how formative organizational evaluation can be used to adapt health literacy interventions delivered by community partners. Key informant interviews and ethnographic observations were conducted as part of a formative organizational evaluation of potential community partners. The observed brevity of volunteer-client interaction led program planners to incorporate substantial emphasis on communicating with older adults into the health literacy coach training curriculum. Ethnographic observations made clear that program materials had to be portable and fit it in with the mobile nature of MOW delivery. Formative organizational research can greatly increase the chance of successful implementation of public health interventions when those interventions will be implemented in partnerships with community-based organizations in diverse settings and with varying practices.

  10. Nuclear physics research front line by K computer. Elucidation of inter-hadron interactions by lattice QCD simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Takumi

    2013-01-01

    Research of nuclear forces by lattice QCD including inter-hadron interactions is presented. Determination of nuclear forces based on the first principle of QCD means to give underpinning of nuclear physics from the elementary particle standard model. Determining the unknown interactions such as hyperon forces or three-body ones gives large impacts not only to the nuclear physics but also to the universe or astrophysics. In this paper, the most up-to-date achievements as well as the scientific visions of future by using K computer is introduced. The nuclear potential is shown to be determined by the first principle simulation based on the purely fundamental theory without using any input from experiments. When this research is completed, nuclear physics is consolidated in the frame of standard model of elementary particles. The formulation of nuclear potentials was though very problematic but solved by using HAL method. The way to use Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter wave functions to go to the QCD is explained. The results of the lattice QCD simulation are shown about the nuclear force potential of 1 S 0 channel and the scattering phase differences. About the hyperon forces, computer results from the limit of flavor SU(3) where the masses of u, d and s quarks are equal are introduced here. Further studies using different quark masses are necessary and calculation taking the SU(3) breaking into consideration is in progress. The calculation result of triple proton channel is shown as an example of three-body forth, which is another important nuclear force. To let the lattice QCD exert the predicting ability further steps are left. Calculations on real quark masses are considered especially important as the future problem. Confronting the large problem of hadron many-body systems, K computer is the biggest challenging force as well as the new formalism of HAL QCD and Unified Contraction Algorithm (UCA). (S. Funahashi)

  11. Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide-Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagiozis, A.N.

    2007-05-15

    This document serves as the final report documenting work completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Fraunhofer Institute in Building Physics (Holzkirchen, Germany) under an international CRADA No. 0575 with Fraunhofer Institute of Bauphysics of the Federal Republic of Germany for Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads. This CRADA required a multi-faceted approach to building envelope research that included a moisture engineering approach by blending extensive material property analysis, laboratory system and sub-system thermal and moisture testing, and advanced moisture analysis prediction performance. The Participant's Institute for Building physics (IBP) and the Contractor's Buildings Technology Center (BTC) identified potential research projects and activities capable of accelerating and advancing the development of innovative, low energy and durable building envelope systems in diverse climates. This allowed a major leverage of the limited resources available to ORNL to execute the required Department of Energy (DOE) directives in the area of moisture engineering. A joint working group (ORNL and Fraunhofer IBP) was assembled and a research plan was executed from May 2000 to May 2005. A number of key deliverables were produced such as adoption of North American loading into the WUFI-software. in addition the ORNL Weather File Analyzer was created and this has been used to address environmental loading for a variety of US climates. At least 4 papers have been co-written with the CRADA partners, and a chapter in the ASTM Manual 40 on Moisture Analysis and Condensation Control. All deliverables and goals were met and exceeded making this collaboration a success to all parties involves.

  12. EPRI's on-site soil-structure interaction research and its application to design/analysis verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepp, J C; Tang, H T [Seismic Center, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1988-07-01

    Soil structure, interaction (SSI) research at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is focused on validating modeling and computational procedures. A data base has been obtained with instrumented scale models of stiff structures founded both on unsaturated alluvial soils and on rock. Explosives were used to induce strong ground-motion for two experiments, one on rock and the other on alluvium. A third experiment, a one-fourth scale containment structure on saturated alluvium, relies on earthquakes as the energy source. Analysis of the explosion-induced SSI data shows a marked shift in the fundamental frequency of the soil-structure system to a lower frequency. The magnitude of the shift is a function of foundation conditions and level of excitation. Analytical simulation was found to require more sophisticated soil constitutive models and computer codes than are used in current practice. The current phase of the program concentrates on evaluating SSI models used in current design practice by comparing predicted with recorded data at points in the soil-structure system. (author)

  13. EPRI's on-site soil-structure interaction research and its application to design/analysis verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepp, J.C.; Tang, H.T.

    1988-01-01

    Soil structure, interaction (SSI) research at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is focused on validating modeling and computational procedures. A data base has been obtained with instrumented scale models of stiff structures founded both on unsaturated alluvial soils and on rock. Explosives were used to induce strong ground-motion for two experiments, one on rock and the other on alluvium. A third experiment, a one-fourth scale containment structure on saturated alluvium, relies on earthquakes as the energy source. Analysis of the explosion-induced SSI data shows a marked shift in the fundamental frequency of the soil-structure system to a lower frequency. The magnitude of the shift is a function of foundation conditions and level of excitation. Analytical simulation was found to require more sophisticated soil constitutive models and computer codes than are used in current practice. The current phase of the program concentrates on evaluating SSI models used in current design practice by comparing predicted with recorded data at points in the soil-structure system. (author)

  14. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Joseph Daniels1,&, Ruth Nduati1,2, James Kiarie1,3, Carey Farquhar1,4,5 .... or basic science research career (Socio-Behavioral Research, .... a research environment that supports knowledge sharing to develop research ...

  15. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-10-01

    Oct 1, 2015 ... allopathic drugs, especially for chronic conditions also makes TMPs popular ..... sodium benzoate as a preservative in food is established [33]. Tamarindus ... drug-drug interactions since the herbalists did not object to the.

  16. Sensor-based assessment of the in-situ quality of human computer interaction in the cars : final research report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Human attention is a finite resource. When interrupted while performing a task, this : resource is split between two interactive tasks. People have to decide whether the benefits : from the interruptive interaction will be enough to offset the loss o...

  17. Microarrays in ecological research: A case study of a cDNA microarray for plant-herbivore interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gase Klaus

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology allows researchers to simultaneously monitor changes in the expression ratios (ERs of hundreds of genes and has thereby revolutionized most of biology. Although this technique has the potential of elucidating early stages in an organism's phenotypic response to complex ecological interactions, to date, it has not been fully incorporated into ecological research. This is partially due to a lack of simple procedures of handling and analyzing the expression ratio (ER data produced from microarrays. Results We describe an analysis of the sources of variation in ERs from 73 hybridized cDNA microarrays, each with 234 herbivory-elicited genes from the model ecological expression system, Nicotiana attenuata, using procedures that are commonly used in ecologic research. Each gene is represented by two independently labeled PCR products and each product was arrayed in quadruplicate. We present a robust method of normalizing and analyzing ERs based on arbitrary thresholds and statistical criteria, and characterize a "norm of reaction" of ERs for 6 genes (4 of known function, 2 of unknown with different ERs as determined across all analyzed arrays to provide a biologically-informed alternative to the use of arbitrary expression ratios in determining significance of expression. These gene-specific ERs and their variance (gene CV were used to calculate array-based variances (array CV, which, in turn, were used to study the effects of array age, probe cDNA quantity and quality, and quality of spotted PCR products as estimates of technical variation. Cluster analysis and a Principal Component Analysis (PCA were used to reveal associations among the transcriptional "imprints" of arrays hybridized with cDNA probes derived from mRNA from N. attenuata plants variously elicited and attacked by different herbivore species and from three congeners: N. quadrivalis, N. longiflora and N. clevelandii. Additionally, the PCA

  18. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A descriptive qualitative research design was used to determine whether participants ... simulation as a teaching method; a manikin offering effective learning; confidence ..... Tesch R. Qualitative Research: Analysis Types and Software Tools.

  19. The Natural Interactive Walking Project and Emergence of Its Results in Research on Rhythmic Walking Interaction and the Role of Footsteps in Affecting Body Ownership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maculewicz, Justyna; Sikström, Erik; Serafin, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    which are interesting in a broader context of interactive walking with audio and haptic feedback to present and discuss the developed systems for gait analysis and feedback presentation, but also, what is even more interesting to show how it influence humans behavior and perception. We hope also to open...

  20. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    research process, as part of which students must find and appraise evidence from research.[5] This highlights that teaching research methodology is inclined towards equipping students ... Students believed that evidence-based practice was vital, yet their understanding of the concept was restricted when compared with the.

  1. State Health Mapper: An Interactive, Web-Based Tool for Physician Workforce Planning, Recruitment, and Health Services Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Denise D

    2015-11-01

    Health rankings in Mississippi are abysmal. Mississippi also has fewer physicians to serve its population compared with all other states. Many residents of this predominately rural state do not have access to healthcare providers. To better understand the demographics and distribution of the current health workforce in Mississippi, the main objective of the study was to design a Web-based, spatial, interactive application to visualize and explore the physician workforce. A Web application was designed to assist in health workforce planning. Secondary datasets of licensure and population information were obtained, and live feeds from licensure systems are being established. Several technologies were used to develop an intuitive, user-friendly application. Custom programming was completed in JavaScript so the application could run on most platforms, including mobile devices. The application allows users to identify and query geographic locations of individual or aggregated physicians based on attributes included in the licensure data, to perform drive time or buffer analyses, and to explore sociodemographic population data by geographic area of choice. This Web-based application with analytical tools visually represents the physician workforce licensed in Mississippi and its attributes, and provides access to much-needed information for statewide health workforce planning and research. The success of the application is not only based on the practicality of the tool but also on its ease of use. Feedback has been positive and has come from a wide variety of organizations across the state.

  2. Shedding lights on the flexible-armed porphyrins: Human telomeric G4 DNA interaction and cell photocytotoxicity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Ping; Jin, Shu-Fang; Liu, Min-Chao; Wang, Xia-Hong; Huang, Yu-Min; Cheng, Zhen-Feng; Yan, Si-Qi; Li, Yan-Yu; Chen, Ya-Qing; Zhong, Yan-Mei

    2017-08-01

    DNA polymorphism exerts a fascination on a large scientific community. Without crystallographic structural data, clarification of the binding modes between G-quadruplex (G4) and ligand (complex) is a challenging job. In the present work, three porphyrin compounds with different flexible carbon chains (arms) were designed, synthesized and characterized. Their binding, folding and stabilizing abilities to human telomeric G4 DNA structures were comparatively researched. Positive charges at the end of the flexible carbon chains seem to be favorable for the DNA-porphyrin interactions, which were evidenced by the spectral results and further confirmed by the molecular docking calculations. Biological function analysis demonstrated that these porphyrins show no substantial inhibition to Hela, A549 and BEL 7402 cancer cell lines under dark while exhibit broad inhibition under visible light. This significantly enhanced photocytotoxicity relative to the dark control is an essential property of photochemotherapeutic agents. The feature of the flexible arms emerges as critical influencing factors in the cell photocytotoxicity. Moreover, an ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway was suggested for the cell apoptosis induced by these flexible-armed porphyrins. It is found that the porphyrins with positive charges located at the end of the flexible arms represent an exciting opportunity for photochemotherapeutic anti-cancer drug design. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. From conditioning to learning communities: implications of fifty years of research in e-learning interaction design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Ravenscroft

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper will consider e-learning in terms of the underlying learning processes and interactions that are stimulated, supported or favoured by new media and the contexts or communities in which it is used. We will review and critique a selection of research and development from the past fifty years that has linked pedagogical and learning theory to the design of innovative e-learning systems and activities, and discuss their implications. It will include approaches that are, essentially, behaviourist (Skinner and Gagné, cognitivist (Pask, Piaget and Papert, situated (Lave, Wenger and Seely-Brown, socioconstructivist (Vygotsky, socio-cultural (Nardi and Engestrom and community-based (Wenger and Preece. Emerging from this review is the argument that effective elearning usually requires, or involves, high-quality educational discourse, that leads to, at the least, improved knowledge, and at the best, conceptual development and improved understanding. To achieve this I argue that we need to adopt a more holistic approach to design that synthesizes features of the included approaches, leading to a framework that emphasizes the relationships between cognitive changes, dialogue processes and the communities, or contexts for e-learning.

  4. EPRI [Electric Power Research Institute]/ANL investigations of MCCI [molten core-concrete interactions] phenomena and aerosol release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.W.; Gunther, W.H.; Armstrong, D.R.; Thompson, D.H.; Chasanov, M.G.; Sehgal, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    A program of laboratory investigations has been undertaken at Argonne National Laboratory, under sponsorship of the Electric Power Research Institute, in which the interaction between molten core materials and concrete is studied, with particular emphasis on measurements of the magnitude and chemical species present in the aerosol releases. The experiment technique used in these investigations is direct electrical heating in which a high electric current is passed through the core debris to sustain the high-temperature melt condition for potentially long periods of time. In the scoping experiments completed to date, this technique has been successfully used for corium masses of 5 and 20 kg, generating an internal heating rate of 1 kw/kg and achieving melt temperatures of 2000C. Experiments have been performed both with a concrete base and also with a cooled base with the addition of H 2 /CO sparging gas to represent chemical processes in a stratified layer. An aerosol and gas sampling system is being used to collect aerosol samples. Test results are now becoming available including masses of aerosols, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscope analyses

  5. An evaluation of the interaction of place and community-based participatory research as a research methodology in the implementation of a sexually transmitted infection intervention for Greenlandic youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Newly emerging research suggests that the actual physical location of a study and the geographic context in which a study is implemented influences the types of research methods most appropriate to use in a study as well as the study's research outcomes. This article presents a reflection on the extent to which place influenced the use of community-based participatory research (CBPR) as a research methodology in the implementation of an intervention to address sexually transmitted infections in Greenland. An evaluation of the interaction between place and CBPR suggests that the physicality of place influenced the intervention's successes and challenges. Future research that uses CBPR as a research methodology in sexual and reproductive health research in the Arctic warrants situating the research design, implementation and outcomes within the context of place.

  6. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-06

    May 6, 2014 ... facilitate and support articulation between the ECT mid-level worker qualification and the professional B EMC degree. Methods. The researchers used an exploratory, sequential mixed-method design, which is characterised by a qualitative phase of research followed by a quantitative phase. This design is ...

  7. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    supports medical education and research at institutions in 12 ... (CBE). CapacityPlus, led by IntraHealth International, is the USAID-funded ... acquire public health, clinical, and/or research skills, usually through applied learning in a .... If students were evaluated, indicate the type of student (i.e. medical, dental, nursing, etc.) ...

  8. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-01-24

    Jan 24, 2017 ... and the specific rotavirus VP4 (P-types) and VP7 (G-types) determined. Results: The .... Centre for Virus Research (CVR) of the Kenya Medical Research. Institute (KEMRI) ... rotavirus dsRNA was run on 10% polyacrylamide resolving gels using a large format .... What is known about this topic. •. Rotavirus is ...

  9. Research on changes of nitrate by interactions with metals under the wastes disposal environment containing TRU nuclide. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Ryutaro; Nishimura, Tsutomu; Masuda, Kaoru; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Imakita, Tsuyoshi; Tateishi, Tsuyoshi

    2004-02-01

    In TRU wastes, wastes containing nitrate ion as salt exist. In the disposal site environment, this nitrate ion changes into nitrite ion, ammonia, etc., and possibly affects disposal site environmental changes or nuclide migration parameters. In the present research, evaluation was carried out on the chemical interaction between nitrate ion and carbon steel, which is primary reducing agent, under the low-oxygen conditions simulating a disposal site. (1) In the electrochemical test, test data were generated in order to supplement influence parameters required for improvement of the accuracy of the nitrate reaction model (NEON). As the results, it was found that the influence of potential and pH is remarkable, also that of initial nitrate concentration is significant, while the temperature is not remarkable to the nitrate and nitrite reaction themselves. Besides, it was found that the difference in the surface condition of the electrodes is not remarkable. (2) Several long-term reaction tests were carried out to assume the effects of important parameters on the nitrate behavior with carbon steel under low-oxygen high-alkaline type simulated groundwater conditions using glass sealed apparatus (ampoule tests). As the results, it was found that initial nitrate ion concentration and temperature causes the increase of hydrogen generation as well as ammonia generation, while it was found that the difference of carbon steel composition doesn't affect significantly. (3) The parameter fitting NEON was reexamined to improve accuracy, gathering data of electrochemical tests and ampoule tests conducted in 2003 and 2000 through 2002. In addition by comparing the calculation results with experimental results, applicability of NEON was investigated. (4) Implementation of NEON to the mass transfer calculation code was carried out in order to enable the calculation of the nitrate ion behavior including incomings and outgoings of substance to and from the system, resulting in the

  10. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-10-25

    Oct 25, 2017 ... stigma and superstition are known to lead to frequent presentation .... The limited documented research on challenges to help-seeking behaviour for cancer ..... to touch your breast [16] that breast self-examination may cause.

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-10-02

    Oct 2, 2015 ... thought to prevent infection, but recent research has proven otherwise. In addition ... One patient had ophthalmalgia and was exposed to. Kaiy for one year and ... migraine, ear infections, tuberculosis, bone fractures, epilepsy,.

  12. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-07-12

    Jul 12, 2016 ... multiple risk factors provides support for multiple-behavior interventions as ... consumption) with smoking therefore needs further research. As such this study .... restaurants, in bars, and on a statewide basis. They preferred to.

  13. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mini-clinical-evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) is a way of assessing the clinical ... Ethical approval for this study was obtained from the Medical Health. Research ..... mini-CEX assessment and feedback session, the greater the likelihood of.

  14. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-04-14

    Apr 14, 2016 ... Qualitative data, content analysis approach was used. Results: Overall 422 .... Study design: A mixed method cross-sectional design using both quantitative and qualitative research methods as described by. Hanson et al [33] ...

  15. Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Subjects covered in this section are: (1) PCAST panel promotes energy research cooperation; (2) Letter issued by ANS urges funding balance in FFTF restart consideration and (3) FESAC panel releases report on priorities and balance

  16. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research. December 2017, Vol. 9, No. 4 AJHPE 171. During curriculum development, teachers ... Ideally, examiners need an educational method to determine ..... A major focus of this study was addressing the human resource gap when.

  17. 3. IAEA research co-ordination meeting on atomic and plasma-wall interaction data for fusion reactor divertor modeling. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.

    1999-04-01

    A brief description of the proceedings and the conclusions of the 3rd Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Atomic and Plasma-Wall Interaction Data for Fusion Reactor Divertor Modeling', held on March 8-9, 1999, at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, is provided. The reports on the activities within the individual projects pertinent to the IAEA Co-ordinated Research program with the same title are given as appendix to the present report. (author)

  18. Interactive Methods for Teaching Action Potentials, an Example of Teaching Innovation from Neuroscience Postdoctoral Fellows in the Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen-Rhinehart, E.; Eisen, A.; Eaton, D.; McCormack, K.

    2009-01-01

    Acquiring a faculty position in academia is extremely competitive and now typically requires more than just solid research skills and knowledge of one’s field. Recruiting institutions currently desire new faculty that can teach effectively, but few postdoctoral positions provide any training in teaching methods. Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) is a successful postdoctoral training program funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) providing training in both research and teaching methodology. The FIRST program provides fellows with outstanding interdisciplinary biomedical research training in fields such as neuroscience. The postdoctoral research experience is integrated with a teaching program which includes a How to Teach course, instruction in classroom technology and course development and mentored teaching. During their mentored teaching experiences, fellows are encouraged to explore innovative teaching methodologies and to perform science teaching research to improve classroom learning. FIRST fellows teaching neuroscience to undergraduates have observed that many of these students have difficulty with the topic of neuroscience. Therefore, we investigated the effects of interactive teaching methods for this topic. We tested two interactive teaching methodologies to determine if they would improve learning and retention of this information when compared with standard lectures. The interactive methods for teaching action potentials increased understanding and retention. Therefore, FIRST provides excellent teaching training, partly by enhancing the ability of fellows to integrate innovative teaching methods into their instruction. This training in turn provides fellows that matriculate from this program more of the characteristics that hiring institutions desire in their new faculty. PMID:23493377

  19. Effects of a Socially Interactive Robot on the Conversational Turns between Parents and Their Young Children with Autism. Social Robots Research Reports, Number 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Carl J.; Hamby, Deborah W.; Trivette, Carol M.; Prior, Jeremy; Derryberry, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The effects of a socially interactive robot on the conversational turns between four young children with autism and their mothers were investigated as part of the intervention study described in this research report. The interventions with each child were conducted over 4 or 5 days in the children's homes where a practitioner facilitated…

  20. Assessing the Use of YouTube Videos and Interactive Activities as a Critical Thinking Stimulator for Tertiary Students: An Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    June, Sethela; Yaacob, Aizan; Kheng, Yeoh Khar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this action research was to investigate the use of YouTube videos and interactive activities in stimulating critical thinking among students from a public university in Malaysia. There were 50 students of mixed background, comprised of local and foreign students who participated in this study which lasted for one semester. Data was…

  1. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-05-18

    May 18, 2017 ... available to populations of developing countries [2-5]. In 2013, in. Western and Central Europe and ..... initiation among the infected persons in the community. Addressing stigma and educating ... Lifespan/Tufts/Brown Center for AIDS Research (P30AI042853). Tables. Table 1: Baseline characteristics of ...

  2. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    15 févr. 2016 ... présentent un Indice de Masse Corporel (IMC) normal, les autres femmes sont soit ..... In The health belief model and personal health behavior, edited by MH ... Evaluation of the Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale. Research in.

  3. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-14

    Mar 14, 2017 ... R Ebrahim,1 MSc (Dent); H Julie,2 MPH, MCur, PhD. 1 Extended ... and research is applied to develop and sustain society.[5]. Methods .... service they want, not the service we want to give whether they want it or. Co math. G.

  4. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-11-24

    Nov 24, 2017 ... Page number not for citation purposes. 1. Prevalence and determinants of common mental ..... illnesses were smoke cigarette in the last 3 months that make prevalence of tobacco use 38.2%. ..... Okasha A, Karam E.Mental health services and research in the. Arab world. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica.

  5. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-04-21

    Apr 21, 2014 ... Prospective assessment of the risk of obstructive sleep apnea in ... Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of .... University Teaching Hospital Health Research Ethics Committee ... BANG, Berlin questionnaire and the American Society of .... The epidemiology of adult obstructive sleep.

  6. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-02-01

    Feb 1, 2016 ... University Hospital, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark, 3Center for Global Health, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5000. Odense .... BHP is a Danish-Guinean Demographic Surveillance Site with a study-area .... variables such as age groups, previous military duty, history of.

  7. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-06-24

    Jun 24, 2015 ... related immunosuppression, previous history of TB, and pause in treatment [6]. In Brazil, researchers .... treatment, use of traditional medicines or herbs, history of TB drug side effects and treatment delay). ..... therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis in Lima Ciudad, Peru. International journal of tuberculosis and ...

  8. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research. May 2016, Vol. 8, No. 1 AJHPE 37. Students who enrol in occupational therapy (OT) at the. University of Kwa Zulu-Natal (UKZN), Durban, South Africa ... The latter may include becoming familiar with the disintegrating social systems in primary .... They also lacked the skills needed to adapt sessions and failed to ...

  9. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-06-22

    Jun 22, 2015 ... collaboration with Makerere University, School of Public Health. We acknowledge The Family Health Research and Development Centre. (FHRDC) Uganda. Supported by Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for. Population & Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, ...

  10. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, a focus on competence alone is inadequate to produce graduates who are capable of adapting to the changing needs of health systems. While knowledge and technical ... shared their responses to guided questions. There were three sessions; after each session the researcher aggregated participant responses ...

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... by Hazarika in a population-based study in India. The researcher noted that patients' preference to the private health facilities was due mainly to their dissatisfaction with the services in the public health facilities [11]. Furthermore, the quality of the services in the private health facilities could also be a major ...

  12. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-20

    Mar 20, 2018 ... student health professionals in various institutions, both in South Africa. (SA) and internationally. ... field include dentists, dental therapists and oral hygienists in training, .... The College of Health Sciences at UKZN has four schools: clinical ..... Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy ...

  13. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... Abstract. Introduction: Medical and dental students are a high-risk group for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection which is an ... The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. ... Research ... in the College of Health Sciences and clinical students (years four to .... Hepatology International.2017 Jan; 11(1):.

  14. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-01-19

    Jan 19, 2015 ... One research assistant was available to assist the learners and to answer questions while they completed the questionnaires during a classroom period. ..... PubMed | Google Scholar. 4. Hall PA, Holmqvist M, Sherry SB. Risky adolescent sexual behaviour: A psychological perspective for primary care.

  15. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission research program on core debris/concrete interactions and ex-vessel fission-product release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burson, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    The study of core debris/concrete interaction phenomena has been a significant element of the NRC's Severe Accident Research Program for a number of years. The CORCON and VANESA codes used to predict the consequences of high-temperature debris attack on concrete and fission-product aerosol release are state-of-the-art computational tools. The major thrust of current NRC sponsored research focuses on the refinement, verification, and validation of these codes. An overview of the analytical and experimental aspects of the NRC research program is presented

  16. 2nd (final) IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'plasma-material interaction data for mixed plasma facing materials in fusion reactors'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2001-11-01

    The proceedings and conclusions of the 2nd Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Mixed Plasma Facing Materials in Fusion Reactors', held on October 16 and 17, 2000 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, are briefly described. This report includes a summary of the presentations made by the meeting participants and a review of the accomplishments of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). In addition, short summaries from the participants are included indicating the specific research completed in support of this CRP. (author)

  17. The interaction of economic and pedagogical ideals in the context of workplace learning in Germany: a framework for empirical research - inspired by business ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Röbel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As an effect of marketisation, the importance of workplace learning in Germany has increased. The article follows up on the long-standing discourse around the question of how economic and pedagogical ideals interact in this context. In order to develop a theoretical framework for empirical research, three major positions of the discipline of business ethics are introduced. Business ethics in more abstract ways deals with the very same question, namely how do ideas such as profit orientation interact with other norms and values? The new perspectives show that the discourse has been hitherto based on a specific understanding of economy. In order to derive an empirical answer to the research question, the question is re-formulated as follows: Which values are inherent in the decisions taken? Consequently, it suggests using the concept of "rationalities of justification" for empirical research. The article shows how this concept can be applied by conducting a test run.

  18. Army Plasma/Propellant Interaction Workshop - U.S. Army Research Office, 17-18 November 1998

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shaw, Robert

    1999-01-01

    .... Army Research Laboratory (ARL)-ARO effort to develop a coordinated research program to address the needs of advanced gun propulsion, in particular, in the application of plasmas as ignition and energy augmentation sources...

  19. 国内社会性交互研究文献综述%The Literature Review of Social Interaction Research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李良; 乔海英

    2012-01-01

    Distance learning is the core of distance education and social interaction is the most important component of distance learning, which not only can facilitate learners'knowledge construction, but also is a vital method of online teaching. This paper concludes the achievements and existing problems of social interaction in three aspects, namely student -student interaction, teacherstudent interaction and interaction strategies, and provides some re- search suggestions in the above three aspects based on the literature review of the related domestic research in social interaction in the last ten years.%远程教育的核心是远程学习,社会性交互是远程学习的重要组成部分,它不但可以促进学习者知识的建构,也是教师开展网上教学的重要手段。回顾近十年来国内社会性交互的相关研究,对社会性交互研究在生生交互、师生交互以及交互策略三方面取得的成果进行了总结,分析目前国内社会性交互存在的问题,同时指出了每个方面研究的具体方向。

  20. Systematic research review of observational approaches used to evaluate mother-child mealtime interactions during preschool years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmeier, Heidi; Skouteris, Helen; Hetherington, Marion

    2015-01-01

    The family meal and social interactions during the meal are important events in a child's life. Specifically, mealtime interactions have been linked to child weight status, the development of children's eating patterns, and socialization. Mealtime interactions may be observed and evaluated to provide insights into this important event beyond self-reported measurements. We aimed to identify, review, and examine studies in which mother-child mealtime behaviors were measured through observation. MEDLINE Complete, PsycINFO, and PsycARTICLES were systematically searched by using sensitive search strategies. We included observational studies of mother-child eating and mealtimes and associations between mother-child interactions and preschool child eating or weight status published to March 2014. Thirteen articles were included in our review. All studies but one were cross-sectional, and none of the studies evaluated how mutual dimensions (e.g., parent responsiveness to the child and child responsiveness to the parent) of dyadic interactions between mothers and children influence maternal feeding practices, children's eating, and weight. The parenting style was associated with maternal feeding practices but not directly with children's eating. Parental discouragements to eat and negative statements about food were associated with higher child weight status. Parental encouragement to eat was associated with higher child weight status as well as maternal body mass index. No associations were shown between maternal reports of feeding practices and observed maternal feeding practices. Parents' overarching attitudes and approaches to parenting appear to be associated with their feeding practices or styles. Future studies should implement longitudinal observational methods with the capacity to measure levels of dimensions within bidirectional parent-child interactions and the extent to which these factors influence maternal practices, children's eating, and weight status.

  1. Relevance of slow positron beam research to astrophysical studies of positron interactions and annihilation in the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guessoum, N.; Jean, P.; Gillard, W.

    2006-01-01

    The processes undergone by positrons in the interstellar medium (ISM) from the moments of their birth to their annihilation are examined. Both the physics of the positron interactions with gases and solids (dust grains), and the physical conditions and characteristics of the environments where the processes of energy loss, positronium formation, and annihilation taking place, are reviewed. An explanation is given as to how all the relevant physical information are taken into account in order to calculate annihilation rates and spectra of the 511 keV emission for the various phases of the ISM; special attention is paid to positron interactions with dust and with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. An attempt is made to show to what extent the interactions between positrons and interstellar dust grains are similar to laboratory experiments in which beams of slow positrons impinge upon solids and surfaces. Sample results are shown for the effect of dust grains on positron annihilation spectra in some phases of the ISM which, together with high resolution spectra measured by satellites, can be used to infer useful knowledge about the environment where the annihilation is predominantly taking place and ultimately about the birth place and history of positrons in the Galaxy. The important complementarity between work done by the astrophysical and the solid-state positron communities is strongly emphasized and specific experimental work is suggested which could assist the modeling of the interaction and annihilation of positrons in the ISM

  2. Relevance of slow positron beam research to astrophysical studies of positron interactions and annihilation in the interstellar medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guessoum, N. [American University of Sharjah, Physics Department, P.O. Box 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)]. E-mail: nguessoum@aus.ac.ae; Jean, P. [Centre d' Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, Toulouse (France); Gillard, W. [Centre d' Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, Toulouse (France)

    2006-02-28

    The processes undergone by positrons in the interstellar medium (ISM) from the moments of their birth to their annihilation are examined. Both the physics of the positron interactions with gases and solids (dust grains), and the physical conditions and characteristics of the environments where the processes of energy loss, positronium formation, and annihilation taking place, are reviewed. An explanation is given as to how all the relevant physical information are taken into account in order to calculate annihilation rates and spectra of the 511 keV emission for the various phases of the ISM; special attention is paid to positron interactions with dust and with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. An attempt is made to show to what extent the interactions between positrons and interstellar dust grains are similar to laboratory experiments in which beams of slow positrons impinge upon solids and surfaces. Sample results are shown for the effect of dust grains on positron annihilation spectra in some phases of the ISM which, together with high resolution spectra measured by satellites, can be used to infer useful knowledge about the environment where the annihilation is predominantly taking place and ultimately about the birth place and history of positrons in the Galaxy. The important complementarity between work done by the astrophysical and the solid-state positron communities is strongly emphasized and specific experimental work is suggested which could assist the modeling of the interaction and annihilation of positrons in the ISM.

  3. Starting research in interaction design with visuals for low-functioning children in the autistic spectrum: a protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parés, Narcís; Carreras, Anna; Durany, Jaume; Ferrer, Jaume; Freixa, Pere; Gómez, David; Kruglanski, Orit; Parés, Roc; Ribas, J Ignasi; Soler, Miquel; Sanjurjo, Alex

    2006-04-01

    On starting to think about interaction design for low-functioning persons in the autistic spectrum (PAS), especially children, one finds a number of questions that are difficult to answer: Can we typify the PAS user? Can we engage the user in interactive communication without generating frustrating or obsessive situations? What sort of visual stimuli can we provide? Will they prefer representational or abstract visual stimuli? Will they understand three-dimensional (3D) graphic representation? What sort of interfaces will they accept? Can we set ambitious goals such as education or therapy? Unfortunately, most of these questions have no answer yet. Hence, we decided to set an apparently simple goal: to design a "fun application," with no intention to reach the level of education or therapy. The goal was to be attained by giving the users a sense of agency--by providing first a sense of control in the interaction dialogue. Our approach to visual stimuli design has been based on the use of geometric, abstract, two-dimensional (2D), real-time computer graphics in a full-body, non-invasive, interactive space. The results obtained within the European-funded project MultiSensory Environment Design for an Interface between Autistic and Typical Expressiveness (MEDIATE) have been extremely encouraging.

  4. Multiple Homicide as a Function of Prisonization and Concurrent Instrumental Violence: Testing an Interactive Model--A Research Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLisi, Matt; Walters, Glenn D.

    2011-01-01

    Prisonization (as measured by number of prior incarcerations) and concurrent instrumental offending (as measured by contemporaneous kidnapping, rape, robbery, and burglary offenses) were found to interact in 160 multiple-homicide offenders and 494 single-homicide offenders. Controlling for age, gender, race, criminal history, prior incarcerations,…

  5. The interaction of economic and pedagogical ideals in the context of workplace learning in Germany: a framework for empirical research – inspired by business ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Röbel, Tina

    2016-01-01

    As an effect of marketisation, the importance of workplace learning in Germany has increased. The article follows up on the long-standing discourse around the question of how economic and pedagogical ideals interact in this context. In order to develop a theoretical framework for empirical research, three major positions of the discipline of business ethics are introduced. Business ethics in more abstract ways deals with the very same question, namely how do ideas such as profit orientation i...

  6. Final IAEA research coordination meeting on plasma-interaction induced erosion of fusion reactor materials. October 9-11, 1995, Vienna, Austria. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The proceedings and results of the Final IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on ''Plasma-interaction Induced Erosion of Fusion Reactor Materials'' held on October 9, 10 and 11, 1995 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of a data survey and needs assessment for the erosion of plasma facing components and in-vessel materials, and recommendations regarding future work. (author). Refs, figs, tabs

  7. General Overview: European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI)– Integrating Aerosol Research from Nano to Global Scales

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulmala, M.; Asmi, A.; Lappalainen, H.K.; Baltensperger, U.; Brenguier, J.-L.; Facchini, M.C.; Hansson, H.-C.; Hov, O.; O'Dowd, C.D.; Pöschl, U.; Wiedensohler, A.; Boers, R.; Boucher, O.; de Leeuw, G.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Feichter, J.; Krejčí, R.; Laj, P.; Lihavainen, H.; Lohmann, U.; McFiggans, G.; Mentel, T.; Pilinis, C.; Riipinen, I.; Schulz, M.; Stohl, A.; Swietlicki, E.; Vignati, E.; Alves, C.; Amann, M.; Ammann, M.; Arabas, S.; Artaxo, P.; Baars, H.; Beddows, D.C.S.; Bergström, R.; Beukes, J.P.; Bilde, M.; Burkhart, J.F.; Canonaco, F.; Clegg, S.L.; Coe, H.; Crumeyrolle, S.; D'Anna, B.D.; Decesari, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Fischer, M.; Fjaeraa, A.M.; Fountoukis, C.; George, C.; Gomes, L.; Halloran, P.; Hamburger, T.; Harrison, R. M.; Herrmann, H.; Hoffmann, T.; Hoose, C.; Hu, M.; Hyvärinen, A.; Hörrak, U.; Iinuma, Y.; Iversen, T.; Josipovic, M.; Kanakidou, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kirgevak, A.; Kiss, G.; Klimont, Z.; Kolmonen, P.; Komppula, M.; Kristjánsson, J.-E.; Laakso, L.; Laaksonen, A.; Labonnote, L.; Lanz, V.A.; Lehtinen, K.E.J.; Rizzo, L.V.; Makkonen, R.; Manninen, H.E.; McMeeking, G.; Merikanto, J.; Minikin, A.; Mirme, S.; Morgan, W.T.; Nemitz, E.; O'Donell, D.; Panwar, T.S.; Pawlowska, H.; Petzold, A.; Pienaar, J.J.; Pio, C.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Prévot, A.S.H.; Pryor, S.; Reddington, C.L.; Roberts, G.; Rosenfeld, D.; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Seland, O.; Sellegri, K.; Shen, X.J.; Shiraiwa, M.; Siebert, H.; Sierau, B.; Simpson, D.; Sun, J.Y.; Topping, D.; Tunved, P.; Vaattovaara, P.; Vakkari, V.; Veefkind, J.P.; Visschedijk, A.; Vuollekoski, H.; Vuolo, R.; Wehner, B.; Wildt, J.; Woodward, S.; Worsnop, D.R.; van Zadelhoff, G.-J.; Zardini, A.A.; Zhang, K.; van Zyl, P.G.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Carslaw, K.S.; Pandis, S.N.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 24 (2012), s. 13061-13143 ISSN 1680-7316 Grant - others:AFCE(FI) 1118615; EUCAARI(XE) 34684; ERC AG(FI) ATMNUCLE:227463; EUSAAR(XE) RII3-CT-2006-026140 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : aerosol radiative forcing * air quality-climate interactions * abatement strategies Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.510, year: 2012

  8. Proposal for a coordination research programme (CRP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on stable isotope tracer techniques for studies on protein-energy interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, P.; James, W.P.T.

    1993-01-01

    This Report provides a rationale and justification for the initiation of a Coordinated Research programme to support studies using stable isotopic tracer techniques to address priority areas of human protein-energy interactions with special emphasis on the problems of human nutrition in developing countries. The Report suggests a modus for establishing such a practically oriented Coordinated Research Programme under the aegis of the International Atomic Energy Agency with concrete suggestions for its organization and the identification of probable participants in such a programme. The likely sources of additional funding to sustain such an activity viable for a period of 4 to 5 years are also indicated. 8 refs

  9. 1st IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'plasma-material interaction data for mixed plasma facing materials in fusion reactors'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.; Longhurst, G.

    1998-12-01

    The proceedings and conclusions of the 1st IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Mixed Plasma Facing Materials in Fusion Reactors', held on December 19 and 20, 1998 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, are briefly described. This report includes a summary of the presentations made by meeting participants, a review of the data availability and data needs in the areas from the scope of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the subject of the meeting, and recommendations regarding the future work within this CRP. (author)

  10. Behavioral science and the study of gene-nutrition and gene-physical activity interactions in obesity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, Myles S

    2008-12-01

    This report summarizes emerging opportunities for behavioral science to help advance the field of gene-environment and gene-behavior interactions, based on presentations at The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Workshop, "Gene-Nutrition and Gene-Physical Activity Interactions in the Etiology of Obesity." Three opportunities are highlighted: (i) designing potent behavioral "challenges" in experiments, (ii) determining viable behavioral phenotypes for genetics studies, and (iii) identifying specific measures of the environment or environmental exposures. Additional points are underscored, including the need to incorporate novel findings from neuroimaging studies regarding motivation and drive for eating and physical activity. Advances in behavioral science theory and methods can play an important role in advancing understanding of gene-brain-behavior relationships in obesity onset.

  11. Sequence walkers: a graphical method to display how binding proteins interact with DNA or RNA sequences | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A graphical method is presented for displaying how binding proteins and other macromolecules interact with individual bases of nucleotide sequences. Characters representing the sequence are either oriented normally and placed above a line indicating favorable contact, or upside-down and placed below the line indicating unfavorable contact. The positive or negative height of each letter shows the contribution of that base to the average sequence conservation of the binding site, as represented by a sequence logo.

  12. Enhancing a CAVE with Eye Tracking System for Human-Computer Interaction Research in 3D Visualization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hix, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this award was to purchase and install two ISCAN Inc. Eye Tracking Systems and associated equipment to create a unique set-up for research in fully immersive virtual environments (VEs...

  13. Installation of a Plasmatron at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre and its Use for Plasma-Wall Interaction Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uytdenhouwen, I.; Schuurmans, J.; Decreton, M.; Massaut, V.; Oost, G. van

    2008-01-01

    In JET and ITER, the first wall will be covered by beryllium and a full or partial W divertor will be common. In DEMO, only high-Z, low erosion material such as tungsten will be present as a plasma facing material. In present day tokamaks, the very high fluence/low temperature plasma cannot be obtained. Important key issues to be resolved according to plasma wall interaction studies are the tritium retention, dust production, resilience to large steady-state fluences, transient loads, surface erosion, material redeposition and neutron damage. Some linear plasma simulators come close to the very high fluences expected in ITER and DEMO such as PSI -2; PISCES-B; NAGDIS-II and pilot-PSI. In future the larger device MAGNUM-PSI will have even higher fluences and lower temperatures for large scale components. The plasmatron facility VISION I to be installed in Mol, will have the capability to investigate mixed materials (with beryllium/tritium contaminations) and in the long term neutron activated samples. The ETHEL plasmatron VISION I from JRC-Ispra was transferred to SCKCEN (Mol, Belgium) recently. The equipment is meant to study plasma-wall interaction, in particular the interaction with hydrogen isotopes. The facility is capable to produce relatively cold self-sustained volumetric plasmas with a high plasma flux density at the target of about 10 20 -10 21 ions/m 2 .s. The plasmatron has a volume of 18 litres, a target diameter of ∼25 cm and modular ion energies in the range of 20-500 eV

  14. Quantification of ultraviolet photon emission from interaction of charged particles in materials of interest in radiation biology research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal, E-mail: ahmadsb@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); McNeill, Fiona E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Prestwich, William V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Byun, Soo Hyun, E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Seymour, Colin, E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Mothersill, Carmel E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    In radiation biology experiments often cells are irradiated using charged particles with the intention that only a specified number of cells are hit by the primary ion track. However, in doing so several other materials such as the cell container and the growth media etc. are also irradiated, and UV radiation emitted from these materials can potentially interact with the cells. We have hypothesized that some “bystander effects” that are thought to be chemically mediated, may be, in fact, a physical effect, where UV is interacting with non-targeted cells. Based upon our hypothesis we quantified the emission of UV from Polypropylene, Mylar, Teflon, and Cellophane which are all commonly used materials in radiation biology experiments. Additionally we measured the NIST standard materials of Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves as these powdered materials are derived from living cells. Protons accelerated up to an energy of 2.2 MeV, in a 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator, were used for irradiation. Beam current was kept to 10 nA, which corresponds to a proton fluence rate of 2.7 × 10{sup 10} protons mm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. All the materials were found to emit light at UV frequencies and intensities that were significant enough to conduct a further investigation for their biological consequences. Mylar and polypropylene are commonly used in radiation induced bystander effect studies and are considered to be non-fluorescent. However our study showed that this is not the case. Significant luminescence observed from the irradiated NIST standard reference materials for Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves verified that the luminescence emission is not restricted only to the polymeric materials that are used to contain cells. It can also occur from ion interactions within the cells as well.

  15. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, Finland. Annex I [Example of TSOs and their Interaction with Key Stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland was established January 16, 1942. In January 1, 2015 VTT was transformed into a limited liability company by the Act on the Limited Liability Company Called VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd (8761/2014). VTT is a non-profit research and technology organisation. The Ministry of Employment and the Economy is responsible for state ownership steering. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd is a Finnish state-owned limited liability company. The liabilities and obligations of the company’s governing bodies are as defined in applicable Finnish law. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd as the parent company together with its subsidiary companies forms the VTT Group of companies. The tasks carried out by VTT to the Finnish Regulatory Body Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) or any other Regulatory Body as support to their licensing or any other regulatory function are 100 % funded by the Regulatory Body as a customer to VTT.

  16. Final report for the 'Melt-Vessel Interactions' Project. European Union R and TD Program 4th Framework. MVI project final research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.; Kolb, G.; Karbojian, A.; Theerthan, S.A.; Gubaidulline, A. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety; Helle, M.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Tuomisto, H. [IVO Power Engineering Ltd., Vantaa (Finland); Bonnet, J.M.; Rouge, S.; Narcoux, M.; Liegeois, A. [CEA - Grenoble (France); Turland, B.D.; Dobson, G.P. [AEA Technology plc, Dorchester (United Kingdom); Siccama, A. [ECN Nuclear Research, Petten (Netherlands); Ikonen, K. [VTT Energy, Helsinki (Finland); Parozzi, F. [ENEL - SRI/PAM/GRA, Segrate, MI (Italy); Kolev, N. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany); Caira, M. [Univ. of Roma (Italy)

    1999-04-01

    The Melt Vessel Interaction (MVI) project is concerned with the consequences of the interactions that a core melt, generated during a postulated severe accident in a light water reactor, may have with the pressure vessel. In particular, the issues concerned with the failure of the vessel bottom head are the focus of the research. The specific objectives of the project are to obtain data and develop validated models, which could be applied to prototypic plants, and accident conditions, for resolution of issues related to the melt vessel interactions. The project work has been performed by nine partners having varied responsibility. The work included a large number of experiments, with simulant materials, whose observations and results are employed, respectively, to understand the physical mechanisms and to develop validated models. Applications to the prototypic geometry and conditions have also been performed. This report is volume 1 of the Final Report for the Project, in which a summary of the progress achieved in the experimental program is provided. We have, however, included some aspects of the modeling activities. Volume 2 of the Final report describes the progress achieved in the modeling program. The progress achieved in the experimental and modeling parts of the Project has led to the resolution of some of the issues of melt vessel interaction. Considerable progress was also achieved towards resolution of the remaining issues.

  17. Humic acids and their interactions with metallic elements: Cu II, Eu III, Th IV, U VI: contribution of size exclusion chromatography method and research of complexation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesourd-Moulin, V.

    1986-04-01

    The interest given to natural organic matter (humic and fulvic acids) as complexing agents of metallic ions in soils and natural waters becomes more and more important in environmental area. Cation - humic matter interactions have a great importance, a better understanding of the contribution of these substances in natural media specially towards radioactive elements with long life time. Interactions are studied by a chromatographic technique of gel filtration: the dynamic equilibrium method is based on the separation of the formed complex humic macromolecule - metallic ion and the free metallic ion, which due to its size penetrates totally in the pores of the gel. Separation mechanisms of the chromatographic support and the contribution of each parameter, are studied as a function of the buffer nature, its concentration, the PH, the gel porosity and the valence of the metallic cation. This study led to the determination of the appropriate experimental conditions for each cation. A study of metallic binding with humic acid has been undertaken with Cu 2+ , Eu 3+ , Th 4+ , Uo 2 2+ . These elements, except copper, have been chosen for their properties similar to the transuranic elements. Different samples of humic acids (commercial, podzolic soil, rendzine soil) are also studied. A deeper research of europium - humic acid interactions by means of different treatment models (discrete or gaussian models) has been undertaken in order to determine the number, the binding site strength and the global interaction constants [fr

  18. Final report for the 'Melt-Vessel Interactions' Project. European Union R and TD Program 4th Framework. MVI project final research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.; Kolb, G.; Karbojian, A.; Theerthan, S.A.; Gubaidulline, A.; Bonnet, J.M.; Rouge, S.; Narcoux, M.; Liegeois, A.; Turland, B.D.; Dobson, G.P.; Siccama, A.; Ikonen, K.; Parozzi, F.; Kolev, N.; Caira, M.

    1999-04-01

    The Melt Vessel Interaction (MVI) project is concerned with the consequences of the interactions that a core melt, generated during a postulated severe accident in a light water reactor, may have with the pressure vessel. In particular, the issues concerned with the failure of the vessel bottom head are the focus of the research. The specific objectives of the project are to obtain data and develop validated models, which could be applied to prototypic plants, and accident conditions, for resolution of issues related to the melt vessel interactions. The project work has been performed by nine partners having varied responsibility. The work included a large number of experiments, with simulant materials, whose observations and results are employed, respectively, to understand the physical mechanisms and to develop validated models. Applications to the prototypic geometry and conditions have also been performed. This report is volume 1 of the Final Report for the Project, in which a summary of the progress achieved in the experimental program is provided. We have, however, included some aspects of the modeling activities. Volume 2 of the Final report describes the progress achieved in the modeling program. The progress achieved in the experimental and modeling parts of the Project has led to the resolution of some of the issues of melt vessel interaction. Considerable progress was also achieved towards resolution of the remaining issues

  19. Findings on the Development and Use of Technology-Infused Curricula in Preschool Classrooms. Interactive STEM Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Jennifer; Louie, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Mobile tablets are becoming more prevalent in educational settings, but little is known about the impact of using technology-infused curricula in preschool classrooms. The research summarized in this brief suggests that well-designed tablet-based activities can indeed improve student learning outcomes at the preschool level. These positive…

  20. From 'knowledge use' to 'boundary work': sketch of an emerging new research programme for science/policy interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppe, Robertus; in 't Veld, Roeland J.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter is about a new agenda for inquiry into the relationships between science and public policy. So far, most research has conceptualised this relationship in terms of knowledge utilisation and downstream impact on the policy process. However, this leads to over-instrumentalisation and

  1. A Comparative Analysis of Interactional Metadiscourse Markers in the Introduction and Conclusion Sections of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Research Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estaji, Masoomeh; Vafaeimehr, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Academic writing, particularly writing research articles, is an indispensable part of every major in higher education. Hyland (2004) argued that a valuable means of exploring academic writing, and comparing the rhetorical features and preferences of different discourse communities, is through the metadiscourse analysis of the text. The present…

  2. New research directions in flexural member failure at an interior support (Interaction of web crippling and bending moment)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeyer, H.; Kerstens, J.G.M.; Snijder, H.H.; Bakker, M.C.M.

    1996-01-01

    Design rules describing failure at an interior support of cold-formed steel flexural members are of an empirical nature. This is probably due to the complex character of the failure mechanisms, which makes an analytical approach difficult. An overview of research on this subject has been made. The

  3. Differences in Chemical Engineering Student-Faculty Interactions by Student Age and Experience at a Large, Public, Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciston, Shannon; Sehgal, Sanya; Mikel, Tressa; Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel

    2018-01-01

    Adult undergraduate students aged 25+ in engineering disciplines are an important demographic bringing a wealth of life experience to the classroom. This study uses qualitative data drawn from semi-structured interviews with two groups of undergraduate chemical engineering students at a large, public research university: adult students with…

  4. Twenty years of research on fungal-plant interactions on Lyman Glacier forefront—lessons learned and questions yet unanswered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari Jumpponen; Shawn P. Brown; James M. Trappe; Efrén Cázares; Rauni. Strömmer

    2012-01-01

    Retreating glaciers and the periglacial areas that they vacate produce a harsh environment of extreme radiation, nutrient limitations and temperature oscillations. They provide a model system for studying mechanisms that drive the establishment and early assembly of communities. Here, we synthesize more than 20 years of research at the Lyman Glacier forefront in the...

  5. Gene-environment Interactions in Human Health: Case Studies and Strategies for developing new paradigms and research methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah L.C. Jackson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The synergistic effects of genes and the environment on health are explored in three case studies: adult lactase persistence, autism spectrum disorders, and the metabolic syndrome, providing examples of the interactive complexities underlying these phenotypes. Since the phenotypes are the initial targets of evolutionary processes, understanding the specific environmental contexts of the genetic, epigenetic, and proteomic changes associated with these phenotypes is essential in predicting their health implications. Robust databases must be developed on the local scale to deconstruct both the population substructure and the unique components of the environment that stimulate geographically-specific changes in gene expression patterns. To produce these databases and make valid predictions, new, locally-focused and information-dense models are needed that incorporate data on evolutionary ecology, environmental complexity, local geographic patterns of gene expression, and population substructure.

  6. Interaction of superconducting vortices: lectures presented at the Canadian Mathematical Society Summer Research Institute on gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebbi, C.

    1979-09-01

    Results recently obtained on multi-vortex configurations are described. After a brief review of the model, a numerical analysis, performed by variational methods, of the interaction between two vortices is illustrated. The study, done in collaboration with Laurence Jacobs, shows that two vortices attract or repel each other according to whether a dimensionless coupling constant lambda, characterizing the relative strength of the matter self-coupling versus the gauge coupling, takes a value smaller or greater than one. This agrees with results previously obtained for asymptotic separations of the vortices. For lambda = 1, in particular, the vortices appear in equilibrium at any separation, hinting to the existence of a much wider class of solutions to the field equations. In the second lecture, the case lambda = 1 is considered in detail, illustrating analytical results which demonstrate that for this special value of the coupling constant solutions with any number of vortices at arbitrary positions do indeed exist

  7. Multi probes measurements at the PALS Facility Research Centre during high intense laser pulse interactions with various target materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Marco Massimo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During the interaction of high intense laser pulse with solid target, a large amount of hot electrons is produced and a giant Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP is generated due to the current flowing into the system target–target holder, as well as due to the escaping charged particles in vacuum. EMP production for different target materials is investigated inside and outside the target chamber, using monopole antenna, super wide-band microstrip antenna and Moebius antenna. The EMP consists in a fast transient magnetic field lasting hundreds of nanosecond with frequencies ranging from MHz to tens of GHz. Measurements of magnetic field and return target current in the range of kA were carried out by an inductive target probe (Cikhardt J. et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85 (2014 103507.

  8. Inventory of Federal Energy-Related Environment and Safety Research for FY 1978. Volume III, interactive terminal users guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C. E.; Barker, Janice F.

    1979-12-01

    This users' guide was prepared to provide interested persons access to, via computer terminals, federally funded energy-related environmental and safety research projects for FY 1978. Although this information is also available in hardbound volumes, this on-line searching capability is expected to reduce the time required to answer ad hoc questions and, at the same time, produce meaningful reports. The data contained in this data base are not exhaustive and represent research reported by the following agencies: Department of Agriculture, Department of Commerce, Department of Defense, Department of Energy, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Department of the Interior, Department of Transportation, Federal Energy Administration, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Tennessee Valley Authority, U.S. Coast Guard, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

  9. Contributions to advances in blend pellet products (BPP) research on molecular structure and molecular nutrition interaction by advanced synchrotron and globar molecular (Micro)spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Oquendo, Víctor H; Zhang, Huihua; Yu, Peiqiang

    2018-04-13

    To date, advanced synchrotron-based and globar-sourced techniques are almost unknown to food and feed scientists. There has been little application of these advanced techniques to study blend pellet products at a molecular level. This article aims to provide recent research on advanced synchrotron and globar vibrational molecular spectroscopy contributions to advances in blend pellet products research on molecular structure and molecular nutrition interaction. How processing induced molecular structure changes in relation to nutrient availability and utilization of the blend pellet products. The study reviews Utilization of co-product components for blend pellet product in North America; Utilization and benefits of inclusion of pulse screenings; Utilization of additives in blend pellet products; Application of pellet processing in blend pellet products; Conventional evaluation techniques and methods for blend pellet products. The study focus on recent applications of cutting-edge vibrational molecular spectroscopy for molecular structure and molecular structure association with nutrient utilization in blend pellet products. The information described in this article gives better insight on how advanced molecular (micro)spectroscopy contributions to advances in blend pellet products research on molecular structure and molecular nutrition interaction.

  10. Interaction Widget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Mads

    2003-01-01

    This pattern describes the idea of making a user interface of discrete, reusable entities---here called interaction widgets. The idea behind widgets is described using two perspectives, that of the user and that of the developer. It is the forces from these two perspectives that are balanced...... in the pattern. The intended audience of the pattern is developers and researchers within the field of human computer interaction....

  11. Modeling Groundwater-Surface Water Interaction and Contaminant Transport of Chlorinated Solvent Contaminated Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimer Ebrahim, Girma; Jonoski, Andreja; van Griensven, Ann; Dujardin, Juliette; Baetelaan, Okke; Bronders, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Chlorinated-solvent form one of the largest groups of environmental chemicals. Their use and misuse in industry have lead to a large entry of these chemicals into the environment, resulting in widespread dissemination and oftentimes environmental contamination. Chlorinated solvent contamination of groundwater resources has been widely reported. For instance, there has been much interest in the assessment of these contaminant levels and their evolutions with time in the groundwater body below the Vilvoorde-Machelen industrial area (Belgium). The long industrial history of the area has lead to complex patterns of pollution from multiple sources and the site has been polluted to the extent that individual plumes are not definable any more. Understanding of groundwater/surface water interaction is a critical component for determining the fate of contaminant both in streams and ground water due to the fact that groundwater and surface water are in continuous dynamic interaction in the hydrologic cycle. The interaction has practical consequences in the quantity and quality of water in either system in the sense that depletion and/or contamination of one of the system will eventually affect the other one. The transition zone between a stream and its adjacent aquifer referred to as the hyporheic zone plays a critical role in governing contaminant exchange and transformation during water exchange between the two water bodies. The hyporheic zone of Zenne River ( the main receptor ) is further complicated due to the fact that the river banks are artificially trained with sheet piles along its reach extending some 12 m below the surface. This study demonstrates the use of MODFLOW, a widely used modular three-dimensional block-centred finite difference, saturated flow model for simulating the flow and direction of movement of groundwater through aquifer and stream-aquifer interaction and the use of transport model RT3D, a three-dimensional multi-species reactive transport model

  12. Research on multi - channel interactive virtual assembly system for power equipment under the “VR+” era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yilong; Duan, Xitong; Wu, Lei; He, Jin; Xu, Wu

    2017-06-01

    With the development of the “VR+” era, the traditional virtual assembly system of power equipment has been unable to satisfy our growing needs. In this paper, based on the analysis of the traditional virtual assembly system of electric power equipment and the application of VR technology in the virtual assembly system of electric power equipment in our country, this paper puts forward the scheme of establishing the virtual assembly system of power equipment: At first, we should obtain the information of power equipment, then we should using OpenGL and multi texture technology to build 3D solid graphics library. After the completion of three-dimensional modeling, we can use the dynamic link library DLL package three-dimensional solid graphics generation program to realize the modularization of power equipment model library and power equipment model library generated hidden algorithm. After the establishment of 3D power equipment model database, we set up the virtual assembly system of 3D power equipment to separate the assembly operation of the power equipment from the space. At the same time, aiming at the deficiency of the traditional gesture recognition algorithm, we propose a gesture recognition algorithm based on improved PSO algorithm for BP neural network data glove. Finally, the virtual assembly system of power equipment can really achieve multi-channel interaction function.

  13. Early Career. Harnessing nanotechnology for fusion plasma-material interface research in an in-situ particle-surface interaction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allain, Jean Paul [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-08-08

    This project consisted of fundamental and applied research of advanced in-situ particle-beam interactions with surfaces/interfaces to discover novel materials able to tolerate intense conditions at the plasma-material interface (PMI) in future fusion burning plasma devices. The project established a novel facility that is capable of not only characterizing new fusion nanomaterials but, more importantly probing and manipulating materials at the nanoscale while performing subsequent single-effect in-situ testing of their performance under simulated environments in fusion PMI.

  14. Exploring the differences between pet and non-pet owners: Implications for human-animal interaction research and policy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Saunders

    Full Text Available There is conflicting evidence about whether living with pets results in better mental and physical health outcomes, with the majority of the empirical research evidence being inconclusive due to methodological limitations. We briefly review the research evidence, including the hypothesized mechanisms through which pet ownership may influence health outcomes. This study examines how pet and non-pet owners differ across a variety of socio-demographic and health measures, which has implications for the proper interpretation of a large number of correlational studies that attempt to draw causal attributions. We use a large, population-based survey from California administered in 2003 (n = 42,044 and find that pet owners and non-pet owners differ across many traits, including gender, age, race/ethnicity, living arrangements, and income. We include a discussion about how the factors associated with the selection into the pet ownership group are related to a range of mental and physical health outcomes. Finally, we provide guidance on how to properly model the effects of pet ownership on health to accurately estimate this relationship in the general population.

  15. How to Set Up a Research Framework to Analyze Social-Ecological Interactive Processes in a Rural Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Deconchat

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Interdisciplinary research frameworks can be useful in providing answers to the environmental challenges facing rural environments, but concrete implementation of them remains empirical and requires better control. We present our practical experience of an interdisciplinary research project dealing with non-industrial private forestry in rural landscapes. The theoretical background, management, and methodological aspects, as well as results of the project, are presented in order to identify practical key factors that may influence its outcomes. Landscape ecology plays a central role in organizing the project. The efforts allocated for communication between scientists from different disciplines must be clearly stated in order to earn reciprocal trust. Sharing the same nested sampling areas, common approaches, and analytical tools (GIS is important, but has to be balanced by autonomy for actual implementation of field work and data analysis in a modular and evolving framework. Data sets are at the heart of the collaboration and GIS is necessary to ensure their long-term management and sharing. The experience acquired from practical development of such projects should be shared more often in networks of teams to compare their behavior and identify common rules of functioning.

  16. Illustrating idiographic methods for translation research: moderation effects, natural clinical experiments, and complex treatment-by-subgroup interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridenour, Ty A; Wittenborn, Andrea K; Raiff, Bethany R; Benedict, Neal; Kane-Gill, Sandra

    2016-03-01

    A critical juncture in translation research involves the preliminary studies of intervention tools, provider training programs, policies, and other mechanisms used to leverage knowledge garnered at one translation stage into another stage. Potentially useful for such studies are rigorous techniques for conducting within-subject clinical trials, which have advanced incrementally over the last decade. However, these methods have largely not been utilized within prevention or translation contexts. The purpose of this manuscript is to demonstrate the flexibility, wide applicability, and rigor of idiographic clinical trials for preliminary testing of intervention mechanisms. Specifically demonstrated are novel uses of state-space modeling for testing intervention mechanisms of short-term outcomes, identifying heterogeneity in and moderation of within-person treatment mechanisms, a horizontal line plot to refine sampling design during the course of a clinic-based experimental study, and the need to test a treatment's efficacy as treatment is administered along with (e.g., traditional 12-month outcomes).

  17. Interaction between research and diagnosis and surveillance of avian influenza within the Caribbean animal health network (CaribVET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrançois, T; Hendrikx, P; Vachiéry, N; Ehrhardt, N; Millien, M; Gomez, L; Gouyet, L; Gerbier, G; Gongora, V; Shaw, J; Trotman, M

    2010-04-01

    The Caribbean region is considered to be at risk for avian influenza (AI) because of predominance of the backyard poultry system, important commercial poultry production, migratory birds and disparities in the surveillance systems. The Caribbean animal health network (CaribVET) has developed tools to implement AI surveillance in the region: (i) a regionally harmonized surveillance protocol, (ii) specific web pages for AI surveillance on http://www.caribvet.net, and (iii) a diagnostic network for the Caribbean including AI virus molecular diagnostic capability in Guadeloupe and technology transfer. Altogether 303 samples from four Caribbean countries were tested between June 2006 and March 2009 by real time PCR either for importation purposes or following clinical suspicion. Following AI H5N2 outbreaks in the Dominican Republic in 2007, a questionnaire was developed to collect data for risk analysis of AI spread in the region through fighting cocks. The infection pathway of Martinique commercial poultry sector by AI through introduction of infected cocks was designed and recommendations were provided to the Caribbean veterinary services to improve fighting cock movement controls and biosecurity measures. Altogether, these CaribVET activities contribute to strengthen surveillance of AI in the Caribbean region and may allow the development of research studies on AI risk analysis.

  18. MAGNUM-PSI, a plasma generator for plasma-surface interaction research in ITER-like conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedheer, W.J.; Rooij, G.J. van; Veremiyenko, V.; Ahmad, Z.; Barth, C.J.; Eck, H.J.N. van; Groot, B. de; Hellermann, M.G. von; Kruijtzer, G.L.; Wolff, J.C.; Brezinsek, S.; Philipps, V.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Samm, U.; Schweer, B.; Dahiya, R.P.; Engeln, R.A.H.; Schram, D.C.; Fantz, U.; Kleyn, A.W.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.

    2005-01-01

    The FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics - together with its TEC partners - is preparing the construction of Magnum-psi, a magnetized (3 T), steady-state, large area (100 cm 2 ), high-flux (up to 10 24 H + ions m -2 s -1 ) plasma generator. The research programme of Magnum-psi will address the questions for the ITER divertor: erosion, redeposition and hydrogen retention with carbon substrates, melting of metal surfaces, erosion and redeposition with mixed materials. In order to explore and develop the techniques to be applied in Magnum-psi, a pilot experiment (Pilot-psi), operating at a magnetic field up to 1.6 Tesla, has been constructed. Pilot-psi produces a hydrogen plasma beam with the required parameters (T e ≤ 1eV and flux ≥ 10 23 m -2 s -1 ) over an area of 1 cm 2 . In this paper the results of extensive diagnostic measurements on Pilot-psi (a.o., Thomson Scattering and high-resolution spectroscopy), combined with numerical studies of the source and the expansion of the plasma will be presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the large Magnum-psi plasma generator. (author)

  19. Incorporating an Interactive Statistics Workshop into an Introductory Biology Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) Enhances Students' Statistical Reasoning and Quantitative Literacy Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olimpo, Jeffrey T; Pevey, Ryan S; McCabe, Thomas M

    2018-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) provide an avenue for student participation in authentic scientific opportunities. Within the context of such coursework, students are often expected to collect, analyze, and evaluate data obtained from their own investigations. Yet, limited research has been conducted that examines mechanisms for supporting students in these endeavors. In this article, we discuss the development and evaluation of an interactive statistics workshop that was expressly designed to provide students with an open platform for graduate teaching assistant (GTA)-mentored data processing, statistical testing, and synthesis of their own research findings. Mixed methods analyses of pre/post-intervention survey data indicated a statistically significant increase in students' reasoning and quantitative literacy abilities in the domain, as well as enhancement of student self-reported confidence in and knowledge of the application of various statistical metrics to real-world contexts. Collectively, these data reify an important role for scaffolded instruction in statistics in preparing emergent scientists to be data-savvy researchers in a globally expansive STEM workforce.

  20. Incorporating an Interactive Statistics Workshop into an Introductory Biology Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) Enhances Students’ Statistical Reasoning and Quantitative Literacy Skills †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olimpo, Jeffrey T.; Pevey, Ryan S.; McCabe, Thomas M.

    2018-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) provide an avenue for student participation in authentic scientific opportunities. Within the context of such coursework, students are often expected to collect, analyze, and evaluate data obtained from their own investigations. Yet, limited research has been conducted that examines mechanisms for supporting students in these endeavors. In this article, we discuss the development and evaluation of an interactive statistics workshop that was expressly designed to provide students with an open platform for graduate teaching assistant (GTA)-mentored data processing, statistical testing, and synthesis of their own research findings. Mixed methods analyses of pre/post-intervention survey data indicated a statistically significant increase in students’ reasoning and quantitative literacy abilities in the domain, as well as enhancement of student self-reported confidence in and knowledge of the application of various statistical metrics to real-world contexts. Collectively, these data reify an important role for scaffolded instruction in statistics in preparing emergent scientists to be data-savvy researchers in a globally expansive STEM workforce. PMID:29904549

  1. Evaluating the Quality of the Interaction between Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities and Direct Support Staff: A Preliminary Application of Three Observation Scales from Parent-Infant Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostyn, Ine; Petry, Katja; Lambrechts, Greet; Maes, Bea

    2011-01-01

    Background: Affective and reciprocal interactions with others are essential for persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD), but it is a challenge to assess their quality. This study aimed to investigate the usefulness of instruments from parent-infant research to evaluate these interactions. Method: Eighteen videotaped…

  2. Radiocarbon dating uncertainty and the reliability of the PEWMA method of time-series analysis for research on long-term human-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carleton, W Christopher; Campbell, David; Collard, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Statistical time-series analysis has the potential to improve our understanding of human-environment interaction in deep time. However, radiocarbon dating-the most common chronometric technique in archaeological and palaeoenvironmental research-creates challenges for established statistical methods. The methods assume that observations in a time-series are precisely dated, but this assumption is often violated when calibrated radiocarbon dates are used because they usually have highly irregular uncertainties. As a result, it is unclear whether the methods can be reliably used on radiocarbon-dated time-series. With this in mind, we conducted a large simulation study to investigate the impact of chronological uncertainty on a potentially useful time-series method. The method is a type of regression involving a prediction algorithm called the Poisson Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (PEMWA). It is designed for use with count time-series data, which makes it applicable to a wide range of questions about human-environment interaction in deep time. Our simulations suggest that the PEWMA method can often correctly identify relationships between time-series despite chronological uncertainty. When two time-series are correlated with a coefficient of 0.25, the method is able to identify that relationship correctly 20-30% of the time, providing the time-series contain low noise levels. With correlations of around 0.5, it is capable of correctly identifying correlations despite chronological uncertainty more than 90% of the time. While further testing is desirable, these findings indicate that the method can be used to test hypotheses about long-term human-environment interaction with a reasonable degree of confidence.

  3. Work Engagement: A Double-Edged Sword? A Study of the Relationship between Work Engagement and the Work-Home Interaction Using the ARK Research Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrine Listau

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate how being engaged at work affects academics’ work-home interaction. Using the Conservation of Resources theory as a theoretical framework, the study contributes to existing research by examining the relationship between the work engagement subscales (i.e. vigour, dedication, and absorption and both work-home facilitation and work-home conflict. In order to test the hypotheses, a Partial Least Squares-Structural Equation Modelling analysis was conducted using a large sample of academics from the Norwegian university sector (N = 4378. The results indicated that vigour and dedication had a positive relationship with work-home facilitation and a negative relationship with work-home conflict. In contrast, absorption was not significantly related to work-home facilitation, but was positively associated with work-home conflict. Thus, we conclude that work engagement seems to have the potential to create both positive and negative outcomes.

  4. Synergism of the method of characteristic, R-functions and diffusion solution for accurate representation of 3D neutron interactions in research reactors using the AGENT code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hursin, Mathieu; Xiao Shanjie; Jevremovic, Tatjana

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes the theoretical and numerical aspects of the AGENT code methodology accurately applied for detailed three-dimensional (3D) multigroup steady-state modeling of neutron interactions in complex heterogeneous reactor domains. For the first time we show the fine-mesh neutron scalar flux distribution in Purdue research reactor (that was built over forty years ago). The AGENT methodology is based on the unique combination of the three theories: the method of characteristics (MOC) used to simulate the neutron transport in two-dimensional (2D) whole core heterogeneous calculation, the theory of R-functions used as a mathematical tool to describe the true geometry and fuse with the MOC equations, and one-dimensional (1D) higher-order diffusion correction of 2D transport model to account for full 3D heterogeneous whole core representation. The synergism between the radial 2D transport and the 1D axial transport (to take into account the axial neutron interactions and leakage), called the 2D/1D method (used in DeCART and CHAPLET codes), provides a 3D computational solution. The unique synergism between the AGENT geometrical algorithm capable of modeling any current or future reactor core geometry and 3D neutron transport methodology is described in details. The 3D AGENT accuracy and its efficiency are demonstrated showing the eigenvalues, point-wise flux and reaction rate distributions in representative reactor geometries. The AGENT code, comprising this synergism, represents a building block of the computational system, called the virtual reactor. Its main purpose is to perform 'virtual' experiments and demonstrations of various mainly university research reactor experiments

  5. Researching research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pais, Alexandre; Valero, Paola

    2012-01-01

    We discuss contemporary theories in mathematics education in order to do research on research. Our strategy consists of analysing discursively and ideologically recent key publications addressing the role of theory in mathematics education research. We examine how the field fabricates its object...... of research by deploying Foucault’s notion of bio-politics - mainly to address the object “learning” - and Žižek’s ideology critique - to address the object “mathematics”. These theories, which have already been used in the field to research teaching and learning, have a great potential to contribute...... to a reflexivity of research on its discourses and effects. Furthermore, they enable us to present a clear distinction between what has been called the sociopolitical turn in mathematics education research and what we call a positioning of mathematics education (research) practices in the Political....

  6. The Impact of an Interactive Statistics Module on Novices' Development of Scientific Process Skills and Attitudes in a First-Semester Research Foundations Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsan, Lynnsay A; D'Arcy, Christina E; Olimpo, Jeffrey T

    2016-12-01

    Evidence suggests that incorporating quantitative reasoning exercises into existent curricular frameworks within the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines is essential for novices' development of conceptual understanding and process skills in these domains. Despite this being the case, such studies acknowledge that students often experience difficulty in applying mathematics in the context of scientific problems. To address this concern, the present study sought to explore the impact of active demonstrations and critical reading exercises on novices' comprehension of basic statistical concepts, including hypothesis testing, experimental design, and interpretation of research findings. Students first engaged in a highly interactive height activity that served to intuitively illustrate normal distribution, mean, standard deviation, and sample selection criteria. To enforce practical applications of standard deviation and p -value, student teams were subsequently assigned a figure from a peer-reviewed primary research article and instructed to evaluate the trustworthiness of the data. At the conclusion of this exercise, students presented their evaluations to the class for open discussion and commentary. Quantitative assessment of pre- and post-module survey data indicated a statistically significant increase both in students' scientific reasoning and process skills and in their self-reported confidence in understanding the statistical concepts presented in the module. Furthermore, data indicated that the majority of students (>85%) found the module both interesting and helpful in nature. Future studies will seek to develop additional, novel exercises within this area and to evaluate the impact of such modules across a variety of STEM and non-STEM contexts.

  7. How secondary school students conceptualize infrared radiation-matter interaction? Findings from a research study and implications for an instructional design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández, María Isabel; Ríos, Raquel; Pintó, Roser

    2015-01-01

    This study has been carried out within the REVIR scenario, which is a project promoting that secondary school students have access to a computerized laboratory at the Faculty of Education of our university and work in small groups during four hours with specific instructional material. One of the laboratory sessions included in the REVIR project deals with IR radiation-matter interaction, and is addressed to post-compulsory secondary students (16–18 year-old students). Within this framework, we have conducted a research study to analyse students’ conceptualizations of the processes or mechanisms that take place in IR radiation-matter interaction (energy transfer, selective absorption), and its effects at a macroscopic level (temperature increase) and at a molecular level (vibration). For data collection, a question was posed to all students at the end of each REVIR session, asking students to relate what was described in an article about the application of an IR laser for acne treatment to what they had learnt throughout the session. The analysis of the 67 students’ answers to that question revealed that many students explained the effects of the IR laser in vague terms, often repeating information included in the article, without explaining absorption of IR radiation in terms of energy. In consecutive versions of the instructional material, more oriented application questions were added after the article and explicit discussion around synthesis and exploratory (of students’ previous ideas) questions was carried out during the session. From the analysis of 49 and 119 students’ answers in consecutive later versions, we found that the introduction of these changes resulted in a greater number of students’ descriptions in macroscopic and microscopic terms, and a lower number of answers simply repeating information extracted from the reading. Furthermore, more students explicitly explained absorption in terms of energy associated to IR light. Implications

  8. Application of the multicriterion optimization techniques and hierarchy of computational models to the research of ion acceleration due to laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inovenkov, I. N.; Echkina, E. Yu.; Nefedov, V. V.; Ponomarenko, L. S.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we discuss how a particles-in-cell computation code can be combined with methods of multicriterion optimization (in particular the Pareto optimal solutions of the multicriterion optimization problem) and a hierarchy of computational models approach to create an efficient tool for solving a wide array of problems related to the laser-plasma interaction. In case of the computational experiment the multicriterion optimization can be applied as follows: the researcher defines the objectives of the experiment - some computable scalar values (i.e. high kinetic energy of the ions leaving the domain, least possible number of electrons leaving domain in the given direction, etc). After that the parameters of the experiment which can be varied to achieve these objectives and the constrains on these parameters are chosen (e.g. amplitude and wave-length of the laser radiation, dimensions of the plasma slab(s)). The Pareto optimality of the vector of the parameters can be seen as this: x 0 is Pareto optimal if there exists no vector which would improve some criterion without causing a simultaneous degradation in at least one other criterion. These efficient set of parameter and constrains can be selected based on the preliminary calculations in the simplified models (one or two-dimensional) either analytical or numerical. The multistage computation of the Pareto set radically reduces the number of variants which are to be evaluated to achieve the given accuracy. During the final stage we further improve the results by recomputing some of the optimal variants on the finer grids, with more particles and/or in the frame of a more detailed model. As an example we have considered the ion acceleration caused by interaction of very intense and ultra-short laser pulses with plasmas and have calculated the optimal set of experiment parameters for optimizing number and average energy of high energy ions leaving the domain in the given direction and minimizing the expulsion

  9. Collocated Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E. Fischer, Joel; Porcheron, Martin; Lucero, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    interactions. Yet, new challenges abound as people wear and carry more devices than ever, creating fragmented device ecologies at work, and changing the ways we socialise with each other. In this workshop we seek to start a dialogue to look back as well as forward, review best practices, discuss and design......In the 25 years since Ellis, Gibbs, and Rein proposed the time-space taxonomy, research in the ‘same time, same place’ quadrant has diversified, perhaps even fragmented. This one-day workshop will bring together researchers with diverse, yet convergent interests in tabletop, surface, mobile...

  10. Higher FKBP5, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 allele burdens are associated with PTSD and interact with trauma exposure: implications for neuropsychiatric research and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boscarino JA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Joseph A Boscarino1,2, Porat M Erlich1,3, Stuart N Hoffman4, Xiaopeng Zhang51Center for Health Research, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA, 2Department of Psychiatry, 3Department of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, 4Department of Neurology, 5Department of Anesthesiology, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA, USAObjective: The study aim was to assess the cumulative burden of polymorphisms located within four genetic loci previously associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD among outpatients at risk for PTSD.Methods: Diagnostic interviews were completed and DNA samples collected among 412 pain patients to determine if FKBP5 (rs9470080, COMT (rs4680, CHRNA5 (rs16969968, and CRHR1 (rs110402 single nucleotide polymorphisms were cumulatively associated with increased risk for PTSD.Results: In bivariate analyses, it was found that a count of specific PTSD risk alleles located within FKBP5, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 genetic loci (allele range = 0–6, mean count = 2.92, standard deviation = 1.36 was associated with lifetime (t [409] = 3.430, P = 0.001 and early onset PTSD (t [409] = 4.239, P = 0.000028. In logistic regression, controlling for demographic factors, personality traits, and trauma exposures, this risk allele count remained associated with both lifetime (odds ratio = 1.49, P = 0.00158 and early onset PTSD (odds ratio = 2.36, P = 0.000093. Interaction effects were also detected, whereby individuals with higher risk allele counts and higher trauma exposures had an increased risk of lifetime PTSD (allele count × high trauma, P = 0.026 and early onset PTSD (allele count × high trauma, P = 0.016 in these logistic regressions. Those with no or few risk alleles appeared resilient to PTSD, regardless of exposure history.Conclusion: A cumulative risk allele count involving four single nucleotide polymorphisms located within the FKBP5, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 genes are associated with PTSD. Level of trauma exposure

  11. Influences of a Socially Interactive Robot on the Affective Behavior of Young Children with Disabilities. Social Robots Research Reports, Number 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Carl J.; Prior, Jeremy; Hamby, Deborah W.; Trivette, Carol M.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from two studies of 11 young children with autism, Down syndrome, or attention deficit disorders investigating the effects of Popchilla, a socially interactive robot, on the children's affective behavior are reported. The children were observed under two conditions, child-toy interactions and child-robot interactions, and ratings of child…

  12. The Impact of an Interactive Statistics Module on Novices’ Development of Scientific Process Skills and Attitudes in a First-Semester Research Foundations Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynnsay A. Marsan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that incorporating quantitative reasoning exercises into existent curricular frameworks within the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM disciplines is essential for novices’ development of conceptual understanding and process skills in these domains. Despite this being the case, such studies acknowledge that students often experience difficulty in applying mathematics in the context of scientific problems. To address this concern, the present study sought to explore the impact of active demonstrations and critical reading exercises on novices’ comprehension of basic statistical concepts, including hypothesis testing, experimental design, and interpretation of research findings. Students first engaged in a highly interactive height activity that served to intuitively illustrate normal distribution, mean, standard deviation, and sample selection criteria. To enforce practical applications of standard deviation and p-value, student teams were subsequently assigned a figure from a peer-reviewed primary research article and instructed to evaluate the trustworthiness of the data. At the conclusion of this exercise, students presented their evaluations to the class for open discussion and commentary. Quantitative assessment of pre- and post-module survey data indicated a statistically significant increase both in students’ scientific reasoning and process skills and in their self-reported confidence in understanding the statistical concepts presented in the module. Furthermore, data indicated that the majority of students (>85% found the module both interesting and helpful in nature. Future studies will seek to develop additional, novel exercises within this area and to evaluate the impact of such modules across a variety of STEM and non-STEM contexts.

  13. Generalist health professional's interactions with consumers who have a mental illness in nonmental health settings: A systematic review of the qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunero, Scott; Ramjan, Lucie M; Salamonson, Yenna; Nicholls, Daniel

    2018-05-10

    Generalist health professionals (GHPs) or those healthcare professionals working in nonmental health facilities are increasingly being required to provide care to consumers with a mental illness. The review aimed to synthesize the qualitative research evidence on the meanings and interpretations made by GHPs (nonmental health professional) who interact with consumers with mental illness in nonmental health settings. A systematic review of the qualitative literature was undertaken for the years 1994-2016. The following electronic databases were searched: CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Sociological Abstracts. Using narrative synthesis methods, the following themes were identified: mental health knowledge (the GHPs' knowledge level about mental illness and how this impacts their experiences and perceptions); GHPs perceive mental illness as a safety risk (GHPs concern over harm to the consumer and themselves); organizational support (the system response from the environmental design, and expert support and care); and emotional consequences of care (the feelings expressed by GHPs based on their experiences and perceptions of consumers). The results suggest that GHPs provide care in a setting which consists of multiple understandings of what care means. Efforts beyond educational initiatives such as organizational and system-level changes will need to be implemented if we are to progress care for this consumer group. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  14. Experiences of Latinos with limited English proficiency with patient registration systems and their interactions with clinic front office staff: an exploratory study to inform community-based translational research in North Carolina

    OpenAIRE

    Calo, William A.; Cubillos, Laura; Breen, James; Hall, Megan; Rojas, Krycya Flores; Mooneyham, Rachel; Schaal, Jennifer; Hardy, Christina Yongue; Dave, Gaurav; Jolles, M?nica P?rez; Garcia, Nacire; Reuland, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Health services research of Latinos with limited English proficiency (LEP) have largely focused on studying disparities related to patient-provider communication. Less is known about their non-provider interactions such as those with patient registration systems and clinic front office staff; these interactions precede the encounter with providers and may shape how comfortable patients feel about their overall health services experience. This study explored Latino patients with LEP...

  15. A methodological proposal for comprehensive research: Communicative interactions in a virtual learning environment [Propuesta metodológica para la investigación comprensiva: Interacciones comunicativas en un entorno virtual de aprendizaje

    OpenAIRE

    Lopera C.V.; Vasquez S.A.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the communicative interactions that come up in the relationships of students in a virtual learning environment, the project "Communicative interactions in a virtual learning environment" was developed within a comprehensive research framework that refers to the structure of epistemological and methodological decisions and acts that allows a person to comprehensively access to the sense of life practices. Departing from an etnomethodological focus, the data obtaining, the analysi...

  16. Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology (NERIES)-Web Portal Developments for Interactive Access to Earthquake Data on a European Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuso, A.; Trani, L.; Rives, S.; Thomy, P.; Euchner, F.; Schorlemmer, D.; Saul, J.; Heinloo, A.; Bossu, R.; van Eck, T.

    2009-04-01

    The Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology (NERIES) is European Commission (EC) project whose focus is networking together seismological observatories and research institutes into one integrated European infrastructure that provides access to data and data products for research. Seismological institutes and organizations in European and Mediterranean countries maintain large, geographically distributed data archives, therefore this scenario suggested a design approach based on the concept of an internet service oriented architecture (SOA) to establish a cyberinfrastructure for distributed and heterogeneous data streams and services. Moreover, one of the goals of NERIES is to design and develop a Web portal that acts as the uppermost layer of the infrastructure and provides rendering capabilities for the underlying sets of data The Web services that are currently being designed and implemented will deliver data that has been adopted to appropriate formats. The parametric information about a seismic event is delivered using a seismology-specific Extensible mark-up Language(XML) format called QuakeML (https://quake.ethz.ch/quakeml), which has been formalized and implemented in coordination with global earthquake-information agencies. Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs) are used to assign identifiers to (1) seismic-event parameters described by QuakeML, and (2) generic resources, for example, authorities, locations providers, location methods, software adopted, and so on, described by use of a data model constructed with the resource description framework (RDF) and accessible as a service. The European-Mediterranean Seismological Center (EMSC) has implemented a unique event identifier (UNID) that will create the seismic event URI used by the QuakeML data model. Access to data such as broadband waveform, accelerometric data and stations inventories will be also provided through a set of Web services that will wrap the middleware used by the

  17. Atomic and Molecular Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic and Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field

  18. Use of a wiki as an interactive teaching tool in pathology residency education: Experience with a genomics, research, and informatics in pathology course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The need for informatics and genomics training in pathology is critical, yet limited resources for such training are available. In this study we sought to critically test the hypothesis that the incorporation of a wiki (a collaborative writing and publication tool with roots in "Web 2.0" in a combined informatics and genomics course could both (1 serve as an interactive, collaborative educational resource and reference and (2 actively engage trainees by requiring the creation and sharing of educational materials. Materials and Methods: A 2-week full-time course at our institution covering genomics, research, and pathology informatics (GRIP was taught by 36 faculty to 18 second- and third-year pathology residents. The course content included didactic lectures and hands-on demonstrations of technology (e.g., whole-slide scanning, telepathology, and statistics software. Attendees were given pre- and posttests. Residents were trained to use wiki technology (MediaWiki and requested to construct a wiki about the GRIP course by writing comprehensive online review articles on assigned lectures. To gauge effectiveness, pretest and posttest scores for our course were compared with scores from the previous 7 years from the predecessor course (limited to informatics given at our institution that did not utilize wikis. Results: Residents constructed 59 peer-reviewed collaborative wiki articles. This group showed a 25% improvement (standard deviation 12% in test scores, which was greater than the 16% delta recorded in the prior 7 years of our predecessor course (P = 0.006. Conclusions: Our use of wiki technology provided a wiki containing high-quality content that will form the basis of future pathology informatics and genomics courses and proved to be an effective teaching tool, as evidenced by the significant rise in our resident posttest scores. Data from this project provide support for the notion that active participation in content creation

  19. Hypothesis-Driven Research for G x E Interactions: The Relationship between Oxytocin, Parental Divorce during Adolescence, and Depression in Young Adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Michael eWindle; Sylvie eMrug

    2015-01-01

    Research in molecular genetics has generally focused on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and exploratory candidate gene and candidate gene-environment (GE) studies. In this article it is proposed that hypothesis-driven and biologically informed research provides a complementary approach to GWAS to advance pressing research questions about GE relations that are of public health relevance. Prior research studies and developmental and evolutionary theory were used to guide hypothesis testi...

  20. Hypothesis-driven research for G × E interactions: the relationship between oxytocin, parental divorce during adolescence, and depression in young adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Windle, Michael; Mrug, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Research in molecular genetics has generally focused on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and exploratory candidate gene and candidate gene–environment (G × E) studies. In this article it is proposed that hypothesis-driven and biologically informed research provides a complementary approach to GWAS to advance pressing research questions about G × E relations that are of public health relevance. Prior research studies and developmental and evolutionary theory were used to guide hypothesis...

  1. Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology (NERIES)—Web Portal Developments for Interactive Access to Earthquake Data on a European Scale

    OpenAIRE

    A. Spinuso; L. Trani; S. Rives; P. Thomy; F. Euchner; Danijel Schorlemmer; Joachim Saul; Andres Heinloo; R. Bossu; T. van Eck

    2009-01-01

    The Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology (NERIES) is European Commission (EC) project whose focus is networking together seismological observatories and research institutes into one integrated European infrastructure that provides access to data and data products for research. Seismological institutes and organizations in European and Mediterranean countries maintain large, geographically distributed data archives, therefore this scenario suggested a design approach bas...

  2. Research on the Factors Influencing Preference for Online Social Interaction%网络社交偏好影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋姜; 甘利人; 吴鹏

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of online social interactions, the way of people's social communication has been changed. The pur-pose of the current study was to identify potential factors leading to a preference for online social interaction to offline interaction. Based on an online survey (N=233) and a SEM analysis, we found that:compared to those who were good at face-to-face communication, indi-viduals who were not might prefer online social interaction much more;the higher the popularity level of preference for online social inter-action among the crowd around an individual, the more he was likely to show similar preference;compared to those with a limited level of involvement in online social interaction, individuals with a higher level would develop a stronger preference for online social interaction;compared to those with a higher level of satisfaction with their current offline contacts, individuals with a lower level of satisfaction were more likely to prefer online social interaction. The paper contributes to the understanding of the preference for online social interaction and provides references for enterprises to improve their social networking platforms.%网络社交的兴起改变了人们社会交流的方式,旨在研究人们网络社交偏好的影响因素。通过对233个被试的在线问卷调查,使用结构方程分析方法,我们得到:和擅长面对面交流的人相比,不擅长面对面交流的人更偏好于网络社交;周围人群网络社交普及程度越高,人们越偏好于网络社交;和网络社交涉入深度低的人相比,网络社交涉入深度高的人更偏好于网络社交;和对线下交流满意程度高的人相比,对线下社交满意度低的人更偏好于网络社交。本研究能促进对人们网络社交偏好行为的理解以及为改善网络社交平台提供参考。

  3. Action and Interactiv research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kurt Aagaard; Svensson, Lennart

    The text is written as a first version of editors introduction to a book about action research/interactive research in Nordic countries. You can read abouttrends and contradictions in the history of action research.The authors question the trends and demands a more explicit critical approach...... to actual action research/interactive research....

  4. Media Facades beyond Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas

    2008-01-01

    As part of a the research project Digital Urban Living [www.digitalurbanliving.dk], we have taken part in the design of two large-scale installations that employ interactive technologies to facilitate participation and foster social interactions in public, urban settings. We present the two cases......, Aarhus by Light and Projected Poetry, and discuss the future trajectory of our work in this field, as well as some of our findings regarding the challenges of designing large-scale public interactive installations. In doing so, we specifically highlight the possibilities in relation to designing...... for affective experience and engaging interaction that advocate for a long-term interactive experience....

  5. Assessment of groundwater–surface water interaction using long-term hydrochemical data and isotope hydrology: Headwaters of the Condamine River, Southeast Queensland, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jorge L., E-mail: jlmarti@ig.com.br [Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Raiber, Matthias [CSIRO Land and Water Flagship, Brisbane (Australia); Cox, Malcolm E. [Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia)

    2015-12-01

    A spatial analysis of hydrochemical data of groundwater and surface water was undertaken to identify groundwater-surface water connectivity in the headwaters of the Condamine River catchment, Southeast Queensland, Australia. An assessment of long-term hydrochemical and water level data supplemented by stable- and radioisotope measurements following a prolonged dry period dominated by baseflow, helped in determining patterns of interaction in different tributaries of the upper Condamine catchment. A conceptual hydrological model representing the major hydrochemical processes and their implications for stream-aquifer connectivity was developed and tested using multiple lines of evidence. The results of a multivariate statistical analysis highlight that there are two main regions with distinct hydrochemical facies (salinity, alkalinity, and predominant ions) in surface water. Geomorphology, geology, anthropogenic and climate influence were identified as the most relevant controlling factors of the spatial variability in water quality. Stable isotope data confirmed a clear evaporation trend in almost all surface water samples during baseflow conditions. Two water types can be identified and separated by the degree of evaporation and the proximity of one group to the local meteoric water line. The results confirm the discharge of groundwater from aquifers recharged by rainfall and located upstream of the surface water sampling sites. Overall, {sup 222}Rn data show a trend of increased activity in surface water towards the upstream portions of these tributaries, validating the use of this tracer to estimate groundwater input to the local creeks. The proportion of groundwater contribution to stream flow calculated by {sup 222}Rn and chloride mass balance is in agreement, and ranges between 20–70% in tributaries in the northern areas, and between 8–50% in the upper reaches of the main river channel. This study shows the efficacy of an integrated approach combining long

  6. Assessment of groundwater–surface water interaction using long-term hydrochemical data and isotope hydrology: Headwaters of the Condamine River, Southeast Queensland, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Jorge L.; Raiber, Matthias; Cox, Malcolm E.

    2015-01-01

    A spatial analysis of hydrochemical data of groundwater and surface water was undertaken to identify groundwater-surface water connectivity in the headwaters of the Condamine River catchment, Southeast Queensland, Australia. An assessment of long-term hydrochemical and water level data supplemented by stable- and radioisotope measurements following a prolonged dry period dominated by baseflow, helped in determining patterns of interaction in different tributaries of the upper Condamine catchment. A conceptual hydrological model representing the major hydrochemical processes and their implications for stream-aquifer connectivity was developed and tested using multiple lines of evidence. The results of a multivariate statistical analysis highlight that there are two main regions with distinct hydrochemical facies (salinity, alkalinity, and predominant ions) in surface water. Geomorphology, geology, anthropogenic and climate influence were identified as the most relevant controlling factors of the spatial variability in water quality. Stable isotope data confirmed a clear evaporation trend in almost all surface water samples during baseflow conditions. Two water types can be identified and separated by the degree of evaporation and the proximity of one group to the local meteoric water line. The results confirm the discharge of groundwater from aquifers recharged by rainfall and located upstream of the surface water sampling sites. Overall, 222 Rn data show a trend of increased activity in surface water towards the upstream portions of these tributaries, validating the use of this tracer to estimate groundwater input to the local creeks. The proportion of groundwater contribution to stream flow calculated by 222 Rn and chloride mass balance is in agreement, and ranges between 20–70% in tributaries in the northern areas, and between 8–50% in the upper reaches of the main river channel. This study shows the efficacy of an integrated approach combining long

  7. Effects of Child-Robot Interactions on the Vocalization Production of Young Children with Disabilities. Social Robots. Research Reports, Number 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Carl J.; Trivette, Carol M.; Hamby, Deborah W.; Prior, Jeremy; Derryberry, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Findings from two studies investigating the effects of a socially interactive robot on the vocalization production of young children with disabilities are reported. The two studies included seven children with autism, two children with Down syndrome, and two children with attention deficit disorders. The Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA)…

  8. A Review of the Quality of Behaviorally-Based Intervention Research to Improve Social Interaction Skills of Children with ASD in Inclusive Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Síglia Pimentel Höher; Rispoli, Mandy; Ganz, Jennifer; Hong, Ee Rea; Davis, Heather; Mason, Rose

    2014-01-01

    Students with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) often have difficulties in social interaction skills, which may prevent their successful inclusion in general education placements. Behaviorally-based social skills interventions have been shown to be effective in attenuating such difficulties in these environments. In light of the increasing number…

  9. Parents' Appraisals of the Animacy and Likability of Socially Interactive Robots for Intervening with Young Children with Disabilities. Social Robots Research Reports, Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Carl J.; Trivette, Carol M.; Prior, Jeremy; Hamby, Deborah W.; Embler, Davon

    2013-01-01

    Findings from a survey of parents' ratings of seven different human-like qualities of four socially interactive robots are reported. The four robots were Popchilla, Keepon, Kaspar, and CosmoBot. The participants were 96 parents and other primary caregivers of young children with disabilities 1 to 12 years of age. Results showed that Popchilla, a…

  10. Parents' Judgments of the Acceptability and Importance of Socially Interactive Robots for Intervening with Young Children with Disabilities. Social Robots Research Reports, Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Carl J.; Trivette, Carol M.; Prior, Jeremy; Hamby, Deborah W.; Embler, Davon

    2013-01-01

    A number of different types of socially interactive robots are being used as part of interventions with young children with disabilities to promote their joint attention and language skills. Parents' judgments of two dimensions (acceptance and importance) of the social validity of four different social robots were the focus of the study described…

  11. General overview: European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI)-integrating aerosol research from nano to global scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulmala, M.; Asmi, A.; Lappalainen, H.K.; Baltensperger, U.; Brenguier, J.-L.; Facchini, M.C.; Hansson, H.-C.; Hov, Ø.; O'Dowd, C.D.; Pöschl, U.; Wiedensohler, A.; Boers, R.; Boucher, O.; Leeuw, G. de; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Feichter, J.; Krejci, R.; Laj, P.; Lihavainen, H.; Lohmann, U.; McFiggans, G.; Mentel, T.; Pilinis, C.; Riipinen, I.; Schulz, M.; Stohl, A.; Swietlicki, E.; Vignati, E.; Alves, C.; Amann, M.; Ammann, M.; Arabas, S.; Artaxo, P.; Baars, H.; Beddows, D.C.S.; Bergström, R.; Beukes, J.P.; Bilde, M.; Burkhart, J.F.; Canonaco, F.; Clegg, S.L.; Coe, H.; Crumeyrolle, S.; D'Anna, B.; Decesari, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Fischer, M.; Fjaeraa, A.M.; Fountoukis, C.; George, C.; Gomes, L.; Halloran, P.; Hamburger, T.; Harrison, R.M.; Herrmann, H.; Hoffmann, T.; Hoose, C.; Hu, M.; Hyvärinen, A.; Hõrrak, U.; Iinuma, Y.; Iversen, T.; Josipovic, M.; Kanakidou, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kirkevåg, A.; Kiss, G.; Klimont, Z.; Kolmonen, P.; Komppula, M.; Kristjánsson, J.-E.; Laakso, L.; Laaksonen, A.; Labonnote, L.; Lanz, V.A.; Lehtinen, K.E.J.; Rizzo, L.V.; Makkonen, R.; Manninen, H.E.; McMeeking, G.; Merikanto, J.; Minikin, A.; Mirme, S.; Morgan, W.T.; Nemitz, E.; O'Donnell, D.; Panwar, T.S.; Pawlowska, H.; Petzold, A.; Pienaar, J.J.; Pio, C.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Prévôt, A.S.H.; Pryor, S.; Reddington, C.L.; Roberts, G.; Rosenfeld, D.; Schwarz, J.; Seland, O.; Sellegri, K.; Shen, X.J.; Shiraiwa, M.; Siebert, H.; Sierau, B.; Simpson, D.; Sun, J.Y.; Topping, D.; Tunved, P.; Vaattovaara, P.; Vakkari, V.; Veefkind, J.P.; Visschedijk, A.; Vuollekoski, H.; Vuolo, R.; Wehner, B.; Wildt, J.; Woodward, S.; Worsnop, D.R.; Zadelhoff, G.J. van; Zardini, A.A.; Zhang, K.; Zyl, P.G. van; Kerminen, V.-M.; Carslaw, K.S.; Pandis, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe and summarize the main achievements of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI). EUCAARI started on 1 January 2007 and ended on 31 December 2010 leaving a rich legacy including: (a) a comprehensive database with a year of

  12. Co-ordinated research project on application of isotopic and nuclear techniques in the study of nutrition-pollution interactions and their impact on the nutritional status of human subjects in developing country populations. Report on the 2. research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is actively contributing through coordinated research project mechanisms to the development of isotopic techniques applicable for pollution-nutrition interactions. This CRP is based on the recommendations of a consultants' meeting on: 'Nuclear Analytical and Isotope Techniques for assessing nutrition-pollution interactions', NAHRES-62. The main objective of the CRP is to provide a scientific basis for better assessment of selected pollutants and nutrients in biological samples with a view to elucidate their interactions and the impact on human health. Results of this study will enhance the existing body of knowledge on nutrition-pollution interactions mechanisms and can be used to develop preventive strategies. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: Use of non-invasive specimens (e.g. breast milk, blood, hair, urine, placenta, eventually adipose tissue for organic pollutants) as indicators to monitor the interaction between the environmental pollution (both organic and inorganic) and nutritional status. Development of protocols to assess the health impact of environmental conditions on populations living under the risk of malnutrition. Validated procedures for chemical analysis in selected environment and nutritional specimens for research in the pollutant-nutrition interaction

  13. 'I am treated well if I adhere to my HIV medication': putting patient-provider interactions in context through insights from qualitative research in five sub-Saharan African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondenge, Ken; Renju, Jenny; Bonnington, Oliver; Moshabela, Mosa; Wamoyi, Joyce; Nyamukapa, Constance; Seeley, Janet; Wringe, Alison; Skovdal, Morten

    2017-07-01

    The nature of patient-provider interactions and communication is widely documented to significantly impact on patient experiences, treatment adherence and health outcomes. Yet little is known about the broader contextual factors and dynamics that shape patient-provider interactions in high HIV prevalence and limited-resource settings. Drawing on qualitative research from five sub-Saharan African countries, we seek to unpack local dynamics that serve to hinder or facilitate productive patient-provider interactions. This qualitative study, conducted in Kisumu (Kenya), Kisesa (Tanzania), Manicaland (Zimbabwe), Karonga (Malawi) and uMkhanyakude (South Africa), draws upon 278 in-depth interviews with purposively sampled people living with HIV with different diagnosis and treatment histories, 29 family members of people who died due to HIV and 38 HIV healthcare workers. Data were collected using topic guides that explored patient testing and antiretroviral therapy treatment journeys. Thematic analysis was conducted, aided by NVivo V.8.0 software. Our analysis revealed an array of inter-related contextual factors and power dynamics shaping patient-provider interactions. These included (1) participants' perceptions of roles and identities of 'self' and 'other'; (2) conformity or resistance to the 'rules of HIV service engagement' and a 'patient-persona'; (3) the influence of significant others' views on service provision; and (4) resources in health services. We observed that these four factors/dynamics were located in the wider context of conceptualisations of power, autonomy and structure. Patient-provider interaction is complex, multidimensional and deeply embedded in wider social dynamics. Multiple contextual domains shape patient-provider interactions in the context of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. Interventions to improve patient experiences and treatment adherence through enhanced interactions need to go beyond the existing focus on patient-provider communication

  14. 網路虛擬實境博物館之互動展示設計研究 Research of interactive Exhibition Design for the Web-based Virtual Reality Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E-shin Shen

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available 無With the rapid growth of network technology, the related software and hardware industries are booming. In the meantime, museums that use computer networks to communicate their exhibition information are continually increasing. in turn, the operation of museum also exposes different features. This research is aimed at exploring the interactive exhibit design for the web-based virtual reality museum. Based upon the exhibit design principles, the researchers take the historical museum of Yuan Ze University as an example to develop an Internet museum exhibit system. In addition to reviewing the related literature and excellent examples on lnternet, the researchers integrate game design ideas into the exhibit system in order to provide visitors more enjoyable experience. Furthermore, the researchers will also verify the feasibility through expert review and user test.

  15. Curiosity and Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieben, R.; Bekker, M.M.; Schouten, B.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the concepts of curiosity and interaction: how can we elicit curiosity in public spaces through interactive systems? We have developed a model consisting of five curiosity-evoking principles. In an iterative design research approach, we have explored the design implementations of these

  16. INTERACT Station Catalogue - 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    INTERACT stations are located in all major environmental envelopes of the Arctic providing an ideal platform for studying climate change and its impact on the environment and local communities. Since alpine environments face similar changes and challenges as the Arctic, the INTERACT network also ...... catalogue includes descriptions of 73 research stations included in the network at the time of printing....

  17. Media Facades beyond Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas

    2008-01-01

    As part of a the research project Digital Urban Living [www.digitalurbanliving.dk], we have taken part in the design of two large-scale installations that employ interactive technologies to facilitate participation and foster social interactions in public, urban settings. We present the two cases...

  18. Elementary particle interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.T.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.L.; Read, K.; Ward, B.F.L.

    1992-10-01

    Work continues on strange particle production in weak interactions using data from a high-energy neutrino exposure in a freon bubble chamber. Meson photoproduction has also consumed considerable effort. Detector research and development activities have been carried out

  19. Interaction Research on the Antiviral Molecule Dufulin Targeting on Southern Rice Black Streaked Dwarf Virus P9-1 Nonstructural Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenchao Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV causes severe harm to rice production. Unfortunately, studies on effective antiviral drugs against SRBSDV and interaction mechanism of antiviral molecule targeting on SRBSDV have not been reported. This study found dufulin (DFL, an ideal anti-SRBSDV molecule, and investigated the interactions of DFL targeting on the nonstructural protein P9-1. The biological sequence information and bonding characterization of DFL to four kinds of P9-1 protein were described with fluorescence titration (FT and microscale thermophoresis (MST assays. The sequence analysis indicated that P9-1 had highly-conserved C- and N-terminal amino acid residues and a hypervariable region that differed from 131 aa to 160 aa. Consequently, wild-type (WT-His-P9-1, 23 C-terminal residues truncated (TR-ΔC23-His-P9-1, 6 N-terminal residues truncated (TR-ΔN6-His-P9-1, and Ser138 site-directed (MU-138-His-P9-1 mutant proteins were expressed. The FT and MST assay results indicated that DFL bounded to WT-His-P9-1 with micromole affinity and the 23 C-terminal amino acids were the potential targeting site. This system, which combines a complete sequence analysis, mutant protein expression, and binding action evaluating system, could further advance the understanding of the interaction abilities between antiviral drugs and their targets.

  20. Enhancing the gene-environment interaction framework through a quasi-experimental research design: evidence from differential responses to September 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jason M

    2014-01-01

    This article uses a gene-environment interaction framework to examine the differential responses to an objective external stressor based on genetic variation in the production of depressive symptoms. This article advances the literature by utilizing a quasi-experimental environmental exposure design, as well as a regression discontinuity design, to control for seasonal trends, which limit the potential for gene-environment correlation and allow stronger causal claims. Replications are attempted for two prominent genes (5-HTT and MAOA), and three additional genes are explored (DRD2, DRD4, and DAT1). This article provides evidence of a main effect of 9/11 on reports of feelings of sadness and fails to replicate a common finding of interaction using 5-HTT but does show support for interaction with MAOA in men. It also provides new evidence that variation in the DRD4 gene modifies an individual's response to the exposure, with individuals with no 7-repeats found to have a muted response.

  1. Instrumental interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani , Annie

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The expression instrumental interaction as been introduced by Claude Cadoz to identify a human-object interaction during which a human manipulates a physical object - an instrument - in order to perform a manual task. Classical examples of instrumental interaction are all the professional manual tasks: playing violin, cutting fabrics by hand, moulding a paste, etc.... Instrumental interaction differs from other types of interaction (called symbolic or iconic interactio...

  2. Report on activities and findings under DOE grant “Collaborative research. An Interactive Multi-Model for Consensus on Climate Change”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duane, Gregory S. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Tsonis, Anastasios [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Kocarev, Ljupco [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Tribbia, Joseph [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-10-30

    for inter-model nudging using the DART (Data Assimilation Research Testbed) capability to stop and re-start models in synchrony. It was clearly established that the inter-model nudging adds almost no computational burden to the runs, but there appears to be a problem with the re-initialization software that is still being debugged. Publications: Several papers were published on the basic idea of the interactive multi-model (supermodel) including demonstrations with low-order ODEs. The last of these, a semi-philosophical review paper on the relevance of synchronization generally, encountered considerable resistance but was finally published in Entropy [Duane 2015]. A paper on the ECHAM/COSMOS supermodel, containing the most promising results so far [Shen et al. 2015] is presently under review.

  3. Defining the Interactions of Cellobiohydrolase with Substrate through Structure Function Studies: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-409

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.

    2013-07-01

    NREL researchers will use their expertise and skilled resources in numerical computational modeling to generate structure-function relationships for improved cellulase variant enzymes to support the development of cellulases with improved performance in biomass conversion.

  4. Interactive Methods for Teaching Action Potentials, an Example of Teaching Innovation from Neuroscience Postdoctoral Fellows in the Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) Program

    OpenAIRE

    Keen-Rhinehart, E.; Eisen, A.; Eaton, D.; McCormack, K.

    2009-01-01

    Acquiring a faculty position in academia is extremely competitive and now typically requires more than just solid research skills and knowledge of one?s field. Recruiting institutions currently desire new faculty that can teach effectively, but few postdoctoral positions provide any training in teaching methods. Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) is a successful postdoctoral training program funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) providing training in both researc...

  5. General overview: European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI) – integrating aerosol research from nano to global scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulmala, M.; Asmi, A.; Lappalainen, H. K.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe and summarize the main achievements of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI). EUCAARI started on 1 January 2007 and ended on 31 December 2010 leaving a rich legacy including: (a) a comprehensive database with a year...... of observations of the physical, chemical and optical properties of aerosol particles over Europe, (b) comprehensive aerosol measurements in four developing countries, (c) a database of airborne measurements of aerosols and clouds over Europe during May 2008, (d) comprehensive modeling tools to study aerosol...

  6. RESEARCH ON THE PROBLEMS OF interaction BETWEEN SCIENCE AND RELIGION IN UNIVERSITY COURSE OF PHILOSOPHY (BASED ON WORKS BY RUSSIAN RELIGIOUS THINKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey I. Belkin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the article explores the interrelations between science and religion in the context of shaping integrated world outlook of future specialists in the framework of the competence-based approach. Axiological and ethical aspects of the interaction between the two major branches of human culture are considered using the example of works by Russian religious thinkers: Archbishop Luke (V. F. Voyno-Yasenetsky, V. S. Soloviev, N. A. Berdyaev. Materials and Methods: materials and methods: the study employed the method of original sources, i. e. works by N. A. Berdyaev, V. F. Voino-Yasenetsky, V. S. Solovyov, considering the problems of interaction between science and religion. The method of original sources was combined with methods of analysis, synthesis and generalisation. Results: attention is paid to different approaches to addressing this problem over the historical development of human thought. When analysing the works by V. S. Solovyov emphasis is made on the concept of integral knowledge, considering the true knowledge as a result of the interaction of rational, empirical and mystical aspects. Much attention is paid to the interpretation of Archbishop Luke’s thoughts (V. F. Voyno-Yasenetsky who advocated theoretically and practically the idea of the synthesis of the knowledge and belief in their inextricable link to the genuine scientific and philosophical works. When discussing N. A. Berdyaev’s ideas the focus is on the critical analysis of the three types of relationships between science and religion, established in human culture: 1 supremacy of knowledge and denial of faith, 2 supremacy of faith and denial of knowledge, and 3 the dualism of knowledge and faith. The article also gives a thorough account of the philosopher’s idea about the synthesis of knowledge, faith and intuition that contradicts traditional approach. The article presents the arguments of modern science about the importance of interaction between religious

  7. Two-dimensional simulations of laser–plasma interaction and hot electron generation in the context of shock-ignition research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Weber, Stefan A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 5 (2014), 055010 ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser plasma interaction * stimulated Raman scattering * hot electrons * particle-in-cell simulation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.186, year: 2014

  8. Interaction university and school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gionara Tauchen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the interaction between universities and middle schools is fundamental for organization and the qualification of the education system, we conducted a qualitative study on twenty public municipal schools of Rio Grande, RS, designed to investigate and understand the effectiveness of university activities (teaching, research and extension in regard to the promotion and strengthening of the interactions between these institutions. We highlight the activities related to Pibid, the Education Observatory, extension, supervised internships, and to undergraduate and postgraduate research. From comprehensions about these activities, we discuss the interaction between school and university.

  9. Vision-based interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Turk, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    In its early years, the field of computer vision was largely motivated by researchers seeking computational models of biological vision and solutions to practical problems in manufacturing, defense, and medicine. For the past two decades or so, there has been an increasing interest in computer vision as an input modality in the context of human-computer interaction. Such vision-based interaction can endow interactive systems with visual capabilities similar to those important to human-human interaction, in order to perceive non-verbal cues and incorporate this information in applications such

  10. Proxemic Mobile Collocated Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porcheron, Martin; Lucero, Andrés; Quigley, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    and their digital devices (i.e. the proxemic relationships). Building on the ideas of proxemic interactions, this workshop is motivated by the concept of ‘proxemic mobile collocated interactions’, to harness new or existing technologies to create engaging and interactionally relevant experiences. Such approaches......Recent research on mobile collocated interactions has been looking at situations in which collocated users engage in collaborative activities using their mobile devices. However, existing practices fail to fully account for the culturally-dependent spatial relationships between people...... in exploring proxemics and mobile collocated interactions....

  11. General overview: European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI – integrating aerosol research from nano to global scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Simpson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe and summarize the main achievements of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI. EUCAARI started on 1 January 2007 and ended on 31 December 2010 leaving a rich legacy including: (a a comprehensive database with a year of observations of the physical, chemical and optical properties of aerosol particles over Europe, (b comprehensive aerosol measurements in four developing countries, (c a database of airborne measurements of aerosols and clouds over Europe during May 2008, (d comprehensive modeling tools to study aerosol processes fron nano to global scale and their effects on climate and air quality. In addition a new Pan-European aerosol emissions inventory was developed and evaluated, a new cluster spectrometer was built and tested in the field and several new aerosol parameterizations and computations modules for chemical transport and global climate models were developed and evaluated. These achievements and related studies have substantially improved our understanding and reduced the uncertainties of aerosol radiative forcing and air quality-climate interactions. The EUCAARI results can be utilized in European and global environmental policy to assess the aerosol impacts and the corresponding abatement strategies.

  12. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanda, R.

    1981-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidences to form a basis for Lagrangian Quantum field theory for Weak Interactions are discussed. In this context, gauge invariance aspects of such interactions are showed. (L.C.) [pt

  13. Mobile Collocated Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucero, Andrés; Clawson, James; Lyons, Kent

    2015-01-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets were originally conceived and have traditionally been utilized for individual use. Research on mobile collocated interactions has been looking at situations in which collocated users engage in collaborative activities using their mobile devices, thus...... going from personal/individual toward shared/multiuser experiences and interactions. However, computers are getting smaller, more powerful, and closer to our bodies. Therefore, mobile collocated interactions research, which originally looked at smartphones and tablets, will inevitably include ever......-smaller computers, ones that can be worn on our wrists or other parts of the body. The focus of this workshop is to bring together a community of researchers, designers and practitioners to explore the potential of extending mobile collocated interactions to the use of wearable devices....

  14. Intermolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, I.G.; Rodimova, O.B.; AN SSSR, Tomsk. Inst. Optiki Atmosfery)

    1978-01-01

    The present state of the intermolecular interaction theory is described. The general physical picture of the molecular interactions is given, the relative contributions of interactions of different types are analyzed (electrostatic, resonance, induction, dispersion, relativistic, magnetostatic and exchange), and the main ones in each range of separations are picked out. The methods of the potential curve calculations are considered, specific for definite separations between the interacting systems. The special attention is paid to the analysis of approximations used in different theoretical calculation methods

  15. Multidimensional electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) for quantitative analysis of the proteome and phosphoproteome in clinical and biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loroch, Stefan; Schommartz, Tim; Brune, Wolfram; Zahedi, René Peiman; Sickmann, Albert

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics have become key disciplines in understanding cellular processes. Fundamental research can be done using cell culture providing researchers with virtually infinite sample amounts. In contrast, clinical, pre-clinical and biomedical research is often restricted to minute sample amounts and requires an efficient analysis with only micrograms of protein. To address this issue, we generated a highly sensitive workflow for combined LC-MS-based quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics by refining an ERLIC-based 2D phosphoproteomics workflow into an ERLIC-based 3D workflow covering the global proteome as well. The resulting 3D strategy was successfully used for an in-depth quantitative analysis of both, the proteome and the phosphoproteome of murine cytomegalovirus-infected mouse fibroblasts, a model system for host cell manipulation by a virus. In a 2-plex SILAC experiment with 150 μg of a tryptic digest per condition, the 3D strategy enabled the quantification of ~75% more proteins and even ~134% more peptides compared to the 2D strategy. Additionally, we could quantify ~50% more phosphoproteins by non-phosphorylated peptides, concurrently yielding insights into changes on the levels of protein expression and phosphorylation. Beside its sensitivity, our novel three-dimensional ERLIC-strategy has the potential for semi-automated sample processing rendering it a suitable future perspective for clinical, pre-clinical and biomedical research. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Interactive Read-Alouds--An Avenue for Enhancing Children's Language for Thinking and Understanding: A Review of Recent Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing young children's early literacy achievement is a top priority in many countries. There is a considerable body of research demonstrating young children's language development as a critical factor in reading and later academic success. Implementation of high quality literacy instruction has the potential to improve literacy…

  17. Training HBCU Faculty and Students in Prostate Cancer (PC) Research: Signal Transduction and Receptor-Inhibitor Interactions in the Progress of PC

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wiese, Thomas E; Klassen, R. B

    2007-01-01

    .... One new project has been developed and is involving students. (3) To establish a long-term collaborative relationship between Xavier University and the TCC in PC research. XU faculty in the program are now members of the Tulane Cancer Center and involved in weekly seminars and focus group meetings.

  18. Training HBCU Faculty and Students in Prostate Cancer (PC) Research: Signal Transduction and Receptor-Inhibitor Interactions in the Progress of PC

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wiese, Thomas E; Klassen, R. B

    2008-01-01

    .... One new project has been developed and is involving students. (3) To establish a long-term collaborative relationship between Xavier University and the TCC in PC research. XU faculty in the program are now members of the Tulane Cancer Center and involved in weekly seminars and focus group meetings.

  19. Interactions between states and markets in a global context of change : Contribution for building a research agenda on stakeholders’ social responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Ashley (Patricia Almeida)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis working paper is part of ongoing research on international comparison between European and Brazilian public policies for cross-sector and multi-actor social responsibility based on a concept of stakeholders’ social responsibility as proposed by Ashley (2010). One of the propositions

  20. Validation of seismic soil-structure interaction analysis methods: EPRI [Electric Power Research Institute]/NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] cooperation in Lotung, Taiwan, experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.; Tang, Y.K.; Kassawara, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    The cooperative program between NRC/ANL and EPRI on the validation of soil-structure interaction analysis methods with actual seismic response data is described. A large scale-model of a containment building has been built by EPRI/Taipower in a highly seismic region of Taiwan. Vibration tests were performed, first on the basemat before the superstructure was built and then on the completed structure. Since its completion, the structure has experienced many earthquakes. The site and structural response to these earthquakes have been recorded with field (surface and downhole) and structural instrumentation. The validation program involves blind predictions of site and structural response during vibration tests and a selected seismic event, and subsequent comparison between the predictions and measurements. The predictive calculations are in progress. The results of the correlation are expected to lead to the evaluation of the methods as to their conservatisms and sensitivities

  1. Research on Credit Evaluation of Mobile Medical APP Interactive Online Consultation Service-Take Haodaifu APP Online Payment Service as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Dandan; Zhao, Lei

    2017-10-01

    Mobile medical industry is developing rapidly, but the relevant credit evaluation system is still in the exploratory stage. Haodaifu in the interactive online consulting services more representatives and has a credit evaluation system, but the system is not perfect. There are many problems in the system, such as credits indicators cannot better reflect the results of user’s evaluation, the lack of user qualification supervision, evaluation index system and assessment channels are not perfect. On the basis of drawing on the advantages of E-commerce evaluation system and combining with the characteristics of mobile medical itself, two suggestions are put forward: Improve the credit evaluation model (Generate physician static credit index, Change the doctor 's dynamic credit index algorithm, Update the dynamic credit index), Improve the basic mechanism of credit evaluation.

  2. Experimental research of the NN scattering with polarized particles at the VdG accelerator of Charles University. Project 'NN interactions'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, N.S.; Broz, J.; Cerny, J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to study three-nucleon interactions using 14-16 MeV polarized neutron beam in conjunction with polarized deuteron target. Spin-dependent total cross-section differences Δρ L and Δρ T will be measured in the energy range, where there are no experimental data, with sufficient accuracy to check the contribution of the three-nucleon forces. In the test run, the obtained deuteron vector polarizations were P - = (- 39.5 ± 2)% and P + = (32.9 ± 2)%. The proposed experiment is the continuation of the preceding measurements of the same quantities in the np scattering at the Van de Graaff accelerator of Charles University

  3. Grasp interaction with tablets

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    This book presents guidelines for a future device type: a tablet that allows ergonomic front- and back-of-device interaction. These guidelines help designers and developers of user interfaces to build ergonomic applications for tablet devices, in particular for devices that enable back-of-device interaction. In addition, manufacturers of tablet devices obtain arguments that back-of-device interaction is a promising extension of the interaction design space and results in increased input capabilities, enriched design possibilities, and proven usability. The guidelines are derived from empirical studies and developed to fit the users’ skills to the way the novel device type is held. Three particular research areas that are relevant to develop design guidelines for tablet interaction are investigated: ergonomic gestures, interaction areas, and pointing techniques.

  4. Interaction Design for Public Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Karen Johanne

    2008-01-01

    In this abstract I describe the doctorial research project "Interaction Design for Public Spaces". The objective of the project is to explore and design interaction contexts in culture related public spaces such as museums, experience centres and festivals. As a perspective on this domain, I...... will focus on the usage of the body as an interaction device. Furthermore, the project will involve a dramaturgic take on communication and design of interactive systems in the pursuit of new ways to stage the interactive contexts. The outcome of the project will be guidelines and conceptual frameworks which...... will help interaction designers when designing for bodily movement, and communicating and staging interactive content in public spaces....

  5. Annual report of STACY operation in FY.1999. Experiments on two unit neutron-interacting system with slab-shaped core tanks and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution (1). (contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Seiji; Sono, Hiroki; Hirose, Hideyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-11-01

    A new series of experiments on two unit neutron-interacting system started in the last half of FY.1999 at STACY (Static Experiment Critical Facility) in NUCEF (Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility). The experiments were conducted with two slab-shaped core tanks and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution. The dimensions of the core tanks are 35 cm in thickness, 70 cm in width and 150 cm in height. In the experiments, critical level heights were measured varying the distance between the two core tanks under the non-reflected condition in order to evaluate reactivity effects on the neutron interaction between the two core tanks. This report summarizes the data on the operation and the fuel management for the 25 experiments conducted in the last half of FY.1999. (author)

  6. Research ethics for clinical researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, John D; Neuman, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of the development of modern research ethics. The governance of research ethics is discussed and varies according to geographical location. However, the guidelines used for research ethics review are very similar across a wide variety of jurisdictions. The paramount importance of protecting the privacy and confidentiality of research participants is discussed at length. Particular emphasis is placed on the process of informed consent, and step-by-step practical guidelines are described. The issue of research in vulnerable populations is touched upon and guidelines are provided. Practical advice is provided for researchers to guide their interactions with research ethics boards. Issues related to scientific misconduct and research fraud are not dealt with in this paper.

  7. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonçalves, Frederica; Campos, Pedro; Clemmensen, Torkil

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review research in the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID). We present a HWID frame-work, and a sample of 54 papers from workshops, conferences and journals from the period 2009-2014. We group the papers into six topical groups, and then ...

  8. Hypothesis-driven research for G × E interactions: the relationship between oxytocin, parental divorce during adolescence, and depression in young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windle, Michael; Mrug, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Research in molecular genetics has generally focused on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and exploratory candidate gene and candidate gene-environment (G × E) studies. In this article it is proposed that hypothesis-driven and biologically informed research provides a complementary approach to GWAS to advance pressing research questions about G × E relations that are of public health relevance. Prior research studies and developmental and evolutionary theory were used to guide hypothesis testing of G × E relationships in this study. The study investigated whether the oxytocin polymorphism, rs53576, moderated the relationship between parental divorce during adolescence and depression symptoms in young adulthood. Oxytocin is a neuropeptide that has been related to the regulation of complex social cognition and behaviors such as empathy, attachment, and nurturance. We hypothesized that the GG polymorphism would be associated with more depressive symptoms following parental divorce, and that this effect would be stronger in females than males. The sample consisted of 340 individuals who participated in a longitudinal study with data used both from adolescence and young adulthood. Findings using prospective follow-up and autoregressive change models supported the hypothesized relationships. Young adult females who had experienced parental divorce during adolescence and had the GG oxytocin genotype reported almost twice as many depressive symptoms relative to young adult females who also experienced parental divorce during adolescence but had the AA or AG genotype. This pattern was not indicated among males. Findings were discussed with regard to how molecular genetic factors in combination with environmental stressors, such parental divorce, framed within a developmental framework may facilitate the future study of G × E relationships in the parental divorce-child adjustment literature and contribute to a prevention science perspective.

  9. Hypothesis-Driven Research for G x E Interactions: The Relationship between Oxytocin, Parental Divorce during Adolescence, and Depression in Young Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eWindle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Research in molecular genetics has generally focused on genome-wide association studies (GWAS and exploratory candidate gene and candidate gene-environment (GE studies. In this article it is proposed that hypothesis-driven and biologically informed research provides a complementary approach to GWAS to advance pressing research questions about GE relations that are of public health relevance. Prior research studies and developmental and evolutionary theory were used to guide hypothesis testing of GE relationships in this study. The study investigated whether the oxytocin polymorphism, rs53576, moderated the relationship between parental divorce during adolescence and depression symptoms in young adulthood. Oxytocin is a neuropeptide that has been related to the regulation of complex social cognition and behaviors such as empathy, attachment, and nurturance. We hypothesized that the GG polymorphism would be associated with more depressive symptoms following parental divorce, and that this effect would be stronger in females than males. The sample consisted of 340 individuals who participated in a longitudinal study with data used both from adolescence and young adulthood. Findings using prospective follow-up and autoregressive change models supported the hypothesized relationships. Young adult females who had experienced parental divorce during adolescence and had the GG oxytocin genotype reported almost twice as many depressive symptoms relative to young adult females who also experienced parental divorce during adolescence but had the AA or AG genotype. This pattern was not indicated among males. Findings were discussed with regard to how molecular genetic factors in combination with environmental stressors, such parental divorce, framed within a developmental framework may facilitate the future study of G X E relationships in the parental divorce-child adjustment literature and contribute to a prevention science perspective.

  10. Effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter attempts to describe and compare some of the more important nucleon-nucleon interactions that have been used in nuclear structure calculations, and to relate them where possible to the real nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explains that different interactions have been used depending on whether one is fitting to total binding energies and densities with a Hartree Fock (HF) calculation or fitting to spectra and spectroscopic data in a shell model calculation. Examines both types of calculation after two preliminary sections concerned with notation and with the philosophy underlying the use of model spaces and effective interactions. Discusses Skyrme interactions, finite range interactions, small model space, large model space, and the Sussex potential matrix elements. Focuses on the more empirical approaches in which a simple form is chosen for the effective interaction in a given model space and the parameters are deduced from fitting many-body data

  11. A Generic Data Harmonization Process for Cross-linked Research and Network Interaction. Construction and Application for the Lung Cancer Phenotype Database of the German Center for Lung Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firnkorn, D; Ganzinger, M; Muley, T; Thomas, M; Knaup, P

    2015-01-01

    Joint data analysis is a key requirement in medical research networks. Data are available in heterogeneous formats at each network partner and their harmonization is often rather complex. The objective of our paper is to provide a generic approach for the harmonization process in research networks. We applied the process when harmonizing data from three sites for the Lung Cancer Phenotype Database within the German Center for Lung Research. We developed a spreadsheet-based solution as tool to support the harmonization process for lung cancer data and a data integration procedure based on Talend Open Studio. The harmonization process consists of eight steps describing a systematic approach for defining and reviewing source data elements and standardizing common data elements. The steps for defining common data elements and harmonizing them with local data definitions are repeated until consensus is reached. Application of this process for building the phenotype database led to a common basic data set on lung cancer with 285 structured parameters. The Lung Cancer Phenotype Database was realized as an i2b2 research data warehouse. Data harmonization is a challenging task requiring informatics skills as well as domain knowledge. Our approach facilitates data harmonization by providing guidance through a uniform process that can be applied in a wide range of projects.

  12. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic and complementary tools for the study of micronutrient status and interactions in developing country populations exposed to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    From a global perspective and in spite of decades of nutrition programmes, micronutrients deficiency is at alarming proportions in many developing societies today. It affects millions of people worldwide, and includes consequences that potentially compromise morbidity, mortality, cognitive development, and growth, reproductive and work capacity. Recent estimates by the WHO are that deficiencies of iron (Fe), iodine (I), and vitamin A continue to influence the health of 2000 million, 740 million, and 250 million persons respectively. In addition to these three micronutrients, the possible negative consequences of deficiencies of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) are now also being increasingly recognized as important health concerns. As a result of the increasing recognition of the co-existence of multiple micronutrient deficiencies in developing countries, United Nations Agencies have urged that supplementation, fortification and dietary modification/diversification programmes are designed to combat multiple micronutrient deficiencies simultaneously. Fortificant levels for fortification, like supplementation, must be carefully selected to minimize risk of antagonistic nutrient interactions and to take into account the toxic threshold level for normal individuals. Possible antagonistic interactions that may interfere with the utilisation of trace elements in the supplements or fortificants per se, and/or with the utilization of elements intrinsic to the food or the meal include those between Cu-Zn, Cu-Fe, Fe-Zn, Mn-Fe, Ca-Zn. Stable isotope techniques play an important role in quantifying the optimal levels and the bioavailability of micronutrient supplements and fortificants for a range of indigenous meals consumed in developing countries, especially those containing potent absorption inhibitors. This Capacity building CRP or Thermatic CRP (T-CRP) addresses the need to develop effective strategies to combat micro-nutrient malnutrition in developing countries

  13. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic and complementary tools for the study of micronutrient status and interactions in developing country populations exposed to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    From a global perspective and in spite of decades of nutrition programmes, micronutrients deficiency is at alarming proportions in many developing societies today. It affects millions of people worldwide, and includes consequences that potentially compromise morbidity, mortality, cognitive development, and growth, reproductive and work capacity. Recent estimates by the WHO are that deficiencies of iron (Fe), iodine (I), and vitamin A continue to influence the health of 2000 million, 740 million, and 250 million persons respectively. In addition to these three micronutrients, the possible negative consequences of deficiencies of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) are now also being increasingly recognized as important health concerns. As a result of the increasing recognition of the co-existence of multiple micronutrient deficiencies in developing countries, United Nations Agencies have urged that supplementation, fortification and dietary modification/diversification programmes are designed to combat multiple micronutrient deficiencies simultaneously. Fortificant levels for fortification, like supplementation, must be carefully selected to minimize risk of antagonistic nutrient interactions and to take into account the toxic threshold level for normal individuals. Possible antagonistic interactions that may interfere with the utilisation of trace elements in the supplements or fortificants per se, and/or with the utilization of elements intrinsic to the food or the meal include those between Cu-Zn, Cu-Fe, Fe-Zn, Mn-Fe, Ca-Zn. Stable isotope techniques play an important role in quantifying the optimal levels and the bioavailability of micronutrient supplements and fortificants for a range of indigenous meals consumed in developing countries, especially those containing potent absorption inhibitors. This Capacity building CRP or Thermatic CRP (T-CRP) addresses the need to develop effective strategies to combat micro-nutrient malnutrition in developing countries

  14. Researcher / Researched: Repositioning Research Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwald, Agnes May Lin

    2013-01-01

    "Researcher / Researched" calls for a complementary research methodology by proposing autoethnography as both a method and text that crosses the boundaries of conventional and alternative methodologies in higher education. Autoethnography rearticulates the researcher / researched positions by blurring the boundary between them. This…

  15. Development of novel, 384-well high-throughput assay panels for human drug transporters: drug interaction and safety assessment in support of discovery research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huaping; Shen, Ding Ren; Han, Yong-Hae; Kong, Yan; Balimane, Praveen; Marino, Anthony; Gao, Mian; Wu, Sophie; Xie, Dianlin; Soars, Matthew G; O'Connell, Jonathan C; Rodrigues, A David; Zhang, Litao; Cvijic, Mary Ellen

    2013-10-01

    Transporter proteins are known to play a critical role in affecting the overall absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion characteristics of drug candidates. In addition to efflux transporters (P-gp, BCRP, MRP2, etc.) that limit absorption, there has been a renewed interest in influx transporters at the renal (OATs, OCTs) and hepatic (OATPs, BSEP, NTCP, etc.) organ level that can cause significant clinical drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Several of these transporters are also critical for hepatobiliary disposition of bilirubin and bile acid/salts, and their inhibition is directly implicated in hepatic toxicities. Regulatory agencies took action to address transporter-mediated DDI with the goal of ensuring drug safety in the clinic and on the market. To meet regulatory requirements, advanced bioassay technology and automation solutions were implemented for high-throughput transporter screening to provide structure-activity relationship within lead optimization. To enhance capacity, several functional assay formats were miniaturized to 384-well throughput including novel fluorescence-based uptake and efflux inhibition assays using high-content image analysis as well as cell-based radioactive uptake and vesicle-based efflux inhibition assays. This high-throughput capability enabled a paradigm shift from studying transporter-related issues in the development space to identifying and dialing out these concerns early on in discovery for enhanced mechanism-based efficacy while circumventing DDIs and transporter toxicities.

  16. Simulations of beam-matter interaction experiments at the CERN HiRadMat facility and prospects of high-energy-density physics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N A; Burkart, F; Shutov, A; Schmidt, R; Wollmann, D; Piriz, A R

    2014-12-01

    In a recent publication [Schmidt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 080701 (2014)], we reported results on beam-target interaction experiments that have been carried out at the CERN HiRadMat (High Radiation to Materials) facility using extended solid copper cylindrical targets that were irradiated with a 440-GeV proton beam delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). On the one hand, these experiments confirmed the existence of hydrodynamic tunneling of the protons that leads to substantial increase in the range of the protons and the corresponding hadron shower in the target, a phenomenon predicted by our previous theoretical investigations [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 25, 051003 (2012)]. On the other hand, these experiments demonstrated that the beam heated part of the target is severely damaged and is converted into different phases of high energy density (HED) matter, as suggested by our previous theoretical studies [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. E 79, 046410 (2009)]. The latter confirms that the HiRadMat facility can be used to study HED physics. In the present paper, we give details of the numerical simulations carried out to understand the experimental measurements. These include the evolution of the physical parameters, for example, density, temperature, pressure, and the internal energy in the target, during and after the irradiation. This information is important in order to determine the region of the HED phase diagram that can be accessed in such experiments. These simulations have been done using the energy deposition code fluka and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code, big2, iteratively.

  17. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogava, S.; Savada, S.; Nakagava, M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of the use of weak interaction laws to study models of elementary particles is discussed. The most typical examples of weak interaction is beta-decay of nucleons and muons. Beta-interaction is presented by quark currents in the form of universal interaction of the V-A type. Universality of weak interactions is well confirmed using as examples e- and μ-channels of pion decay. Hypothesis on partial preservation of axial current is applicable to the analysis of processes with pion participation. In the framework of the model with four flavours lepton decays of hadrons are considered. Weak interaction without lepton participation are also considered. Properties of neutral currents are described briefly

  18. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  19. Nutrigenomics, the Microbiome, and Gene-Environment Interactions: New Directions in Cardiovascular Disease Research, Prevention, and Treatment: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jane F; Allayee, Hooman; Gerszten, Robert E; Ideraabdullah, Folami; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Ordovás, José M; Rimm, Eric B; Wang, Thomas J; Bennett, Brian J

    2016-06-01

    Cardiometabolic diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide and are strongly linked to both genetic and nutritional factors. The field of nutrigenomics encompasses multiple approaches aimed at understanding the effects of diet on health or disease development, including nutrigenetic studies investigating the relationship between genetic variants and diet in modulating cardiometabolic risk, as well as the effects of dietary components on multiple "omic" measures, including transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, lipidomics, epigenetic modifications, and the microbiome. Here, we describe the current state of the field of nutrigenomics with respect to cardiometabolic disease research and outline a direction for the integration of multiple omics techniques in future nutrigenomic studies aimed at understanding mechanisms and developing new therapeutic options for cardiometabolic disease treatment and prevention. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Interactions between science and technology: analysis of the intellectual production of the researchers-inventors of the first letter- patent of the UFRGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Mielniczuk de Moura

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses intellectual and industrial property and existing differences between scientific and technological knowledge. It aims at incorporating the patent in the context of the scientific and technological communication. It presents preliminary data of a study that aims at analyzing the relationship between scientific and technological information in the intellectual production of the researchers-inventors of the first patent from the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS. It concludes that, in the case studied, a flow between scientific and technological information occurs, in which the former, after its diffusion and approval in the peer review process, subsidizes the latter. It suggests that other studies should be carried out.

  1. Laboratory challenges in the scaling up of HIV, TB, and malaria programs: The interaction of health and laboratory systems, clinical research, and service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birx, Deborah; de Souza, Mark; Nkengasong, John N

    2009-06-01

    Strengthening national health laboratory systems in resource-poor countries is critical to meeting the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. Despite strong commitment from the international community to fight major infectious diseases, weak laboratory infrastructure remains a huge rate-limiting step. Some major challenges facing laboratory systems in resource-poor settings include dilapidated infrastructure; lack of human capacity, laboratory policies, and strategic plans; and limited synergies between clinical and research laboratories. Together, these factors compromise the quality of test results and impact patient management. With increased funding, the target of laboratory strengthening efforts in resource-poor countries should be the integrating of laboratory services across major diseases to leverage resources with respect to physical infrastructure; types of assays; supply chain management of reagents and equipment; and maintenance of equipment.

  2. Playful Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The video Playful Interaction describes a future architectural office, and envisions ideas and concepts for playful interactions between people, materials and appliances in a pervasive and augmented working environment. The video both describes existing developments, technologies and designs...... as well as ideas not yet implemented such as playful modes of interaction with an augmented ball. Playful Interaction has been used as a hybrid of a vision video and a video prototype (1). Externally the video has been used to visualising our new ideas, and internally the video has also worked to inspire...

  3. Chasing Ecological Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordano, Pedro

    2016-09-01

    Basic research on biodiversity has concentrated on individual species-naming new species, studying distribution patterns, and analyzing their evolutionary relationships. Yet biodiversity is more than a collection of individual species; it is the combination of biological entities and processes that support life on Earth. To understand biodiversity we must catalog it, but we must also assess the ways species interact with other species to provide functional support for the Tree of Life. Ecological interactions may be lost well before the species involved in those interactions go extinct; their ecological functions disappear even though they remain. Here, I address the challenges in studying the functional aspects of species interactions and how basic research is helping us address the fast-paced extinction of species due to human activities.

  4. Experiences of Latinos with limited English proficiency with patient registration systems and their interactions with clinic front office staff: an exploratory study to inform community-based translational research in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, William A; Cubillos, Laura; Breen, James; Hall, Megan; Rojas, Krycya Flores; Mooneyham, Rachel; Schaal, Jennifer; Hardy, Christina Yongue; Dave, Gaurav; Jolles, Mónica Pérez; Garcia, Nacire; Reuland, Daniel S

    2015-12-23

    Health services research of Latinos with limited English proficiency (LEP) have largely focused on studying disparities related to patient-provider communication. Less is known about their non-provider interactions such as those with patient registration systems and clinic front office staff; these interactions precede the encounter with providers and may shape how comfortable patients feel about their overall health services experience. This study explored Latino patients with LEP experiences with, and expectations for, interactions with patient registration systems and front office staff. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews with Latinos with LEP (≥ 18 years of age) who seek health services in the Piedmont Triad region, North Carolina. We analyzed participants' quotes and identified themes by using a constant comparison method. This research was conducted by a community-academic partnership; partners were engaged in study design, instrument development, recruitment, data analysis, and manuscript writing. Qualitative analysis allowed us to identify the following recurring themes: 1) inconsistent registration of multiple surnames may contribute to patient misidentification errors and delays in receiving health care; 2) lack of Spanish language services in front office medical settings negatively affect care coordination and satisfaction with health care; and 3) perceived discrimination generates patients' mistrust in front office staff and discomfort with services. Latino patients in North Carolina experience health services barriers unique to their LEP background. Participants identified ways in which the lack of cultural and linguistic competence of front office staff negatively affect their experiences seeking health services. Healthcare organizations need to support their staff to encourage patient-centered principles.

  5. Plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, Rainer

    1978-01-01

    The plasma wall interactions for two extreme cases, the 'vacuum model' and the 'cold gas blanket' are outlined. As a first step for understanding the plasma wall interactions the elementary interaction processes at the first wall are identified. These are energetic ion and neutral particle trapping and release, ion and neutral backscattering, ion sputtering, desorption by ions, photons and electrons and evaporation. These processes have only recently been started to be investigated in the parameter range of interest for fusion research. The few measured data and their extrapolation into regions not yet investigated are reviewed

  6. Interactive Information Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borlund, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The paper introduces the research area of interactive information retrieval (IIR) from a historical point of view. Further, the focus here is on evaluation, because much research in IR deals with IR evaluation methodology due to the core research interest in IR performance, system interaction...... and satisfaction with retrieved information. In order to position IIR evaluation, the Cranfield model and the series of tests that led to the Cranfield model are outlined. Three iconic user-oriented studies and projects that all have contributed to how IIR is perceived and understood today are presented......: The MEDLARS test, the Book House fiction retrieval system, and the OKAPI project. On this basis the call for alternative IIR evaluation approaches motivated by the three revolutions (the cognitive, the relevance, and the interactive revolutions) put forward by Robertson & Hancock-Beaulieu (1992) is presented...

  7. Aesthetic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Krogh, Peter

    2004-01-01

    , as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  8. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... in the suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  9. Explicit Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löwgren, Jonas; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Linde, Per

    2006-01-01

    We report an ongoing study of palpable computing to support surgical rehabilitation, in the general field of interaction design for ubiquitous computing. Through explorative design, fieldwork and participatory design techniques, we explore the design principle of explicit interaction as an interp...

  10. Kinesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Fritsch, Jonas; Kortbek, Karen Johanne

    2008-01-01

    Within the Human-Computer Interaction community there is a growing interest in designing for the whole body in interaction design. The attempts aimed at addressing the body have very different outcomes spanning from theoretical arguments for understanding the body in the design process, to more...... practical examples of designing for bodily potential. This paper presents Kinesthetic Interaction as a unifying concept for describing the body in motion as a foundation for designing interactive systems. Based on the theoretical foundation for Kinesthetic Interaction, a conceptual framework is introduced...... to reveal bodily potential in relation to three design themes – kinesthetic development, kinesthetic means and kinesthetic disorder; and seven design parameters – engagement, sociality, movability, explicit motivation, implicit motivation, expressive meaning and kinesthetic empathy. The framework is a tool...

  11. Ecological impacts of atmospheric pollution and interactions with climate change in terrestrial ecosystems of the Mediterranean Basin: Current research and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Hueso, Raúl; Munzi, Silvana; Alonso, Rocío; Arróniz-Crespo, María; Avila, Anna; Bermejo, Victoria; Bobbink, Roland; Branquinho, Cristina; Concostrina-Zubiri, Laura; Cruz, Cristina; Cruz de Carvalho, Ricardo; De Marco, Alessandra; Dias, Teresa; Elustondo, David; Elvira, Susana; Estébanez, Belén; Fusaro, Lina; Gerosa, Giacomo; Izquieta-Rojano, Sheila; Lo Cascio, Mauro; Marzuoli, Riccardo; Matos, Paula; Mereu, Simone; Merino, José; Morillas, Lourdes; Nunes, Alice; Paoletti, Elena; Paoli, Luca; Pinho, Pedro; Rogers, Isabel B; Santos, Arthur; Sicard, Pierre; Stevens, Carly J; Theobald, Mark R

    2017-08-01

    Mediterranean Basin ecosystems, their unique biodiversity, and the key services they provide are currently at risk due to air pollution and climate change, yet only a limited number of isolated and geographically-restricted studies have addressed this topic, often with contrasting results. Particularities of air pollution in this region include high O 3 levels due to high air temperatures and solar radiation, the stability of air masses, and dominance of dry over wet nitrogen deposition. Moreover, the unique abiotic and biotic factors (e.g., climate, vegetation type, relevance of Saharan dust inputs) modulating the response of Mediterranean ecosystems at various spatiotemporal scales make it difficult to understand, and thus predict, the consequences of human activities that cause air pollution in the Mediterranean Basin. Therefore, there is an urgent need to implement coordinated research and experimental platforms along with wider environmental monitoring networks in the region. In particular, a robust deposition monitoring network in conjunction with modelling estimates is crucial, possibly including a set of common biomonitors (ideally cryptogams, an important component of the Mediterranean vegetation), to help refine pollutant deposition maps. Additionally, increased attention must be paid to functional diversity measures in future air pollution and climate change studies to establish the necessary link between biodiversity and the provision of ecosystem services in Mediterranean ecosystems. Through a coordinated effort, the Mediterranean scientific community can fill the above-mentioned gaps and reach a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying the combined effects of air pollution and climate change in the Mediterranean Basin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ecological impacts of atmospheric pollution and interactions with climate change in terrestrial ecosystems of the Mediterranean Basin: Current research and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa-Hueso, Raúl; Munzi, Silvana; Alonso, Rocío; Arróniz-Crespo, María; Avila, Anna; Bermejo, Victoria; Bobbink, Roland; Branquinho, Cristina; Concostrina-Zubiri, Laura; Cruz, Cristina; Cruz de Carvalho, Ricardo; De Marco, Alessandra; Dias, Teresa; Elustondo, David

    2017-01-01

    Mediterranean Basin ecosystems, their unique biodiversity, and the key services they provide are currently at risk due to air pollution and climate change, yet only a limited number of isolated and geographically-restricted studies have addressed this topic, often with contrasting results. Particularities of air pollution in this region include high O 3 levels due to high air temperatures and solar radiation, the stability of air masses, and dominance of dry over wet nitrogen deposition. Moreover, the unique abiotic and biotic factors (e.g., climate, vegetation type, relevance of Saharan dust inputs) modulating the response of Mediterranean ecosystems at various spatiotemporal scales make it difficult to understand, and thus predict, the consequences of human activities that cause air pollution in the Mediterranean Basin. Therefore, there is an urgent need to implement coordinated research and experimental platforms along with wider environmental monitoring networks in the region. In particular, a robust deposition monitoring network in conjunction with modelling estimates is crucial, possibly including a set of common biomonitors (ideally cryptogams, an important component of the Mediterranean vegetation), to help refine pollutant deposition maps. Additionally, increased attention must be paid to functional diversity measures in future air pollution and climate change studies to establish the necessary link between biodiversity and the provision of ecosystem services in Mediterranean ecosystems. Through a coordinated effort, the Mediterranean scientific community can fill the above-mentioned gaps and reach a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying the combined effects of air pollution and climate change in the Mediterranean Basin. - Highlights: • Mediterranean Basin ecosystems are at risk due to air pollution and climate change. • A more robust monitoring network in conjunction with modelling estimates is crucial. • Monitoring networks should

  13. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Ready to create rich interactive experiences with your artwork, designs, or prototypes? This is the ideal place to start. With this hands-on guide, you'll explore several themes in interactive art and design-including 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, computer vision, and geolocation-and learn the basic programming and electronics concepts you need to implement them. No previous experience is necessary. You'll get a complete introduction to three free tools created specifically for artists and designers: the Processing programming language, the Arduino microcontroller, and the openFr

  14. Interaction graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Interaction graphs were introduced as a general, uniform, construction of dynamic models of linear logic, encompassing all Geometry of Interaction (GoI) constructions introduced so far. This series of work was inspired from Girard's hyperfinite GoI, and develops a quantitative approach that should...... be understood as a dynamic version of weighted relational models. Until now, the interaction graphs framework has been shown to deal with exponentials for the constrained system ELL (Elementary Linear Logic) while keeping its quantitative aspect. Adapting older constructions by Girard, one can clearly define...... "full" exponentials, but at the cost of these quantitative features. We show here that allowing interpretations of proofs to use continuous (yet finite in a measure-theoretic sense) sets of states, as opposed to earlier Interaction Graphs constructions were these sets of states were discrete (and finite...

  15. Embarrassing Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deterding, Sebastian; Lucero, Andrés; Holopainen, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Wherever the rapid evolution of interactive technologies disrupts standing situational norms, creates new, often unclear situational audiences, or crosses cultural boundaries, embarrassment is likely. This makes embarrassment a fundamental adoption and engagement hurdle, but also a creative design...

  16. Diffractive interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.; Marage, P.

    1996-08-01

    The general framework of diffractive deep inelastic scattering is introduced and reports given in the session on diffractive interactions at the international workshop on deep-inelastic scattering and related phenomena, Rome, April 1996, are presented. (orig.)

  17. A Virtual Research Partner

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cowie, Jim; Guerrero, Felicia

    2006-01-01

    .... The goal was to investigate the feasibility of creating a software agent that would be able to interact with researchers and provide them with support at a level equivalent to a human research partner...

  18. Hair Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Cani , Marie-Paule; Bertails , Florence

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Processing interactions is one of the main challenges in hair animation. Indeed, in addition to the collisions with the body, an extremely large number of contacts with high friction rates are permanently taking place between individual hair strands. Simulating the latter is essential: without hair self-interactions, strands would cross each other during motion or come to rest at the same location, yielding unrealistic behavior and a visible lack of hair volume. This c...

  19. Annual report of STACY operation in FY.2000. Experiments on neutron-interacting systems with two slab-shaped core tanks and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution. 2. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Seiji; Hirose, Hideyuki; Izawa, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-09-01

    Criticality experiments on neutron-interacting systems have been performed since FY.1999 at STACY (Static Experiment Critical Facility) in NUCEF (Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility). In the experiments two slab-shaped core tanks and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution were used. The dimension of the core tanks is 35 cm in thickness, 70 cm in width and 150 cm in height. In FY.2000, the reactivity effect of neutron-isolating materials, such as polyethylene and concrete, and neutron absorbers made of hafnium and cadmium, which were placed between those two core tanks, was determined by the experiments. This report summarizes the data on the operation and the fuel management for the 57 experiments conducted in FY.2000. (author)

  20. Research and practice on building social interactive learning based open course platform and teaching mode%社交互动式高职网络公开课平台和教学模式的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静; 汪昀

    2012-01-01

    通过将积木块技术和项目化教学方式引入到专业共享型网络公开课平台的建设,探索适合高职的网络公开课课程的社交互动学习模式,同时通过对学习模式的研究完善网络公开课平台的构建。%Practical research on Dynamic modular designed Open Course platform based on building blocks technology and project teaching mode is to explore a social interactive learning mode of High Vocational Education. The exploration is also for improving the construction of open course platform and breaking local resources sharing barriers.