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Sample records for strained silicon utb

  1. Engineering piezoresistivity using biaxially strained silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Richter, Jacob; Brandbyge, Mads

    2008-01-01

    of the piezocoefficient on temperature and dopant density is altered qualitatively for strained silicon. In particular, we find that a vanishing temperature coefficient may result for silicon with grown-in biaxial tensile strain. These results suggest that strained silicon may be used to engineer the iezoresistivity...

  2. Hot Electron Injection into Uniaxially Strained Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Soo

    In semiconductor spintronics, silicon attracts great attention due to the long electron spin lifetime. Silicon is also one of the most commonly used semiconductor in microelectronics industry. The spin relaxation process of diamond crystal structure such as silicon is dominant by Elliot-Yafet mechanism. Yafet shows that intravalley scattering process is dominant. The conduction electron spin lifetime measured by electron spin resonance measurement and electronic measurement using ballistic hot electron method well agrees with Yafet's theory. However, the recent theory predicts a strong contribution of intervalley scattering process such as f-process in silicon. The conduction band minimum is close the Brillouin zone edge, X point which causes strong spin mixing at the conduction band. A recent experiment of electric field-induced hot electron spin relaxation also shows the strong effect of f-process in silicon. In uniaxially strained silicon along crystal axis [100], the suppression of f-process is predicted which leads to enhance electron spin lifetime. By inducing a change in crystal structure due to uniaxial strain, the six fold degeneracy becomes two fold degeneracy, which is valley splitting. As the valley splitting increases, intervalley scattering is reduced. A recent theory predicts 4 times longer electron spin lifetime in 0.5% uniaxially strained silicon. In this thesis, we demonstrate ballistic hot electron injection into silicon under various uniaxial strain. Spin polarized hot electron injection under strain is experimentally one of the most challenging part to measure conduction electron spin lifetime in silicon. Hot electron injection adopts tunnel junction which is a thin oxide layer between two conducting materials. Tunnel barrier, which is an oxide layer, is only 4 ˜ 5 nm thick. Also, two conducting materials are only tens of nanometer. Therefore, under high pressure to apply 0.5% strain on silicon, thin films on silicon substrate can be easily

  3. UT-B Urea Transporter Localization in the Bovine Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, J; McDaid, S; Walpole, C; Stewart, Gavin S

    2016-04-01

    Facilitative UT-B urea transporters play an important role in the urea nitrogen salvaging process that occurs in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals, particularly ruminants. Gastrointestinal UT-B transporters have previously been reported in various ruminant species-including cow, sheep and goat. In this present study, UT-B transporter localization was investigated in tissues throughout the bovine gastrointestinal tract. RT-PCR analysis showed that UT-B2 was the predominant UT-B mRNA transcript expressed in dorsal, ventral and cranial ruminal sacs, while alternative UT-B transcripts were present in other gastrointestinal tissues. Immunoblotting analysis detected a strong, glycosylated ~50 kDa UT-B2 protein in all three ruminal sacs. Immunolocalization studies showed that UT-B2 protein was predominantly localized to the plasma membrane of cells in the stratum basale layer of all ruminal sac papillae. In contrast, other UT-B protein staining was detected in the basolateral membranes of the surface epithelial cells lining the abomasum, colon and rectum. Overall, these findings confirm that UT-B2 cellular localization is similar in all ruminal sacs and that other UT-B proteins are located in epithelial cells lining various tissues in the bovine gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Silicon-on-insulator interferometric strain sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Graham N.; Jessop, Paul E.

    2003-06-01

    An integrated optical strain sensor based on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) optical waveguide Mach-Zehnder interferometer has been demonstrated. The common problem of cross sensitivity to temperature changes has been greatly reduced by designing the lengths of the two interferometer arms to be exactly equal, in the absence of strain, so that thermally induced changes in the optical path lengths cancel out in the interference signal. The waveguide path in both arms of the interferometer has a long straight section and is folded back by a 180 degree bend. The straight section in one arm is perpendicular to that in the other arm so that the symmetry in the optical path lengths is broken when the applied strain in these two orthogonal directions is different. The interferometer output is thus a measure of the difference in strain along these two directions. For the initial device, the interferometer's size was approximately 15 x 15 mm, with the straight sections in each of the two arms being 12 mm long. For TM polarized light at a wavelength of 1.55 microns, the interferometer output intensity was observed to vary sinusoidally with applied uniaxial strain at a rate of 10 degrees per microstrain. This is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. The strain sensitivity, as limited by system noise, was below one microstrain. SOI is an ideal material choice for this device. It is suitable for passive fiber alignment using V-groove techniques, and the ability to use small waveguide bending radii makes possible sensors that are more compact than has been demonstrated here.

  5. Strained silicon as a new electro-optic material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Rune Shim; Andersen, Karin Nordström; Borel, Peter Ingo

    2006-01-01

    functionalities can be integrated into monolithic components based on the versatile silicon platform, is due to the limited active optical properties of silicon3. Recently, however, a continuous-wave Raman silicon laser was demonstrated4; if an effective modulator could also be realized in silicon, data......For decades, silicon has been the material of choice for mass fabrication of electronics. This is in contrast to photonics, where passive optical components in silicon have only recently been realized1, 2. The slow progress within silicon optoelectronics, where electronic and optical...... processing and transmission could potentially be performed by all-silicon electronic and optical components. Here we have discovered that a significant linear electro-optic effect is induced in silicon by breaking the crystal symmetry. The symmetry is broken by depositing a straining layer on top...

  6. Embedded silicon nanocrystal interface structure and strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Bhamy Maithry; Hegde, G. M.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2018-01-01

    The structure of nanocrystal-matrix interface and strain in embedded nanocrystals are studied using large-scale atomistic simulations, with the examples of Si nanocrystal embedded in amorphous matrix of SiO2. Photoluminescence from silicon nanocrystals embedded in a dielectric matrix like SiO2 and Si3N4 are promising for Si-based optical devices. The nanocrystal-matrix interface plays a crucial role in understanding its optical and electrical properties. Nanocrystals with diameters varying from 2.17 to 4.56 nm are studied. A detailed quantitative analysis of the variation of Si/SiO2 interface structure and strain distribution with nanocrystal diameter is reported. A linear variation of the interface width with nanocrystal diameter is observed with thinner interfaces for larger nanocrystals. Local deformation analysis reveals that the smaller nanocrystals are highly strained, whereas the strain in the larger ones shifts to the interface. This is in accordance with observed increase in total percentage of defect states in the interface from 39 to 70 % for diameter increasing from 2.17 to 4.56 nm. Moreover, based on the atomic arrangements at the interface, optically active defects like Pb centres, E centres and non-bridging oxygen centres are identified and a dominance of Pb centres is observed for all the nanocrystals. The detailed structural characterization-related investigations using the proposed simulation approach will find useful application in designing system-level response of embedded nanocrystals and also to correlate various experimental observations.

  7. Elastic strain engineering in silicon and silicon-germanium nanomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskiewicz, Deborah Marie

    Strain in crystalline materials alters the atomic symmetry, thereby changing materials properties. Controlling the strain allows tunability of these new properties. Elastic strain engineering in crystalline nanomembranes (NMs) provides ways to induce and relax strain in thin sheets of single-crystalline materials without exposing the material to the formation of extended defects. I use strain engineering in NMs in two ways: (1) elastic strain sharing between multiple layers using the crystalline symmetry of the layers to induce unique strain distributions, and (2) complete elastic relaxation of single-crystalline alloy NMs. In both cases, NM strain engineering methods enable the introduction of unique strain profiles or strain relaxation in ways not compatible with conventional bulk processing, where strain destroys the long-range crystallinity. Elastically strain-shared NMs are fabricated by releasing multi-layer thin film heterostructures from the original host substrate. If one layer of the original heterostructure contains strain, the strain will share between the layers of the freestanding NM. The extent of strain sharing will depend on the relative thicknesses, the ratio of the elastic moduli between the materials, and elastic symmetry of the layers. I calculate strain distributions in flat NMs between layers with 2-fold and 4-fold elastic symmetry. I verify my calculations with experimental proof of two examples: (1) strain sharing between biaxially isotropic layers, Si/SiGe/Si(001), and (2) strain sharing between biaxially anisotropic layers, Si/SiGe/Si(110). Strain engineering in NMs is also used to relax strain elastically in thin materials that are difficult to fabricate with conventional bulk crystal growth techniques. Thin films of SiGe grow uniformly and elastically strained on Si substrates. I release the SiGe layer from the Si growth template with NM fabrication processes and allow the SiGe allow to relax elastically to the appropriate bulk lattice

  8. Elastically relaxed free-standing strained-silicon nanomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michelle M; Klein, Levente J; Savage, Donald E; Slinker, Keith A; Friesen, Mark; Celler, George; Eriksson, Mark A; Lagally, Max G

    2006-05-01

    Strain plays a critical role in the properties of materials. In silicon and silicon-germanium, strain provides a mechanism for control of both carrier mobility and band offsets. In materials integration, strain is typically tuned through the use of dislocations and elemental composition. We demonstrate a versatile method to control strain by fabricating membranes in which the final strain state is controlled by elastic strain sharing, that is, without the formation of defects. We grow Si/SiGe layers on a substrate from which they can be released, forming nanomembranes. X-ray-diffraction measurements confirm a final strain predicted by elasticity theory. The effectiveness of elastic strain to alter electronic properties is demonstrated by low-temperature longitudinal Hall-effect measurements on a strained-silicon quantum well before and after release. Elastic strain sharing and film transfer offer an intriguing path towards complex, multiple-layer structures in which each layer's properties are controlled elastically, without the introduction of undesirable defects.

  9. Low-temperature strain gauges based on silicon whiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druzhinin A. A.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available To create low-temperature strain gauges based on p-type silicon whiskers tensoresistive characteristics of these crystals in 4,2—300 K temperature range were studied. On the basis of p-type Si whiskers with different resistivity the strain gauges for different materials operating at cryogenic temperatures with extremely high gauge factor at 4,2 K were developed, as well as strain gauges operating at liquid helium temperatures in high magnetic fields.

  10. Strained silicon/silicon germanium heterojunction n-channel metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, S H

    2002-01-01

    Investigations into the performance of strained silicon/silicon-germanium (Si/SiGe) n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) have been carried out. Theoretical predictions suggest that use of a strained Si/SiGe material system with advanced material properties compared with conventional silicon allows enhanced MOSFET device performance. This study has therefore investigated the practical feasibility of obtaining superior electrical performance using a Si/SiGe material system. The MOSFET devices consisted of a strained Si surface channel and were fabricated on relaxed SiGe material using a reduced thermal budget process in order to preserve the strain. Two batches of strained Si/SiGe devices fabricated on material grown by differing methods have been analysed and both showed good transistor action. A correlation of electrical and physical device data established that the electrical device behaviour was closely related to the SiGe material quality, which differed depending on growt...

  11. Atomistic simulations of focused ion beam machining of strained silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guénolé, J.; Prakash, A.; Bitzek, E.

    2017-09-01

    The focused ion beam (FIB) technique has established itself as an indispensable tool in the material science community, both to analyze samples and to prepare specimens by FIB milling. In combination with digital image correlation (DIC), FIB milling can, furthermore, be used to evaluate intrinsic stresses by monitoring the strain release during milling. The irradiation damage introduced by such milling, however, results in a change in the stress/strain state and elastic properties of the material; changes in the strain state in turn affect the bonding strength, and are hence expected to implicitly influence irradiation damage formation and sputtering. To elucidate this complex interplay between strain, irradiation damage and sputtering, we perform TRIM calculations and molecular dynamics simulations on silicon irradiated by Ga+ ions, with slab and trench-like geometries, whilst simultaneously applying uniaxial tensile and compressive strains up to 4%. In addition we calculate the threshold displacement energy (TDE) and the surface binding energy (SBE) for various strain states. The sputter rate and amount of damage produced in the MD simulations show a clear influence of the strain state. The SBE shows no significant dependence on strain, but is strongly affected by surface reconstructions. The TDE shows a clear strain-dependence, which, however, cannot explain the influence of strain on the extent of the induced irradiation damage or the sputter rate.

  12. Analytical threshold voltage model for strained silicon GAA-TFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hai-Yan; Hu, Hui-Yong; Wang, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Tunnel field effect transistors (TFETs) are promising devices for low power applications. An analytical threshold voltage model, based on the channel surface potential and electric field obtained by solving the 2D Poisson’s equation, for strained silicon gate all around TFETs is proposed. The variation of the threshold voltage with device parameters, such as the strain (Ge mole fraction x), gate oxide thickness, gate oxide permittivity, and channel length has also been investigated. The threshold voltage model is extracted using the peak transconductance method and is verified by good agreement with the results obtained from the TCAD simulation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61474085).

  13. Embedded strain gauges for condition monitoring of silicone gaskets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotzko, Timo; Lang, Walter

    2014-07-10

    A miniaturized strain gauge with a thickness of 5 µm is molded into a silicone O-ring. This is a first step toward embedding sensors in gaskets for structural health monitoring. The signal of the integrated sensor exhibits a linear correlation with the contact pressure of the O-ring. This affords the opportunity to monitor the gasket condition during installation. Thus, damages caused by faulty assembly can be detected instantly, and early failures, with their associated consequences, can be prevented. Through the embedded strain gauge, the contact pressure applied to the gasket can be directly measured. Excessive pressure and incorrect positioning of the gasket can cause structural damage to the material of the gasket, which can lead to an early outage. A platinum strain gauge is fabricated on a thin polyimide layer and is contacted through gold connections. The measured resistance pressure response exhibits hysteresis for the first few strain cycles, followed by a linear behavior. The short-term impact of the embedded sensor on the stability of the gasket is investigated. Pull-tests with O-rings and test specimens have indicated that the integration of the miniaturized sensors has no negative impact on the stability in the short term.

  14. Embedded Strain Gauges for Condition Monitoring of Silicone Gaskets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Schotzko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A miniaturized strain gauge with a thickness of 5 µm is molded into a silicone O-ring. This is a first step toward embedding sensors in gaskets for structural health monitoring. The signal of the integrated sensor exhibits a linear correlation with the contact pressure of the O-ring. This affords the opportunity to monitor the gasket condition during installation. Thus, damages caused by faulty assembly can be detected instantly, and early failures, with their associated consequences, can be prevented. Through the embedded strain gauge, the contact pressure applied to the gasket can be directly measured. Excessive pressure and incorrect positioning of the gasket can cause structural damage to the material of the gasket, which can lead to an early outage. A platinum strain gauge is fabricated on a thin polyimide layer and is contacted through gold connections. The measured resistance pressure response exhibits hysteresis for the first few strain cycles, followed by a linear behavior. The short-term impact of the embedded sensor on the stability of the gasket is investigated. Pull-tests with O-rings and test specimens have indicated that the integration of the miniaturized sensors has no negative impact on the stability in the short term.

  15. A threshold voltage model of short-channel fully-depleted recessed-source/drain (Re-S/D) UTB SOI MOSFETs including substrate induced surface potential effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajit; Tiwari, Pramod Kumar

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a threshold voltage model of short-channel recessed-source/drain (Re-S/D) ultra-thin body (UTB) SOI MOSFETs has been presented considering the substrate induced surface potential (SISP) to improve the model accuracy over wide ranges of device parameters and substrate bias. The potential distribution of the front and the back surfaces of the Si-body have been derived using the evanescent mode analysis method in which the channel potential is broken into one-dimensional long-channel potential and two-dimensional short-channel potential. A one-dimensional Poisson's equation has also been solved in the substrate region to account the effect of substrate induced surface potential (SISP) at substrate/buried-oxide interface. The minimum front- and back-surface potentials of silicon body have been used to obtain front and back channel threshold voltages, respectively. However, the smaller one between front and back channel threshold voltages is considered to be the threshold voltage of the device. The accuracy of the present model has been extended up to 10 nm channel length by incorporating the quantum effects induced correction term. The model results are verified with simulation results obtained using ATLAS™ from Silvaco.

  16. Process-induced strain in silicon-on-insulator materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tiberj, A; Blanc, C; Contreras, S; Camassel, J

    2002-01-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the influence of oxidation and thinning processes on the in-plane stress in silicon-on-insulator materials. Combining double x-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared and micro-Raman spectroscopy, we show that one can separately evaluate the stress present in the silicon over layer, the buried oxide and the underlying (handle) silicon wafer at any time of a device-forming process.

  17. Characterization of Integrated Optical Strain Sensors Based on Silicon Waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, W.J.; Leinders, S.M.; Muilwijk, P.M.; Pozo, J.

    2013-01-01

    Microscale strain gauges are widely used in micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) to measure strains such as those induced by force, acceleration, pressure or sound. We propose all-optical strain sensors based on micro-ring resonators to be integrated with MEMS. We characterized the strain-induced

  18. High-temperature pressure sensors with strain gauges based on silicon whiskers

    OpenAIRE

    Druzhinin A. A.; Kutrakov A. P.; Maryamova I. I.

    2012-01-01

    Studies aimed at the creating of piezoresistive pressure sensors based on silicon whiskers, operating at high temperatures were carried out. Using the glass adhesive for strain gauges mounting on spring elements of covar alloy gave the possibility to elevate the sensor’s operating temperature range. Several modifications of pressure sensors based on the proposed strain-unit design were developed.

  19. High-temperature pressure sensors with strain gauges based on silicon whiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druzhinin A. A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies aimed at the creating of piezoresistive pressure sensors based on silicon whiskers, operating at high temperatures were carried out. Using the glass adhesive for strain gauges mounting on spring elements of covar alloy gave the possibility to elevate the sensor’s operating temperature range. Several modifications of pressure sensors based on the proposed strain-unit design were developed.

  20. Tunable electronic properties of silicon nanowires under strain and electric bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Nduwimana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The electronic structure characteristics of silicon nanowires under strain and electric bias are studied using first-principles density functional theory. The unique wire-like structure leads to distinct spatial distribution of carriers, which can be tailored by applying tensile and compressive strains, as well as by an electric bias. Our results indicate that the combined effect of strain and electric bias leads to tunable electronic structures that can be used for piezo-electric devices.

  1. Characterization of optical strain sensors based on silicon waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, W.J.; Pozo Torres, J.M.; Muilwijk, P.M.; Leinders, S.M.; Harmsma, P.J.; Tabak, E.; Dool, T.C. van den; Dongen, K.W.A. van; Yousefi, M.; Urbach, H.P.

    2013-01-01

    Strain gauges are widely employed in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for sensing of, for example, deformation, acceleration, pressure, or sound [1]. Such gauges are typically based on electronic piezoresistivity. We propose integrated optical sensors which have particular benefits:

  2. The Effects of Ionising Radiation on MEMS Silicon Strain Gauges: Preliminary Background and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    are silicon strain gauges that use the response of piezoresistors to distortion as the sensing mechanism, which have been designed for structural...gauges. Two test methodologies to characterise the strain gauges have been developed; namely, direct control over the piezoresistor length changes, or...structural defects. This can affect a material’s electronic properties (especially in the case of semiconductors , discussed below in Section 6) or its

  3. Out-of-plane strain effect on silicon-based flexible FinFETs

    KAUST Repository

    Ghoneim, Mohamed T.

    2015-06-21

    Summary form only given. We report out-of-plane strain effect on silicon based flexible FinFET, with sub 20 nm wide fins and hafnium silicate based high-κ gate dielectric. Since ultra-thin inorganic solid state substrates become flexible with reduced thickness, flexing induced strain does not enhance performance. However, detrimental effects arise as the devices are subject to various out-of-plane stresses (compressive and tensile) along the channel length.

  4. Spin-dependent optical properties in strained silicon and germanium

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Pengke; Trivedi, Dhara; Dery, Hanan

    2012-01-01

    We present a comprehensive theory of the circularly polarized luminescence and its dependence on strain in spin-polarized Si and Ge. Symmetries of wavefunctions and interactions are used to derive concise ratios between intensities of the right and left circularly polarized luminescence for each of the dominant phonon-assisted optical transitions. These ratios are then used to explain the circular polarization degrees of the luminescence peaks in the spectra of biaxially-strained Si and Ge, a...

  5. Strain-Induced Lithium Losses in the Solid Electrolyte Interphase on Silicon Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ravi; Lu, Peng; Xiao, Xingcheng; Huang, Zhuangqun; Sheldon, Brian W

    2017-08-30

    The chemical and mechanical stability of SEI layers are particularly important for high capacity anode materials such as silicon, which undergoes large volume changes (∼300%) during cycling. In this work, we present a novel approach for applying controlled strains to SEI films with patterned Si electrodes to systematically investigate the impact of large volume changes on SEI formation and evolution. Comparisons between patterned silicon islands and continuous silicon thin films make it possible to correlate the irreversible capacity losses due to expansion and contraction of underlying silicon. The current work demonstrates that strain in the SEI layer leads to more lithium consumption. The combination of in situ AFM and electrochemical lithium loss measurements provides further information on SEI layer growth. These experiments indicate that in-plane strains in the SEI layer lead to substantial increases in the amount of inorganic phase formation, without significantly affecting the overall SEI thickness. These observations are further supported with EIS and TOF-SIMS results. A map of irreversible capacity evolution with strain in the SEI is obtained from the experimental results.

  6. Simulation and parameter optimization of polysilicon gate biaxial strained silicon MOSFETs

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tsague, HD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available the viewpoint of electronic states of carriers in inversion layers and, in particular, the sub-band structures. In addition, design and simulation of biaxial strained silicon NMOSFET (n-channel) is done using Silvaco’s Athena/Atlas simulator. From the results...

  7. Characterization of strained silicon FinFETs and the integration of a piezoelectric layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaleli, B.

    2013-01-01

    Strain is often applied in semiconductor technology to improve the device performance in a field effect transistor (FET). However, it increases the off-state current as well. In this work, we investigated so-called silicon-on-insulator (SOI) fin-shaped field-effect transistors (FinFETs) and the

  8. Dislocation-free strain-engineered silicon and silicon-germanium nanomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanto, Boy

    Strain-engineered Si and SiGe have been widely used in industry and academia due to their highly desirable properties, such as the increased mobility and the ability to confine charge carriers. The conventional method of strain engineering Si and SiGe is prone to dislocations and strain non-uniformity. Researchers have developed new methods that are not prone to these problems, and elastically-strained Si nanomembranes is one such method. The method is achieved by first growing pseudomorphic Si/SiGe/Si layers (trilayer) on Si on insulator (SOI) substrate. The trilayer is dislocation-free because the layers are grown below the critical thickness. Upon selective removal of the insulator layer, elastic strain-sharing occurs which partially relaxes the compressive strain in SiGe layer and tensilely strains the Si layers. Dislocation-free, smooth 0.6% strained Si nanomembranes had been obtained. This dissertation involves the investigation of the challenges in using the nanomembranes elastic strain-sharing method to achieve higher strain. Solution to the challenges were developed and explained. A new method of strain-engineering using nanomembranes was developed and was experimentally proven to yield dislocation-free fully-relaxed SiGe 33%. Plan-view Transverse Electron Microscopy (TEM) shows that the SiGe nanomembranes (SiGeNM) is completely misfit-dislocation free. Raman and Xray diffraction (XRD) confirm that the SiGe is fully relaxed. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) shows that the back surface of the SiGeNM is smooth (0.27 nm Root Mean Square [RMS] roughness). Pseudomorphic growth of 35 nm strained Si on the back surface of SiGeNM yields 1.2% smooth strained Si.

  9. Spin-dependent optical properties in strained silicon and germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengke; Trivedi, Dhara; Dery, Hanan

    2013-03-01

    We present a comprehensive theory of spin-dependent optical transitions and their dependence on strain in Si and Ge. Symmetries of wave functions and interactions are used to derive concise ratios between intensities of the right and left circularly polarized luminescence for each of the dominant phonon-assisted optical transitions. These ratios are then used to explain the circular polarization degrees of the luminescence peaks in the spectra of biaxially strained Si and Ge, and of relaxed Si1-xGex alloys. The spectra are numerically calculated by a combination of an empirical pseudopotential method, an adiabatic bond-charge model, and a rigid-ion model.

  10. Reversible Strain-Induced Electron-Hole Recombination in Silicon Nanowires Observed with Femtosecond Pump-Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    optoelectronic devices that rely on long charge carrier lifetimes, such as nanostructured solar cells . Further studies of the effects of strain on the carrier...resolution and submicron spatial resolution to characterize charge–carrier recombination and transport dynamics in silicon nanowires (NWs) locally strained...release; distribution is unlimited. Reversible Strain-Induced Electron–Hole Recombination in Silicon Nanowires Observed with Femtosecond Pump–Probe

  11. Tattoo-Like Strain Gauges Based on Silicon Nano-Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Nanshu

    2012-02-01

    This talk reports the in vivo measurement of tissue deformation through adhesive-free, conformable lamination of a tattoo-like elastic strain gauge consisted of piezoresistive silicon nano-membranes strategically integrated with tissue-like elastomeric substrates. The mechanical deformation in soft tissues cannot yet be directly quantified due to the lack of enabling tools. While stiff strain gauges for structural health monitoring have long existed, biological tissues are soft, curvilinear and highly deformable in contrast to civil or aerospace structures. An ultra-thin, ultra-soft, tattoo-like strain gauge that can conform to the convoluted surface of human body and stay attached during locomotion will be able to directly quantify tissue deformation without affecting the mechanical behavior of the tissue. While single crystalline silicon is known to have the highest gauge factor and best elastic response, it is intrinsically stiff and brittle. To achieve strain gauges with high compliance, high stretchability and reasonable sensitivity, single crystalline silicon nano-membranes will be transfer-printed onto polymeric support through carefully engineered stamps. The thickness and length of the Si strip will be chosen according to theoretical and numerical mechanics analysis which takes into account for the tradeoff between stretchability and sensitivity.

  12. Strained silicon on SiGe: Temperature dependence of carrier effective masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Soline; Cavassilas, Nicolas; Aniel, Frédéric; Fishman, Guy

    2003-10-01

    A strain Bir-Pikus Hamiltonian Hst, based on a 20 band sps* kṡp Hamiltonian Hkp, is used to describe the valence band and the first two conduction bands over the entire Brillouin zone. This full-band kṡp computation of the carrier dispersion relation is used to calculate electron and hole effective masses in strained silicon. Hole density of states masses are found to be very temperature dependent whereas electron effective masses can be considered temperature independent to first order.

  13. Characterization of strain in sub-100 nm silicon transistors by convergent-beam electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng

    As silicon devices shrink further beyond the 65 nm technology node, strain is increasingly important for the fabrication and operation of nano-devices. According to the latest International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, however, the detection and mapping of strain at the required nanometer spatial resolution has yet to be achieved. The project is to evaluate the convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) technique in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) as a nanoscale strain metrology. In this work, by using energy-filtered CBED under scanning TEM (STEM) mode, we have successfully measured strain in two types of sub-100 nm semiconductor structures: 90 nm node and 65 nm node shallow trench isolation (STI) structures, and a 65 nm node locally strained p-type metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (P-MOSFET, or PMOS) featuring SiGe source and drain (S/D). In the 90 nm STI structures, the strain is generally less than 0.1%. Nevertheless, CBED is sensitive enough to tell the strain difference in two 90 nm STI structures with different oxide trench filling conditions. In the 65 nm STI structure, the strain tensors at different positions around the oxide trench filling are measured. The experimental results are compared with finite element modeling based on isotropic elasticity theory. A large discrepancy is found between experiments and simulation, which suggests that a more sophisticated model is necessary for accurate modeling, and more importantly that CBED strain measurements can be used to check the applicability of models at nanometer scale. In the 65 nm node uniaxially strained PMOS, the lattice parameters of silicon at a distance of 25 nm to 55nm below the gate are measured. It is found that at 25 below the gate, the major stress component, 1.1 GPa, is compressive along the source-drain axis. It is also noticed that in the strained silicon area, all three diagonal components of the strain tensor are compressive. Thus the CBED strain

  14. Twins and strain relaxation in zinc-blende GaAs nanowires grown on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piñero, J.C., E-mail: josecarlos.pinero@uca.es [Dpto. Ciencias de los Materiales, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510, Puerto Real, Cádiz (Spain); Araújo, D.; Pastore, C.E.; Gutierrez, M. [Dpto. Ciencias de los Materiales, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510, Puerto Real, Cádiz (Spain); Frigeri, C. [Istituto CNR-IMEM Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, Fontanini, 43010, Parma (Italy); Benali, A.; Lelièvre, J.F.; Gendry, M. [INL-Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, UMR 5270 Ecole Centrale de Lyon 36, Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134, Ecully Cedex (France)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • A TEM-HREM study of GaAs nanowires, growth over Si, is presented. • Misfit dislocations are detected in the Si/GaAs magma interface. • The study demonstrates strain relaxation through twin formation in some nanowires. - Abstract: To integrate materials with large lattice mismatch as GaAs on silicon (Si) substrate, one possible approach, to improve the GaAs crystalline quality, is to use nanowires (NWs) technology. In the present contribution, NWs are grown on <111> oriented Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses show that NWs are mainly grown alternating wurtzite and zinc blend (ZB) phases, and only few are purely ZB. On the latter, High Resolution Electron Microscopy (HREM) evidences the presence of twins near the surface of the NW showing limited concordance with the calculations of Yuan (2013) [1], where {111} twin planes in a <111>-oriented GaAs NW attain attractive interactions mediated by surface strain. In addition, such twins allow slight strain relaxation and are probably induced by the local huge elastic strain observed by HREM in the lattice between the twin and the surface. The latter is attributed to some slight bending of the NW as shown by the inversion of the strain from one side to the other side of the NW.

  15. Vapor phase polymerization of PEDOT on silicone rubber as flexible large strain sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Giffney

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a flexible large strain sensor made from ethylenedioxythiophene deposited on silicone rubber (Ecoflex® 00-30 via vacuum assisted vapor phase polymerization (VPP process. EDOT was used due to its stability when exposed to the atmosphere. VPP is a very simple process requiring only a vacuum bell jar and a vacuum pump. Ferrite chloride (FeCl3 dissolved in tethrahydrofuran was used as the oxidant to make the resulting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT conductive. THF was used because it swells Ecoflex® for better infusion of oxidant and PEDOT adherence. The sensor performs reliably up to 80% strain with a gauge factor of ~2.4 and small hysteresis.

  16. Micromachined silicon cantilevers with integrated high-frequency magnetoimpedance sensors for simultaneous strain and magnetic field detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettel, G.; Joppich, J.; Hartmann, U.

    2017-12-01

    Giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) measurements in the high-frequency regime utilizing a coplanar waveguide with an integrated Permalloy multilayer and micromachined on a silicon cantilever are reported. The fabrication process is described in detail. The aspect ratio of the magnetic multilayer in the magnetoresistive and magnetostrictive device was varied. Tensile strain and compressive strain were applied. Vector network analyzer measurements in the range from the skin effect to ferromagnetic resonance confirm the technological potential of GMI-based micro-electro-mechanical devices for strain and magnetic field sensing applications. The strain-impedance gauge factor was quantified by finite element strain calculations and reaches a maximum value of almost 200.

  17. More than 10-fold increase in the actuation strain of silicone dielectric elastomer actuators by applying prestrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, S.; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-04-01

    Silicone based dielectric elastomer actuators are preferred for reliable and fast actuation due to their negligible viscoelastic behavior. However, it is more challenging to achieve large deformation actuation using this class of polymers compared to the traditionally used VHB films. In this paper, we present theoretical guidelines for improving actuation strain of silicone based dielectric elastomer actuators. The electromechanical behavior of two different silicones is compared and it is demonstrated that the softest elastomer is not necessarily the best choice to achieve large deformation. Lastly, we have experimentally shown that uniaxially prestretching the elastomer with an optimum prestretch ratio enhances the actuation strain up to 10 times. Actuation strain of up to 80% on 100 × 100 μm2 microactuators is generated.

  18. Strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength of two silicon carbides: experimental evidence and micromechanical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinszner, Jean-Luc; Erzar, Benjamin; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic materials are commonly used to design multi-layer armour systems thanks to their favourable physical and mechanical properties. However, during an impact event, fragmentation of the ceramic plate inevitably occurs due to its inherent brittleness under tensile loading. Consequently, an accurate model of the fragmentation process is necessary in order to achieve an optimum design for a desired armour configuration. In this work, shockless spalling tests have been performed on two silicon carbide grades at strain rates ranging from 103 to 104 s-1 using a high-pulsed power generator. These spalling tests characterize the tensile strength strain rate sensitivity of each ceramic grade. The microstructural properties of the ceramics appear to play an important role on the strain rate sensitivity and on the dynamic tensile strength. Moreover, this experimental configuration allows for recovering damaged, but unbroken specimens, giving unique insight on the fragmentation process initiated in the ceramics. All the collected data have been compared with corresponding results of numerical simulations performed using the Denoual-Forquin-Hild anisotropic damage model. Good agreement is observed between numerical simulations and experimental data in terms of free surface velocity, size and location of the damaged zones along with crack density in these damaged zones. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  19. Strain-tolerant High Capacity Silicon Anodes via Directed Lithium Ion Transport for High Energy Density Lithium-ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Jason

    2012-02-01

    Energy storage is an essential component of modern technology, with applications including public infrastructure, transportation systems, and consumer electronics. Lithium-ion batteries are the preeminent form of energy storage when high energy / moderate power densities are required. Improvements to lithium-ion battery energy / power density through the adoption of silicon anodes—with approximately an order of magnitude greater gravimetric capacity than traditional carbon-based anodes--have been limited by ˜300% strains during electrochemical lithium insertion which result in short operational lifetimes. In two different systems we demonstrated improvements to silicon-based anode performance via directed lithium ion transport. The first system demonstrated a crystallographic-dependent anisotropic electrochemical lithium insertion in single-crystalline silicon anode microstructures. Exploiting this anisotropy, we highlight model silicon anode architectures that limit the maximum strain during electrochemical lithium insertion. This self-strain-limiting is a result of selecting a specific microstructure design such that during lithiation the anisotropic evolution of strain, above a given threshold, blocks further lithium intercalation. Exemplary design rules have achieved self-strain-limited charging capacities ranging from 677 mAhg-1 to 2833 mAhg-1. A second system with variably encapsulated silicon-based anodes demonstrated greater than 98% of their initial capacity after 130+ cycles. This anode also can operate stably at high energy/power densities. A lithium-ion battery with this anode was able to continuously (dis)charge in 10 minutes, corresponding to a power / energy density of ˜1460 W/kg and ˜243 Wh/kg--up to 780% greater power density and 220% higher energy density than conventional lithium-ion batteries. Anodes were also demonstrated with areal capacities of 12.7 mAh/cm^2, two orders of magnitude greater than traditional thin-film silicon anodes.[4pt

  20. Biomechanical analysis of silicon microelectrode-induced strain in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunjung; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.; Sun, Wei; Levenston, Marc E.

    2005-12-01

    The ability to successfully interface the brain to external electrical systems is important both for fundamental understanding of our nervous system and for the development of neuroprosthetics. Silicon microelectrode arrays offer great promise in realizing this potential. However, when they are implanted into the brain, recording sensitivity is lost due to inflammation and astroglial scarring around the electrode. The inflammation and astroglial scar are thought to result from acute injury during electrode insertion as well as chronic injury caused by micromotion around the implanted electrode. To evaluate the validity of this assumption, the finite element method (FEM) was employed to analyze the strain fields around a single Michigan Si microelectrode due to simulated micromotion. Micromotion was mimicked by applying a force to the electrode, fixing the boundaries of the brain region and applying appropriate symmetry conditions to nodes lying on symmetry planes. Characteristics of the deformation fields around the electrode including maximum electrode displacement, strain fields and relative displacement between the electrode and the adjacent tissue were examined for varying degrees of physical coupling between the brain and the electrode. Our analysis demonstrates that when physical coupling between the electrode and the brain increases, the micromotion-induced strain of tissue around the electrode decreases as does the relative slip between the electrode and the brain. These results support the use of neuro-integrative coatings on electrode arrays as a means to reduce the micromotion-induced injury response.

  1. Germanium-on-Silicon Strain Engineered Materials for Improved Device Performance Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathan, Jayesh Moorkoth

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a chemical vapor deposition process for growing epitaxial films of germanium on silicon (001) substrates with two-dimensional (2-D) morphology, and a low density of threading dislocations. Growth was carried out in a reduced-pressure chemical vapor deposition (RPCVD) system by a two-step growth technique. An accurate knowledge of elastic constants of thin films is important in understanding the effect of strain on material properties. Residual thermal strain was used to measure the Poisson ratio of Ge films grown on Si(001) substrates, by the sin2Psi method and highresolution x-ray diffraction. The Poisson ratio of the Ge films was measured to be 0.25, compared to the bulk value of 0.27. The result was found to be independent of film thickness and defect density, which confirmed that the strain is associated with the elastic response of the film. The study showed that the use of Poisson ratio instead of bulk compliance values yields a more accurate description of the state of in-plane strain present in the film. The experimentally measured in-plane strain in Ge films was found to be lower than the theoretical calculations based on the differential thermal expansion coefficients of Si and Ge. The mechanism of thermal misfit strain relaxation in epitaxial Ge films grown on Si(001) substrates was investigated by x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Lattice misfit strain associated with Ge/(001)Si mismatched epitaxy is relieved by a network of Lomer edge misfit dislocations during the first step of the growth technique. However, thermal misfit strain energy during growth is relieved by interdiffusion mechanism at the heterointerface. Two SiGe compositions containing 0.5 and 6.0 atomic percent Si were detected that relieve the thermal mismatch strain associated with the two steps of the growth process. This study discusses the importance of interdiffusion mechanism in relieving small misfit strains

  2. Anisotropic Lithium Insertion Behavior in Silicon Nanowires: Binding Energy, Diffusion Barrier, and Strain Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Qianfan

    2011-05-19

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have recently been shown to be promising as high capacity lithium battery anodes. SiNWs can be grown with their long axis along several different crystallographic directions. Due to distinct atomic configuration and electronic structure of SiNWs with different axial orientations, their lithium insertion behavior could be different. This paper focuses on the characteristics of single Li defects, including binding energy, diffusion barriers, and dependence on uniaxial strain in [110], [100], [111], and [112] SiNWs. Our systematic ab initio study suggests that the Si-Li interaction is weaker when the Si-Li bond direction is aligned close to the SiNW long axis. This results in the [110] and [111] SiNWs having the highest and lowest Li binding energy, respectively, and it makes the diffusion barrier along the SiNW axis lower than other pathways. Under external strain, it was found that [110] and [001] SiNWs are the most and least sensitive, respectively. For diffusion along the axial direction, the barrier increases (decreases) under tension (compression). This feature results in a considerable difference in the magnitude of the energy barrier along different diffusion pathways. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction topography study of bonding-induced strain in silicon-on-insulator wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lankinen, A., E-mail: aapo.lankinen@iki.fi [Department of Micro and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 AALTO (Finland); Okmetic Oyj, Piitie 2, FI-01510 Vantaa, Koivuhaka (Finland); Tuomi, T.O.; Kostamo, P.; Jussila, H.; Sintonen, S.; Lipsanen, H. [Department of Micro and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 AALTO (Finland); Tilli, M.; Mäkinen, J. [Okmetic Oyj, Piitie 2, FI-01510 Vantaa, Koivuhaka (Finland); Danilewsky, A.N. [Kristallographie, Institut für Geo- und Umweltnaturwissenschaften, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität, Hermann-Herder-Straße 5, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-03-31

    Large-area back-reflection and transmission X-ray diffraction topographs of bonded silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers made with synchrotron radiation allowed direct and simultaneous imaging of bonding-induced strain patterns of both the 7 μm thick (011) top layers and the (001) Si substrates of the SOI structures. The bonding-induced strain pattern consists of cells having a diameter of about 40 μm. Section topographs show a lattice misorientation of the adjacent cells of about 0.001° and the maximum observed strain-induced lattice plane rotation ten times larger, i.e. about 0.01°. Topographs made after etching away the insulator layer show no indication of residual strain or defects either in the silicon-on-insulator layer or in the substrate. This is in agreement with the experimentally determined maximum bonding stress of 30 MPa, which is much smaller than the estimated stress needed to nucleate dislocations. - Highlights: • SOI wafer strain consists of sharp-edged strain cells. • Bonding-induced strain patterns are not permanent in SOI wafers. • Observed stress was much lower than required for dislocation nucleation.

  4. Carrier-transport mechanism of Er-silicide Schottky contacts to strained-silicon-on-insulator and silicon-on-insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyothi, I; Janardhanam, V; Kang, Min-Sung; Yun, Hyung-Joong; Lee, Jouhahn; Choi, Chel-Jong

    2014-11-01

    The current-voltage characteristics and the carrier-transport mechanism of the Er-silicide (ErSi1.7) Schottky contacts to strained-silicon-on-insulator (sSOI) and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) were investigated. Barrier heights of 0.74 eV and 0.82 eV were obtained for the sSOI and SOI structures, respectively. The barrier height of the sSOI structure was observed to be lower than that of the SoI structure despite the formation of a Schottky contact using the same metal silicide. The sSOI structure exhibited better rectification and higher current level than the SOI structure, which could be associated with a reduction in the band gap of Si caused by strain. The generation-recombination mechanism was found to be dominant in the forward bias for both structures. Carrier generation along with the Poole-Frenkel mechanism dominated the reverse-biased current in the SOI structure. The saturation tendency of the reverse leakage current in the sSOI structure could be attributed to strain-induced defects at the interface in non-lattice-matched structures.

  5. Black Silicon/Elastomer Composite Surface with Switchable Wettability and Adhesion between Lotus and Rose Petal Effects by Mechanical Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Kyu; Yang, Zining; Kim, Seok

    2017-09-27

    Although many recent studies demonstrate surfaces with switchable wettability under various external stimuli, a deliberate effort to self-propel liquid droplets utilizing a surface wetting mode switch between slippery lotus and adhesive rose petal states via a mechanical strain has not been made yet, which would otherwise further benefit microfluidic applications. In this work, we present a black silicon/elastomer (bSi/elastomer) composite surface which shows switchable wettability and adhesion across the two wetting modes by mechanical stretching. The composite surface is composed of a scale-like nanostructured silicon platelet array that covers an elastomer surface. The gap between the neighboring silicon platelets is reversibly changeable as a function of a mechanical strain, leading to the transition between the two wetting modes. Moreover, the composite surface is highly flexible although its wetting properties primarily originate from superhydrophobic bSi platelets. Different wetting characteristics of the composite surface in various mechanical strains are studied, and droplet manipulation such as droplet self-propulsion and pick-and-place using the composite surface is demonstrated, which highlights its potentials for microfluidic applications.

  6. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Asad Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material\\'s luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon. This journal is

  7. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, A; El Demellawi, J K; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2014-12-14

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material's luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon.

  8. Strain effects in low-dimensional silicon MOS and AlGaN/GaN HEMT devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykan, Mehmet Onur

    Strained silicon technology is a well established method to enhance sub-100nm MOSFET performance. With the scalability of process-induced strain, strained silicon channels have been used in every advanced CMOS technology since the 90nm node. At the 22nm node, due to the detrimental short channel effects, non-planar silicon CMOS has emerged as a viable solution to sustain transistor scaling without compromising the device performance. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct a physics based investigation of the effects of mechanical strain in silicon MOS device performance enhancement, as the transverse and longitudinal device dimensions scale down for future technology nodes. While silicon is widely used as the material basis for logic transistors, AlGaN/GaN HEMTs promise a superior device platform over silicon based power MOSFETs for high-frequency and high-power applications. In contrast to the mature Si crystal growth technology, the abundance of defects in the GaN material system creates obstacles for the realization of a reliable AlGaN/GaN HEMT device technology. Due to the high levels of internal mechanical strain present in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs, it is of utmost importance to understand the impact of mechanical stress on AlGaN/GaN trap generation. First, we have investigated the underlying physics of the comparable electron mobility observed in (100) and (110) sidewall silicon double-gate FinFETs, which is different from the observed planar (100) and (110) electron mobility. By conducting a systematic experimental study, it is shown that the undoped body, metal gate induced stress, and volume-inversion effects do not explain the comparable electron mobility. Using a self-consistent double-gate FinFET simulator, we have showed that for (110) FinFETs, an increased population of electrons is obtained for the Delta2 valley due to the heavy nonparabolic confinement mass, leading to a comparable average electron transport effective mass for both orientations. The width

  9. Quantitative Imaging of the Stress/Strain Fields and Generation of Macroscopic Cracks from Indents in Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K. Tanner

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The crack geometry and associated strain field around Berkovich and Vickers indents on silicon have been studied by X-ray diffraction imaging and micro-Raman spectroscopy scanning. The techniques are complementary; the Raman data come from within a few micrometres of the indentation, whereas the X-ray image probes the strain field at a distance of typically tens of micrometres. For example, Raman data provide an explanation for the central contrast feature in the X-ray images of an indent. Strain relaxation from breakout and high temperature annealing are examined and it is demonstrated that millimetre length cracks, similar to those produced by mechanical damage from misaligned handling tools, can be generated in a controlled fashion by indentation within 75 micrometres of the bevel edge of 200 mm diameter wafers.

  10. Mobility and Device Applications of Heavily Doped Silicon and Strained SILICON(1-X) Germanium(x) Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carns, Timothy Keith

    With the advent of Si molecular beam epitaxy (Si -MBE), a significant amount of research has occurred to seek alternative high conductivity Si-based materials such as rm Si_{1-x}Ge_ {x} and delta-doped Si. These materials have brought improvements in device speeds and current drives with the added advantage of monolithic integration into Si VLSI circuits. The bulk of research in Si-based materials has been devoted to the implementation of strained rm Si_{1-x}Ge_{x} as the base layer of a rm Si_ {1-x}Ge_{x}/Si heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). Because of the valence band offset, the rm Si_{1-x}Ge _{x} layer can be heavily doped, leading to lower base sheet resistances and hence, improved speed performances. The Ge content in the base can also be graded to increase the drift field in the base. However, very few hole mobility measurements have been done in these strained layers, leading to limitations in device modeling and in understanding the transport behavior in this important material. In addition to rm Si_{1 -x}Ge_{x}, much potential also exists in using delta-doping in Si for improved conductivities over those of bulk Si. However, as of yet, delta-doped Si has received little attention. Therefore, this dissertation is dedicated to the investigation of both of these Si-based materials (strained rm Si_{1-x}Ge_{x } and delta-doped Si and rm Si_{1-x}Ge_ {x}) for the purpose of obtaining higher conductivities than comparably doped bulk Si. This work is divided into three parts to accomplish this objective. The first part is contained in Chapter 3 and is comprised of a comprehensive characterization of the hole mobility in compressively strained rm Si_{1 -x}Ge_{x}. Few results have been obtained prior to this research which has led to many inaccuracies in device modeling. The second part of this dissertation in Chapters 4 and 5 is devoted to the study of the mobility behavior in both boron and antimony delta-doped Si and rm Si_ {1-x}Ge_{x}. The important

  11. Strain engineering on silicon/germanium nanoscale heterostructures using molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yumi

    Nanoscale architectures provide additional variables to engineer electronic/mechanical properties of material systems due to their high surface volume ratio and physics that arise from their extremely small size. To date, the device performance of microelectronics has been improved largely by miniaturization. However, with feature sizes below 100 nm, the fundamental challenges demand development of new architectures, new materials, and strain engineering. Strain engineering has been one of the most widely used techniques to achieve desired electronic properties of materials. For example, uniaxial compression and tension are desirable for high speed p-and n-MOSFET, respectively. However, accurate experimental characterization of strain in nanomaterials remains challenges such as resolving strain components and quantifying strain gradient which can affect electronic properties. Molecular dynamics (MD) describe materials with atomic resolution and it can provide invaluable information and insight into nanoscale strain engineering. MD simulations are used to study strain relaxation in Si/Ge heteroepitaxial structures of interest to nanoelectonic applications. Nanopatterning is considered as an avenue for strain engineering to achieve uniaxial strain state from epitaxially integrated Si/Ge heterostructures. Using MD, it is studied how size affect strain relaxation on strained Si/Ge/Si nanobars representing the structures obtained by patterning the films in nanoscale. The MD results demonstrate that Ge with a roughly square cross section has a uniaxial strain state desirable for hole mobility enhancement. Also, process-induced strain relaxation on Si/Ge heterostructures is discussed. The simulations suggest that, by engineering the aspect ratio of Si/Ge nanolaminates, local amorphization followed by recrystallization can be used for either preserving the engineered strain or achieving the desired strain state in crystalline region, showing a possibility as a new avenue

  12. Bandgap-customizable germanium using lithographically determined biaxial tensile strain for silicon-compatible optoelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhdeo, David S; Nam, Donguk; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L; Saraswat, Krishna C

    2015-06-29

    Strain engineering has proven to be vital for germanium-based photonics, in particular light emission. However, applying a large permanent biaxial tensile strain to germanium has been a challenge. We present a simple, CMOS-compatible technique to conveniently induce a large, spatially homogenous strain in circular structures patterned within germanium nanomembranes. Our technique works by concentrating and amplifying a pre-existing small strain into a circular region. Biaxial tensile strains as large as 1.11% are observed by Raman spectroscopy and are further confirmed by photoluminescence measurements, which show enhanced and redshifted light emission from the strained germanium. Our technique allows the amount of biaxial strain to be customized lithographically, allowing the bandgaps of different germanium structures to be independently customized in a single mask process.

  13. Voice prosthetic biofilm formation and Candida morphogenic conversions in absence and presence of different bacterial strains and species on silicone-rubber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henny C van der Mei

    Full Text Available Morphogenic conversion of Candida from a yeast to hyphal morphology plays a pivotal role in the pathogenicity of Candida species. Both Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis, in combination with a variety of different bacterial strains and species, appear in biofilms on silicone-rubber voice prostheses used in laryngectomized patients. Here we study biofilm formation on silicone-rubber by C. albicans or C. tropicalis in combination with different commensal bacterial strains and lactobacillus strains. In addition, hyphal formation in C. albicans and C. tropicalis, as stimulated by Rothia dentocariosa and lactobacilli was evaluated, as clinical studies outlined that these bacterial strains have opposite results on the clinical life-time of silicone-rubber voice prostheses. Biofilms were grown during eight days in a silicone-rubber tube, while passing the biofilms through episodes of nutritional feast and famine. Biofilms consisting of combinations of C. albicans and a bacterial strain comprised significantly less viable organisms than combinations comprising C. tropicalis. High percentages of Candida were found in biofilms grown in combination with lactobacilli. Interestingly, L. casei, with demonstrated favorable effects on the clinical life-time of voice prostheses, reduced the percentage hyphal formation in Candida biofilms as compared with Candida biofilms grown in absence of bacteria or grown in combination with R. dentocariosa, a bacterial strain whose presence is associated with short clinical life-times of voice prostheses.

  14. Piezoresistance of Silicon and Strained Si0.9Ge0.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Jacob; Hansen, Ole; Larsen, A. Nylandsted

    2005-01-01

    systems (MEMS) devices. The measurements are performed on microfabricated test chips where resistors are defined in layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (0 0 1) silicon substrates. A uniaxial stress along the [1 1 0] direction is applied to the chip, with the use of a four point bending fixture...

  15. Manipulation of strain state in silicon nanoribbons by top-down approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Miao; Xue, Zhongying; Sun, Gaodi; Guo, Qinglei; Chen, Da; Di, Zengfeng, E-mail: zfdi@mail.sim.ac.cn; Wang, Xi [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Huang, Gaoshan; Mei, Yongfeng [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-04-27

    Tensile strain is often utilized to enhance the electron mobility and luminescent characteristics of semiconductors. A top-down approach in conjunction with roll-up technology is adopted to produce high tensile strain in Si nanoribbons by patterning and releasing of the bridge-like structures. The tensile strain can be altered between uniaxial state and biaxial state by adjusting the dimensions of the patterns and can be varied controllably up to 3.2% and 0.9% for the uniaxial- and biaxial-strained Si nanoribbons, respectively. Three-dimensional finite element analysis is performed to investigate the mechanism of strain generation during patterning and releasing of the structure. Since the process mainly depends on the geometrical factors, the technique can be readily extended to other types of mechanical, electrical, and optical membranes.

  16. Silicon-germanium interdiffusion in strained Ge/SiGe multiple quantum well structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue-Chao; Leadley, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    A strain-symmetrized Ge/Si0.35Ge0.65 multiple quantum well (MQW) structure has been grown on a relaxed Si0.2Ge0.8 virtual substrate by reduced pressure chemical vapour deposition. The as-grown Ge/Si0.35Ge0.65 MQW structure with one period thickness of 25 nm (14 nm/11 nm) was annealed in nitrogen ambient at different temperatures from 550 to 750 °C. The thermal stability and interdiffusion properties were studied by high-resolution x-ray diffraction. No obvious interdiffusion or strain relaxation in the Ge/Si0.35Ge0.65 MQW structure was observed for annealing temperatures strained Ge/Si0.35Ge0.65 MQW structure with an average Ge composition of 85 at%.

  17. Misfit strain of oxygen precipitates in Czochralski silicon studied with energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröschel, A.; Will, J.; Bergmann, C.; Magerl, A.

    2014-06-01

    Annealed Czochralski Silicon wafers containing SiOx precipitates have been studied by high energy X-ray diffraction in a defocused Laue setup using a laboratory tungsten tube. The energy dispersive evaluation of the diffracted Bragg intensity of the 220 reflection within the framework of the statistical dynamical theory yields the static Debye-Waller factor E of the crystal, which gives access to the strain induced by the SiOx precipitates. The results are correlated with precipitate densities and sizes determined from transmission electron microscopy measurements of equivalent wafers. This allows for the determination of the constrained linear misfit ɛ between precipitate and crystal lattice. For samples with octahedral precipitates the values ranging from ɛ = 0.39 (+0.28/-0.12) to ɛ = 0.48 (+0.34/-0.16) indicate that self-interstitials emitted into the matrix during precipitate growth contribute to the lattice strain. In this case, the expected value calculated from literature values is ɛ = 0.26 ± 0.05. Further, the precise evaluation of Pendellösung oscillations in the diffracted Bragg intensity of as-grown wafers reveals a thermal Debye-Waller parameter for the 220 reflection B220(293 K) of 0.5582 ± 0.0039 Å2 for a structure factor based on spherically symmetric scattering contributions.

  18. Energy-band structure in strained silicon: A 20-band kṡp and Bir-Pikus Hamiltonian model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Soline; Aniel, Frédéric; Fishman, Guy; Cavassilas, Nicolas

    2003-08-01

    A strain Bir-Pikus Hamiltonian Hst, associated with a 20-band sp3s* kṡp Hamiltonian Hkp, is used to describe the valence band and the first two conduction bands all over the Brillouin zone. Because the local (in k space) deformation potentials Ⅺu and Ⅺd used in pseudopotential method are unusable in kṡp theory, we show that taking into account the Bir-Pikus parameters (a, b) of the Brillouin zone center in the Hst Hamiltonian allows one to describe the dispersion relation in the whole Brillouin zone. The method is applied to strained Si on a relaxed Si1-xGex alloy. The values of the energy band gap, and of the Δ2-4 conduction band splitting between the four equivalent in-plane valleys Δ4 and the two valleys along the growth direction Δ2 are in very good agreement with those reported in other publications. The small value of the spin-orbit splitting in silicon is taken explicitly into account. We show that the valence band splitting is consequently not proportional to the stress.

  19. Design of a CMOS readout circuit on ultra-thin flexible silicon chip for printed strain gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsobky, Mourad; Mahsereci, Yigit; Keck, Jürgen; Richter, Harald; Burghartz, Joachim N.

    2017-09-01

    Flexible electronics represents an emerging technology with features enabling several new applications such as wearable electronics and bendable displays. Precise and high-performance sensors readout chips are crucial for high quality flexible electronic products. In this work, the design of a CMOS readout circuit for an array of printed strain gauges is presented. The ultra-thin readout chip and the printed sensors are combined on a thin Benzocyclobutene/Polyimide (BCB/PI) substrate to form a Hybrid System-in-Foil (HySiF), which is used as an electronic skin for robotic applications. Each strain gauge utilizes a Wheatstone bridge circuit, where four Aerosol Jet® printed meander-shaped resistors form a full-bridge topology. The readout chip amplifies the output voltage difference (about 5 mV full-scale swing) of the strain gauge. One challenge during the sensor interface circuit design is to compensate for the relatively large dc offset (about 30 mV at 1 mA) in the bridge output voltage so that the amplified signal span matches the input range of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The circuit design uses the 0. 5 µm mixed-signal GATEFORESTTM technology. In order to achieve the mechanical flexibility, the chip fabrication is based on either back thinned wafers or the ChipFilmTM technology, which enables the manufacturing of silicon chips with a thickness of about 20 µm. The implemented readout chip uses a supply of 5 V and includes a 5-bit digital-to-analog converter (DAC), a differential difference amplifier (DDA), and a 10-bit successive approximation register (SAR) ADC. The circuit is simulated across process, supply and temperature corners and the simulation results indicate excellent performance in terms of circuit stability and linearity.

  20. Design of a CMOS readout circuit on ultra-thin flexible silicon chip for printed strain gauges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Elsobky

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Flexible electronics represents an emerging technology with features enabling several new applications such as wearable electronics and bendable displays. Precise and high-performance sensors readout chips are crucial for high quality flexible electronic products. In this work, the design of a CMOS readout circuit for an array of printed strain gauges is presented. The ultra-thin readout chip and the printed sensors are combined on a thin Benzocyclobutene/Polyimide (BCB/PI substrate to form a Hybrid System-in-Foil (HySiF, which is used as an electronic skin for robotic applications. Each strain gauge utilizes a Wheatstone bridge circuit, where four Aerosol Jet® printed meander-shaped resistors form a full-bridge topology. The readout chip amplifies the output voltage difference (about 5 mV full-scale swing of the strain gauge. One challenge during the sensor interface circuit design is to compensate for the relatively large dc offset (about 30 mV at 1 mA in the bridge output voltage so that the amplified signal span matches the input range of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC. The circuit design uses the 0. 5 µm mixed-signal GATEFORESTTM technology. In order to achieve the mechanical flexibility, the chip fabrication is based on either back thinned wafers or the ChipFilmTM technology, which enables the manufacturing of silicon chips with a thickness of about 20 µm. The implemented readout chip uses a supply of 5 V and includes a 5-bit digital-to-analog converter (DAC, a differential difference amplifier (DDA, and a 10-bit successive approximation register (SAR ADC. The circuit is simulated across process, supply and temperature corners and the simulation results indicate excellent performance in terms of circuit stability and linearity.

  1. Silicon-germanium interdiffusion in strained Ge/SiGe multiple quantum well structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xuechao; Leadley, D R, E-mail: xuechao.liu@hotmail.co [Department of Physics, The University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-22

    A strain-symmetrized Ge/Si{sub 0.35}Ge{sub 0.65} multiple quantum well (MQW) structure has been grown on a relaxed Si{sub 0.2}Ge{sub 0.8} virtual substrate by reduced pressure chemical vapour deposition. The as-grown Ge/Si{sub 0.35}Ge{sub 0.65} MQW structure with one period thickness of 25 nm (14 nm/11 nm) was annealed in nitrogen ambient at different temperatures from 550 to 750 {sup 0}C. The thermal stability and interdiffusion properties were studied by high-resolution x-ray diffraction. No obvious interdiffusion or strain relaxation in the Ge/Si{sub 0.35}Ge{sub 0.65} MQW structure was observed for annealing temperatures {<=}600 {sup 0}C, while the onset of interdiffusion occurred as the temperature was increased to above 650 {sup 0}C. The interdiffusion coefficient was obtained by analysing the decay rate of Ge/SiGe periodic satellites in the recorded intensity at temperatures 650-750 {sup 0}C. The extracted activation energy was found to be 3.08 {+-} 0.1 eV for the strained Ge/Si{sub 0.35}Ge{sub 0.65} MQW structure with an average Ge composition of 85 at%.

  2. Energy Dissipation and the High-Strain Rate Dynamic Response of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Ensembles Grown on Silicon Wafer Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Raju Mantena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic mechanical behavior and high-strain rate response characteristics of a functionally graded material (FGM system consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanotube ensembles grown on silicon wafer substrate (VACNT-Si are presented. Flexural rigidity (storage modulus and loss factor (damping were measured with a dynamic mechanical analyzer in an oscillatory three-point bending mode. It was found that the functionally graded VACNT-Si exhibited significantly higher damping without sacrificing flexural rigidity. A Split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB was used for determining the system response under high-strain rate compressive loading. Combination of a soft and flexible VACNT forest layer over the hard silicon substrate presented novel challenges for SHPB testing. It was observed that VACNT-Si specimens showed a large increase in the specific energy absorption over a pure Si wafer.

  3. Back gated strained-Si (s-Si) on silicon-germanium-on-insulator (SGOI) MOSFETs for improved switching speed and short-channel effects (SCEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mirgender; Dubey, Sarvesh; Tiwari, Pramod Kumar; Jit, S.

    2013-06-01

    The present work focuses on Figure-of-merit (FOM) of strained-Si-on-Silicon-Germanium-on-Insulator (SSGOI) MOSFETs with back gate configuration in terms of drain-induced-barrier-lowering (DIBL) and subthreshold swing (S). The theoretical model is developed by solving the 2D Poisson's equation with suitable boundary conditions using evanescent mode analysis technique in both the strained-Si and relaxed Si1-xGex layers. We have studied the effect of buried oxide thickness on DIBL and subthreshold swing. The validity of analytical model is verified by using ATLAS™, a 2D device simulator from Silvaco.

  4. Comparative study on microstructure, crystallite size and lattice strain of as-deposited and thermal treatment silver silicon nitride coating on Ti6Al4V alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalilah, Umi; Mahmoodian, R.

    2017-06-01

    Silver silicon nitride coating were deposited on Ti6Al4V alloy using physical vapor deposition magnetron sputtering technique. Field Emission Spectroscopy (FESEM), Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize as-deposited and after heat treatment of AgSiN coatings in order to understand the morphology, compositions and structure. Meanwhile, in determining the crystallite size and lattice strain, the simplified Williamson-Hall plot method was utilized. The heat treated coated sample shown to reveal granular surface structure, bigger crystallite size and lattice strain as compared to the as-deposited coated sample.

  5. Fabrication of phosphorus doped polysilicon thin-film strain gauges using a 50 microns silicon substrate thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siarkowski, A. L.; Rodrigues, B. S.; Morimoto, N. I.

    2013-03-01

    Strain gauges fabrication using phosphorus doped polysilicon thin-film resistors was performed. Strain gauges transducers were designed to measure the strain in load cells, using a Wheatstone bridge circuit configuration. The strain and sensitivity measurements results for load cells application are described. A linear response and excellent repeatability were obtained.

  6. Fully tensile strained partial silicon-on-insulator n-type lateral-double-diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor using localized contact etching stop layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangzhan; Tan, Changgui; Zou, Xi; Zhang, Yi; Pan, Jianhua; Liu, Yang

    2017-05-01

    The use of contact etching stop layer (CESL) stressors is a popular technique for introducing stress into a transistor channel. However, when tensile stress is applied to an n-type lateral double-diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor (LDMOS) by covering the whole device with a CESL, the drift region adjacent to the channel will be compressively strained, which is detrimental to device performance. The current work presents a strained partial silicon-on-insulator LDMOS in which tensile stress was introduced in both the channel and drift region via a CESL to reduce the device's on-resistance and improve its frequency performance. An n-type LDMOS device with a top-layer Si thickness that was varied between 300 and 20 nm was simulated to investigate the effect of CESLs on device performance. Devices in which the channel and drift region were fully strained had larger carrier mobilities, and their cut-off frequencies were increased by 25% compared with a normal unstrained partial silicon-on-insulator LDMOS field effect transistor. Meanwhile stress was shown to have little impact on the breakdown voltage of the two types of LDMOS field effect transistor studied here.

  7. Copper-Free Click Biofunctionalization of Silicon Nitride Surfaces via Strain-Promoted Alkyne-Azide Cycloaddition Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manova, R.K.; Pujari, S.P.; Weijers, C.A.G.M.; Zuilhof, H.; Beek, van T.A.

    2012-01-01

    Cu-free "click" chemistry is explored on silicon nitride (Si3N4) surfaces as an effective way for oriented immobilization of biomolecules. An omega-unsaturated ester was grafted onto Si3N4 using UV irradiation. Hydrolysis followed by carbodiimide-mediated activation yielded surface-bound active

  8. Synchronously Tailoring Strain Sensitivity and Electrical Stability of Silicone Elastomer Composites by the Synergistic Effect of a Dual Conductive Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanying Ning

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of conductive polymer composites (CPCs as strain sensors has been widely investigated. A wide range of strain sensitivities and high repeatability are vital for different applications of CPCs. In this study, the relations of the conductive filler network and the strain-sensing behavior and electrical stability under fatigue cycles were studied systematically for the first time based on the conductive polymethylvinylsiloxane (PMVS composites filled with both carbon nanotubes arrays (CNTAs and carbon black (CB. It was proved that the composites could be fabricated with large strain-sensing capability and a wide range of strain sensitivities by controlling the volume ratio of CNTA/CB and their amounts. Additionally, the CNTA/CB/PMVS composite with 3 vol % content of fillers showed high sensitivity (GF is 10 at 60% strain, high repeatability (the relative standard deviation (RSD of the max R/R0 value is 3.58%, and electrical stability under fatigue cycles (value range of R/R0 is 1.62 to 1.82 at the same time due to the synergistic effects of the dual conductive network of CNTAs and CB. This could not be achieved by relying on a single CNTA or CB conductive network. This study may provide guidance for the preparation of high performance CPCs for applications in strain sensors.

  9. Analytical model for subthreshold current and subthreshold swing of short-channel double-material-gate MOSFETs with strained-silicon channel on silicon—germanium substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Pramod Kumar; Krishna Saramekala, Gopi; Dubey, Sarvesh; Mukhopadhyay, Anand Kumar

    2014-10-01

    The present work gives some insight into the subthreshold behaviour of short-channel double-material-gate strained-silicon on silicon—germanium MOSFETs in terms of subthreshold swing and off-current. The formulation of subthreshold current and, thereupon, the subthreshold swing have been done by exploiting the expression of potential distribution in the channel region of the device. The dependence of the subthreshold characteristics on the device parameters, such as Ge mole fraction, gate length ratio, work function of control gate metal and gate length, has been tested in detail. The analytical models have been validated by the numerical simulation results that were obtained from the device simulation software ATLAS™ by Silvaco Inc.

  10. Analytical models of subthreshold current and swing of short-channel strained-Si (s-Si) on Silicon-Germanium-on-Insulator (SGOI) MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mirgender; Dubey, Sarvesh; Tiwari, Pramod Kumar; Jit, S.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, surface potential based analytical models of subthreshold current and subthreshold swing of the strained-Si (s-Si) on Silicon-Germanium-on-Insulator (SGOI) MOSFETs have been presented. The models are based on the solution of the 2D Poisson's equation in the fully depleted channel region by approximating the potential in vertical direction of the channel. The thus obtained potential distribution function has been employed in deriving the closed form expressions of subthreshold current and subthreshold swing. The subthreshold characteristics have been studied as a function of various device parameters such as Ge mole fraction (x), gate length (Lg), gate oxide thickness (tf) and channel thickness (ts-Si). The proposed analytical model results have been validated by comparing with the simulation data obtained by the 2D device simulator ATLAS™ from Silvaco.

  11. Analysis of stress-strain, fracture and ductility behavior of aluminum matrix composites containing discontinuous silicon carbide reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdanels, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical properties and stress-strain behavior for several types of commercially fabricated aluminum matrix composites, containing up to 40 vol % discontinuous SiC whisker, nodule, or particulate reinforcement were evaluated. It was found that the elastic modulus of the composites was isotropic, to be independent of type of reinforcement, and to be controlled solely by the volume percentage of SiC reinforcement present. The yield/tensile strengths and ductility were controlled primarily by the matrix alloy and temper condition. Ductility decreased with increasing reinforcement content, however, the fracture strains observed were higher than those reported in the literature for this type of composite. This increase in fracture strain is attributed to cleaner matrix powder and increased mechanical working during fabrication. Conventional aluminum and titanium structural alloys were compared and have shown that the properties of these low cost, lightweight composites have good potential for application to aerospace structures.

  12. Analysis of stress-strain, fracture, and ductility behavior of aluminum maxtrix composites containing discontinuous silicon carbide reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdanels, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical properties and stress-strain behavior were evaluated for several types of commercially fabricated aluminum matrix composites, containing up to 40 vol pct discontinuous SiC whisker, nodule, or particulate reinforcement. The elastic modulus of the composites was found to be isotropic, to be independent of type of reinforcement, and to be controlled solely by the volume percentage of SiC reinforcement present. The yield/tensile strengths and ductility were controlled primarily by the matrix alloy and temper condition. Type and orientation of reinforcement had some effect on the strengths of composites, but only for those in which the whisker reinforcement was highly oriented. Ductility decreased with increasing reinforcement content; however, the fracture strains observed were higher than those reported in the literature for this type of composite. This increase in fracture strain was probably attributable to cleaner matrix powder, better mixing, and increased mechanical working during fabrication. Comparison of properties with conventional aluminum and titanium structural alloys showed that the properties of the low-cost, lightweight composites demonstrated very good potential for application to aerospace structures.

  13. Strain-induced structural defects and their effects on the electrochemical performances of silicon core/germanium shell nanowire heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Chen; Kim, Dongheun; Li, Zhen; Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Li, Nan; Zhang, Shixiong; Yoo, Jinkyoung

    2017-01-19

    We report on strain-induced structural defect formation in core Si nanowires of a Si/Ge core/shell nanowire heterostructure and the influence of the structural defects on the electrochemical performances in lithium-ion battery anodes based on Si/Ge core/shell nanowire heterostructures. The induced structural defects consisting of stacking faults and dislocations in the core Si nanowire were observed for the first time. The generation of stacking faults in the Si/Ge core/shell nanowire heterostructure is observed to prefer settling in either only the Ge shell region or in both the Ge shell and Si core regions and is associated with the increase of the shell volume fraction. The relaxation of the misfit strain in the [112] oriented core/shell nanowire heterostructure leads to subsequent gliding of Shockley partial dislocations, preferentially forming the twins. The observation of crossover of defect formation is of great importance for understanding heteroepitaxy in radial heterostructures at the nanoscale and for building three dimensional heterostructures for the various applications. Furthermore, the effect of the defect formation on the nanomaterial's functionality is investigated using electrochemical performance tests. The Si/Ge core/shell nanowire heterostructures enhance the gravimetric capacity of lithium ion battery anodes under fast charging/discharging rates compared to Si nanowires. However, the induced structural defects hamper lithiation of the Si/Ge core/shell nanowire heterostructure.

  14. Formation mechanism of germanium self-assembled quantum dots (SAQDs) on silicon(001) with an undulated strain field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Jun

    Ge self-assembled quantum dots (SAQDs) are grown on a relaxed Si 1-xGex buffer layer in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The formation mechanism and process of Ge SAQDs are investigated for the ultimate goal of size and shape uniformity with regular distribution. Many factors influencing the uniformity and spatial distribution are interrelated but have not been understood completely. Understanding key parameters of the uniformity as well as the surface diffusion of Ge adatom facilitate the fabrication of SAQDs for better opto-electronic device performance. A relaxed Si1-x Gex buffer layer grown on a Si(001) substrate leads to undulated strain field by the formation of buried dislocations. As a result, Ge SAQDs are preferentially nucleated over the buried dislocations. Major findings of this thesis research include the following Si-Ge inter-diffusion is much more rapid at the surface comparing to at the interface inside the bulk crystal; commonly observed pyramid-to-dome transition of Ge SAQDs on Si(001) depends significantly on the strain in SAQDs; a well designed, partially relaxed buffer layer is a very useful vehicle for studying surface processes. Two-step growth for Ge SAQDs employed in this study greatly improves the size and shape uniformity with a dominant shape of dome. Ge wetting-layer is grown at a significantly lower temperature compared to three-dimensional Ge islands. This new approach minimizes the inter-diffusion causing the bulk diffusion of Si from a substrate into Ge SAQDs. The critical size of pyramid-to-dome transition strongly depending on the misfit strain within dots is considerably smaller in two-step samples, implying the lower faction of Si in Ge SAQDs. The larger critical size of SiyGe1-y alloy SAQDs with higher Si fraction further illustrates the effect of the lower misfit strain resulting from the inter-diffusion. On the other hand, the buried misfit dislocations not only provide the lowest energy site for Ge SAQDs nucleation but also

  15. Observation of silicon self-diffusion enhanced by the strain originated from end-of-range defects using isotope multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isoda, Taiga; Uematsu, Masashi; Itoh, Kohei M., E-mail: kitoh@appi.keio.ac.jp [School of Fundamental Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2015-09-21

    Si self-diffusion in the presence of end-of-range (EOR) defects is investigated using {sup nat}Si/{sup 28}Si isotope multilayers. The isotope multilayers were amorphized by Ge ion implantation, and then annealed at 800–950 °C. The behavior of Si self-interstitials is investigated through the {sup 30}Si self-diffusion. The experimental {sup 30}Si profiles show further enhancement of Si self-diffusion at the EOR defect region, in addition to the transient enhanced diffusion via excess Si self-interstitials by EOR defects. To explain this additional enhanced diffusion, we propose a model which takes into account enhanced diffusion by tensile strain originated from EOR defects. The calculation results based on this model have well reproduced the experimental {sup 30}Si profiles.

  16. A first principles analysis of the effect of hydrogen concentration in hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the formation of strained Si-Si bonds and the optical and mobility gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legesse, Merid; Nolan, Michael, E-mail: Michael.nolan@tyndall.ie; Fagas, Giorgos, E-mail: Georgios.fagas@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Dyke Parade, Cork (Ireland)

    2014-05-28

    In this paper, we use a model of hydrogenated amorphous silicon generated from molecular dynamics with density functional theory calculations to examine how the atomic geometry and the optical and mobility gaps are influenced by mild hydrogen oversaturation. The optical and mobility gaps show a volcano curve as the hydrogen content varies from undersaturation to mild oversaturation, with largest gaps obtained at the saturation hydrogen concentration. At the same time, mid-gap states associated with dangling bonds and strained Si-Si bonds disappear at saturation but reappear at mild oversaturation, which is consistent with the evolution of optical gap. The distribution of Si-Si bond distances provides the key to the change in electronic properties. In the undersaturation regime, the new electronic states in the gap arise from the presence of dangling bonds and strained Si-Si bonds, which are longer than the equilibrium Si-Si distance. Increasing hydrogen concentration up to saturation reduces the strained bonds and removes dangling bonds. In the case of mild oversaturation, the mid-gap states arise exclusively from an increase in the density of strained Si-Si bonds. Analysis of our structure shows that the extra hydrogen atoms form a bridge between neighbouring silicon atoms, thus increasing the Si-Si distance and increasing disorder in the sample.

  17. Creep analysis of silicone for podiatry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeiro-Arocas, Julia; Tarrío-Saavedra, Javier; López-Beceiro, Jorge; Naya, Salvador; López-Canosa, Adrián; Heredia-García, Nicolás; Artiaga, Ramón

    2016-10-01

    This work shows an effective methodology to characterize the creep-recovery behavior of silicones before their application in podiatry. The aim is to characterize, model and compare the creep-recovery properties of different types of silicone used in podiatry orthotics. Creep-recovery phenomena of silicones used in podiatry orthotics is characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Silicones provided by Herbitas are compared by observing their viscoelastic properties by Functional Data Analysis (FDA) and nonlinear regression. The relationship between strain and time is modeled by fixed and mixed effects nonlinear regression to compare easily and intuitively podiatry silicones. Functional ANOVA and Kohlrausch-Willians-Watts (KWW) model with fixed and mixed effects allows us to compare different silicones observing the values of fitting parameters and their physical meaning. The differences between silicones are related to the variations of breadth of creep-recovery time distribution and instantaneous deformation-permanent strain. Nevertheless, the mean creep-relaxation time is the same for all the studied silicones. Silicones used in palliative orthoses have higher instantaneous deformation-permanent strain and narrower creep-recovery distribution. The proposed methodology based on DMA, FDA and nonlinear regression is an useful tool to characterize and choose the proper silicone for each podiatry application according to their viscoelastic properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Elastically Relaxed Free-standing Strained-Si Nanomembranes

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Michelle M.; Klein, Levente J.; Savage, Don E.; Slinker, Keith A.; Friesen, Mark; Celler, George; Eriksson, Mark A.; Lagally, Max G.

    2006-01-01

    Strain plays a critical role in the properties of materials. In silicon and silicon-germanium, strain provides a mechanism for control of both carrier mobility and band offsets. In materials integra-tion, strain is typically tuned through the use of dislocations and elemental composition. We demonstrate a versatile method to control strain, by fabricating membranes in which the final strain state is controlled by elastic strain sharing, i.e., without the formation of defects. We grow Si/SiGe ...

  19. Strain control of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures on silicon (111) by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidam, Rolf; Diwo, Elke; Rollbühler, Nicola; Kirste, Lutz; Benkhelifa, Fouad

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports on the use of plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy of AlGaN/GaN-based high electron mobility transistor structures grown on 4 in. Si (111) substrates. In situ measurements of wafer curvature during growth proved to be a very powerful method to analyze the buffer layer's thickness dependent strain. The Ga/N ratio at the beginning of growth of the GaN buffer layer is the critical parameter to control the compressive strain of the entire grown structure. An engineered amount of compressive strain must be designed into the structure to perfectly compensate for the tensile strain caused by differences in the thermal expansion coefficient between the epi-layer and substrate during sample cool down from growth temperatures. A maximum film thickness of 4.2 μm was achieved without the formation of any cracks and a negligible bow of the wafers below 10 μm. Measurement of the as-grown wafers revealed depth profiles of the charge carrier concentration comparable to values achieved on SiC substrates and mobility values of the two dimensional electron gas in the range 1230 to 1350 cm2/Vs at a charge carrier concentration of 6.5-7 1012/cm2. First results on processed wafers with 2 μm thick buffer layer indicate very promising results with a resistance of the buffer, measured on 200 μm long contacts with 15 μm pitch, in the range of R > 109 Ω at 100 V and breakdown voltages up to 550 V.

  20. Strain-engineered MOSFETs

    CERN Document Server

    Maiti, CK

    2012-01-01

    Currently strain engineering is the main technique used to enhance the performance of advanced silicon-based metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Written from an engineering application standpoint, Strain-Engineered MOSFETs introduces promising strain techniques to fabricate strain-engineered MOSFETs and to methods to assess the applications of these techniques. The book provides the background and physical insight needed to understand new and future developments in the modeling and design of n- and p-MOSFETs at nanoscale. This book focuses on recent developments in st

  1. Germanium epitaxy on silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ye

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of on-chip optical interconnects and optical computing in the past decade, silicon-based integrated devices for monolithic and hybrid optoelectronic integration have attracted wide attention. Due to its narrow pseudo-direct gap behavior and compatibility with Si technology, epitaxial Ge-on-Si has become a significant material for optoelectronic device applications. In this paper, we describe recent research progress on heteroepitaxy of Ge flat films and self-assembled Ge quantum dots on Si. For film growth, methods of strain modification and lattice mismatch relief are summarized, while for dot growth, key process parameters and their effects on the dot density, dot morphology and dot position are reviewed. The results indicate that epitaxial Ge-on-Si materials will play a bigger role in silicon photonics.

  2. Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Joining Silicon Carbide to Silicon Carbide and Silicon Nitride to Silicon Nitride for Advanced Heat Engine Applications Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    Techniques were developed to produce reliable silicon nitride to silicon nitride (NCX-5101) curved joins which were used to manufacture spin test specimens as a proof of concept to simulate parts such as a simple rotor. Specimens were machined from the curved joins to measure the following properties of the join interlayer: tensile strength, shear strength, 22 C flexure strength and 1370 C flexure strength. In parallel, extensive silicon nitride tensile creep evaluation of planar butt joins provided a sufficient data base to develop models with accurate predictive capability for different geometries. Analytical models applied satisfactorily to the silicon nitride joins were Norton's Law for creep strain, a modified Norton's Law internal variable model and the Monkman-Grant relationship for failure modeling. The Theta Projection method was less successful. Attempts were also made to develop planar butt joins of siliconized silicon carbide (NT230).

  3. Next generation structural silicone glazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles D. Clift

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an advanced engineering evaluation, using nonlinear analysis of hyper elastic material that provides significant improvement to structural silicone glazing (SSG design in high performance curtain wall systems. Very high cladding wind pressures required in hurricane zones often result in bulky SSG profile dimensions. Architectural desire for aesthetically slender curtain wall framing sight-lines in combination with a desire to reduce aluminium usage led to optimization of silicone material geometry for better stress distribution.To accomplish accurate simulation of predicted behaviour under structural load, robust stress-strain curves of the silicone material are essential. The silicone manufacturer provided physical property testing via a specialized laboratory protocol. A series of rigorous curve fit techniques were then made to closely model test data in the finite element computer analysis that accounts for nonlinear strain of hyper elastic silicone.Comparison of this advanced design technique to traditional SSG design highlights differences in stress distribution contours in the silicone material. Simplified structural engineering per the traditional SSG design method does not provide accurate forecasting of material and stress optimization as shown in the advanced design.Full-scale specimens subject to structural load testing were performed to verify the design capacity, not only for high wind pressure values, but also for debris impact per ASTM E1886 and ASTM E1996. Also, construction of the test specimens allowed development of SSG installation techniques necessitated by the unique geometry of the silicone profile. Finally, correlation of physical test results with theoretical simulations is made, so evaluation of design confidence is possible. This design technique will introduce significant engineering advancement to the curtain wall industry.

  4. Strained silicon and silicon germanium nanowire tunnel FETs and inverters

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Reducing power consumption is an important issue for integrated circuits in portable devices relying on batteries and systems without external power supply. Scaling of the supply voltage VDD in integrated circuits is a powerful tool for reducing the power consumption, due to the quadratic dependence on VDD. MOSFETs, however, exhibit a fundamental limitation for the drain current increase per applied gate voltage difference. The tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) provides the ability for be...

  5. Lithographically patterned silicon nanostructures on silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megouda, Nacera [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire (IRI, USR 3078), Universite Lille1, Parc de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley-BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d' Ascq and Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN, CNRS-8520), Cite Scientifique, Avenue Poincare-B.P. 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Unite de Developpement de la Technologie du Silicium (UDTS), 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140 Alger-7 merveilles, Alger (Algeria); Piret, Gaeelle; Galopin, Elisabeth; Coffinier, Yannick [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire (IRI, USR 3078), Universite Lille1, Parc de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley-BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d' Ascq and Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN, CNRS-8520), Cite Scientifique, Avenue Poincare-B.P. 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Hadjersi, Toufik, E-mail: hadjersi@yahoo.com [Unite de Developpement de la Technologie du Silicium (UDTS), 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140 Alger-7 merveilles, Alger (Algeria); Elkechai, Omar [Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); and others

    2012-06-01

    The paper reports on controlled formation of silicon nanostructures patterns by the combination of optical lithography and metal-assisted chemical dissolution of crystalline silicon. First, a 20 nm-thick gold film was deposited onto hydrogen-terminated silicon substrate by thermal evaporation. Gold patterns (50 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 50 {mu}m spaced by 20 {mu}m) were transferred onto the silicon wafer by means of photolithography. The etching process of crystalline silicon in HF/AgNO{sub 3} aqueous solution was studied as a function of the silicon resistivity, etching time and temperature. Controlled formation of silicon nanowire arrays in the unprotected areas was demonstrated for highly resistive silicon substrate, while silicon etching was observed on both gold protected and unprotected areas for moderately doped silicon. The resulting layers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  6. Stable configurations of graphene on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Shenoy, Bhamy Maithry [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Mahapatra, D. Roy, E-mail: droymahapatra@aero.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Ravikumar, Abhilash [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal 575025 (India); Hegde, G.M. [Center for Nano Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Rizwan, M.R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal 575025 (India)

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • Simulations of epitaxial growth process for silicon–graphene system is performed. • Identified the most favourable orientation of graphene sheet on silicon substrate. • Atomic local strain due to the silicon–carbon bond formation is analyzed. - Abstract: Integration of graphene on silicon-based nanostructures is crucial in advancing graphene based nanoelectronic device technologies. The present paper provides a new insight on the combined effect of graphene structure and silicon (001) substrate on their two-dimensional anisotropic interface. Molecular dynamics simulations involving the sub-nanoscale interface reveal a most favourable set of temperature independent orientations of the monolayer graphene sheet with an angle of ∽15° between its armchair direction and [010] axis of the silicon substrate. While computing the favorable stable orientations, both the translation and the rotational vibrations of graphene are included. The possible interactions between the graphene atoms and the silicon atoms are identified from their coordination. Graphene sheet shows maximum bonding density with bond length 0.195 nm and minimum bond energy when interfaced with silicon substrate at 15° orientation. Local deformation analysis reveals probability distribution with maximum strain levels of 0.134, 0.047 and 0.029 for 900 K, 300 K and 100 K, respectively in silicon surface for 15° oriented graphene whereas the maximum probable strain in graphene is about 0.041 irrespective of temperature. Silicon–silicon dimer formation is changed due to silicon–carbon bonding. These results may help further in band structure engineering of silicon–graphene lattice.

  7. Silicon Photonics-Silicon Raman Lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 10. Silicon Photonics - Silicon Raman Lasers. P K Basu. General Article Volume 12 ... Keywords. Silicon photonics; Si Raman laser; semiconductor laser; light emitter; optical interconnect; optical communication; Indirect gap semiconductors.

  8. Silicone chain extender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a silicone chain extender, more particularly a chain extender for silicone polymers and copolymers, to a chain extended silicone polymer or copolymer and to a functionalized chain extended silicone polymer or copolymer, to a method for the preparation thereof...

  9. Silicon takes a spin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.

    An efficient way to transport electron spins from a ferromagnet into silicon essentially makes silicon magnetic, and provides an exciting step towards integration of magnetism and mainstream semiconductor electronics.

  10. Producing Silicon Carbide/Silicon Nitride Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Manufacturing process makes CxSiyNz fibers. Precursor fibers spun from extruding machine charged with polycarbosilazane resin. When pyrolyzed, resin converted to cross-linked mixture of silicon carbide and silicon nitride, still in fiber form. CxSiyNz fibers promising substitutes for carbon fibers in high-strength, low-weight composites where high electrical conductivity unwanted.

  11. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible

  12. Silicon spintronics: Progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2015-07-01

    Electron spin attracts much attention as an alternative to the electron charge degree of freedom for low-power reprogrammable logic and non-volatile memory applications. Silicon appears to be the perfect material for spin-driven applications. Recent progress and challenges regarding spin-based devices are reviewed. An order of magnitude enhancement of the electron spin lifetime in silicon thin films by shear strain is predicted and its impact on spin transport in SpinFETs is discussed. A relatively weak coupling between spin and effective electric field in silicon allows magnetoresistance modulation at room temperature, however, for long channel lengths. Due to tunneling magnetoresistance and spin transfer torque effects, a much stronger coupling between the spin (magnetization) orientation and charge current is achieved in magnetic tunnel junctions. Magnetic random access memory (MRAM) built on magnetic tunnel junctions is CMOS compatible and possesses all properties needed for future universal memory. Designs of spin-based non-volatile MRAM cells are presented. By means of micromagnetic simulations it is demonstrated that a substantial reduction of the switching time can be achieved. Finally, it is shown that any two arbitrary memory cells from an MRAM array can be used to perform a logic operation. Thus, an intrinsic non-volatile logic-in-memory architecture can be realized.

  13. Silicon spintronics: Progress and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried, E-mail: Selberherr@TUWien.ac.at

    2015-07-14

    Electron spin attracts much attention as an alternative to the electron charge degree of freedom for low-power reprogrammable logic and non-volatile memory applications. Silicon appears to be the perfect material for spin-driven applications. Recent progress and challenges regarding spin-based devices are reviewed. An order of magnitude enhancement of the electron spin lifetime in silicon thin films by shear strain is predicted and its impact on spin transport in SpinFETs is discussed. A relatively weak coupling between spin and effective electric field in silicon allows magnetoresistance modulation at room temperature, however, for long channel lengths. Due to tunneling magnetoresistance and spin transfer torque effects, a much stronger coupling between the spin (magnetization) orientation and charge current is achieved in magnetic tunnel junctions. Magnetic random access memory (MRAM) built on magnetic tunnel junctions is CMOS compatible and possesses all properties needed for future universal memory. Designs of spin-based non-volatile MRAM cells are presented. By means of micromagnetic simulations it is demonstrated that a substantial reduction of the switching time can be achieved. Finally, it is shown that any two arbitrary memory cells from an MRAM array can be used to perform a logic operation. Thus, an intrinsic non-volatile logic-in-memory architecture can be realized.

  14. Silicon photonics beyond silicon-on-insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiles, Jeff; Fathpour, Sasan

    2017-05-01

    The standard platform for silicon photonics has been ridge or channel waveguides fabricated on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. SOI waveguides are so versatile and the technology built around it is so mature and popular that silicon photonics is almost regarded as synonymous with SOI photonics. However, due to several shortcomings of SOI photonics, novel platforms have been recently emerging. The shortcomings could be categorized into two sets: (a) those due to using silicon as the waveguide core material; and (b) those due to using silicon dioxide as the bottom cladding layer. Several heterogeneous platforms have been developed to address the first set of shortcomings. In such important heterogeneous integrated photonic platforms, the top silicon layer of SOI is typically replaced by a thin film of another optical material with a refractive index higher than the buried oxide (BOX) bottom cladding layer. Silicon is still usually preferred as the substrate of choice, but silicon has no optical functionality. In contrast, the second category of solutions aim at using silicon as the core waveguide material, while resolving issues related to the BOX layer. Particularly, one of the main drawbacks of SOI is that the BOX layer induces high optical loss in the mid-wavelength infrared (mid-IR) range. Accordingly, a host of platforms have been proposed, and some have been demonstrated, in which the BOX is replaced with insulating materials that have low intrinsic loss in the mid-IR. Examples are sapphire, lithium niobate, silicon nitride and air (suspended Si membrane waveguides). Although silicon is still the preferred substrate, sometimes a thin film of silicon, on which the optical waveguide is formed, is directly placed on top of another substrate (e.g., sapphire or lithium niobate). These alternative substrates act as both mechanical support and the lower cladding layer. In addition to the demands of mid-IR photonics, the non-SOI platforms can potentially offer other

  15. The chemistry of silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Rochow, E G; Emeléus, H J; Nyholm, Ronald

    1975-01-01

    Pergamon Texts in Organic Chemistry, Volume 9: The Chemistry of Silicon presents information essential in understanding the chemical properties of silicon. The book first covers the fundamental aspects of silicon, such as its nuclear, physical, and chemical properties. The text also details the history of silicon, its occurrence and distribution, and applications. Next, the selection enumerates the compounds and complexes of silicon, along with organosilicon compounds. The text will be of great interest to chemists and chemical engineers. Other researchers working on research study involving s

  16. Porous silicon gettering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Al-Jassim, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    We have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that utilizes the very large surface areas, produced by porous silicon etch on both front and back surfaces of the silicon wafer, as gettering sites. In this method, a simple and low-cost chemical etching is used to generate the porous silicon layers. Then, a high-flux solar furnace (HFSF) is used to provide high-temperature annealing and the required injection of silicon interstitials. The gettering sites, along with the gettered impurities, can be easily removed at the end the process. The porous silicon removal process consists of oxidizing the porous silicon near the end the gettering process followed by sample immersion in HF acid. Each porous silicon gettering process removes up to about 10 {mu}m of wafer thickness. This gettering process can be repeated so that the desired purity level is obtained.

  17. Miniature ultrasonic transducers with optical strain readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-Hoon; Lal, Amit

    1999-09-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of diffractive gratings to optically measure strain in miniature ultrasonic transducers. Aluminum diffraction gratings were fabricated on silicon-microfabricated ultrasonic horns and beams which were actuated by bonded piezoelectric PZT (Lead-Zirconate Titanate) plates. A He-Ne laser beam was diffracted from the grating and a knife-edge was used to measure small changes in the diffraction angle as a result of time varying grating space and width. The measured strain and displacement profiles agreed with the expected mode patterns for the silicon resonators.

  18. Effects of patterning induced stress relaxation in strained SOI/SiGe layers and substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, P.; Hecker, M.; Renn, F.; Rölke, M.; Kolanek, K.; Rinderknecht, J.; Eng, L. M.

    2011-06-01

    Local stress fields in strained silicon structures important for CMOS technology are essentially related to size effects and properties of involved materials. In the present investigation, Raman spectroscopy was utilized to analyze the stress distribution within strained silicon (sSi) and silicon-germanium (SiGe) island structures. As a result of the structuring of initially unpatterned strained films, a size-dependent relaxation of the intrinsic film stresses was obtained in agreement with model calculations. This changed stress state in the features also results in the appearance of opposing stresses in the substrate underneath the islands. Even for strained island structures on top of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers, corresponding stresses in the silicon substrate underneath the oxide were detected. Within structures, the stress relaxation is more pronounced for islands on SOI substrates as compared to those on bulk silicon substrates.

  19. Structure of deformed silicon and implications for low cost solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, N.; Leipold, M. H.; Turner, G. B.; Digges, T. G., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The microstructure and minority carrier lifetime of silicon were investigated in uniaxially compressed silicon samples. The objective of the investigation was to determine if it is feasible to produce silicon solar cells from sheet formed by high temperature rolling. The initial structure of the silicon samples ranged from single crystal to fine-grained polycrystals. The samples had been deformed at strain rates of 0.1 to 8.5/sec and temperatures of 1270-1380 C with subsequent annealing at 1270-1380 C. The results suggest that high temperature rolling of silicon to produce sheet for cells of high efficiency is not practical.

  20. Liquid Silicon Pouch Anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-06

    Docket No. 300139 1 of 13 LIQUID SILICON POUCH ANODE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured... silicon -based anodes during cycling, lithium insertion and deinsertion. Mitigation of this problem has long been sought and will result in improved...with other potential lithium alloy materials such as gallium and tin. Silicon -based solid state anodes are typically composed of small particles of

  1. Silicon spin communication

    OpenAIRE

    Dery, Hanan; Song, Yang; Li, Pengke; Zutic, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental breakthroughs have demonstrated that the electron spin in silicon can be reliably injected and detected as well as transferred over distances exceeding 1 mm. We propose an on-chip communication paradigm which is based on modulating spin polarization of a constant current in silicon wires. We provide figures of merit for this scheme by studying spin relaxation and drift-diffusion models in silicon.

  2. Handbook of silicon photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    The development of integrated silicon photonic circuits has recently been driven by the Internet and the push for high bandwidth as well as the need to reduce power dissipation induced by high data-rate signal transmission. To reach these goals, efficient passive and active silicon photonic devices, including waveguide, modulators, photodetectors, multiplexers, light sources, and various subsystems, have been developed that take advantage of state-of-the-art silicon technology.

  3. Low blow Charpy impact of silicon carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, H.; Chandan, H. C.; Bradt, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    The room-temperature impact resistance of several commercial silicon carbides was examined using an instrumented pendulum-type machine and Charpy-type specimens. Energy balance compliance methods and fracture toughness approaches, both applicable to other ceramics, were used for analysis. The results illustrate the importance of separating the machine and the specimen energy contributions and confirm the equivalence of KIc and KId. The material's impact energy was simply the specimen's stored elastic strain energy at fracture.

  4. Silicon web process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Skutch, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.; Hopkins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The silicon web process takes advantage of natural crystallographic stabilizing forces to grow long, thin single crystal ribbons directly from liquid silicon. The ribbon, or web, is formed by the solidification of a liquid film supported by surface tension between two silicon filaments, called dendrites, which border the edges of the growing strip. The ribbon can be propagated indefinitely by replenishing the liquid silicon as it is transformed to crystal. The dendritic web process has several advantages for achieving low cost, high efficiency solar cells. These advantages are discussed.

  5. Impact of varying buffer thickness generated strain and threading dislocations on the formation of plasma assisted MBE grown ultra-thin AlGaN/GaN heterostructure on silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhra Chowdhury

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE growth of ultra-thin Al0.2Ga0.8N/GaN heterostructures on Si(111 substrate with three buffer thickness (600 nm/400 nm/200 nm have been reported. An unique growth process has been developed that supports lower temperature epitaxy of GaN buffer which minimizes thermally generated tensile strain through appropriate nitridation and AlN initiated epitaxy for achieving high quality GaN buffer which supports such ultra-thin heterostructures in the range of 10-15Å. It is followed by investigations of role of buffer thickness on formation of ultra-thin Al0.2Ga0.8N/GaN heterostructure, in terms of stress-strain and threading dislocation (TD. Structural characterization were performed by High-Resolution X-Ray Diffraction (HRXRD, room-temperature Photoluminescence (RT-PL, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. Analysis revealed increasing biaxial tensile stress of 0.6918 ± 0.04, 1.1084, 1.1814 GPa in heterostructures with decreasing buffer thickness of 600, 400, 200 nm respectively which are summed up with residual tensile strain causing red-shift in RT-PL peak. Also, increasing buffer thickness drastically reduced TD density from the order 1010 cm−2 to 108 cm−2. Surface morphology through AFM leads to decrease of pits and root mean square value with increasing buffer thickness which are resulted due to reduction of combined effect of strain and TDs.

  6. Dislocation emission at the Silicon/Silicon nitride interface: A million atom molecular dynamics simulation on parallel computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachlechner; Omeltchenko; Nakano; Kalia; Vashishta; Ebbsjo; Madhukar

    2000-01-10

    Mechanical behavior of the Si(111)/Si(3)N4(0001) interface is studied using million atom molecular dynamics simulations. At a critical value of applied strain parallel to the interface, a crack forms on the silicon nitride surface and moves toward the interface. The crack does not propagate into the silicon substrate; instead, dislocations are emitted when the crack reaches the interface. The dislocation loop propagates in the (1; 1;1) plane of the silicon substrate with a speed of 500 (+/-100) m/s. Time evolution of the dislocation emission and nature of defects is studied.

  7. Strain Gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    HITEC Corporation developed a strain gage application for DanteII, a mobile robot developed for NASA. The gage measured bending forces on the robot's legs and warned human controllers when acceptable forces were exceeded. HITEC further developed the technology for strain gage services in creating transducers out of "Indy" racing car suspension pushrods, NASCAR suspension components and components used in motion control.

  8. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, M.; Castellan, C.; Signorini, S.; Trenti, A.; Pavesi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Silicon photonics is a technology based on fabricating integrated optical circuits by using the same paradigms as the dominant electronics industry. After twenty years of fervid development, silicon photonics is entering the market with low cost, high performance and mass-manufacturable optical devices. Until now, most silicon photonic devices have been based on linear optical effects, despite the many phenomenologies associated with nonlinear optics in both bulk materials and integrated waveguides. Silicon and silicon-based materials have strong optical nonlinearities which are enhanced in integrated devices by the small cross-section of the high-index contrast silicon waveguides or photonic crystals. Here the photons are made to strongly interact with the medium where they propagate. This is the central argument of nonlinear silicon photonics. It is the aim of this review to describe the state-of-the-art in the field. Starting from the basic nonlinearities in a silicon waveguide or in optical resonator geometries, many phenomena and applications are described—including frequency generation, frequency conversion, frequency-comb generation, supercontinuum generation, soliton formation, temporal imaging and time lensing, Raman lasing, and comb spectroscopy. Emerging quantum photonics applications, such as entangled photon sources, heralded single-photon sources and integrated quantum photonic circuits are also addressed at the end of this review.

  9. ALICE silicon strip module

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    This small silicon detector strip will be inserted into the inner tracking system (ITS) on the ALICE detector at CERN. This detector relies on state-of-the-art particle tracking techniques. These double-sided silicon strip modules have been designed to be as lightweight and delicate as possible as the ITS will eventually contain five square metres of these devices.

  10. Silicon Valley: Planet Startup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. P. Ester; dr. A. Maas

    2016-01-01

    For decades now, Silicon Valley has been the home of the future. It's the birthplace of the world's most successful high-tech companies-including Apple, Yahoo, Google, Facebook, Twitter, and many more. So what's the secret? What is it about Silicon Valley that fosters entrepreneurship and

  11. Inhibition of microbial adhesion to silicone rubber treated with biosurfactant from Streptococcus thermophilus A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, L; van der Mei, H; Banat, IM; Teixeira, J; Oliveira, R

    Microbial adhesion of four bacterial and two yeast strains isolated from explanted voice prostheses to silicone rubber before and after conditioning with a biosurfactant obtained from the probiotic bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus A was investigated in a parallel plate flow chamber. The silicone

  12. Advances in silicon nanophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Pu, Minhao

    plasma effect have been tested up to 40 Gbit/s, and hybrid evanescent silicon lasers have been realized both in the form of distributed feed-back lasers and micro-disk lasers. For enhancing the impact of silicon photonics in future ultrafast and energy-efficient all-optical signal processing, e......Silicon has long been established as an ideal material for passive integrated optical circuitry due to its high refractive index, with corresponding strong optical confinement ability, and its low-cost CMOS-compatible manufacturability. However, the inversion symmetry of the silicon crystal lattice...... has been an obstacle for a simple realization of electro-optic modulators, and its indirect band gap has prevented the realization of efficient silicon light emitting diodes and lasers. Still, significant progress has been made in the past few years. Electro-optic modulators based on the free carrier...

  13. Silicone-containing composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mustafa

    2012-01-24

    A silicone-containing composition comprises the reaction product of a first component and an excess of an isocyanate component relative to the first component to form an isocyanated intermediary. The first component is selected from one of a polysiloxane and a silicone resin. The first component includes a carbon-bonded functional group selected from one of a hydroxyl group and an amine group. The isocyanate component is reactive with the carbon-bonded functional group of the first component. The isocyanated intermediary includes a plurality of isocyanate functional groups. The silicone-containing composition comprises the further reaction product of a second component, which is selected from the other of the polysiloxane and the silicone resin. The second component includes a plurality of carbon-bonded functional groups reactive with the isocyanate functional groups of the isocyanated intermediary for preparing the silicone-containing composition.

  14. Intraventricular Silicone Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Stéphane; Boissonnot, Michèle; Tasu, Jean-Pierre; Simonet, Charles; Ciron, Jonathan; Neau, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intracranial silicone oil is a rare complication of intraocular endotamponade with silicone oil. We describe a case of intraventricular silicone oil fortuitously observed 38 months after an intraocular tamponade for a complicated retinal detachment in an 82 year-old woman admitted in the Department of Neurology for a stroke. We confirm the migration of silicone oil along the optic nerve. We discuss this rare entity with a review of the few other cases reported in the medical literature. Intraventricular migration of silicone oil after intraocular endotamponade is usually asymptomatic but have to be known of the neurologists and the radiologists because of its differential diagnosis that are intraventricular hemorrhage and tumor. PMID:26735537

  15. Silicon germanium mask for deep silicon etching

    KAUST Repository

    Serry, Mohamed

    2014-07-29

    Polycrystalline silicon germanium (SiGe) can offer excellent etch selectivity to silicon during cryogenic deep reactive ion etching in an SF.sub.6/O.sub.2 plasma. Etch selectivity of over 800:1 (Si:SiGe) may be achieved at etch temperatures from -80 degrees Celsius to -140 degrees Celsius. High aspect ratio structures with high resolution may be patterned into Si substrates using SiGe as a hard mask layer for construction of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and semiconductor devices.

  16. Silicon nanomembranes for fingertip electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Ming; Bonifas, Andrew P.; Lu, Nanshu; Su, Yewang; Li, Rui; Cheng, Huanyu; Ameen, Abid; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2012-08-01

    We describe the use of semiconductor nanomaterials, advanced fabrication methods and unusual device designs for a class of electronics capable of integration onto the inner and outer surfaces of thin, elastomeric sheets in closed-tube geometries, specially formed for mounting on the fingertips. Multifunctional systems of this type allow electrotactile stimulation with electrode arrays multiplexed using silicon nanomembrane (Si NM) diodes, high-sensitivity strain monitoring with Si NM gauges, and tactile sensing with elastomeric capacitors. Analytical calculations and finite element modeling of the mechanics quantitatively capture the key behaviors during fabrication/assembly, mounting and use. The results provide design guidelines that highlight the importance of the NM geometry in achieving the required mechanical properties. This type of technology could be used in applications ranging from human-machine interfaces to ‘instrumented’ surgical gloves and many others.

  17. Strain characterization of FinFETs using Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaleli, B.; van Hemert, T.; Hueting, Raymond Josephus Engelbart; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Metal induced strain in the channel region of silicon (Si) fin-field effect transistor (FinFET) devices has been characterized using Raman spectroscopy. The strain originates from the difference in thermal expansion coefficient of Si and titanium-nitride. The Raman map of the device region is used

  18. Transformational silicon electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2014-02-25

    In today\\'s traditional electronics such as in computers or in mobile phones, billions of high-performance, ultra-low-power devices are neatly integrated in extremely compact areas on rigid and brittle but low-cost bulk monocrystalline silicon (100) wafers. Ninety percent of global electronics are made up of silicon. Therefore, we have developed a generic low-cost regenerative batch fabrication process to transform such wafers full of devices into thin (5 μm), mechanically flexible, optically semitransparent silicon fabric with devices, then recycling the remaining wafer to generate multiple silicon fabric with chips and devices, ensuring low-cost and optimal utilization of the whole substrate. We show monocrystalline, amorphous, and polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide fabric, all from low-cost bulk silicon (100) wafers with the semiconductor industry\\'s most advanced high-κ/metal gate stack based high-performance, ultra-low-power capacitors, field effect transistors, energy harvesters, and storage to emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of this process to transform traditional electronics into flexible and semitransparent ones for multipurpose applications. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  19. Transformational silicon electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Torres Sevilla, Galo Andres; Ghoneim, Mohamed Tarek; Inayat, Salman Bin; Ahmed, Sally M; Hussain, Aftab Mustansir; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-02-25

    In today's traditional electronics such as in computers or in mobile phones, billions of high-performance, ultra-low-power devices are neatly integrated in extremely compact areas on rigid and brittle but low-cost bulk monocrystalline silicon (100) wafers. Ninety percent of global electronics are made up of silicon. Therefore, we have developed a generic low-cost regenerative batch fabrication process to transform such wafers full of devices into thin (5 μm), mechanically flexible, optically semitransparent silicon fabric with devices, then recycling the remaining wafer to generate multiple silicon fabric with chips and devices, ensuring low-cost and optimal utilization of the whole substrate. We show monocrystalline, amorphous, and polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide fabric, all from low-cost bulk silicon (100) wafers with the semiconductor industry's most advanced high-κ/metal gate stack based high-performance, ultra-low-power capacitors, field effect transistors, energy harvesters, and storage to emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of this process to transform traditional electronics into flexible and semitransparent ones for multipurpose applications.

  20. Silicon applications in photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelenski, A. M.; Gawlik, G.; Wesolowski, M.

    2005-09-01

    Silicon technology enabled the miniaturization of computers and other electronic system for information storage, transmission and transformation allowing the development of the Knowledge Based Information Society. Despite the fact that silicon roadmap indicates possibilities for further improvement, already now the speed of electrons and the bandwidth of electronic circuits are not sufficient and photons are commonly utilized for signal transmission through optical fibers and purely photonic circuits promise further improvements. However materials used for these purposes II/V semiconductor compounds, glasses make integration of optoelectronic circuits with silicon complex an expensive. Therefore research on light generation, transformation and transmission in silicon is very active and recently, due to nanotechnology some spectacular results were achieved despite the fact that mechanisms of light generation are still discussed. Three topics will be discussed. Porous silicon was actively investigated due to its relatively efficient electroluminescence enabling its use in light sources. Its index of refraction, differs considerably from the index of silicon, and this allows its utilization for Bragg mirrors, wave guides and photonic crystals. The enormous surface enables several applications on medicine and biotechnology and in particular due to the effective chemo-modulation of its refracting index the design of optical chemosensors. An effective luminescence of doped and undoped nanocrystalline silicon opened another way for the construction of silicon light sources. Optical amplification was already discovered opening perspectives for the construction of nanosilicon lasers. Luminescences was observed at red, green and blue wavelengths. The used technology of silica and ion implantation are compatible with commonly used CMOS technology. Finally the recently developed and proved idea of optically pumped silicon Raman lasers, using nonlinearity and vibrations in the

  1. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.

    2010-06-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  2. Porous silicon gettering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Pitts, J.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    The authors have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that uses the large surface areas produced by a porous-silicon etch as gettering sites. The annealing step of the gettering used a high-flux solar furnace. They found that a high density of photons during annealing enhanced the impurity diffusion to the gettering sites. The authors used metallurgical-grade Si (MG-Si) prepared by directional solidification casing as the starting material. They propose to use porous-silicon-gettered MG-Si as a low-cost epitaxial substrate for polycrystalline silicon thin-film growth.

  3. Silicon tracker for LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencze, G.; Bosteels, M.; Brenner, R.; Czellar, S.; Ekman, K.; Hentinen, A.; Hietanen, I.; Huhtinen, M.; Inkinen, S.; Karimaeki, V.; Karttaavi, T.; Kinnunen, R.; Lindgren, J.; Merlo, J.P.; Oksakivi, T.; Onnela, A.; Orava, R.; Pietarinen, E.; Pimiae, M.; Roth, W.; Roennqvist, C.; Saarikko, J.P.; Schulman, T.; Tuuva, T.; Voutilainen, M.; Vuoskoski, J.; Oesterberg, K. (Research Inst. for High Energy Physics, SEFT, Helsinki (Finland) Physics Dept., Univ. of Helsinki (Finland) Univ. of Technology, Helsinki, Espoo (Finland) AAbo Akademi, Domkyrkotorget, Turku (Finland) Univ. of Technology, Tampere (Finland) DAPNIA, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, 91 Gif-sur-Yvette, Saclay (France) CERN, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1993-05-01

    A study of a possible layout of a Silicon tracker has been done. The design is based on simulations done in the context of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector for the LHC. The high granularity of the silicon strip detectors yields to low occupancies. New type of a silicon strip detector, single sided stereo angle detector (SSSD), has been designed to match the requirements of a LHC tracker. This detector allows a z-coordinate measurement without increasing the number of channels i.e. power consumption and it facilitates a tracker design with reasonable complicity. (orig.)

  4. Advanced silicon on insulator technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbey, D.; Hughes, H.; Kub, F.

    1991-01-01

    Undoped, thin-layer silicon-on-insulator was fabricated using wafer bonding and selective etching techniques employing a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown Si0.7Ge0.3 layer as an etch stop. Defect free, undoped 200-350 nm silicon layers over silicon dioxide are routinely fabricated using this procedure. A new selective silicon-germanium etch was developed that significantly improves the ease of fabrication of the bond and etch back silicon insulator (BESOI) material.

  5. Extremely dense arrays of germanium and silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, A. A.; Ichikawa, M.

    2008-02-01

    Results of investigations into surface processes of the formation of germanium and silicon nanostructures are analyzed. A mechanism of three-dimensional island nucleation and relaxation of strained two-dimensional layers in heteroepitaxy of germanium in silicon, which initiates spontaneous island growth, is considered. The oxidation of the silicon surface prior to germanium or silicon deposition drastically alters the growth mechanism, leading to the formation of islands with an extremely high areal density of 1012 - 1013 cm-2 and with sizes of less than 10 nm. The effects of spatial quantization determine their properties. Moreover, arrays of these islands form a unique surface for the growth of Si layers that are able to emit photons in the 1.5-1.6-μm wavelength range.

  6. Inorganic Glue Enabling High Performance of Silicon Particles as Lithium Ion Battery Anode

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Li-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Silicon, as an alloy-type anode material, has recently attracted lots of attention because of its highest known Li+ storage capacity (4200 mAh/g). But lithium insertion into and extraction from silicon are accompanied by a huge volume change, up to 300, which induces a strong strain on silicon and causes pulverization and rapid capacity fading due to the loss of the electrical contact between part of silicon and current collector. Silicon nanostructures such as nanowires and nanotubes can overcome the pulverization problem, however these nano-engineered silicon anodes usually involve very expensive processes and have difficulty being applied in commercial lithium ion batteries. In this study, we report a novel method using amorphous silicon as inorganic glue replacing conventional polymer binder. This inorganic glue method can solve the loss of contact issue in conventional silicon particle anode and enables successful cycling of various sizes of silicon particles, both nano-particles and micron particles. With a limited capacity of 800 mAh/g, relatively large silicon micron-particles can be stably cycled over 200 cycles. The very cheap production of these silicon particle anodes makes our method promising and competitive in lithium ion battery industry. © 2011 The Electrochemical Society.

  7. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, A., E-mail: aliman@ppinang.uitm.edu.my; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Ain, M. F. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300,Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  8. Porous Silicon Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yongquan; Zhou, Hailong; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    In this minreview, we summarize recent progress in the synthesis, properties and applications of a new type of one-dimensional nanostructures — single crystalline porous silicon nanowires. The growth of porous silicon nanowires starting from both p- and n-type Si wafers with a variety of dopant concentrations can be achieved through either one-step or two-step reactions. The mechanistic studies indicate the dopant concentration of Si wafers, oxidizer concentration, etching time and temperature can affect the morphology of the as-etched silicon nanowires. The porous silicon nanowires are both optically and electronically active and have been explored for potential applications in diverse areas including photocatalysis, lithium ion battery, gas sensor and drug delivery. PMID:21869999

  9. ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) is part of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment : . SPD Structure . Bump Bonding . Test beam . ALICE1LHCb Readout Chip . Chip Tests . Data from the SPD

  10. Silicon production process evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    Engineering design of the third distillation column in the process was accomplished. The initial design is based on a 94.35% recovery of dichlorosilane in the distillate and a 99.9% recovery of trichlorosilane in the bottoms. The specified separation is achieved at a reflux ratio of 15 with 20 trays (equilibrium stages). Additional specifications and results are reported including equipment size, temperatures and pressure. Specific raw material requirements necessary to produce the silicon in the process are presented. The primary raw materials include metallurgical grade silicon, silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen, copper (catalyst) and lime (waste treatment). Hydrogen chloride is produced as by product in the silicon deposition. Cost analysis of the process was initiated during this reporting period.

  11. Silicon as an anisotropic mechanical material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Reck, Kasper; Skands, Gustav Erik

    2014-01-01

    While silicon is an anisotropic material it is often in literature treated as an isotropic material when it comes to plate calculations. This leads to considerable errors in the calculated deflection. To overcome this problem, we present an in-depth analysis of the bending behavior of thin...... both exact analytical expressions and approximate expressions calculated by the Galerkin method. The results are applied to plates made on silicon (0 0 1), (0 1 1) and (1 1 1) substrates, respectively, and analytical equations for the deflection, strain energy and resonance frequency of such plates...... are presented. These expressions are in excellent agreement with anisotropic finite element calculations. The calculated deflection differs less than 0.1%, for both circular and rectangular plates, compared to finite element calculations. The results are presented as ready-to-use facilitating accurate...

  12. Amorphous silicon crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrner, Wolfgang Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous Silicon/Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells deals with some typical properties of heterojunction solar cells, such as their history, the properties and the challenges of the cells, some important measurement tools, some simulation programs and a brief survey of the state of the art, aiming to provide an initial framework in this field and serve as a ready reference for all those interested in the subject. This book helps to "fill in the blanks" on heterojunction solar cells. Readers will receive a comprehensive overview of the principles, structures, processing techniques and the current developmental states of the devices. Prof. Dr. Wolfgang R. Fahrner is a professor at the University of Hagen, Germany and Nanchang University, China.

  13. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, A.

    2015-06-18

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  14. Silicon-Based Light Sources for Silicon Integrated Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pavesi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon the material per excellence for electronics is not used for sourcing light due to the lack of efficient light emitters and lasers. In this review, after having introduced the basics on lasing, I will discuss the physical reasons why silicon is not a laser material and the approaches to make it lasing. I will start with bulk silicon, then I will discuss silicon nanocrystals and Er3+ coupled silicon nanocrystals where significant advances have been done in the past and can be expected in the near future. I will conclude with an optimistic note on silicon lasing.

  15. Thermo-mechanical characterization of silicone foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaswamy, Partha [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Nickolaus A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cady, Carl M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewis, Matthew W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Cellular solids such as elastomeric foams are used in many structural applications to absorb and dissipate energy, due to their light weight (low density) and high energy absorption capability. In this paper we will discuss foams derived from S5370, a silicone foam formulation developed by Dow Corning. In the application presented, the foam is consolidated into a cushion component of constant thickness but variable density. A mechanical material model developed by Lewis (2013), predicts material response, in part, as a function of relative density. To determine the required parameters for this model we have obtained the mechanical response in compression for ambient, cold and hot temperatures. The variable density cushion provided samples sufficient samples so that the effect of sample initial density on the mechanical response could be studied. The mechanical response data showed extreme sensitivity to relative density. We also observed at strains corresponding to 1 MPa a linear relationship between strain and initial density for all temperatures. Samples taken from parts with a history of thermal cycling demonstrated a stiffening response that was a function of temperature, with the trend of more stiffness as temperature increased above ambient. This observation is in agreement with the entropic effects on the thermo-mechanical behavior of silicone polymers. In this study, we present the experimental methods necessary for the development of a material model, the testing protocol, analysis of test data, and a discussion of load (stress) and gap (strain) as a function of sample initial densities and temperatures

  16. High temperature deformation of silicon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Calvillo, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.rodriguez@ctm.com.es [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Cataluna (Spain); Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain); Houbaert, Yvan, E-mail: Yvan.Houbaert@UGent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium); Petrov, Roumen, E-mail: Roumen.Petrov@ugent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium); Kestens, Leo, E-mail: Leo.kestens@ugent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium); Colas, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.colas@uanl.edu.mx [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Centro de Innovacion, Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The microstructure and texture development during high temperature plane strain compression of 2% in weight silicon steel was studied. The tests were carried out at a constant strain rate of 5 s{sup -1} with reductions of 25, 35 and 75% at temperatures varying from 800 to 1100 Degree-Sign C. The changes in microstructure and texture were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction. The microstructure close to the surface of the samples was equiaxed, which is attributed to the shear caused by friction, whereas that at the centre of the specimens was made of a mixture of elongated and fine equiaxed grains, the last ones attributed to the action of dynamic recovery followed by recrystallization. It was found that the volume fraction of these equiaxed grains augmented as reduction and temperature increased; a 0.7 volume fraction was accomplished with a 75% reduction at 1100 Degree-Sign C. The texture of the equiaxed and elongated grains was found to vary with the increase of deformation and temperature, as the {gamma}-fibre tends to disappear and the {alpha}-fibre to increase towards the higher temperature range. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The plastic deformation of a silicon containing steel is studied by plane strain compression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Equiaxed and elongated grains develop in different regions of the sample due to recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Texture, by EBSD, is revealed to be similar in either type of grains.

  17. Nanoslits in silicon chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref, Thomas; Brenner, Matthew; Bezryadin, Alexey

    2009-01-28

    Potassium hydroxide (KOH) etching of a patterned [100] oriented silicon wafer produces V-shaped etch pits. We demonstrate that the remaining thickness of silicon at the tip of the etch pit can be reduced to approximately 5 microm using an appropriately sized etch mask and optical feedback. Starting from such an etched chip, we have developed two different routes for fabricating 100 nm scale slits that penetrate through the macroscopic silicon chip (the slits are approximately 850 microm wide at one face of the chip and gradually narrow to approximately 100-200 nm wide at the opposite face of the chip). In the first process, the etched chips are sonicated to break the thin silicon at the tip of the etch pit and then further KOH etched to form a narrow slit. In the second process, focused ion beam milling is used to etch through the thin silicon at the tip of the etch pit. The first method has the advantage that it uses only low-resolution technology while the second method offers more control over the length and width of the slit. Our slits can be used for preparing mechanically stable, transmission electron microscopy samples compatible with electrical transport measurements or as nanostencils for depositing nanowires seamlessly connected to their contact pads.

  18. Origami-enabled deformable silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Rui; Huang, Hai; Liang, Hanshuang; Liang, Mengbing [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Tu, Hongen; Xu, Yong [Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne State University, 5050 Anthony Wayne Dr., Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Song, Zeming; Jiang, Hanqing, E-mail: hanqing.jiang@asu.edu [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Yu, Hongyu, E-mail: hongyu.yu@asu.edu [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2014-02-24

    Deformable electronics have found various applications and elastomeric materials have been widely used to reach flexibility and stretchability. In this Letter, we report an alternative approach to enable deformability through origami. In this approach, the deformability is achieved through folding and unfolding at the creases while the functional devices do not experience strain. We have demonstrated an example of origami-enabled silicon solar cells and showed that this solar cell can reach up to 644% areal compactness while maintaining reasonable good performance upon cyclic folding/unfolding. This approach opens an alternative direction of producing flexible, stretchable, and deformable electronics.

  19. Hybrid stretchable circuits on silicone substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, A., E-mail: adam.1.robinson@nokia.com; Aziz, A., E-mail: a.aziz1@lancaster.ac.uk [Nanoscience Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB01FF (United Kingdom); Liu, Q.; Suo, Z. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Lacour, S. P., E-mail: stephanie.lacour@epfl.ch [Centre for Neuroprosthetics and Laboratory for Soft Bioelectronics Interfaces, School of Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne 1015 (Switzerland)

    2014-04-14

    When rigid and stretchable components are integrated onto a single elastic carrier substrate, large strain heterogeneities appear in the vicinity of the deformable-non-deformable interfaces. In this paper, we report on a generic approach to manufacture hybrid stretchable circuits where commercial electronic components can be mounted on a stretchable circuit board. Similar to printed circuit board development, the components are electrically bonded on the elastic substrate and interconnected with stretchable electrical traces. The substrate—a silicone matrix carrying concentric rigid disks—ensures both the circuit elasticity and the mechanical integrity of the most fragile materials.

  20. Performance improvement of silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhafarov T. D.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the method is shown to improve the photovoltaic parameters of screen-printed silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon film formation on the frontal surface of the cell using the electrochemical etching. The possible mechanisms responsible for observed improvement of silicon solar cell performance are discussed.

  1. Silicon Bulk Micromachined Vibratory Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, T. K.; Gutierrez, R. C.; Wilcox, J. Z.; Stell, C.; Vorperian, V.; Calvet, R.; Li, W. J.; Charkaborty, I.; Bartman, R.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports on design, modeling, fabrication, and characterization of a novel silicon bulk micromachined vibratory rate gyroscope designed for microspacecraft applications. The new microgyroscope consists of a silicon four leaf cloverstructure with a post attached to the center.

  2. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  3. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Vollhardt, A

    2004-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a collider experiment at the new LHC at CERN/Switzerland. It is dedicated to measure precisely CP violation parameters in the B-system. The LHCb Silicon Tracker is covering the regions of the tracking detector with the highest particle fluences. The silicon sensors are wide pitch strip detectors connected to multi-channel analogue readout amplifiers. The analogue data is then digitized and transmitted optically to the counting room for further processing. The following paper describes R&D of the silicon sensors performed including testbeam data. We present readout chip performance followed by an overview of the used data transmission system, which has been designed for radiation tolerance and low cost.

  4. Integrated Silicon Optoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Horst K

    2010-01-01

    Integrated Silicon Optoelectronics synthesizes topics from optoelectronics and microelectronics. The book concentrates on silicon as the major base of modern semiconductor devices and circuits. Starting from the basics of optical emission and absorption, as well as from the device physics of photodetectors, the aspects of the integration of photodetectors in modern bipolar, CMOS, and BiCMOS technologies are discussed. Detailed descriptions of fabrication technologies and applications of optoelectronic integrated circuits are included. The book, furthermore, contains a review of the newest state of research on eagerly anticipated silicon light emitters. In order to cover the topics comprehensively, also included are integrated waveguides, gratings, and optoelectronic power devices. Numerous elaborate illustrations facilitate and enhance comprehension. This extended edition will be of value to engineers, physicists, and scientists in industry and at universities. The book is also recommended to graduate student...

  5. Neuromorphic silicon neuron circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo eIndiveri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain-machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance based Hodgkin-Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive Integrate and Fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips.

  6. Floating Silicon Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellerman, Peter

    2013-12-21

    The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a “Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies” grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

  7. Silicon containing copolymers

    CERN Document Server

    Amiri, Sahar; Amiri, Sanam

    2014-01-01

    Silicones have unique properties including thermal oxidative stability, low temperature flow, high compressibility, low surface tension, hydrophobicity and electric properties. These special properties have encouraged the exploration of alternative synthetic routes of well defined controlled microstructures of silicone copolymers, the subject of this Springer Brief. The authors explore the synthesis and characterization of notable block copolymers. Recent advances in controlled radical polymerization techniques leading to the facile synthesis of well-defined silicon based thermo reversible block copolymers?are described along with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), a technique utilized to develop well-defined functional thermo reversible block copolymers. The brief also focuses on Polyrotaxanes and their great potential as stimulus-responsive materials which produce poly (dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) based thermo reversible block copolymers.

  8. Adhesion to silicone rubber of yeasts and bacteria isolated from voice prostheses : Influence of salivary conditioning films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, HJ; GeertsemaDoornbusch, GI; vanderMei, HC

    Adhesion of yeasts and bacteria to silicone rubber is one of the first steps in the biodeterioration of silicone rubber voice prostheses. In this paper, adhesion of two streptococcal, staphylococcal, Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis strains, isolated from explanted voice prostheses was

  9. Compliant intracortical implants reduce strains and strain rates in brain tissue in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Arati; Nguyen, Jessica K.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2015-06-01

    Objective. The objective of this research is to characterize the mechanical interactions of (1) soft, compliant and (2) non-compliant implants with the surrounding brain tissue in a rodent brain. Understanding such interactions will enable the engineering of novel materials that will improve stability and reliability of brain implants. Approach. Acute force measurements were made using a load cell in n = 3 live rats, each with 4 craniotomies. Using an indentation method, brain tissue was tested for changes in force using established protocols. A total of 4 non-compliant, bare silicon microshanks, 3 non-compliant polyvinyl acetate (PVAc)-coated silicon microshanks, and 6 compliant, nanocomposite microshanks were tested. Stress values were calculated by dividing the force by surface area and strain was estimated using a linear stress-strain relationship. Micromotion effects from breathing and vascular pulsatility on tissue stress were estimated from a 5 s interval of steady-state measurements. Viscoelastic properties were estimated using a second-order Prony series expansion of stress-displacement curves for each shank. Main results. The distribution of strain values imposed on brain tissue for both compliant nanocomposite microshanks and PVAc-coated, non-compliant silicon microshanks were significantly lower compared to non-compliant bare silicon shanks. Interestingly, step-indentation experiments also showed that compliant, nanocomposite materials significantly decreased stress relaxation rates in the brain tissue at the interface (p brain tissue. Understanding the material behavior at the site of tissue contact will help to improve neural implant design.

  10. The Silicon Cube detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matea, I.; Adimi, N. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan - Universite Bordeaux 1 - UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Blank, B. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan - Universite Bordeaux 1 - UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France)], E-mail: blank@cenbg.in2p3.fr; Canchel, G.; Giovinazzo, J. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan - Universite Bordeaux 1 - UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Borge, M.J.G.; Dominguez-Reyes, R.; Tengblad, O. [Insto. Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Thomas, J.-C. [GANIL, CEA/DSM - CNRS/IN2P3, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

    2009-08-21

    A new experimental device, the Silicon Cube detector, consisting of six double-sided silicon strip detectors placed in a compact geometry was developed at CENBG. Having a very good angular coverage and high granularity, it allows simultaneous measurements of energy and angular distributions of charged particles emitted from unbound nuclear states. In addition, large-volume Germanium detectors can be placed close to the collection point of the radioactive species to be studied. The setup is ideally suited for isotope separation on-line (ISOL)-type experiments to study multi-particle emitters and was tested during an experiment at the low-energy beam line of SPIRAL at GANIL.

  11. Silicon detectors at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E. [University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97405-1274 (United States)], E-mail: jimbrau@uoregon.edu; Breidenbach, Martin [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Baltay, Charles [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States); Frey, Raymond E.; Strom, David M. [University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97405-1274 (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Silicon detectors are being developed for several applications in ILC detectors. These include vertex detection, tracking, electromagnetic calorimetry, and forward detectors. The advantages of silicon detector technology have been incorporated into a full detector design, SiD (the Silicon Detector). A brief overview of this effort is presented.

  12. Silicon quantum dots: surface matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dohnalová, K.; Gregorkiewicz, T.; Kůsová, K.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) hold great promise for many future technologies. Silicon is already at the core of photovoltaics and microelectronics, and SiQDs are capable of efficient light emission and amplification. This is crucial for the development of the next technological frontiers—silicon

  13. Stress effects in meso-porous silicon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lysenko, V.; Populaire, C.; Remaki, B.; Barbier, D. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere, UMR-5511 CNRS, INSA de Lyon, 7, avenue Jean Capelle, Bat. Blaise Pascal, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Champagnon, B. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de Materiaux Luminescents, UMR-5620 CNRS, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon I, 43 boulevard 11 novembre 1918, Bat. Lippmann, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Artmann, H.; Pannek, T. [Robert Bosch GmbH, FV/FLD, Postfach 10 60 50, 70049 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Mechanisms of strain and stress appearing in as-prepared and treated meso-porous silicon nanostructures are described. Stress effects induced by nano-pores filling with ethanol and capping of the porous nanostructures are observed by micro-Raman spectroscopy and discussed in details. Strong correlations between macroscopic and nanoscale stresses as well as with earlier X-ray measurements are found. Influence of stress on thermal properties of meso-porous silicon nanostructures is demonstrated. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Influence of impurity atmosphere on the deformation of silicon crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyuchnik, P. A.; Petukhov, B. V.

    2017-07-01

    The Alexander-Haasen theory, which describes the deformation kinetics of silicon crystals, has been generalized for impurity crystals. The deformation kinetics of an impurity sample is calculated in a wide range of parameters, including the cases of partial and complete entrainment of impurities by moving dislocations. The developed model, despite its simplicity, adequately describes the qualitative transformation of the stress-strain curves of impurity silicon crystals in dependence of the impurity concentration and other material parameters. The manifestation of negative velocity dependence of the yield stress, observed in natural experiments, is analyzed.

  15. Stretchable silicon nanoribbon electronics for skin prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaemin; Lee, Mincheol; Shim, Hyung Joon; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Cho, Hye Rim; Son, Donghee; Jung, Yei Hwan; Soh, Min; Choi, Changsoon; Jung, Sungmook; Chu, Kon; Jeon, Daejong; Lee, Soon-Tae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Choi, Seung Hong; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2014-12-01

    Sensory receptors in human skin transmit a wealth of tactile and thermal signals from external environments to the brain. Despite advances in our understanding of mechano- and thermosensation, replication of these unique sensory characteristics in artificial skin and prosthetics remains challenging. Recent efforts to develop smart prosthetics, which exploit rigid and/or semi-flexible pressure, strain and temperature sensors, provide promising routes for sensor-laden bionic systems, but with limited stretchability, detection range and spatio-temporal resolution. Here we demonstrate smart prosthetic skin instrumented with ultrathin, single crystalline silicon nanoribbon strain, pressure and temperature sensor arrays as well as associated humidity sensors, electroresistive heaters and stretchable multi-electrode arrays for nerve stimulation. This collection of stretchable sensors and actuators facilitate highly localized mechanical and thermal skin-like perception in response to external stimuli, thus providing unique opportunities for emerging classes of prostheses and peripheral nervous system interface technologies.

  16. Microfabricated photoplastic cantilever with integrated photoplastic/carbon based piezoresistive strain sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Lauge; Rasmussen, Peter Andreas; Calleja, M.

    2006-01-01

    We present an SU-8 micrometer sized cantilever strain sensor with an integrated piezoresistor made of a conductive composite of SU-8 polymer and carbon black particles. The composite has been developed using ultrasonic mixing. Cleanroom processing of the polymer composite has been investigated...... silicon and the gauge factor of the composite material is relatively high, this polymer based strain sensor is more sensitive than a similar silicon based cantilever sensor. (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics....

  17. Peculiarities of electronic structure of silicon-on-insulator structures and their interaction with synchrotron radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Terekhov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available SOI (silicon-on-insulator structures with strained and unstrained silicon layers were studied by ultrasoft X-ray emission spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy with the use of synchrotron radiation techniques. Analysis of X-ray data has shown a noticeable transformation of the electron energy spectrum and local partial density of states distribution in valence and conduction bands in the strained silicon layer of the SOI structure. USXES Si L2,3 spectra analysis revealed a decrease of the distance between the L2v′ и L1v points in the valence band of the strained silicon layer as well as a shift of the first two maxima of the XANES first derivation spectra to the higher energies with respect to conduction band bottom Ec. At the same time the X-ray standing waves of synchrotron radiation (λ~12–20 nm are formed in the silicon-on-insulator structure with and without strains of the silicon layer. Moreover changing the synchrotron radiation grazing angle θ by 2° leads to a change of the electromagnetic field phase to the opposite.

  18. Nanoscale strained-Si MOSFET physics and modeling approaches: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhry, Amit; Joshi, Garima [University Institute of Engineering and Technology, Panjab University, Chandigarh 91160047 (India); Roy, J. N., E-mail: amit_chaudhry01@yahoo.co [Solar Semiconductor Private Limited, Hyderabad 91510001 (India)

    2010-10-15

    An attempt has been made to give a detailed review of strained silicon technology. Various device models have been studied that consider the effect of strain on the devices, and comparisons have been drawn. A review of some modeling issues in strained silicon technology has also been outlined. The review indicates that this technology is very much required in nanoscale MOSFETs due to its several potential benefits, and there is a strong need for an analytical model which describes the complete physics of the strain technology. (semiconductor devices)

  19. ALICE Silicon Strip Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) constitutes the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE Experiment. The SSD plays a crucial role in the tracking of the particles produced in the collisions connecting the tracks from the external detectors (Time Projection Chamber) to the ITS. The SSD also contributes to the particle identification through the measurement of their energy loss.

  20. Silicone/Acrylate Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Two-step process forms silicone/acrylate copolymers. Resulting acrylate functional fluid is reacted with other ingredients to produce copolymer. Films of polymer were formed by simply pouring or spraying mixture and allowing solvent to evaporate. Films showed good weatherability. Durable, clear polymer films protect photovoltaic cells.

  1. On nanostructured silicon success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2016-01-01

    Recent Letters by Piggott et al. 1 and Shen et al. 2 claim the smallest ever dielectric wave length and polarization splitters. The associated News & Views article by Aydin3 states that these works “are the first experimental demonstration of on-chip, silicon photonic components based on complex ...

  2. DELPHI Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    DELPHI was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The silicon tracking detector was nearest to the collision point in the centre of the detector. It was used to pinpoint the collision and catch short-lived particles.

  3. ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Manzari, V

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the innermost two layers of the 6-layer barrel Inner Tracking System (ITS). The SPD plays a key role in the determination of the position of the primary collision and in the reconstruction of the secondary vertices from particle decays.

  4. Silicon in cereal straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murozuka, Emiko

    Silicon (Si) is known to be a beneficial element for plants. However, when plant residues are to be used as feedstock for second generation bioenergy, Si may reduce the suitability of the biomass for biochemical or thermal conversion technologies. The objective of this PhD study was to investigate...

  5. Electrometallurgy of Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    on record is that of St. Claire DeVille, who claimed that silicon was produced by electrolysing an impure melt of NaAlC14, but his material did not...this composition and purified melts were electrolysed at about 14500C in graphite crucible and using graphite electrodes. Applied potentials were

  6. OPAL Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  7. Hybrid silicon ring lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Di; Fiorentino, Marco; Bowers, John E.; Beausoleil, Raymond G.

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid silicon platform provides a solution to integrate active components (lasers, amplifiers, photodetectors, etc.) with passive ones on the same silicon substrate, which can be used for building an optical interconnect system. Owing to the advantages in footprint, power consumption, and high-speed modulation, hybrid silicon microring lasers have been demonstrated as a potential candidate for on-chip silicon light source. In this paper we review the progress to improve the performance of recently demonstrated compact microring lasers with ring diameter of 50 μm. A simple approach to enhance optical mode and electron-hole recombination, which results in threshold reduction and efficiency improvement is developed. This is done by appropriately undercutting the multiple quantum well (MQW) region to force carriers to flow towards the outer edge of the microring for better gain/optical mode overlap. We observe a reduction of the threshold of over 20% and up to 80% output power enhancement. The model and the experimental results highlight the benefits, as well as the negative effects from excessive undercutting, including lower MQW confinement, higher modal loss and higher thermal impedance. A design rule for MQW undercutting is therefore provided. Application as on-chip optical interconnects is discussed from a system perspective.

  8. Silicon in beer and brewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Troy R; Bamforth, Charles W

    2010-04-15

    It has been claimed that beer is one of the richest sources of silicon in the diet; however, little is known of the relationship between silicon content and beer style and the manner in which beer is produced. The purpose of this study was to measure silicon in a diversity of beers and ascertain the grist selection and brewing factors that impact the level of silicon obtained in beer. Commercial beers ranged from 6.4 to 56.5 mg L(-1) in silicon. Products derived from a grist of barley tended to contain more silicon than did those from a wheat-based grist, likely because of the high levels of silica in the retained husk layer of barley. Hops contain substantially more silicon than does grain, but quantitatively hops make a much smaller contribution than malt to the production of beer and therefore relatively less silicon in beer derives from them. During brewing the vast majority of the silicon remains with the spent grains; however, aggressive treatment during wort production in the brewhouse leads to increased extraction of silicon into wort and much of this survives into beer. It is confirmed that beer is a very rich source of silicon. (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Formation of silicon nanoparticles from high temperature annealed silicon rich silicon oxynitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaoui, Abdelilah; Ehrhardt, Fabien; Delachat, Florian; Ferblantier, Gérald; Muller, Dominique

    2012-10-01

    Silicon rich silicon oxynitride layers were deposited by ECR-PECVD in order to form silicon nanoparticles upon high thermal annealing at 1100°C. The effect of the gas precursor type and flows on the atomic composition and the structural properties was assessed by RBS and ERDA analysis as well as by Raman spectroscopy. The morphological and crystalline properties of the resulting nanoparticles were investigated by TEM analysis. We have found that the silicon nanoparticules average size and the crystalline fraction depend strongly on the silicon excess in the SiN and SiON layer.

  10. Silicon Carbide Capacitive High Temperature MEMS Strain Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    it is a little difficult to measure using traditional methods. One option could be using the 72 Wheatstone bridge method. Although this method is...commonly used for resistive bridges , it can be adapted to inductive or capacitive bridges . The more difficult task that lies ahead is attachment

  11. Simulation Research on Micro Contact Based on Force in Silicon Wafer Rotation Grinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qinglei; Wei, Xin; Xie, Xiaozhu; Hu, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Silicon wafer rotation grinding with cup type diamond wheel is a typical ultra precision grinding process. In this paper, a simulation model based on force for micro contact between wheel micro unit and silicon wafer is established from the stable ductile grinding process. Micro contact process in grinding is simulated using the nonlinear explicit finite element analysis software LS-DYNA. The stress-strain results on silicon wafer and wheel micro unit are analyzed by finite element method. The results show that the critical displacement and load corresponding elastic to plastic - plastic to brittle exist on silicon wafer. In silicon plastic zone tangential sliding can produce plastic groove and uplift. Wear of wheel micro unit can be based on the simulation data to judge. The research provides support for wafer grinding and wheel wear mechanism.

  12. Recent advances in silicon photonic integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Davenport, Michael; Hulme, Jared; Liu, Alan Y.; Santis, Christos T.; Spott, Alexander; Srinivasan, Sudharsanan; Stanton, Eric J.; Zhang, Chong

    2016-02-01

    We review recent breakthroughs in silicon photonics technology and components and describe progress in silicon photonic integrated circuits. Heterogeneous silicon photonics has recently demonstrated performance that significantly outperforms native III-V components. The impact active silicon photonic integrated circuits could have on interconnects, telecommunications, sensors and silicon electronics is reviewed.

  13. Silicon oxidation by ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Christian K; Jenkins, Stephen J [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Nakamura, Ken; Ichimura, Shingo [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)], E-mail: sjj24@cam.ac.uk

    2009-05-06

    Understanding the oxidation of silicon has been an ongoing challenge for many decades. Ozone has recently received considerable attention as an alternative oxidant in the low temperature, damage-free oxidation of silicon. The ozone-grown oxide was also found to exhibit improved interface and electrical characteristics over a conventionally dioxygen-grown oxide. In this review article, we summarize the key findings about this alternative oxidation process. We discuss the different methods of O{sub 3} generation, and the advantages of the ozone-grown Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. An understanding of the growth characteristics is of utmost importance for obtaining control over this alternative oxidation process. (topical review)

  14. Silicon Carbide Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    The status of emerging silicon carbide (SiC) widebandgap semiconductor electronics technology is briefly surveyed. SiC-based electronic devices and circuits are being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot function. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are briefly illustrated for several applications. However, most of these operational benefits of SiC have yet to be realized in actual systems, primarily owing to the fact that the growth techniques of SiC crystals are relatively immature and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for widespread, reliable commercial use. Key crystal growth and device fabrication issues that limit the performance and capability of high-temperature and/or high-power SiC electronics are identified. The electrical and material quality differences between emerging SiC and mature silicon electronics technology are highlighted.

  15. Electron beam silicon purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravtsov, Anatoly [SIA ' ' KEPP EU' ' , Riga (Latvia); Kravtsov, Alexey [' ' KEPP-service' ' Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Purification of heavily doped electronic grade silicon by evaporation of N-type impurities with electron beam heating was investigated in process with a batch weight up to 50 kilos. Effective temperature of the melt, an indicative parameter suitable for purification process characterization was calculated and appeared to be stable for different load weight processes. Purified material was successfully approbated in standard CZ processes of three different companies. Each company used its standard process and obtained CZ monocrystals applicable for photovoltaic application. These facts enable process to be successfully scaled up to commercial volumes (150-300 kg) and yield solar grade silicon. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Silicone breast implants: complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwuagwu, F C; Frame, J D

    1997-12-01

    Silicone breast implants have been used for augmentation mammoplasty for cosmetic purposes as well as for breast reconstruction following mastectomy for more than three decades. Though the use of the silicone gel filled variety has been banned in the USA except for special cases, they continue to be available elsewhere in the world including the UK. Despite the immense benefit they provide, their usage is associated with some complications. Most of these are related to the surgery and can be reduced by good surgical management. The major complications associated with their use is adverse capsular contracture, an outcome which can be very frustrating to manage. This article reviews the commonly reported complications and suggested management alternatives.

  17. Silicon nanowire transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Bindal, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the n and p-channel Silicon Nanowire Transistor (SNT) designs with single and dual-work functions, emphasizing low static and dynamic power consumption. The authors describe a process flow for fabrication and generate SPICE models for building various digital and analog circuits. These include an SRAM, a baseband spread spectrum transmitter, a neuron cell and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform in the digital domain, as well as high bandwidth single-stage and operational amplifiers, RF communication circuits in the analog domain, in order to show this technology’s true potential for the next generation VLSI. Describes Silicon Nanowire (SNW) Transistors, as vertically constructed MOS n and p-channel transistors, with low static and dynamic power consumption and small layout footprint; Targets System-on-Chip (SoC) design, supporting very high transistor count (ULSI), minimal power consumption requiring inexpensive substrates for packaging; Enables fabrication of different types...

  18. Electrons in silicon microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R E; Jackel, L D; Mankiewich, P M; Skocpol, W J

    1986-01-24

    Silicon microstructures only a few hundred atoms wide can be fabricated and used to study electron transport in narrow channels. Spatially localized voltage probes as close together as 0.1 micrometer can be used to investigate a variety of physical phenomena, including velocity saturation due to phonon emission, the local potentials caused by scattering from a single trapped electron, and quantum tunneling or hopping among very few electron states.

  19. Bringing Silicon Valley inside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, G

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, Silicon Valley companies produced 41 IPOs, which by January 1999 had a combined market capitalization of $27 billion--that works out to $54,000 in new wealth creation per worker in a single year. Multiply the number of employees in your company by $54,000. Did your business create that much new wealth last year? Half that amount? It's not a group of geniuses generating such riches. It's a business model. In Silicon Valley, ideas, capital, and talent circulate freely, gathering into whatever combinations are most likely to generate innovation and wealth. Unlike most traditional companies, which spend their energy in resource allocation--a system designed to avoid failure--the Valley operates through resource attraction--a system that nurtures innovation. In a traditional company, people with innovative ideas must go hat in hand to the guardians of the old ideas for funding and for staff. But in Silicon Valley, a slew of venture capitalists vie to attract the best new ideas, infusing relatively small amounts of capital into a portfolio of ventures. And talent is free to go to the companies offering the most exhilarating work and the greatest potential rewards. It should actually be easier for large, traditional companies to set up similar markets for capital, ideas, and talent internally. After all, big companies often already have extensive capital, marketing, and distribution resources, and a first crack at the talent in their own ranks. And some of them are doing it. The choice is yours--you can do your best to make sure you never put a dollar of capital at risk, or you can tap into the kind of wealth that's being created every day in Silicon Valley.

  20. Structure of Silicon Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Jun; Bahel, Atul; Ramakrishna, Mushti V.

    1995-01-01

    We determined the structures of silicon clusters in the 11-14 atom size range using the tight-binding molecular dynamics method. These calculations reveal that \\Si{11} is an icosahedron with one missing cap, \\Si{12} is a complete icosahedron, \\Si{13} is a surface capped icosahedron, and \\Si{14} is a 4-4-4 layer structure with two caps. The characteristic feature of these clusters is that they are all surface.

  1. Dynamic Silicon Nanophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    the waveguide. Furthermore, the design is fabricated using standard contact’s/via’s in a CMOS process (i.e. that traditionally connect metal layers to...process steps or even materials. It directly makes use of the standard metal contacts/via’s used to connect upper Metal layers to the active Silicon...Low-Voltage Lithium Niobate Electro-Optic Modulator,” In Preparation PERSONNEL SUPPORTED The following personnel have been supported by the YIP

  2. Radiation Hardening of Silicon Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Leroy, C; Glaser, M

    2002-01-01

    %RD48 %title\\\\ \\\\Silicon detectors will be widely used in experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider where high radiation levels will cause significant bulk damage. In addition to increased leakage current and charge collection losses worsening the signal to noise, the induced radiation damage changes the effective doping concentration and represents the limiting factor to long term operation of silicon detectors. The objectives are to develop radiation hard silicon detectors that can operate beyond the limits of the present devices and that ensure guaranteed operation for the whole lifetime of the LHC experimental programme. Radiation induced defect modelling and experimental results show that the silicon radiation hardness depends on the atomic impurities present in the initial monocrystalline material.\\\\ \\\\ Float zone (FZ) silicon materials with addition of oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, germanium and tin were produced as well as epitaxial silicon materials with epilayers up to 200 $\\mu$m thickness. Their im...

  3. Silicon photonics fundamentals and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Deen, M Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The creation of affordable high speed optical communications using standard semiconductor manufacturing technology is a principal aim of silicon photonics research. This would involve replacing copper connections with optical fibres or waveguides, and electrons with photons. With applications such as telecommunications and information processing, light detection, spectroscopy, holography and robotics, silicon photonics has the potential to revolutionise electronic-only systems. Providing an overview of the physics, technology and device operation of photonic devices using exclusively silicon and related alloys, the book includes: * Basic Properties of Silicon * Quantum Wells, Wires, Dots and Superlattices * Absorption Processes in Semiconductors * Light Emitters in Silicon * Photodetectors , Photodiodes and Phototransistors * Raman Lasers including Raman Scattering * Guided Lightwaves * Planar Waveguide Devices * Fabrication Techniques and Material Systems Silicon Photonics: Fundamentals and Devices outlines ...

  4. Materials characterization and fracture mechanics of a space grade dielectric silicone insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Latif, A. I.; Tweedie, A. T.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the DC 93-500 high voltage silicone insulation material employed to pot the gun and the collector end of a traveling wave tube (TWT) used on the Landsat D Satellite. The fracture mechanics behavior of the silicone resin was evaluated by measuring the slow crack velocity as a function of the opening mode of the stress intensity factor at +25 and -10 C, taking into account various uniaxial discrete strain values. It was found that the silicone resins slow crack growth is faster than that for a high voltage insulation polyurethane material at the same stress intensity factor value and room temperature.

  5. Epitaxial Silicon Doped With Antimony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, James E.; Halleck, Bradley L.

    1996-01-01

    High-purity epitaxial silicon doped with antimony made by chemical vapor deposition, using antimony pentachloride (SbCI5) as source of dopant and SiH4, SiCI2H2, or another conventional source of silicon. High purity achieved in layers of arbitrary thickness. Epitaxial silicon doped with antimony needed to fabricate impurity-band-conduction photodetectors operating at wavelengths from 2.5 to 40 micrometers.

  6. Radiation hardening of silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lemeilleur, F

    1999-01-01

    The radiation hardness of high grade silicon detectors is summarized in terms of an increase of the diode reverse current and evolution of the full depletion voltage and charge collection efficiency. With the aim of improving their radiation tolerance, detectors have been produced from non-standard, float-zone silicon containing various atomic impurities and from epitaxial silicon materials. Some recent results concerning their radiation hardness are presented. (15 refs).

  7. Atomic Layer Epitaxial Growth of Gaas on Porous Silicon Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Lajnef; Afrah Bardaoui; Isabelle Sagne; Radwan Chtouroua; Hatem Ezzaouia

    2008-01-01

    GaAs thin film has been grown on porous silicon by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) for different growth temperatures using atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) technique. The morphology of GaAs layer was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effect of growth temperature is studied using photoluminescence measurements (PL).The photoluminescence spectra revealed a dissymmetry form toward high energies attributed to strain effect resulting from the lattice mismatch between Ga...

  8. Effects of radiation damage on the silicon lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Katherine A.; Lowry, Lynn; Russo, O. Louis

    1987-01-01

    Silicon was irradiated with both proton and electron particle beams in order to investigate changes in the structural and optical properties of the lattice as a result of the radiation damage. Lattice expansions occurred when large strain fields (+0.34 percent) developed after 1- and 3-MeV proton bombardment. The strain was a factor of three less after 1-MeV electron irradiation. Average increases of approximately 22 meV in the 3.46-eV interband energy gap and 14 meV in the Lorentz broadening parameter were measured after the electron irradiation.

  9. Silicon processing for photovoltaics II

    CERN Document Server

    Khattak, CP

    2012-01-01

    The processing of semiconductor silicon for manufacturing low cost photovoltaic products has been a field of increasing activity over the past decade and a number of papers have been published in the technical literature. This volume presents comprehensive, in-depth reviews on some of the key technologies developed for processing silicon for photovoltaic applications. It is complementary to Volume 5 in this series and together they provide the only collection of reviews in silicon photovoltaics available.The volume contains papers on: the effect of introducing grain boundaries in silicon; the

  10. Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Breast Implants Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Description: Silicone gel-filled breast implants have a silicone outer shell ...

  11. Expanding the Ge emission wavelength to 2.25 μm with Si{sub x}N{sub y} strain engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millar, R.W.; Gallacher, K.; Samarelli, A. [University of Glasgow, School of Engineering, Rankine Building, Oakfield Avenue, Glasgow G12 8LT, Scotland (United Kingdom); Frigerio, J.; Chrastina, D. [L-NESS, Politecnico di Milano, Via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy); Dieing, T. [WITec Wissenschaftliche, Instrumente und Technologie GmbH, Lise-Meitner-Str. 6, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Isella, G. [L-NESS, Politecnico di Milano, Via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy); Paul, D.J., E-mail: Douglas.Paul@glasgow.ac.uk [University of Glasgow, School of Engineering, Rankine Building, Oakfield Avenue, Glasgow G12 8LT, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-01

    Photoluminescence up to 2.25 μm wavelength is demonstrated from Ge nanopillars strained by silicon nitride stressor layers. Tensile biaxial equivalent strains of up to ~ 1.35% and ~ 0.9% are shown from 200 × 200 nm, and 300 × 300 nm square top Ge pillars respectively. Strain in the latter is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, and supported by finite element modelling, which gives an insight into the strain distribution and its effect on the band structure, in pillar structures fully coated by silicon nitride stressor layers. - Highlights: • Ge nanopillar structures were fabricated using electron beam lithography. • The structures were strained by silicon nitride stressor layers. • Photoluminescence was measured to determine the band-edge of the strained pillars. • Raman measurements were taken to confirm high levels of strain. • Finite element modelling was used to calculate strain distributions.

  12. Strained Silicon and Silicon-GermaniumNanowire Tunnel FETs and Inverters

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Reducing power consumption is an important issue for integrated circuits in portable devicesrelying on batteries and systems without external power supply. Scaling of the supply voltageVDD in integrated circuits is a powerful tool for reducing the power consumption, due to thequadratic dependence on VDD. MOSFETs, however, exhibit a fundamental limitation forthe drain current increase per applied gate voltage difference. The tunnel field-effect transistor(TFET) provides the ability for beating...

  13. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz. 1 m and 25 m, and a sintered silicon carbide (SSiC) are reported. The RIF experiments were conducted using a Vicker's ...

  14. Numerical method for a 2D drift diffusion model arising in strained n ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper reports the calculation of electron transport in metal oxide semiconductor field effects transistors (MOSFETs) with biaxially tensile strained silicon channel. The calculation is formulated based on two-dimensional drift diffusion model (DDM) including strain effects. The carrier mobility dependence on the ...

  15. Numerical method for a 2D drift diffusion model arising in strained n ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper reports the calculation of electron transport in metal oxide semiconductor field effects transistors (MOSFETs) with biaxially tensile strained silicon channel. The calculation is formulated based on two-dimensional drift diffusion model (DDM) including strain effects. The carrier mobility dependence on the lateral and ...

  16. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1996-01-01

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  17. Nanoindentation Response Analysis of Thin Film Substrates-II: Strain Hardening-Softening Oscillations in Subsurface Layer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Uldis Kanders; Karlis Kanders

    2017-01-01

    ...: bearing and tooling steels, silicon, glasses, and fused silica. Oscillations of the stress-strain field gradient and divergence induced in the subsurface layer by the nanoindentation have been revealed...

  18. Towards establishing broad-spectrum disease resistance in plants: silicon leads the way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bockhaven, Jonas; De Vleesschauwer, David; Höfte, Monica

    2013-03-01

    Plants are constantly threatened by a wide array of microbial pathogens. Pathogen invasion can lead to vast yield losses and the demand for sustainable plant-protection strategies has never been greater. Chemical plant activators and selected strains of rhizobacteria can increase resistance against specific types of pathogens but these treatments are often ineffective or even cause susceptibility against others. Silicon application is one of the scarce examples of a treatment that effectively induces broad-spectrum disease resistance. The prophylactic effect of silicon is considered to be the result of both passive and active defences. Although the phenomenon has been known for decades, very little is known about the molecular basis of silicon-afforded disease control. By combining knowledge on how silicon interacts with cell metabolism in diatoms and plants, this review describes silicon-induced regulatory mechanisms that might account for broad-spectrum plant disease resistance. Priming of plant immune responses, alterations in phytohormone homeostasis, regulation of iron homeostasis, silicon-driven photorespiration and interaction with defence signalling components all are potential mechanisms involved in regulating silicon-triggered resistance responses. Further elucidating how silicon exerts its beneficial properties may create new avenues for developing plants that are better able to withstand multiple attackers.

  19. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Elsasser, Ch; Gallas Torreira, A; Pérez Trigo, A; Rodríguez Pérez, P; Bay, A; Blanc, F; Dupertuis, F; Haefeli, G; Komarov, I; Märki, R; Muster, B; Nakada, T; Schneider, O; Tobin, M; Tran, M T; Anderson, J; Bursche, A; Chiapolini, N; Saornil, S; Steiner, S; Steinkamp, O; Straumann, U; Vollhardt, A; Britsch, M; Schmelling, M; Voss, H; Okhrimenko, O; Pugatch, V

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the LHCb experiment is to study rare heavy quark decays and CP vio- lation with the high rate of beauty and charmed hadrons produced in $pp$ collisions at the LHC. The detector is designed as a single-arm forward spectrometer with excellent tracking and particle identification performance. The Silicon Tracker is a key part of the tracking system to measure the particle trajectories to high precision. This paper reports the performance as well as the results of the radiation damage monitoring based on leakage currents and on charge collection efficiency scans during the data taking in the LHC Run I.

  20. Edgeless silicon pad detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perea Solano, B. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)]. E-mail: blanca.perea.solano@cern.ch; Abreu, M.C. [LIP and University of Algarve, 8000 Faro (Portugal); Avati, V. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Boccali, T. [INFN Sez. di Pisa and Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Boccone, V. [INFN Sez. di Genova and Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Bozzo, M. [INFN Sez. di Genova and Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Capra, R. [INFN Sez. di Genova and Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Casagrande, L. [INFN Sez. di Roma 2 and Universita di Roma 2, Rome (Italy); Chen, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Eggert, K. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Heijne, E. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Klauke, S. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Li, Z. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Maeki, T. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Mirabito, L. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Morelli, A. [INFN Sez. di Genova and Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Niinikoski, T.O. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Oljemark, F. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Palmieri, V.G. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Rato Mendes, P. [LIP and University of Algarve, 8000 Faro (Portugal); Rodrigues, S. [LIP and University of Algarve, 8000 Faro (Portugal); Siegrist, P. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Silvestris, L. [INFN Sez. Di Bari, Bari (Italy); Sousa, P. [LIP and University of Algarve, 8000 Faro (Portugal); Tapprogge, S. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Trocme, B. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Villeurbanne (France)

    2006-05-01

    We report measurements in a high-energy pion beam of the sensitivity of the edge region in 'edgeless' planar silicon pad diode detectors diced through their contact implants. A large surface current on such an edge prevents the normal reverse biasing of the device, but the current can be sufficiently reduced by the use of a suitable cutting method, followed by edge treatment, and by operating the detector at low temperature. The depth of the dead layer at the diced edge is measured to be (12.5{+-}8{sub stat.}.{+-}6{sub syst.}) {mu}m.

  1. Edgeless silicon pad detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea Solano, B.; Abreu, M. C.; Avati, V.; Boccali, T.; Boccone, V.; Bozzo, M.; Capra, R.; Casagrande, L.; Chen, W.; Eggert, K.; Heijne, E.; Klauke, S.; Li, Z.; Mäki, T.; Mirabito, L.; Morelli, A.; Niinikoski, T. O.; Oljemark, F.; Palmieri, V. G.; Rato Mendes, P.; Rodrigues, S.; Siegrist, P.; Silvestris, L.; Sousa, P.; Tapprogge, S.; Trocmé, B.

    2006-05-01

    We report measurements in a high-energy pion beam of the sensitivity of the edge region in "edgeless" planar silicon pad diode detectors diced through their contact implants. A large surface current on such an edge prevents the normal reverse biasing of the device, but the current can be sufficiently reduced by the use of a suitable cutting method, followed by edge treatment, and by operating the detector at low temperature. The depth of the dead layer at the diced edge is measured to be (12.5±8 stat..±6 syst.) μm.

  2. Impurity doping processes in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, FFY

    1981-01-01

    This book introduces to non-experts several important processes of impurity doping in silicon and goes on to discuss the methods of determination of the concentration of dopants in silicon. The conventional method used is the discussion process, but, since it has been sufficiently covered in many texts, this work describes the double-diffusion method.

  3. Muscle strain treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  4. Muscle strain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  5. Silicon-micromachined microchannel plates

    CERN Document Server

    Beetz, C P; Steinbeck, J; Lemieux, B; Winn, D R

    2000-01-01

    Microchannel plates (MCP) fabricated from standard silicon wafer substrates using a novel silicon micromachining process, together with standard silicon photolithographic process steps, are described. The resulting SiMCP microchannels have dimensions of approx 0.5 to approx 25 mu m, with aspect ratios up to 300, and have the dimensional precision and absence of interstitial defects characteristic of photolithographic processing, compatible with positional matching to silicon electronics readouts. The open channel areal fraction and detection efficiency may exceed 90% on plates up to 300 mm in diameter. The resulting silicon substrates can be converted entirely to amorphous quartz (qMCP). The strip resistance and secondary emission are developed by controlled depositions of thin films, at temperatures up to 1200 deg. C, also compatible with high-temperature brazing, and can be essentially hydrogen, water and radionuclide-free. Novel secondary emitters and cesiated photocathodes can be high-temperature deposite...

  6. Etched silicon gratings for NGST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, J.; Ciarlo, D.; Kuzmenko, P.; Macintosh, B.; Alcock, C.; Cook, K.

    1999-10-28

    The authors have developed the world's first etched silicon grisms at LLNL in September 1999. The high optical surface quality of the grisms allows diffraction-limited spectral resolution in the IR wavelengths where silicon has good transmission. They estimated that the scattering light level is less than 4% at 2.2 {micro}m. Silicon can significantly increase the dispersive power of spectroscopic instruments for NGST due to its very large refractive index (n = 3.4). For example, a silicon grism with 40 mm clear entrance aperture and a 46 wedge angle can provide R = 10,000--100,000 in {approximately} 1--10 {micro}m. The same grating working in the immersed reflection mode can provide {approximately} three times higher spectral resolution than in the transmission mode. To achieve a desired spectral resolution for NGST, the spectrograph size and weight can be significantly reduced if silicon gratings are used instead of conventional gratings.

  7. Strained Si/SiGe MOS transistor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Pešić-Brđanin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a new model of surfacechannel strained-Si/SiGe MOSFET based on the extension of non-quasi-static (NQS circuit model previously derived for bulk-Si devices. Basic equations of the NQS model have been modified to account for the new physical parameters of strained-Si and relaxed-SiGe layers. From the comparisons with measurements, it is shown that a modified NQS MOS including steady-state self heating can accurately predict DC characteristics of Strained Silicon MOSFETs.

  8. Micromachined silicon seismic transducers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Armour, D.L.; Fleming, R.P.

    1995-08-01

    Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of CTBT monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily depolyable sensor arrays. Although our goal is to fabricate seismic sensors that provide the same performance level as the current state-of-the-art ``macro`` systems, if necessary one could deploy a larger number of these small sensors at closer proximity to the location being monitored in order to compensate for lower performance. We have chosen a modified pendulum design and are manufacturing prototypes in two different silicon micromachining fabrication technologies. The first set of prototypes, fabricated in our advanced surface- micromachining technology, are currently being packaged for testing in servo circuits -- we anticipate that these devices, which have masses in the 1--10 {mu}g range, will resolve sub-mG signals. Concurrently, we are developing a novel ``mold`` micromachining technology that promises to make proof masses in the 1--10 mg range possible -- our calculations indicate that devices made in this new technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach to 10{sup {minus}10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

  9. Microplasticity of silicon crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozhzhin, A. I.; Sidel'Nikov, I. V.; Antipov, S. A.; Sedykh, N. K.

    1980-05-01

    The low-frequency (˜1 Hz) internal friction (Q-1) method was used to study the microplasticity of silicon whisker crystals grown by the method of chemical gas-transport reactions in a closed ampoule. A study was made of p-type crystals with the growth axis , 1 60 μ in diameter, working length 1 3 mm, both in the original state and after plastic (γ ˜ 1%) deformtion by torsion. The temperature and amplitude dependences of Q-1 were studied in ˜5·10-5 torr vacuum. The amplitude of alternating vibrations was within the range ˜10-5 10-3 and the axial stresses were ˜106 107 N/m2. The experimental results led to the conclusion that the microplasticity of undeformed silicon whiskers was due to heterogeneous nucleation of dislocations in stress concentration regions near surface defects, assisted by thermal fluctuations. In deformed whiskers the microplasticity was attributed to the nucleation and motion along dislocations of single and double thermal kinks in accordance with the Seeger model.

  10. The Silicon Lattice Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J

    2003-11-24

    Previously, the generalized luminosity L was defined and calculated for all incident channels based on an NLC e{sup +}e{sup -} design. Alternatives were then considered to improve the differing beam-beam effects in the e{sup -}e{sup -}, e{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma} channels. One example was tensor beams composed of bunchlets n{sub ijk} implemented with a laser-driven, silicon accelerator based on micromachining techniques. Problems were considered and expressions given for radiative broadening due to bunchlet manipulation near the final focus to optimize luminosity via charge enhancement, neutralization or bunch shaping. Because the results were promising, we explore fully integrated structures that include sources, optics (for both light and particles) and acceleration in a common format--an accelerator-on-chip. Acceptable materials (and wavelengths) must allow velocity synchronism between many laser and electron pulses with optimal efficiency in high radiation environments. There are obvious control and cost advantages that accrue from using silicon structures if radiation effects can be made acceptable and the structures fabricated. Tests related to deep etching, fabrication and radiation effects on candidate amorphous and crystalline materials indicate Si(1.2 < {lambda}{sub L} < 10 {micro}m) and fused c-SiO{sub 2}(0.3 < {lambda}{sub L} < 4 {micro}m) to be ideal.

  11. Selective emitter using porous silicon for crystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Inyong; Kim, Kyunghae; Kim, Youngkuk; Han, Kyumin; Kyeong, Doheon; Kwon, Taeyoung; Vinh Ai, Dao; Lee, Jeongchul; Yi, Junsin [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon-City, Kyunggi-Do 440-746 (Korea); Thamilselvan, M. [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon-City, Kyunggi-Do 440-746 (Korea); Government College of Technology, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu (India); Ju, Minkyu; Lee, Kyungsoo [KPE Ins. Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon-City, Kyunggi-Do 440-746 (Korea)

    2009-06-15

    This study is devoted to the formation of high-low-level-doped selective emitter for crystalline silicon solar cells for photovoltaic application. We report here the formation of porous silicon under chemical reaction condition. The chemical mixture containing hydrofluoric and nitric acid, with de-ionized water, was used to make porous on the half of the silicon surface of size 125 x 125 cm. Porous and non-porous areas each share half of the whole silicon surface. H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}:methanol gives the best deposited layer with acceptable adherence and uniformity on the non-porous and porous areas of the silicon surface to get high- and low-level-doped regions. The volume concentration of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} does not exceed 10% of the total volume emulsion. Phosphoric acid was used as an n-type doping source to make emitter for silicon solar cells. The measured emitter sheet resistances at the high- and low-level-doped regions were 30-35 and 97-474 {omega}/{open_square} respectively. A simple process for low- and high-level doping has been achieved by forming porous and porous-free silicon surface, in this study, which could be applied for solar cells selective emitter doping. (author)

  12. Stoichiometry of silicon-rich dielectrics for silicon nanocluster formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Jorge; Morales, Alfredo; Dominguez, Carlos [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, IMB-CNM (CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Peralvarez, Mariano; Garrido, Blas [EME, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-03-15

    Silicon photonics has been bred by several techniques including Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) and ion implantation amongst others in order to synthesize silicon nanoclusters with CMOS-compatible technologies. Most of these techniques end up relying on the formation of nanoclusters through the diffusion and segregation of silicon atoms in a silicon-rich dielectric matrix. In this work we present a parallel analysis on silicon rich dielectric layers obtained by different methods. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, ellipsometry and photoluminescence are used to characterize Low Pressure CVD and Plasma Enhanced CVD samples in the same theoretical silicon excess range. The analysis shows that independently on the obtaining method the initial concentration of silicon excess can be used to estimate some properties. The actual binding of the atoms can change as well regardless of their initial quantity. However secondary parameters such as the obtaining temperature and the nitrogen concentration in the layer have to be taken into account. Therefore, experimental parameters such as the flow ratio between reactant gases or the refractive index prove to be insufficient if samples obtained by different methods are compared. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    1999-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  14. A silicon microwire under a three-dimensional anisotropic tensile stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Xiaoyu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Poilvert, Nicolas [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Liu, Wenjun [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Xiong, Yihuang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Cheng, Hiu Yan [Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Badding, John V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Dabo, Ismaila [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Gopalan, Venkatraman [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA

    2017-02-27

    Three-dimensional tensile stress, or triaxial tensile stress, is difficult to achieve in a material. We present the investigation of an unusual three-dimensional anisotropic tensile stress field and its influence on the electronic properties of a single crystal silicon microwire. The microwire was created by laser heating an amorphous silicon wire deposited in a 1.7 μm silica glass capillary by high pressure chemical vapor deposition. Tensile strain arises due to the thermal expansion mismatch between silicon and silica. Synchrotron X-ray micro-beam Laue diffraction (μ-Laue) microscopy reveals that the three principal strain components are +0.47% (corresponding to a tensile stress of +0.7 GPa) along the fiber axis and nearly isotropic +0.02% (corresponding to a tensile stress of +0.3 GPa) in the cross-sectional plane. This effect was accompanied with a reduction of 30 meV in the band gap energy of silicon, as predicted by the density-functional theory calculations and in close agreement with energy-dependent photoconductivity measurements. While silicon has been explored under many stress states, this study explores a stress state where all three principal stress components are tensile. Given the technological importance of silicon, the influence of such an unusual stress state on its electronic properties is of fundamental interest.

  15. Lipid membranes on nanostructured silicon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slade, Andrea Lynn; Lopez, Gabriel P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ista, Linnea K. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); O' Brien, Michael J. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bisong, Paul (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Zeineldin, Reema R. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Last, Julie A.; Brueck, Stephen R. J. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-12-01

    A unique composite nanoscale architecture that combines the self-organization and molecular dynamics of lipid membranes with a corrugated nanotextured silicon wafer was prepared and characterized with fluorescence microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. The goal of this project was to understand how such structures can be assembled for supported membrane research and how the interfacial interactions between the solid substrate and the soft, self-assembled material create unique physical and mechanical behavior through the confinement of phases in the membrane. The nanometer scale structure of the silicon wafer was produced through interference lithography followed by anisotropic wet etching. For the present study, a line pattern with 100 nm line widths, 200 nm depth and a pitch of 360 nm pitch was fabricated. Lipid membranes were successfully adsorbed on the structured silicon surface via membrane fusion techniques. The surface topology of the bilayer-Si structure was imaged using in situ tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The membrane was observed to drape over the silicon structure producing an undulated topology with amplitude of 40 nm that matched the 360 nm pitch of the silicon structure. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments found that on the microscale those same structures exhibit anisotropic lipid mobility that was coincident with the silicon substructure. The results showed that while the lipid membrane maintains much of its self-assembled structure in the composite architecture, the silicon substructure indeed influences the dynamics of the molecular motion within the membrane.

  16. Eastern Europe's Silicon Rush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Colin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents how the fast expansion of information technology industry in eastern Slovakia is putting a strain on its labor supply. Suddenly, computer-science graduates have become one of the former Eastern Bloc's greatest assets, attracting multinational technology companies hungry for skilled programmers, technicians, and engineers.…

  17. Silicon force sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  18. Multifunctional epitaxial systems on silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: ssingam@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Materials Science Division, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Prater, John Thomas [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Materials Science Division, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Narayan, Jagdish [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Multifunctional heterostructures can exhibit a wide range of functional properties, including colossal magneto-resistance, magnetocaloric, and multiferroic behavior, and can display interesting physical phenomena including spin and charge ordering and strong spin-orbit coupling. However, putting this functionality to work remains a challenge. To date, most of the work reported in the literature has dealt with heterostructures deposited onto closely lattice matched insulating substrates such as DyScO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3} (STO), or STO buffered Si(100) using concepts of lattice matching epitaxy (LME). However, strain in heterostructures grown by LME is typically not fully relaxed and the layers contain detrimental defects such as threading dislocations that can significantly degrade the physical properties of the films and adversely affect the device characteristics. In addition, most of the substrates are incompatible with existing CMOS-based technology, where Si (100) substrates dominate. This review discusses recent advances in the integration of multifunctional oxide and non-oxide materials onto silicon substrates. An alternative thin film growth approach, called “domain matching epitaxy,” is presented which identifies approaches for minimizing lattice strain and unwanted defects in large misfit systems (7%–25% and higher). This approach broadly allows for the integration of multifunctional materials onto silicon substrates, such that sensing, computation, and response functions can be combined to produce next generation “smart” devices. In general, pulsed laser deposition has been used to epitaxially grow these materials, although the concepts developed here can be extended to other deposition techniques, as well. It will be shown that TiN and yttria-stabilized zirconia template layers provide promising platforms for the integration of new functionality into silicon-based computer chips. This review paper reports on a number of thin

  19. Silicon-to-silicon wafer bonding using evaporated glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Lindahl, M.

    1998-01-01

    Anodic bending of silicon to silicon 4-in. wafers using an electron-beam evaporated glass (Schott 8329) was performed successfully in air at temperatures ranging from 200 degrees C to 450 degrees C. The composition of the deposited glass is enriched in sodium as compared to the target material...... of silicon/glass structures in air around 340 degrees C for 15 min leads to stress-free structures. Bonded wafer pairs, however, show no reduction in stress and always exhibit compressive stress. The bond yield is larger than 95% for bonding temperatures around 350 degrees C and is above 80% for bonding...... from 25 N/mm(2) to 0 N/mm(2) at 200 degrees C. A weak dependence on feature size was observed. For bonding temperatures higher than 300 degrees C fracture occurs randomly in the bulk of the silicon, whereas for bonding temperatures lower than 300 degrees C fracture always occurs at the bonding...

  20. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Synthesized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienhard, Michael A.; Larkin, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated a great deal of scientific and commercial interest because of the countless envisioned applications that stem from their extraordinary materials properties. Included among these properties are high mechanical strength (tensile and modulus), high thermal conductivity, and electrical properties that make different forms of single-walled CNTs either conducting or semiconducting, and therefore, suitable for making ultraminiature, high-performance CNT-based electronics, sensors, and actuators. Among the limitations for CNTs is their inability to survive in high-temperature, harsh-environment applications. Silicon carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs) are being developed for their superior material properties under such conditions. For example, SiC is stable in regards to oxidation in air to temperatures exceeding 1000 C, whereas carbon-based materials are limited to 600 C. The high-temperature stability of SiCNTs is envisioned to enable high-temperature, harsh-environment nanofiber- and nanotube-reinforced ceramics. In addition, single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors are being developed for hightemperature, high-power electronics, and by analogy to CNTs with silicon semiconductors, SiCNTs with single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors may allow high-temperature harsh-environment nanoelectronics, nanosensors, and nanoactuators to be realized. Another challenge in CNT development is the difficulty of chemically modifying the tube walls, which are composed of chemically stable graphene sheets. The chemical substitution of the CNTs walls will be necessary for nanotube self-assembly and biological- and chemical-sensing applications. SiCNTs are expected to have a different multiple-bilayer wall structure, allowing the surface Si atoms to be functionalized readily with molecules that will allow SiCNTs to undergo self-assembly and be compatible with a variety of materials (for biotechnology applications and high-performance fiber-reinforced ceramics).

  1. Stress topology within silicon single-crystal cantilever beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P. Kuzmenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Flexural elastic deformations of single-crystal silicon have been studied using microspectral Raman scattering. Results are reported on nano-scaled sign-changing shifts of the main peak of the microspectral Raman scattering within the single-crystal silicon cantilever beam during exposure to flexural stress. The maximum value of Raman shift characteristic of the 518 cm−1 silicon peak at which elasticity still remains has been found to be 8 cm−1 which corresponds to an applied deformation of 4 GPa. We report three-dimensional maps of the distribution of internal stresses at different levels of deformation up to irreversible changes and brittle fracture of the samples that clearly show compression and tension areas and an undeformed area. A qualitative explanation of the increase in the strength of the cantilever beam due to its small thickness (2 μm has been provided that agrees with the predictions of real-world physical parameters obtained in SolidWorks software environment with the SimulationXpress module. We have defined the relative strain of the beam surface which was 2% and received a confirmation of changes in the silicon lattice parameter from 0.54307 nm to 0.53195 nm by the BFGS algorithm.

  2. Efficiency Enhancement of Silicon Solar Cells by Porous Silicon Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenijus SHATKOVSKIS

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Silicon solar cells produced by a usual technology in p-type, crystalline silicon wafer were investigated. The manufactured solar cells were of total thickness 450 mm, the junction depth was of 0.5 mm – 0.7 mm. Porous silicon technologies were adapted to enhance cell efficiency. The production of porous silicon layer was carried out in HF: ethanol = 1 : 2 volume ratio electrolytes, illuminating by 50 W halogen lamps at the time of processing. The etching current was computer-controlled in the limits of (6 ÷ 14 mA/cm2, etching time was set in the interval of (10 ÷ 20 s. The characteristics and performance of the solar cells samples was carried out illuminating by Xenon 5000 K lamp light. Current-voltage characteristic studies have shown that porous silicon structures produced affect the extent of dark and lighting parameters of the samples. Exactly it affects current-voltage characteristic and serial resistance of the cells. It has shown, the formation of porous silicon structure causes an increase in the electric power created of solar cell. Conversion efficiency increases also respectively to the initial efficiency of cell. Increase of solar cell maximum power in 15 or even more percent is found. The highest increase in power have been observed in the spectral range of Dl @ (450 ÷ 850 nm, where ~ 60 % of the A1.5 spectra solar energy is located. It has been demonstrated that porous silicon technology is effective tool to improve the silicon solar cells performance.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.3.2428

  3. Silicon Quantum Dots for Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    16 2.2.2 Si/SiGe Heterostructures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.2.3 Silicon Nanowires ...Recently, silicon MOS, silicon/silicon- germanium (Si/SiGe) heterostructures and silicon nanowire architectures have also achieved spin manipulation and...Churchill, D. J. Reilly, J. Xiang, C. M. Lieber, and C. M. Marcus. A Ge/Si heterostructure nanowire -based double quantum dot with integrated charge

  4. Solar silicon refining; Inclusions, settling, filtration, wetting

    OpenAIRE

    Ciftja, Arjan

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the present work is the removal of inclusions from silicon scrap and metallurgical grade silicon. To reach this goal, two various routes are investigated. First, settling of SiC particles from molten silicon followed by directional solidification is reported in this thesis. Then, removal of SiC and Si3N4 inclusions in silicon scrap by filtration with foam filters and wettabilities of silicon on graphite materials are studied. To supply the increasing needs of the...

  5. The structure and bonding of iron-acceptor pairs in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, S.; Assali, L.V.C.; Kimerling, L.C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The highly mobile interstitial iron and Group III impurities (B, Al, Ga, In) form iron-acceptor pairs in silicon. Based on the migration kinetics and taking host silicon as a dielectric medium, we have simulated the pairing process in a static silicon lattice. Different from the conventional point charge ionic model, our phenomenological calculations include (1) a correction that takes into account valence electron cloud polarization which adds a short range, attractive interaction in the iron-acceptor pair bonding; and (2) silicon lattice relaxation due to the atomic size difference which causes a local strain field. Our model explains qualitatively (1) trends among the iron-acceptor pairs revealing an increase of the electronic state hole emission energy with increasing principal quantum number of acceptor and decreasing pair separation distance; and (2) the stable and metastable sites and configurational symmetries of the iron-acceptor pairs. The iron-acceptor pairing and bonding mechanism is also discussed.

  6. Classical molecular dynamics and quantum abs-initio studies on lithium-intercalation in interconnected hollow spherical nano-spheres of amorphous Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhowmik, Arghya; Malik, R.; Prakash, S.

    2016-01-01

    A high concentration of lithium, corresponding to charge capacity of ~4200 mAh/g, can be intercalated in silicon. Unfortunately, due to high intercalation strain leading to fracture and consequent poor cyclability, silicon cannot be used as anode in lithium ion batteries. But recently...... interconnected hollow nano-spheres of amorphous silicon have been found to exhibit high cyclability. The absence of fracture upon lithiation and the high cyclability has been attributed to reduction in intercalation stress due to hollow spherical geometry of the silicon nano-particles. The present work argues...

  7. Characterization of silicon-silicon carbide ceramic derived from carbon-carbon silicon carbide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vijay K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Varanasi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Krenkel, Walter [Univ. of Bayreuth (Germany). Dept. of Ceramic Materials Engineering

    2013-04-15

    The main objective of the present work is to process porous silicon - silicon carbide (Si - SiC) ceramic by the oxidation of carboncarbon silicon carbide (C/C - SiC) composites. Phase studies are performed on the oxidized porous composite to examine the changes due to the high temperature oxidation. Further, various characterization techniques are performed on Si- SiC ceramics in order to study the material's microstructure. The effects of various parameters such as fiber alignment (twill weave and short/chopped fiber) and phenolic resin type (resol and novolak) are characterized.

  8. Imprinted silicon-based nanophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borel, Peter Ingo; Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate and optically characterize silicon-on-insulator based nanophotonic devices fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. In our demonstration, we have realized ordinary and topology-optimized photonic crystal waveguide structures. The topology-optimized structures require lateral pattern ...

  9. Optical information capacity of silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitropoulos, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Modern computing and data storage systems increasingly rely on parallel architectures where processing and storage load is distributed within a cluster of nodes. The necessity for high-bandwidth data links has made optical communication a critical constituent of modern information systems and silicon the leading platform for creating the necessary optical components. While silicon is arguably the most extensively studied material in history, one of its most important attributes, an analysis of its capacity to carry optical information, has not been reported. The calculation of the information capacity of silicon is complicated by nonlinear losses, phenomena that emerge in optical nanowires as a result of the concentration of optical power in a small geometry. Nonlinear losses are absent in silica glass optical fiber and other common communication channels. While nonlinear loss in silicon is well known, noise and fluctuations that arise from it have never been considered. Here we report sources of fluctuations...

  10. Characterization of Czochralski Silicon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Luukka, Panja-Riina

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the characterization of irradiated and non-irradiated segmenteddetectors made of high-resistivity (>1 kΩcm) magnetic Czochralski (MCZ) silicon. It isshown that the radiation hardness (RH) of the protons of these detectors is higher thanthat of devices made of traditional materials such as Float Zone (FZ) silicon or DiffusionOxygenated Float Zone (DOFZ) silicon due to the presence of intrinsic oxygen (> 5 x1017 cm-3). The MCZ devices therefore present an interesting alternative for future highenergy physics experiments. In the large hadron collider (LHC), the RH of the detectorsis a critical issue due to the high luminosity (1034 cm-2s-1) corresponding to the expectedtotal fluencies of fast hadrons above 1015 cm-2. This RH improvement is important sinceradiation damage in the detector bulk material reduces the detector performance andbecause some of the devices produced from standard detector-grade silicon, e.g. FZsilicon with negligible oxygen concentration, might not survive the plann...

  11. SILICONE RUBBER MOULDS FOR FOOTWEAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia LUCA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The leather confections industry uses the silicone rubber moulds for the symbols,notices and models stamping on the footwear or morocco goods parts. The paper presents somecontributions in this kind of devices manufacturing technology

  12. Silicon Solar Cell Turns 50

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, J.

    2004-08-01

    This short brochure describes a milestone in solar (or photovoltaic, PV) research-namely, the 50th anniversary of the invention of the first viable silicon solar cell by three researchers at Bell Laboratories.

  13. Ultra-fast silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W., E-mail: hartmut@scipp.ucsc.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Petersen, B.; Seiden, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Cartiglia, N.; Marchetto, F. [INFN Torino, Torino (Italy); Bruzzi, M.; Mori, R.; Scaringella, M.; Vinattieri, A. [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    We propose to develop a fast, thin silicon sensor with gain capable to concurrently measure with high precision the space (∼10 μm) and time (∼10 ps) coordinates of a particle. This will open up new application of silicon detector systems in many fields. Our analysis of detector properties indicates that it is possible to improve the timing characteristics of silicon-based tracking sensors, which already have sufficient position resolution, to achieve four-dimensional high-precision measurements. The basic sensor characteristics and the expected performance are listed, the wide field of applications are mentioned and the required R and D topics are discussed. -- Highlights: •We are proposing thin pixel silicon sensors with 10's of picoseconds time resolution. •Fast charge collection is coupled with internal charge multiplication. •The truly 4-D sensors will revolutionize imaging and particle counting in many applications.

  14. Scattering characteristics from porous silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sabet-Dariani

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available   Porous silicon (PS layers come into existance as a result of electrochemical anodization on silicon. Although a great deal of research has been done on the formation and optical properties of this material, the exact mechanism involved is not well-understood yet.   In this article, first, the optical properties of silicon and porous silicon are described. Then, previous research and the proposed models about reflection from PS and the origin of its photoluminescence are reveiwed. The reflecting and scattering, absorption and transmission of light from this material, are then investigated. These experiments include,different methods of PS sample preparation their photoluminescence, reflecting and scattering of light determining different characteristics with respect to Si bulk.

  15. High force 10 kN piezoresistive silicon force sensor with output independent of force distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijze, A.F.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, Meint J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Peeters, Eric; Paul, Oliver

    2000-01-01

    A 10 kN silicon force sensor is realized in which the force is measured by compressing a meander shaped polysilicon strain gage. A second gage which is not loaded, is used for temperature compensation, for compensation of bending and stretching stresses in the chip and for common changes in zero

  16. Streptococcus thermophilus and its biosurfactants inhibit adhesion by Candida spp. on silicone rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, HJ; vanHoogmoed, CG; GeertsemaDoornbusch, GI; vanderKuijlBooij, M; vanderMei, HC

    1997-01-01

    The adhesion of yeasts, two Candida albicans and two Candida tropicalis strains isolated from naturally colonized voice prostheses, to silicone rubber with and without a salivary conditioning film in the absence and presence of adhering Streptococcus thermophilus B, a biosurfactant-releasing dairy

  17. Influence of Uniaxial Stress on the Indirect Absorption Edge in Silicon and Germanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, I.

    1966-01-01

    The indirect optical absorption edge in silicon and germanium has been studied in the presence of shear strain. The splitting observed in the transmission spectrum is dependent on the direction and magnitude of the applied stress and on the polarization of the light with respect to the stress axis...

  18. Air-flow resistances of silicone rubber voice prostheses after formation of bacterial and fungal biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elving, GJ; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; van Weissenbruch, R; Albers, FWJ

    Laryngectomized patients use silicone rubber voice prostheses to rehabilitate their voice. However, biofilm formation limits the lifetime of voice prostheses by causing leakage or an increased air-flow resistance and the prosthesis has to be replaced. To determine which bacterial or yeast strains,

  19. New applications of silicon micromachining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauf, R.J.; Wood, R.F.; Fleming, P.H.; Bauer, M.L.

    1988-06-01

    The use of photolithography and anisotropic etching of silicon wafers to make strong, thin membranes has created a large family of miniature sensing devices such as pressure transducers and accelerometers. This report describes several entirely new devices in which silicon membranes are used for their strength and for their transparency to certain kinds of radiation. Two applications are described: a rugged alpha detector and a fluid sample cell for small-angle x-ray scattering. 8 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Topological Order in Silicon Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-07

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0037 Topological orders in Silicon photonics Mohammad Hafezi MARYLAND UNIV COLLEGE PARK 3112 LEE BLDG COLLEGE PARK, MD 20742...15 SEP 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Topological Order in Silicon Photonics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA-9550-14-1-0267 5c. PROGRAM...DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Topological features

  1. Silicon Sensors for HEP Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Dierlamm, Alexander Hermann

    2017-01-01

    With increasing luminosity of accelerators for experiments in High Energy Physics the demands on the detectors increase as well. Especially tracking and vertexing detectors made of silicon sensors close to the interaction point need to be equipped with more radiation hard devices. This article introduces the different types of silicon sensors, describes measures to increase radiation hardness and provides an overview of present upgrade choices of HEP experiments.

  2. Silicone nanocomposite coatings for fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberts, Kenneth (Inventor); Lee, Stein S. (Inventor); Singhal, Amit (Inventor); Ou, Runqing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A silicone based coating for fabrics utilizing dual nanocomposite fillers providing enhanced mechanical and thermal properties to the silicone base. The first filler includes nanoclusters of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a metal oxide and a second filler of exfoliated clay nanoparticles. The coating is particularly suitable for inflatable fabrics used in several space, military, and consumer applications, including airbags, parachutes, rafts, boat sails, and inflatable shelters.

  3. Metallization of Large Silicon Wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    A metallization scheme was developed which allows selective plating of silicon solar cell surfaces. The system is comprised of three layers. Palladium, through the formation of palladium silicide at 300 C in nitrogen, makes ohmic contact to the silicon surface. Nickel, plated on top of the palladium silicide layer, forms a solderable interface. Lead-tin solder on the nickel provides conductivity and allows a convenient means for interconnection of cells. To apply this metallization, three chemical plating baths are employed.

  4. Evanescent field phase shifting in a silicon nitride waveguide using a coupled silicon slab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Asger Sellerup; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Green, William M. J.

    2015-01-01

    An approach for electrical modulation of low-loss silicon nitride waveguides is proposed, using a silicon nitride waveguide evanescently loaded with a thin silicon slab. The thermooptic phase-shift characteristics are investigated in a racetrack resonator configuration.......An approach for electrical modulation of low-loss silicon nitride waveguides is proposed, using a silicon nitride waveguide evanescently loaded with a thin silicon slab. The thermooptic phase-shift characteristics are investigated in a racetrack resonator configuration....

  5. EDITORIAL: Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-08-01

    A little stress or strain has been known to improve the performance of athletes, actors and of course nanomaterials alike. In fact strain in silicon is now a major engineering tool for improving the performance of devices, and is ubiquitously used in device design and fabrication. Strain engineering alters a material's band structure, a model of electron behaviour that describes how as atoms come together in a solid, their discrete electron orbitals overlap to ultimately give rise to bands of allowed energy levels. In a strained crystal lattice of silicon or silicon germanium the distance between atoms in the lattice is greater than usual and the bands of allowed energy levels change. This July marks 100 years since Bohr submitted his paper 'On the constitution of atoms and molecules' [1] where he describes the structure of the atom in terms of discrete allowed energy levels. The paper was a seminal contribution to the development of quantum mechanics and laid the initial theoretical precepts for band gap engineering in devices. In this issue Nrauda and a collaboration of researchers in Europe and Australia study the growth of defect-free SiGe islands on pre-patterned silicon [2]. They analyse the strain in the islands and determine at what point lattice dislocations set in with a view to informing implementation of strain engineering in devices. The effects of strain on band structure in silicon and germanium were already studied and reported in the 1950s [3, 4]. Since then the increasing focus on nanoscale materials and the hunger for control of electronic properties has prompted further study of strain effects. The increased surface area to volume ratio in nanostructures changes the strain behaviour with respect to bulk materials, and this can also be exploited for handling and fine tuning strain to manipulate material properties. It is perhaps no surprise that graphene, one of the most high-profile materials in current nanotechnology research, has attracted

  6. Annealing of silicon optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, N.; McMillen, C.; Singh, R.; Podila, R.; Rao, A. M.; Hawkins, T.; Foy, P.; Morris, S.; Rice, R.; Poole, K. F.; Zhu, L.; Ballato, J.

    2011-11-01

    The recent realization of silicon core optical fibers has the potential for novel low insertion loss rack-to-rack optical interconnects and a number of other uses in sensing and biomedical applications. To the best of our knowledge, incoherent light source based rapid photothermal processing (RPP) was used for the first time to anneal glass-clad silicon core optical fibers. X-ray diffraction examination of the silicon core showed a considerable enhancement in the length and amount of single crystallinity post-annealing. Further, shifts in the Raman frequency of the silicon in the optical fiber core that were present in the as-drawn fibers were removed following the RPP treatment. Such results indicate that the RPP treatment increases the local crystallinity and therefore assists in the reduction of the local stresses in the core, leading to more homogenous fibers. The dark current-voltage characteristics of annealed silicon optical fiber diodes showed lower leakage current than the diodes based on as-drawn fibers. Photons in UV and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) regions play a very important role in improving the bulk and carrier transport properties of RPP-treated silicon optical fibers, and the resultant annealing permits a path forward to in situ enhancement of the structure and properties of these new crystalline core optical fibers.

  7. Thermal strains in titanium aluminide and nickel aluminide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saigal, A. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Kupperman, D.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Neutron diffraction was used to measure residual thermal strains developed during postfabrication cooling in titanium aluminide and nickel aluminide intermetallic matrix composites. Silicon carbide /Ti 14Al-21Nb, tungsten and sapphire/NiAl, and sapphire and SiC-coated sapphire/NiAl{sub 25}Fe{sub 10} composites were investigated. The thermal expansion coefficient of the matrix is usually greater than that of the fibers. As such, during cooldown, compressive residual strains are generated in the fibers and tensile residual strains are generated in the matrix, parallel to the fibers. Liquid-nitrogen dipping and thermal cycling tend to reduce the fabrication-induced residual strains in silicon carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide matrix composites. However, matrix cracking can occur as a result of these processes. The axial residual strains in the matrix were lower in the nickel aluminide matrix than in the titanium aluminide matrix. As the matrix undergoes plastic deformation, residual thermal strains are related to the yield stress of the matrix.

  8. Thermal strains in titanium aluminide and nickel aluminide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saigal, A. (Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Kupperman, D.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Neutron diffraction was used to measure residual thermal strains developed during postfabrication cooling in titanium aluminide and nickel aluminide intermetallic matrix composites. Silicon carbide /Ti 14Al-21Nb, tungsten and sapphire/NiAl, and sapphire and SiC-coated sapphire/NiAl{sub 25}Fe{sub 10} composites were investigated. The thermal expansion coefficient of the matrix is usually greater than that of the fibers. As such, during cooldown, compressive residual strains are generated in the fibers and tensile residual strains are generated in the matrix, parallel to the fibers. Liquid-nitrogen dipping and thermal cycling tend to reduce the fabrication-induced residual strains in silicon carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide matrix composites. However, matrix cracking can occur as a result of these processes. The axial residual strains in the matrix were lower in the nickel aluminide matrix than in the titanium aluminide matrix. As the matrix undergoes plastic deformation, residual thermal strains are related to the yield stress of the matrix.

  9. Direct Production of Silicones From Sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry N. Lewis; F.J. Schattenmann: J.P. Lemmon

    2001-09-30

    Silicon, in the form of silica and silicates, is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. However the synthesis of silicones (scheme 1) and almost all organosilicon chemistry is only accessible through elemental silicon. Silicon dioxide (sand or quartz) is converted to chemical-grade elemental silicon in an energy intensive reduction process, a result of the exceptional thermodynamic stability of silica. Then, the silicon is reacted with methyl chloride to give a mixture of methylchlorosilanes catalyzed by cooper containing a variety of tract metals such as tin, zinc etc. The so-called direct process was first discovered at GE in 1940. The methylchlorosilanes are distilled to purify and separate the major reaction components, the most important of which is dimethyldichlorosilane. Polymerization of dimethyldichlorosilane by controlled hydrolysis results in the formation of silicone polymers. Worldwide, the silicones industry produces about 1.3 billion pounds of the basic silicon polymer, polydimethylsiloxane.

  10. Formation of strain-induced quantum dots in gated semiconductor nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Thorbeck

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A long-standing mystery in the field of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs is: Why are there so many unintentional dots (also known as disorder dots which are neither expected nor controllable. It is typically assumed that these unintentional dots are due to charged defects, however the frequency and predictability of the location of the unintentional QDs suggests there might be additional mechanisms causing the unintentional QDs besides charged defects. We show that the typical strains in a semiconductor nanostructure from metal gates are large enough to create strain-induced quantum dots. We simulate a commonly used QD device architecture, metal gates on bulk silicon, and show the formation of strain-induced QDs. The strain-induced QD can be eliminated by replacing the metal gates with poly-silicon gates. Thus strain can be as important as electrostatics to QD device operation operation.

  11. Silicon Photomultiplier charaterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Leonel; Osornio, Leo; Para, Adam

    2014-03-01

    Silicon Photo Multiples (SiPM's) are relatively new photon detectors. They offer many advantages compared to photo multiplier tubes (PMT's) such as insensitivity to magnetic field, robustness at varying lighting levels, and low cost. The SiPM output wave forms are poorly understood. The experiment conducted collected waveforms of responses of Hamamatsu SiPM to incident laser pulse at varying temperatures and bias voltages. Ambient noise was characterized at all temperatures and bias voltages by averaging the waveforms. Pulse shape of the SiPM response was determined under different operating conditions: the pulse shape is nearly independent of the bias voltage but exhibits strong variation with temperature, consistent with the temperature variation of the quenching resistor. Amplitude of responses of the SiPM to low intensity laser light shows many peaks corresponding to the detection of 1,2,3 etc. photons. Amplitude of these pulses depends linearly on the bias voltage, enabling determination of the breakdown voltage at each temperature. Poisson statistics has been used to determine the average number of detected photons at each operating conditions. Department of Education Grant No. P0315090007 and the Department of Energy/ Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

  12. Silicon Carbide Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Andrew Trunek has focused on supporting the Sic team through the growth of Sic crystals, making observations and conducting research that meets the collective needs and requirements of the team while fulfilling program commitments. Cancellation of the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program has had a significant negative impact on resources and research goals. This report highlights advancements and achievements made with this cooperative agreement over the past year. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) continues to make advances in silicon carbide (SiC) research during the past year. Step free surfaces were used as substrates for the deposition of GaN epilayers that yielded very low dislocation densities. Defect free 3C- SiC was successfully nucleated on step free mesas and test diodes were fabricated. Web growth techniques were used to increase the usable surface area of dislocation free SiC by approximately equal to 40%. The greatest advancement has been attained on stepped surfaces of SiC. A metrology standard was developed using high temperature etching techniques titled "Nanometer Step Height Standard". This development culminated in being recognized for a 2004 R&D100 award and the process to produce the steps received a NASA Space Act award.

  13. Collimation: a silicon solution

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Silicon crystals could be used very efficiently to deflect high-energy beams. Testing at CERN has produced conclusive results, which could pave the way for a new generation of collimators. The set of five crystals used to test the reflection of the beams. The crystals are 0.75 mm wide and their alignment is adjusted with extreme precision. This figure shows the deflection of a beam by channelling and by reflection in the block of five crystals. Depending on the orientation of the crystals: 1) The beam passes without "seeing" the crystals and is not deflected 2) The beam is deflected by channelling (with an angle of around 100 μrad) 3) The beam is reflected (with an angle of around 50 μrad). The intensity of the deflected beam is illustrated by the intensity of the spot. The spot of the reflected beam is clearly more intense than that one of the channelled beam, demonstrating the efficiency of t...

  14. Silicon nitride passivated bifacial Cz-silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, L. [Institute of Semiconductor Electronics, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstr. 24, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Solland Solar Cells GmbH, Bohr 12, 52072 Aachen (Germany); Windgassen, H.; Baetzner, D.L. [Institute of Semiconductor Electronics, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstr. 24, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Bitnar, B.; Neuhaus, H. [Deutsche Cell GmbH, Berthelsdorfer Str. 111a, 09599 Freiberg (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    A new process for all silicon nitride passivated silicon solar cells with screen printed contacts is analysed in detail. Since the contacts are fired through the silicon nitride layers on both sides, the process is easy to adapt to industrial production. The potential and limits of the presented bifacial design are simulated and discussed. The effectiveness of the presented process depends strongly on the base doping of the substrate, but only the open circuit voltage is affected. The current is mainly determined by the rear surface passivation properties. Thus, using a low resistivity (<1.5{omega}cm) base material higher efficiencies compared to an aluminium back surface field can be achieved. (author)

  15. Strains and Sprains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... long winter off might lead to a strained calf or thigh muscle. Sprains are caused by injuries, such as twisting your ankle. This kind of injury is common in sports, but can also happen any time you trip or fall. What if I Get a Strain or Sprain? If you get a strain or ...

  16. Obturator internus muscle strains

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Caoimhe; Alkhayat, Abdullah; O'Neill, Pat; Eustace, Stephen; Kavanagh, Eoin

    2017-01-01

    We report 2 cases of obturator internus muscle strains. The injuries occurred in young male athletes involved in kicking sports. Case 1 details an acute obturator internus muscle strain with associated adductor longus strain. Case 2 details an overuse injury of the bilateral obturator internus muscles. In each case, magnetic resonance imaging played a crucial role in accurate diagnosis.

  17. Obturator internus muscle strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Caoimhe; Alkhayat, Abdullah; O'Neill, Pat; Eustace, Stephen; Kavanagh, Eoin

    2017-03-01

    We report 2 cases of obturator internus muscle strains. The injuries occurred in young male athletes involved in kicking sports. Case 1 details an acute obturator internus muscle strain with associated adductor longus strain. Case 2 details an overuse injury of the bilateral obturator internus muscles. In each case, magnetic resonance imaging played a crucial role in accurate diagnosis.

  18. Obturator internus muscle strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caoimhe Byrne, MB BCh, BAO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of obturator internus muscle strains. The injuries occurred in young male athletes involved in kicking sports. Case 1 details an acute obturator internus muscle strain with associated adductor longus strain. Case 2 details an overuse injury of the bilateral obturator internus muscles. In each case, magnetic resonance imaging played a crucial role in accurate diagnosis.

  19. Silicon nitride equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert C.; Swaminathan, Pazhayannur K.

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the development of a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4).1 Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonal β-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data that have indicated a complex and slow time dependent phase change to the c-Si3N4 phase. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products; however, the need for a kinetic approach is suggested to combine with the single component solid models to simulate and further investigate the global phase coexistences.

  20. Nanocrystalline silicon in biological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fucikova, Anna [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16, Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics AS CR, v. v. i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Valenta, Jan [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16, Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Pelant, Ivan; Kusova, Katerina [Institute of Physics AS CR, v. v. i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Brezina, Vitezslav [Institute of Systems Biology and Ecology AS CR, v. v. i., Zamek 136, 373 33 Nove Hrady (Czech Republic)

    2011-03-15

    Porous silicon and similar materials, like micro- and nanocrystalline silicon, are nowadays studied not only in physical research (e.g. optical gain studies, electro-optical devices, solar energy conversion), but they are very promising also in biological research as fluorescent labels, biological sensors, drug delivery systems or scaffold for various tissues. We are giving an overview of various approaches of preparation of micro- and nanocrystalline silicon and current studies of applications with main focus on biology and medicine. In contrast to other nanomaterials used in biological studies (e.g. carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, cadmium containing quantum dots) silicon based nanomaterials show very good biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity. Therefore, these materials have potential to become powerful tools for in vivo investigation of life processes on subcellular and molecular level. Our group concentrates on developing of gentle fluorescent label based on porous silicon for single molecule detection in the cell. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. 2D device-level simulation study of strained-Si pnp heterojunction bipolar transistors on virtual substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, N. D.; O'Neill, A.

    2004-02-01

    A novel strained-Si pnp heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) design, suitable for virtual substrate technology, is proposed that is inherently free from the detrimental valence band barrier effects usually encountered in conventional SiGe pnp HBTs on silicon. It takes advantage of the heterojunction formed between a strained-Si layer and a relaxed SiGe buffer (virtual substrate), whose associated valence band offset appears favorable for minority hole transport at the base/collector junction. From two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation, it is found that the newly proposed strained-Si pnp HBT substantially outperforms the equivalent BJT on a silicon substrate in terms of DC and high-frequency characteristics. A threefold increase in maximum current gain β, a fourfold improvement in peak ft and a 2.5 times increase in peak fmax are predicted for strained-Si pnp HBTs on a 50% Ge virtual substrate in comparison with identical conventional silicon pnp BJTs.

  2. Tin oxide - silicon dioxide - silicon MIS solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llabres, K.; Dominguez, E.; Lora-Tamayo, E.; Arjona, F.

    1981-01-01

    The results obtained in tin oxide-silicon dioxide-n type silicon Schottky barrier solar cells are presented. Samples were prepared in a two-zone furnace where the thermal oxidation of the wafer and the SnO/sub 2/ deposition were carried out without further handling. The tin oxide layer was grown using a gas transport method in an open tube. The characteristic parameters of the solar cell performance gave the following results: short circuit current density.21 mA/cm/sup 2/, open circuit voltage.550 mV. 7 refs.

  3. Dislocation Generation in the Initiation of Fractures in Silicon Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Yoichi; Imura, Toru

    1982-09-01

    Notched silicon crystals were deformed in tension at elevated temperatures, and the incipient microplasticity associated with the notch was studied by in-situ X-ray topographic observation. Above a stress level of about 2 kg/mm2 at 700°C, a plastic zone was formed around the notch tip, accompanied by long-range elastic strain. Dislocations were generated on the slip planes parallel to the tensile axis by the operation of a bending moment induced around the notch tip mainly by the activity of two slip systems with the maximum Schmid factor, and the crack propagation is considered to break out as a result.

  4. Undoped strained germanium quantum wells towards spin qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scappucci, Giordano; Sammak, Amir; Yeoh, Lareine; Sabbagh, Diego; Conesa-Boj, Sonia; Kolling, Sebastian; Zaumseil, Peter; Capellini, Giovanni

    Germanium is emerging as a promising material to implement spin qubits because of the key properties of high carrier mobility, strong spin-orbit coupling, long spin coherence times and compatibility with silicon technology. We report the deposition of undoped strained Ge/SiGe quantum wells of high structural quality in a reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition tool. Structural analysis of the Ge/SiGe heterostructures confirm sharp interfaces, full relaxation of the virtual substrate, and coherent deposition of the strained quantum well. Furthermore, we will discuss architectures towards the development of CMOS compatible spin qubits in laterally defined Ge quantum dots. .

  5. Silicon Nitride Bearings for Total Joint Arthroplasty

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McEntire, Bryan; Lakshminarayanan, Ramaswamy; Ray, Darin; Clarke, Ian; Puppulin, Leonardo; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

      The articulation performance of silicon nitride against conventional and highly cross-linked polyethylene, as well as for self-mated silicon nitride bearings, was examined in a series of standard hip simulation studies...

  6. The LHCb silicon tracker project

    CERN Document Server

    Blouw, J

    2004-01-01

    Two silicon strip detectors, the Trigger Tracker(TT) and the Inner Tracker(IT) will be constructed for the LHCb experiment. Transverse momentum information extracted from the TT will be used in the Level 1 trigger. The IT is part of the main tracking system behind the magnet. Both silicon detectors will be read out using a custom-developed chip by the ASIC lab in Heidelberg. The signal-over-noise behavior and performance of various geometrical designs of the silicon sensors, in conjunction with the Beetle read-out chip, have been extensively studied in test beam experiments. Results from those experiments are presented, and have been used in the final choice of sensor geometry.

  7. SILICON REFINING BY VACUUM TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Alexandrino Lotto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to investigate the phosphorus removal by vacuum from metallurgical grade silicon (MGSi (98.5% to 99% Si. Melting experiments were carried out in a vacuum induction furnace, varying parameters such as temperature, time and relation area exposed to the vacuum / volume of molten silicon. The results of chemical analysis were obtained by inductively coupled plasma (ICP, and evaluated based on thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the reaction of vaporization of the phosphorus in the silicon. The phosphorus was decreased from 33 to approximately 1.5 ppm after three hours of vacuum treatment, concluding that the evaporation step is the controlling step of the process for parameters of temperature, pressure and agitation used and refining by this process is technically feasible.

  8. A silicon tracker for Christmas

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The CMS experiment installed the world’s largest silicon tracker just before Christmas. Marcello Mannelli: physicist and deputy CMS project leader, and Alan Honma, physicist, compare two generations of tracker: OPAL for the LEP (at the front) and CMS for the LHC (behind). There is quite a difference between 1m2 and 205m2.. CMS received an early Christmas present on 18 December when the silicon tracker was installed in the heart of the CMS magnet. The CMS tracker team couldn’t have hoped for a better present. Carefully wrapped in shiny plastic, the world’s largest silicon tracker arrived at Cessy ready for installation inside the CMS magnet on 18 December. This rounded off the year for CMS with a major event, the crowning touch to ten years of work on the project by over five hundred scientists and engineers. "Building a scientific instrument of this size and complexity is a huge technical a...

  9. Inkjet 3D printing of UV and thermal cure silicone elastomers for dielectric elastomer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoul, David; Rosset, Samuel; Schlatter, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2017-12-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) are an attractive form of electromechanical transducer, possessing high energy densities, an efficient design, mechanical compliance, high speed, and noiseless operation. They have been incorporated into a wide variety of devices, such as microfluidic systems, cell bioreactors, tunable optics, haptic displays, and actuators for soft robotics. Fabrication of DEA devices is complex, and the majority are inefficiently made by hand. 3D printing offers an automated and flexible manufacturing alternative that can fabricate complex, multi-material, integrated devices consistently and in high resolution. We present a novel additive manufacturing approach to DEA devices in which five commercially available, thermal and UV-cure DEA silicone rubber materials have been 3D printed with a drop-on-demand, piezoelectric inkjet system. Using this process, 3D structures and high-quality silicone dielectric elastomer membranes as thin as 2 μm have been printed that exhibit mechanical and actuation performance at least as good as conventionally blade-cast membranes. Printed silicone membranes exhibited maximum tensile strains of up to 727%, and DEAs with printed silicone dielectrics were actuated up to 6.1% area strain at a breakdown strength of 84 V μm‑1 and also up to 130 V μm‑1 at 2.4% strain. This approach holds great potential to manufacture reliable, high-performance DEA devices with high throughput.

  10. Analysis of local deformation effects in resistive strain sensing of a submicron-thickness AFM cantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Schwalb, Christian H.; Winhold, Marcel; Šńukić, Maja; Huth, Michael; Fantner, Georg E.

    2013-05-01

    Incorporating resistive strain-sensing elements into MEMS devices is a long-standing approach for electronic detection of the device deformation. As the need for more sensitivity trends the device dimensions downwards, the size of the strain-sensor may become comparable to the device size, which can have significant impact on the mechanical behaviour of the device. To study this effect, we modelled a submicron-thickness silicon nitride AFM cantilever with strain-sensing element. Using finite element analysis, we calculated the strain in the sensor elements for a deflected cantilever. The sensor element contributes to a local stiffening effect in the device structure which lowers the strain in the sensor. By varying the sensor geometry, we investigated the degree to which this effect impacts the strain. Minimizing the sensor size increases the strain, but the reduction in sensor cross-sectional area increases the resistance and expected sensor noise. The optimal sensor geometry must therefore account for this effect. We used our analysis to optimize geometric variations of nanogranular tunnelling resistor (NTR) strain sensors arranged in a Wheatstone bridge on a silicon nitride AFM cantilever. We varied the dimensions of each sensor element to maintain a constant cross-sectional area but maximize the strain in the sensor element. Through this approach, we expect a 45% increase in strain in the sensor and corresponding 20% increase in the Wheatstone bridge signal. Our results provide an important consideration in the design geometry of resistive strainsensing elements in MEMS devices.

  11. Semiconducting silicon nanowires for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Coffer, JL

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical applications have benefited greatly from the increasing interest and research into semiconducting silicon nanowires. Semiconducting Silicon Nanowires for Biomedical Applications reviews the fabrication, properties, and applications of this emerging material. The book begins by reviewing the basics, as well as the growth, characterization, biocompatibility, and surface modification, of semiconducting silicon nanowires. It goes on to focus on silicon nanowires for tissue engineering and delivery applications, including cellular binding and internalization, orthopedic tissue scaffol

  12. Energy Harvesting from Energetic Porous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    wafers backed with platinum are patterned into 2- mm devices with bridge wires (Fig. 1 [left]). Using a silicon nitride layer as a mask, the silicon is...ARL-TR-7719 ● JULY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Energy Harvesting from Energetic Porous Silicon by Louis B Levine, Matthew...Harvesting from Energetic Porous Silicon by Louis B Levine Academy of Applied Science, Concord, NH Matthew H Ervin and Wayne A Churaman Sensors and

  13. Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVore, P. T. S.; Jiang, Y.; Lynch, M.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud.org) is the first silicon photonics interactive web tool. Here we report new features of this tool including mode propagation parameters and mode distribution galleries for user specified waveguide dimensions and wavelengths.......Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud.org) is the first silicon photonics interactive web tool. Here we report new features of this tool including mode propagation parameters and mode distribution galleries for user specified waveguide dimensions and wavelengths....

  14. Silicon nanocrystal inks, films, and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Lance Michael; Kortshagen, Uwe Richard

    2015-09-01

    Silicon nanocrystal inks and films, and methods of making and using silicon nanocrystal inks and films, are disclosed herein. In certain embodiments the nanocrystal inks and films include halide-terminated (e.g., chloride-terminated) and/or halide and hydrogen-terminated nanocrystals of silicon or alloys thereof. Silicon nanocrystal inks and films can be used, for example, to prepare semiconductor devices.

  15. Hot forming of silicon sheet, silicon sheet growth development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Final report, May 12, 1976--August 11, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Jr, C D; Pope, D P; Kulkarni, S

    1978-04-14

    Results of an experimental program investigating the hot workability of polytextuerystalline silicon are reported. Uniaxial stress-strain curves are given for strain rates in the range of 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup 1/ sec/sup -1/ and temperatures from 1100 to 1380/sup 0/C. At the highest strain rates at 1380/sup 0/C axial strains in excess of 20% were easily obtainable without cracking; although special preparation of the compression platens allows strains in excess of 50%. After deformations of 36%, recrystallization is completed within 0.1 hr at 1380/sup 0/C. When the recrystallization is ''complete,'' there is still a small volume fraction of unrecrystallized material which appears very stable and may degrade the electronic properties of the bulk material. Texture measurements show that the as-produced vapor deposited polycrystalline rods have a <110> fiber texture with the <110> direction parallel to the growth direction and no preferred orientation about this axis. Upon axial compression perpendicular to the growth direction the former <110> fiber axis changes to <111> and the compression axis becomes <110>. Recrystallization changes the texture to <110> along the former fiber axis and <100> along the compression axis.

  16. Functionally strain-graded nanoscoops for high power Li-ion battery anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Rahul; Lu, Toh-Ming; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2011-02-09

    Lithium-ion batteries show poor performance for high power applications involving ultrafast charging/discharging rates. Here we report a functionally strain-graded carbon-aluminum-silicon anode architecture that overcomes this drawback. It consists of an array of nanostructures each comprising an amorphous carbon nanorod with an intermediate layer of aluminum that is finally capped by a silicon nanoscoop on the very top. The gradation in strain arises from graded levels of volumetric expansion in these three materials on alloying with lithium. The introduction of aluminum as an intermediate layer enables the gradual transition of strain from carbon to silicon, thereby minimizing the mismatch at interfaces between differentially strained materials and enabling stable operation of the electrode under high-rate charge/discharge conditions. At an accelerated current density of ∼51.2 A/g (i.e., charge/discharge rate of ∼40C), the strain-graded carbon-aluminum-silicon nanoscoop anode provides average capacities of ∼412 mAh/g with a power output of ∼100 kW/kg(electrode) continuously over 100 charge/discharge cycles.

  17. Silicon sources for rice crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Hamilton Seron

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Although silicon is not an essential nutrient, its application is beneficial for plant growth and development. To evaluate silicon sources in relation to agronomic efficiency and economic viability in rice crops (Oryza sativa L., a greenhouse experiment was conducted, Quartzipsamment soil, in a completely randomized experimental design (n = 4. Treatments were 12 silicon sources and a control. Silicon was applied at the rate of 125 kg Si ha-1. Data were compared to a standard response curve for Si using the standard source Wollastonite at rates of 0, 125, 250, 375, and 500 kg Si ha-1. All treatments received CaCO3 and MgCO3 to balance pH, Ca and Mg. One hundred and fifty days after sowing, evaluations on dry matter yield in the above-ground part of plants, grain yield, and Si contents in the soil and plant tissues were performed. Wollastonite had linear response, increasing silicon in the soil and plants with increasing application rates. Differences between silicon sources in relation to Si uptake were observed. Phosphate slag provided the highest Si uptake, followed by Wollastonite and electric furnace silicates which however, did not show differed among themselves. The highest Si accumulation in grain was observed for stainless steel, which significantly differed from the control, silicate clay, Wollastonite, and AF2 (blast furnace of the company 2 slag. Silicate clay showed the lowest Si accumulation in grain and did not differ from the control, AF2 slag, AF1 slag, schist ash, schist, and LD4 (furnace steel type LD of the company 4 slag.

  18. Laser wafering for silicon solar.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-03-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  19. Prediction of the Strain Response of Poly-AlN/(100Si Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator and Experimental Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The strain sensitivity of the Aluminum Nitride (AlN/Silicon (Si surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR is predicted based on a modeling method introduced in this work, and further compared with experimental results. The strain influence on both the period of the inter-digital transducer (IDT and the sound velocity is taken into consideration when modeling the strain response. From the modeling results, AlN and Si have opposite responses to strain; hence, for the AlN/Si-based SAWR, both a positive and a negative strain coefficient factor can be achieved by changing the thickness of the AlN layer, which is confirmed by strain response testing based on a silicon cantilever structure with two AlN configurations (1 μm and 3 μm in thickness, respectively.

  20. Prediction of the Strain Response of Poly-AlN/(100)Si Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator and Experimental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuo; You, Zheng

    2016-04-27

    The strain sensitivity of the Aluminum Nitride (AlN)/Silicon (Si) surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR) is predicted based on a modeling method introduced in this work, and further compared with experimental results. The strain influence on both the period of the inter-digital transducer (IDT) and the sound velocity is taken into consideration when modeling the strain response. From the modeling results, AlN and Si have opposite responses to strain; hence, for the AlN/Si-based SAWR, both a positive and a negative strain coefficient factor can be achieved by changing the thickness of the AlN layer, which is confirmed by strain response testing based on a silicon cantilever structure with two AlN configurations (1 μm and 3 μm in thickness, respectively).

  1. Vertical integration of high-Q silicon nitride microresonators into silicon-on-insulator platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Eftekhar, Ali A; Sodagar, Majid; Xia, Zhixuan; Atabaki, Amir H; Adibi, Ali

    2013-07-29

    We demonstrate a vertical integration of high-Q silicon nitride microresonators into the silicon-on-insulator platform for applications at the telecommunication wavelengths. Low-loss silicon nitride films with a thickness of 400 nm are successfully grown, enabling compact silicon nitride microresonators with ultra-high intrinsic Qs (~ 6 × 10(6) for 60 μm radius and ~ 2 × 10(7) for 240 μm radius). The coupling between the silicon nitride microresonator and the underneath silicon waveguide is based on evanescent coupling with silicon dioxide as buffer. Selective coupling to a desired radial mode of the silicon nitride microresonator is also achievable using a pulley coupling scheme. In this work, a 60-μm-radius silicon nitride microresonator has been successfully integrated into the silicon-on-insulator platform, showing a single-mode operation with an intrinsic Q of 2 × 10(6).

  2. Synthesis and characterization of germanium nanowires and germanium/silicon radially heterostructured nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldthorpe, Irene Anne

    Semiconductor nanowires offer new opportunities to study physical phenomena in low-dimensional nanostructures. They also possess technologically useful properties for applications in electronics, optics, sensing, and thermoelectrics. Germanium nanowires are of particular interest, because of germanium's compatibility with standard silicon integrated circuit fabrication processes, its high electronic carrier mobilities, and the low temperature required for germanium nanowire growth. In this work, epitaxially-aligned germanium nanowires are grown on silicon substrates by chemical vapor deposition through the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. Uniform nanowire diameters between 5 and 50 nm are obtained through the use of monodisperse gold colloids as catalysts. The crystallographic orientation of the nanowires, their strain, and their heteroepitaxial relationship with the substrate are characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). A process for removing the gold catalysts from the tips of the germanium nanowires is demonstrated. Silicon shells are then heteroepitaxially deposited around the wires to fabricate radial heterostructures. These shells passivate the germanium nanowire surface, create electronic band offsets to confine holes away the surface where they can scatter or recombine, and induce strain which could allow for the engineering of properties such as band gap and carrier mobilities. However, analogous to planar heteroepitaxy, surface roughening and misfit dislocations can relax this strain. The effects of coaxial dimensions on strain relaxation in these structures are analyzed quantitatively by TEM and synchrotron XRD, and these results are related to continuum elasticity models. Lessons learned generated two successful strategies for synthesizing coherent core-shell nanowires with large misfit strain: chlorine surface passivation and growth of nanowires with low-energy sidewall facets. Both approaches avoid the strain

  3. Antioxidative responses, physiological and productive of rice grown under water deficit and silicon fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Lima Moro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Silicon is a nutrient that can provide better development of rice plants grown in environments with water deficit. This element reduces water loss by transpiration, increases photosynthetic rate and acts as an activator of the enzyme defense system. The purpose of this research was analyse the effect of silicon in two rice cultivars (Curinga and IAC 202 submitted to water deficit under the enzymatic parameters, physiological and productive. We used four strains of soil water (-10, –30, –50 and –70 kPa combined with two ways of correcting the soil saturation (absence and presence of silicon. We measured the enzymatic activity of Superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, the rate of CO2 assimilation and yield. The experimental design was randomized in blocks 4 x 2 factorial with four replications, and the means compared by Tukey test (p <0.05. The enzyme activity increased with the application of silicon even in intense water deficit. The CO2 assimilation rate and also grain yield increased with the addition of silicon. The application of silicone on both cultivars alleviate the effects of stress caused by lack of water.

  4. High-End Silicon PDICs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zimmermann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available An overview on integrated silicon photodiodes and photodiode integrated circuits (PDICs or optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEICs for optical storage systems (OSS and fiber receivers is given. It is demonstrated, that by using low-cost silicon technologies high-performance OEICs being true competitors for some III/V-semiconductor OEICs can be realized. OSS-OEICs with bandwidths of up to 380 MHz and fiber receivers with maximum data rates of up to 11 Gbps are described. Low-cost data comm receivers for plastic optical fibers (POF as well as new circuit concepts for OEICs and highly parallel optical receivers are described also in the following.

  5. Microdefects in cast multicrystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, E.; Klinger, D.; Bergmann, S. [Inst. of Crystal Growth Berlin (Germany)

    1995-08-01

    The microdefect etching behavior of cast multicrystalline BAYSIX and SILSO samples is mainly the same as that of EFG silicon, in spite of the very different growth parameters applied to these two techniques and the different carbon contents of the investigated materials. Intentional decorating of mc silicon with copper, iron and gold did not influence the results of etching and with help of infrared transmission microscopy no metal precipitates at the assumed microdefects could be established. There are many open questions concerning the origin of the assumed, not yet doubtless proved microdefects.

  6. Advancements in silicon web technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. H.; Easoz, J.; Mchugh, J. P.; Piotrowski, P.; Hundal, R.

    1987-01-01

    Low defect density silicon web crystals up to 7 cm wide are produced from systems whose thermal environments are designed for low stress conditions using computer techniques. During growth, the average silicon melt temperature, the lateral melt temperature distribution, and the melt level are each controlled by digital closed loop systems to maintain thermal steady state and to minimize the labor content of the process. Web solar cell efficiencies of 17.2 pct AM1 have been obtained in the laboratory while 15 pct efficiencies are common in pilot production.

  7. A silicon microstrip gas chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Marel, J. (Radiation Technology Group, Faculty of Applied Physics, Delft Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands)); Van den Bogaard, A. (Delft Inst. of Microelectronics and Submicrotechnology, Delft Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands)); Van Eijk, C.W.E. (Radiation Technology Group, Faculty of Applied Physics, Delft Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands)); Hollander, R.W. (Radiation Technology Group, Faculty of Applied Physics, Delft Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands)); Okx, W.J.C. (Radiation Technology Group, Faculty of Applied Physics, Delft Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands)); Sarro, P.M. (Delft Inst. of Microelectronics and Submicrotechnology, Delft Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands))

    1994-09-01

    We are manufacturing microstrip gas chambers (MSGC) on silicon with an insulating SiO[sub 2] layer. To study the effect of the sheet resistance of the SiO[sub 2] on the operation of the detector several processes to modify the SiO[sub 2] layer have been investigated: ion implantation, boron and phosphorus diffusion, phosphosilicate glass evaporation and polycrystalline silicon deposition. The dependence of the gas gain on the potentials of the different electrodes and the long term stability have been studied. ((orig.))

  8. Extrinsic doping in silicon revisited

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2010-06-17

    Both n-type and p-type doping of silicon is at odds with the charge transfer predicted by Pauling electronegativities and can only be reconciled if we no longer regarding dopant species as isolated atoms but rather consider them as clusters consisting of the dopant and its four nearest neighbor silicon atoms. The process that gives rise to n-type and p-type effects is the charge redistribution that occurs between the dopant and its neighbors, as we illustrate here using electronic structure calculations. This view point is able to explain why conventional substitutional n-type doping of carbon has been so difficult.

  9. Radiation effects in bulk silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, Cor; Vanhellemont, Jan

    1994-01-01

    This paper highlights important aspects related to irradiation effects in bulk silicon. Some basic principles related to the interaction of radiation with material, i.e. ionization and atomic displacement, are briefly reviewed. A physical understanding of radiation effects strongly depends on the availability of appropriate analytical tools. These tools are critically accessed from a silicon bulk viewpoint. More detailed information, related to the properties of the bulk damage and some dedicated application aspects, is given for both electron and proton irradiations. Emphasis is placed on radiation environments encountered during space missions and on their influence on the electrical performance of devices such as memories and image sensors.

  10. Silicon Nano-Photonic Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao

    to microwave systems and biosensing devices. An ultra-low loss inverse taper coupler for interfacing silicon ridge waveguides and optical bers is introduced and insertion losses of less than 1 dB are achieved for both transverse-electric (TE) and transversemagnetic (TM) polarizations. Integrated...... with the couplers, a silicon ridge waveguide is utilized in nonlinear all-optical signal processing for optical time division multiplexing (OTDM) systems. Record ultra-highspeed error-free optical demultiplexing and waveform sampling are realized and demonstrated for the rst time. Microwave phase shifters and notch...

  11. PECASE: New Directions for Silicon Integrated Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    silicon microring resonators for label-free biosensing in undiluted human plasma,” Biosensors and Bioelectronics 42 (2013) A widely acknowledged...resonators as high sensitivity biosensors will be discussed. The results of the research including scientific publications and patents are...demonstrating mid-infrared integrated optics in silicon and pursuing new investigations into using silicon resonators as high sensitivity biosensors . A

  12. Surface Passivation for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deligiannis, D.

    2017-01-01

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells (SHJ) are currently one of the most promising solar cell technologies in the world. The SHJ solar cell is based on a crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafer, passivated on both sides with a thin intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layer. Subsequently, p-type

  13. MITLL Silicon Integrated Photonics Process: Design Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-31

    MIT Lincoln Laboratory Silicon Integrated Photonics Process Design Guide Revision 2015:1a (31 July 2015) Comprehensive Design...Government. Rev.: 2015:1a (18 June 2015) i MITLL Silicon Integrated Photonics Process Comprehensive Design Guide ... Silicon Integrated Photonics Process Comprehensive Design Guide 16  Deep Etch for Fiber Coupling (DEEP_ETCH

  14. Silicon vertex detector for superheavy elements identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bednarek A.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Silicon vertex detector for superheavy elements (SHE identification has been proposed. It will be constructed using very thin silicon detectors about 5 μm thickness. Results of test of 7.3 μm four inch silicon strip detector (SSD with fission fragments and α particles emitted by 252Cf source are presented

  15. ePIXfab - The silicon photonics platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khanna, A.; Drissi, Y.; Dumon, P.; Baets, R.; Absil, P.; Pozo Torres, J.M.; Lo Cascio, D.M.R.; Fournier, M.; Fedeli, J.M.; Fulbert, L.; Zimmermann, L.; Tillack, B.; Aalto, T.; O'Brien, P.; Deptuck, D.; Xu, J.; Gale, D.

    2013-01-01

    ePIXfab-The European Silicon Photonics Support Center continues to provide state-of-the-art silicon photonics solutions to academia and industry for prototyping and research. ePIXfab is a consortium of EU research centers providing diverse expertise in the silicon photonics food chain, from training

  16. 21 CFR 573.940 - Silicon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 573.940 Section 573.940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Listing § 573.940 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in animal feed in...

  17. Analysis of silicon transporters in turfgrass species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silicon is an abundant element on earth and is also known to be beneficial as an amendment in some crops such as rice. Despite its abundance in many soils, accumulation of silicon in plants is species-specific and can be widely different. It has been shown that the genes responsible for silicon upta...

  18. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food in...

  19. PECVD silicon nitride diaphragms for condenser microphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeper, P.R.; Scheeper, P.R.; Voorthuyzen, J.A.; Voorthuyzen, J.A.; Bergveld, Piet

    1991-01-01

    The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride as a diaphragm material for condenser microphones has been investigated. By means of adjusting the SiH4/NH3 gas-flow composition, silicon-rich silicon nitride films have been obtained with a relatively low tensile

  20. Aquaporins Mediate Silicon Transport in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garneau, Alexandre P; Carpentier, Gabriel A; Marcoux, Andrée-Anne; Frenette-Cotton, Rachelle; Simard, Charles F; Rémus-Borel, Wilfried; Caron, Luc; Jacob-Wagner, Mariève; Noël, Micheline; Powell, Jonathan J; Bélanger, Richard; Côté, François; Isenring, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In animals, silicon is an abundant and differentially distributed trace element that is believed to play important biological functions. One would thus expect silicon concentrations in body fluids to be regulated by silicon transporters at the surface of many cell types. Curiously, however, and even though they exist in plants and algae, no such transporters have been identified to date in vertebrates. Here, we show for the first time that the human aquaglyceroporins, i.e., AQP3, AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 can act as silicon transporters in both Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK-293 cells. In particular, heterologously expressed AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 are all able to induce robust, saturable, phloretin-sensitive silicon transport activity in the range that was observed for low silicon rice 1 (lsi1), a silicon transporter in plant. Furthermore, we show that the aquaglyceroporins appear as relevant silicon permeation pathways in both mice and humans based on 1) the kinetics of substrate transport, 2) their presence in tissues where silicon is presumed to play key roles and 3) their transcriptional responses to changes in dietary silicon. Taken together, our data provide new evidence that silicon is a potentially important biological element in animals and that its body distribution is regulated. They should open up original areas of investigations aimed at deciphering the true physiological role of silicon in vertebrates.

  1. 77 FR 20649 - Silicon Metal From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... COMMISSION Silicon Metal From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on silicon metal from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... Publication 4312 (March 2012), entitled Silicon Metal from China: Investigation No. 731-TA-472 (Third Review...

  2. Aquaporins Mediate Silicon Transport in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre P Garneau

    Full Text Available In animals, silicon is an abundant and differentially distributed trace element that is believed to play important biological functions. One would thus expect silicon concentrations in body fluids to be regulated by silicon transporters at the surface of many cell types. Curiously, however, and even though they exist in plants and algae, no such transporters have been identified to date in vertebrates. Here, we show for the first time that the human aquaglyceroporins, i.e., AQP3, AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 can act as silicon transporters in both Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK-293 cells. In particular, heterologously expressed AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 are all able to induce robust, saturable, phloretin-sensitive silicon transport activity in the range that was observed for low silicon rice 1 (lsi1, a silicon transporter in plant. Furthermore, we show that the aquaglyceroporins appear as relevant silicon permeation pathways in both mice and humans based on 1 the kinetics of substrate transport, 2 their presence in tissues where silicon is presumed to play key roles and 3 their transcriptional responses to changes in dietary silicon. Taken together, our data provide new evidence that silicon is a potentially important biological element in animals and that its body distribution is regulated. They should open up original areas of investigations aimed at deciphering the true physiological role of silicon in vertebrates.

  3. Highly efficient silicon light emitting diode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Minh, P.; Holleman, J.; Wallinga, Hans

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the fabrication, using standard silicon processing techniques, of silicon light-emitting diodes (LED) that efficiently emit photons with energy around the silicon bandgap. The improved efficiency had been explained by the spatial confinement of charge carriers due to a

  4. Silicon carbide as platform for energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syväjärvi, Mikael; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Sun, Jianwu

    Silicon carbide is emerging as a novel material for a range of energy and environmental technologies. Previously, silicon carbide was considered as a material mainly for transistor applications. We have initiated the use of silicon carbide material towards optoelectronics in general lighting and ...

  5. Mechanics of silicon nitride thin-film stressors on a transistor-like geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Reboh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To understand the behavior of silicon nitride capping etch stopping layer stressors in nanoscale microelectronics devices, a simplified structure mimicking typical transistor geometries was studied. Elastic strains in the silicon substrate were mapped using dark-field electron holography. The results were interpreted with the aid of finite element method modeling. We show, in a counterintuitive sense, that the stresses developed by the film in the vertical sections around the transistor gate can reach much higher values than the full sheet reference. This is an important insight for advanced technology nodes where the vertical contribution of such liners is predominant over the horizontal part.

  6. 1366 Project Silicon: Reclaiming US Silicon PV Leadership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Adam [1366 Technologies, Bedford, MA (United States)

    2016-02-16

    1366 Technologies’ Project Silicon addresses two of the major goals of the DOE’s PV Manufacturing Initiative Part 2 program: 1) How to reclaim a strong silicon PV manufacturing presence and; 2) How to lower the levelized cost of electricity (“LCOE”) for solar to $0.05-$0.07/kWh, enabling wide-scale U.S. market adoption. To achieve these two goals, US companies must commercialize disruptive, high-value technologies that are capable of rapid scaling, defensible from foreign competition, and suited for US manufacturing. These are the aims of 1366 Technologies Direct Wafer ™ process. The research conducted during Project Silicon led to the first industrial scaling of 1366’s Direct Wafer™ process – an innovative, US-friendly (efficient, low-labor content) manufacturing process that destroys the main cost barrier limiting silicon PV cost-reductions: the 35-year-old grand challenge of making quality wafers (40% of the cost of modules) without the cost and waste of sawing. The SunPath program made it possible for 1366 Technologies to build its demonstration factory, a key and critical step in the Company’s evolution. The demonstration factory allowed 1366 to build every step of the process flow at production size, eliminating potential risk and ensuring the success of the Company’s subsequent scaling for a 1 GW factory to be constructed in Western New York in 2016 and 2017. Moreover, the commercial viability of the Direct Wafer process and its resulting wafers were established as 1366 formed key strategic partnerships, gained entry into the $8B/year multi-Si wafer market, and installed modules featuring Direct Wafer products – the veritable proving grounds for the technology. The program also contributed to the development of three Generation 3 Direct Wafer furnaces. These furnaces are the platform for copying intelligently and preparing our supply chain – large-scale expansion will not require a bigger machine but more machines. SunPath filled the

  7. Silicon nanocrystals and defect states in silicon rich silicon nitride for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Shakil

    Research interest in silicon nanocrystals (Si-NC) has increased significantly as a result of the desire to improve the light emission efficiency of bulk silicon. Si-NCs embedded in silicon nitride have desirable characteristics for optoelectronic applications since they can increase the tunneling probability and have a lower tunneling barrier than silicon oxide. Higher tunneling probability is an important feature as it can be used to develop more efficient electroluminescent and photovoltaic devices. In this dissertation, the Si-rich Si3N 4 (SRN) was prepared using low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) and RF sputtering followed by high temperature treatment in order to precipitate Si-NCs within the silicon nitride matrix. Several different characterization techniques were used on the Si-NC samples in order to understand the physical, structural, optical and electrical behavior of the nanocrystals. Characterization techniques used in this analysis included photoluminescence (PL), time resolved PL, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ellipsometry and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. Silicon nitride was found to contain a high defect density which suppressed the PL effect from the Si-NC. The PL observed from each different SRN sample correlated to defect states, namely dangling bonds and oxygen related bonding. Although substantial evidence suggested that Si-NC had formed within the SRN sample, a PL effect due to the quantum confinement effect (QCE) from the nanocrystals could not be detected. However, Si rich SiOx samples exhibited excellent PL which correlated with the QCE for an indirect bandgap semiconductor. Further experiments were conducted using forming gas in order to passivate the defects in the SRN. Though significant changes in PL was not achieved due to passivation, the electrical behavior from the SRN indicated that the

  8. III-V semiconductor devices integrated with silicon III-V semiconductor devices integrated with silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, Mark; Martin, Trevor; Smowton, Peter

    2013-09-01

    et al describe the transfer printing and bonding of III-V die on to CMOS wafers and Dastjerdi et al describe the optical performance of free-standing InGaAsP tube optical cavities which may be transferred to silicon substrates. Finally, describing important recent progress on GaN-based devices Jiang et al describe their work on InGaN light-emitting diodes on Si (1 1 1) substrates, Wallis et al describe similar structures with the emphasis on x-ray methods for the control of AlGaN buffer layer strain, Kumar et al describe low leakage current, large-area Schottky barrier photodetectors on Si, whilst Soltani et al describe their recent progress on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors grown on (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) silicon substrates. Overall, we think that this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology provides a timely overview of progress and the opportunities in this exciting and important field. Finally, we would like to thank the IOP editorial staff, in particular Alice Malhador, for their support, and we would also like to thank all contributors for their efforts in making this special issue possible.

  9. Double-walled silicon nanotubes: an ab initio investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Matheus P.

    2018-02-01

    The synthesis of silicon nanotubes realized in the last decade demonstrates multi-walled tubular structures consisting of Si atoms in {{sp}}2 and the {{sp}}3 hybridizations. However, most of the theoretical models were elaborated taking as the starting point {{sp}}2 structures analogous to carbon nanotubes. These structures are unfavorable due to the natural tendency of the Si atoms to undergo {{sp}}3. In this work, through ab initio simulations based on density functional theory, we investigated double-walled silicon nanotubes proposing layered tubes possessing most of the Si atoms in an {{sp}}3 hybridization, and with few {{sp}}2 atoms localized at the outer wall. The lowest-energy structures have metallic behavior. Furthermore, the possibility to tune the band structure with the application of a strain was demonstrated, inducing a metal-semiconductor transition. Thus, the behavior of silicon nanotubes differs significantly from carbon nanotubes, and the main source of the differences is the distortions in the lattice associated with the tendency of Si to make four chemical bonds.

  10. Specific selection for virulent urinary tract infectious Escherichia coli strains during catheter-associated biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrieres, Lionel; Hancock, Viktoria; Klemm, Per

    2007-01-01

    Biofilm-associated bacterial infections have a major impact on artificial implants such as urinary catheters, often with devastating consequences. The capacity of a microorganism to form a biofilm on a surface depends on the nature of the surface and its conditioning. When a urinary catheter...... microorganisms can attach. Urinary tract infectious (UTI) Escherichia coli range in pathogenicity and the damage they cause - from benign asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) strains, which inflict no or few problems to the host, to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains, which are virulent and often cause severe...... symptoms and complications. We have found that whereas ABU strains produce better biofilms on polystyrene and glass, UPEC strains have a clear competitive advantage during biofilm growth on catheter surfaces. Our results indicate that some silicone and silicone-latex catheters actually select...

  11. Silicon carbide fibers and articles including same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, John E; Griffith, George W

    2015-01-27

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  12. Methods for producing silicon carbide fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  13. Solar silicon via the Dow Corning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, L. P.; Dosaj, V. D.

    1979-01-01

    Technical feasibility for high volume production of solar cell-grade silicon is investigated. The process consists of producing silicon from pure raw materials via the carbothermic reduction of quartz. This silicon was then purified to solar grade by impurity segregation during Czochralski crystal growth. Commercially available raw materials were used to produce 100 kg quantities of silicon during 60 hour periods in a direct arc reactor. This silicon produced single crystalline ingot, during a second Czochralski pull, that was fabricated into solar cells having efficiencies ranging from 8.2 percent to greater than 14 percent. An energy analysis of the entire process indicated a 5 month payback time.

  14. Intraventricular Silicone Oil: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Stéphane; Boissonnot, Michèle; Tasu, Jean-Pierre; Simonet, Charles; Ciron, Jonathan; Neau, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial silicone oil is a rare complication of intraocular endotamponade with silicone oil. We describe a case of intraventricular silicone oil fortuitously observed 38 months after an intraocular tamponade for a complicated retinal detachment in an 82 year-old woman admitted in the Department of Neurology for a stroke. We confirm the migration of silicone oil along the optic nerve. We discuss this rare entity with a review of the few other cases reported in the medical literature. Intraventricular migration of silicone oil after intraocular endotamponade is usually asymptomatic but have to be known of the neurologists and the radiologists because of its differential diagnosis that are intraventricular hemorrhage and tumor.

  15. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Marcie [Bandgap Engineering, Lincoln, MA (United States)

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  16. Silicon on insulator self-aligned transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    2003-11-18

    A method for fabricating thin-film single-crystal silicon-on-insulator (SOI) self-aligned transistors. Standard processing of silicon substrates is used to fabricate the transistors. Physical spaces, between the source and gate, and the drain and gate, introduced by etching the polysilicon gate material, are used to provide connecting implants (bridges) which allow the transistor to perform normally. After completion of the silicon substrate processing, the silicon wafer is bonded to an insulator (glass) substrate, and the silicon substrate is removed leaving the transistors on the insulator (glass) substrate. Transistors fabricated by this method may be utilized, for example, in flat panel displays, etc.

  17. Method For Producing Mechanically Flexible Silicon Substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-08-28

    A method for making a mechanically flexible silicon substrate is disclosed. In one embodiment, the method includes providing a silicon substrate. The method further includes forming a first etch stop layer in the silicon substrate and forming a second etch stop layer in the silicon substrate. The method also includes forming one or more trenches over the first etch stop layer and the second etch stop layer. The method further includes removing the silicon substrate between the first etch stop layer and the second etch stop layer.

  18. Hybrid Integrated Platforms for Silicon Photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Bowers

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent progress in hybrid integrated platforms for silicon photonics is presented. Integration of III-V semiconductors onto silicon-on-insulator substrates based on two different bonding techniques is compared, one comprising only inorganic materials, the other technique using an organic bonding agent. Issues such as bonding process and mechanism, bonding strength, uniformity, wafer surface requirement, and stress distribution are studied in detail. The application in silicon photonics to realize high-performance active and passive photonic devices on low-cost silicon wafers is discussed. Hybrid integration is believed to be a promising technology in a variety of applications of silicon photonics.

  19. Aleph silicon microstrip vertex detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This microstrip vertex locator was located at the heart of the ALEPH experiment, one of the four experiments at the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider. In the experiments at CERN's LEP, which ran from 1989 to 2000, modern silicon microvertex detectors, such as those used at ALEPH, monitored the production of short-lived particles close to the beam pipe.

  20. Magnetically retained silicone facial prosthesis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    straps, spectacle frames, extension from the denture, magnets, adhesives and implants material.[4] In this case report using maxillofacial silicone material and magnets, the prosthesis was constructed to camouflage the facial defect more esthetically. Case Report. A 67‑year‑old male patient was referred to the department.

  1. Magnetically retained silicone facial prosthesis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Magnet retention, oro cutaneous fistula, silicone maxillofacial prosthesis. Date of Acceptance: 09-Jun-2013. Address for correspondence: Dr. Suresh Venugopalan, Department of Prosthodontics,. Saveetha Dental College, Ponamalle High Road,. Chennai ‑ 600 077, Tamil Nadu, India. E‑mail: ...

  2. Behavior of dislocations in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumino, Koji [Nippon Steel Corp., Chiba Prefecture (Japan)

    1995-08-01

    A review is given of dynamic behavior of dislocations in silicon on the basis of works of the author`s group. Topics taken up are generation, motion and multiplication of dislocations as affected by oxygen impurities and immobilization of dislocations due to impurity reaction.

  3. Seedless electroplating on patterned silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vargas Llona, Laura Dolores; Jansen, Henricus V.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2006-01-01

    Nickel thin films have been electrodeposited without the use of an additional seed layer, on highly doped silicon wafers. These substrates conduct sufficiently well to allow deposition using a peripherical electrical contact on the wafer. Films 2 μm thick have been deposited using a nickel sulfamate

  4. Silicon nitride microwave photonic circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeloffzen, C.G.H.; Zhuang, L.; Taddei, Caterina; Taddei, Caterina; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, Rene; van Dijk, Paulus W.L.; Oldenbeuving, Ruud; Marpaung, D.A.I.; Burla, M.; Buria, Maurizio; Boller, Klaus J.

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview of several microwave photonic processing functionalities based on combinations of Mach-Zehnder and ring resonator filters using the high index contrast silicon nitride (TriPleXTM) waveguide technology. All functionalities are built using the same basic building blocks, namely

  5. Theory of unsaturated silicon lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Stucke, David; Stojkovic, Dragan; Crespi, Vincent

    2008-03-01

    Several molecules are known to contain stable silicon double or triple bonds that are sterically protected by bulky side groups. Through first-principles computation, we demonstrate that well-defined π bonds can also be formed in two prototypical crystalline Si structures: Schwarzite Si-168 and dilated diamond. The sp^2-bonded Si-168 is thermodynamically preferred over diamond silicon at a modest negative pressure of -2.5 GPa. Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations of Si-168 at 1000 K reveal significant thermal stability. Si-168 is metallic in density functional theory, but with distinct π-like and &*circ;-like valence and conduction band complexes just above and below the Fermi energy. A bandgap buried in the valence band but close to the Fermi level can be accessed via hole doping in semiconducting Si144B24. A less-stable crystalline system with a silicon-silicon triple bond is also examined: a rare-gas intercalated open framework on a dilated diamond lattice.

  6. Mesoporous Silicon-Based Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peramunage, Dharmasena

    2015-01-01

    For high-capacity, high-performance lithium-ion batteries. A new high-capacity anode composite based on mesoporous silicon is being developed. With a structure that resembles a pseudo one-dimensional phase, the active anode material will accommodate significant volume changes expected upon alloying and dealloying with lithium (Li).

  7. Let’s talk silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    While silicon (Si) has been a known plant nutrient for centuries, how plants use this element is still poorly understood. Researchers have identified how plants acquire Si from the environment and transport the element to all plant tissues, including roots, stems, petioles, leaves and flowers. We ...

  8. Pathology of silicon carbide pneumoconiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massé, S; Bégin, R; Cantin, A

    1988-03-01

    Silicon carbide is a widely used synthetic abrasive manufactured by heating silica and coke in electric furnaces at 2400 degrees C. Until recently it had been considered a relatively inert dust in humans and animals. However, several roentgenologic surveys had revealed lesions similar to low-grade silicosis. A recent epidemiological study has revealed a 35% incidence of pulmonary problems. Tissues from three such workers were available for light microscopy. A mixed pneumoconiosis was found, and lesions can be summarized as follows: (a) abundance of intraalveolar macrophages associated with a mixture of inhaled particles including carbon, silicon, pleomorphic crystals, silicon carbide, and ferruginous bodies showing a thin black central core; (b) nodular fibrosis, generally profuse, containing silica and ferruginous bodies and associated with large amount of carbon pigment; (c) interstitial fibrosis, less prominent than the nodular form; (d) carcinoma in two cases. We believe this pneumoconiosis is sufficiently characteristic to be recognized as a distinct entity. The Stanton hypothesis on fiber properties and carcinogenesis could be applied to silicon carbide dust. At present, it appears that the occupational hazard is limited to the manufacturing process and powdered product used in some industries.

  9. Microelectromechanical pump utilizing porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Jeffrey W [Albuquerque, NM; Stalford, Harold L [Norman, OK

    2011-07-19

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) pump is disclosed which includes a porous silicon region sandwiched between an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber. The porous silicon region is formed in a silicon substrate and contains a number of pores extending between the inlet and outlet chambers, with each pore having a cross-section dimension about equal to or smaller than a mean free path of a gas being pumped. A thermal gradient is provided along the length of each pore by a heat source which can be an electrical resistance heater or an integrated circuit (IC). A channel can be formed through the silicon substrate so that inlet and outlet ports can be formed on the same side of the substrate, or so that multiple MEM pumps can be connected in series to form a multi-stage MEM pump. The MEM pump has applications for use in gas-phase MEM chemical analysis systems, and can also be used for passive cooling of ICs.

  10. Untreated silicone breast implant rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölmich, Lisbet R; Vejborg, Ilse M; Conrad, Carsten; Sletting, Susanne; Høier-Madsen, Mimi; Fryzek, Jon P; McLaughlin, Joseph K; Kjøller, Kim; Wiik, Allan; Friis, Søren

    2004-07-01

    Implant rupture is a well-known complication of breast implant surgery that can pass unnoticed by both patient and physician. To date, no prospective study has addressed the possible health implications of silicone breast implant rupture. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether untreated ruptures are associated with changes over time in magnetic resonance imaging findings, serologic markers, or self-reported breast symptoms. A baseline magnetic resonance imaging examination was performed in 1999 on 271 women who were randomly chosen from a larger cohort of women having cosmetic breast implants for a median period of 12 years (range, 3 to 25 years). A follow-up magnetic resonance imaging examination was carried out in 2001, excluding women who underwent explantation in the period between the two magnetic resonance imaging examinations (n = 44). On the basis of these examinations, the authors identified 64 women who had at least one ruptured implant at the first magnetic resonance imaging examination and, for comparison, all women who had intact implants at both examinations (n = 98). Magnetic resonance images from the two examinations were compared and changes in rupture configuration were evaluated. Comparisons were also made for self-reported breast symptoms occurring during the study period and for changes in serum values of antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor, and cardiolipin antibodies immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M. The majority of the women with implant rupture had no visible magnetic resonance imaging changes of their ruptured implants. For 11 implants (11 percent) in 10 women, the authors observed progression of silicone seepage, either as a conversion from intracapsular into extracapsular rupture (n = 7), as progression of extra-capsular silicone (n = 3), or as increasing herniation of the silicone within the fibrous capsule (n = 1); however, in most cases, these changes were minor. Some changes could be ascribed to trauma, but

  11. Flexible Thermoelectric Generators on Silicon Fabric

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, the development of a Thermoelectric Generator on Flexible Silicon Fabric is explored to extend silicon electronics for flexible platforms. Low cost, easily deployable plastic based flexible electronics are of great interest for smart textile, wearable electronics and many other exciting applications. However, low thermal budget processing and fundamentally limited electron mobility hinders its potential to be competitive with well established and highly developed silicon technology. The use of silicon in flexible electronics involve expensive and abrasive materials and processes. In this work, high performance flexible thermoelectric energy harvesters are demonstrated from low cost bulk silicon (100) wafers. The fabrication of the micro- harvesters was done using existing silicon processes on silicon (100) and then peeled them off from the original substrate leaving it for reuse. Peeled off silicon has 3.6% thickness of bulk silicon reducing the thermal loss significantly and generating nearly 30% more output power than unpeeled harvesters. The demonstrated generic batch processing shows a pragmatic way of peeling off a whole silicon circuitry after conventional fabrication on bulk silicon wafers for extremely deformable high performance integrated electronics. In summary, by using a novel, low cost process, this work has successfully integrated existing and highly developed fabrication techniques to introduce a flexible energy harvester for sustainable applications.

  12. Aluminum gettering in single and multicrystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugo, S.A.; Hieslmair, H.; Weber, E.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Al gettering has been performed on integrated circuit (I.C.) quality silicon and a variety of single and multicrystalline silicon solar cell materials. The minority carrier diffusion length, Ln, has been used to quantify the gettering response. Vast differences in response to the Al gettering treatment are observed between the I.C. quality silicon and the solar cell materials. The I.C. silicon generally responds well while the solar cell silicon performance progressively degrades with increasing gettering temperature. Preliminary data shows that by performing a Rapid Thermal Annealing treatment prior to the Al gettering, an improved or further degraded Ln emerges in solar cell material depending on the material`s manufacturer. We explain these observed phenomena by suggesting that Al gettering in solar cell silicon is an impurity emission-limited process while for I.C. quality silicon it is diffusion limited.

  13. Recent progress and patents in silicon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Li Z; Wang, Shang B; Fan, Chuan G

    2010-01-01

    Silicon nanotubes, as a novel kind of silicon nanomaterials, exhibit good application prospect in lithium ion battery, field effect transistors, magnetic nanodevices, hydrogen storage, nanoscale electron and field emitting devices. This article reviews the recent progress and patents in silicon nanotubes. The progress and corresponding patents for the synthesis of silicon nanotubes using different templates, hydrothermal method, electrochemical deposition, plasma method and laser ablation method are demonstrated. The experimental application and patents of silicon nanotubes as field effect transistors and lithium ion battery are discussed. The application potential of silicon nanotubes in magnetic devices, hydrogen storage, nanoscale electron and field-emitting devices is demonstrated. Finally, the future development of silicon nanotubes for the synthesis and practice application is also discussed.

  14. A strain gauge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The invention relates to a strain gauge of a carrier layer and a meandering measurement grid positioned on the carrier layer, wherein the strain gauge comprises two reinforcement members positioned on the carrier layer at opposite ends of the measurement grid in the axial direction. The reinforce......The invention relates to a strain gauge of a carrier layer and a meandering measurement grid positioned on the carrier layer, wherein the strain gauge comprises two reinforcement members positioned on the carrier layer at opposite ends of the measurement grid in the axial direction....... The reinforcement members are each placed within a certain axial distance to the measurement grid with the axial distance being equal to or smaller than a factor times the grid spacing. The invention further relates to a multi-axial strain gauge such as a bi-axial strain gauge or a strain gauge rosette where each...... of the strain gauges comprises reinforcement members. The invention further relates to a method for manufacturing a strain gauge as mentioned above....

  15. Electrical Properties of Materials for Elevated Temperature Resistance Strain Gage Application. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1987-01-01

    The objective was to study the electrical resistances of materials that are potentially useful as resistance strain gages at 1000 C. Transition metal carbides and nitrides, boron carbide and silicon carbide were selected for the experimental phase of this research. Due to their low temperature coefficient of resistance and good stability, TiC, ZrC, B sub 4 C and beta-SiC are suggested as good candidates for high temperature resistance strain gage applications.

  16. Control of biaxial strain in single-layer molybdenite using local thermal expansion of the substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plechinger, Gerd; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Buscema, Michele; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Steele, Gary A.; Kuc, Agnieszka; Heine, Thomas; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Single-layer MoS2 is a direct-gap semiconductor whose electronic band structure strongly depends on the strain applied to its crystal lattice. While uniaxial strain can be easily applied in a controlled way, e.g., by bending of a flexible substrate with the atomically thin MoS2 layer on top, experimental realization of biaxial strain is more challenging. Here, we exploit the large mismatch between the thermal expansion coefficients of MoS2 and a silicone-based substrate to apply a controllable biaxial tensile strain by heating the substrate with a focused laser. The effect of this biaxial strain is directly observable in optical spectroscopy as a redshift of the MoS2 photoluminescence. We also demonstrate the potential of this method to engineer more complex strain patterns by employing highly absorptive features on the substrate to achieve non-uniform heat profiles. By comparison of the observed redshift to strain-dependent band structure calculations, we estimate the biaxial strain applied by the silicone-based substrate to be up to 0.2%, corresponding to a band gap modulation of 105 meV per percentage of biaxial tensile strain.

  17. Silicon-Based Anode and Method for Manufacturing the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushin, Gleb Nikolayevich (Inventor); Luzinov, Igor (Inventor); Zdyrko, Bogdan (Inventor); Magasinski, Alexandre (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A silicon-based anode comprising silicon, a carbon coating that coats the surface of the silicon, a polyvinyl acid that binds to at least a portion of the silicon, and vinylene carbonate that seals the interface between the silicon and the polyvinyl acid. Because of its properties, polyvinyl acid binders offer improved anode stability, tunable properties, and many other attractive attributes for silicon-based anodes, which enable the anode to withstand silicon cycles of expansion and contraction during charging and discharging.

  18. National solar technology roadmap: Film-silicon PV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, Brian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Silicon photovoltaic (PV) technologies are addressed in two different technology roadmaps: Film-Silicon PV and Wafer-Silicon PV. This Film-Silicon PV roadmap applies to all silicon-film technologies that rely on a supporting substrate such as glass, polymer, aluminum, stainless steel, or metallurgical-grade silicon. Such devices typically use amorphous, nanocrystalline, fine-grained polycrystalline, or epitaxial silicon layers that are 1–20 μm thick.

  19. Properties and Applications of Silicon Oxynitride Gate Dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisch, K. S.

    1996-03-01

    Reducing the size of silicon CMOS transistors enables higher speed, lower-power, denser and cheaper circuits, but introduces many challenges in process technology. As the gate oxide thickness is reduced, and as electric fields in the MOSFET increase, there are increased concerns about hot-carrier damage and oxide breakdown. Additionally, thinner SiO2 layers cannot effectively block diffusion of dopants and impurities. Silicon oxynitride dielectrics minimize these difficulties, making them attractive as gate dielectrics for future CMOS processes. Silicon oxynitrides are thermally grown on Si, in N_2O at temperatures ranging from 800-1100^circC, to thicknesses of 3-10 nm. The resulting material is primarily SiO_2, with 10^14-10^15 cm-2 nitrogen atoms incorporated (as measured by nuclear reaction analysis), equivalent to less than a monolayer of pure Si_3N_4. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy profiles indicate that this nitrogen is mainly near the crystalline silicon/dielectric interface, as a result of two competing reactions:(E.C. Carr, K.A. Ellis and R.A. Buhrman, Appl. Phys. Lett., v. 66, n. 12, p. 1492, (1995).) first, a nitrogen-oxygen species diffuses through the film and reacts at the Si interface, growing a silicon oxynitride layer. As the reaction proceeds and the grown layer is pushed up from the interface, a competing reaction removes the nitrogen from the dielectric ``bulk'', leaving behind SiO_2. This small amount of nitrogen incorporated at the dielectric interface has a dramatic effect on electrical reliability. Nitrogen-containing gate dielectrics inhibit generation of electrical defects and charge traps that degrade device performance, and they can more than double the time until breakdown. Such improvements are attributed to reduction of strain at the interface, which allows stronger bonds and fewer defect precursors. Oxynitrides also have the advantage of acting as a diffusion barrier. In MOS structures, boron dopant atoms originating in the

  20. Silicon Micromachined Sensor for Broadband Vibration Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Adolfo; Edmans, Daniel; Cormeau, Chris; Seidler, Gernot; Deangelis, Dave; Maby, Edward

    1995-01-01

    The development of a family of silicon based integrated vibration sensors capable of sensing mechanical resonances over a broad range of frequencies with minimal signal processing requirements is presented. Two basic general embodiments of the concept were designed and fabricated. The first design was structured around an array of cantilever beams and fabricated using the ARPA sponsored multi-user MEMS processing system (MUMPS) process at the Microelectronics Center of North Carolina (MCNC). As part of the design process for this first sensor, a comprehensive finite elements analysis of the resonant modes and stress distribution was performed using PATRAN. The dependence of strain distribution and resonant frequency response as a function of Young's modulus in the Poly-Si structural material was studied. Analytical models were also studied. In-house experimental characterization using optical interferometry techniques were performed under controlled low pressure conditions. A second design, intended to operate in a non-resonant mode and capable of broadband frequency response, was proposed and developed around the concept of a cantilever beam integrated with a feedback control loop to produce a null mode vibration sensor. A proprietary process was used to integrat a metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS) sensing device, with actuators and a cantilever beam, as part of a compatible process. Both devices, once incorporated as part of multifunction data acquisition and telemetry systems will constitute a useful system for NASA launch vibration monitoring operations. Satellite and other space structures can benefit from the sensor for mechanical condition monitoring functions.

  1. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-04-09

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  2. Silicon-germanium (Sige) nanostructures production, properties and applications in electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Usami, N

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured silicon-germanium (SiGe) provides the prospect of novel and enhanced electronic device performance. This book reviews the materials science and technology of SiGe nanostructures, including crystal growth, fabrication of nanostructures, material properties and applications in electronics.$bNanostructured silicon-germanium (SiGe) opens up the prospects of novel and enhanced electronic device performance, especially for semiconductor devices. Silicon-germanium (SiGe) nanostructures reviews the materials science of nanostructures and their properties and applications in different electronic devices. The introductory part one covers the structural properties of SiGe nanostructures, with a further chapter discussing electronic band structures of SiGe alloys. Part two concentrates on the formation of SiGe nanostructures, with chapters on different methods of crystal growth such as molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapour deposition. This part also includes chapters covering strain engineering and mo...

  3. Debug automation from pre-silicon to post-silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Dehbashi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    This book describes automated debugging approaches for the bugs and the faults which appear in different abstraction levels of a hardware system. The authors employ a transaction-based debug approach to systems at the transaction-level, asserting the correct relation of transactions. The automated debug approach for design bugs finds the potential fault candidates at RTL and gate-level of a circuit. Debug techniques for logic bugs and synchronization bugs are demonstrated, enabling readers to localize the most difficult bugs. Debug automation for electrical faults (delay faults)finds the potentially failing speedpaths in a circuit at gate-level. The various debug approaches described achieve high diagnosis accuracy and reduce the debugging time, shortening the IC development cycle and increasing the productivity of designers. Describes a unified framework for debug automation used at both pre-silicon and post-silicon stages; Provides approaches for debug automation of a hardware system at different levels of ...

  4. Void initiation from interfacial debonding of spherical silicon particles inside a silicon-copper nanocomposite: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yi; Chen, Zengtao

    2017-02-01

    Silicon particles with diameters from 1.9 nm to 30 nm are embedded in a face-centered-cubic copper matrix to form nanocomposite specimens for simulation. The interfacial debonding of silicon particles from the copper matrix and the subsequent growth of nucleated voids are studied via molecular dynamics (MD). The MD results are examined from several different perspectives. The overall mechanical performance is monitored by the average stress-strain response and the accumulated porosity. The ‘relatively farthest-traveled’ atoms are identified to characterize the onset of interfacial debonding. The relative displacement field is plotted to illustrate both subsequent interfacial debonding and the growth of a nucleated void facilitated by a dislocation network. Our results indicate that the initiation of interfacial debonding is due to the accumulated surface stress if the matrix is initially dislocation-free. However, pre-existing dislocations can make a considerable difference. In either case, the dislocation emission also contributes to the subsequent debonding process. As for the size effect, the debonding of relatively larger particles causes a drop in the stress-strain curve. The volume fraction of second-phase particles is found to be more influential than the size of the simulation box on the onset of interfacial debonding. The volume fraction of second-phase particles also affects the shape of the nucleated void and, therefore, influences the stress response of the composite.

  5. Design and development of a MEMS capacitive bending strain sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebersold, J.; Walsh, K.; Crain, M.; Martin, M.; Voor, M.; Lin, J.-T.; Jackson, D.; Hnat, W.; Naber, J.

    2006-05-01

    The design, modeling, fabrication and testing of a MEMS-based capacitive bending strain sensor utilizing a comb drive is presented. This sensor is designed to be integrated with a telemetry system that will monitor changes in bending strain to assist with the diagnosis of spinal fusion. ABAQUS/CAE finite-element analysis (FEA) software was used to predict sensor actuation, capacitance output and avoid material failure. Highly doped boron silicon wafers with a low resistivity were fabricated into an interdigitated finger array employing deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) to create 150 µm sidewalls with 25 µm spacing between the adjacent fingers. The sensor was adhered to a steel beam and subjected to four-point bending to mechanically change the spacing between the interdigitated fingers as a function of strain. As expected, the capacitance output increased as an inverse function of the spacing between the interdigitated fingers. At the unstrained state, the capacitive output was 7.56 pF and increased inversely to 17.04 pF at 1571 µɛ of bending strain. The FEA and analytical models were comparable with the largest differential of 0.65 pF or 6.33% occurring at 1000 µɛ. Advantages of this design are a dice-free process without the use of expensive silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers.

  6. Chitinase producing Bt strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haim B. Gunner; Matthew Zimet; Sarah Berger

    1985-01-01

    Screening of 402 strains of more than 18 varieties of Bacillus thuringiensis showed chitinase to be inducible in virtually every serovar tested. Though the chitinase titre varied among strains, there was a strong correlation between enhanced lethality to spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clemens), and an increase in...

  7. Mapping strain fields in ultrathin bonded Si wafers by x-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; Poulsen, Mette; Bunk, Oliver

    2002-01-01

    X-ray scattering reveals the atomic displacements arising from rotational misalignment in ultrathin silicon bonded wafers. For a 4.3 nm top wafer, the strain field penetrates from the bonded interface to the surface and produces distinctive finite-size oscillations in x-ray data. Analytical...... calculations permit the atomic displacements throughout the thin top wafer to be modeled....

  8. Reactive magnetron sputtering of silicon to produce silicon oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, R. P.; Danson, N.; Hall, G. W.

    1997-01-01

    Well controlled silicon dioxide films with refractive index 1.400-1.490 have been deposited at rates of up to 0.85 nm/s from a 100 mm diameter polycrystalline silicon cathode, sputtered at 200 W of 40 kHz rectified AC power in a reactive environment. This frequency used with control of the partial pressure of the oxygen in the system from the cathode potential has demonstrated an ability to reactively sputter silicon oxide of high quality. Stress/stoichiometry curves showed a peak in stress at a refractive index of 1.460 indicating both a dense structure and optimised SiO 2. We have demonstrated a pulsing system for the admission of oxygen into the silicon sputtering system which is under the control of a signal derived from the voltage appearing on the cathode when sputtering at constant power. Such a signal indicates the sputtering status of the target as to the degree to which the cathode is covered with oxide i.e. poisoned. By varying combinations of reactive gas flow rate and switching levels, different film compositions could be reproducibly and reliably obtained. The growing films could be subjected to a externally-varied degree of argon-ion bombardment with a simple modification of the geometry of the unbalanced magnetron used for the sputtering. The amount of ion bombardment with such a system was also a function of the argon sputtering pressure that was used. Increased argon-ion bombardment resulted in more compressive stress in the film that was produced.

  9. A general classification of silicon utilizing organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, P.; Das, S.

    2010-12-01

    Silicon utilizing organisms may be defined as organisms with high silicon content (≥ 1% dry weight) and they can metabolize silicon with or without demonstrable silicon transporter genes (SIT) in them(Das,2010). Silicon is the second most abundant element in the lithosphere (27.70%) and it is as important as phosphorus and magnesium (0.03%) in the biota. Hydrated silica represents the second most abundant biogenic mineral after carbonate minerals. Silicon is accumulated and metabolized by some prokaryotes, and Si compounds can stimulate the growth of a range of fungi. It is well known that Si is essential for diatoms. In mammals, Si is considered an essential trace element, required in bone, cartilage and connective tissue formation, enzymatic activities and other metabolic processes. Silicon was suggested to act as a phosphoprotein effector in bone. In mammals, Si is also reported to positively influence the immune system and to be required for lymphocyte proliferation. The aqueous chemistry of Si is dominated by silicic acid at biological pH ranges. Monosilicic acid can form stable complexes with organic hydroxy-containing molecules . Biosilica also has been identified associated with various biomolecules including proteins and carbohydrates. There are main seven groups of silicon utilizing organisms belonging to Gram positive bacteria, algae, protozoa, sponges, fungi, lichens, and monocotyledon plants. In each group again all the members are not silicon utilizing organisms, thus selective members in each group are further classified depending their degree of silicon utilization. Important silicon utilizing bacteria are Mycobacteria, Nocardia, Streptomyces, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Lactobacillus spp. etc., Important silicon utilizing algae are Centrobacillariophyceae, Pennatibacillariophyceae and Chrysophyceae. Many protozoa belonging to Heterokonta, Choanoflagellida, Actinopoda are well known silicon utilizing microorganisms. Hexactinellida ( glass sponges

  10. Interference in adhesion of bacteria and yeasts isolated from explanted voice prostheses to silicone rubber by rhamnolipid biosurfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, LR; Banat, IM; van der Mei, HC; Teixeira, JA; Oliveira, R

    Aims: The effects and extent of adhesion of four different bacterial and two yeast strains isolated from explanted voice prostheses to silicone rubber with and without an adsorbed rhamnolipid biosurfactant layer obtained from Pseudomonasaeruginosa DS10-129 was studied. Methods and Results: The

  11. Choosing a Silicone Encapsulant for Photovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velderrain, Michelle

    2011-12-01

    Growth in the solar industry has resulted in newer technologies, specifically concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) modules, to explore using new types of materials such as silicone encapsulants. CPV and LCPV module designs are to achieve the most efficient energy conversion possible however it is equally important to demonstrate long term reliability. Silicone is a material of interest due to its thermal stability and ability to absorb stresses incurred during thermal cycling. The refractive index of clear silicone adhesives is advantageous because it can be optimized using phenyl groups to match BK7 glass and other substrates to minimize light loss at the interfaces but it is relatively unknown how the optical properties change over time possibly yellowing in such a harsh environment. A 1.41 silicone encapsulant is compared to a 1.52 refractive index silicone. Optical Absorption (300 nm-1300 nm), Water Vapor Permeability, Moisture Absorption and effects of oxidation at elevated temperatures will be compared of these materials to aid the engineer in choosing a silicone for their CPV application. Non-phenyl containing 1.41 RI silicones have been used for several years for bonding solar arrays in the satellite industry. Phenyl groups on the siloxane polymer can change various properties of the silicone. Understanding how phenyl affects these properties allows the engineer to understand the benefits and risks when using a RI matching silicone to minimize light loss versus a non-phenyl containing silicone.

  12. Theoretical studies of H-passivated silicon nanowires, silicon surface systems and silicon/germanium core/shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ning

    Global structural optimization with Genetic Algorithm and first principle analysis have been performed on the Silicon nanowires, Ag induced Si surface reconstruction systems and Si/Ge core/shell nanowires. By using genetic algorithm combined with ab-initio calculation, we determined the atomic structures H-passivated and silicon nanowires. We found that at certain values of the hydrogen chemical potential the nanowires can take relatively stable structures in SiNWs with rectangular cross sections bounded by monohydride {110} and {111} facets with dihydride wire edges. In SiNWs cross section of the nanowire evolves from chains of six-atom rings to fused pairs of such chains to hexagons bounded by {001} and {111} facets. Second, with the structural models of SiNWs, we further analyzed their electronic properties. We showed that the SiNWs have an indirect to quasi-direct band gap transition with the increasing sizes and the band gap properties under uniaxial stress and different aspect ratios. Third, we did a Ag-induced Si(111) (rt3xrt3) and (3x1) surface reconstruction search with our variablenumber GA with ab-initio relaxation. The (rt3xrt3) global search found the Inequivalent Triangle (IET) structure as the lowest energy. A model of combination of pure Ag films and IET structure is proposed to explain the islands-to-holes ratio (RIH) equals 3 situation observed in experiments. For the (3x1) reconstruction, a model with 2/3 ML Ag and 1Ml Si coverage has been found and it has lower surface energy than the widely accepted HCC model with only 1/3 ML Ag coverage. Finally, we did some DFT calculation on the Si/Ge and Ge/Si core/shell [112] nanowires. The charged localization inside the NWs reveals that the electrons and holes are seperated. The quantum confinement effect in the NWs is strongly modified by the band offsets. An indirect to quasi-direct band gap transition can be obtained with a compressive strain, and the depth of the quantum wells can be modulated by the

  13. Dry etch method for texturing silicon and device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Talia S.; Haight, Richard A.; Kim, Jeehwan; Lee, Yun Seog

    2017-07-25

    A method for texturing silicon includes loading a silicon wafer into a vacuum chamber, heating the silicon wafer and thermal cracking a gas to generate cracked sulfur species. The silicon wafer is exposed to the cracked sulfur species for a time duration in accordance with a texture characteristic needed for a surface of the silicon wafer.

  14. Quantum ballistic transport in strained epitaxial germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Y.; Holmes, S. N.; Newton, P. J.; Ellis, D. J. P.; Morrison, C.; Pepper, M.; Barnes, C. H. W.; Myronov, M.

    2017-12-01

    Large scale fabrication using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor compatible technology of semiconductor nanostructures that operate on the principles of quantum transport is an exciting possibility now due to the recent development of ultra-high mobility hole gases in epitaxial germanium grown on standard silicon substrates. We present here a ballistic transport study of patterned surface gates on strained Ge quantum wells with SiGe barriers, which confirms the quantum characteristics of the Ge heavy hole valence band structure in 1-dimension. Quantised conductance at multiples of 2e2/h is a universal feature of hole transport in Ge up to 10 × (2e2/h). The behaviour of ballistic plateaus with finite source-drain bias and applied magnetic field is elucidated. In addition, a reordering of the ground state is observed.

  15. Enhancing the Efficiency of Silicon-Based Solar Cells by the Piezo-Phototronic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Laipan; Wang, Longfei; Pan, Caofeng; Chen, Libo; Xue, Fei; Chen, Baodong; Yang, Leijing; Su, Li; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-02-28

    Although there are numerous approaches for fabricating solar cells, the silicon-based photovoltaics are still the most widely used in industry and around the world. A small increase in the efficiency of silicon-based solar cells has a huge economic impact and practical importance. We fabricate a silicon-based nanoheterostructure (p(+)-Si/p-Si/n(+)-Si (and n-Si)/n-ZnO nanowire (NW) array) photovoltaic device and demonstrate the enhanced device performance through significantly enhanced light absorption by NW array and effective charge carrier separation by the piezo-phototronic effect. The strain-induced piezoelectric polarization charges created at n-doped Si-ZnO interfaces can effectively modulate the corresponding band structure and electron gas trapped in the n(+)-Si/n-ZnO NW nanoheterostructure and thus enhance the transport process of local charge carriers. The efficiency of the solar cell was improved from 8.97% to 9.51% by simply applying a static compress strain. This study indicates that the piezo-phototronic effect can enhance the performance of a large-scale silicon-based solar cell, with great potential for industrial applications.

  16. Characterisation of Silicon Pad Diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Hodson, Thomas Connor

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pad sensors are used in high luminosity particle detectors because of their excellent timing resolution, radiation tolerance and possible high granularity. The effect of different design decisions on detector performance can be investigated nondestructively through electronic characterisation of the sensor diodes. Methods for making accurate measurements of leakage current and cell capacitance are described using both a standard approach with tungsten needles and an automated approach with a custom multiplexer and probing setup.

  17. Spectroscopy of single silicon nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.; Cichos, F.; Borczyskowski, C. von E-mail: borczyskowski@physik.tu-chemnitz.de

    2004-06-01

    Confocal microscopy has been performed on silicon nanoparticles prepared by gas-phase methods and electrochemical etching (single particles), respectively. Spectral line narrowing has been obtained for single particles. Spectra are in agreement with interstellar extended red emission (ERE) when properly choosing size distributions. Independent of preparation techniques, both types show similar behaviour with respect to (partly reversible in the dark) photobleaching accompanied by spectral red shifts on timescales of seconds upon 514 nm laser irradiation.

  18. Coating of silicon pore optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Ackermann, M.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2009-01-01

    For the International X-ray observatory (IXO), a mirror module with an effective area of 3 m2 at 1.25 keV and at least 0.65 m2 at 6 keV has to be realized. To achieve this goal, coated silicon pore optics has been developed over the last years. One of the challenges is to coat the Si plates...

  19. The ATLAS Silicon Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, M S; Einsweiler, K F; Emes, J; Gilchriese, M G D; Joshi, A; Kleinfelder, S A; Marchesini, R; McCormack, F; Milgrome, O; Palaio, N; Pengg, F; Richardson, J; Zizka, G; Ackers, M; Andreazza, A; Comes, G; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Klasen, V; Kühl, T; Meuser, S; Ockenfels, W; Raith, B; Treis, J; Wermes, N; Gössling, C; Hügging, F G; Wüstenfeld, J; Wunstorf, R; Barberis, D; Beccherle, R; Darbo, G; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Musico, P; Osculati, B; Parodi, F; Rossi, L; Blanquart, L; Breugnon, P; Calvet, D; Clemens, J-C; Delpierre, P A; Hallewell, G D; Laugier, D; Mouthuy, T; Rozanov, A; Valin, I; Aleppo, M; Caccia, M; Ragusa, F; Troncon, C; Lutz, Gerhard; Richter, R H; Rohe, T; Brandl, A; Gorfine, G; Hoeferkamp, M; Seidel, SC; Boyd, GR; Skubic, P L; Sícho, P; Tomasek, L; Vrba, V; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; D'Auria, S; del Papa, C; Charles, E; Fasching, D; Becks, K H; Lenzen, G; Linder, C

    2001-01-01

    Prototype sensors for the ATLAS silicon pixel detector have been developed. The design of the sensors is guided by the need to operate them in the severe LHC radiation environment at up to several hundred volts while maintaining a good signal-to-noise ratio, small cell size, and minimal multiple scattering. The ability to be operated under full bias for electrical characterization prior to the attachment of the readout integrated circuit electronics is also desired.

  20. Silicon nanocrystals as handy biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Kouki; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Tilley, Richard; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2007-02-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have brighter and longer fluorescence than organic dyes. Therefore, QDs can be applied to biotechnology, and have capability to be applied to medical technology. Currently, among the several types of QDs, CdSe with a ZnS shell is one of the most popular QDs to be used in biological experiments. However, when the CdSe QDs were applied to clinical technology, potential toxicological problems due to CdSe core should be considered. To eliminate the problem, silicon nanocrystals, which have the potential of biocompatibility, could be a candidate of alternate probes. Silicon nanocrystals have been synthesized using several techniques such as aerosol, electrochemical etching, laser pyrolysis, plasma deposition, and colloids. Recently, the silicon nanocrystals were reported to be synthesized in inverse micelles and also stabilized with 1-heptene or allylamine capping. Blue fluorescence of the nanocrystals was observed when excited with a UV light. The nanocrystals covered with 1-heptene are hydrophobic, whereas the ones covered with allylamine are hydrophilic. To test the stability in cytosol, the water-soluble nanocrystals covered with allylamine were examined with a Hela cell incorporation experiment. Bright blue fluorescence of the nanocrystals was detected in the cytosol when excited with a UV light, implying that the nanocrystals were able to be applied to biological imaging. In order to expand the application range, we synthesized and compared a series of silicon nanocrystals, which have variable surface modification, such as alkyl group, alcohol group, and odorant molecules. This study will provide a wider range of optoelectronic applications and bioimaging technology.

  1. Purity of silicon: with great effect on its performance in graphite-silicon anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chenxin; Xu, Guojun; Liu, Liekai; Yue, Zhihao; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Fugen; Tang, Hao; Huang, Haibin; Zhou, Lang

    2017-09-01

    Ferrosilicon, industrial grade silicon, solar grade silicon, and electronic grade silicon were ball-milled to form four types of silicon powders, which were mixed with graphite powders at weight ratio of 5:95, respectively, for being used as graphite-silicon anode materials in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The effect of the purity of silicon on its electrochemical performance in graphite-silicon anode materials for LIBs was investigated by the cycle and rate tests. Results show that silicon with higher purity shows higher capacity, better cycle, and rate performance. In addition, the significant difference in capacity of the four graphite-silicon anodes with different purities of silicon is not completely resulted from the content of silicon materials, and the influence of the impurity inside the silicon cannot be ignored as well. The sample prepared from electronic grade silicon presents the highest first discharge capacity, which is 440.5 mAh g-1.

  2. Flexible high-κ/Metal gate metal/insulator/metal capacitors on silicon (100) fabric

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2013-10-01

    Implementation of memory on bendable substrates is an important step toward a complete and fully developed notion of mechanically flexible computational systems. In this paper, we have demonstrated a simple fabrication flow to build metal-insulator-metal capacitors, key components of dynamic random access memory, on a mechanically flexible silicon (100) fabric. We rely on standard microfabrication processes to release a thin sheet of bendable silicon (area: 18 {\\ m cm}2 and thickness: 25 \\\\mu{\\ m m}) in an inexpensive and reliable way. On such platform, we fabricated and characterized the devices showing mechanical robustness (minimum bending radius of 10 mm at an applied strain of 83.33% and nominal strain of 0.125%) and consistent electrical behavior regardless of the applied mechanical stress. Furthermore, and for the first time, we performed a reliability study suggesting no significant difference in performance and showing an improvement in lifetime projections. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  3. Modeling Indirect Tunneling in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Edward

    Indirect tunneling in silicon p-n junctions catches people's attention again in recent years. First, the phenomenon induces a serious leakage problem, so called gate-induced drain leakage (GIDL) effect, in modern metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Second, it is utilized to develop a novel tunneling transistor with the sharp turn-on ability for continuing ITRS roadmap. Although the indirect tunneling is important for the state-of-the-art transistor-technology, the accuracy of the present tunneling models in technology computer-aided design (TCAD) tools is still vague. In the research work, the theory of indirect tunneling in silicon has been thoroughly studied. The phonon-assisted tunneling model has been developed and compared with the existing ones in the Sentaurus-Synopsys, Medici-Synopsys, and Atlas-Silvaco TCAD tools. Beyond these existing models, ours successfully predicts the indirect tunneling current under the different field direction in silicon. In addition, bandgap narrowing in heavily-doped p-n junctions under the reverse-biased condition is also studied during the model development. At the end of the research work, the application to low standby power (LSTP) transistors is demonstrated to show the capability of our tunneling model in the device level.

  4. Casting larger polycrystalline silicon ingots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Tomlinson, T.; Cliber, J.; Shea, S.; Narayanan, M.

    1995-08-01

    Solarex has developed and patented a directional solidification casting process specifically designed for photovoltaics. In this process, silicon feedstock is melted in a ceramic crucible and solidified into a large grained semicrystalline silicon ingot. In-house manufacture of low cost, high purity ceramics is a key to the low cost fabrication of Solarex polycrystalline wafers. The casting process is performed in Solarex designed casting stations. The casting operation is computer controlled. There are no moving parts (except for the loading and unloading) so the growth process proceeds with virtually no operator intervention Today Solarex casting stations are used to produce ingots from which 4 bricks, each 11.4 cm by 11.4 cm in cross section, are cut. The stations themselves are physically capable of holding larger ingots, that would yield either: 4 bricks, 15 cm by 15 an; or 9 bricks, 11.4 cm by 11.4 an in cross-section. One of the tasks in the Solarex Cast Polycrystalline Silicon PVMaT Program is to design and modify one of the castings stations to cast these larger ingots. If successful, this effort will increase the production capacity of Solarex`s casting stations by 73% and reduce the labor content for casting by an equivalent percentage.

  5. Waveguiding Light into Silicon Oxycarbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Ahmed Memon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we demonstrate the fabrication of single mode optical waveguides in silicon oxycarbide (SiOC with a high refractive index n = 1.578 on silica (SiO2, exhibiting an index contrast of Δn = 8.2%. Silicon oxycarbide layers were deposited by reactive RF magnetron sputtering of a SiC target in a controlled process of argon and oxygen gases. The optical properties of SiOC film were measured with spectroscopic ellipsometry in the near-infrared range and the acquired refractive indices of the film exhibit anisotropy on the order of 10−2. The structure of the SiOC films is investigated with atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The channel waveguides in SiOC are buried in SiO2 (n = 1.444 and defined with UV photolithography and reactive ion etching techniques. Propagation losses of about 4 dB/cm for both TE and TM polarizations at telecommunication wavelength 1550 nm are estimated with cut-back technique. Results indicate the potential of silicon oxycarbide for guided wave applications.

  6. The DAMPE silicon tungsten tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, Valentina; Asfandiyarov, R; Azzarello, P; Bernardini, P; Bertucci, B; Bolognini, A; Cadoux, F; Caprai, M; Domenjoz, M; Dong, Y; Duranti, M; Fan, R; Franco, M; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gong, K; Guo, D; Husi, C; Ionica, M; Lacalamita, N; Loparco, F; Marsella, G; Mazziotta, M N; Mongelli, M; Nardinocchi, A; Nicola, L; Pelleriti, G; Peng, W; Pohl, M; Postolache, V; Qiao, R; Surdo, A; Tykhonov, A; Vitillo, S; Wang, H; Weber, M; Wu, D; Wu, X; Zhang, F; De Mitri, I; La Marra, D

    2017-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) satellite has been successfully launched on the 17th December 2015. It is a powerful space detector designed for the identification of possible Dark Matter signatures thanks to its capability to detect electrons and photons with an unprecedented energy resolution in an energy range going from few GeV up to 10 TeV. Moreover, the DAMPE satellite will contribute to a better understanding of the propagation mechanisms of high energy cosmic rays measuring the nuclei flux up to 100 TeV. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon-tungsten tracker-converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is made of twelve layers of single-sided AC-coupled silicon micro-strip detectors for a total silicon area of about 7 $m^2$ . To promote the conversion of incident photons into electron-positron pairs, tungsten foils are inserted into the supporting structure. In this document, a detailed description of the STK constructi...

  7. Effects of equiaxial strain on the differentiation of dental pulp stem cells without using biochemical reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, F S; Jazayeri, M; Ghahari, P; Haghighipour, N

    2014-09-01

    During orthodontic treatments, applied mechanical forces create strain and result in tooth movement through the alveolar bone. This response to mechanical strain is a fundamental biological reaction. The present study evaluated the effect of equiaxial strain within the range of orthodontic forces on the osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Following isolation and culture of hDPSCs, 3rd passage cells were transferred on a silicone membrane covered with collagen. Cell adhesion to the membrane was evaluated under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Cells were divided into three groups: the first group was placed in a conventional culture medium, transferred to an equiaxial stretching device (3% strain for 2 weeks). The positive control was placed in an osteogenic medium with no mechanical strain. The negative control group was placed in the conventional culture medium with no mechanical strain either. Study groups were evaluated for expression ofosteogenic markers (Alkaline phosphatase and Osteopontin) with immunofluorescence and real time PCR. SEM images revealed optimal adhesion of cells to the silicone membrane. Immunofluorescence study demonstrated that osteocalcin expression occurred after 2 weeks in the two groups under mechanical and chemical signals. After application of equiaxial strain, level of expression of osteogenic markers was significantly higher than in the negative and positive control groups. Based on the study results, static equiaxial strain which mimics the types of orthodontic forces can result in differentiation of hDPSCs to osteoblasts. The results obtained may be used in cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  8. Silicon quantum dot superlattice solar cell structure including silicon nanocrystals in a photogeneration layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Konagai, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    The solar cell structure of n-type poly-silicon/5-nm-diameter silicon nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous silicon oxycarbide matrix (30 layers)/p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon/Al electrode was fabricated on a quartz substrate. An open-circuit voltage and a fill factor of 518 mV and 0.51 in the solar cell were obtained, respectively. The absorption edge of the solar cell was 1.49 eV, which corresponds to the optical bandgap of the silicon nanocrystal materials, suggesting that it is possible to fabricate the solar cells with silicon nanocrystal materials, whose bandgaps are wider than that of crystalline silicon. 85.35.Be; 84.60.Jt; 78.67.Bf.

  9. Silicon nanostructures in silicon oxynitride for PV application: effect of argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhardt, Fabien; Ferblantier, Gerald; Muller, Dominique; Slaoui, Abdelilah [Institut d' Electronique du Solide et des Systemes, UMR CNRS-UdS 7163, 23 Rue du Loess, BP20, 67034 Strasbourg cedex 2 (France); Ulhaq-Bouillet, Corinne [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg, UMR CNRS-UdS 7504, 23 Rue du Loess, BP43, 67034 Strasbourg cedex 2 (France)

    2012-10-15

    Silicon rich silicon oxynitride (SRSON) were deposited by ECR-PECVD to form silicon nanostructures. The effect of argon flow during the deposition was investigated. The silicon nanoparticles were fabricated by a classical thermal treatment of SRSON films. The structural properties of the SRSON films were investigated by RBS and FTIR measurements. We show that the silicon excess in the SiO{sub x}N{sub y} matrix changes slightly with Ar flow but it has a significant impact on the silicon nanoparticles morphology embedded in the silicon oxynitride layer. Different shapes for silicon nanostructures ranging from separated Si nanocrystals to Si nanocolumns were formed as studied by energy-filtred transmission electron microscopy analysis (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Single-Event Effects in Silicon and Silicon Carbide Power Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan C.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Topper, Alyson D.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony M.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Electronics Parts and Packaging program-funded activities over the past year on single-event effects in silicon and silicon carbide power devices are presented, with focus on SiC device failure signatures.

  11. Liquid phase epitaxial growth of silicon on porous silicon for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, S.; Quoizola, S.; Fave, A.; Kaminski, A.; Perichon, S.; Barbier, D.; Laugier, A. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. de Physique de la Matiere; Ouldabbes, A.; Chabane-Sari, N.E. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. de Physique de la Matiere; Lab. des Materiaux et Energies Renouvelables, Tlemcen (Algeria)

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this experiment is to grow a thin silicon layer (<50{mu}m) by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) onto porous silicon. This one acts as a sacrificial layer in order to transfer the 50 {mu}m epitaxial layer onto foreign substrates like ceramics. After transfer, the silicon wafer is then re-usable. In this work, we used the following procedure : the porous silicon formation by HF anodisation on (100) or (111) Si wafers is realised in first step, followed by an eventual annealing in H{sub 2} atmosphere, and finally LPE silicon growth with different temperature profiles in order to obtain a silicon layer on the sacrificial porous silicon (p-Si). We observed a pyramidal growth on the surface of the (100) porous silicon but the coalescence was difficult to obtain. However, on a p-Si (111) oriented wafer, homogeneous layers were obtained. (orig.)

  12. Silicon entering through silicon utilizing organisms has biological effects in human beings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shraddhamayananda, S.

    2012-12-01

    Except in the lungs, there is no evidence that silicon can do any harm in our body and Silicon is as essential as magnesium and calcium for us. It helps in proper activities of the bone tissues and all of the components in the human skeletal system. It can prevent osteoporosis in bones and also helps in lowering of blood pressure. Silicon can also inhibit fungal disease by physically inhibiting fungal germ tube penetration of the epidermis. Many of our foods which are associated with silicon utilizing organisms like rice, vegetables, wheat etc, contain plenty silicon, however, during processing most silicon get lost. In alternative medicine silicon is used to promote expulsion of foreign bodies from tissue, in formation of suppuration and finally expulsion of pus from abscesses. Silicon is also used to remove fibrotic lesions and scar tissue and in this way it can prevent formation of keloids. Sometimes it is also used to treat chronic otitis media, and chronic fistula,

  13. Development of Radiation Hard Radiation Detectors, Differences between Czochralski Silicon and Float Zone Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Tuominen, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop radiation hard silicon detectors. Radiation detectors made ofsilicon are cost effective and have excellent position resolution. Therefore, they are widely used fortrack finding and particle analysis in large high-energy physics experiments. Silicon detectors willalso be used in the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment that is being built at the LHC (LargeHadron Collider) accelerator at CERN (European Organisation for Nuclear Research). This work wasdone in the CMS programme of Helsinki Institute of Physics (HIP).Exposure of the silicon material to particle radiation causes irreversible defects that deteriorate theperformance of the silicon detectors. In HIP CMS Programme, our approach was to improve theradiation hardness of the silicon material with increased oxygen concentration in silicon material. Westudied two different methods: diffusion oxygenation of Float Zone silicon and use of high resistivityCzochralski silicon.We processed, characterised, tested in a parti...

  14. Signal development in irradiated silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kramberger, Gregor; Mikuz, Marko

    2001-01-01

    This work provides a detailed study of signal formation in silicon detectors, with the emphasis on detectors with high concentration of irradiation induced defects in the lattice. These defects give rise to deep energy levels in the band gap. As a consequence, the current induced by charge motion in silicon detectors is signifcantly altered. Within the framework of the study a new experimental method, Charge correction method, based on transient current technique (TCT) was proposed for determination of effective electron and hole trapping times in irradiated silicon detectors. Effective carrier trapping times were determined in numerous silicon pad detectors irradiated with neutrons, pions and protons. Studied detectors were fabricated on oxygenated and non-oxygenated silicon wafers with different bulk resistivities. Measured effective carrier trapping times were found to be inversely proportional to fuence and increase with temperature. No dependence on silicon resistivity and oxygen concentration was observ...

  15. Ultrafast Terahertz Conductivity of Photoexcited Nanocrystalline Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; MacDonald, A. Nicole; Hryciw, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    The ultrafast transient ac conductivity of nanocrystalline silicon films is investigated using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. While epitaxial silicon on sapphire exhibits a free carrier Drude response, silicon nanocrystals embedded in glass show a response that is best described by a class......The ultrafast transient ac conductivity of nanocrystalline silicon films is investigated using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. While epitaxial silicon on sapphire exhibits a free carrier Drude response, silicon nanocrystals embedded in glass show a response that is best described...... by a classical Drude–Smith model, suitable for disorder-driven metal–insulator transitions. In this work, we explore the time evolution of the frequency dependent complex conductivity after optical injection of carriers on a picosecond time scale. Furthermore, we show the lifetime of photoconductivity...

  16. The integration of InGaP LEDs with CMOS on 200 mm silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Lee, Kwang Hong; Wang, Cong; Wang, Yue; Made, Riko I.; Sasangka, Wardhana Aji; Nguyen, Viet Cuong; Lee, Kenneth Eng Kian; Tan, Chuan Seng; Yoon, Soon Fatt; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Michel, Jurgen

    2017-02-01

    The integration of photonics and electronics on a converged silicon CMOS platform is a long pursuit goal for both academe and industry. We have been developing technologies that can integrate III-V compound semiconductors and CMOS circuits on 200 mm silicon wafers. As an example we present our work on the integration of InGaP light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with CMOS. The InGaP LEDs were epitaxially grown on high-quality GaAs and Ge buffers on 200 mm (100) silicon wafers in a MOCVD reactor. Strain engineering was applied to control the wafer bow that is induced by the mismatch of coefficients of thermal expansion between III-V films and silicon substrate. Wafer bonding was used to transfer the foundry-made silicon CMOS wafers to the InGaP LED wafers. Process trenches were opened on the CMOS layer to expose the underneath III-V device layers for LED processing. We show the issues encountered in the 200 mm processing and the methods we have been developing to overcome the problems.

  17. Silicon Photonics Platform for Government Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    high difference in refractive index that allows the silicon to guide light around relatively sharp bends, facilitating devices with dimensions in the...978-1-4799-5380-6/15/$31.00 ©2015 IEEE Silicon Photonics Platform for Government Applications Anthony L. Lentine, Christopher T. DeRose, Paul...Labs PO Box 5800 MS1082 Albuquerque, NM 87185 505-284-1736 alentine@sandia.gov Abstract—   We review Sandia’s silicon photonics platform

  18. Silicon-based nanochannel glucose sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xihua; Chen, Yu; Gibney, Katherine A.; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2008-01-01

    Silicon nanochannel biological field effect transistors have been developed for glucose detection. The device is nanofabricated from a silicon-on-insulator wafer with a top-down approach and surface functionalized with glucose oxidase. The differential conductance of silicon nanowires, tuned with source-drain bias voltage, is demonstrated to be sensitive to the biocatalyzed oxidation of glucose. The glucose biosensor response is linear in the 0.5-8 mM concentration range with 3-5 min response...

  19. Silicon Photomultiplier - New Era of Photon Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Saveliev, Valeri

    2010-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers is novel type of the semiconductor photodetector for the detecting of low photon flux. Already now the technology is developed and suitable for many critical application as medical imaging, and biology, homeland security, optic communications, experimental physics and military applications. Few world well known companies Hamamatsu, Sensl, Kotura are already producing or close to production of silicon photomultiplier type sensors. Near future of silicon photomultiplier...

  20. Heterogeneous Integration of 3-5 Photonics and Silicon Electronics for Advanced Optical Microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-17

    incorporate strained InGaAs quantum wells for high bandwidths at low drive currents. Modified fabrication processes were used to achieve the...surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), InGaAs photodiodes on InP, and advanced silicon CMOS circuits through die-level hybrid integration. Electronic...current. InGaAs photodiodes were fabricated on InP with layouts similar to that of the VCSEL arrays. Figure 4 shows detectors prior to integration

  1. Dynamic mechanical properties of isotropic/anisotropic silicon magnetorheological elastomer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapouna, K.; Xiong, Y. P.; Shenoi, R. A.

    2017-11-01

    This study examines the principle of combining isotropic and anisotropic magnetorheological elastomers (MRE) in parallel and series configurations, to adjust the zero-field dynamic stiffness and damping capability of silicon MREs without compromising MR effect. The dynamic mechanical properties can be further tailored by adjusting the isotropic/anisotropic ratio. Damping of parallel configuration isotropic/anisotropic composites can be increased by combining MREs made with iron particles of small (4-6 μm) and large (magnetic field-strain amplitude coupling effects were examined under a dynamic compressive strain where the amplitude was varied from 0.25% to 1.5%.

  2. Ultrahigh-performance (100)-oriented polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors and their microscopic crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuy Nguyen, Thi; Hiraiwa, Mitsuhisa; Kuroki, Shin-Ichiro

    2017-05-01

    A multiline beam continuous-wave laser lateral crystallization (MLB-CLC) method was developed to realize a predominantly (100)-oriented polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) film with a high biaxial tensile strain. Low-temperature poly-Si (LTPS) thin film transistors (TFTs) with an ultrahigh maximum electron field effect mobility of 1010 cm2 V-1 s-1 were realized. The correlation between the performance and microscopic crystallinity of the TFTs was investigated. The performance enhancement of TFTs brings about highly (100)-surface-oriented large Si crystallites with a high biaxial tensile strain and grain boundaries being parallel to the current flow.

  3. Constitutive modeling of Radiation effects on the Permanent Set in a silicone elastomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, A; Gee, R; Weisgraber, T; Chinn, S; Maxwell, R

    2008-03-10

    When a networked polymeric composite under high stress is subjected to irradiation, the resulting chemical changes like chain scissioning and cross-link formation can lead to permanent set and altered elastic modulus. Using a commercial silicone elastomer as a specific example we show that a simple 2-stage Tobolsky model in conjunction with Fricker's stress-transfer function can quantitatively reproduce all experimental data as a function of radiation dosage and the static strain at which radiation is turned on, including permanent set, stress-strain response, and net cross-linking density.

  4. Temperature dependence of dislocation-related luminescence in silicon-germanium heterostructure

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H S

    1998-01-01

    We measured the photoluminescence spectra of very thin and partially strained Si sub 0 sub . sub 6 Ge sub 0 sub . sub 4 alloys grown on silicon substrate with varying degrees of strain relaxation. We observed photoluminescence lines, so called D-lines, which arose from dislocations in the SiGe/Si alloys. We identified the origin of the D-lines as the dislocations in Si substrate extending from the SiGe/Si interface. We also studied the temperature dependence of the Si D-lines and determined the dissociation energy of the defect energy levels.

  5. Molecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO3 on Si (001): Early stages of the growth and strain relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, G.; Saint-Girons, G.; Vilquin, B.; Delhaye, G.; Maurice, J.-L.; Botella, C.; Robach, Y.; Hollinger, G.

    2009-08-01

    The molecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO3 (STO) layers on Si (001) is studied, focusing on the early stages of the growth and on the strain relaxation process. Evidence is given that even for optimized growth conditions, STO grows initially amorphous on silicon and recrystallizes, leading to the formation of an atomically abrupt heterointerface with silicon. Just after recrystallization, STO is partially strained. Further increase in its thickness leads to the onset of a progressive plastic relaxation mechanism. STO recovers its bulk lattice parameter for thicknesses of the order of 30 ML.

  6. Silicon photonics for telecommunications and biomedicine

    CERN Document Server

    Fathpour, Sasan

    2011-01-01

    Given silicon's versatile material properties, use of low-cost silicon photonics continues to move beyond light-speed data transmission through fiber-optic cables and computer chips. Its application has also evolved from the device to the integrated-system level. A timely overview of this impressive growth, Silicon Photonics for Telecommunications and Biomedicine summarizes state-of-the-art developments in a wide range of areas, including optical communications, wireless technologies, and biomedical applications of silicon photonics. With contributions from world experts, this reference guides

  7. Solar cell with silicon oxynitride dielectric layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Michael; Smith, David D

    2015-04-28

    Solar cells with silicon oxynitride dielectric layers and methods of forming silicon oxynitride dielectric layers for solar cell fabrication are described. For example, an emitter region of a solar cell includes a portion of a substrate having a back surface opposite a light receiving surface. A silicon oxynitride (SiO.sub.xN.sub.y, 0silicon oxynitride dielectric layer.

  8. Silicon Micromachined Microlens Array for THz Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Mehdi, IImran; Gill, John J.; Jung-Kubiak, Cecile D.; Llombart, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    5 5 silicon microlens array was developed using a silicon micromachining technique for a silicon-based THz antenna array. The feature of the silicon micromachining technique enables one to microfabricate an unlimited number of microlens arrays at one time with good uniformity on a silicon wafer. This technique will resolve one of the key issues in building a THz camera, which is to integrate antennas in a detector array. The conventional approach of building single-pixel receivers and stacking them to form a multi-pixel receiver is not suited at THz because a single-pixel receiver already has difficulty fitting into mass, volume, and power budgets, especially in space applications. In this proposed technique, one has controllability on both diameter and curvature of a silicon microlens. First of all, the diameter of microlens depends on how thick photoresist one could coat and pattern. So far, the diameter of a 6- mm photoresist microlens with 400 m in height has been successfully microfabricated. Based on current researchers experiences, a diameter larger than 1-cm photoresist microlens array would be feasible. In order to control the curvature of the microlens, the following process variables could be used: 1. Amount of photoresist: It determines the curvature of the photoresist microlens. Since the photoresist lens is transferred onto the silicon substrate, it will directly control the curvature of the silicon microlens. 2. Etching selectivity between photoresist and silicon: The photoresist microlens is formed by thermal reflow. In order to transfer the exact photoresist curvature onto silicon, there needs to be etching selectivity of 1:1 between silicon and photoresist. However, by varying the etching selectivity, one could control the curvature of the silicon microlens. The figure shows the microfabricated silicon microlens 5 x5 array. The diameter of the microlens located in the center is about 2.5 mm. The measured 3-D profile of the microlens surface has a

  9. Silicon solid state devices and radiation detection

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, Claude

    2012-01-01

    This book addresses the fundamental principles of interaction between radiation and matter, the principles of working and the operation of particle detectors based on silicon solid state devices. It covers a broad scope with respect to the fields of application of radiation detectors based on silicon solid state devices from low to high energy physics experiments including in outer space and in the medical environment. This book covers stateof- the-art detection techniques in the use of radiation detectors based on silicon solid state devices and their readout electronics, including the latest developments on pixelated silicon radiation detector and their application.

  10. The strained state cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Starting from some relevant facts concerning the behaviour of the universe over large scale and time span, the analogy between the geometric approach of General Relativ- ity and the classical description of an elastic strained material continuum is discussed. Extending the elastic deformation approach to four dimensions it is shown that the accelerated expansion of the universe is recovered. The strain field of space-time repro- duces properties similar to the ones ascribed to the dark energy currently called in to explain the accelerated expansion. The strain field in the primordial universe behaves as radiation, but asymptotically it reproduces the cosmological constant. Subjecting the theory to a number of cosmological tests confirms the soundness of the approach and gives an optimal value for the one parameter of the model, i.e. the bulk modulus of the space-time continuum. Finally various aspects of the Strained State Cosmology (SSC) are discussed and contrasted with some non-linear massive gravity theor...

  11. Hamstring strain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does not seem to be healing as expected. Alternative Names Pulled hamstring muscle; Sprain - hamstring References Ali K, Leland JM. Hamstring strains and tears in the athlete. Clin Sports Med . 2012;31(2):263-272. PMID: 22341016 ...

  12. High breakdown-strength composites from liquid silicone rubbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Zakaria, Shamsul Bin; Yu, Liyun

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of liquid silicone rubbers (LSRs) as dielectric elastomer transducers. Commonly used silicones in this application include room-temperature vulcanisable (RTV) silicone elastomers and composites thereof. Pure LSRs and their composites with commercially...

  13. Control of biaxial strain in single-layer Molybdenite using local thermal expansion of the substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Plechinger, G.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Buscema, M.; van der Zant, H. S. J.; Steele, G. A.; Kuc, A.; Heine, T; Schüller, C.; Korn, T.

    2015-01-01

    Single-layer MoS2 is a direct-gap semiconductor whose electronic band structure strongly depends on the strain applied to its crystal lattice. While uniaxial strain can be easily applied in a controlled way, e.g., by bending of a flexible substrate with the atomically thin MoS2 layer on top, experimental realization of biaxial strain is more challenging. Here, we exploit the large mismatch between the thermal expansion coefficients of MoS2 and a silicone-based substrate to apply a controllabl...

  14. Precise measurement of local strain fields with energy-unfiltered convergent-beam electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Takashi; Isaka, Tomoko; Kuramochi, Koji; Hashimoto, Iwao; Watanabe, Kazuto

    2006-05-01

    A simple and robust method to precisely determine local strain fields using energy-unfiltered convergent-beam electron diffraction is presented. This method involves the subtraction of background intensity, the extraction of higher-order Laue-zone lines by tracing using a Radon transformation and a system of analytical strain determination without the need for an optimization routine such as chi2-based minimization. As an example, the measurement of residual strain in a silicon-on-insulator wafer is demonstrated. It is found from micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis that, at the nanometre scale, this measurement succeeds with an accuracy of 0.06%.

  15. Psychological strain between nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Obročníková

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to identify differences in perception of work (mental workload among nurses providing acute and chronic nursing care. Design: Study design is cross-sectional and descriptive. Methods: The sample of respondents consisted of 97 nurses working in departments Neurology, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Unit of the hospital St. James in Bardejov, University Hospital of L. Pasteur in Košice and University Hospital J. A. Reiman in Prešov. To measure psychological strain, Meister's questionnaire for neuropsychological strain was used. Results: Increased psychological strain was observed in nurses providing acute care versus nurses providing chronic care, particularly in job satisfaction, long-term tolerance, time constraints, high responsibility, nervousness, fatigue and satiety. In comparison with the population norm, nurses in acute care achieved significantly higher indicators of factor I (strain and gross score as nurses in neurological care. A statistically significant relationship between psychological stress and age of nurses working in anesthesiology and intensive care departments was confirmed. Nurses with long term practical experience are exposed to intense mental stress (especially in the areas of strain and monotony. Conclusion: The results of our study suggest the reality that variable qualities of work related strain among nurses can lead to physical and emotional exhaustion.

  16. Band offsets for biaxially and uniaxially stressed silicon-germanium layers with arbitrary substrate and channel orientations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eneman, Geert; Roussel, Philippe; Brunco, David Paul; Collaert, Nadine; Mocuta, Anda; Thean, Aaron [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2016-08-07

    The conduction and valence band offsets between a strained silicon-germanium layer and a silicon-germanium substrate are reported for arbitrary substrate and channel crystal orientations. The offsets are calculated both for the case of biaxial stress, corresponding approximately to the stress state of a thin strained channel in a planar field-effect transistor (FET), and for uniaxial stress, which is the approximate stress state for strained channels in a FinFET configuration. Significant orientation dependence is found for the conduction band offset, overall leading to the strongest electron quantum confinement in biaxial-tensile stressed channels on {100}-oriented substrates, and uniaxial-tensile stressed channels in the 〈100〉 and 〈110〉 directions. For biaxially stressed layers on {111} substrates, the conduction band offset is significantly smaller than for {100} or {110} directions. For the valence band offset, the dependence on crystal orientation is found to be small.

  17. Tuning Light Emission of a Pressure-Sensitive Silicon/ZnO Nanowires Heterostructure Matrix through Piezo-phototronic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mengxiao; Pan, Caofeng; Zhang, Taiping; Li, Xiaoyi; Liang, Renrong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-28

    Based on white light emission at silicon (Si)/ZnO hetrerojunction, a pressure-sensitive Si/ZnO nanowires heterostructure matrix light emitting diode (LED) array is developed. The light emission intensity of a single heterostructure LED is tuned by external strain: when the applied stress keeps increasing, the emission intensity first increases and then decreases with a maximum value at a compressive strain of 0.15-0.2%. This result is attributed to the piezo-phototronic effect, which can efficiently modulate the LED emission intensity by utilizing the strain-induced piezo-polarization charges. It could tune the energy band diagrams at the junction area and regulate the optoelectronic processes such as charge carriers generation, separation, recombination, and transport. This study achieves tuning silicon based devices through piezo-phototronic effect.

  18. Strain: Fact or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbronner, Renée

    2017-04-01

    2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of John Ramsay's well known textbook "Folding and Fracturing of Rocks" - ... and the 30th anniversary of the rejection of a rather less well known paper entitled "Strain: Fact or Fiction?" submitted by Renée Panozzo to the Journal of Structural Geology. The gist of the paper was simple and straight forward: it was argued that not every fabric that can be observed in deformed rocks is necessarily a measure of the amount of strain the rock incurred. A distinction was made between a general "fabric", i.e., the traceable geometry of grain boundaries, for example, and a so-called "strain fabric", i.e., the model geometry that would result from homogeneously straining an initially isotropic fabric and that would exhibit at least orthorhombic symmetry. To verify if a given fabric was indeed a strain fabric it was therefore suggested to use the SURFOR method (published by Panozzo) and to carry out a so-called strain test, i.e., a check of symmetry, before interpreting the results of a fabric analysis in terms of strain. The problem with the paper was that it was very obviously written out of frustration. The frustration came form having reviewed a number of manuscripts which tried to use the then novel SURFOR method for strain analysis without first checking if the the fabric was a indeed a "strain fabric" or not, and then blaming the SURFOR method for producing ambiguous results. As a result, the paper was not exactly well balanced and carefully thought out. It was considered "interesting but not scholarly" by one of the reviewers and down-right offensive by the second. To tell the truth, however, the paper was not formally rejected. The editor Sue Treagus strongly encouraged Panozzo to revise the paper, ... and 30 years later, I will follow her advise and offer a revised paper as a tribute to John Ramsay. To quote from the original manuscript: "We should be a little more impressed that strain works so well, and less

  19. Emerging heterogeneous integrated photonic platforms on silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathpour Sasan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Silicon photonics has been established as a mature and promising technology for optoelectronic integrated circuits, mostly based on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI waveguide platform. However, not all optical functionalities can be satisfactorily achieved merely based on silicon, in general, and on the SOI platform, in particular. Long-known shortcomings of silicon-based integrated photonics are optical absorption (in the telecommunication wavelengths and feasibility of electrically-injected lasers (at least at room temperature. More recently, high two-photon and free-carrier absorptions required at high optical intensities for third-order optical nonlinear effects, inherent lack of second-order optical nonlinearity, low extinction ratio of modulators based on the free-carrier plasma effect, and the loss of the buried oxide layer of the SOI waveguides at mid-infrared wavelengths have been recognized as other shortcomings. Accordingly, several novel waveguide platforms have been developing to address these shortcomings of the SOI platform. Most of these emerging platforms are based on heterogeneous integration of other material systems on silicon substrates, and in some cases silicon is integrated on other substrates. Germanium and its binary alloys with silicon, III–V compound semiconductors, silicon nitride, tantalum pentoxide and other high-index dielectric or glass materials, as well as lithium niobate are some of the materials heterogeneously integrated on silicon substrates. The materials are typically integrated by a variety of epitaxial growth, bonding, ion implantation and slicing, etch back, spin-on-glass or other techniques. These wide range of efforts are reviewed here holistically to stress that there is no pure silicon or even group IV photonics per se. Rather, the future of the field of integrated photonics appears to be one of heterogenization, where a variety of different materials and waveguide platforms will be used for

  20. New Perspectives in Silicon Micro and Nanophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, M.; Coppola, G.; De Stefano, L.; Calio, A.; Rea, I.; Mocella, V.; Dardano, P.; Romano, S.; Rao, S.; Rendina, I.

    2015-05-01

    In the last two decades, there has been growing interest in silicon-based photonic devices for many optical applications: telecommunications, interconnects and biosensors. In this work, an advance overview of our results in this field is presented. Proposed devices allow overcoming silicon intrinsic drawbacks limiting its application as a photonic substrate. Taking advantages of both non-linear and linear effects, size reduction at nanometric scale and new two-dimensional emerging materials, we have obtained a progressive increase in device performance along the last years. In this work we show that a suitable design of a thin photonic crystal slab realized in silicon nitride can exhibit a very strong field enhancement. This result is very promising for all photonic silicon devices based on nonlinear phenomena. Moreover we report on the fabrication and characterization of silicon photodetectors working at near-infrared wavelengths based on the internal photoemission absorption in a Schottky junction. We show as an increase in device performance can be obtained by coupling light into both micro-resonant cavity and waveguiding structures. In addition, replacing metal with graphene in a Schottky junction, a further improve in PD performance can be achieved. Finally, silicon-based microarray for biomedical applications, are reported. Microarray of porous silicon Bragg reflectors on a crystalline silicon substrate have been realized using a technological process based on standard photolithography and electrochemical anodization of the silicon. Our insights show that silicon is a promising platform for the integration of various optical functionalities on the same chip opening new frontiers in the field of low-cost silicon micro and nanophotonics.

  1. Emerging heterogeneous integrated photonic platforms on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathpour, Sasan

    2015-05-01

    Silicon photonics has been established as a mature and promising technology for optoelectronic integrated circuits, mostly based on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide platform. However, not all optical functionalities can be satisfactorily achieved merely based on silicon, in general, and on the SOI platform, in particular. Long-known shortcomings of silicon-based integrated photonics are optical absorption (in the telecommunication wavelengths) and feasibility of electrically-injected lasers (at least at room temperature). More recently, high two-photon and free-carrier absorptions required at high optical intensities for third-order optical nonlinear effects, inherent lack of second-order optical nonlinearity, low extinction ratio of modulators based on the free-carrier plasma effect, and the loss of the buried oxide layer of the SOI waveguides at mid-infrared wavelengths have been recognized as other shortcomings. Accordingly, several novel waveguide platforms have been developing to address these shortcomings of the SOI platform. Most of these emerging platforms are based on heterogeneous integration of other material systems on silicon substrates, and in some cases silicon is integrated on other substrates. Germanium and its binary alloys with silicon, III-V compound semiconductors, silicon nitride, tantalum pentoxide and other high-index dielectric or glass materials, as well as lithium niobate are some of the materials heterogeneously integrated on silicon substrates. The materials are typically integrated by a variety of epitaxial growth, bonding, ion implantation and slicing, etch back, spin-on-glass or other techniques. These wide range of efforts are reviewed here holistically to stress that there is no pure silicon or even group IV photonics per se. Rather, the future of the field of integrated photonics appears to be one of heterogenization, where a variety of different materials and waveguide platforms will be used for different purposes with

  2. Anti-phase boundaries-Free GaAs epilayers on "quasi-nominal" Ge-buffered silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogumilowicz, Y.; Hartmann, J. M.; Cipro, R.; Alcotte, R.; Martin, M.; Bassani, F.; Moeyaert, J.; Baron, T.; Pin, J. B.; Bao, X.; Ye, Z.; Sanchez, E.

    2015-11-01

    We have obtained Anti-Phase Boundary (APB) free GaAs epilayers on "quasi-nominal" (001) silicon substrates, while using a thick germanium strain relaxed buffer between the GaAs layer and the silicon substrate in order to accommodate the 4% lattice mismatch between the two. As silicon (001) substrates always have a small random offcut angle from their nominal surface plane, we call them "quasi-nominal." We have focused on the influence that this small (≤0.5°) offcut angle has on the GaAs epilayer properties, showing that it greatly influences the density of APBs. On 0.5° offcut substrates, we obtained smooth, slightly tensile strained (R = 106%) GaAs epilayers that were single domain (e.g., without any APB), showing that it is not necessary to use large offcut substrates, typically 4° to 6°, for GaAs epitaxy on silicon. These make the GaAs layers more compatible with the existing silicon manufacturing technology that uses "quasi-nominal" substrates.

  3. Crystal growth and evaluation of silicon for VLSI and ULSI

    CERN Document Server

    Eranna, Golla

    2014-01-01

    PrefaceAbout the AuthorIntroductionSilicon: The SemiconductorWhy Single CrystalsRevolution in Integrated Circuit Fabrication Technology and the Art of Device MiniaturizationUse of Silicon as a SemiconductorSilicon Devices for Boolean ApplicationsIntegration of Silicon Devices and the Art of Circuit MiniaturizationMOS and CMOS Devices for Digital ApplicationsLSI, VLSI, and ULSI Circuits and ApplicationsSilicon for MEMS ApplicationsSummaryReferencesSilicon: The Key Material for Integrated Circuit Fabrication TechnologyIntroductionPreparation of Raw Silicon MaterialMetallurgical-Grade SiliconPuri

  4. Partitioning Effects in Recrystallization of Silicon from Silicon-Metal Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, E. A.; Wang, T. H.; Ciszek, T. F.; Frost, R. H.; Page, M. R.; Landry, M. D.

    2002-08-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate various silicon-metal eutectic systems that selectively retain detrimental impurities, such as Ni, Co, Fe, Cr, in the melt so that silicon may be purified. We studied possible interactions in the melt and in the silicon crystal between impurity elements and solvent metals that lead to reduced or enhanced impurity partition relative to the respective silicon-impurity binary systems. Systems such as Al- Si, Cu-Si, and In-Si show promises of reduced impurity incorporations in recrystallized silicon, which are good candidates for further investigation besides Ga-Si, Au-Si, and Ag-Si.

  5. The STAR silicon vertex tracker: a large area silicon drift detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lynn, D; Beuttenmüller, Rolf H; Caines, H; Chen, W; Dimassimo, D; Dyke, H; Elliot, D; Eremin, V; Grau, M; Hoffmann, G W; Humanic, T; Ilyashenko, Yu S; Kotov, I; Kraner, H W; Kuczewski, P; Leonhardt, B; Li, Z; Liaw, C J; Lo Curto, G; Middelkamp, P; Minor, R; Munhoz, M; Ott, G; Pandey, S U; Pruneau, C A; Rykov, V L; Schambach, J; Sedlmeir, J; Soja, B; Sugarbaker, E R; Takahashi, J; Wilson, K; Wilson, R

    2000-01-01

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC-Silicon Vertex Tracker (STAR-SVT) is a three barrel microvertex detector based upon silicon drift detector technology. As designed for the STAR-SVT, silicon drift detectors (SDDs) are capable of providing unambiguous two-dimensional hit position measurements with resolutions on the order of 20 mu m in each coordinate. Achievement of such resolutions, particularly in the drift direction coordinate, depends upon certain characteristics of silicon and drift detector geometry that are uniquely critical for silicon drift detectors hit measurements. Here we describe features of the design of the STAR-SVT SDDs and the front-end electronics that are motivated by such characteristics.

  6. Fabrication of thick silicon nitride blocks embedded in low-resistivity silicon substrates for radio frequency applications

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, L.J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Flokstra, Jakob; Flokstra, Jan; Jansen, Henricus V.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2006-01-01

    Thick silicon nitride blocks embedded in silicon wafers were recently proposed as a substrate for RF devices. In this paper we show that deep trenches filled with silicon nitride—having thin slices of monocrystalline silicon in between—already result in a significantly improved RF behavior. Measurement results are presented on RF coplanar waveguides using solid silicon nitride blocks and silicon nitride filled trenches with various dimensions and orientations with respect to the transmission ...

  7. Silicon phthalocyanine 4 phototoxicity in Trichophyton rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Minh; Dimaano, Matthew L; Oyetakin-White, Patricia; Retuerto, Mauricio A; Chandra, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A; Cooper, Kevin D; Baron, Elma D

    2014-06-01

    Trichophyton rubrum is the leading pathogen that causes long-lasting skin and nail dermatophyte infections. Currently, topical treatment consists of terbinafine for the skin and ciclopirox for the nails, whereas systemic agents, such as oral terbinafine and itraconazole, are also prescribed. These systemic drugs have severe side effects, including liver toxicity. Topical therapies, however, are sometimes ineffective. This led us to investigate alternative treatment options, such as photodynamic therapy (PDT). Although PDT is traditionally recognized as a therapeutic option for treating a wide range of medical conditions, including age-related macular degeneration and malignant cancers, its antimicrobial properties have also received considerable attention. However, the mechanism(s) underlying the susceptibility of dermatophytic fungi to PDT is relatively unknown. As a noninvasive treatment, PDT uses a photosensitizing drug and light, which, in the presence of oxygen, results in cellular destruction. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of cytotoxicity of PDT in vitro using the silicon phthalocyanine (Pc) 4 [SiPc(OSi(CH3)2(CH2)3N(CH3)2)(OH)] in T. rubrum. Confocal microscopy revealed that Pc 4 binds to cytoplasmic organelles, and upon irradiation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated. The impairment of fungal metabolic activities as measured by an XTT (2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxyanilide inner salt) assay indicated that 1.0 μM Pc 4 followed by 670 to 675 nm light at 2.0 J/cm(2) reduced the overall cell survival rate, which was substantiated by a dry weight assay. In addition, we found that this therapeutic approach is effective against terbinafine-sensitive (24602) and terbinafine-resistant (MRL666) strains. These data suggest that Pc 4-PDT may have utility as a treatment for dermatophytosis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Effect of Silicon Nanowire on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ostadmahmoodi Do

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanowires (NWs are recently used in several sensor or actuator devices to improve their ordered characteristics. Silicon nanowire (Si NW is one of the most attractive one-dimensional nanostructures semiconductors because of its unique electrical and optical properties. In this paper, silicon nanowire (Si NW, is synthesized and characterized for application in photovoltaic device. Si NWs are prepared using wet chemical etching method which is commonly used as a simple and low cost method for producing nanowires of the same substrate material. The process conditions are adjusted to find the best quality of Si NWs. Morphology of Si NWs is studied using a field emission scanning electron microscopic technique. An energy dispersive X-Ray analyzer is also used to provide elemental identification and quantitative compositional information. Subsequently, Schottky type solar cell samples are fabricated on Si and Si NWs using ITO and Ag contacts. The junction properties are calculated using I-V curves in dark condition and the solar cell I-V characteristics are obtained under incident of the standardized light of AM1.5. The results for the two mentioned Schottky solar cell samples are compared and discussed. An improvement in short circuit current and efficiency of Schottky solar cell is found when Si nanowires are employed.

  9. Optical manipulation of silicon nanowires on silicon nitride waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Néel, D.; Gétin, S.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Baron, T.; Gentile, P.; Ferret, P.

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are drawing more and more interest due to their numerous potential applications in nanoelectronics devices [1,2], including interconnects, transistor channels, nanoelectrodes, or in the emerging application areas of photonics [3], chemistry [4] and photovoltaics [5]. In this context, optical tweezers appear like a pertinent tool for the manipulation and assembly of nanowires into complex structures. It was previously shown that the near-field existing at the surface of a waveguide allows the micromanipulation of nanoparticles and biological objects [6,7]. In this article, we investigate for the first time to our knowledge the motion of silicon nanowires above silicon nitride waveguides. The nanowires in aqueous solution are attracted toward the waveguide by optical gradient forces. The nanowires align themselves according to the axis of the waveguide and get propelled along the waveguide due to radiation pressure. Velocities are up to 40 μm/s. For a better understanding of the experimental results, the distribution of the electromagnetic field in the nanowire is calculated using the finite element method. Then, the resulting optical forces exerted on the nanowires are calculated, thanks to the Maxwell stress tensor formalism.

  10. Silicon Carbide Diodes Performance Characterization and Comparison With Silicon Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron-Velilla, Ramon C.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Trapp, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Commercially available silicon carbide (SiC) Schottky diodes from different manufacturers were electrically tested and characterized at room temperature. Performed electrical tests include steady state forward and reverse I-V curves, as well as switching transient tests performed with the diodes operating in a hard switch dc-to-dc buck converter. The same tests were performed in current state of the art silicon (Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs) Schottky and pn junction devices for evaluation and comparison purposes. The SiC devices tested have a voltage rating of 200, 300, and 600 V. The comparison parameters are forward voltage drop at rated current, reverse current at rated voltage and peak reverse recovery currents in the dc to dc converter. Test results show that steady state characteristics of the tested SiC devices are not superior to the best available Si Schottky and ultra fast pn junction devices. Transient tests reveal that the tested SiC Schottky devices exhibit superior transient behavior. This is more evident at the 300 and 600 V rating where SiC Schottky devices showed drastically lower reverse recovery currents than Si ultra fast pn diodes of similar rating.

  11. Epitaxial silicon carbide on a 6″ silicon wafer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukushkin, S. A.; Lukyanov, A. V.; Osipov, A. V.; Feoktistov, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    The results of the growth of silicon-carbide films on silicon wafers with a large diameter of 150 mm (6″) by using a new method of solid-phase epitaxy are presented. A SiC film growing on Si wafers was studied by means of spectral ellipsometry, SEM, X-ray diffraction, and Raman scattering. As follows from the studies, SiC layers are epitaxial over the entire surface of a 150-mm wafer. The wafers have no mechanical stresses, are smooth, and do not have bends. The half-width of the X-ray rocking curve (FWHMω- θ) of the wafers varies in the range from 0.7° to 0.8° across the thickness layer of 80-100 nm. The wafers are suitable as templates for the growth of SiC, AlN, GaN, ZnO, and other wide-gap semiconductors on its surface using standard CVD, HVPE, and MBE methods.

  12. Compositional analysis of silicon oxide/silicon nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meziani Samir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen, amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx:H abbreviated SiNx films were grown on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD in parallel configuration using NH3/SiH4 gas mixtures. The mc-Si wafers were taken from the same column of Si cast ingot. After the deposition process, the layers were oxidized (thermal oxidation in dry oxygen ambient environment at 950 °C to get oxide/nitride (ON structure. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX were employed for analyzing quantitatively the chemical composition and stoichiometry in the oxide-nitride stacked films. The effect of annealing temperature on the chemical composition of ON structure has been investigated. Some species, O, N, Si were redistributed in this structure during the thermal oxidation of SiNx. Indeed, oxygen diffused to the nitride layer into Si2O2N during dry oxidation.

  13. Amorphous Silicon Nanowires Grown on Silicon Oxide Film by Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhishan; Wang, Chengyong; Chen, Ke; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, amorphous silicon nanowires (α-SiNWs) were synthesized on (100) Si substrate with silicon oxide film by Cu catalyst-driven solid-liquid-solid mechanism (SLS) during annealing process (1080 °C for 30 min under Ar/H2 atmosphere). Micro size Cu pattern fabrication decided whether α-SiNWs can grow or not. Meanwhile, those micro size Cu patterns also controlled the position and density of wires. During the annealing process, Cu pattern reacted with SiO2 to form Cu silicide. More important, a diffusion channel was opened for Si atoms to synthesis α-SiNWs. What is more, the size of α-SiNWs was simply controlled by the annealing time. The length of wire was increased with annealing time. However, the diameter showed the opposite tendency. The room temperature resistivity of the nanowire was about 2.1 × 103 Ω·cm (84 nm diameter and 21 μm length). This simple fabrication method makes application of α-SiNWs become possible.

  14. Optimization of a VOC Sensor with a Bilayered Diaphragm Using FBAR as Strain Sensing Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huihui; Guo, Aohui; Gao, Yang; Liu, Tingting

    2017-08-01

    Film bulk acoustic resonators (FBARs) are widely applied in mass bio-sensing and pressure sensors, owing to their extreme sensitivity and integration ability, and ability to miniaturize circuits. A volatile organic compound (VOC) sensor with a polymer-coated diaphragm, using FBARs as a strain sensing element is proposed and optimized. This vapor sensor is based on organic vapor-induced changes of mechanical deformation of the micro-diaphragm. The four FBARs are located at the edge of the bi-layer diaphragm comprising silicon nitride and silicon oxide for strain extraction. In this work, the strain distribution of the FBAR area under vapor loads is obtained using the finite element analysis (FEA) and the response frequency changes of the FBARs under vapor loads are obtained based on both the first-principle methods to deduce the elastic coefficient variation of aluminum nitride film in FBARs under the bending stresses and the Mason equivalent circuit model of the sensor using ADS software. Finally, optimizations are performed on both the bilayered diaphragm structure and sensing film. The diaphragm with a 0.7 μm silicon nitride layer and a 0.5 μm silicon oxide layer are considered to be the optimized design. The optimal coverage area of the sensing film for the diaphragm is around 0.8.

  15. The Belle Silicon Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kawasaki, T

    2002-01-01

    The Belle Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) started working from June 1999 at the KEK B-factory experiment. The main purpose of the SVD is to make precise measurements of the B decay vertex position, which are essential for the observation of CP asymmetries. Excellent vertex resolution and a good detection efficiency are required for the SVD. In the present paper, the performance of Belle SVD is reviewed. The upgrade plan for the SVD2, which is under construction and will be installed in summer 2002, is also presented.

  16. The CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkaczyk, S.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B. [and others

    1993-09-01

    A silicon strip vertex detector was designed, constructed and commissioned at the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. The mechanical design of the detector, its cooling and monitoring are presented. The front end electronics employing a custom VLSI chip, the readout electronics and various components of the SVX system are described. The system performance and the experience with the operation of the detector in the radiation environment are discussed. The device has been taking colliding beams data since May of 1992, performing at its best design specifications and enhancing the physics program of CDF.

  17. Untreated silicone breast implant rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet R; Vejborg, Ilse M; Conrad, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    were evaluated. Comparisons were also made for self-reported breast symptoms occurring during the study period and for changes in serum values of antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor, and cardiolipin antibodies immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M. The majority of the women with implant rupture...... that implant rupture is a relatively harmless condition, which only rarely progresses and gives rise to notable symptoms. Even so, because of a small risk of silicone spread, the authors suggest that women with implant ruptures be followed clinically, if not operated on. Because implant ruptures often occur...

  18. Silicon photonics for multicore fiber communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Kamchevska, Valerija; Dalgaard, Kjeld

    2016-01-01

    We review our recent work on silicon photonics for multicore fiber communication, including multicore fiber fan-in/fan-out, multicore fiber switches towards reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexers. We also present multicore fiber based quantum communication using silicon devices....

  19. Broadband Nonlinear Signal Processing in Silicon Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yvind, Kresten; Pu, Minhao; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    The fast non-linearity of silicon allows Tbit/s optical signal processing. By choosing suitable dimensions of silicon nanowires their dispersion can be tailored to ensure a high nonlinearity at power levels low enough to avoid significant two-photon abso We have fabricated low insertion...

  20. Case Report: Magnetically retained silicone facial prosthesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prosthetic camouflaging of facial defects and use of silicone maxillofacial material are the alternatives to the surgical retreatment. Silicone elastomers provide more options to clinician for customization of the facial prosthesis which is simple, esthetically good when coupled with bio magnets for retention. Key words: Magnet ...

  1. Optical spectroscopy of single silicon nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruen, Mathias; Steinmetz, David; Becher, Christoph [Fachrichtung 7.3 (Technische Physik), Universitaet des Saarlandes, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Miska, Patrice; Montaigne, F.; Rinnert, Herve; Vergnat, Michel [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux - UMR- CNRS 7556, Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2007-07-01

    Silicon crystals with sizes of few nanometers embedded in a silica matrix show an improved quantum efficiency for optical emission in comparison with bulk silicon yielding an intense photoluminescence signal in the spectral region around 700-800 nm. This surprising property is attributed to the quantum confinement of excitons in these nanocrystals, also called ''silicon quantum dots''. Such nanostructures are promising candidates for the realization of photonic devices and quantum optics experiments. Although the properties of an ensemble of silicon nanocrystals are well known the optical properties of a single silicon quantum dot are still not well understood. Thus, the investigation of single silicon nanocrystals will contribute to the understanding of their intense photoluminescence. Isolating single silicon nanocrystals would also allow for their employment in quantum optics experiments. Here, we report on the fabrication of silicon nanocrystals with sizes of about 3 nm embedded in thin silica films. The samples show intense luminescence at 770-800 nm depending on fabrication parameters. We discuss the luminescence properties and strategies to experimentally isolate single nanocrystals.

  2. Selecting silicone tubing for device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, D

    2005-10-01

    A number of factors are involved in selecting the most suitable silicone tubing for a given purpose. These include physical chemistry, performance properties, a supplier's quality system and regulatory compliance. This article provides a guide for device developers when selecting silicone tubing for their applications.

  3. Mechanism of single atom switch on silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaade, Ulrich; Stokbro, Kurt; Thirstrup, C.

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate single atom switch on silicon which operates by displacement of a hydrogen atom on the silicon (100) surface at room temperature. We find two principal effects by which the switch is controlled: a pronounced maximum of the switching probability as function of sample bias...

  4. Micromachined silicon plates for sensing molecular interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlen, Edwin; Weinberg, M.S.; Dube, C.E.; Zapata, A.M.; Borenstein, J.T.

    2006-01-01

    A micromachined surface stress sensor based on a thin suspended crystalline silicon circular plate measures differential surface stress changes associated with vapor phase chemisorption of an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer. The isolated face of the suspended silicon plate serves as the sensing

  5. SOI silicon on glass for optical MEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian Pontoppidan; Ravnkilde, Jan Tue; Hansen, Ole

    2003-01-01

    A newly developed fabrication method for fabrication of single crystalline Si (SCS) components on glass, utilizing Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) of a Silicon On Insulator (SOI) wafer is presented. The devices are packaged at wafer level in a glass-silicon-glass (GSG) stack by anodic bonding...

  6. Identification of a Mammalian Silicon Transporter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratcliffe, Sarah; Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Ma, Jian Feng; Mitani-Ueno, Nakimi; Vivancos, Julien; Deshmukh, Rupesh; Boekschoten, Mark; Muller, Michael; Mawhinney, Robert; Marron, Alan; Isenring, Paul; Kinrade, Stephen; Bélanger, Richard; Powell, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Silicon (Si) has long been known to play a major physiological role in certain organisms, including some sponges and many diatoms and higher plants, leading to the recent identification of multiple proteins responsible for silicon transport in a range of algal and plant species. In mammals, despite

  7. Silicon nanostructures produced by laser direct etching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllenborn, Matthias; Dirac, Paul Andreas Holger; Petersen, Jon Wulff

    1995-01-01

    A laser direct-write process has been applied to structure silicon on a nanometer scale. In this process, a silicon substrate, placed in a chlorine ambience, is locally heated above its melting point by a continuous-wave laser and translated by high-resolution direct-current motor stages. Only...

  8. Silicon LEDs in FinFET technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piccolo, G.; Kuindersma, P.I.; Ragnarsson, L-A.; Hueting, Raymond Josephus Engelbart; Collaert, N.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2014-01-01

    We present what to our best knowledge is the first forward operating silicon light-emitting diode (LED) in fin-FET technology. The results show near-infrared (NIR) emission around 1100 nm caused by band-to-band light emission in the silicon which is uniformly distributed across the lowly doped

  9. Improved Jet-Mill Silicon Grinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed refinement in jet-mill grinding of silicon reduces proportion of unusable, overly ground particles. Particles serve as seeds for growth of silicon from vapor. In new grinding apparatus, particle separator distinct from collision chamber. Particle collides only once before sorted for size. If proper size, extracted; if not, returned to chamber for another collision.

  10. Hydroxide catalysis bonding of silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veggel, A.A. van; Ende, D.A. van den; Bogenstahl, J.; Rowan, S.; Cunningham, W.; Gubbels, G.H.M.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2008-01-01

    For bonding silicon carbide optics, which require extreme stability, hydroxide catalysis bonding is considered [Rowan, S., Hough, J. and Elliffe, E., Silicon carbide bonding. UK Patent 040 7953.9, 2004. Please contact Mr. D. Whiteford for further information: D.Whiteford@admin.gla.ac.uk]. This

  11. Simple Approach to Superamphiphobic Overhanging Silicon Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Bøggild, Peter

    2010-01-01

    with contact angles up to 152 degrees and roll-off angle down to 8 degrees. Such nonlithographic nanoscale overhanging Structures can also be added to silicon nanograss by deposition of a thin SiO2 layer, which equips the silicon rods with 100-300 nm sized overhanging Structures. This is a simple, fast...

  12. Optical and microstructural investigations of porous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raman scattering and photoluminescence (PL) measurements on (100) oriented -type crystalline silicon (-Si) and porous silicon (PS) samples were carried out. PS samples were prepared by anodic etching of -Si under the illumination of light for different etching times of 30, 60 and 90 min. Raman scattering from the ...

  13. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

    2014-09-02

    A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

  14. Hysteroscopic tubal occlusion with silicone rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, T P; Erb, R

    1983-03-01

    A new method of sterilization for women is being investigated in several outpatient centers. The technique involves flowing liquid silicone rubber into the fallopian tubes. The silicone cures in place and forms a rubbery solid plug. The catalyzed liquid silicone is pumped through a special polysulfone guide assembly that fits through the operating channel of a standard hysteroscope. On the end of the guide is a hollow premolded silicone rubber tip that fits into the cornual ostium of the tube. When the silicone cures it also cross-links to this tip so that the tip becomes part of the plug. Results as of April 1, 1982, from 350 women in the Philadelphia center suggest that proper plug formation prevents pregnancy and that the method can be applied to about 85% of properly selected women.

  15. Silicon photonics and challenges for fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feilchenfeld, N. B.; Nummy, K.; Barwicz, T.; Gill, D.; Kiewra, E.; Leidy, R.; Orcutt, J. S.; Rosenberg, J.; Stricker, A. D.; Whiting, C.; Ayala, J.; Cucci, B.; Dang, D.; Doan, T.; Ghosal, M.; Khater, M.; McLean, K.; Porth, B.; Sowinski, Z.; Willets, C.; Xiong, C.; Yu, C.; Yum, S.; Giewont, K.; Green, W. M. J.

    2017-03-01

    Silicon photonics is rapidly becoming the key enabler for meeting the future data speed and volume required by the Internet of Things. A stable manufacturing process is needed to deliver cost and yield expectations to the technology marketplace. We present the key challenges and technical results from both 200mm and 300mm facilities for a silicon photonics fabrication process which includes monolithic integration with CMOS. This includes waveguide patterning, optical proximity correction for photonic devices, silicon thickness uniformity and thick material patterning for passive fiber to waveguide alignment. The device and process metrics show that the transfer of the silicon photonics process from 200mm to 300mm will provide a stable high volume manufacturing platform for silicon photonics designs.

  16. Silicon quantum dots for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Chen, Song; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (or quantum dots, QDs) exhibit unique optical and electronic properties such as size-controlled fluorescence, high quantum yields, and stability against photobleaching. These properties allow QDs to be used as optical labels for multiplexed imaging and in drug delivery detection systems. Luminescent silicon QDs and surface-modified silicon QDs have also been developed as potential minimally toxic fluorescent probes for bioapplications. Silicon, a well-known power electronic semiconductor material, is considered an extremely biocompatible material, in particular with respect to blood. This review article summarizes existing knowledge related to and recent research progress made in the methods for synthesizing silicon QDs, as well as their optical properties and surface-modification processes. In addition, drug delivery systems and in vitro and in vivo imaging applications that use silicon QDs are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Cao, Zhaohui; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Chu, Binbin; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology suggests new and exciting opportunities for early diagnosis and therapy of cancer. During the recent years, silicon-based nanomaterials featuring unique properties have received great attention, showing high promise for myriad biological and biomedical applications. In this review, we will particularly summarize latest representative achievements on the development of silicon nanostructures as a powerful platform for cancer early diagnosis and therapy. First, we introduce the silicon nanomaterial-based biosensors for detecting cancer markers (e.g., proteins, tumor-suppressor genes and telomerase activity, among others) with high sensitivity and selectivity under molecular level. Then, we summarize in vitro and in vivo applications of silicon nanostructures as efficient nanoagents for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the future perspective of silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  18. Roll up nanowire battery from silicon chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, Alexandru; Reddy, Arava Leela Mohana; Ajayan, Anakha; Singh, Neelam; Gohy, Jean-François; Melinte, Sorin; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2012-09-18

    Here we report an approach to roll out Li-ion battery components from silicon chips by a continuous and repeatable etch-infiltrate-peel cycle. Vertically aligned silicon nanowires etched from recycled silicon wafers are captured in a polymer matrix that operates as Li(+) gel-electrolyte and electrode separator and peeled off to make multiple battery devices out of a single wafer. Porous, electrically interconnected copper nanoshells are conformally deposited around the silicon nanowires to stabilize the electrodes over extended cycles and provide efficient current collection. Using the above developed process we demonstrate an operational full cell 3.4 V lithium-polymer silicon nanowire (LIPOSIL) battery which is mechanically flexible and scalable to large dimensions.

  19. Measurement of minute local strain in semiconductor materials and electronic devices by using a highly parallel X-ray microbeam

    CERN Document Server

    Matsui, J; Yokoyama, K; Takeda, S; Katou, M; Kurihara, H; Watanabe, K; Kagoshima, Y; Kimura, S

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an X-ray microbeam with a small angular divergence by adopting X-ray optics with successive use of asymmetric Bragg reflection from silicon crystals for the both polarizations of the synchrotron X-rays. The microbeam actually obtained is several microns in size and possesses an angular divergence of less than 2 arcsec which enables us to measure the strain of 10 sup - sup 5 -10 sup - sup 6. By scanning the sample against the microbeam, distribution of the minute local strain in various regions of semiconductor crystals for electronic devices, e.g., the strain around the SiO sub 2 /Si film edge in silicon devices, the strain in an InGaAsP/InP stripe laser were measured.

  20. Micromachined silicon seismic accelerometer development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S. [and others

    1996-08-01

    Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of seismic monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily deployable sensor arrays. Our ultimate goal is to fabricate seismic sensors with sensitivity and noise performance comparable to short-period seismometers in common use. We expect several phases of development will be required to accomplish that level of performance. Traditional silicon micromachining techniques are not ideally suited to the simultaneous fabrication of a large proof mass and soft suspension, such as one needs to achieve the extreme sensitivities required for seismic measurements. We have therefore developed a novel {open_quotes}mold{close_quotes} micromachining technology that promises to make larger proof masses (in the 1-10 mg range) possible. We have successfully integrated this micromolding capability with our surface-micromachining process, which enables the formation of soft suspension springs. Our calculations indicate that devices made in this new integrated technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach the 10{sup -10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

  1. Vacuum silicon photomultipliers: Recent developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbarino, Giancarlo [Dipartimento Scienze Fisiche, Università “Federico II” Napoli (Italy); INFN Napoli (Italy); Barbato, Felicia Carla Tiziana [INFN Napoli (Italy); Campajola, Luigi [Dipartimento Scienze Fisiche, Università “Federico II” Napoli (Italy); Asmundis, Riccardo de [INFN Napoli (Italy); De Rosa, Gianfranca [Dipartimento Scienze Fisiche, Università “Federico II” Napoli (Italy); Mollo, Carlos Maximiliano [INFN Napoli (Italy); Vivolo, Daniele, E-mail: vivolo@na.infn.it [Dipartimento Scienze Fisiche, Università “Federico II” Napoli (Italy); INFN Napoli (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    VSiPMT (Vacuum Silicon PhotoMultiplier Tube) is an innovative design for a modern hybrid, high gain, silicon based photodetector based on the combination of a SiPM with a hemispherical vacuum glass PMT standard envelope. In such a device photoelectrons emitted by the photocathode are accelerated and focused by an electric field towards a small focal area covered by the SiPM which therefore acts as an amplifier, thus substituting the classical dynode chain of a PMT. With a view to the realization of a first prototype of VSiPMT our group is carrying out a preliminary work aimed at the study of SiPM performances as an electron detector, including an accurate Geant4-based simulation of the interaction between SiPM and electron beams. In order to perform a full characterization of the SiPM we developed an experimental setup for the extraction and the acceleration of a beam of backward secondary electrons emitted after the bombardment of a carbon foil by a proton beam extracted in a TTT-3 accelerator.

  2. Silicon transporters in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian Feng

    2010-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in the Earth's crust and exerts beneficial effects on plant growth and production by alleviating both biotic and abiotic stresses including diseases, pests, lodging, drought and nutrient imbalance. Silicon is taken up by the roots in the form ofsilicic acid, a noncharged molecule. Recently both influx (Lsil) and efflux (Lsi2) transporters for silicic acid have been identified in gramineous plants including rice, barley and maize. Lsil and its homologs are influx Si transporters, which belong to a Nod26-like major intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily in the aquaporin protein family. They are responsible for the transport of Si from the external solution to the root cells. On the other hand, Lsi2 and its homologs are efflux Si transporters, belonging to putative anion transporters and are responsible for the transport of Si out of the cells toward the xylem. All influx transporters show polar localization at the distal side. Among efflux transporters, Lsi2 in rice shows polar localization at the proximal side, but that in barley and maize does not show polar localization. The cell-specificity of localization of Si transporters and expression patterns are different between species. Rice Si transporters are also permeable to arsenite.

  3. Phonon conduction in silicon nanobeams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woosung; Shin, Dongsuk D.; Kim, Soo Jin; Katz, Joseph S.; Park, Joonsuk; Ahn, Chae Hyuck; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Kenny, Thomas W.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2017-05-01

    Despite extensive studies on thermal transport in thin silicon films, there has been little work studying the thermal conductivity of single-crystal rectangular, cross-sectional nanobeams that are commonly used in many applications such as nanoelectronics (FinFETs), nano-electromechanical systems, and nanophotonics. Here, we report experimental data on the thermal conductivity of silicon nanobeams of a thickness of ˜78 nm and widths of ˜65 nm, 170 nm, 270 nm, 470 nm, and 970 nm. The experimental data agree well (within ˜9%) with the predictions of a thermal conductivity model that uses a combination of bulk mean free paths obtained from ab initio calculations and a suppression function derived from the kinetic theory. This work quantifies the impact of nanobeam aspect ratios on thermal transport and establishes a criterion to differentiate between thin films and beams in studying thermal transport. The thermal conductivity of a 78 nm × 65 nm nanobeam is ˜32 W m-1 K-1, which is roughly a factor of two smaller than that of a 78 nm thick film.

  4. Industrial Silicon Wafer Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk-Holger Neuhaus

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, around 86% of all wafer-based silicon solar cells were produced using screen printing to form the silver front and aluminium rear contacts and chemical vapour deposition to grow silicon nitride as the antireflection coating onto the front surface. This paper reviews this dominant solar cell technology looking into state-of-the-art equipment and corresponding processes for each process step. The main efficiency losses of this type of solar cell are analyzed to demonstrate the future efficiency potential of this technology. In research and development, more various advanced solar cell concepts have demonstrated higher efficiencies. The question which arises is “why are new solar cell concepts not transferred into industrial production more frequently?”. We look into the requirements a new solar cell technology has to fulfill to have an advantage over the current approach. Finally, we give an overview of high-efficiency concepts which have already been transferred into industrial production.

  5. Low cost silicon solar array project large area silicon sheet task: Silicon web process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Blais, P. D.; Davis, J. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Growth configurations were developed which produced crystals having low residual stress levels. The properties of a 106 mm diameter round crucible were evaluated and it was found that this design had greatly enhanced temperature fluctuations arising from convection in the melt. Thermal modeling efforts were directed to developing finite element models of the 106 mm round crucible and an elongated susceptor/crucible configuration. Also, the thermal model for the heat loss modes from the dendritic web was examined for guidance in reducing the thermal stress in the web. An economic analysis was prepared to evaluate the silicon web process in relation to price goals.

  6. Synchrotron X-ray imaging applied to solar photovoltaic silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafford, T. A.; Villanova, J.; Plassat, N.; Dubois, S.; Camel, D.

    2013-03-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cell performance is dictated by the material of the cell, its quality and purity, the type, quantity, size and distribution of defects, as well as surface treatments, deposited layers and contacts. A synchrotron offers unique opportunities for a variety of complementary X-ray techniques, given the brilliance, spectrum, energy tunability and potential for (sub-) micron-sized beams. Material properties are revealed within in the bulk and at surfaces and interfaces. X-ray Diffraction Imaging (X-ray Topography), Rocking Curve Imaging and Section Topography reveal defects such as dislocations, inclusions, misorientations and strain in the bulk and at surfaces. Simultaneous measurement of micro-X-Ray Fluorescence (μ-XRF) and micro-X-ray Beam Induced Current (μ-XBIC) gives direct correlation between impurities and PV performance. Together with techniques such as microscopy and Light Beam Induced Current (LBIC) measurements, the correlation between structural properties and photovoltaic performance can be deduced, as well as the relative influence of parameters such as defect type, size, spatial distribution and density (e.g [1]). Measurements may be applied at different stages of solar cell processing in order to follow the evolution of the material and its properties through the manufacturing process. Various grades of silicon are under study, including electronic and metallurgical grades in mono-crystalline, multi-crystalline and mono-like forms. This paper aims to introduce synchrotron imaging to non-specialists, giving example results on selected solar photovoltaic silicon samples.

  7. Hysteroscopic sterilization: silicone elastic plugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, T P

    1983-06-01

    Erb, Davis, and Kyriazis developed the application of the silicone rubber plug directly into the cornual openings of the fallopian tubes in rabbits by working through hysterotomies. Subsequently, does were exposed to bucks for periods up to 280 days, and none of the does became pregnant. Tissue sections of some tubes were studied microscopically, and no pathological findings were found. The only finding was the flattening of the cilia. This work continued through the early 1970s at Franklin Research Center and Hahnemann Medical College in Philadelphia. 2 basic concepts were developed: 1) there was direct application of catalyzed silicone rubber into the cornual ostium, and 2) the molded obturator (cornual) tip became part of the plug. The technique's success depends on the fact that silicone rubber cures (becomes a rubbery solid) in about 5 minutes without heat or chemical reaction. The formed-in-place plug is made possible because the silicone rubber in curing will cross-link to itself only with the result that the obturator tip at the cornu cross-links and becomes part of the formed-in-place plug. The procedure, as performed in humans, is outlined in detail and is diagrammed. A single hinged bivalve speculum exposes the cervix so that after the hysteroscope is inserted through the cervix into the uterine cavity, the speculum can be removed. The procedure should be performed early in the proliferative phase of the cycle, for generally visualization is better at this time because the endometrium is thinner and less vascular and succulent. Once the ostia have been identified, the aspirator is removed from the cavity. The guide assembly with its attached obturator tip is introduced through the opening channel of the scope into the uterine cavity. Once bilateral good push tests have been obtained, the assistant adds catalyst (stanous octuate) to the silicone in the nonairentraining mixer and dispenser that has been taken from the freezer. Once curing is complete, the

  8. Vibration analysis of multi-phase nanocrystalline material nanoshells using strain gradient elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Mohammad Reza

    2017-10-01

    This paper studies the free vibrational behavior of porous nanocrystalline silicon nanoshells using strain gradient theory. Nanocrystalline materials are multi-phase composites with the contribution of nanopores, nanograins and interface phase. Because of experimental observation of strain gradients near the interface phase, the nanoshell is modeled via strain gradient theory. A micromechanical model based on the Mori–Tanaka scheme is employed to incorporate the size of nanograins/nanopores and their surface energies. The nanoshell is modeled via first order shear deformation theory and Galerkin’s method is implemented to obtain vibration frequencies. Shape functions that satisfy available classical and non-classical boundary conditions in strain gradient theory are proposed. It is shown that the vibrational behavior of the nanoshell is influenced by the porosity percentage, nanograin size, strain gradient coefficient, boundary conditions, and the surface phase of nanograins/nanopores.

  9. Ge Microdisk with Lithographically-Tunable Strain using CMOS-Compatible Process

    CERN Document Server

    Sukhdeo, David S; Gupta, Shashank; Kim, Daeik; Woo, Sungdae; Kim, Youngmin; Vuckovic, Jelena; Saraswat, Krishna C; Nam, Donguk

    2015-01-01

    We present germanium microdisk optical resonators under a large biaxial tensile strain using a CMOS-compatible fabrication process. Biaxial tensile strain of ~0.7% is achieved by means of a stress concentration technique that allows the strain level to be customized by carefully selecting certain lithographic dimensions. The partial strain relaxation at the edges of a patterned germanium microdisk is compensated by depositing compressively stressed silicon nitride layer. Two-dimensional Raman spectroscopy measurements along with finite-element method simulations confirm a relatively homogeneous strain distribution within the final microdisk structure. Photoluminescence results show clear optical resonances due to whispering gallery modes which are in good agreement with finite-difference time-domain optical simulations. Our bandgap-customizable microdisks present a new route towards an efficient germanium light source for on-chip optical interconnects.

  10. Nanoindentation Response Analysis of Thin Film Substrates-II: Strain Hardening-Softening Oscillations in Subsurface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanders, Uldis; Kanders, Karlis

    2017-04-01

    We have extracted stress-strain field (SSF) gradient and divergence representations from nanoindentation data sets of bulk solids often used as thin film substrates: bearing and tooling steels, silicon, glasses, and fused silica. Oscillations of the stress-strain field gradient and divergence induced in the subsurface layer by the nanoindentation have been revealed. The oscillations are especially prominent in single indentation tests at shallow penetration depths, hhardening-softening plastic deformation cycles induced in the subsurface layer under the indenter load.

  11. Synthesis of colloidal solutions with silicon nanocrystals from porous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna López, José Alberto; Garzón Román, Abel; Gómez Barojas, Estela; Gracia, Jf Flores; Martínez Juárez, Javier; Carrillo López, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have obtained colloidal solutions of Si nanocrystals (Si-ncs), starting from free-standing porous silicon (PSi) layers. PSi layers were synthesized using a two-electrode Teflon electrochemical cell; the etching solution contained hydrogen peroxide 30%, hydrofluoric acid 40% (HF), and methanol. The anodizing current density was varied to 250 mA cm(-2), 1 A cm(-2), and 1.2 A cm(-2). Thus obtained, PSi was mechanically pulverized in a mortar agate; then, the PSi powders were poured into different solutions to get the final Si-ncs colloidal solutions. The different optical, morphological, and structural characteristics of the colloidal solutions with Si-ncs were measured and studied. These Si-ncs colloidal solutions, measured by photoluminescence (PL), revealed efficient blue-green or violet emission intensities. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicate that the colloidal solutions are mainly composed of silicon nanocrystallites. The result of UV-vis transmittance indicates that the optical bandgap energies of the colloidal solutions varied from 2.3 to 3.5 eV for colloids prepared in methanol, ethanol, and acetone. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed the size of the nanocrystals in the colloidal solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra showed different types of chemical bonds such as Si-O-Si, Si-CH2, and SiH x , as well as some kind of defects. 61.46Df.-a; 61.43.Gt; 61.05.cp; 78.55.-m; 81.15.Gh.

  12. Determining the mechanical properties of a radiochromic silicone-based 3D dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, L. P.; Høye, E. M.; Balling, P.; Muren, L. P.; Petersen, J. B. B.; Poulsen, P. R.; Yates, E. S.; Skyt, P. S.

    2017-07-01

    New treatment modalities in radiotherapy (RT) enable delivery of highly conformal dose distributions in patients. This creates a need for precise dose verification in three dimensions (3D). A radiochromic silicone-based 3D dosimetry system has recently been developed. Such a dosimeter can be used for dose verification in deformed geometries, which requires knowledge of the dosimeter’s mechanical properties. In this study we have characterized the dosimeter’s elastic behaviour under tensile and compressive stress. In addition, the dose response under strain was determined. It was found that the dosimeter behaved as an incompressible hyperelastic material with a non-linear stress/strain curve and with no observable hysteresis or plastic deformation even at high strains. The volume was found to be constant within a 2% margin at deformations up to 60%. Furthermore, it was observed that the dosimeter returned to its original geometry within a 2% margin when irradiated under stress, and that the change in optical density per centimeter was constant regardless of the strain during irradiation. In conclusion, we have shown that this radiochromic silicone-based dosimeter’s mechanical properties make it a viable candidate for dose verification in deformable 3D geometries.

  13. Running Title: Strained Yoghurts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2012-09-27

    Sep 27, 2012 ... prebiotics (inulin and oligofructose) added in different ratios. Al Otaibi and El Demerdash (2008) investigated the quality and shelf life of concentrated yoghurt (labneh) by the addition of some essential oils. Şenel et al. (2009) also determined some compounds affecting aroma and flavour of strained yoghurt ...

  14. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow...

  15. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2011-01-01

    results on bonding of thin and thick Si3N4 layers. The new results include high temperature bonding without any pretreatment, along with improved bonding ability achieved by thermal oxidation and chemical pretreatment. The bonded wafers include both unprocessed and processed wafers with a total silicon......While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...... specific. Often fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces to silicon or silicon dioxide to silicon surfaces is preferred, though Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding is indeed possible and practical for many devices as will be shown in this paper. We present an overview of existing knowledge on Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding and new...

  16. Silicon Micro- and Nanofabrication for Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Daniel; Goodall, Randy; Bansal, Shyam S.; Chiappini, Ciro; Hosali, Sharath; van de Ven, Anne L.; Srinivasan, Srimeenkashi; Liu, Xuewu; Godin, Biana; Brousseau, Louis; Yazdi, Iman K.; Fernandez-Moure, Joseph; Tasciotti, Ennio; Wu, Hung-Jen; Hu, Ye; Klemm, Steve; Ferrari, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript constitutes a review of several innovative biomedical technologies fabricated using the precision and accuracy of silicon micro- and nanofabrication. The technologies to be reviewed are subcutaneous nanochannel drug delivery implants for the continuous tunable zero-order release of therapeutics, multi-stage logic embedded vectors for the targeted systemic distribution of both therapeutic and imaging contrast agents, silicon and porous silicon nanowires for investigating cellular interactions and processes as well as for molecular and drug delivery applications, porous silicon (pSi) as inclusions into biocomposites for tissue engineering, especially as it applies to bone repair and regrowth, and porous silica chips for proteomic profiling. In the case of the biocomposites, the specifically designed pSi inclusions not only add to the structural robustness, but can also promote tissue and bone regrowth, fight infection, and reduce pain by releasing stimulating factors and other therapeutic agents stored within their porous network. The common material thread throughout all of these constructs, silicon and its associated dielectrics (silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, etc.), can be precisely and accurately machined using the same scalable micro- and nanofabrication protocols that are ubiquitous within the semiconductor industry. These techniques lend themselves to the high throughput production of exquisitely defined and monodispersed nanoscale features that should eliminate architectural randomness as a source of experimental variation thereby potentially leading to more rapid clinical translation. PMID:23584841

  17. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon carbide to silicon carbide and silicon nitride to silicon nitride for advanced heat engine applications Phase 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, G.J.; Vartabedian, A.M.; Wade, J.A.; White, C.S. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of joining, Phase 2 was to develop joining technologies for HIP`ed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with 4wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (NCX-5101) and for a siliconized SiC (NT230) for various geometries including: butt joins, curved joins and shaft to disk joins. In addition, more extensive mechanical characterization of silicon nitride joins to enhance the predictive capabilities of the analytical/numerical models for structural components in advanced heat engines was provided. Mechanical evaluation were performed by: flexure strength at 22 C and 1,370 C, stress rupture at 1,370 C, high temperature creep, 22 C tensile testing and spin tests. While the silicon nitride joins were produced with sufficient integrity for many applications, the lower join strength would limit its use in the more severe structural applications. Thus, the silicon carbide join quality was deemed unsatisfactory to advance to more complex, curved geometries. The silicon carbide joining methods covered within this contract, although not entirely successful, have emphasized the need to focus future efforts upon ways to obtain a homogeneous, well sintered parent/join interface prior to siliconization. In conclusion, the improved definition of the silicon carbide joining problem obtained by efforts during this contract have provided avenues for future work that could successfully obtain heat engine quality joins.

  18. Weakening of the anisotropy of surface roughness in ultra-precision turning of single-crystal silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Minghai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-precision machining causes materials to undergo a greatly strained deformation process in a short period of time. The effect of shear strain rates on machining quality, in particular on surface anisotropy, is a topic deserving of research that has thus far been overlooked. This study analyzes the impact of the strain rate during the ultra-precision turning of single-crystal silicon on the anisotropy of surface roughness. Focusing on the establishment of cutting models considering the tool rake angle and the edge radius, this is the first research that takes into account the strain rate dislocation emission criteria in studying the effects of the edge radius, the cutting speed, and the cutting thickness on the plastic deformation of single-crystal silicon. The results of this study show that the uses of a smaller edge radius, faster cutting speeds, and a reduced cutting thickness can result in optimally uniform surface roughness, while the use of a very sharp cutting tool is essential when operating with smaller cutting thicknesses. A further finding is that insufficient plastic deformation is the major cause of increased surface roughness in the ultra-precision turning of brittle materials. On this basis, we propose that the capacity of single-crystal silicon to emit dislocations be improved as much as possible before brittle fracture occurs, thereby promoting plastic deformation and minimizing the anisotropy of surface roughness in the machined workpiece.

  19. Porous silicon technology for integrated microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Jin Zheng

    With the development of micro systems, there is an increasing demand for integrable porous materials. In addition to those conventional applications, such as filtration, wicking, and insulating, many new micro devices, including micro reactors, sensors, actuators, and optical components, can benefit from porous materials. Conventional porous materials, such as ceramics and polymers, however, cannot meet the challenges posed by micro systems, due to their incompatibility with standard micro-fabrication processes. In an effort to produce porous materials that can be used in micro systems, porous silicon (PS) generated by anodization of single crystalline silicon has been investigated. In this work, the PS formation process has been extensively studied and characterized as a function of substrate type, crystal orientation, doping concentration, current density and surfactant concentration and type. Anodization conditions have been optimized for producing very thick porous silicon layers with uniform pore size, and for obtaining ideal pore morphologies. Three different types of porous silicon materials: meso porous silicon, macro porous silicon with straight pores, and macro porous silicon with tortuous pores, have been successfully produced. Regular pore arrays with controllable pore size in the range of 2mum to 6mum have been demonstrated as well. Localized PS formation has been achieved by using oxide/nitride/polysilicon stack as masking materials, which can withstand anodization in hydrofluoric acid up to twenty hours. A special etching cell with electrolytic liquid backside contact along with two process flows has been developed to enable the fabrication of thick macro porous silicon membranes with though wafer pores. For device assembly, Si-Au and In-Au bonding technologies have been developed. Very low bonding temperature (˜200°C) and thick/soft bonding layers (˜6mum) have been achieved by In-Au bonding technology, which is able to compensate the potentially

  20. Silicon Heterojunction System Field Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Dirk C.; Deline, Chris; Johnston, Steve; Rummel, Steve R.; Sekulic, Bill; Hacke, Peter; Kurtz, Sarah R.; Davis, Kristopher O.; Schneller, Eric John; Sun, Xingshu; Alam, Muhammad A.; Sinton, Ronald A.

    2017-11-17

    A silicon heterostructure photovoltaic system fielded for 10 years has been investigated in detail. The system has shown degradation, but at a rate similar to an average Si system, and still within the module warranty level. The power decline is dominated by a nonlinear Voc loss rather than more typical changes in Isc or Fill Factor. Modules have been evaluated using multiple techniques including: dark and light I-V measurement, Suns-Voc, thermal imaging, and quantitative electroluminescence. All techniques indicate that recombination and series resistance in the cells have increased along with a decrease of factor 2 in minority carrier lifetime. Performance changes are fairly uniform across the module, indicating changes occur primarily within the cells.

  1. Germanium silicon physics and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, R K; Bean, John C; Hull, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Since its inception in 1966, the series of numbered volumes known as Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. The "Willardson and Beer" Series, as it is widely known, has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. Not only did many of these volumes make an impact at the time of their publication, but they continue to be well-cited years after their original release. Recently, Professor Eicke R. Weber of the University of California at Berkeley joined as a co-editor of the series. Professor Weber, a well-known expert in the field of semiconductor materials, will further contribute to continuing the series' tradition of publishing timely, highly relevant, and long-impacting volumes. Some of the recent volumes, such as Hydrogen in Semiconductors, Imperfections in III/V Materials, Epitaxial Microstructures, High-Speed Heterostructure Devices, Oxygen in Silicon, and others promise that this tradition ...

  2. Silicon in plant disease control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Ampélio Pozza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available All essential nutrients can affect the incidence and severity of plant diseases. Although silicon (Si is not considered as an essential nutrient for plants, it stands out for its potential to decrease disease intensity in many crops. The mechanism of Si action in plant resistance is still unclear. Si deposition in plant cell walls raised the hypothesis of a possible physical barrier to pathogen penetration. However, the increased activity of phenolic compounds, polyphenol oxidases and peroxidases in plants treated with Si demonstrates the involvement of this element in the induction of plant defense responses. The studies examined in this review address the role of Si in disease control and the possible mechanisms involved in the mode of Si action in disease resistance in plants.

  3. Schematic driven silicon photonics design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrostowski, Lukas; Lu, Zeqin; Flückiger, Jonas; Pond, James; Klein, Jackson; Wang, Xu; Li, Sarah; Tai, Wei; Hsu, En Yao; Kim, Chan; Ferguson, John; Cone, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Electronic circuit designers commonly start their design process with a schematic, namely an abstract representation of the physical circuit. In integrated photonics on the other hand, it is very common for the design to begin at the physical component level. In order to build large integrated photonic systems, it is crucial to design using a schematic-driven approach. This includes simulations based on schematics, schematic-driven layout, layout versus schematic verification, and post-layout simulations. This paper describes such a design framework implemented using Mentor Graphics and Lumerical Solutions design tools. In addition, we describe challenges in silicon photonics related to manufacturing, and how these can be taken into account in simulations and how these impact circuit performance.

  4. Visualizing a silicon quantum computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Barry C.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Edmundson, Darran; Edmundson, Andrew

    2008-12-01

    Quantum computation is a fast-growing, multi-disciplinary research field. The purpose of a quantum computer is to execute quantum algorithms that efficiently solve computational problems intractable within the existing paradigm of 'classical' computing built on bits and Boolean gates. While collaboration between computer scientists, physicists, chemists, engineers, mathematicians and others is essential to the project's success, traditional disciplinary boundaries can hinder progress and make communicating the aims of quantum computing and future technologies difficult. We have developed a four minute animation as a tool for representing, understanding and communicating a silicon-based solid-state quantum computer to a variety of audiences, either as a stand-alone animation to be used by expert presenters or embedded into a longer movie as short animated sequences. The paper includes a generally applicable recipe for successful scientific animation production.

  5. Bimodal condensation silicone elastomers as dielectric elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    unimodal refers to that there is one polymer only in the system. As an alternative to unimodal networks there are the bimodal networks where two polymers with significantly different molecular weights are mixed with one crosslinker. [2]Silicone rubber can be divided into condensation type and addition type...... according to the curing reaction. The advantages of condensation silicones compared to addition are the relatively low cost, the curing rate largely being independent of temperature, the excellent adhesion, and the catalyst being nontoxic. [3]In this work, a series of bimodal condensation silicone...

  6. Quantum conductance in silicon quantum wires

    CERN Document Server

    Bagraev, N T; Klyachkin, L E; Malyarenko, A M; Gehlhoff, W; Ivanov, V K; Shelykh, I A

    2002-01-01

    The results of investigations of electron and hole quantum conductance staircase in silicon quantum wires are presented. The characteristics of self-ordering quantum wells of n- and p-types, which from on the silicon (100) surface in the nonequilibrium boron diffusion process, are analyzed. The results of investigations of the quantum conductance as the function of temperature, carrier concentration and modulation degree of silicon quantum wires are given. It is found out, that the quantum conductance of the one-dimensional channels is observed, for the first time, at an elevated temperature (T >= 77 K)

  7. Silicon photonics III systems and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lockwood, David

    2016-01-01

    This book is volume III of a series of books on silicon photonics. It reports on the development of fully integrated systems where many different photonics component are integrated together to build complex circuits. This is the demonstration of the fully potentiality of silicon photonics. It contains a number of chapters written by engineers and scientists of the main companies, research centers and universities active in the field. It can be of use for all those persons interested to know the potentialities and the recent applications of silicon photonics both in microelectronics, telecommunication and consumer electronics market.

  8. Silicon compounds in the Jupiter atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, G.; Harteck, P.; Reeves, R. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The formation of colored silicon compounds under nonequilibrium conditions is discussed with reference to the composition of the Jupiter atmosphere. It is shown that many of these reactions produce strongly colored intermediates that are relatively stable and similar in appearance to those observed on Jupiter. It is suggested that the silicon compounds could substantially contribute to the colors observed on Jupiter. The colored intermediates may be the result of relatively rapid amorphous silicon monoxide formation in vertical atmospheric currents in the region near the red spot and in the red spot itself.

  9. Titanium catalyzed silicon nanowires and nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. U. Usman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanowires, nanoplatelets, and other morphologies resulted from silicon growth catalyzed by thin titanium layers. The nanowires have diameters down to 5 nm and lengths to tens of micrometers. The two-dimensional platelets, in some instances with filigreed, snow flake-like shapes, had thicknesses down to the 10 nm scale and spans to several micrometers. These platelets grew in a narrow temperature range around 900 celsius, apparently representing a new silicon crystallite morphology at this length scale. We surmise that the platelets grow with a faceted dendritic mechanism known for larger crystals nucleated by titanium silicide catalyst islands.

  10. Fluidized-Bed Cleaning of Silicon Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, Naresh K.; Hsu, George C.

    1987-01-01

    Fluidized-bed chemical cleaning process developed to remove metallic impurities from small silicon particles. Particles (250 micrometer in size) utilized as seed material in silane pyrolysis process for production of 1-mm-size silicon. Product silicon (1 mm in size) used as raw material for fabrication of solar cells and other semiconductor devices. Principal cleaning step is wash in mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acids, leaching out metals and carrying them away as soluble chlorides. Particles fluidized by cleaning solution to assure good mixing and uniform wetting.

  11. Bond Testing for Effects of Silicone Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaia, James; Evans, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    In 2003 ATK Thiokol discovered that the smocks and coveralls worn by its operations personnel for safety and contamination control were themselves contaminated with a silicone defoamer and a silicone oil. As a growing list of items have been identified as having this form of contamination, it was desirable to devise a test method to determine if the contamination level detected could cause subsequent processing concerns. The smocks and coveralls could potentially contact bonding surfaces during processing so the test method focused on dry transfer of the silicone from the clothing to the bonding surface.

  12. Fabrication of thick silicon nitride blocks embedded in low-resistivity silicon substrates for radio frequency applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, L.J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Flokstra, Jakob; Flokstra, Jan; Jansen, Henricus V.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2006-01-01

    Thick silicon nitride blocks embedded in silicon wafers were recently proposed as a substrate for RF devices. In this paper we show that deep trenches filled with silicon nitride—having thin slices of monocrystalline silicon in between—already result in a significantly improved RF behavior.

  13. Effects of Silicon-Limitation on Growth and Morphology of Triparma laevis NIES-2565 (Parmales, Heterokontophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazumasa; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Ichinomiya, Mutsuo; Kuwata, Akira; Kamiya, Mitsunobu; Ohki, Kaori

    2014-01-01

    The order Parmales (Heterokontophyta) is a group of small-sized unicellular marine phytoplankton, which is distributed widely from tropical to polar waters. The cells of Parmales are surrounded by a distinctive cell wall, which consists of several siliceous plates fitting edge to edge. Phylogenetic and morphological analyses suggest that Parmales is one of the key organisms for elucidating the evolutionary origin of Bacillariophyceae (diatoms), the most successful heterokontophyta. The effects of silicon-limitation on growth and morphogenesis of plates were studied using a strain of Triparma laevis NIES-2565, which was cultured for the first time in artificial sea water. The cells of T. laevis were surrounded by eight plates when grown with sufficient silicon. However, plate formation became incomplete when cells were cultured in a medium containing low silicate (ca. silicon-limitation did not affect growth rate; cells continued to divide without changing their growth rate, even after all plates were lost. Loss of plates was reversible; when cells without plates were transferred to a medium containing sufficient silicate, regeneration of shield and ventral plates was followed by the formation of girdle and triradiate plates. The results indicate that the response to silicon-limitation of T. laevis is different from that of diatoms, where cell division becomes inhibited under such conditions. PMID:25054645

  14. Optical properties and microstructures of beta-iron disilicide in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Caiming

    annealing (RTA) and strong photoluminescence is present. We also found that RTA could maintain the strain in beta-FeSi2 precipitates and there exists an epitaxial relationship between beta-FeSi2 and silicon. Additional furnace annealing at 850°C can relax the strain in beta-FeSi2 precipitates. A metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) tunneling diode is utilized to embed beta-FeSi 2 precipitates and give strong 1.5 tam electroluminescence at 80 K. And this simple MOS structure with beta-FeSi2 was fabricated by Fe ion implantation and rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) at 900°C, which is fully compatible with ultra-large scale integration (ULSI) processes. beta-FeSi2 precipitates are also incorporated into a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) rib waveguide and a p+-i-n+ photodetector is monolithically integrated with this SOI rib waveguide. The photoresponse to 1550 nm laser of beta-FeSi2 precipitates was observed and compared to intrinsic silicon.

  15. All-silicon photonic crystal photoconductor on silicon-on-insulator at telecom wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haret, Laurent-Daniel; Checoury, Xavier; Han, Zheng; Boucaud, Philippe; Combrié, Sylvain; De Rossi, Alfredo

    2010-11-08

    We demonstrate an all-silicon photodetector working at telecom wavelength. The device is a simple metal-semiconductor-metal detector fabricated on silicon-on-insulator. A two-dimensional photonic crystal nanocavity (Q=60,000) is used to increase the response that arises from the linear and two-photon absorption of silicon. The responsivity of the detector is about 20 mA/W and its bandwidth is larger than 1 GHz.

  16. Antifuse with a single silicon-rich silicon nitride insulating layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermehl, Scott D.; Apodaca, Roger T.

    2013-01-22

    An antifuse is disclosed which has an electrically-insulating region sandwiched between two electrodes. The electrically-insulating region has a single layer of a non-hydrogenated silicon-rich (i.e. non-stoichiometric) silicon nitride SiN.sub.X with a nitrogen content X which is generally in the range of 0silicon. Arrays of antifuses can also be formed.

  17. Isotope effect on electron paramagnetic resonance of boron acceptors in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegner, A. R.; Tezuka, H.; Andlauer, T.; Stutzmann, M.; Thewalt, M. L. W.; Brandt, M. S.; Itoh, K. M.

    2010-09-01

    The fourfold degeneracy of the boron acceptor ground state in silicon, which is easily lifted by any symmetry-breaking perturbation, allows for a strong inhomogeneous broadening of the boron-related electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lines, e.g., by a random distribution of local strains. However, since EPR of boron acceptors in externally unstrained silicon was reported initially, neither the line shape nor the magnitude of the residual broadening observed in samples with high-crystalline purity were compatible with the low concentrations of carbon and oxygen point defects, being the predominant source of random local strain. Adapting a theoretical model which has been applied to understand the acceptor ground-state splitting in the absence of a magnetic field as an effect due to the presence of different silicon isotopes, we show that local fluctuations of the valence-band edge due to different isotopic configurations in the vicinity of the boron acceptors can quantitatively account for all inhomogeneous broadening effects in high-purity Si with a natural isotope composition. Our calculations show that such an isotopic perturbation also leads to a shift in the g value of different boron-related resonances, which we could verify in our experiments. Further, our results provide an independent test and verification of the valence-band offsets between the different Si isotopes determined in previous works.

  18. Silicon based dielectrics : growth, characterization, and applications in integrated optics

    OpenAIRE

    Ay, Feridun

    2005-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. In recent years, growing attention has been paid to silicon based dielectrics, such as silicon oxynitrides, silicon nitrides, and semiconductor doped silicon oxides, all combined under the name silica on silicon technology. This attention has been motivated mainly due to their excellent optical properties such as well controlled refractive index and high transparency over a wide range of wavelength. In accordance with the main goal of t...

  19. SiCloud: an online education tool for silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cathy Y.; DeVore, Peter T. S.; Lonappan, Cejo Konuparamban; Adam, Jost; Jalali, Bahram

    2017-08-01

    The silicon photonics industry is projected to be a multibillion dollar industry driven by the growth of data centers. In this work, we present an interactive online tool for silicon photonics. Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCCloud.org) is an easy to use instructional tool for optical properties of silicon and related materials, waveguide design and modal simulations as well as information capacity of silicon channels.

  20. Room Temperature Reactivity Of Silicon Nanocrystals With Solvents: The Case Of Ketone And Hydrogen Production From Secondary Alcohols: Catalysis?

    KAUST Repository

    El Demellawi, Jehad K.

    2015-05-29

    Although silicon nanoparticles dispersed in liquids are used in various applications ranging from bio-labeling to hydrogen production, their reactivities with their solvents and their catalytic properties re-main still unexplored. Here, we discovered that, because of their surface structures and mechanical strain, silicon nanoparticles react strongly with their solvents and may act as catalysts for the dehydrogenation, at room temperature, of secondary alcohols (e.g. isopropanol) to ketones and hydrogen. This catalytic reaction was followed by gas chromatography, pH measurements, mass spectroscopy and solidstate NMR. This discovery provides new understanding of the role played by silicon nanoparticles, and nanosilicon in general, in their stability in solvents in general as well as being candidates in catalysis.

  1. Crystallization behavior of silicon quantum dots in a silicon nitride matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Rin; Kim, Shinho; Kim, Hyun Jong; Lee, Jung Chul; Bae, Jong-Seong; Kim, Yangdo

    2012-02-01

    Silicon quantum dot superlattice was fabricated by alternating deposition of silicon rich nitride (SRN) and Si3N4 layers using RF magnetron co-sputtering. Samples were then annealed at temperatures between 800 and 1,100 degrees C and characterized by grazing incident X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). GIXRD and Raman analyses show that the formation of silicon quantum dots occurs with annealing above 1,100 degrees C for at least 60 minutes. As the annealing time increased the crystallization of silicon quantum dots was also increased. TEM images clearly showed SRN/Si3N4 superlattice structure and silicon quantum dots formation in SRN layers after annealing at 1,100 degrees C for more than 60 minutes. The changes in FTIR transmission spectra observed with annealing condition corresponded to the configuration of Si-N bonds. Crystallization of silicon quantum dots in a silicon nitride matrix started stabilizing after 60 minutes' annealing and approached completion after 120 minutes'. The systematic investigation of silicon quantum dots in a silicon nitride matrix and their properties for solar cell application are presented.

  2. Evidence for a silicon oxycarbide phase in the Nicalon silicon carbide fibre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porte, L.; Sartre, A.

    1989-01-01

    The Nicalon silicon carbide fibre has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Elements entering the fiber are carbon, silicon and oxygen. In addition to previously reported chemical entities (silicon carbide, silica and graphitic carbon) evidence is found of the presence of a new supplementary phase which is attributed to an intermediate silicon oxycarbide phase. As this phase is found to participate in very appreciable proportions to the composition of the fiber, some influence on the properties of this fiber can be anticipated. 17 references.

  3. Aderência bacteriana in vitro a lentes intra-oculares de polimetilmetacrilato e de silicone In vitro bacterial adherence to silicone and polymetylmethacrylate intraocular lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudete Inês Locatelli

    2004-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Staphylococcus epidermidis (clinical isolate and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 strains including growth curves, tests to verify capsule production, hydrophobicity and adherence to different materials as well as optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. RESULTS: No relation between capsule production, adherence of the strains tested and amount of microorganisms was observed; no statistically significant differences were detected between S. aureus and S. epidermidis adherence to polymetylmethacrylate and silicone intraocular lenses; P. aeruginosa was the most adherent microorganism to both materials. This adherence pattern was confirmed by SEM, while biofilm production by the three strains was visualized by AFM. CONCLUSIONS: In vitro experiments showed no differences of bacterial adherence between PMMA and silicone lenses, but P. aeruginosa displayed a greater level of adherence in relation to staphylococci. All three strains were shown to produce biofilm. Silicone was shown to be more hydrophobic when compared to polymethylmethacrylate.

  4. Deep Ultraviolet Macroporous Silicon Filters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal describes a novel method to make deep and far UV optical filters from macroporous silicon. This type of filter consists of an array of...

  5. Meie ingel Silicon Valleys / Raigo Neudorf

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Neudorf, Raigo

    2008-01-01

    Ettevõtluse Arendamise Sihtasutuse esinduse töölepanekust USAs Silicon Valleys räägib esinduse juht Andrus Viirg. Vt. ka: Eestlasi leidub San Franciscos omajagu; Muljetavaldav karjäär; USAga ammune tuttav

  6. Meie mees Silicon Valleys / Kertu Ruus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ruus, Kertu, 1977-

    2007-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Delovõje Vedomosti 5. dets. lk. 4. Peaminister Andrus Ansip avas Eesti Ettevõtluse Sihtasutuse esinduse Silicon Valley pealinnas San Joses. Vt. samas: Ränioru kliima on tehnoloogiasõbralik; Andrus Viirg

  7. Silicon based ultrafast optical waveform sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Hua; Galili, Michael; Pu, Minhao

    2010-01-01

    A 300 nmx450 nmx5 mm silicon nanowire is designed and fabricated for a four wave mixing based non-linear optical gate. Based on this silicon nanowire, an ultra-fast optical sampling system is successfully demonstrated using a free-running fiber laser with a carbon nanotube-based mode-locker as th......A 300 nmx450 nmx5 mm silicon nanowire is designed and fabricated for a four wave mixing based non-linear optical gate. Based on this silicon nanowire, an ultra-fast optical sampling system is successfully demonstrated using a free-running fiber laser with a carbon nanotube-based mode......-locker as the sampling source. A clear eye-diagram of a 320 Gbit/s data signal is obtained. The temporal resolution of the sampling system is estimated to 360 fs....

  8. Apparatus for silicon nitride precursor solids recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Gary M.; Predmesky, Ronald L.; Nicholson, John M.

    1995-04-04

    Method and apparatus are provided for collecting reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow from a reaction situs, wherein the gaseous outflow includes a condensable vapor. A condensate is formed of the condensable vapor on static mixer surfaces within a static mixer heat exchanger. The entrained reaction product solids are captured in the condensate which can be collected for further processing, such as return to the reaction situs. In production of silicon imide, optionally integrated into a production process for making silicon nitride caramic, wherein reactant feed gas comprising silicon halide and substantially inert carrier gas is reacted with liquid ammonia in a reaction vessel, silicon imide reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow comprising residual carrier gas and vaporized ammonia can be captured by forming a condensate of the ammonia vapor on static mixer surfaces of a static mixer heat exchanger.

  9. Method for silicon nitride precursor solids recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Gary M.; Predmesky, Ronald L.; Nicholson, John M.

    1992-12-15

    Method and apparatus are provided for collecting reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow from a reaction situs, wherein the gaseous outflow includes a condensable vapor. A condensate is formed of the condensable vapor on static mixer surfaces within a static mixer heat exchanger. The entrained reaction product solids are captured in the condensate which can be collected for further processing, such as return to the reaction situs. In production of silicon imide, optionally integrated into a production process for making silicon nitride caramic, wherein reactant feed gas comprising silicon halide and substantially inert carrier gas is reacted with liquid ammonia in a reaction vessel, silicon imide reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow comprising residual carrier gas and vaporized ammonia can be captured by forming a condensate of the ammonia vapor on static mixer surfaces of a static mixer heat exchanger.

  10. Characterisation of adaptive fluidic silicone membrane lenses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schneider, F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the auhtors compare the performance and optical quality of two types of adaptive fluidic silicone-membrane lenses. The membranes feature either a homogeneous thickness, or they are shaped resulting in an inhomogeneous cross...

  11. APPLICATION OF ANTIFRICTION ALUMINIUM-SILICON ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ju. Stetsenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that antifriction aluminium-silicon alloy is perspective material for change of the parts of heavy and expensive bronze in different frictional units of machines and mechanisms.

  12. Silicon Wafer X-ray Mirror Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this one year research project, we propose to do the following four tasks; (1) Design the silicon wafer X-ray mirror demo unit and develop a ray-tracing code to...

  13. Lithium ion batteries based on nanoporous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Sarah H.; Nemanick, Eric J.; Kang, Chris Byung-Hwa

    2015-09-22

    A lithium ion battery that incorporates an anode formed from a Group IV semiconductor material such as porous silicon is disclosed. The battery includes a cathode, and an anode comprising porous silicon. In some embodiments, the anode is present in the form of a nanowire, a film, or a powder, the porous silicon having a pore diameters within the range between 2 nm and 100 nm and an average wall thickness of within the range between 1 nm and 100 nm. The lithium ion battery further includes, in some embodiments, a non-aqueous lithium containing electrolyte. Lithium ion batteries incorporating a porous silicon anode demonstrate have high, stable lithium alloying capacity over many cycles.

  14. Mesoporous Silicon Far Infrared Filters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal describes a novel method to make optical filters based on mesoporous silicon multilayers, for use at cold temperatures in the far infrared...

  15. Thermoelectric Properties of Silicon Microchannel Plates Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ci, P L; Shi, J; Wang, F; Sun, L; Xu, S H; Yang, P X; Wang, L W [Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, and Department of Electronic Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Chu, Paul K, E-mail: lwwang@ee.ecnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Material Sciences, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2011-02-01

    We have fabricated silicon microchannel plates (MCPs) by photo-assisted electrochemical etching (PAECE) and determined the thermoelectric properties by measuring the Seebeck coefficient of the samples. The samples are composed of regular arrayed lattices with a width of about 5 {mu}m and spacing of about 1 {mu}m. The Seebeck coefficient along the edge of the lattice is 466 {mu}V/K. The silicon MCPs are potential materials for power generation and refrigeration. After oxidation from 30 minutes to 70 minutes and removing the silicon dioxide layer by buffered hydrofluoric acid, the samples show an improved coefficient as high as 1019 {mu}V/K after repeating oxidation and etching 5 times. Our results show that the Seebeck coefficient increases when the wall of the silicon MCPs is thinned.

  16. Semiconductors and semimetals oxygen in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Shimura, Fumio

    1994-01-01

    This volume reviews the latest understanding of the behavior and roles of oxygen in silicon, which will carry the field into the ULSI era from the experimental and theoretical points of view. The fourteen chapters, written by recognized authorities representing industrial and academic institutions, cover thoroughly the oxygen related phenomena from the crystal growth to device fabrication processes, as well as indispensable diagnostic techniques for oxygen.Key Features* Comprehensive study of the behavior of oxygen in silicon* Discusses silicon crystals for VLSI and ULSI applications* Thorough coverage from crystal growth to device fabrication* Edited by technical experts in the field* Written by recognized authorities from industrial and academic institutions* Useful to graduate students, scientists in other disciplines, and active participants in the arena of silicon-based microelectronics research* 297 original line drawings

  17. Core-shell silicon nanowire solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, M M; Anantram, M P; Karim, K S

    2013-01-01

    Silicon nanowires can enhance broadband optical absorption and reduce radial carrier collection distances in solar cell devices. Arrays of disordered nanowires grown by vapor-liquid-solid method are attractive because they can be grown on low-cost substrates such as glass, and are large area compatible. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that an array of disordered silicon nanowires surrounded by a thin transparent conductive oxide has both low diffuse and specular reflection with total values as low as nanowire facilitates enhancement in external quantum efficiency using two different active shell materials: amorphous silicon and nanocrystalline silicon. As a result, the core-shell nanowire device exhibits a short-circuit current enhancement of 15% with an amorphous Si shell and 26% with a nanocrystalline Si shell compared to their corresponding planar devices.

  18. The two sides of silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Devine, S R

    2001-01-01

    /p/n sup + and essentially two p-n junctions within one device. With increasing bias voltage, as the electric field is extending into the detector bulk from opposite sides of the silicon detector, there are two distinct depletion regions that collect charge signal independently. Summing the signal charge from the two regions, one is able to reconstruct the initial energy of the incident particle. From Transient Current measurements it is apparent that E-field manipulation is possible by excess carrier injection, enabling a high enough E-field to extend across the width of the detector, allowing for efficient charge collection. Results are presented on in situ irradiation of silicon detector's at cryogenic temperature. The results show that irradiation at cryogenic temperatures does not detrimentally effect a silicon detectors performance when compared to its irradiation at room temperature. Operation of silicon devices at cryogenic temperatures offers the advantage of reducing radiation-induced leakage curren...

  19. Some disconnected speculations on slicing silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    The basic principles for qualifying silicon wafering methods are summarized, and unconventional methods of wafering was discussed. Methods of cleaving analogous to diamond cutting, geological processes employing the expansion of freezing water, and karate chops are touched upon.

  20. Some disconnected speculations on slicing silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, P. A.

    1982-02-01

    The basic principles for qualifying silicon wafering methods are summarized, and unconventional methods of wafering was discussed. Methods of cleaving analogous to diamond cutting, geological processes employing the expansion of freezing water, and karate chops are touched upon.