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Sample records for strain-specific loci controls

  1. Twenty-eight divergent polysaccharide loci specifying within and amongst strain capsule diversity in three strains of Bacteroides fragilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patrick, S.; Blakely, G.W.; Houston, S.

    2010-01-01

    including a putative Wzx flippase and Wzy polymerase, was confirmed in all three strains, despite a lack of cross-reactivity between NCTC 9343 and 638R surface polysaccharide-specific antibodies by immunolabelling and microscopy. Genomic comparisons revealed an exceptional level of polysaccharide...... biosynthesis locus diversity. Of the 10 divergent polysaccharide associated loci apparent in each strain, none are similar between NCTC9343 and 638R. YCH46 shares one locus with NCTC9343, confirmed by MAb labelling, and a second different locus with 638R, making a total of 28 divergent polysaccharide...... restriction and modification systems that act to prevent acquisition of foreign DNA. The level of amongst strain diversity in polysaccharide biosynthesis loci is unprecedented....

  2. Evaluation of customised lineage-specific sets of MIRU-VNTR loci for genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asante-Poku, Adwoa; Nyaho, Michael Selasi; Borrell, Sonia; Comas, Iñaki; Gagneux, Sebastien; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    Different combinations of variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) loci have been proposed for genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Existing VNTR schemes show different discriminatory capacity among the six human MTBC lineages. Here, we evaluated the discriminatory power of a "customized MIRU12" loci format proposed previously by Comas et al. based on the standard 24 loci defined by Supply et al. for VNTR-typing of MTBC in Ghana. One hundred and fifty-eight MTBC isolates classified into Lineage 4 and Lineage 5 were used to compare a customized lineage-specific panel of 12 MIRU-VNTR loci ("customized MIRU-12") to the standard MIRU-15 genotyping scheme. The resolution power of each typing method was determined based on the Hunter-Gaston- Discriminatory Index (HGDI). A minimal set of customized MIRU-VNTR loci for typing Lineages 4 (Euro-American) and 5 (M. africanum West African 1) strains from Ghana was defined based on the cumulative HGDI. Among the 106 Lineage 4 strains, the customized MIRU-12 identified a total of 104 distinct genotypes consisting of 2 clusters of 2 isolates each (clustering rate 1.8%), and 102 unique strains while standard MIRU-15 yielded a total of 105 different genotypes, including 1 cluster of 2 isolates (clustering rate: 0.9%) and 104 singletons. Among, 52 Lineage 5 isolates, customized MIRU-12 genotyping defined 51 patterns with 1 cluster of 2 isolates (clustering rate: 0.9%) and 50 unique strains whereas MIRU-15 classified all 52 strains as unique. Cumulative HGDI values for customized MIRU-12 for Lineages 4 and 5 were 0.98 respectively whilst that of standard MIRU-15 was 0.99. A union of loci from the customised MIRU-12 and standard MIRU-15 revealed a set of customized eight highly discriminatory loci: 4052, 2163B, 40, 4165, 2165, 10,16 and 26 with a cumulative HGDI of 0.99 for genotyping Lineage 4 and 5 strains from Ghana.

  3. Evaluation of customised lineage-specific sets of MIRU-VNTR loci for genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adwoa Asante-Poku

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Different combinations of variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR loci have been proposed for genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC. Existing VNTR schemes show different discriminatory capacity among the six human MTBC lineages. Here, we evaluated the discriminatory power of a "customized MIRU12" loci format proposed previously by Comas et al. based on the standard 24 loci defined by Supply et al. for VNTR-typing of MTBC in Ghana. METHOD: One hundred and fifty-eight MTBC isolates classified into Lineage 4 and Lineage 5 were used to compare a customized lineage-specific panel of 12 MIRU-VNTR loci ("customized MIRU-12" to the standard MIRU-15 genotyping scheme. The resolution power of each typing method was determined based on the Hunter-Gaston- Discriminatory Index (HGDI. A minimal set of customized MIRU-VNTR loci for typing Lineages 4 (Euro-American and 5 (M. africanum West African 1 strains from Ghana was defined based on the cumulative HGDI. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Among the 106 Lineage 4 strains, the customized MIRU-12 identified a total of 104 distinct genotypes consisting of 2 clusters of 2 isolates each (clustering rate 1.8%, and 102 unique strains while standard MIRU-15 yielded a total of 105 different genotypes, including 1 cluster of 2 isolates (clustering rate: 0.9% and 104 singletons. Among, 52 Lineage 5 isolates, customized MIRU-12 genotyping defined 51 patterns with 1 cluster of 2 isolates (clustering rate: 0.9% and 50 unique strains whereas MIRU-15 classified all 52 strains as unique. Cumulative HGDI values for customized MIRU-12 for Lineages 4 and 5 were 0.98 respectively whilst that of standard MIRU-15 was 0.99. A union of loci from the customised MIRU-12 and standard MIRU-15 revealed a set of customized eight highly discriminatory loci: 4052, 2163B, 40, 4165, 2165, 10,16 and 26 with a cumulative HGDI of 0.99 for genotyping Lineage 4 and 5 strains from Ghana.

  4. [Discriminatory power of variable number on tandem repeats loci for genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H X; Cai, C; Liu, J Y; Zhang, Z G; Yuan, M; Jia, J N; Sun, Z G; Huang, H R; Gao, J M; Li, W M

    2017-06-10

    Objective: Using the standard genotype method, variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), we constructed a VNTR database to cover all provinces and proposed a set of optimized VNTR loci combinations for each province, in order to improve the preventive and control programs on tuberculosis, in China. Methods: A total of 15 loci VNTR was used to analyze 4 116 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, isolated from national survey of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis, in 2007. Hunter-Gaston Index (HGI) was also used to analyze the discriminatory power of each VNTR site. A set combination of 12-VNTR, 10-VNTR, 8-VNTR and 5-VNTR was respectively constructed for each province, based on 1) epidemic characteristics of M. tuberculosis lineages in China, with high discriminatory power and genetic stability. Results: Through the completed 15 loci VNTR patterns of 3 966 strains under 96.36 % (3 966/4 116) coverage, we found seven high HGI loci (including QUB11b and MIRU26) as well as low stable loci (including QUB26, MIRU16, Mtub21 and QUB11b) in several areas. In all the 31 provinces, we found an optimization VNTR combination as 10-VNTR loci in Inner Mongolia, Chongqing and Heilongjiang, but with 8-VNTR combination shared in other provinces. Conclusions: It is necessary to not only use the VNTR database for tracing the source of infection and cluster of M. tuberculosis in the nation but also using the set of optimized VNTR combinations in monitoring those local epidemics and M. tuberculosis (genetics in local) population.

  5. 19-VNTR loci used in genotyping Chinese clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains and in association with spoligotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi; Liu, Hai-can; Zheng, Huajun; Dou, Xiangfeng; Tang, Biao; Zhao, Xiu-qin; Zhu, Yongqiang; Lu, Bing; Wang, Shengyue; Dong, Hai-yan; Zhang, Yuan-yuan; Zhao, Guoping; Wan, Kanglin

    2013-07-01

    Recently, tandem repeat typing has emerged as a rapid and easy method for the molecular epidemiology of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) complex. In this study, a collection of 19 VNTRs incorporating 15 previously described loci and 4 newly evaluated markers were used to genotype 206 Chinese M. tuberculosis isolates and 9 BCG strains. The discriminatory power was evaluated and compared with that obtained by Spoligotyping. It turned out that 15-locus VNTR could be very useful in M. tuberculosis complex strains genotyping in China. The 4 newly evaluated loci were proved informative and could be useful for future epidemiology studies, especially in Beijing family strains. In addition, a unique pattern of the latter 4 loci were found in Chinese BCG strains. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sherman, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtype...... stratification might help in the identification and characterization of novel risk factors for breast cancer subtypes. This may eventually result in further improvements in prevention, early detection and treatment.......Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtypes...... were defined by five markers (ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR) and other pathological and clinical features. Analyses included up to 30 040 invasive breast cancer cases and 53 692 controls from 31 studies within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We confirmed previous reports of stronger associations...

  7. Efficient Differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains of the W-Beijing Family from Russia using Highly Polymorphic VNTR Loci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surikova, O. V.; Voitech, D. S.; Kuzmicheva, G.; Tatkov, S. I.; Mokrousov, I. V.; Narvskaya, O. V.; Rot, M. A.; Soolingen, D. van; Filipenko, M. L.

    2005-01-01

    The W-Beijing family is a widespread Mycobacterium tuberculosis clonal lineage that frequently causes epidemic outbreaks. This family is genetically homogeneous and conserved, so ETR-VNTR (exact tandem repeat-variable number of tandem repeats) typing is insufficient for strain differentiation, due to a common ETR-A to E profile (42435). This leads to the false clustering in molecular epidemiological studies, especially in the regions of predominance of the W-Beijing family. In this study, we searched for VNTR loci with a high evolutionary rate of polymorphism in the W-Beijing genome. Here we further evaluated VNTR typing on a set of 99 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates and reference strains. These isolates were characterized and classified into several genotype families based on three ETR loci (A, C, E) and eight additional loci [previously described as QUB (Queen's University Belfast) or MIRU (Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units) or Mtubs]. Ninety-nine strains were divided into 74 VNTR-types, 51 isolates of the W-Beijing family identified by IS6110 RFLP-typing (the restriction fragment length polymorphism-typing) and/or spoligotyping were subdivided into 30 VNTR-types. HGDI (the Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index) for all studied loci was close to that of IS6110 RFLP typing, a 'gold standard' method for subtyping M. tuberculosis complex strains. The QUB 26 and QUB 18 loci located in the PPE genes were highly polymorphic and more discriminative than other loci (HGDI is 0.8). Statistically significant increase of tandem repeats number in loci ETR-A, -E, QUB 26, QUB 18, QUB 11B, Mtub21 was revealed in the W-Beijing group compared to genetically divergent non-W-Beijing strains. Thirty-six isolates were subjected to IS6110 RFLP typing. The congruence between results of the IS6110 RFLP typing and 11-loci VNTR typing was estimated on 23 isolates of the W-Beijing family. These isolates were subdivided into 9 IS6110-RFLP types and 13 VNTR types. The poor

  8. Genetic mapping of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-inducing loci in five mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, C A; Rowe, W P

    1980-07-01

    A single mendelian gene was identified for induction of the endogenous xenotropic murine leukemia virus in five mouse strains (C57BL/10, C57L, C57BR, AKR, and BALB/c). This locus, designated Bxv-1, mapped to the same site on chromosome 1 in all strains: Id-1-Pep-3-[Bxv-1-Lp]. Thus, inducibility loci for xenotropic virus are more limited in number and chromosomal distribution than ecotropic inducibility loci. Virus expression in mice with Bxv-1 was induced by treatment of fibroblasts with 5-iododeoxyuridine or by exposure of spleen cells to a B cell mitogen, bacterial lipopolysaccharide. An analysis of the hamster X mouse somatic cell hybrids indicated that chromosome 1, alone, was sufficient for virus induction.

  9. BXSB/long-lived is a recombinant inbred strain containing powerful disease suppressor loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Michelle E K; Gabriel, Luisa; Rose, S Jane; Rogers, Nicola J; Izui, Shozo; Morley, Bernard J

    2007-08-15

    The BXSB strain of recombinant inbred mice develops a spontaneous pathology that closely resembles the human disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Six non-MHC loci, Yaa, Bxs1-4, and Bxs6, have been linked to the development of aspects of the disease while a further locus, Bxs5, may be a BXSB-derived disease suppressor. Disease development is delayed in a substrain of BXSB, BXSB/MpJScr-long-lived (BXSB/ll). We compared the genetic derivation of BXSB/ll mice to the original strain, BXSB/MpJ, using microsatellite markers and single nucleotide polymorphisms across the genome. These differences were clustered and included two regions known to be important in the disease-susceptibility of these mice, Bxs5 and 6, as well as regions on chromosomes 5, 6, 9, 11, 12, and 13. We compared BXSB/ll to >20 strains including the BXSB parental SB/Le and C57BL/6 strains. This revealed that BXSB/ll is a separate recombinant inbred line derived from SB/Le and C57BL/6, but distinctly different from BXSB, that most likely arose due to residual heterozygosity in the BXSB stock. Despite the continued presence of the powerful disease-susceptibility locus Bxs3, BXSB/ll mice do not develop disease. We propose that the disappearance of the disease phenotype in the BXSB/ll mice is due to the inheritance of one or more suppressor loci in the differentially inherited intervals between the BXSB/ll and BXSB strains.

  10. Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative-specific breast cancer risk loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Lindstrom, Sara

    2013-01-01

    differences in genetic predisposition. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls......), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10(-12) and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10(-8)), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10(-8)) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10(-8)), were associated with ER-negative but not ER...

  11. Description of electrophoretic loci and tissue specific gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protein electrophoresis was used to study the distributions and tissue specificity of gene expression of enzymes encoded by 42 loci in Rhinolophus clivosus and R. landeri, the genetically most divergent of the ten species of southern African horseshoe bats. No differences in gene expression were found between R.

  12. Association analysis of genomic loci important for grain weight control in elite common wheat varieties cultivated with variable water and fertiliser supply.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunpu Zhang

    Full Text Available Grain weight, an essential yield component, is under strong genetic control and markedly influenced by the environment. Here, by genome-wide association analysis with a panel of 94 elite common wheat varieties, 37 loci were found significantly associated with thousand-grain weight (TGW in one or more environments differing in water and fertiliser levels. Five loci were stably associated with TGW under all 12 environments examined. Their elite alleles had positive effects on TGW. Four, two, three, and two loci were consistently associated with TGW in the irrigated and fertilised (IF, rainfed (RF, reduced nitrogen (RN, and reduced phosphorus (RP environments. The elite alleles of the IF-specific loci enhanced TGW under well-resourced conditions, whereas those of the RF-, RN-, or RP-specific loci conferred tolerance to the TGW decrease when irrigation, nitrogen, or phosphorus were reduced. Moreover, the elite alleles of the environment-independent and -specific loci often acted additively to enhance TGW. Four additional loci were found associated with TGW in specific locations, one of which was shown to contribute to the TGW difference between two experimental sites. Further analysis of 14 associated loci revealed that nine affected both grain length and width, whereas the remaining loci influenced either grain length or width, indicating that these loci control grain weight by regulating kernel size. Finally, the elite allele of Xpsp3152 frequently co-segregated with the larger grain haplotype of TaGW2-6A, suggesting probable genetic and functional linkages between Xpsp3152 and GW2 that are important for grain weight control in cereal plants. Our study provides new knowledge on TGW control in elite common wheat lines, which may aid the improvement of wheat grain weight trait in further research.

  13. Three loci on mouse chromosome 5 and 10 modulate sex determination in XX Ods/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Christophe; Moran, Jennifer L; Kovanci, Ertug; Petit, Deborah C; Beier, David R; Bishop, Colin E

    2007-07-01

    In mouse, XY embryos are committed to the male sex determination pathway after the transient expression of the Y-linked Sry gene in the Sertoli cell lineage between 10.5 and 12.5 dpc. In the C57BL/6J strain, male sex determination program can be modulated by some autosomal genes. The C57BL/6J alleles at these autosomal loci can antagonize male sex determination in combination with specific Sry alleles. In this report, the authors have identified an effect of these C57BL/6J specific alleles in combination with a mutated Sox9 allele, Sox9(Ods). Authors report the mapping of three of these genetic loci on mouse chromosome 5 and 10 in a backcross of the Ods mutation to the C57BL/6J background. Our study confirms the importance of the strain C57BL/6J for the investigation of the genetic mechanisms that control sex determination.

  14. The loci controlling plasticity in flax

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    Bickel CL

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cory L Bickel, Marshall Lukacs, Christopher A CullisCase Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH, USAAbstract: Flax undergoes heritable genomic changes in response to nutrient stress, including changes in total DNA content, rDNA copy number variation, and the appearance of Linum Insertion Sequence 1 (LIS-1. The nature of the genomic changes suggests a very different mechanism, which is not yet understood, from that of other DNA changes in response to stress, such as the activation of transposable elements. To identify the genes that control genomic changes in response to stress in flax, reciprocal crosses were made between a responsive flax line, Stormont cirrus, and an unresponsive line, Bethune. The ability of the F2 generation (from selfed F1 plants to respond to nutrient stress was assayed using the insertion of LIS-1 as the criteria for responsiveness. Twenty-nine out of 89 F2s responded at 5 weeks, suggesting that 3-4 dominant loci were all necessary for early LIS-1 insertion. Seventy out of 76 responded at 10 weeks, indicating two dominant loci independently capable of initiating LIS-1 insertion under prolonged nutrient stress. F1 plants and their progeny with either P1 or Bethune as the maternal parent were capable of responding with LIS-1 insertion, indicating that LIS-1 insertion is under nuclear genetic control and does not involve maternal factors. Thus, a small number of loci within the genome of Stormont cirrus appear to control the ability to respond to nutrient stress with LIS-1 insertion. A genetic map of the flax genome is currently under construction, and will be used to identify these loci within the genome.Keywords: nutrient stress, genomic plasticity, flax, Linum usitatissimum, LIS-1 

  15. Multiple Avirulence Loci and Allele-Specific Effector Recognition Control the Pm3 Race-Specific Resistance of Wheat to Powdery Mildew[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffler, Stefan; Stirnweis, Daniel; Treier, Georges; Herren, Gerhard; Korol, Abraham B.; Wicker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In cereals, several mildew resistance genes occur as large allelic series; for example, in wheat (Triticum aestivum and Triticum turgidum), 17 functional Pm3 alleles confer agronomically important race-specific resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis). The molecular basis of race specificity has been characterized in wheat, but little is known about the corresponding avirulence genes in powdery mildew. Here, we dissected the genetics of avirulence for six Pm3 alleles and found that three major Avr loci affect avirulence, with a common locus_1 involved in all AvrPm3-Pm3 interactions. We cloned the effector gene AvrPm3a2/f2 from locus_2, which is recognized by the Pm3a and Pm3f alleles. Induction of a Pm3 allele-dependent hypersensitive response in transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana and in wheat demonstrated specificity. Gene expression analysis of Bcg1 (encoded by locus_1) and AvrPm3 a2/f2 revealed significant differences between isolates, indicating that in addition to protein polymorphisms, expression levels play a role in avirulence. We propose a model for race specificity involving three components: an allele-specific avirulence effector, a resistance gene allele, and a pathogen-encoded suppressor of avirulence. Thus, whereas a genetically simple allelic series controls specificity in the plant host, recognition on the pathogen side is more complex, allowing flexible evolutionary responses and adaptation to resistance genes. PMID:26452600

  16. Strain-Specificity and Disease-Specificity of Probiotic Efficacy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne V. McFarland

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAs the use and diversity of probiotic products expands, the choice of an appropriate type of probiotic is challenging for both medical care professionals and the public alike. Two vital factors in choosing the appropriate probiotic are often ignored, namely, the probiotic strain-specificity and disease-specificity for efficacy. Reviews and meta-analyses often pool together different types of probiotics, resulting in misleading conclusions of efficacy.MethodsA systematic review of the literature (1970–2017 assessing strain-specific and disease-specific probiotic efficacy was conducted. Trials were included for probiotics with an identifiable strain (either single strain or mixtures of strains that had at least two randomized, controlled trials for each type of disease indication. The goal was to determine if probiotic strains have strain and/or disease-specific efficacy.ResultsWe included 228 trials and found evidence for both strain specificity and disease specificity for the efficacy of specific probiotic strains. Significant efficacy evidence was found for 7 (70% of probiotic strain(s among four preventive indications and 11 (65% probiotic strain(s among five treatment indications. Strain-specific efficacy for preventing adult antibiotic-associated diarrhea was clearly demonstrated within the Lactobacillus species [e.g., by the mixture of Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285, Lactobacillus casei LBC80R, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CLR2 (Bio-K+®, by L. casei DN114001 (Actimel® and by Lactobacillus reuteri 55730], while other Lactobacillus strains did not show efficacy. Significant disease-specific variations in efficacy was demonstrated by L. rhamnosus GG and Saccharomyces boulardii CNCM I-745, as well as other probiotic strains.ConclusionStrong evidence was found supporting the hypothesis that the efficacy of probiotics is both strain-specific and disease-specific. Clinical guidelines and meta-analyses need to recognize the

  17. Clostridial Strain-Specific Characteristics Associated with Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

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    Schönherr-Hellec, Sophia; Klein, Geraldine L; Delannoy, Johanne; Ferraris, Laurent; Rozé, Jean Christophe; Butel, Marie José; Aires, Julio

    2018-04-01

    We aimed at identifying potential bacterial factors linking clostridia with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We compared the phenotypic traits, stress responses, cellular cytotoxicity, and inflammatory capabilities of the largest collection of Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium neonatale strains isolated from fecal samples of NEC preterm neonates (PN) and control PNs. When strain characteristics were used as explanatory variables, a statistical discriminant analysis allowed the separation of NEC and control strains into separate groups. Strains isolated from NEC PN were characterized by a higher viability at 30°C ( P = 0.03) and higher aerotolerance ( P = 0.01), suggesting that NEC strains may have a competitive and/or survival advantage in the environmental gastrointestinal tract conditions of NEC PN. Heat-treated NEC bacteria induced higher production of interleukin-8 in Caco-2 cells ( P = 0.03), suggesting proinflammatory activity. In vitro , bacteria, bacterial components, and fecal filtrates showed variable cytotoxic effects affecting the cellular network and/or cell viability, without specific association with NEC or control samples. Altogether, our data support the existence of a specific clostridial strain signature associated with NEC. IMPORTANCE Clostridia are part of the commensal microbiota in preterm neonates (PN). However, microbiota analyses by culture and metagenomics have linked necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and intestinal colonization with clostridial species. Nevertheless, little is known about the specific characteristics that may be shared by clostridia associated with NEC compared to commensal clostridia. Therefore, our goal was to identify specific bacterial factors linking clostridial strains with NEC. We report the existence of a specific bacterial signature associated with NEC and propose that activation of the innate immune response may be a unifying causative mechanism for the development of NEC independent of a specific pathogenic

  18. Comparison of the reversibility of loci pet23 and lys2 after UV irradiation in the standard and UV-sensitive strains of Saccharomyces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlckova, V.; Kovacova, V.

    1984-01-01

    Reversibility of the respiration-deficient locus pet23 and auxotrophic locus lys2 was followed in the standard (RAD1) and UV sensitive (rad1 to 2) strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, both after identical doses of UV radiation and at identical survival. By comparison of reversibility after treatment with identical doses of UV radiation a much higher reversibility of both loci in strain rad1 to 2 could be detected. A comparison of reversibility of the loci at identical survival of both strains showed that the reversibility of the pet23 locus is much higher in strain rad1 to 2, whereas reversibility of the lys2 locus is roughly identical in the two strains. Thus, the function of gene RAD1 in repair processes is apparently associated with ''error-free'' repair, both at low and high doses of ultraviolet radiation. (author)

  19. Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundby, Alicia; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Steffensen, Annette B.; Acha, Moshe Ray; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Pfeufer, Arne; Lyneh, Stacey N.; Olesen, Soren-Peter; Brunak, Soren; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Nathoe, Hendrik M.; Spiering, Wilko; Daly, Mark J.; Asselbergs, Ikea W.; van der Harst, Pim; Milan, David J.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Lage, Kasper; Olsen, Jesper V.

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated with complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five genes

  20. Whole-Genome Analysis of Three Yeast Strains Used for Production of Sherry-Like Wines Revealed Genetic Traits Specific to Flor Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldarov, Mikhail A.; Beletsky, Alexey V.; Tanashchuk, Tatiana N.; Kishkovskaya, Svetlana A.; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Mardanov, Andrey V.

    2018-01-01

    Flor yeast strains represent a specialized group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts used for biological wine aging. We have sequenced the genomes of three flor strains originated from different geographic regions and used for production of sherry-like wines in Russia. According to the obtained phylogeny of 118 yeast strains, flor strains form very tight cluster adjacent to the main wine clade. SNP analysis versus available genomes of wine and flor strains revealed 2,270 genetic variants in 1,337 loci specific to flor strains. Gene ontology analysis in combination with gene content evaluation revealed a complex landscape of possibly adaptive genetic changes in flor yeast, related to genes associated with cell morphology, mitotic cell cycle, ion homeostasis, DNA repair, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, and cell wall biogenesis. Pangenomic analysis discovered the presence of several well-known “non-reference” loci of potential industrial importance. Events of gene loss included deletions of asparaginase genes, maltose utilization locus, and FRE-FIT locus involved in iron transport. The latter in combination with a flor-yeast-specific mutation in the Aft1 transcription factor gene is likely to be responsible for the discovered phenotype of increased iron sensitivity and improved iron uptake of analyzed strains. Expansion of the coding region of the FLO11 flocullin gene and alteration of the balance between members of the FLO gene family are likely to positively affect the well-known propensity of flor strains for velum formation. Our study provides new insights in the nature of genetic variation in flor yeast strains and demonstrates that different adaptive properties of flor yeast strains could have evolved through different mechanisms of genetic variation. PMID:29867869

  1. Genetic Variation of pln Loci Among Probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum Group Strains with Antioxidant and Cholesterol-Lowering Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Sundru Manjulata; Halami, Prakash M

    2017-10-13

    In the present study, 14 different plantaricin-encoding genes of pln loci were studied and compared to available sequences from public domain database of probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum strains. Based upon the presence and absence of selected genes, pln locus was grouped into eight clusters. Further, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis for seven genes has discriminated the complex pln locus into five types which includes WCFS1 (in Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum MCC 2976 and MCC 2974 and Lactobacillus paraplantarum MCC 2978), closely related to J51 (in Lb. paraplantarum MCC 2973 and MCC 2977), J23 (in Lb. plantarum MTCC 5422), NC8 (in Lb. paraplantarum MTCC 9483), and a new E1 type (in Lb. plantarum subsp. plantarum E1). It was observed that the plnA, EF, NC8βα, NC81F, NC8HK, and G were expressed in E1 strain. Further, southern hybridization confirmed the chromosome-encoded plantaricin in Lb. plantarum group (LPG) strains. Several PCR assays and DNA sequence analysis of the regions amplified in pln loci of E1 isolate suggested a hybrid variant of NC8 and J51 plantaritypes. This indicates the wide distribution of plantaricin with remarkable variation, diversity, and plasticity among the LPG strains of vegetable origin. Further, the selected strains were able to reduce the growth of Kocuria rhizophila ATCC 9341 by 40-54% within 6 h of co-incubation under in vitro pathogen exclusion assay. These isolates also possessed cholesterol-lowering and antioxidant activity suggesting their application in the development of functional foods.

  2. Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative-specific breast cancer risk loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Lindstrom, Sara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Brook, Mark N; Orr, Nick; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Riboli, Elio; Feigelson, Heather S; Le Marchand, Loic; Buring, Julie E; Eccles, Diana; Miron, Penelope; Fasching, Peter A; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Carpenter, Jane; Godwin, Andrew K; Nevanlinna, Heli; Giles, Graham G; Cox, Angela; Hopper, John L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Howat, Will J; Schoof, Nils; Bojesen, Stig E; Lambrechts, Diether; Broeks, Annegien; Andrulis, Irene L; Guénel, Pascal; Burwinkel, Barbara; Sawyer, Elinor J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Fletcher, Olivia; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Mannermaa, Arto; Hamann, Ute; Meindl, Alfons; Lindblom, Annika; Zheng, Wei; Devillee, Peter; Goldberg, Mark S; Lubinski, Jan; Kristensen, Vessela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Matsuo, Keitaro; Wu, Anna H; Radice, Paolo; Teo, Soo Hwang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Kang, Daehee; Hartman, Mikael; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C; Park, Daniel J; Hammet, Fleur; Stone, Jennifer; Veer, Laura J Van't; Rutgers, Emiel J; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Peto, Julian; Schrauder, Michael G; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Warren, Helen; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lichtner, Peter; Lochmann, Magdalena; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Greco, Dario; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Margolin, Sara; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Balleine, Rosemary; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Berg, David Van Den; Stram, Daniel O; Neven, Patrick; Dieudonné, Anne-Sophie; Leunen, Karin; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bernard, Loris; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Feng, Ye; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Signorello, Lisa; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Miao, Hui; Chan, Ching Wan; Chia, Kee Seng; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; John, Esther M; Chen, Gary K; Hu, Jennifer J; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Bernstein, Leslie; Press, Michael F; Ziegler, Regina G; Millikan, Robert M; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Nyante, Sarah; Ingles, Sue A; Waisfisz, Quinten; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Gibson, Lorna; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schmutzler, Rita K; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Pilarski, Robert; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Slamon, Dennis J; Rauh, Claudia; Lux, Michael P; Jud, Sebastian M; Bruning, Thomas; Weaver, Joellen; Sharma, Priyanka; Pathak, Harsh; Tapper, Will; Gerty, Sue; Durcan, Lorraine; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Peeters, Petra H; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele; Canzian, Federico; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Johansson, Mattias; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chen, Constance; Beck, Andy; Hankinson, Susan E; Berg, Christine D; Hoover, Robert N; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chasman, Daniel I; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Willett, Walter C; Hunter, David J; Simard, Jacques; Benitez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M; Sherman, Mark E; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chanock, Stephen J; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Vachon, Celine; Easton, Douglas F; Haiman, Christopher A; Kraft, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20-30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry. The etiology and clinical behavior of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differences in genetic predisposition. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10(-12) and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10(-8)), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10(-8)) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10(-8)), were associated with ER-negative but not ER-positive breast cancer (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence for distinct etiological pathways associated with invasive ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers.

  3. Unique genetic loci identified for emotional behavior in control and chronic stress conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly AK Carhuatanta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An individual’s genetic background affects their emotional behavior and response to stress. Although studies have been conducted to identify genetic predictors for emotional behavior or stress response, it remains unknown how prior stress history alters the interaction between an individual’s genome and their emotional behavior. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify chromosomal regions that affect emotional behavior and are sensitive to stress exposure. We utilized the BXD behavioral genetics mouse model to identify chromosomal regions that predict fear learning and emotional behavior following exposure to a control or chronic stress environment. 62 BXD recombinant inbred strains and C57BL/6 and DBA/2 parental strains underwent behavioral testing including a classical fear conditioning paradigm and the elevated plus maze. Distinct quantitative trait loci (QTLs were identified for emotional learning, anxiety and locomotion in control and chronic stress populations. Candidate genes, including those with already known functions in learning and stress were found to reside within the identified QTLs. Our data suggest that chronic stress history reveals novel genetic predictors of emotional behavior.

  4. A quantitative and efficient approach to select MIRU-VNTR loci based on accumulation of the percentage differences of strains for discriminating divergent Mycobacterium tuberculosis sublineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xin-Ling; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Nakajima, Chie; Fu, Jin; Shao, Chang-Xia; Zhao, Li-Na; Cui, Jia-Yi; Jiao, Na; Fan, Chang-Long; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Hattori, Toshio; Li, Di; Ling, Hong

    2017-07-26

    Although several optimal mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) loci have been suggested for genotyping homogenous Mycobacterium tuberculosis, including the Beijing genotype, a more efficient and convenient selection strategy for identifying optimal VNTR loci is needed. Here 281 M. tuberculosis isolates were analyzed. Beijing genotype and non-Beijing genotypes were identified, as well as Beijing sublineages, according to single nucleotide polymorphisms. A total of 22 MIRU-VNTR loci were used for genotyping. To efficiently select optimal MIRU-VNTR loci, we established accumulations of percentage differences (APDs) between the strains among the different genotypes. In addition, we constructed a minimum spanning tree for clustering analysis of the VNTR profiles. Our findings showed that eight MIRU-VNTR loci displayed disparities in h values of ≥0.2 between the Beijing genotype and non-Beijing genotype isolates. To efficiently discriminate Beijing and non-Beijing genotypes, an optimal VNTR set was established by adding loci with APDs ranging from 87.2% to 58.8%, resulting in the construction of a nine-locus set. We also found that QUB11a is a powerful locus for separating ST10s (including ST10, STF and STCH1) and ST22s (including ST22 and ST8) strains, whereas a combination of QUB11a, QUB4156, QUB18, Mtub21 and QUB26 could efficiently discriminate Beijing sublineages. Our findings suggested that two nine-locus sets were not only efficient for distinguishing the Beijing genotype from non-Beijing genotype strains, but were also suitable for sublineage genotyping with different discriminatory powers. These results indicate that APD represents a quantitative and efficient approach for selecting MIRU-VNTR loci to discriminate between divergent M. tuberculosis sublineages.

  5. A quantitative and efficient approach to select MIRU–VNTR loci based on accumulation of the percentage differences of strains for discriminating divergent Mycobacterium tuberculosis sublineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xin-Ling; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Nakajima, Chie; Fu, Jin; Shao, Chang-Xia; Zhao, Li-Na; Cui, Jia-Yi; Jiao, Na; Fan, Chang-Long; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Hattori, Toshio; Li, Di; Ling, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Although several optimal mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units–variable number tandem repeat (MIRU–VNTR) loci have been suggested for genotyping homogenous Mycobacterium tuberculosis, including the Beijing genotype, a more efficient and convenient selection strategy for identifying optimal VNTR loci is needed. Here 281 M. tuberculosis isolates were analyzed. Beijing genotype and non-Beijing genotypes were identified, as well as Beijing sublineages, according to single nucleotide polymorphisms. A total of 22 MIRU–VNTR loci were used for genotyping. To efficiently select optimal MIRU–VNTR loci, we established accumulations of percentage differences (APDs) between the strains among the different genotypes. In addition, we constructed a minimum spanning tree for clustering analysis of the VNTR profiles. Our findings showed that eight MIRU–VNTR loci displayed disparities in h values of ≥0.2 between the Beijing genotype and non-Beijing genotype isolates. To efficiently discriminate Beijing and non-Beijing genotypes, an optimal VNTR set was established by adding loci with APDs ranging from 87.2% to 58.8%, resulting in the construction of a nine-locus set. We also found that QUB11a is a powerful locus for separating ST10s (including ST10, STF and STCH1) and ST22s (including ST22 and ST8) strains, whereas a combination of QUB11a, QUB4156, QUB18, Mtub21 and QUB26 could efficiently discriminate Beijing sublineages. Our findings suggested that two nine-locus sets were not only efficient for distinguishing the Beijing genotype from non-Beijing genotype strains, but were also suitable for sublineage genotyping with different discriminatory powers. These results indicate that APD represents a quantitative and efficient approach for selecting MIRU–VNTR loci to discriminate between divergent M. tuberculosis sublineages. PMID:28745309

  6. Characterization and Exploitation of CRISPR Loci in Bifidobacterium longum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Hidalgo-Cantabrana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Diverse CRISPR-Cas systems provide adaptive immunity in many bacteria and most archaea, via a DNA-encoded, RNA-mediated, nucleic-acid targeting mechanism. Over time, CRISPR loci expand via iterative uptake of invasive DNA sequences into the CRISPR array during the adaptation process. These genetic vaccination cards thus provide insights into the exposure of strains to phages and plasmids in space and time, revealing the historical predatory exposure of a strain. These genetic loci thus constitute a unique basis for genotyping of strains, with potential of resolution at the strain-level. Here, we investigate the occurrence and diversity of CRISPR-Cas systems in the genomes of various Bifidobacterium longum strains across three sub-species. Specifically, we analyzed the genomic content of 66 genomes belonging to B. longum subsp. longum, B. longum subsp. infantis and B. longum subsp. suis, and identified 25 strains that carry 29 total CRISPR-Cas systems. We identify various Type I and Type II CRISPR-Cas systems that are widespread in this species, notably I-C, I-E, and II-C. Noteworthy, Type I-C systems showed extended CRISPR arrays, with extensive spacer diversity. We show how these hypervariable loci can be used to gain insights into strain origin, evolution and phylogeny, and can provide discriminatory sequences to distinguish even clonal isolates. By investigating CRISPR spacer sequences, we reveal their origin and implicate phages and prophages as drivers of CRISPR immunity expansion in this species, with redundant targeting of select prophages. Analysis of CRISPR spacer origin also revealed novel PAM sequences. Our results suggest that CRISPR-Cas immune systems are instrumental in mounting diversified viral resistance in B. longum, and show that these sequences are useful for typing across three subspecies.

  7. Chromosomal mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling elastin content in rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauguier, Dominique; Behmoaras, Jacques; Argoud, Karène; Wilder, Steven P; Pradines, Christelle; Bihoreau, Marie Thérèse; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Jacob, Marie Paule

    2005-03-01

    Extracellular matrix molecules such as elastin and collagens provide mechanical support to the vessel wall. In addition to its structural role, elastin is a regulator that maintains homeostasis through biologic signaling. Genetically determined minor modifications in elastin and collagen in the aorta could influence the onset and evolution of arterial pathology, such as hypertension and its complications. We previously demonstrated that the inbred Brown Norway (BN) rat shows an aortic elastin deficit in both abdominal and thoracic segments, partly because of a decrease in tropoelastin synthesis when compared with the LOU rat, that elastin gene polymorphisms in these strains do not significantly account for. After a genome-wide search for quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing the aortic elastin, collagen, and cell protein contents in an F2 population derived from BN and LOU rats, we identified on chromosomes 2 and 14, 3 QTL specifically controlling elastin levels, and a further highly significant QTL on chromosome 17 linked to the level of cell proteins. We also mapped 3 highly significant QTL linked to body weight (on chromosomes 1 and 3) and heart weight (on chromosome 1) in the cross. This study demonstrates the polygenic control of the content of key components of the arterial wall. Such information represents a first step in understanding possible mechanisms involved in dysregulation of these parameters in arterial pathology.

  8. Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative–specific breast cancer risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Lindstrom, Sara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Brook, Mark N; orr, Nick; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Riboli, Elio; Feigelson, Heather s; Le Marchand, Loic; Buring, Julie E; Eccles, Diana; Miron, Penelope; Fasching, Peter A; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Carpenter, Jane; Godwin, Andrew K; Nevanlinna, Heli; Giles, Graham G; Cox, Angela; Hopper, John L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Howat, Will J; Schoof, Nils; Bojesen, Stig E; Lambrechts, Diether; Broeks, Annegien; Andrulis, Irene L; Guénel, Pascal; Burwinkel, Barbara; Sawyer, Elinor J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Fletcher, Olivia; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Mannermaa, Arto; Hamann, Ute; Meindl, Alfons; Lindblom, Annika; Zheng, Wei; Devillee, Peter; Goldberg, Mark S; Lubinski, Jan; Kristensen, Vessela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Matsuo, Keitaro; Wu, Anna H; Radice, Paolo; Teo, Soo Hwang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Kang, Daehee; Hartman, Mikael; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C; Park, Daniel J; Hammet, Fleur; Stone, Jennifer; Veer, Laura J Van’t; Rutgers, Emiel J; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Peto, Julian; Schrauder, Michael G; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Johnson, Nichola; Warren, Helen; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lichtner, Peter; Lochmann, Magdalena; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Greco, Dario; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Margolin, Sara; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Balleine, Rosemary; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Neven, Patrick; Dieudonné, Anne-Sophie; Leunen, Karin; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bernard, Loris; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Mclean, Catriona; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Feng, Ye; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje J; Van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Signorello, Lisa; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Miao, Hui; Chan, Ching Wan; Chia, Kee Seng; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; John, Esther M; Chen, Gary K; Hu, Jennifer J; Rodriguez-gil, Jorge L; Bernstein, Leslie; Press, Michael F; Ziegler, Regina G; Millikan, Robert M; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Nyante, Sarah; Ingles, Sue A; Waisfisz, Quinten; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Gibson, Lorna; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schmutzler, Rita K; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Pilarski, Robert; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Slamon, Dennis J; Rauh, Claudia; Lux, Michael P; Jud, Sebastian M; Bruning, Thomas; Weaver, Joellen; Sharma, Priyanka; Pathak, Harsh; Tapper, Will; Gerty, Sue; Durcan, Lorraine; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Peeters, Petra H; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele; Canzian, Federico; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Johansson, Mattias; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chen, Constance; Beck, Andy; Hankinson, Susan E; Berg, Christine D; Hoover, Robert N; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chasman, Daniel I; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Willett, Walter C; Hunter, David J; Simard, Jacques; Benitez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M; Sherman, Mark E; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chanock, Stephen J; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Vachon, Celine; Easton, Douglas F; Haiman, Christopher A; Kraft, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20–30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry1. The etiology2 and clinical behavior3 of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differences in genetic predisposition4. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10−12 and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10−8), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10−8) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10−8), were associated with ER-negative but not ER-positive breast cancer (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence for distinct etiological pathways associated with invasive ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:23535733

  9. Congruent strain specific intestinal persistence of Lactobacillus plantarum in an intestine-mimicking in vitro system and in human volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermien van Bokhorst-van de Veen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An important trait of probiotics is their capability to reach their intestinal target sites alive to optimally exert their beneficial effects. Assessment of this trait in intestine-mimicking in vitro model systems has revealed differential survival of individual strains of a species. However, data on the in situ persistence characteristics of individual or mixtures of strains of the same species in the gastrointestinal tract of healthy human volunteers have not been reported to date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The GI-tract survival of individual L. plantarum strains was determined using an intestine mimicking model system, revealing substantial inter-strain differences. The obtained data were correlated to genomic diversity of the strains using comparative genome hybridization (CGH datasets, but this approach failed to discover specific genetic loci that explain the observed differences between the strains. Moreover, we developed a next-generation sequencing-based method that targets a variable intergenic region, and employed this method to assess the in vivo GI-tract persistence of different L. plantarum strains when administered in mixtures to healthy human volunteers. Remarkable consistency of the strain-specific persistence curves were observed between individual volunteers, which also correlated significantly with the GI-tract survival predicted on basis of the in vitro assay. CONCLUSION: The survival of individual L. plantarum strains in the GI-tract could not be correlated to the absence or presence of specific genes compared to the reference strain L. plantarum WCFS1. Nevertheless, in vivo persistence analysis in the human GI-tract confirmed the strain-specific persistence, which appeared to be remarkably similar in different healthy volunteers. Moreover, the relative strain-specific persistence in vivo appeared to be accurately and significantly predicted by their relative survival in the intestine-mimicking in vitro

  10. Nuclear positioning rather than contraction controls ordered rearrangements of immunoglobulin loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Magdalena B; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; van Kester, Kevin A M; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Hendriks, Rudi W; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Murre, Cornelis; van Zelm, Menno C

    2016-01-08

    Progenitor-B cells recombine their immunoglobulin (Ig) loci to create unique antigen receptors. Despite a common recombination machinery, the Ig heavy and Ig light chain loci rearrange in a stepwise manner. We studied pre-pro-B cells and Rag(-/-) progenitor-B cells to determine whether Ig locus contraction or nuclear positioning is decisive for stepwise rearrangements. We found that both Ig loci were contracted in pro-B and pre-B cells. Igh relocated from the nuclear lamina to central domains only at the pro-B cell stage, whereas, Igκ remained sequestered at the lamina, and only at the pre-B cell stage located to central nuclear domains. Finally, in vitro induced re-positioning of Ig alleles away from the nuclear periphery increased germline transcription of Ig loci in pre-pro-B cells. Thus, Ig locus contraction juxtaposes genomically distant elements to mediate efficient recombination, however, sequential positioning of Ig loci away from the nuclear periphery determines stage-specific accessibility of Ig loci. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. DNA-damaging agents stimulate gene expression at specific loci in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenyon, C.J.; Walker, G.C.

    1988-05-01

    Operon fusions in Escherichia coli were obtained that showed increased beta-galactosidase expression in response to treatment with the DNA-damaging agent mitomycin C. These fusions were generated by using the Mud(ApR, lac) vector to insert the lactose structural genes randomly into the bacterial chromosome. Induction of beta-galactosidase in these strains, which carried fusions of lac to these din (damage-inducible) loci, was (i) triggered by UV light as well as by mitomycin C and (ii) abolished by either a recA- or a lexA- mutation. Similar characteristics of induction were observed when the lactose genes were fused to a prophage lambda promoter by using Mud(ApR, lac). These results indicate that E. coli contains a set of genes that, like prophage lambda genes, are expressed in response to DNA-damaging agents and regulated by the recA and lexA gene products. These din genes map at five bacterial loci. One din::Mud(ApR, lac) insertion results in a UV-sensitive phenotype and may be within the uvrA transcriptional unit.

  12. Mutagenesis at the ad-3A and ad-3B loci in haploid UV-sensitive strains of Neurospora crassa. Pt. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Serres, F.J.; Inoue, H.; Schuepbach, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Genetic characterization of ad-3B mutants induced in wild-type and UV-sensitive strains has revealed qualitative differences between the spectra of genetic alterations at the molecular level. Ad-3B mutants induced in the two nucleotide excision-repair-deficient strains upr-1 and uvs-2 had significantly lower frequencies of nonpolarized complementation patterns and higher frequencies of noncomplementing mutants than ad-3B mutants induced in the wild-type strain in samples induced by either UV, #betta#-rays, 4NQO or MNNG. In these same samples ad-3B mutants induced in uvs-4, uvs-5 or uvs-6 did not differ significantly from those induced in the wild-type strain. After ICR-170 treatment, ad-3B mutants induced in the UV-sensitive strains did not differ significantly from those induced in wild-type. The comparisons in the present and previous studies demonstrate that the process of mutation-induction in the ad-3 region is under the control of other loci that not only alter mutant recovery quantitatively but also qualitatively. These data have important implications for comparative chemical mutagenesis, since the spectrum of genetic alterations produced by a given agent can be modified markedly as a result of defects in DNA repair. (orig./AJ)

  13. Genotyping of Bacillus anthracis strains based on automated capillary 25-loci Multiple Locus Variable-Number Tandem Repeats Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciervo Alessandra

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome of Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is highly monomorphic which makes differentiation between strains difficult. A Multiple Locus Variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR Analysis (MLVA assay based on 20 markers was previously described. It has considerable discrimination power, reproducibility, and low cost, especially since the markers proposed can be typed by agarose-gel electrophoresis. However in an emergency situation, faster genotyping and access to representative databases is necessary. Results Genotyping of B. anthracis reference strains and isolates from France and Italy was done using a 25 loci MLVA assay combining 21 previously described loci and 4 new ones. DNA was amplified in 4 multiplex PCR reactions and the length of the resulting 25 amplicons was estimated by automated capillary electrophoresis. The results were reproducible and the data were consistent with other gel based methods once differences in mobility patterns were taken into account. Some alleles previously unresolved by agarose gel electrophoresis could be resolved by capillary electrophoresis, thus further increasing the assay resolution. One particular locus, Bams30, is the result of a recombination between a 27 bp tandem repeat and a 9 bp tandem repeat. The analysis of the array illustrates the evolution process of tandem repeats. Conclusion In a crisis situation of suspected bioterrorism, standardization, speed and accuracy, together with the availability of reference typing data are important issues, as illustrated by the 2001 anthrax letters event. In this report we describe an upgrade of the previously published MLVA method for genotyping of B. anthracis and apply the method to the typing of French and Italian B. anthracis strain collections. The increased number of markers studied compared to reports using only 8 loci greatly improves the discrimination power of the technique. An Italian strain belonging to the

  14. Variable Extent of Lineage-Specificity and Developmental Stage-Specificity of Cohesin and CCCTC-Binding Factor Binding Within the Immunoglobulin and T Cell Receptor Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Loguercio

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF is largely responsible for the 3D architecture of the genome, in concert with the action of cohesin, through the creation of long-range chromatin loops. Cohesin is hypothesized to be the main driver of these long-range chromatin interactions by the process of loop extrusion. Here, we performed ChIP-seq for CTCF and cohesin in two stages each of T and B cell differentiation and examined the binding pattern in all six antigen receptor (AgR loci in these lymphocyte progenitors and in mature T and B cells, ES cells, and fibroblasts. The four large AgR loci have many bound CTCF sites, most of which are only occupied in lymphocytes, while only the CTCF sites at the end of each locus near the enhancers or J genes tend to be bound in non-lymphoid cells also. However, despite the generalized lymphocyte restriction of CTCF binding in AgR loci, the Igκ locus is the only locus that also shows significant lineage-specificity (T vs. B cells and developmental stage-specificity (pre-B vs. pro-B in CTCF binding. We show that cohesin binding shows greater lineage- and stage-specificity than CTCF at most AgR loci, providing more specificity to the loops. We also show that the culture of pro-B cells in IL7, a common practice to expand the number of cells before ChIP-seq, results in a CTCF-binding pattern resembling pre-B cells, as well as other epigenetic and transcriptional characteristics of pre-B cells. Analysis of the orientation of the CTCF sites show that all sites within the large V portions of the Igh and TCRβ loci have the same orientation. This suggests either a lack of requirement for convergent CTCF sites creating loops, or indicates an absence of any loops between CTCF sites within the V region portion of those loci but only loops to the convergent sites at the D-J-enhancer end of each locus. The V region portions of the Igκ and TCRα/δ loci, by contrast, have CTCF sites in both orientations, providing many options for

  15. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Identifies Four New Disease-Specific Risk Loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Gregory T; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2017-01-01

    studies (GWAS). Through a meta-analysis of 6 GWAS datasets and a validation study totalling 10,204 cases and 107,766 controls we identified 4 new AAA risk loci: 1q32.3 (SMYD2), 13q12.11 (LINC00540), 20q13.12 (near PCIF1/MMP9/ZNF335), and 21q22.2 (ERG). In various database searches we observed no new...... associations between the lead AAA SNPs and coronary artery disease, blood pressure, lipids or diabetes. Network analyses identified ERG, IL6R and LDLR as modifiers of MMP9, with a direct interaction between ERG and MMP9. The 4 new risk loci for AAA appear to be specific for AAA compared with other...

  16. Identification of quantitative trait loci influencing wood specific gravity in an outbred pedigree of loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Groover; M. Devey; T. Fiddler; J. Lee; R. Megraw; T. Mitchel-Olds; B. Sherman; S. Vujcic; C. Williams; D. Neale

    1994-01-01

    We report the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing wood specific gravity (WSG) in an outbred pedigree of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) . QTL mapping in an outcrossing species is complicated by the presence of multiple alleles (>2) at QTL and marker loci. Multiple alleles at QTL allow the examination of interaction among...

  17. Discrimination of candidate subgenome-specific loci by linkage map construction with an S1 population of octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Soichiro; Shirasawa, Kenta; Hirakawa, Hideki; Maeda, Fumi; Ishikawa, Masami; Isobe, Sachiko N

    2017-05-12

    The strawberry, Fragaria × ananassa, is an allo-octoploid (2n = 8x = 56) and outcrossing species. Although it is the most widely consumed berry crop in the world, its complex genome structure has hindered its genetic and genomic analysis, and thus discrimination of subgenome-specific loci among the homoeologous chromosomes is needed. In the present study, we identified candidate subgenome-specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci, and constructed a linkage map using an S 1 mapping population of the cultivar 'Reikou' with an IStraw90 Axiom® SNP array and previously published SSR markers. The 'Reikou' linkage map consisted of 11,574 loci (11,002 SNPs and 572 SSR loci) spanning 2816.5 cM of 31 linkage groups. The 11,574 loci were located on 4738 unique positions (bin) on the linkage map. Of the mapped loci, 8999 (8588 SNPs and 411 SSR loci) showed a 1:2:1 segregation ratio of AA:AB:BB allele, which suggested the possibility of deriving loci from candidate subgenome-specific sequences. In addition, 2575 loci (2414 SNPs and 161 SSR loci) showed a 3:1 segregation of AB:BB allele, indicating they were derived from homoeologous genomic sequences. Comparative analysis of the homoeologous linkage groups revealed differences in genome structure among the subgenomes. Our results suggest that candidate subgenome-specific loci are randomly located across the genomes, and that there are small- to large-scale structural variations among the subgenomes. The mapped SNPs and SSR loci on the linkage map are expected to be seed points for the construction of pseudomolecules in the octoploid strawberry.

  18. Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Steffensen, Annette B.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated with complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five genes...... involved in the Mendelian disorder long QT syndrome (LOTS). We integrated the LOTS network with GWAS loci from the corresponding common complex trait, QT-interval variation, to identify candidate genes that were subsequently confirmed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and zebrafish. We used the LOTS protein...... network to filter weak GWAS signals by identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in proximity to genes in the network supported by strong proteomic evidence. Three SNPs passing this filter reached genome-wide significance after replication genotyping. Overall, we present a general strategy...

  19. Mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling Orobanche foetida Poir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling Orobanche foetida Poir. resistance in faba bean (Vicia faba L.) R Díaz-Ruiz, A Torres, MV Gutierrez, D Rubiales, JI Cubero, M Kharrat, Z Satovic, B Román ...

  20. Tissue-specific tagging of endogenous loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Koles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent protein tags have revolutionized cell and developmental biology, and in combination with binary expression systems they enable diverse tissue-specific studies of protein function. However these binary expression systems often do not recapitulate endogenous protein expression levels, localization, binding partners and/or developmental windows of gene expression. To address these limitations, we have developed a method called T-STEP (tissue-specific tagging of endogenous proteins that allows endogenous loci to be tagged in a tissue specific manner. T-STEP uses a combination of efficient CRISPR/Cas9-enhanced gene targeting and tissue-specific recombinase-mediated tag swapping to temporally and spatially label endogenous proteins. We have employed this method to GFP tag OCRL (a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase in the endocytic pathway and Vps35 (a Parkinson's disease-implicated component of the endosomal retromer complex in diverse Drosophila tissues including neurons, glia, muscles and hemocytes. Selective tagging of endogenous proteins allows, for the first time, cell type-specific live imaging and proteomics in complex tissues.

  1. Standard practice for strain controlled thermomechanical fatigue testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the determination of thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) properties of materials under uniaxially loaded strain-controlled conditions. A “thermomechanical” fatigue cycle is here defined as a condition where uniform temperature and strain fields over the specimen gage section are simultaneously varied and independently controlled. This practice is intended to address TMF testing performed in support of such activities as materials research and development, mechanical design, process and quality control, product performance, and failure analysis. While this practice is specific to strain-controlled testing, many sections will provide useful information for force-controlled or stress-controlled TMF testing. 1.2 This practice allows for any maximum and minimum values of temperature and mechanical strain, and temperature-mechanical strain phasing, with the restriction being that such parameters remain cyclically constant throughout the duration of the test. No restrictions are placed on en...

  2. High density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I.; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E.M.; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Summary Using the Immunochip custom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, designed for dense genotyping of 186 genome wide association study (GWAS) confirmed loci we analysed 11,475 rheumatoid arthritis cases of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. The data were combined in meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n=2,363) and controls (n=17,872). We identified fourteen novel loci; nine were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and 5 specifically in anti-citrillunated peptide antibody positive disease, bringing the number of confirmed European ancestry rheumatoid arthritis loci to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at six loci and association to low frequency variants (minor allele frequency <0.05) at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analysis of the data generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations. PMID:23143596

  3. A genome-wide screen in human embryonic stem cells reveals novel sites of allele-specific histone modification associated with known disease loci

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prendergast, James G D

    2012-05-19

    AbstractBackgroundChromatin structure at a given site can differ between chromosome copies in a cell, and such imbalances in chromatin structure have been shown to be important in understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling several disease loci. Human genetic variation, DNA methylation, and disease have been intensely studied, uncovering many sites of allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM). However, little is known about the genome-wide occurrence of sites of allele-specific histone modification (ASHM) and their relationship to human disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent and characteristics of sites of ASHM in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).ResultsUsing a statistically rigorous protocol, we investigated the genomic distribution of ASHM in hESCs, and their relationship to sites of allele-specific expression (ASE) and DNA methylation. We found that, although they were rare, sites of ASHM were substantially enriched at loci displaying ASE. Many were also found at known imprinted regions, hence sites of ASHM are likely to be better markers of imprinted regions than sites of ASM. We also found that sites of ASHM and ASE in hESCs colocalize at risk loci for developmental syndromes mediated by deletions, providing insights into the etiology of these disorders.ConclusionThese results demonstrate the potential importance of ASHM patterns in the interpretation of disease loci, and the protocol described provides a basis for similar studies of ASHM in other cell types to further our understanding of human disease susceptibility.

  4. Molecular typing of Brucella melitensis endemic strains and differentiation from the vaccine strain Rev-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noutsios, Georgios T; Papi, Rigini M; Ekateriniadou, Loukia V; Minas, Anastasios; Kyriakidis, Dimitrios A

    2012-03-01

    In the present study forty-four Greek endemic strains of Br. melitensis and three reference strains were genotyped by Multi locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat (ML-VNTR) analysis based on an eight-base pair tandem repeat sequence that was revealed in eight loci of Br. melitensis genome. The forty-four strains were discriminated from the vaccine strain Rev-1 by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and Denaturant Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). The ML-VNTR analysis revealed that endemic, reference and vaccine strains are genetically closely related, while most of the loci tested (1, 2, 4, 5 and 7) are highly polymorphic with Hunter-Gaston Genetic Diversity Index (HGDI) values in the range of 0.939 to 0.775. Analysis of ML-VNTRs loci stability through in vitro passages proved that loci 1 and 5 are non stable. Therefore, vaccine strain can be discriminated from endemic strains by allele's clusters of loci 2, 4, 6 and 7. RFLP and DGGE were also employed to analyse omp2 gene and reveled different patterns among Rev-1 and endemic strains. In RFLP, Rev-1 revealed three fragments (282, 238 and 44 bp), while endemic strains two fragments (238 and 44 bp). As for DGGE, the electrophoretic mobility of Rev-1 is different from the endemic strains due to heterologous binding of DNA chains of omp2a and omp2b gene. Overall, our data show clearly that it is feasible to genotype endemic strains of Br. melitensis and differentiate them from vaccine strain Rev-1 with ML-VNTR, RFLP and DGGE techniques. These tools can be used for conventional investigations in brucellosis outbreaks.

  5. Laboratory and wild-derived mice with multiple loci for production of xenotropic murine leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, C A; Hartley, J W; Morse, H C

    1984-07-01

    Mendelian segregation analysis was used to define genetic loci for the induction of infectious xenotropic murine leukemia virus in several laboratory and wild-derived mice. MA/My mice contain two loci for xenotropic virus inducibility, one of which, Bxv -1, is the only induction locus carried by five other inbred strains. The second, novel MA/My locus, designated Mxv -1, is unlinked to Bxv -1 and shows a lower efficiency of virus induction. The NZB mouse carries two induction loci; both are distinct from Bxv -1 since neither is linked to the Pep-3 locus on chromosome 1. Finally, one partially inbred strain derived from the wild Japanese mouse, Mus musculus molossinus, carries multiple (at least three) unlinked loci for induction of xenotropic virus. Although it is probable that inbred strains inherited xenotropic virus inducibility from Japanese mice, our data suggest that none of the induction loci carried by this particular M. m. molossinus strain are allelic with Bxv -1.

  6. Chromosomal localization of microsatellite loci in Drosophila mediopunctata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Cavasini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila mediopunctata has been used as a model organism for genetics and evolutionary studies in the last three decades. A linkage map with 48 microsatellite loci recently published for this species showed five syntenic groups, which had their homology determined to Drosophila melanogaster chromosomes. Then, by inference, each of the groups was associated with one of the five major chromosomes of D. mediopunctata. Our objective was to carry out a genetic (chromosomal analysis to increase the number of available loci with known chromosomal location. We made a simultaneous analysis of visible mutant phenotypes and microsatellite genotypes in a backcross of a standard strain and a mutant strain, which had each major autosome marked. Hence, we could establish the chromosomal location of seventeen loci; including one from each of the five major linkage groups previously published, and twelve new loci. Our results were congruent with the previous location and they open new possibilities to future work integrating microsatellites, chromosomal inversions, and genetic determinants of physiological and morphological variation.

  7. Genetic basis of resistance to trauma in inbred strains of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radojicic, C.; Andric, B.; Simovic, M.; Dujic, A.; Marinkovic, D.

    1990-01-01

    In this study the resistance to mechanical, thermal, and radiation trauma in four inbred strains of mice (AKR, BALB/c, CBA, and C57Bl/6) was compared with the degree of genetic resemblance, by analyzing the allozyme variabilities of these strains. It was shown that the highest degree of genetic resemblance was among CBA and AKR strains, which correlated with a similar degree of resistance to trauma. On the other hand, BALB/c and C57Bl/6 strains expressed significant differences, both genetically and with respect to the responses to trauma. The hypothesis is introduced that the genetic determination of the resistance to trauma is based on: (a) a polygenic control of general physiological homeostasis, with the possibility that (b) some specific genes or single loci may contribute more than others to such adaptations of the strains tested

  8. Identification of multiple genetic loci in the mouse controlling immobility time in the tail suspension and forced swimming tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elnaga, Ahmed F; Torigoe, Daisuke; Fouda, Mohamed M; Darwish, Ragab A; Abou-Ismail, Usama A; Morimatsu, Masami; Agui, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Depression is one of the most famous psychiatric disorders in humans in all over the countries and considered a complex neurobehavioral trait and difficult to identify causal genes. Tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST) are widely used for assessing depression-like behavior and antidepressant activity in mice. A variety of antidepressant agents are known to reduce immobility time in both TST and FST. To identify genetic determinants of immobility duration in both tests, we analyzed 101 F2 mice from an intercross between C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping using 106 microsatellite markers revealed three loci (two significant and one suggestive) and five suggestive loci controlling immobility time in the TST and FST, respectively. Results of QTL analysis suggest a broad description of the genetic architecture underlying depression, providing underpinnings for identifying novel molecular targets for antidepressants to clear the complex genetic mechanisms of depressive disorders.

  9. Identification of loci controlling restriction of parasite growth in experimental Taenia crassiceps cysticercosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Ramirez-Aquino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Human neurocysticercosis (NC caused by Taenia solium is a parasitic disease of the central nervous system that is endemic in many developing countries. In this study, a genetic approach using the murine intraperitoneal cysticercosis caused by the related cestode Taenia crassiceps was employed to identify host factors that regulate the establishment and proliferation of the parasite. A/J mice are permissive to T. crassiceps infection while C57BL/6J mice (B6 are comparatively restrictive, with a 10-fold difference in numbers of peritoneal cysticerci recovered 30 days after infection. The genetic basis of this inter-strain difference was explored using 34 AcB/BcA recombinant congenic strains derived from A/J and B6 progenitors, that were phenotyped for T. crassiceps replication. In agreement with their genetic background, most AcB strains (A/J-derived were found to be permissive to infection while most BcA strains (B6-derived were restrictive with the exception of a few discordant strains, together suggesting a possible simple genetic control. Initial haplotype association mapping using >1200 informative SNPs pointed to linkages on chromosomes 2 (proximal and 6 as controlling parasite replication in the AcB/BcA panel. Additional linkage analysis by genome scan in informative [AcB55xDBA/2]F1 and F2 mice (derived from the discordant AcB55 strain, confirmed the effect of chromosome 2 on parasite replication, and further delineated a major locus (LOD = 4.76, p<0.01; peak marker D2Mit295, 29.7 Mb that we designate Tccr1 (T. crassiceps cysticercosis restrictive locus 1. Resistance alleles at Tccr1 are derived from AcB55 and are inherited in a dominant fashion. Scrutiny of the minimal genetic interval reveals overlap of Tccr1 with other host resistance loci mapped to this region, most notably the defective Hc/C5 allele which segregates both in the AcB/BcA set and in the AcB55xDBA/2 cross. These results strongly suggest that the complement component 5 (C5

  10. Identification of Loci Controlling Restriction of Parasite Growth in Experimental Taenia crassiceps Cysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Anny; Sciutto-Conde, Edda; Fragoso-González, Gladis; Gros, Philippe; Aguilar-Delfin, Irma

    2011-01-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) caused by Taenia solium is a parasitic disease of the central nervous system that is endemic in many developing countries. In this study, a genetic approach using the murine intraperitoneal cysticercosis caused by the related cestode Taenia crassiceps was employed to identify host factors that regulate the establishment and proliferation of the parasite. A/J mice are permissive to T. crassiceps infection while C57BL/6J mice (B6) are comparatively restrictive, with a 10-fold difference in numbers of peritoneal cysticerci recovered 30 days after infection. The genetic basis of this inter-strain difference was explored using 34 AcB/BcA recombinant congenic strains derived from A/J and B6 progenitors, that were phenotyped for T. crassiceps replication. In agreement with their genetic background, most AcB strains (A/J-derived) were found to be permissive to infection while most BcA strains (B6-derived) were restrictive with the exception of a few discordant strains, together suggesting a possible simple genetic control. Initial haplotype association mapping using >1200 informative SNPs pointed to linkages on chromosomes 2 (proximal) and 6 as controlling parasite replication in the AcB/BcA panel. Additional linkage analysis by genome scan in informative [AcB55xDBA/2]F1 and F2 mice (derived from the discordant AcB55 strain), confirmed the effect of chromosome 2 on parasite replication, and further delineated a major locus (LOD = 4.76, p<0.01; peak marker D2Mit295, 29.7 Mb) that we designate Tccr1 (T. crassiceps cysticercosis restrictive locus 1). Resistance alleles at Tccr1 are derived from AcB55 and are inherited in a dominant fashion. Scrutiny of the minimal genetic interval reveals overlap of Tccr1 with other host resistance loci mapped to this region, most notably the defective Hc/C5 allele which segregates both in the AcB/BcA set and in the AcB55xDBA/2 cross. These results strongly suggest that the complement component 5 (C5) plays a

  11. High-density genotyping of immune loci in Koreans and Europeans identifies eight new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Kang, Young Mo; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Nath, Swapan K; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Kremer, Joel M; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothée; Liao, Katherine P; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Plenge, Robert M; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2015-03-01

    A highly polygenic aetiology and high degree of allele-sharing between ancestries have been well elucidated in genetic studies of rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, the high-density genotyping array Immunochip for immune disease loci identified 14 new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci among individuals of European ancestry. Here, we aimed to identify new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci using Korean-specific Immunochip data. We analysed Korean rheumatoid arthritis case-control samples using the Immunochip and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) array to search for new risk alleles of rheumatoid arthritis with anticitrullinated peptide antibodies. To increase power, we performed a meta-analysis of Korean data with previously published European Immunochip and GWAS data for a total sample size of 9299 Korean and 45,790 European case-control samples. We identified eight new rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci (TNFSF4, LBH, EOMES, ETS1-FLI1, COG6, RAD51B, UBASH3A and SYNGR1) that passed a genome-wide significance threshold (p<5×10(-8)), with evidence for three independent risk alleles at 1q25/TNFSF4. The risk alleles from the seven new loci except for the TNFSF4 locus (monomorphic in Koreans), together with risk alleles from previously established RA risk loci, exhibited a high correlation of effect sizes between ancestries. Further, we refined the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that represent potentially causal variants through a trans-ethnic comparison of densely genotyped SNPs. This study demonstrates the advantage of dense-mapping and trans-ancestral analysis for identification of potentially causal SNPs. In addition, our findings support the importance of T cells in the pathogenesis and the fact of frequent overlap of risk loci among diverse autoimmune diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Mutagenesis at the ad-3A and ad-3B loci in haploid UV-sensitive strains of Neurospora crassa. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serres, F.J. de

    1980-01-01

    UV-induced inactivation and induction of mutations at the ad-3A and ad-3B loci of Neurospora crassa have been compared among 7 different UV-sensitive strains and a standard wild-type strain. The 7 strains show varying degrees of sensitivity to UV-induced inactivation, with the relative sensitivity being: uvs-2 > uvs-3 > uvs-4 > uvs-6 > upr-1 > uvs-5 > uvs-1. Studies on the induction of ad-3 mutants by UV show that the 2 excision-repair deficient mutants uvs-2 and upr-1 exhibit enhanced ad-3 mutant frequencies, while uvs-4 and uvs-5 exhibit reduced ad-3 mutant frequencies, and uvs-3 completely eliminates UV mutagenesis. The ad-3 mutation-induction curves obtained with uvs-1 or uvs-6 are not significantly different from that found with the wild-type strain. (orig.)

  13. The Red Queen lives: Epistasis between linked resistance loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, César M J A; Luijckx, Pepijn; Bento, Gilberto; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Ebert, Dieter

    2016-02-01

    A popular theory explaining the maintenance of genetic recombination (sex) is the Red Queen Theory. This theory revolves around the idea that time-lagged negative frequency-dependent selection by parasites favors rare host genotypes generated through recombination. Although the Red Queen has been studied for decades, one of its key assumptions has remained unsupported. The signature host-parasite specificity underlying the Red Queen, where infection depends on a match between host and parasite genotypes, relies on epistasis between linked resistance loci for which no empirical evidence exists. We performed 13 genetic crosses and tested over 7000 Daphnia magna genotypes for resistance to two strains of the bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa. Results reveal the presence of strong epistasis between three closely linked resistance loci. One locus masks the expression of the other two, while these two interact to produce a single resistance phenotype. Changing a single allele on one of these interacting loci can reverse resistance against the tested parasites. Such a genetic mechanism is consistent with host and parasite specificity assumed by the Red Queen Theory. These results thus provide evidence for a fundamental assumption of this theory and provide a genetic basis for understanding the Red Queen dynamics in the Daphnia-Pasteuria system. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  14. Mutagenesis at the ad-3A and ad-3B loci in haploid UV-sensitive strains of Neurospora crassa. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuepbach, M.E.; Serres, F.J. de

    1981-01-01

    γ-ray-induced inactivation and induction of mutations at the ad-3A and ad-3B loci of Neurospora crassa have been compared among 6 different UV- sensitive strains and a standard wild-type strain. The 6 strains show varying degrees of sensitivy to γ-ray-induced inactivation, with the relative sensitivy at 37% survival being uvs-6 > upr-1 > uvs-2 UE uvs-3 > wild-type > uvs-5 > uvs-4. Studies on the induction of ad-3 mutants by γ-rays show that when the dose-response curves (expressed in terms of ad-3 mutants among the surving colonies) of the UV-sensitive strains are compared with wild-type, the excision-repair-deficient mutants uvs-2 and upr-1 exhibit enhanced ad-3 mutant frequencies, uvs-3 exibits reduced ad-3 mutant frequencies whereas both uvs-4 and uvs-5 show lower mutant frequencies than wild-type. (orig.)

  15. Brucella 'HOOF-Prints': strain typing by multi-locus analysis of variable number tandem repeats (VNTRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halling Shirley M

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, there are very few tools available for subtyping Brucella isolates for epidemiological trace-back. Subtyping is difficult because of the genetic homogeneity within the genus. Sequencing of the genomes from three Brucella species has facilitated the search for DNA sequence variability. Recently, hypervariability among short tandem repeat sequences has been exploited for strain-typing of several bacterial pathogens. Results An eight-base pair tandem repeat sequence was discovered in nine genomic loci of the B. abortus genome. Eight loci were hypervariable among the three Brucella species. A PCR-based method was developed to identify the number of repeat units (alleles at each locus, generating strain-specific fingerprints. None of the loci exhibited species- or biovar-specific alleles. Sometimes, a species or biovar contained a specific allele at one or more loci, but the allele also occurred in other species or biovars. The technique successfully differentiated the type strains for all Brucella species and biovars, among unrelated B. abortus biovar 1 field isolates in cattle, and among B. abortus strains isolated from bison and elk. Isolates from the same herd or from short-term in vitro passage exhibited little or no variability in fingerprint pattern. Sometimes, isolates from an animal would have multiple alleles at a locus, possibly from mixed infections in enzootic areas, residual disease from incomplete depopulation of an infected herd or molecular evolution within the strain. Therefore, a mixed population or a pool of colonies from each animal and/or tissue was tested. Conclusion This paper describes a new method for fingerprinting Brucella isolates based on multi-locus characterization of a variable number, eight-base pair, tandem repeat. We have named this technique "HOOF-Prints" for Hypervariable Octameric Oligonucleotide Finger-Prints. The technique is highly discriminatory among Brucella species, among

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains exhibit differential and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mvubu, Nontobeko Eunice; Pillay, Balakrishna; Gamieldien, Junaid; Bishai, William; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-12-01

    Although pulmonary epithelial cells are integral to innate and adaptive immune responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, global transcriptomic changes in these cells remain largely unknown. Changes in gene expression induced in pulmonary epithelial cells infected with M. tuberculosis F15/LAM4/KZN, F11, F28, Beijing and Unique genotypes were investigated by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform generated 50 bp reads that were mapped to the human genome (Hg19) using Tophat (2.0.10). Differential gene expression induced by the different strains in infected relative to the uninfected cells was quantified and compared using Cufflinks (2.1.0) and MeV (4.0.9), respectively. Gene expression varied among the strains with the total number of genes as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (1187), Beijing (1252), F11 (1639), F28 (870), Unique (886) and H37Rv (1179). A subset of 292 genes was commonly induced by all strains, where 52 genes were down-regulated while 240 genes were up-regulated. Differentially expressed genes were compared among the strains and the number of induced strain-specific gene signatures were as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (138), Beijing (52), F11 (255), F28 (55), Unique (186) and H37Rv (125). Strain-specific molecular gene signatures associated with functional pathways were observed only for the Unique and H37Rv strains while certain biological functions may be associated with other strain signatures. This study demonstrated that strains of M. tuberculosis induce differential gene expression and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells. Specific signatures induced by clinical strains of M. tuberculosis can be further explored for novel host-associated biomarkers and adjunctive immunotherapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Diversity and microevolution of CRISPR loci in Helicobacter cinaedi.

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    Junko Tomida

    Full Text Available Helicobacter cinaedi is associated with nosocomial infections. The CRISPR-Cas system provides adaptive immunity against foreign genetic elements. We investigated the CRISPR-Cas system in H. cinaedi to assess the potential of the CRISPR-based microevolution of H. cinaedi strains. A genotyping method based on CRISPR spacer organization was carried out using 42 H. cinaedi strains. The results of sequence analysis showed that the H. cinaedi strains used in this study had two CRISPR loci (CRISPR1 and CRISPR2. The lengths of the consensus direct repeat sequences in CRISPR1 and CRISPR2 were both 36 bp-long, and 224 spacers were found in the 42 H. cinaedi strains. Analysis of the organization and sequence similarity of the spacers of the H. cinaedi strains showed that CRISPR arrays could be divided into 7 different genotypes. Each genotype had a different ancestral spacer, and spacer acquisition/deletion events occurred while isolates were spreading. Spacer polymorphisms of conserved arrays across the strains were instrumental for differentiating closely-related strains collected from the same hospital. MLST had little variability, while the CRISPR sequences showed remarkable diversity. Our data revealed the structural features of H. cinaedi CRISPR loci for the first time. CRISPR sequences constitute a valuable basis for genotyping, provide insights into the divergence and relatedness between closely-related strains, and reflect the microevolutionary process of H. cinaedi.

  18. Bromodomain protein 4 discriminates tissue-specific super-enhancers containing disease-specific susceptibility loci in prostate and breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuber, Verena; Bettella, Francesco; Witoelar, Aree

    2017-01-01

    progression. Although previous approaches have been tried to explain risk associated with SNPs in regulatory DNA elements, so far epigenetic readers such as bromodomain containing protein 4 (BRD4) and super-enhancers have not been used to annotate SNPs. In prostate cancer (PC), androgen receptor (AR) binding......Background: Epigenetic information can be used to identify clinically relevant genomic variants single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of functional importance in cancer development. Super-enhancers are cell-specific DNA elements, acting to determine tissue or cell identity and driving tumor...... the differential enrichment of SNPs mapping to specific categories of enhancers. We find that BRD4 is the key discriminant of tissue-specific enhancers, showing that it is more powerful than AR binding information to capture PC specific risk loci, and can be used with similar effect in breast cancer (BC...

  19. A PQL (protein quantity loci) analysis of mature pea seed proteins identifies loci determining seed protein composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Michael; Jacquin, Françoise; Cassecuelle, Florence; Savois, Vincent; Belghazi, Maya; Aubert, Grégoire; Quillien, Laurence; Huart, Myriam; Marget, Pascal; Burstin, Judith

    2011-05-01

    Legume seeds are a major source of dietary proteins for humans and animals. Deciphering the genetic control of their accumulation is thus of primary significance towards their improvement. At first, we analysed the genetic variability of the pea seed proteome of three genotypes over 3 years of cultivation. This revealed that seed protein composition variability was under predominant genetic control, with as much as 60% of the spots varying quantitatively among the three genotypes. Then, by combining proteomic and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping approaches, we uncovered the genetic architecture of seed proteome variability. Protein quantity loci (PQL) were searched for 525 spots detected on 2-D gels obtained for 157 recombinant inbred lines. Most protein quantity loci mapped in clusters, suggesting that the accumulation of the major storage protein families was under the control of a limited number of loci. While convicilin accumulation was mainly under the control of cis-regulatory regions, vicilins and legumins were controlled by both cis- and trans-regulatory regions. Some loci controlled both seed protein composition and protein content and a locus on LGIIa appears to be a major regulator of protein composition and of protein in vitro digestibility. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Differentiation of five strains of infectious bursal disease virus: Development of a strain-specific multiplex PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, M.; Kabell, Susanne; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    2005-01-01

    and histopathology. Since these methods are laborious and have low specificity alternatives are needed. In the present study, we report the development of a strain-specific multiplex RT-PCR technique, which can detect and differentiate between field strains of IBDV and vaccine virus strains including a so-called hot...

  1. Trans-ethnic fine-mapping of lipid loci identifies population-specific signals and allelic heterogeneity that increases the trait variance explained.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified ~100 loci associated with blood lipid levels, but much of the trait heritability remains unexplained, and at most loci the identities of the trait-influencing variants remain unknown. We conducted a trans-ethnic fine-mapping study at 18, 22, and 18 GWAS loci on the Metabochip for their association with triglycerides (TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, respectively, in individuals of African American (n = 6,832, East Asian (n = 9,449, and European (n = 10,829 ancestry. We aimed to identify the variants with strongest association at each locus, identify additional and population-specific signals, refine association signals, and assess the relative significance of previously described functional variants. Among the 58 loci, 33 exhibited evidence of association at P<1 × 10(-4 in at least one ancestry group. Sequential conditional analyses revealed that ten, nine, and four loci in African Americans, Europeans, and East Asians, respectively, exhibited two or more signals. At these loci, accounting for all signals led to a 1.3- to 1.8-fold increase in the explained phenotypic variance compared to the strongest signals. Distinct signals across ancestry groups were identified at PCSK9 and APOA5. Trans-ethnic analyses narrowed the signals to smaller sets of variants at GCKR, PPP1R3B, ABO, LCAT, and ABCA1. Of 27 variants reported previously to have functional effects, 74% exhibited the strongest association at the respective signal. In conclusion, trans-ethnic high-density genotyping and analysis confirm the presence of allelic heterogeneity, allow the identification of population-specific variants, and limit the number of candidate SNPs for functional studies.

  2. Genetic variation within and between strains of outbred Swiss mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, S; Chesson, C; Hope, R

    1993-04-01

    The aim of this survey was to measure levels of genetic variation within and between 5 different strains of outbred Swiss mice. Ten to 15 animals from each strain (NIH, Q(S), ARC, IMVS and STUD) were typed, using allozyme electrophoresis, at 10 gene loci: Mod-1, Idh-1, Gpi-I, Es-1, Es-3, Hbb, Pep-3, Gr-1, Got-2 and Pgm-1. Polymorphic variation in at least one of the 5 strains was detected at all 10 loci. The proportion of polymorphic loci ranged from 0.3 (NIH) to 0.8 (IMVS) with a mean of 0.52. Average expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.08 (NIH) to 0.37 (IMVS) with a mean of 0.21. The inbred strain SWR was, as expected, homozygous at all 10 loci. The amount of allelic substitution between pairs of strains was quantified using Nei's genetic distance, and a dendrogram based on these genetic distances showed a close overall similarity in its branching pattern to the known genealogy of the strains. This survey showed that a considerable degree of genetic variation persists in the 5 strains examined, a level of variation similar to that previously detected by Rice and O'Brien (1980) in 3 other outbred Swiss strains.

  3. Specific Gene Loci of Clinical Pseudomonas putida Isolates.

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    Lázaro Molina

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas putida are ubiquitous inhabitants of soils and clinical isolates of this species have been seldom described. Clinical isolates show significant variability in their ability to cause damage to hosts because some of them are able to modulate the host's immune response. In the current study, comparisons between the genomes of different clinical and environmental strains of P. putida were done to identify genetic clusters shared by clinical isolates that are not present in environmental isolates. We show that in clinical strains specific genes are mostly present on transposons, and that this set of genes exhibit high identity with genes found in pathogens and opportunistic pathogens. The set of genes prevalent in P. putida clinical isolates, and absent in environmental isolates, are related with survival under oxidative stress conditions, resistance against biocides, amino acid metabolism and toxin/antitoxin (TA systems. This set of functions have influence in colonization and survival within human tissues, since they avoid host immune response or enhance stress resistance. An in depth bioinformatic analysis was also carried out to identify genetic clusters that are exclusive to each of the clinical isolates and that correlate with phenotypical differences between them, a secretion system type III-like was found in one of these clinical strains, a determinant of pathogenicity in Gram-negative bacteria.

  4. Strain Specific Factors Control Effector Gene Silencing in Phytophthora sojae.

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    Sirjana Devi Shrestha

    Full Text Available The Phytophthora sojae avirulence gene Avr3a encodes an effector that is capable of triggering immunity on soybean plants carrying the resistance gene Rps3a. P. sojae strains that express Avr3a are avirulent to Rps3a plants, while strains that do not are virulent. To study the inheritance of Avr3a expression and virulence towards Rps3a, genetic crosses and self-fertilizations were performed. A cross between P. sojae strains ACR10 X P7076 causes transgenerational gene silencing of Avr3a allele, and this effect is meiotically stable up to the F5 generation. However, test-crosses of F1 progeny (ACR10 X P7076 with strain P6497 result in the release of silencing of Avr3a. Expression of Avr3a in the progeny is variable and correlates with the phenotypic penetrance of the avirulence trait. The F1 progeny from a direct cross of P6497 X ACR10 segregate for inheritance for Avr3a expression, a result that could not be explained by parental imprinting or heterozygosity. Analysis of small RNA arising from the Avr3a gene sequence in the parental strains and hybrid progeny suggests that the presence of small RNA is necessary but not sufficient for gene silencing. Overall, we conclude that inheritance of the Avr3a gene silenced phenotype relies on factors that are variable among P. sojae strains.

  5. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Two Novel Loci with Sex-Specific Effects for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Glycemic Traits in a Korean Population

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    Min Jin Go

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundUntil recently, genome-wide association study (GWAS-based findings have provided a substantial genetic contribution to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM or related glycemic traits. However, identification of allelic heterogeneity and population-specific genetic variants under consideration of potential confounding factors will be very valuable for clinical applicability. To identify novel susceptibility loci for T2DM and glycemic traits, we performed a two-stage genetic association study in a Korean population.MethodsWe performed a logistic analysis for T2DM, and the first discovery GWAS was analyzed for 1,042 cases and 2,943 controls recruited from a population-based cohort (KARE, n=8,842. The second stage, de novo replication analysis, was performed in 1,216 cases and 1,352 controls selected from an independent population-based cohort (Health 2, n=8,500. A multiple linear regression analysis for glycemic traits was further performed in a total of 14,232 nondiabetic individuals consisting of 7,696 GWAS and 6,536 replication study participants. A meta-analysis was performed on the combined results using effect size and standard errors estimated for stage 1 and 2, respectively.ResultsA combined meta-analysis for T2DM identified two new (rs11065756 and rs2074356 loci reaching genome-wide significance in CCDC63 and C12orf51 on the 12q24 region. In addition, these variants were significantly associated with fasting plasma glucose and homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function. Interestingly, two independent single nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with sex-specific stratification in this study.ConclusionOur study showed a strong association between T2DM and glycemic traits. We further observed that two novel loci with multiple diverse effects were highly specific to males. Taken together, these findings may provide additional insights into the clinical assessment or subclassification of disease risk in a Korean population.

  6. Strain-controlled nonvolatile magnetization switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geprägs, S.; Brandlmaier, A.; Brandt, M. S.; Gross, R.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate different approaches towards a nonvolatile switching of the remanent magnetization in single-crystalline ferromagnets at room temperature via elastic strain using ferromagnetic thin film/piezoelectric actuator hybrids. The piezoelectric actuator induces a voltage-controllable strain along different crystalline directions of the ferromagnetic thin film, resulting in modifications of its magnetization by converse magnetoelastic effects. We quantify the magnetization changes in the hybrids via ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. These measurements demonstrate a significant strain-induced change of the magnetization, limited by an inefficient strain transfer and domain formation in the particular system studied. To overcome these obstacles, we address practicable engineering concepts and use a model to demonstrate that a strain-controlled, nonvolatile magnetization switching should be possible in appropriately engineered ferromagnetic/piezoelectric actuator hybrids.

  7. DNA-damage-inducible (din) loci are transcriptionally activated in competent Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, P.E.; Lyle, M.J.; Yasbin, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    DNA damage-inducible (din) operon fusions were generated in Bacillus subtilis by transpositional mutagenesis. These YB886(din::Tn917-lacZ) fusion isolates produced increased β-galactosidase when exposed to mitomycin C, UV radiation, or ethyl methanesulfonate, indicating that the lacZ structural gene had inserted into host transcriptional units that are induced by a variety of DNA-damaging agents. One of the fusion strains was DNA-repair deficient and phenotypically resembled a UV-sensitive mutant of B. subtilis. Induction of β-galactosidase also occurred in the competent subpopulation of each of the din fusion strains, independent of exposure to DNA-damaging agents. Both the DNA-damage-inducible and competence-inducible components of β-galactosidase expression were abolished by the recE4 mutation, which inhibits SOS-like (SOB) induction but does not interfere with the development of the component state. The results indicate that gene expression is stimulated at specific loci within the B. subtilis chromosome both by DNA-damaging agents and by the development of competence and that this response is under the control of the SOB regulatory system. Furthermore, they demonstrate that at the molecular level SOB induction and the development of competence are interrelated cellular events

  8. Rat Strain Ontology: structured controlled vocabulary designed to facilitate access to strain data at RGD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Rajni; Munzenmaier, Diane H; Worthey, Elizabeth A; Dwinell, Melinda R; Shimoyama, Mary; Jacob, Howard J

    2013-11-22

    The Rat Genome Database (RGD) ( http://rgd.mcw.edu/) is the premier site for comprehensive data on the different strains of the laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus). The strain data are collected from various publications, direct submissions from individual researchers, and rat providers worldwide. Rat strain, substrain designation and nomenclature follow the Guidelines for Nomenclature of Mouse and Rat Strains, instituted by the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. While symbols and names aid in identifying strains correctly, the flat nature of this information prohibits easy search and retrieval, as well as other data mining functions. In order to improve these functionalities, particularly in ontology-based tools, the Rat Strain Ontology (RS) was developed. The Rat Strain Ontology (RS) reflects the breeding history, parental background, and genetic manipulation of rat strains. This controlled vocabulary organizes strains by type: inbred, outbred, chromosome altered, congenic, mutant and so on. In addition, under the chromosome altered category, strains are organized by chromosome, and further by type of manipulations, such as mutant or congenic. This allows users to easily retrieve strains of interest with modifications in specific genomic regions. The ontology was developed using the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontology (OBO) file format, and is organized on the Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG) structure. Rat Strain Ontology IDs are included as part of the strain report (RS: ######). As rat researchers are often unaware of the number of substrains or altered strains within a breeding line, this vocabulary now provides an easy way to retrieve all substrains and accompanying information. Its usefulness is particularly evident in tools such as the PhenoMiner at RGD, where users can now easily retrieve phenotype measurement data for related strains, strains with similar backgrounds or those with similar introgressed regions. This

  9. Absence of strong strain effects in behavioral analyses of Shank3-deficient mice

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    Elodie Drapeau

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Haploinsufficiency of SHANK3, caused by chromosomal abnormalities or mutations that disrupt one copy of the gene, leads to a neurodevelopmental syndrome called Phelan-McDermid syndrome, symptoms of which can include absent or delayed speech, intellectual disability, neurological changes and autism spectrum disorders. The SHANK3 protein forms a key structural part of the post-synaptic density. We previously generated and characterized mice with a targeted disruption of Shank3 in which exons coding for the ankyrin-repeat domain were deleted and expression of full-length Shank3 was disrupted. We documented specific deficits in synaptic function and plasticity, along with reduced reciprocal social interactions, in Shank3 heterozygous mice. Changes in phenotype owing to a mutation at a single locus are quite frequently modulated by other loci, most dramatically when the entire genetic background is changed. In mice, each strain of laboratory mouse represents a distinct genetic background and alterations in phenotype owing to gene knockout or transgenesis are frequently different across strains, which can lead to the identification of important modifier loci. We have investigated the effect of genetic background on phenotypes of Shank3 heterozygous, knockout and wild-type mice, using C57BL/6, 129SVE and FVB/Ntac strain backgrounds. We focused on observable behaviors with the goal of carrying out subsequent analyses to identify modifier loci. Surprisingly, there were very modest strain effects over a large battery of analyses. These results indicate that behavioral phenotypes associated with Shank3 haploinsufficiency are largely strain-independent.

  10. Strain screen and haplotype association mapping of wheel running in inbred mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, J Timothy; Leamy, Larry; Pomp, Daniel; Turner, Michael J; Fodor, Anthony A; Knab, Amy; Bowen, Robert S; Ferguson, David; Moore-Harrison, Trudy; Hamilton, Alicia

    2010-09-01

    Previous genetic association studies of physical activity, in both animal and human models, have been limited in number of subjects and genetically homozygous strains used as well as number of genomic markers available for analysis. Expansion of the available mouse physical activity strain screens and the recently published dense single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) map of the mouse genome (approximately 8.3 million SNPs) and associated statistical methods allowed us to construct a more generalizable map of the quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with physical activity. Specifically, we measured wheel running activity in male and female mice (average age 9 wk) in 41 inbred strains and used activity data from 38 of these strains in a haplotype association mapping analysis to determine QTL associated with activity. As seen previously, there was a large range of activity patterns among the strains, with the highest and lowest strains differing significantly in daily distance run (27.4-fold), duration of activity (23.6-fold), and speed (2.9-fold). On a daily basis, female mice ran further (24%), longer (13%), and faster (11%). Twelve QTL were identified, with three (on Chr. 12, 18, and 19) in both male and female mice, five specific to males, and four specific to females. Eight of the 12 QTL, including the 3 general QTL found for both sexes, fell into intergenic areas. The results of this study further support the findings of a moderate to high heritability of physical activity and add general genomic areas applicable to a large number of mouse strains that can be further mined for candidate genes associated with regulation of physical activity. Additionally, results suggest that potential genetic mechanisms arising from traditional noncoding regions of the genome may be involved in regulation of physical activity.

  11. GWAS meta-analysis and replication identifies three new susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Ramus, Susan J.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Lawrenson, Kate; Price, Melissa; Fridley, Brooke L.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Shen, Howard; Weber, Rachel; Karevan, Rod; Larson, Melissa C.; Song, Honglin; Tessier, Daniel C.; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie M.; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Aben, Katja K.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Baglietto, Laura; Bandera, Elisa V.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Birrer, Michael J.; Bloom, Greg; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brenton, James D.; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brown, Robert; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian; Carney, Michael E; Carvalho, Renato S.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Y. Anne; Chen, Zhihua; Chow, Wong-Ho; Cicek, Mine S.; Coetzee, Gerhard; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Despierre, Evelyn; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Edwards, Robert; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fenstermacher, David; Flanagan, James; Gao, Yu-Tang; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham; Gjyshi, Anxhela; Gore, Martin; Gronwald, Jacek; Guo, Qi; Halle, Mari K; Harter, Philipp; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hillemanns, Peter; Hoatlin, Maureen; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus K.; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Konecny, Gottfried E.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Nathan; Lee, Janet; Leminen, Arto; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lubiński, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Lurie, Galina; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Nakanishi, Toru; Narod, Steven A.; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stefan; Noushmehr, Houtan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara; Orlow, Irene; Paul, James; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Qu, Xiaotao; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schwaab, Ira; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hui; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Sieh, Weiva; Southey, Melissa C.; Spellman, Paul; Tajima, Kazuo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Berg, David Van Den; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vitonis, Allison F.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wik, Elisabeth; Winterhoff, Boris; Woo, Yin Ling; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah P.; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zulkifli, Famida; Goodman, Marc T.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pearce, Celeste L; Berchuck, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Iversen, Edwin; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Sellers, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified four susceptibility loci for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) with another two loci being close to genome-wide significance. We pooled data from a GWAS conducted in North America with another GWAS from the United Kingdom. We selected the top 24,551 SNPs for inclusion on the iCOGS custom genotyping array. Follow-up genotyping was carried out in 18,174 cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. We validated the two loci at 3q25 and 17q21 previously near genome-wide significance and identified three novel loci associated with risk; two loci associated with all EOC subtypes, at 8q21 (rs11782652, P=5.5×10-9) and 10p12 (rs1243180; P=1.8×10-8), and another locus specific to the serous subtype at 17q12 (rs757210; P=8.1×10-10). An integrated molecular analysis of genes and regulatory regions at these loci provided evidence for functional mechanisms underlying susceptibility that implicates CHMP4C in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. PMID:23535730

  12. Computational identification of strain-, species- and genus-specific proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiagarajan Rathi

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of unique proteins at different taxonomic levels has both scientific and practical value. Strain-, species- and genus-specific proteins can provide insight into the criteria that define an organism and its relationship with close relatives. Such proteins can also serve as taxon-specific diagnostic targets. Description A pipeline using a combination of computational and manual analyses of BLAST results was developed to identify strain-, species-, and genus-specific proteins and to catalog the closest sequenced relative for each protein in a proteome. Proteins encoded by a given strain are preliminarily considered to be unique if BLAST, using a comprehensive protein database, fails to retrieve (with an e-value better than 0.001 any protein not encoded by the query strain, species or genus (for strain-, species- and genus-specific proteins respectively, or if BLAST, using the best hit as the query (reverse BLAST, does not retrieve the initial query protein. Results are manually inspected for homology if the initial query is retrieved in the reverse BLAST but is not the best hit. Sequences unlikely to retrieve homologs using the default BLOSUM62 matrix (usually short sequences are re-tested using the PAM30 matrix, thereby increasing the number of retrieved homologs and increasing the stringency of the search for unique proteins. The above protocol was used to examine several food- and water-borne pathogens. We find that the reverse BLAST step filters out about 22% of proteins with homologs that would otherwise be considered unique at the genus and species levels. Analysis of the annotations of unique proteins reveals that many are remnants of prophage proteins, or may be involved in virulence. The data generated from this study can be accessed and further evaluated from the CUPID (Core and Unique Protein Identification system web site (updated semi-annually at http://pir.georgetown.edu/cupid. Conclusion CUPID

  13. Small RNA expression and strain specificity in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bruijn Ewart

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Digital gene expression (DGE profiling has become an established tool to study RNA expression. Here, we provide an in-depth analysis of small RNA DGE profiles from two different rat strains (BN-Lx and SHR from six different rat tissues (spleen, liver, brain, testis, heart, kidney. We describe the expression patterns of known and novel micro (miRNAs and piwi-interacting (piRNAs. Results We confirmed the expression of 588 known miRNAs (54 in antisense orientation and identified 56 miRNAs homologous to known human or mouse miRNAs, as well as 45 new rat miRNAs. Furthermore, we confirmed specific A to I editing in brain for mir-376a/b/c and identified mir-377 as a novel editing target. In accordance with earlier findings, we observed a highly tissue-specific expression pattern for all tissues analyzed. The brain was found to express the highest number of tissue-specific miRNAs, followed by testis. Notably, our experiments also revealed robust strain-specific differential miRNA expression in the liver that is caused by genetic variation between the strains. Finally, we identified two types of germline-specific piRNAs in testis, mapping either to transposons or in strand-specific clusters. Conclusions Taken together, the small RNA compendium described here advances the annotation of small RNAs in the rat genome. Strain and tissue-specific expression patterns furthermore provide a strong basis for studying the role of small RNAs in regulatory networks as well as biological process like physiology and neurobiology that are extensively studied in this model system.

  14. Proactive control of proactive interference using the method of loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Willa S; Oswald, Karl M

    2014-01-01

    Proactive interferencebuilds up with exposure to multiple lists of similar items with a resulting reduction in recall. This study examined the effectiveness of using a proactive strategy of the method of loci to reduce proactive interference in a list recall paradigm of categorically similar words. While all participants reported using some form of strategy to recall list words, this study demonstrated that young adults were able to proactively use the method of loci after 25 min of instruction to reduce proactive interference as compared with other personal spontaneous strategies. The implications of this study are that top-down proactive strategies such as the method of loci can significantly reduce proactive interference, and that the use of image and sequence or location are especially useful in this regard.

  15. Identification of genetic loci in Lactobacillus plantarum that modulate the immune response of dendritic cells using comparative genome hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein Meijerink

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Probiotics can be used to stimulate or regulate epithelial and immune cells of the intestinal mucosa and generate beneficial mucosal immunomodulatory effects. Beneficial effects of specific strains of probiotics have been established in the treatment and prevention of various intestinal disorders, including allergic diseases and diarrhea. However, the precise molecular mechanisms and the strain-dependent factors involved are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we aimed to identify gene loci in the model probiotic organism Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 that modulate the immune response of host dendritic cells. The amounts of IL-10 and IL-12 secreted by dendritic cells (DCs after stimulation with 42 individual L. plantarum strains were measured and correlated with the strain-specific genomic composition using comparative genome hybridisation and the Random Forest algorithm. This in silico "gene-trait matching" approach led to the identification of eight candidate genes in the L. plantarum genome that might modulate the DC cytokine response to L. plantarum. Six of these genes were involved in bacteriocin production or secretion, one encoded a bile salt hydrolase and one encoded a transcription regulator of which the exact function is unknown. Subsequently, gene deletions mutants were constructed in L. plantarum WCFS1 and compared to the wild-type strain in DC stimulation assays. All three bacteriocin mutants as well as the transcription regulator (lp_2991 had the predicted effect on cytokine production confirming their immunomodulatory effect on the DC response to L. plantarum. Transcriptome analysis and qPCR data showed that transcript level of gtcA3, which is predicted to be involved in glycosylation of cell wall teichoic acids, was substantially increased in the lp_2991 deletion mutant (44 and 29 fold respectively. CONCLUSION: Comparative genome hybridization led to the identification of gene loci in L

  16. Multiple-locus variant-repeat assay (MLVA) is a useful tool for molecular epidemiologic analysis of Streptococcus agalactiae strains causing bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Andreas; Bruheim, Torkjel; Afset, Jan Egil; Bergh, Kåre

    2012-06-15

    Group B streptococci (GBS) were considered a major cause of mastitis in cattle until preventive measures succeeded in controlling the disease in the 1970s and 1980s. During the last 5-6 years an increasing number of cases have been observed in some Scandinavian countries. A total of 187 GBS isolates from mastitis cases were collected from 119 animals in 34 Norwegian farms in the period from April 2007 to November 2010. 133 (71%) of the isolates were from farms with automated milking systems. The strains underwent typing of capsular polysaccharides (CPS) and surface proteins, and were analyzed by multi-locus variable repeat assay (MLVA) to investigate the epidemiological relationship of strains within and between farms. The GBS strains were differentiated into 12 types by CPS and surface protein analysis, with CPS types V (54%) and IV (34%) predominating. MLVA was superior to CPS and protein typing for strain differentiation, resolving the 187 strains into 37 types. In 29 of 34 farms all GBS strains had identical MLVA profiles specific for each farm. However, in one farm represented with 48 isolates, four MLVA variants with differences in one repeat locus were observed during the almost 3-year long collection period. Similar variations were observed at four other farms. This might reflect the stability of repeat loci under in vivo conditions. Farms with automated milking systems were overrepresented in this material. In conclusion, the five-loci MLVA allowed rapid high-resolution genotyping of the bovine GBS strains within and between farms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Control of protein synthesis in Escherichia coli: strain differences in control of translational initiation after energy source shift-down.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, L A; Jen-Jacobson, L

    1980-06-01

    We have studied the parameters of protein synthesis in a number of Escherichia coli strains after a shift-down from glucose-minimal to succinate-minimal medium. One group of strains, including K-12(lambda) (ATCC 10798) and NF162, showed a postshift translational yield of 50 to 65% and a 2- to 2.5-fold increase in the functional lifetime of general messenger ribonucleic acid. There was no change in the lag time for beta-galactosidase induction in these strains after the shift-down. A second group, including W1 and W2, showed no reduction in translational yield, no change in the functional lifetime of messenger ribonucleic acid, and a 50% increase in the lag time for beta-galactosidase induction. Evidence is presented which indicates that this increased lag time is not the result of a decreased rate of polypeptide chain propagation. A third group of strains, including NF161, CP78, and NF859, showed an intermediate pattern: translational yield was reduced to about 75% of normal, and the messenger ribonucleic acid functional lifetime was increased by about 50%. Calculation of the relative postshift rates of translational initiation gave about 0.2, 1.0, and 0.5, respectively, for the three groups. There was no apparent correlation between the ability to control translation and the genotypes of these strains at the relA, relX, or spoT loci. Measurements of the induction lag for beta-galactosidase during short-term glucose starvation or after a down-shift induced by alpha-methylglucoside indicated that these regimens elicit responses that are physiologically distinct from those elicited by a glucose-to-succinate shift-down.

  18. Knock-in/Knock-out (KIKO) vectors for rapid integration of large DNA sequences, including whole metabolic pathways, onto the Escherichia coli chromosome at well-characterised loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Suriana; Steen, Jennifer A; Bongers, Mareike; Nielsen, Lars K; Vickers, Claudia E

    2013-06-24

    Metabolic engineering projects often require integration of multiple genes in order to control the desired phenotype. However, this often requires iterative rounds of engineering because many current insertion approaches are limited by the size of the DNA that can be transferred onto the chromosome. Consequently, construction of highly engineered strains is very time-consuming. A lack of well-characterised insertion loci is also problematic. A series of knock-in/knock-out (KIKO) vectors was constructed for integration of large DNA sequences onto the E. coli chromosome at well-defined loci. The KIKO plasmids target three nonessential genes/operons as insertion sites: arsB (an arsenite transporter); lacZ (β-galactosidase); and rbsA-rbsR (a ribose metabolism operon). Two homologous 'arms' target each insertion locus; insertion is mediated by λ Red recombinase through these arms. Between the arms is a multiple cloning site for the introduction of exogenous sequences and an antibiotic resistance marker (either chloramphenicol or kanamycin) for selection of positive recombinants. The resistance marker can subsequently be removed by flippase-mediated recombination. The insertion cassette is flanked by hairpin loops to isolate it from the effects of external transcription at the integration locus. To characterize each target locus, a xylanase reporter gene (xynA) was integrated onto the chromosomes of E. coli strains W and K-12 using the KIKO vectors. Expression levels varied between loci, with the arsB locus consistently showing the highest level of expression. To demonstrate the simultaneous use of all three loci in one strain, xynA, green fluorescent protein (gfp) and a sucrose catabolic operon (cscAKB) were introduced into lacZ, arsB and rbsAR respectively, and shown to be functional. The KIKO plasmids are a useful tool for efficient integration of large DNA fragments (including multiple genes and pathways) into E. coli. Chromosomal insertion provides stable

  19. Nuclear positioning rather than contraction controls ordered rearrangements of immunoglobulin loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B. Rother (Magdalena); R.-J.T.S. Palstra (Robert-Jan); S. Jhunjhunwala (Suchit); K.A.M. Van Kester (Kevin A. M.); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques); C. Murre (Cornelis); M.C. van Zelm (Menno)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractProgenitor-B cells recombine their immunoglobulin (Ig) loci to create unique antigen receptors. Despite a common recombination machinery, the Ig heavy and Ig light chain loci rearrange in a stepwise manner. We studied pre-pro-B cells and Rag-/- progenitor-B cells to determine whether Ig

  20. CRISPR-cas loci profiling of Cronobacter sakazakii pathovars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrodzki, Pauline; Forsythe, Stephen James

    2016-12-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii sequence types 1, 4, 8 and 12 are associated with outbreaks of neonatal meningitis and necrotizing enterocolitis infections. However clonality results in strains which are indistinguishable using conventional methods. This study investigated the use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-cas loci profiling for epidemiological investigations. Seventy whole genomes of C. sakazakii strains from four clonal complexes which were widely distributed temporally, geographically and origin of source were profiled. All strains encoded the same type I-E subtype CRISPR-cas system with a total of 12 different CRISPR spacer arrays. This study demonstrated the greater discriminatory power of CRISPR spacer array profiling compared with multilocus sequence typing, which will be of use in source attribution during Cronobacter outbreak investigations.

  1. Enterococcus faecium strains characterization through polymorphism study of VNTR loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belteghi, C.,

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci are commensally bacteria of the gastrointestinal and female genital tract in humans and some mammals and birds, and one of the significant causes of hospital-acquired infections, especially in immuno-compromised patients. Genetic fingerprinting (DNA fingerprinting is a tool for identifying, marking and prevention of infectious agents dissemination. SSR (short sequence repeat are known to suffer frequent variations in the number of repetitive units.MLVA (multiple locus variable number tandem repeats analysis is a variant of genetic fingerprinting, in epidemiological studies on the pathogenetic Enterococcus faecium. Our study included laboratory Enterococcus faecium strains or isolated from clinical cases or from the environment (2003-2008. All analyzed strains of Enterococcus faecium were sensitive to vancomycin, except BM4147, and resistant to oxacilin. Strains isolated from the birds’ samples have shown a smaller resistance profile than those of human origin. 33 Enterococus faecium strains were analyzed by PCR amplification. 27 MT (VNTR profiles were obtained: six in the case of the strains isolated from birds, 15 in the case of the strains isolated form humans, 4 in the case of the collection strains and 2 in the case of the strains isolated from water samples. Among the strains isolated from humans and those isolated from animals, identical profiles were not recorded. Within the strains isolated from clinical cases, and those isolated from birds, circulating genotypes were noted, which can be considered as epidemical. The strains used as probiotics proved to be different from those circulating in birds. All MLVA profiles codes compared with those published on line in the UMC Utrecht database proved to be different. Results obtained in this study support the usefulness of the polymorphic VNTR analysis, as genetic marker, inepidemiological investigations.

  2. Proactive control of proactive interference using the method of loci

    OpenAIRE

    Bass, Willa S.; Oswald, Karl M.

    2014-01-01

    Proactive interferencebuilds up with exposure to multiple lists of similar items with a resulting reduction in recall. This study examined the effectiveness of using a proactive strategy of the method of loci to reduce proactive interference in a list recall paradigm of categorically similar words. While all participants reported using some form of strategy to recall list words, this study demonstrated that young adults were able to proactively use the method of loci after 25 min of instructi...

  3. Simultaneous discrimination of species and strains in Lactobacillus rhamnosus using species-specific PCR combined with multiplex mini-sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hsun; Chang, Mu-Tzu; Huang, Lina; Chu, Wen-Shen

    2015-12-01

    This study described the use of species-specific PCR in combination with SNaPshot mini-sequencing to achieve species identification and strain differentiation in Lactobacillus rhamnosus. To develop species-specific PCR and strain subtyping primers, the dnaJ gene was used as a target, and its corresponding sequences were analyzed both in Lb. rhamnosus and in a subset of its phylogenetically closest species. The results indicated that the species-specific primer pair was indeed specific for Lb. rhamnosus, and the mini-sequencing assay was able to unambiguously distinguish Lb. rhamnosus strains into different haplotypes. In conclusion, we have successfully developed a rapid, accurate and cost-effective assay for inter- and intraspecies discrimination of Lb. rhamnosus, which can be applied to achieve efficient quality control of probiotic products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Subspecies diversity in bacteriocin production by intestinal Lactobacillus salivarius strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Shea, Eileen F; O' Connor, Paula M; Raftis, Emma J; O' Toole, Paul W; Stanton, Catherine; Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2012-01-01

    A recent comparative genomic hybridization study in our laboratory revealed considerable plasticity within the bacteriocin locus of gastrointestinal strains of Lactobacillus salivarius. Most notably, these analyses led to the identification of two novel unmodified bacteriocins, salivaricin L and salivaricin T, produced by the neonatal isolate L. salivarius DPC6488 with immunity, regulatory and export systems analogous to those of abp118, a two-component bacteriocin produced by the well characterized reference strain L. salivarius UCC118. In this addendum we discuss the intraspecific diversity of our seven bacteriocin-producing L. salivarius isolates on a genome-wide level, and more specifically, with respect to their salivaricin loci.

  5. Enzyme markers in inbred rat strains: genetics of new markers and strain profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M; Baverstock, P R; Watts, C H; Gutman, G A

    1984-08-01

    Twenty-six inbred strains of the laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) were examined for electrophoretic variation at an estimated 97 genetic loci. In addition to previously documented markers, variation was observed for the enzymes aconitase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, and alkaline phosphatase. The genetic basis of these markers (Acon-1, Ahd-2, and Akp-1) was confirmed. Linkage analysis between 35 pairwise comparisons revealed that the markers Fh-1 and Pep-3 are linked. The strain profiles of the 25 inbred strains at 11 electrophoretic markers are given.

  6. Taxonomic and Strain-Specific Identification of the Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus 35 within the Lactobacillus casei Group▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudeyras, Sophie; Marchandin, Hélène; Fajon, Céline; Forestier, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Lactobacilli are lactic acid bacteria that are widespread in the environment, including the human diet and gastrointestinal tract. Some Lactobacillus strains are regarded as probiotics because they exhibit beneficial health effects on their host. In this study, the long-used probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus 35 was characterized at a molecular level and compared with seven reference strains from the Lactobacillus casei group. Analysis of rrn operon sequences confirmed that L. rhamnosus 35 indeed belongs to the L. rhamnosus species, and both temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis and ribotyping showed that it is closer to the probiotic strain L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (also known as L. rhamnosus GG) than to the species type strain. In addition, L. casei ATCC 334 gathered in a coherent cluster with L. paracasei type strains, unlike L. casei ATCC 393, which was closer to L. zeae; this is evidence of the lack of relatedness between the two L. casei strains. Further characterization of the eight strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis repetitive DNA element-based PCR identified distinct patterns for each strain, whereas two isolates of L. rhamnosus 35 sampled 40 years apart could not be distinguished. By subtractive hybridization using the L. rhamnosus GG genome as a driver, we were able to isolate five L. rhamnosus 35-specific sequences, including two phage-related ones. The primer pairs designed to amplify these five regions allowed us to develop rapid and highly specific PCR-based identification methods for the probiotic strain L. rhamnosus 35. PMID:18326671

  7. Use of the VNTR typing technique to determine the origin of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from Filipino patients in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihye; Tupasi, Thelma E; Park, Young Kil

    2014-05-01

    With increasing international interchange of personnel, international monitoring is necessary to decrease tuberculosis incidence in the world. This study aims to develop a new tool to determine origin of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from Filipino patients living in Korea. Thirty-two variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci were used for discrimination of 50 Filipino M. tuberculosis strains isolated in the Philippines, 317 Korean strains isolated in Korea, and 8 Filipino strains isolated in Korea. We found that the VNTR loci 0580, 0960, 2531, 2687, 2996, 0802, 2461, 2163a, 4052, 0424, 1955, 2074, 2347, 2401, 3171, 3690, 2372, 3232, and 4156 had different mode among copy numbers or exclusively distinct copy number in VNTR typing between Filipino and Korean M. tuberculosis strains. When these differences of the VNTR loci were applied to 8 Filipino M. tuberculosis strains isolated in Korea, 6 of them revealed Filipino type while 2 of them had Korean type. Using the differences of mode or repeated number of VNTR loci were very useful in distinguishing the Filipino strain from Korean strain.

  8. Dahl (S x R congenic strain analysis confirms and defines a chromosome 5 female-specific blood pressure quantitative trait locus to <7 Mbp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L M Herrera

    Full Text Available The detection of multiple sex-specific blood pressure (BP quantitative trait loci (QTLs in independent total genome analyses of F2 (Dahl S x R-intercross male and female rat cohorts confirms clinical observations of sex-specific disease cause and response to treatment among hypertensive patients, and mandate the identification of sex-specific hypertension genes/mechanisms. We developed and studied two congenic strains, S.R5A and S.R5B introgressing Dahl R-chromosome 5 segments into Dahl S chromosome 5 region spanning putative BP-f1 and BP-f2 QTLs. Radiotelemetric non-stressed 24-hour BP analysis at four weeks post-high salt diet (8% NaCl challenge, identified only S.R5B congenic rats with lower SBP (-26.5 mmHg, P = 0.002, DBP (-23.7 mmHg, P = 0.004 and MAP (-25.1 mmHg, P = 0.002 compared with Dahl S female controls at four months of age confirming BP-f1 but not BP-f2 QTL on rat chromosome 5. The S.R5B congenic segment did not affect pulse pressure and relative heart weight indicating that the gene underlying BP-f1 does not influence arterial stiffness and cardiac hypertrophy. The results of our congenic analysis narrowed BP-f1 to chromosome 5 coordinates 134.9-141.5 Mbp setting up the basis for further fine mapping of BP-f1 and eventual identification of the specific gene variant accounting for BP-f1 effect on blood pressure.

  9. Dahl (S x R) congenic strain analysis confirms and defines a chromosome 5 female-specific blood pressure quantitative trait locus to <7 Mbp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Victoria L M; Pasion, Khristine A; Moran, Ann Marie; Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson

    2012-01-01

    The detection of multiple sex-specific blood pressure (BP) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in independent total genome analyses of F2 (Dahl S x R)-intercross male and female rat cohorts confirms clinical observations of sex-specific disease cause and response to treatment among hypertensive patients, and mandate the identification of sex-specific hypertension genes/mechanisms. We developed and studied two congenic strains, S.R5A and S.R5B introgressing Dahl R-chromosome 5 segments into Dahl S chromosome 5 region spanning putative BP-f1 and BP-f2 QTLs. Radiotelemetric non-stressed 24-hour BP analysis at four weeks post-high salt diet (8% NaCl) challenge, identified only S.R5B congenic rats with lower SBP (-26.5 mmHg, P = 0.002), DBP (-23.7 mmHg, P = 0.004) and MAP (-25.1 mmHg, P = 0.002) compared with Dahl S female controls at four months of age confirming BP-f1 but not BP-f2 QTL on rat chromosome 5. The S.R5B congenic segment did not affect pulse pressure and relative heart weight indicating that the gene underlying BP-f1 does not influence arterial stiffness and cardiac hypertrophy. The results of our congenic analysis narrowed BP-f1 to chromosome 5 coordinates 134.9-141.5 Mbp setting up the basis for further fine mapping of BP-f1 and eventual identification of the specific gene variant accounting for BP-f1 effect on blood pressure.

  10. Microsatellite loci discovery from next-generation sequencing data and loci characterization in the epizoic barnacle Chelonibia testudinaria (Linnaeus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Ewers-Saucedo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite markers remain an important tool for ecological and evolutionary research, but are unavailable for many non-model organisms. One such organism with rare ecological and evolutionary features is the epizoic barnacle Chelonibia testudinaria (Linnaeus, 1758. Chelonibia testudinaria appears to be a host generalist, and has an unusual sexual system, androdioecy. Genetic studies on host specificity and mating behavior are impeded by the lack of fine-scale, highly variable markers, such as microsatellite markers. In the present study, we discovered thousands of new microsatellite loci from next-generation sequencing data, and characterized 12 loci thoroughly. We conclude that 11 of these loci will be useful markers in future ecological and evolutionary studies on C. testudinaria.

  11. Microsatellite loci discovery from next-generation sequencing data and loci characterization in the epizoic barnacle Chelonibia testudinaria (Linnaeus, 1758)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardus, John D.; Wares, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellite markers remain an important tool for ecological and evolutionary research, but are unavailable for many non-model organisms. One such organism with rare ecological and evolutionary features is the epizoic barnacle Chelonibia testudinaria (Linnaeus, 1758). Chelonibia testudinaria appears to be a host generalist, and has an unusual sexual system, androdioecy. Genetic studies on host specificity and mating behavior are impeded by the lack of fine-scale, highly variable markers, such as microsatellite markers. In the present study, we discovered thousands of new microsatellite loci from next-generation sequencing data, and characterized 12 loci thoroughly. We conclude that 11 of these loci will be useful markers in future ecological and evolutionary studies on C. testudinaria. PMID:27231653

  12. Location specific in situ TEM straining specimens made using FIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, R.D.; Papin, P.A.

    2004-01-01

    A method has been devised and demonstrated for producing in situ straining specimens for the transmission electron microscope (TEM) from specific locations in a sample using a dual-beam focused ion beam (FIB) instrument. The specimen is removed from a polished surface in the FIB using normal methods and then attached to a pre-fabricated substrate in the form of a modified TEM tensile specimen. In this manner, specific features of the microstructure of a polished optical mount can be selected for in situ tensile straining. With the use of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), this technique could be extended to select specific orientations of the specimen as well

  13. The impact of strain-specific immunity on Lyme disease incidence is spatially heterogeneous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatchikian, Camilo E; Nadelman, Robert B; Nowakowski, John; Schwartz, Ira; Wormser, Gary P; Brisson, Dustin

    2017-12-01

    Lyme disease, caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common tick-borne infection in the US. Recent studies have demonstrated that the incidence of human Lyme disease would have been even greater were it not for the presence of strain-specific immunity, which protects previously infected patients against subsequent infections by the same B. burgdorferi strain. Here, spatial heterogeneity is incorporated into epidemiological models to accurately estimate the impact of strain-specific immunity on human Lyme disease incidence. The estimated reduction in the number of Lyme disease cases is greater in epidemiologic models that explicitly include the spatial distribution of Lyme disease cases reported at the county level than those that utilize nationwide data. strain-specific immunity has the greatest epidemiologic impact in geographic areas with the highest Lyme disease incidence due to the greater proportion of people that have been previously infected and have developed strain-specific immunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. CpG island methylator phenotype-low (CIMP-low) colorectal cancer shows not only few methylated CIMP-high-specific CpG islands, but also low-level methylation at individual loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takako; Ohnishi, Mutsuko; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Suemoto, Yuko; Kirkner, Gregory J; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji

    2008-03-01

    The CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP or CIMP-high) with widespread promoter methylation is a distinct phenotype in colorectal cancer. However, the concept of CIMP-low with less extensive CpG island methylation is still evolving. Our aim is to examine whether density of methylation in individual CpG islands was different between CIMP-low and CIMP-high tumors. Utilizing MethyLight technology and 889 population-based colorectal cancers, we quantified DNA methylation (methylation index, percentage of methylated reference) at 14 CpG islands, including 8 CIMP-high-specific loci (CACNA1G, CDKN2A (p16), CRABP1, IGF2, MLH1, NEUROG1, RUNX3 and SOCS1). Methylation positivity in each locus was defined as methylation index>4. Low-level methylation (methylation index>0, CIMP-high-specific locus was significantly more common in 340 CIMP-low tumors (1/8-5/8 methylation-positive loci) than 133 CIMP-high tumors (> or =6/8 methylation-positive loci) and 416 CIMP-0 tumors (0/8 methylation-positive loci) (PCIMP-high, low-level methylation, was not persistently more prevalent in CIMP-low tumors. In conclusion, compared to CIMP-high and CIMP-0 tumors, CIMP-low colorectal cancers show not only few methylated CIMP-high-specific CpG islands, but also more frequent low-level methylation at individual loci. Our data may provide supporting evidence for a difference in pathogenesis of DNA methylation between CIMP-low and CIMP-high tumors.

  15. Bacillus subtilis strain specificity affects performance improvement in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhayat, L; Jacquier, V; Brinch, K S; Nielsen, P; Nelson, A; Geraert, P-A; Devillard, E

    2017-07-01

    The study reports the effects on broiler performance of a newly isolated Bacillus subtilis strain, which is phylogenetically not closely related to already well-described strains of B. subtilis. In the first experiment, birds were reared in battery cages and exposed to C. perfringens. An increase in growth performance was observed with the strain when compared to the challenged animals. Three additional growth trials were conducted to 35 d of age, in different rearing conditions (genetic breeds, corn-soybean meal-based diet with or without animal proteins, in presence or absence of phytase, on fresh or used litter) to investigate the efficacy and the specificity of this new B. subtilis strain on the improvement of BWG and FCR of broilers in comparison with a B. subtilis-based DFM already used in the field. Whatever the rearing conditions tested, the new B. subtilis strain led to an average 3.2% improvement in feed conversion ratio or bodyweight. Comparatively, the commercial Bacillus strain significantly improved broiler performance in only one trial out of 3 with an average improvement reaching 2%. All these results indicate that this new B. subtilis strain consistently improves broiler performances. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  16. Evaluating location specific strain rates, temperatures, and accumulated strains in friction welds through microstructure modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Akram

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A microstructural simulation method is adopted to predict the location specific strain rates, temperatures, grain evolution, and accumulated strains in the Inconel 718 friction welds. Cellular automata based 2D microstructure model was developed for Inconel 718 alloy using theoretical aspects of dynamic recrystallization. Flow curves were simulated and compared with experimental results using hot deformation parameter obtained from literature work. Using validated model, simulations were performed for friction welds of Inconel 718 alloy generated at three rotational speed i.e., 1200, 1500, and 1500 RPM. Results showed the increase in strain rates with increasing rotational speed. These simulated strain rates were found to match with the analytical results. Temperature difference of 150 K was noticed from center to edge of the weld. At all the rotational speeds, the temperature was identical implying steady state temperature (0.89Tm attainment. Keywords: Microstructure modeling, Dynamic recrystallization, Friction welding, Inconel 718, EBSD, Hot deformation, Strain map

  17. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of non-sexually transmitted strains of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Jordan R; Roberts, Sally A; Humphreys, Tricia L

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, has been previously reported to show genetic variance in several key virulence factors, placing strains of the bacterium into two genetically distinct classes. Recent studies done in yaws-endemic areas of the South Pacific have shown that H. ducreyi is also a major cause of cutaneous limb ulcers (CLU) that are not sexually transmitted. To genetically assess CLU strains relative to the previously described class I, class II phylogenetic hierarchy, we examined nucleotide sequence diversity at 11 H. ducreyi loci, including virulence and housekeeping genes, which encompass approximately 1% of the H. ducreyi genome. Sequences for all 11 loci indicated that strains collected from leg ulcers exhibit DNA sequences homologous to class I strains of H. ducreyi. However, sequences for 3 loci, including a hemoglobin receptor (hgbA), serum resistance protein (dsrA), and a collagen adhesin (ncaA) contained informative amounts of variation. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that these non-sexually transmitted strains of H. ducreyi comprise a sub-clonal population within class I strains of H. ducreyi. Molecular dating suggests that CLU strains are the most recently developed, having diverged approximately 0.355 million years ago, fourteen times more recently than the class I/class II divergence. The CLU strains' divergence falls after the divergence of humans from chimpanzees, making it the first known H. ducreyi divergence event directly influenced by the selective pressures accompanying human hosts.

  18. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of non-sexually transmitted strains of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan R Gaston

    Full Text Available Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, has been previously reported to show genetic variance in several key virulence factors, placing strains of the bacterium into two genetically distinct classes. Recent studies done in yaws-endemic areas of the South Pacific have shown that H. ducreyi is also a major cause of cutaneous limb ulcers (CLU that are not sexually transmitted. To genetically assess CLU strains relative to the previously described class I, class II phylogenetic hierarchy, we examined nucleotide sequence diversity at 11 H. ducreyi loci, including virulence and housekeeping genes, which encompass approximately 1% of the H. ducreyi genome. Sequences for all 11 loci indicated that strains collected from leg ulcers exhibit DNA sequences homologous to class I strains of H. ducreyi. However, sequences for 3 loci, including a hemoglobin receptor (hgbA, serum resistance protein (dsrA, and a collagen adhesin (ncaA contained informative amounts of variation. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that these non-sexually transmitted strains of H. ducreyi comprise a sub-clonal population within class I strains of H. ducreyi. Molecular dating suggests that CLU strains are the most recently developed, having diverged approximately 0.355 million years ago, fourteen times more recently than the class I/class II divergence. The CLU strains' divergence falls after the divergence of humans from chimpanzees, making it the first known H. ducreyi divergence event directly influenced by the selective pressures accompanying human hosts.

  19. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium leprae strains using variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) - fragment length analysis (FLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Ronald W; Rivest, Jason; Li, Wei; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2011-07-15

    The study of the transmission of leprosy is particularly difficult since the causative agent, Mycobacterium leprae, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. The only sources of the bacteria are leprosy patients, and experimentally infected armadillos and nude mice. Thus, many of the methods used in modern epidemiology are not available for the study of leprosy. Despite an extensive global drug treatment program for leprosy implemented by the WHO, leprosy remains endemic in many countries with approximately 250,000 new cases each year. The entire M. leprae genome has been mapped and many loci have been identified that have repeated segments of 2 or more base pairs (called micro- and minisatellites). Clinical strains of M. leprae may vary in the number of tandem repeated segments (short tandem repeats, STR) at many of these loci. Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis has been used to distinguish different strains of the leprosy bacilli. Some of the loci appear to be more stable than others, showing less variation in repeat numbers, while others seem to change more rapidly, sometimes in the same patient. While the variability of certain VNTRs has brought up questions regarding their suitability for strain typing, the emerging data suggest that analyzing multiple loci, which are diverse in their stability, can be used as a valuable epidemiological tool. Multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) has been used to study leprosy evolution and transmission in several countries including China, Malawi, the Philippines, and Brazil. MLVA involves multiple steps. First, bacterial DNA is extracted along with host tissue DNA from clinical biopsies or slit skin smears (SSS). The desired loci are then amplified from the extracted DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fluorescently-labeled primers for 4-5 different loci are used per reaction, with 18 loci being amplified in a total of four reactions. The PCR products may be subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis to verify the

  20. Targeted Sequencing of Lung Function Loci in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Cases and Controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Soler Artigas

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is the third leading cause of death worldwide; smoking is the main risk factor for COPD, but genetic factors are also relevant contributors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS of the lung function measures used in the diagnosis of COPD have identified a number of loci, however association signals are often broad and collectively these loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability. In order to examine the association with COPD risk of genetic variants down to low allele frequencies, to aid fine-mapping of association signals and to explain more of the missing heritability, we undertook a targeted sequencing study in 300 COPD cases and 300 smoking controls for 26 loci previously reported to be associated with lung function. We used a pooled sequencing approach, with 12 pools of 25 individuals each, enabling high depth (30x coverage per sample to be achieved. This pooled design maximised sample size and therefore power, but led to challenges during variant-calling since sequencing error rates and minor allele frequencies for rare variants can be very similar. For this reason we employed a rigorous quality control pipeline for variant detection which included the use of 3 independent calling algorithms. In order to avoid false positive associations we also developed tests to detect variants with potential batch effects and removed them before undertaking association testing. We tested for the effects of single variants and the combined effect of rare variants within a locus. We followed up the top signals with data available (only 67% of collapsing methods signals in 4,249 COPD cases and 11,916 smoking controls from UK Biobank. We provide suggestive evidence for the combined effect of rare variants on COPD risk in TNXB and in sliding windows within MECOM and upstream of HHIP. These findings can lead to an improved understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the development of COPD.

  1. Characteristics of Japanese inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, Yoshiaki; Isshiki, Hiroyuki; Onodera, Kei; Nagaishi, Kanna; Yamashita, Kentaro; Sonoda, Tomoko; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Takazoe, Masakazu; Yamazaki, Keiko; Kubo, Michiaki; Fujimiya, Mineko; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2014-08-01

    There are substantial differences in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) genetics depending on the populations examined. We aimed to identify Japanese population-specific or true culprit susceptibility genes through a meta-analysis of past genetic studies of Japanese IBD. For this study, we reviewed 2,703 articles. The review process consisted of three screening stages: we initially searched for relevant studies and then relevant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Finally, we adjusted them for the meta-analysis. To maximize our chances of analysis, we introduced proxy SNPs during the first stage. To minimize publication bias, no significant SNPs and solitary SNPs without pairs were combined to be reconsidered during the third stage. Additionally, two SNPs were newly genotyped. Finally, we conducted a meta-analysis of 37 published studies in 50 SNPs located at 22 loci corresponding to the total number of 4,853 Crohn's disease (CD), 5,612 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, and 14,239 healthy controls. We confirmed that the NKX2-3 polymorphism is associated with common susceptibility to IBD and that HLA-DRB1*0450 alleles increase susceptibility to CD but reduce risk for UC while HLA-DRB1*1502 alleles increase susceptibility to UC but reduce CD risk. Moreover, we found individual disease risk loci: TNFSF15 and TNFα to CD and HLA-B*5201, and NFKBIL1 to UC. The genetic risk of HLA was substantially high (odds ratios ranged from 1.54 to 2.69) while that of common susceptibility loci to IBD was modest (odds ratio ranged from 1.13 to 1.24). Results indicate that Japanese IBD susceptibility loci identified by the meta-analysis are closely associated with the HLA regions.

  2. Sex chromosome differentiation and the W- and Z-specific loci in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawaribuchi, Shuuji; Takahashi, Shuji; Wada, Mikako; Uno, Yoshinobu; Matsuda, Yoichi; Kondo, Mariko; Fukui, Akimasa; Takamatsu, Nobuhiko; Taira, Masanori; Ito, Michihiko

    2017-06-15

    Genetic sex-determining systems in vertebrates include two basic types of heterogamety; XX (female)/XY (male) and ZZ (male)/ZW (female) types. The African clawed frog Xenopus laevis has a ZZ/ZW-type sex-determining system. In this species, we previously identified a W-specific sex (female)-determining gene dmw, and specified W and Z chromosomes, which could be morphologically indistinguishable (homomorphic). In addition to dmw, we most recently discovered two genes, named scanw and ccdc69w, and one gene, named capn5z in the W- and Z-specific regions, respectively. In this study, we revealed the detail structures of the W/Z-specific loci and genes. Sequence analysis indicated that there is almost no sequence similarity between 278kb W-specific and 83kb Z-specific sequences on chromosome 2Lq32-33, where both the transposable elements are abundant. Synteny and phylogenic analyses indicated that all the W/Z-specific genes might have emerged independently. Expression analysis demonstrated that scanw and ccdc69w or capn5z are expressed in early differentiating ZW gonads or testes, thereby suggesting possible roles in female or male development, respectively. Importantly, the sex-determining gene (SDG) dmw might have been generated after allotetraploidization, thereby indicating the construction of the new sex-determining system by dmw after species hybridization. Furthermore, by direct genotyping, we confirmed that diploid WW embryos developed into normal female frogs, which indicate that the Z-specific region is not essential for female development. Overall, these findings indicate that sex chromosome differentiation has started, although no heteromorphic sex chromosomes are evident yet, in X. laevis. Homologous recombination suppression might have promoted the accumulation of mutations and transposable elements, and enlarged the W/Z-specific regions, thereby resulting in differentiation of the W/Z chromosomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Segregation of a QTL cluster for home-cage activity using a new mapping method based on regression analysis of congenic mouse strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S; Ishii, A; Nishi, A; Kuriki, S; Koide, T

    2014-01-01

    Recent genetic studies have shown that genetic loci with significant effects in whole-genome quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses were lost or weakened in congenic strains. Characterisation of the genetic basis of this attenuated QTL effect is important to our understanding of the genetic mechanisms of complex traits. We previously found that a consomic strain, B6-Chr6CMSM, which carries chromosome 6 of a wild-derived strain MSM/Ms on the genetic background of C57BL/6J, exhibited lower home-cage activity than C57BL/6J. In the present study, we conducted a composite interval QTL analysis using the F2 mice derived from a cross between C57BL/6J and B6-Chr6CMSM. We found one QTL peak that spans 17.6 Mbp of chromosome 6. A subconsomic strain that covers the entire QTL region also showed lower home-cage activity at the same level as the consomic strain. We developed 15 congenic strains, each of which carries a shorter MSM/Ms-derived chromosomal segment from the subconsomic strain. Given that the results of home-cage activity tests on the congenic strains cannot be explained by a simple single-gene model, we applied regression analysis to segregate the multiple genetic loci. The results revealed three loci (loci 1–3) that have the effect of reducing home-cage activity and one locus (locus 4) that increases activity. We also found that the combination of loci 3 and 4 cancels out the effects of the congenic strains, which indicates the existence of a genetic mechanism related to the loss of QTLs. PMID:24781804

  4. The influence of gender-specific loading patterns of the stop-jump task on anterior cruciate ligament strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinhold, Paul S; Stewart, Jason-Dennis N; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Feng; Garrett, William E; Yu, Bing

    2007-08-01

    Studies have shown that women are at higher risk of sustaining noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in specific sports. Recent gait studies of athletic tasks have documented that gender differences in knee movement, muscle activation, and external loading patterns exist. The objective of this study was to determine in a knee cadaver model if application of female-specific loading and movement patterns characterised in vivo for a stop-jump task cause higher ACL strains than male patterns. Gender-specific loading patterns of the landing phase of the vertical stop-jump task were applied to seven cadaver knees using published kinetic/kinematic results for recreational athletes. Loads applied consecutively included: tibial compression, quadriceps, hamstrings, external posterior tibial shear, and tibial torque. Knee flexion was fixed based on the kinematic data. Strain of the ACL was monitored by means of a differential variable reluctance transducer installed on the anterior-medial bundle of the ACL. The ACL strain was significantly increased (P<0.05) for the female loading pattern relative to the male loading pattern after the posterior tibial shear force was applied, and showed a similar trend (P=0.1) to be increased after the final tibial torque was applied. This study suggests that female motor control strategies used during the stop-jump task may place higher strains on the ACL than male strategies, thus putting females at greater risk of ACL injury. We believe these results suggest the potential effectiveness of using training programs to modify motor control strategies and thus modify the risk of injury.

  5. Identifikasi Brucella abortus Isolat Lokal dengan Brucella abortus Strain Specific-Polymerase Chain Reaction (IDENTIFICATION OF LOCAL ISOLATES OF BRUCELLA ABORTUS USING BRUCELLA ABORTUS STRAIN SPECIFIC-POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ASSAY)

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Maphilindawati Noor; Pratiwi Pujilestari Sudarmono; Asmarani Kusumawati; Anis Karuniawati

    2014-01-01

    Brucella abortus Strain Specific-Polymerase Chain Reaction (BaSS-PCR) is a single multiplex PCRtechnique which able to identify and differentiate between Brucella abortus field strains (biovar 1, 2, and4), B. abortus vaccine strains, Brucella species, and non-Brucella species. In this study, BaSS-PCR wasapplied to identify local isolates of B. abortus in order to investigate the B. abortus strains that infectedcattle in Indonesia. Fifty local strains of B.abortus isolated from infected cattle...

  6. Hyperinducibility of Ia antigen on astrocytes correlates with strain-specific susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massa, P.T.; ter Meulen, V.; Fontana, A.

    1987-01-01

    In search of a phenotypic marker determining genetically controlled susceptibility to delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in the brain-in particular, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)- the authors have compared the γ-interferon (IFN-γ) induction of Ia molecules on astrocytes and macrophages from rat and mouse strains that are susceptible or resistant to this disease. They focused on Ia expression because DTH reactions to self or foreign antigens are largely mediated by lymphocytes restricted by class II (Ia) antigens of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The data demonstrate that Lewis (fully susceptible) and Brown Norway (BN) (fully resistant) rats are very different in that Lewis astrocytes express much higher levels of Ia than BN astrocytes. Similar data were obtained from an analysis of EAE-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains (SJL and BALB/c, respectively), which suggest that this phenomenon may be universal and not limited to only one mammalian species. At least one gene responsible for Ia hyperinduction is located outside the rat RT-1 or the mouse MHC locus. Animals congenic at the RT-1 or MHC locus of the resistant strain but with background genes of the susceptible strain exhibit intermediate levels of Ia compared to fully resistant and susceptible rodents, which fits well with the reduced EAE susceptibility of these congenic animals. Furthermore, hyperinduction of Ia is astrocyte specific, since peritoneal macrophages of susceptible and resistant strains exhibit identical profiles of Ia induction. Thus, astrocyte Ia hyperinducibility may be a major strain- and tissue-specific factor that contributes to Ia-restricted DTH reactions in the brain

  7. GWAS of clinically defined gout and subtypes identifies multiple susceptibility loci that include urate transporter genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakayama, A.; Nakaoka, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Sakiyama, M.; Shaukat, A.; Toyoda, Y.; Okada, Y.; Kamatani, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Takada, T.; Inoue, K.; Yasujima, T.; Yuasa, H.; Shirahama, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Shimizu, S.; Higashino, T.; Kawamura, Y.; Ogata, H.; Kawaguchi, M.; Ohkawa, Y.; Danjoh, I.; Tokumasu, A.; Ooyama, K.; Ito, T.; Kondo, T.; Wakai, K.; Stiburkova, B.; Pavelka, K.; Stamp, L.K.; Dalbeth, N.; Sakurai, Y.; Suzuki, H; Hosoyamada, M.; Fujimori, S.; Yokoo, T.; Hosoya, T.; Inoue, I.; Takahashi, A.; Kubo, M.; Ooyama, H.; Shimizu, T.; Ichida, K.; Shinomiya, N.; Merriman, T.R.; Matsuo, H.; Andres, M; Joosten, L.A.; Janssen, M.C.H.; Jansen, T.L.; Liote, F.; Radstake, T.R.; Riches, P.L.; So, A.; Tauches, A.K.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of gout and its subtypes was performed to identify novel gout loci, including those that are subtype-specific. METHODS: Putative causal association signals from a GWAS of 945 clinically defined gout cases and 1213 controls from Japanese males were

  8. Strain specific variation of outer membrane proteins of wild Yersinia pestis strains subjected to different growth temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Guilherme Coutinho Abath

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available Three Yersinia pestis strains isolated from humans and one laboratory strain (EV76 were grown in rich media at 28§C and 37§C and their outer membrane protein composition compared by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-Page. Several proteins with molecular weights ranging from 34 kDa to 7 kDa were observed to change in relative abundance in samples grown at different temperatures. At least seven Y. pestis outer membrane proteins showed a temperature-dependent and strain-specific behaviour. Some differences between the outer membrane proteins of full-pathogenic wild isolates and the EV76 strain could aldso be detected and the relevance of this finding on the use of laboratory strains as a reference to the study of Y. pestis biological properties is discuted.

  9. Strain-Specific Features of Extracellular Polysaccharides and Their Impact on Lactobacillus plantarum-Host Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Chiao; Caggianiello, Graziano; van Swam, Iris I; Taverne, Nico; Meijerink, Marjolein; Bron, Peter A; Spano, Giuseppe; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2016-07-01

    Lactobacilli are found in diverse environments and are widely applied as probiotic, health-promoting food supplements. Polysaccharides are ubiquitously present on the cell surface of lactobacilli and are considered to contribute to the species- and strain-specific probiotic effects that are typically observed. Two Lactobacillus plantarum strains, SF2A35B and Lp90, have an obvious ropy phenotype, implying high extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production levels. In this work, we set out to identify the genes involved in EPS production in these L. plantarum strains and to demonstrate their role in EPS production by gene deletion analysis. A model L. plantarum strain, WCFS1, and its previously constructed derivative that produced reduced levels of EPS were included as reference strains. The constructed EPS-reduced derivatives were analyzed for the abundance and sugar compositions of their EPS, revealing cps2-like gene clusters in SF2A35B and Lp90 responsible for major EPS production. Moreover, these mutant strains were tested for phenotypic characteristics that are of relevance for their capacity to interact with the host epithelium in the intestinal tract, including bacterial surface properties as well as survival under the stress conditions encountered in the gastrointestinal tract (acid and bile stress). In addition, the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) signaling and immunomodulatory capacities of the EPS-negative derivatives and their respective wild-type strains were compared, revealing strain-specific impacts of EPS on the immunomodulatory properties. Taken together, these experiments illustrate the importance of EPS in L. plantarum strains as a strain-specific determinant in host interaction. This study evaluates the role of extracellular polysaccharides that are produced by different strains of Lactobacillus plantarum in the determination of the cell surface properties of these bacteria and their capacity to interact with their environment, including their

  10. Region-specific protein misfolding cyclic amplification reproduces brain tropism of prion strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privat, Nicolas; Levavasseur, Etienne; Yildirim, Serfildan; Hannaoui, Samia; Brandel, Jean-Philippe; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Béringue, Vincent; Seilhean, Danielle; Haïk, Stéphane

    2017-10-06

    Human prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are transmissible brain proteinopathies, characterized by the accumulation of a misfolded isoform of the host cellular prion protein (PrP) in the brain. According to the prion model, prions are defined as proteinaceous infectious particles composed solely of this abnormal isoform of PrP (PrP Sc ). Even in the absence of genetic material, various prion strains can be propagated in experimental models. They can be distinguished by the pattern of disease they produce and especially by the localization of PrP Sc deposits within the brain and the spongiform lesions they induce. The mechanisms involved in this strain-specific targeting of distinct brain regions still are a fundamental, unresolved question in prion research. To address this question, we exploited a prion conversion in vitro assay, protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA), by using experimental scrapie and human prion strains as seeds and specific brain regions from mice and humans as substrates. We show here that region-specific PMCA in part reproduces the specific brain targeting observed in experimental, acquired, and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases. Furthermore, we provide evidence that, in addition to cellular prion protein, other region- and species-specific molecular factors influence the strain-dependent prion conversion process. This important step toward understanding prion strain propagation in the human brain may impact research on the molecular factors involved in protein misfolding and the development of ultrasensitive methods for diagnosing prion disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Pathogen-specific effects of quantitative trait loci affecting clinical mastitis and somatic cell count in danish holstein cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Peter; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Thomasen, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting the risk of clinical mastitis (CM) and QTL affecting somatic cell score (SCS) exhibit pathogen-specific effects on the incidence of mastitis. Bacteriological data on mastitis pathogens were used to investigate...... pathogen specificity of QTL affecting treatments of mastitis in first parity (CM1), second parity (CM2), and third parity (CM3), and QTL affecting SCS. The 5 most common mastitis pathogens in the Danish dairy population were analyzed: Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Escherichia coli, coagulase...... against coagulase-negative staphylococci and Strep. uberis. Our results show that particular mastitis QTL are highly likely to exhibit pathogen-specificity. However, the results should be interpreted carefully because the results are sensitive to the sampling method and method of analysis. Field data were...

  12. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrova, Y.E.; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of γ-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure 137 Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed

  13. Genetic Diversity and Transmission Characteristics of Beijing Family Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Tomotada; Grandjean, Louis; Arikawa, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Noriko; Caviedes, Luz; Coronel, Jorge; Sheen, Patricia; Wada, Takayuki; Taype, Carmen A.; Shaw, Marie-Anne; Moore, David A. J.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Beijing family strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have attracted worldwide attention because of their wide geographical distribution and global emergence. Peru, which has a historical relationship with East Asia, is considered to be a hotspot for Beijing family strains in South America. We aimed to unveil the genetic diversity and transmission characteristics of the Beijing strains in Peru. A total of 200 Beijing family strains were identified from 2140 M. tuberculosis isolates obtained in Lima, Peru, between December 2008 and January 2010. Of them, 198 strains were classified into sublineages, on the basis of 10 sets of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). They were also subjected to variable number tandem-repeat (VNTR) typing using an international standard set of 15 loci (15-MIRU-VNTR) plus 9 additional loci optimized for Beijing strains. An additional 70 Beijing family strains, isolated between 1999 and 2006 in Lima, were also analyzed in order to make a longitudinal comparison. The Beijing family was the third largest spoligotyping clade in Peru. Its population structure, by SNP typing, was characterized by a high frequency of Sequence Type 10 (ST10), which belongs to a modern subfamily of Beijing strains (178/198, 89.9%). Twelve strains belonged to the ancient subfamily (ST3 [n = 3], ST25 [n = 1], ST19 [n = 8]). Overall, the polymorphic information content for each of the 24 loci values was low. The 24 loci VNTR showed a high clustering rate (80.3%) and a high recent transmission index (RTIn−1 = 0.707). These strongly suggest the active and on-going transmission of Beijing family strains in the survey area. Notably, 1 VNTR genotype was found to account for 43.9% of the strains. Comparisons with data from East Asia suggested the genotype emerged as a uniquely endemic clone in Peru. A longitudinal comparison revealed the genotype was present in Lima by 1999. PMID:23185395

  14. Strain actuated aeroelastic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Kenneth B.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on strain actuated aeroelastic control are presented. Topics covered include: structural and aerodynamic modeling; control law design methodology; system block diagram; adaptive wing test article; bench-top experiments; bench-top disturbance rejection: open and closed loop response; bench-top disturbance rejection: state cost versus control cost; wind tunnel experiments; wind tunnel gust alleviation: open and closed loop response at 60 mph; wind tunnel gust alleviation: state cost versus control cost at 60 mph; wind tunnel command following: open and closed loop error at 60 mph; wind tunnel flutter suppression: open loop flutter speed; and wind tunnel flutter suppression: closed loop state cost curves.

  15. Gamma radiation-induced heritable mutations at repetitive DNA loci in out-bred mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somers, C.M.; Sharma, R.; Quinn, J.S.; Boreham, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that expanded-simple-tandem-repeat (ESTR) DNA loci are efficient genetic markers for detecting radiation-induced germ line mutations in mice. Dose responses following irradiation, however, have only been characterized in a small number of inbred mouse strains, and no studies have applied Esters to examine potential modifiers of radiation risk, such as adaptive response. We gamma-irradiated groups of male out-bred Swiss-Webster mice with single acute doses of 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, and compared germ line mutation rates at ESTR loci to a sham-irradiated control. To test for evidence of adaptive response we treated a third group with a total dose of 1.1 Gy that was fractionated into a 0.1 Gy adapting dose, followed by a challenge dose of 1.0 Gy 24 h later. Paternal mutation rates were significantly elevated above the control in the 0.5 Gy (2.8-fold) and 1.0 Gy (3.0-fold) groups, but were similar to each other despite the difference in radiation dose. The doubling dose for paternal mutation induction was 0.26 Gy (95% CI = 0.14-0.51 Gy). Males adapted with a 0.1 Gy dose prior to a 1.0 Gy challenge dose had mutation rates that were not significantly elevated above the control, and were 43% reduced compared to those receiving single doses. We conclude that pre-meiotic male germ cells in out-bred Swiss-Webster mice are sensitive to ESTR mutations induced by acute doses of ionizing radiation, but mutation induction may become saturated at a lower dose than in some strains of inbred mice. Reduced mutation rates in the adapted group provide intriguing evidence for suppression of ESTR mutations in the male germline through adaptive response. Repetitive DNA markers may be useful tools for exploration of biological factors affecting the probability of heritable mutations caused by low-dose ionizing radiation exposure. The biological significance of ESTR mutations in terms of radiation risk assessment, however, is still undetermined

  16. lociNGS: a lightweight alternative for assessing suitability of next-generation loci for evolutionary analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Hird

    Full Text Available Genomic enrichment methods and next-generation sequencing produce uneven coverage for the portions of the genome (the loci they target; this information is essential for ascertaining the suitability of each locus for further analysis. lociNGS is a user-friendly accessory program that takes multi-FASTA formatted loci, next-generation sequence alignments and demographic data as input and collates, displays and outputs information about the data. Summary information includes the parameters coverage per locus, coverage per individual and number of polymorphic sites, among others. The program can output the raw sequences used to call loci from next-generation sequencing data. lociNGS also reformats subsets of loci in three commonly used formats for multi-locus phylogeographic and population genetics analyses - NEXUS, IMa2 and Migrate. lociNGS is available at https://github.com/SHird/lociNGS and is dependent on installation of MongoDB (freely available at http://www.mongodb.org/downloads. lociNGS is written in Python and is supported on MacOSX and Unix; it is distributed under a GNU General Public License.

  17. Independent evolution of neurotoxin and flagellar genetic loci in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Andrew T; Paul, Catherine J; Mason, David R; Twine, Susan M; Alston, Mark J; Logan, Susan M; Austin, John W; Peck, Michael W

    2009-03-19

    Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum is the causative agent of botulism, a severe neuroparalytic illness. Given the severity of botulism, surprisingly little is known of the population structure, biology, phylogeny or evolution of C. botulinum. The recent determination of the genome sequence of C. botulinum has allowed comparative genomic indexing using a DNA microarray. Whole genome microarray analysis revealed that 63% of the coding sequences (CDSs) present in reference strain ATCC 3502 were common to all 61 widely-representative strains of proteolytic C. botulinum and the closely related C. sporogenes tested. This indicates a relatively stable genome. There was, however, evidence for recombination and genetic exchange, in particular within the neurotoxin gene and cluster (including transfer of neurotoxin genes to C. sporogenes), and the flagellar glycosylation island (FGI). These two loci appear to have evolved independently from each other, and from the remainder of the genetic complement. A number of strains were atypical; for example, while 10 out of 14 strains that formed type A1 toxin gave almost identical profiles in whole genome, neurotoxin cluster and FGI analyses, the other four strains showed divergent properties. Furthermore, a new neurotoxin sub-type (A5) has been discovered in strains from heroin-associated wound botulism cases. For the first time, differences in glycosylation profiles of the flagella could be linked to differences in the gene content of the FGI. Proteolytic C. botulinum has a stable genome backbone containing specific regions of genetic heterogeneity. These include the neurotoxin gene cluster and the FGI, each having evolved independently of each other and the remainder of the genetic complement. Analysis of these genetic components provides a high degree of discrimination of strains of proteolytic C. botulinum, and is suitable for clinical and forensic investigations of botulism outbreaks.

  18. Independent evolution of neurotoxin and flagellar genetic loci in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twine Susan M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum is the causative agent of botulism, a severe neuroparalytic illness. Given the severity of botulism, surprisingly little is known of the population structure, biology, phylogeny or evolution of C. botulinum. The recent determination of the genome sequence of C. botulinum has allowed comparative genomic indexing using a DNA microarray. Results Whole genome microarray analysis revealed that 63% of the coding sequences (CDSs present in reference strain ATCC 3502 were common to all 61 widely-representative strains of proteolytic C. botulinum and the closely related C. sporogenes tested. This indicates a relatively stable genome. There was, however, evidence for recombination and genetic exchange, in particular within the neurotoxin gene and cluster (including transfer of neurotoxin genes to C. sporogenes, and the flagellar glycosylation island (FGI. These two loci appear to have evolved independently from each other, and from the remainder of the genetic complement. A number of strains were atypical; for example, while 10 out of 14 strains that formed type A1 toxin gave almost identical profiles in whole genome, neurotoxin cluster and FGI analyses, the other four strains showed divergent properties. Furthermore, a new neurotoxin sub-type (A5 has been discovered in strains from heroin-associated wound botulism cases. For the first time, differences in glycosylation profiles of the flagella could be linked to differences in the gene content of the FGI. Conclusion Proteolytic C. botulinum has a stable genome backbone containing specific regions of genetic heterogeneity. These include the neurotoxin gene cluster and the FGI, each having evolved independently of each other and the remainder of the genetic complement. Analysis of these genetic components provides a high degree of discrimination of strains of proteolytic C. botulinum, and is suitable for clinical and forensic investigations of botulism

  19. Fifteen new risk loci for coronary artery disease highlight arterial-wall-specific mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howson, Joanna M. M.; Zhao, Wei; Barnes, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although 58 genomic regions have been associated with CAD thus far, most of the heritability is unexplained, indicating that additional susceptibility loci await identification. An efficient discovery strategy ...

  20. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Identifies Four New Disease-Specific Risk Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, G.T.; Tromp, G.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Gretarsdottir, S.; Baas, A.F.; Giusti, B.; Strauss, E.; Hof, F.N. van 't; Webb, T.R.; Erdman, R.; Ritchie, M.D.; Elmore, J.R.; Verma, A.; Pendergrass, S.; Kullo, I.J.; Ye, Z.; Peissig, P.L.; Gottesman, O.; Verma, S.S.; Malinowski, J.; Rasmussen-Torvik, L.J.; Borthwick, K.M.; Smelser, D.T.; Crosslin, D.R.; Andrade, M. de; Ryer, E.J.; McCarty, C.A.; Bottinger, E.P.; Pacheco, J.A.; Crawford, D.C.; Carrell, D.S.; Gerhard, G.S.; Franklin, D.P.; Carey, D.J.; Phillips, V.L.; Williams, M.J.; Wei, W.; Blair, R.; Hill, A.A.; Vasudevan, T.M.; Lewis, D.R.; Thomson, I.A.; Krysa, J.; Hill, G.B.; Roake, J.; Merriman, T.R.; Oszkinis, G.; Galora, S.; Saracini, C.; Abbate, R.; Pulli, R.; Pratesi, C.; Saratzis, A.; Verissimo, A.R.; Bumpstead, S.; Badger, S.A.; Clough, R.E.; Cockerill, G.; Hafez, H.; Scott, D.J.; Futers, T.S.; Romaine, S.P.; Bridge, K.; Griffin, K.J.; Bailey, M.A.; Smith, A.; Thompson, M.M.; Bockxmeer, F.M. van; Matthiasson, S.E.; Thorleifsson, G.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Teijink, J.A.; Wijmenga, C.; Graaf, J. de; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Lindholt, J.S.; Hughes, A.; Bradley, D.T.; Stirrups, K.; Golledge, J.; Norman, P.E.; Powell, J.T.; Humphries, S.E.; Hamby, S.E.; Goodall, A.H.; Nelson, C.P.; Sakalihasan, N.; Courtois, A.; Ferrell, R.E.; Eriksson, P.; Folkersen, L.; Franco-Cereceda, A.; Eicher, J.D.; Johnson, A.D.; Betsholtz, C.; Ruusalepp, A.; Franzen, O.; Schadt, E.E.; Bjorkegren, J.L.; et al.,

    2017-01-01

    RATIONALE: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Together, 6 previously identified risk loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability of AAA. OBJECTIVE: To identify additional AAA risk loci using data from all available

  1. GWAS of clinically defined gout and subtypes identifies multiple susceptibility loci that include urate transporter genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Ken; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Shaukat, Amara; Toyoda, Yu; Okada, Yukinori; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Nakamura, Takahiro; Takada, Tappei; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Yasujima, Tomoya; Yuasa, Hiroaki; Shirahama, Yuko; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Seiko; Higashino, Toshihide; Kawamura, Yusuke; Ogata, Hiraku; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Danjoh, Inaho; Tokumasu, Atsumi; Ooyama, Keiko; Ito, Toshimitsu; Kondo, Takaaki; Wakai, Kenji; Stiburkova, Blanka; Pavelka, Karel; Stamp, Lisa K; Dalbeth, Nicola; Sakurai, Yutaka; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Hosoyamada, Makoto; Fujimori, Shin; Yokoo, Takashi; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Inoue, Ituro; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toru; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Merriman, Tony R; Matsuo, Hirotaka

    2017-05-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of gout and its subtypes was performed to identify novel gout loci, including those that are subtype-specific. Putative causal association signals from a GWAS of 945 clinically defined gout cases and 1213 controls from Japanese males were replicated with 1396 cases and 1268 controls using a custom chip of 1961 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We also first conducted GWASs of gout subtypes. Replication with Caucasian and New Zealand Polynesian samples was done to further validate the loci identified in this study. In addition to the five loci we reported previously, further susceptibility loci were identified at a genome-wide significance level (pgout cases, and NIPAL1 and FAM35A for the renal underexcretion gout subtype. While NIPAL1 encodes a magnesium transporter, functional analysis did not detect urate transport via NIPAL1, suggesting an indirect association with urate handling. Localisation analysis in the human kidney revealed expression of NIPAL1 and FAM35A mainly in the distal tubules, which suggests the involvement of the distal nephron in urate handling in humans. Clinically ascertained male patients with gout and controls of Caucasian and Polynesian ancestries were also genotyped, and FAM35A was associated with gout in all cases. A meta-analysis of the three populations revealed FAM35A to be associated with gout at a genome-wide level of significance (p meta =3.58×10 -8 ). Our findings including novel gout risk loci provide further understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of gout and lead to a novel concept for the therapeutic target of gout/hyperuricaemia. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Utilization during mitotic cell division of loci controlling meiotic recombination and disjunction in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, B.S.; Carpenter, A.T.C.; Ripoll, P.

    1978-01-01

    To inquire whether the loci identified by recombination-defective and disjunction-defective meiotic mutants in Drosophila are also utilized during mitotic cell division, the effects of 18 meiotic mutants (representing 13 loci) on mitotic chromosome stability have been examined genetically. To do this, meiotic-mutant-bearing flies heterozygous for recessive somatic cell markers were examined for the frequencies and types of spontaneous clones expressing the cell markers. In such flies, marked clones can arise via mitotic recombination, mutation, chromosome breakage, nondisjunction or chromosome loss, and clones from these different origins can be distinguished. In addition, meiotic mutants at nine loci have been examined for their effects on sensitivity to killing by uv and x rays. Mutants at six of the seven recombination-defective loci examined (mei-9, mei-41, c(3)G, mei-W68, mei-S282, mei-352, mei-218) cause mitotic chromosome instability in both sexes, whereas mutants at one locus (mei-218) do not affect mitotic chromosome stability. Thus many of the loci utilized during meiotic recombination also function in the chromosomal economy of mitotic cells

  3. Characterization of lipooligosaccharide-biosynthetic loci of Campylobacter jejuni reveals new lipooligosaccharide classes: Evidence of mosaic organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.T. Parker (Craig); M. Gilbert (Michel); N. Yuki (Nobuhiro); H.P. Endtz (Hubert); R.E. Mandrell (Robert)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe lipooligosaccharide (LOS) biosynthesis region is one of the more variable genomic regions between strains of Campylobacter jejuni. Indeed, eight classes of LOS biosynthesis loci have been established previously based on gene content and organization. In this study, we characterize

  4. A strain-, cow-, and herd-specific bio-economic simulation model of intramammary infections in dairy cattle herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussmann, Maya; Kirkeby, Carsten; Græsbøll, Kaare; Farre, Michael; Halasa, Tariq

    2018-07-14

    Intramammary infections (IMI) in dairy cattle lead to economic losses for farmers, both through reduced milk production and disease control measures. We present the first strain-, cow- and herd-specific bio-economic simulation model of intramammary infections in a dairy cattle herd. The model can be used to investigate the cost-effectiveness of different prevention and control strategies against IMI. The objective of this study was to describe a transmission framework, which simulates spread of IMI causing pathogens through different transmission modes. These include the traditional contagious and environmental spread and a new opportunistic transmission mode. In addition, the within-herd transmission dynamics of IMI causing pathogens were studied. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to investigate the influence of input parameters on model predictions. The results show that the model is able to represent various within-herd levels of IMI prevalence, depending on the simulated pathogens and their parameter settings. The parameters can be adjusted to include different combinations of IMI causing pathogens at different prevalence levels, representing herd-specific situations. The model is most sensitive to varying the transmission rate parameters and the strain-specific recovery rates from IMI. It can be used for investigating both short term operational and long term strategic decisions for the prevention and control of IMI in dairy cattle herds. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Preexisting Salmonella-specific immunity interferes with the subsequent development of immune responses against the Salmonella strains delivering H9N2 hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajam, Irshad Ahmed; Lee, John Hwa

    2017-06-01

    Recombinant Salmonella strains expressing foreign heterologous antigens have been extensively studied as promising live vaccine delivery vehicles. In this study, we constructed attenuated smooth (S-HA) and rough (R-HA) Salmonella strains expressing hemagglutinin (HA) of H9N2, a low pathogenic avian influenza A virus. We then investigated the HA-specific immune responses following oral immunization with either S-HA or R-HA strain in chicken model. We further examined the effects of the preexisting anti-Salmonella immunity on the subsequent elicitation of the HA and the Salmonella ompA specific immune responses. Our results showed that primary immunization with either the S-HA or the R-HA strain elicited comparable HA-specific immune responses and the responses were significantly (pSalmonella vector control. When chickens were pre-immunized with the smooth Salmonella carrier alone and then vaccinated with either S-HA or R-HA strain 3, 6 and 9 weeks later, respectively, significant reductions were seen for HA-specific immune responses at week 6, a point which corresponded to the peak of the primary Salmonella-specific antibody responses. No reductions were seen at week 3 and 9, albeit, the HA-specific immune responses were boosted at week 9, a point which corresponded to the lowest primary Salmonella-specific antibody responses. The ompA recall responses remain refractory at week 3 and 6 following deliberate immunization with the carrier strain, but were significantly (pSalmonella immunity inhibits antigen-specific immune responses and this effect could be avoided by carefully selecting the time point when carrier-specific immune responses are relatively low. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pathway analysis for intracellular Porphyromonas gingivalis using a strain ATCC 33277 specific database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Tiansong

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative intracellular pathogen associated with periodontal disease. We have previously reported on whole-cell quantitative proteomic analyses to investigate the differential expression of virulence factors as the organism transitions from an extracellular to intracellular lifestyle. The original results with the invasive strain P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 were obtained using the genome sequence available at the time, strain W83 [GenBank: AE015924]. We present here a re-processed dataset using the recently published genome annotation specific for strain ATCC 33277 [GenBank: AP009380] and an analysis of differential abundance based on metabolic pathways rather than individual proteins. Results Qualitative detection was observed for 1266 proteins using the strain ATCC 33277 annotation for 18 hour internalized P. gingivalis within human gingival epithelial cells and controls exposed to gingival cell culture medium, an improvement of 7% over the W83 annotation. Internalized cells showed increased abundance of proteins in the energy pathway from asparagine/aspartate amino acids to ATP. The pathway producing one short chain fatty acid, propionate, showed increased abundance, while that of another, butyrate, trended towards decreased abundance. The translational machinery, including ribosomal proteins and tRNA synthetases, showed a significant increase in protein relative abundance, as did proteins responsible for transcription. Conclusion Use of the ATCC 33277 specific genome annotation resulted in improved proteome coverage with respect to the number of proteins observed both qualitatively in terms of protein identifications and quantitatively in terms of the number of calculated abundance ratios. Pathway analysis showed a significant increase in overall protein synthetic and transcriptional machinery in the absence of significant growth. These results suggest that the interior of host cells

  7. Meta-analysis identifies seven susceptibility loci involved in the atopic march.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenholz, Ingo; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Rüschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Strachan, David P; Spycher, Ben D; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Margaritte-Jeannin, Patricia; Sääf, Annika; Kerkhof, Marjan; Ege, Markus; Baltic, Svetlana; Matheson, Melanie C; Li, Jin; Michel, Sven; Ang, Wei Q; McArdle, Wendy; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Demenais, Florence; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Söderhäll, Cilla; Pershagen, Göran; de Jongste, Johan C; Postma, Dirkje S; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Horak, Elisabeth; Ogorodova, Ludmila M; Puzyrev, Valery P; Bragina, Elena Yu; Hudson, Thomas J; Morin, Charles; Duffy, David L; Marks, Guy B; Robertson, Colin F; Montgomery, Grant W; Musk, Bill; Thompson, Philip J; Martin, Nicholas G; James, Alan; Sleiman, Patrick; Toskala, Elina; Rodriguez, Elke; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Gieger, Christian; Heinzmann, Andrea; Rietschel, Ernst; Keil, Thomas; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M; Pennell, Craig E; Sly, Peter D; Schmidt, Carsten O; Matanovic, Anja; Schneider, Valentin; Heinig, Matthias; Hübner, Norbert; Holt, Patrick G; Lau, Susanne; Kabesch, Michael; Weidinger, Stefan; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ferreira, Manuel A R; Laprise, Catherine; Freidin, Maxim B; Genuneit, Jon; Koppelman, Gerard H; Melén, Erik; Dizier, Marie-Hélène; Henderson, A John; Lee, Young Ae

    2015-11-06

    Eczema often precedes the development of asthma in a disease course called the 'atopic march'. To unravel the genes underlying this characteristic pattern of allergic disease, we conduct a multi-stage genome-wide association study on infantile eczema followed by childhood asthma in 12 populations including 2,428 cases and 17,034 controls. Here we report two novel loci specific for the combined eczema plus asthma phenotype, which are associated with allergic disease for the first time; rs9357733 located in EFHC1 on chromosome 6p12.3 (OR 1.27; P=2.1 × 10(-8)) and rs993226 between TMTC2 and SLC6A15 on chromosome 12q21.3 (OR 1.58; P=5.3 × 10(-9)). Additional susceptibility loci identified at genome-wide significance are FLG (1q21.3), IL4/KIF3A (5q31.1), AP5B1/OVOL1 (11q13.1), C11orf30/LRRC32 (11q13.5) and IKZF3 (17q21). We show that predominantly eczema loci increase the risk for the atopic march. Our findings suggest that eczema may play an important role in the development of asthma after eczema.

  8. Overlap of disease susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Ke, Xiayi; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Packham, Jon; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extremely successful in the search for susceptibility risk factors for complex genetic autoimmune diseases. As more studies are published, evidence is emerging of considerable overlap of loci between these diseases. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), another complex genetic autoimmune disease, the strategy of using information from autoimmune disease GWAS or candidate gene studies to help in the search for novel JIA susceptibility loci has been successful, with confirmed association with two genes, PTPN22 and IL2RA. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that shares similar clinical and pathological features with JIA and, therefore, recently identified confirmed RA susceptibility loci are also excellent JIA candidate loci. Objective To determine the overlap of disease susceptibility loci for RA and JIA. Methods Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at nine RA-associated loci were genotyped in Caucasian patients with JIA (n=1054) and controls (n=3531) and tested for association with JIA. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls using the genetic analysis software, PLINK. Results Two JIA susceptibility loci were identified, one of which was a novel JIA association (STAT4) and the second confirmed previously published associations of the TRAF1/C5 locus with JIA. Weak evidence of association of JIA with three additional loci (Chr6q23, KIF5A and PRKCQ) was also obtained, which warrants further investigation. Conclusion All these loci are good candidates in view of the known pathogenesis of JIA, as genes within these regions (TRAF1, STAT4, TNFAIP3, PRKCQ) are known to be involved in T-cell receptor signalling or activation pathways. PMID:19674979

  9. What difference does it make if viruses are strain-, rather than species-specific?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tron Frede Thingstad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical work has suggested an important role of lytic viruses in controlling the diversity of their prokaryotic hosts. Yet, providing strong experimental or observational support (or refutation for this has proven evasive. Such models have usually assumed host groups to correspond to the species level, typically represented by 16S rDNA data. Recent model developments take into account the resolution of species into strains with differences in their susceptibility to viral attack. With strains as the host groups, the models will have explicit viral control of abundance at strain level, combined with explicit predator or resource control at community level, but the direct viral control at species level then disappears. Abundance of a species therefore emerges as the combination of how many strains, and at what abundance, this species can establish in competition with other species from a seeding community. We here discuss how species diversification and strain diversification may introduce competitors and defenders, respectively, and that the balance between the two may be a factor in the control of species diversity in mature natural communities. These models suggest that the balance between the two may be a factor in the control of species diversity in mature natural communities. These models can also give a dominance of individuals from strains with high cost of resistance; suggesting that the high proportion of dormant cells among pelagic heterotrophic prokaryotes may reflect their need for expensive defense rather than the lack of suitable growth substrates in their environment.

  10. Strain-specific Plasmodium falciparum growth inhibition among Malian children immunized with a blood-stage malaria vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Laurens

    Full Text Available The blood-stage malaria vaccine FMP2.1/AS02A, comprised of recombinant Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1 and the adjuvant system AS02A, had strain-specific efficacy against clinical malaria caused by P. falciparum with the vaccine strain 3D7 AMA1 sequence. To evaluate a potential correlate of protection, we measured the ability of participant sera to inhibit growth of 3D7 and FVO strains in vitro using high-throughput growth inhibition assay (GIA testing. Sera from 400 children randomized to receive either malaria vaccine or a control rabies vaccine were assessed at baseline and over two annual malaria transmission seasons after immunization. Baseline GIA against vaccine strain 3D7 and FVO strain was similar in both groups, but more children in the malaria vaccine group than in the control group had 3D7 and FVO GIA activity ≥15% 30 days after the last vaccination (day 90 (49% vs. 16%, p<0.0001; and 71.8% vs. 60.4%, p = 0.02. From baseline to day 90, 3D7 GIA in the vaccine group was 7.4 times the mean increase in the control group (p<0.0001. In AMA1 vaccinees, 3D7 GIA activity subsequently returned to baseline one year after vaccination (day 364 and did not correlate with efficacy in the extended efficacy time period to day 730. In Cox proportional hazards regression models with time-varying covariates, there was a slight suggestion of an association between 3D7 GIA activity and increased risk of clinical malaria between day 90 and day 240. We conclude that vaccination with this AMA1-based malaria vaccine increased inhibition of parasite growth, but this increase was not associated with allele-specific efficacy in the first malaria season. These results provide a framework for testing functional immune correlates of protection against clinical malaria in field trials, and will help to guide similar analyses for next-generation malaria vaccines. Clinical trials registry: This clinical trial was registered on clinicaltrials

  11. [Identification of novel variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci in Mycobacterium avium and development of an effective means of VNTR typing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Uchiya, Kei-Ichi; Yagi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Hiroyasu; Niimi, Masaki; Ichikawa, Kazuya; Inagaki, Takayuki; Moriyama, Makoto; Nikai, Toshiaki; Hayashi, Yuta; Nakagawa, Taku; Ogawa, Kenji

    2012-07-01

    To make more effective use of variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) typing, we identified novel VNTR loci in Mycobacterium avium and used them for modified M. avium tandem repeat-VNTR (MATR-VNTR) typing. Analysis of a DNA sample extracted from a clinical isolate (strain HN135) with the FLX system genome sequencer (Roche Diagnostic System) led to discovery of several novel VNTR loci. The allelic diversity of the novel VNTR loci was evaluated for 71 clinical isolates and compared with the diversity of the MATR-VNTR loci. To improve efficacy of MATR-VNTR typing, we tested typing using 2 sets of loci selected from the newly identified loci and the MATR loci, i.e., one set containing 7 and another 16 loci. Hunter Gaston's discriminatory index (HGDI) was calculated for these sets. Six VNTR loci were newly identified, of which 5 showed a high diversity. The HGDI was 0.980 for the improved new typing using a set of 7 loci, and 0.995 for another set of 16 loci, while it was 0.992 for the conventional MATR-VNTR typing. VNTR typing with the set of the 7 loci enabled a rapid analysis, and another set of 16 loci enabled a precise analysis, as compared with conventional MATR-VNTR typing. A method that uses only VNTR loci with relatively high allelic diversity is considered to be a useful tool for VNTR typing of MAC isolates.

  12. Genome-wide methylation analysis identifies differentially methylated CpG loci associated with severe obesity in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R C; Garratt, E S; Pan, H; Wu, Y; Davis, E A; Barton, S J; Burdge, G C; Godfrey, K M; Holbrook, J D; Lillycrop, K A

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a major public health issue. Here we investigated whether differential DNA methylation was associated with childhood obesity. We studied DNA methylation profiles in whole blood from 78 obese children (mean BMI Z-score: 2.6) and 71 age- and sex-matched controls (mean BMI Z-score: 0.1). DNA samples from obese and control groups were pooled and analyzed using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. Comparison of the methylation profiles between obese and control subjects revealed 129 differentially methylated CpG (DMCpG) loci associated with 80 unique genes that had a greater than 10% difference in methylation (P-value obesity were validated using sodium bisulfite pyrosequencing across loci within the FYN, PIWIL4, and TAOK3 genes in individual subjects. Three CpG loci within FYN were hypermethylated in obese individuals (all P obesity was associated with lower methylation of CpG loci within PIWIL4 (P = 0.003) and TAOK3 (P = 0.001). After building logistic regression models, we determined that a 1% increase in methylation in TAOK3, multiplicatively decreased the odds of being obese by 0.91 (95% CI: 0.86 - 0.97), and an increase of 1% methylation in FYN CpG3, multiplicatively increased the odds of being obese by 1.03 (95% CI: 0.99 - 1.07). In conclusion, these findings provide evidence that childhood obesity is associated with specific DNA methylation changes in whole blood, which may have utility as biomarkers of obesity risk.

  13. Genome Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Sequence Type 8 Strains Persisting in Salmon and Poultry Processing Environments and Comparison with Related Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Annette; Langsrud, Solveig; Schirmer, Bjørn C. T.; Møretrø, Trond; Heir, Even

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for the disease listeriosis, and can be found throughout the environment, in many foods and in food processing facilities. The main cause of listeriosis is consumption of food contaminated from sources in food processing environments. Persistence in food processing facilities has previously been shown for the L. monocytogenes sequence type (ST) 8 subtype. In the current study, five ST8 strains were subjected to whole-genome sequencing and compared with five additionally available ST8 genomes, allowing comparison of strains from salmon, poultry and cheese industry, in addition to a human clinical isolate. Genome-wide analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) confirmed that almost identical strains were detected in a Danish salmon processing plant in 1996 and in a Norwegian salmon processing plant in 2001 and 2011. Furthermore, we show that L. monocytogenes ST8 was likely to have been transferred between two poultry processing plants as a result of relocation of processing equipment. The SNP data were used to infer the phylogeny of the ST8 strains, separating them into two main genetic groups. Within each group, the plasmid and prophage content was almost entirely conserved, but between groups, these sequences showed strong divergence. The accessory genome of the ST8 strains harbored genetic elements which could be involved in rendering the ST8 strains resilient to incoming mobile genetic elements. These included two restriction-modification loci, one of which was predicted to show phase variable recognition sequence specificity through site-specific domain shuffling. Analysis indicated that the ST8 strains harbor all important known L. monocytogenes virulence factors, and ST8 strains are commonly identified as the causative agents of invasive listeriosis. Therefore, the persistence of this L. monocytogenes subtype in food processing facilities poses a significant concern for food safety

  14. The complete genome sequence and comparative genome analysis of the high pathogenicity Yersinia enterocolitica strain 8081.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R Thomson

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The human enteropathogen, Yersinia enterocolitica, is a significant link in the range of Yersinia pathologies extending from mild gastroenteritis to bubonic plague. Comparison at the genomic level is a key step in our understanding of the genetic basis for this pathogenicity spectrum. Here we report the genome of Y. enterocolitica strain 8081 (serotype 0:8; biotype 1B and extensive microarray data relating to the genetic diversity of the Y. enterocolitica species. Our analysis reveals that the genome of Y. enterocolitica strain 8081 is a patchwork of horizontally acquired genetic loci, including a plasticity zone of 199 kb containing an extraordinarily high density of virulence genes. Microarray analysis has provided insights into species-specific Y. enterocolitica gene functions and the intraspecies differences between the high, low, and nonpathogenic Y. enterocolitica biotypes. Through comparative genome sequence analysis we provide new information on the evolution of the Yersinia. We identify numerous loci that represent ancestral clusters of genes potentially important in enteric survival and pathogenesis, which have been lost or are in the process of being lost, in the other sequenced Yersinia lineages. Our analysis also highlights large metabolic operons in Y. enterocolitica that are absent in the related enteropathogen, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, indicating major differences in niche and nutrients used within the mammalian gut. These include clusters directing, the production of hydrogenases, tetrathionate respiration, cobalamin synthesis, and propanediol utilisation. Along with ancestral gene clusters, the genome of Y. enterocolitica has revealed species-specific and enteropathogen-specific loci. This has provided important insights into the pathology of this bacterium and, more broadly, into the evolution of the genus. Moreover, wider investigations looking at the patterns of gene loss and gain in the Yersinia have highlighted common

  15. Development of a Multiple Loci Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) to Unravel the Intra-Pathovar Structure of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Populations Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarroni, Serena; Gallipoli, Lorenzo; Taratufolo, Maria C.; Butler, Margi I.; Poulter, Russell T. M.; Pourcel, Christine; Vergnaud, Gilles; Balestra, Giorgio M.; Mazzaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial canker of kiwifruit by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an emblematic example of a catastrophic disease of fruit crops. In 2008 a new, extremely virulent form of the pathogen emerged and rapidly devastated many Actinidia spp. orchards all over the world. In order to understand differences in populations within this pathovar and to elucidate their diffusion and movements on world scale, it is necessary to be able to quickly and on a routine basis compare new isolates with previous records. In this report a worldwide collection of 142 strains was analyzed by MLVA, chosen as investigative technique for its efficacy, reproducibility, simplicity and low cost. A panel of 13 Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR) loci was identified and used to describe the pathogen population. The MLVA clustering is highly congruent with the population structure as previously established by other molecular approaches including whole genome sequencing and correlates with geographic origin, time of isolation and virulence. For convenience, we divided the VNTR loci in two panels. Panel 1 assay, using six loci, recognizes 23 different haplotypes, clustered into ten complexes with highest congruence with previous classifications. Panel 2, with seven VNTR loci, provides discriminatory power. Using the total set of 13 VNTR loci, 58 haplotypes can be distinguished. The recent hypervirulent type shows very limited diversity and includes, beside the strains from Europe, New Zealand and Chile, a few strains from Shaanxi, China. A broad genetic variability is observed in China, but different types are also retrievable in Japan and Korea. The low virulent strains cluster together and are very different from the other MLVA genotypes. Data were used to generate a public database in MLVAbank. MLVA represents a very promising first-line assay for large-scale routine genotyping, prior to whole genome sequencing of only the most relevant samples. PMID:26262683

  16. Molecular analysis and MIRU-VNTR typing of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium, 'hominissuis' and silvaticum strains of veterinary origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Csivincsik, Ágnes; Dán, Ádám; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2016-06-01

    Besides Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), M. avium subsp. avium (MAA), M. avium subsp. silvaticum (MAS), and 'M. avium subsp. hominissuis' (MAH) are equally important members of M. avium complex, with worldwide distribution and zoonotic potential. Genotypic discrimination is a prerequisite to epidemiological studies which can facilitate disease prevention through revealing infection sources and transmission routes. The primary aim of this study was to identify the genetic diversity within 135 MAA, 62 MAS, and 84 MAH strains isolated from wild and domestic mammals, reptiles and birds. Strains were tested for the presence of large sequence polymorphism LSP(A)17 and were submitted to Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable-number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) analysis at 8 loci, including MIRU1, 2, 3, and 4, VNTR25, 32, and 259, and MATR9. In 12 strains hsp65 sequence code type was also determined. LSP(A)17 was present only in 19.9% of the strains. All LSP(A)17 positive strains belonged to subspecies MAH. The discriminatory power of the MIRU-VNTR loci set used reached 0.9228. Altogether 54 different genotypes were detected. Within MAH, MAA, and MAS strains 33, 16, and 5 different genotypes were observed. The described genotypes were not restricted to geographic regions or host species, but proved to be subspecies specific. Our knowledge about MAS is limited due to isolation and identification difficulties. This is the first study including a large number of MAS field strains. Our results demonstrate the high diversity of MAH and MAA strains and the relative uniformity of MAS strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Strain-controlled electrocatalysis on multimetallic nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingchuan; Guo, Shaojun

    2017-11-01

    Electrocatalysis is crucial for the development of clean and renewable energy technologies, which may reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. Multimetallic nanomaterials serve as state-of-the-art electrocatalysts as a consequence of their unique physico-chemical properties. One method of enhancing the electrocatalytic performance of multimetallic nanomaterials is to tune or control the surface strain of the nanomaterials, and tremendous progress has been made in this area in the past decade. In this Review, we summarize advances in the introduction, tuning and quantification of strain in multimetallic nanocrystals to achieve more efficient energy conversion by electrocatalysis. First, we introduce the concept of strain and its correlation with other key physico-chemical properties. Then, using the electrocatalytic reduction of oxygen as a model reaction, we discuss the underlying mechanisms behind the strain-adsorption-reactivity relationship based on combined classical theories and models. We describe how this knowledge can be harnessed to design multimetallic nanocrystals with optimized strain to increase the efficiency of oxygen reduction. In particular, we highlight the unexpectedly beneficial (and previously overlooked) role of tensile strain from multimetallic nanocrystals in improving electrocatalysis. We conclude by outlining the challenges and offering our perspectives on the research directions in this burgeoning field.

  18. Novel Centromeric Loci of the Wine and Beer Yeast Dekkera bruxellensis CEN1 and CEN2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishchuk, Olena P.; Vojvoda Zeljko, Tanja; Schifferdecker, Anna J.

    2016-01-01

    The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis thrives in environments that are harsh and limiting, especially in concentrations with low oxygen and high ethanol. Its different strains' chromosomes greatly vary in number (karyotype). This study isolates two novel centromeric loci (CEN1 and CEN2...

  19. Repeated Strains, Social Control, Social Learning, and Delinquency: Testing an Integrated Model of General Strain Theory in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Wan-Ning; Haas, Ain; Chen, Xiaojin; Pi, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    In Agnew's general strain theory, repeated strains can generate crime and delinquency by reducing social control and fostering social learning of crime. Using a sample of 615 middle-and high-school students in China, this study examines how social control and social learning variables mediate the effect of repeated strains in school and at home on…

  20. Design of triaxial test with controlled suction: measure of strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasc-Barbier, M.; Cosenza, Ph.; Ghoreychi, M.; Chanchole, S.; Cosenza, Ph.; Tessier, D.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental study of mechanical behavior of clayey materials under hygrometric condition is usually performed either on unloaded samples or by means of classical odometer tests used in soil mechanics. Such methods are not well adapted to hard deep clayey rocks with little deformability, porosity and permeability. Moreover, stress and strain tensors having a significant effect on hygro-mechanical behaviour and properties cannot be measured and investigated appropriately by classical tests. This is why a specific triaxial test was designed in which the sample is surrounded by a fiber glass tissue allowing air circulation and then by silicon on which confining pressure is applied. Thus, equilibrium between air and sample was reduced. Stress and strain tensors were also measured in time on the sample subjected to a mechanical loading and to a controlled suction. After presentation of the test, preliminary results are given. (authors)

  1. Identifikasi Brucella abortus Isolat Lokal dengan Brucella abortus Strain Specific-Polymerase Chain Reaction (IDENTIFICATION OF LOCAL ISOLATES OF BRUCELLA ABORTUS USING BRUCELLA ABORTUS STRAIN SPECIFIC-POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ASSAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Maphilindawati Noor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brucella abortus Strain Specific-Polymerase Chain Reaction (BaSS-PCR is a single multiplex PCRtechnique which able to identify and differentiate between Brucella abortus field strains (biovar 1, 2, and4, B. abortus vaccine strains, Brucella species, and non-Brucella species. In this study, BaSS-PCR wasapplied to identify local isolates of B. abortus in order to investigate the B. abortus strains that infectedcattle in Indonesia. Fifty local strains of B.abortus isolated from infected cattle in Java (Jakarta andBandung, South Sulawesi (Maros, East Nusa Tenggara (Kupang and Belu were used in this study. TheDNA bands were observed by agarose gel in the presence of ethidium bromide. Identification was performedbased on the size and number of DNA products amplified by PCR from each isolates. The results showedthat the 50 isolates were of B. abortus field strains. This finding showed that the cause of bovine brucellosisin Indonesia is B. abortus field strains.

  2. The carbon storage regulator (Csr) system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelles, Olga; Millard, Pierre; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Oswald, Eric; Létisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr) system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations) showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively), revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system.

  3. Novel microsatellite loci for studies of Thamnophis Gartersnake genetic identity and hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloss, Brian L.; Schuurman, Gregor W.; Paloski, Rori A.; Boyle, Owen D.; Kapfer, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    Butler’s Gartersnakes (BGS; Thamnophis butleri) are confined to open and semi-open canopy wetlands and adjacent uplands, habitats under threat of development in Wisconsin. To address issues of species identity and putative hybridization with congeneric snakes, a suite of 18 microsatellite loci capable of cross-species amplification of Plains Gartersnakes (T. radix) and Common Gartersnakes (T. sirtalis) was developed. All loci were polymorphic in BGS with mean number of alleles per locus of 16.11 (range = 3–41) and mean observed heterozygosity of 0.659 (range = 0.311–0.978). Loci amplified efficiently in the congeneric species with high levels of intra- and inter-specific variation. These loci will aid ongoing efforts to effectively identify and manage BGS in Wisconsin.

  4. GWAS of clinically defined gout and subtypes identifies multiple susceptibility loci that include urate transporter genes

    OpenAIRE

    Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Ken; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Shaukat, Amara; Toyoda, Yu; Okada, Yukinori; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Nakamura, Takahiro; Takada, Tappei; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Yasujima, Tomoya; Yuasa, Hiroaki; Shirahama, Yuko; Nakashima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of gout and its subtypes was performed to identify novel gout loci, including those that are subtype-specific. Methods Putative causal association signals from a GWAS of 945 clinically defined gout cases and 1213 controls from Japanese males were replicated with 1396 cases and 1268 controls using a custom chip of 1961 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We also first conducted GWASs of gout subtypes. Replication with Caucasian and New Zeala...

  5. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been found to play an important role for this HSSS due to load transfer and strain partitioning between two phases, and a higher strain rate could cause even higher strain partitioning in the softer austenite grains, delaying the deformation instability. Deformation twins are observed in the austenite grains at all strain rates to facilitate the uniform tensile deformation. The B2 phase (FeAl intermetallic compound is less deformable at higher strain rates, resulting in easier brittle fracture in B2 particles, smaller dimple size and a higher density of phase interfaces in final fracture surfaces. Thus, more energy need be consumed during the final fracture for the experiments conducted at higher strain rates, resulting in better tensile toughness.

  6. Combining quantitative trait loci analysis with physiological models to predict genotype-specific transpiration rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuning, Gretchen A; Bauerle, William L; Mullen, Jack L; McKay, John K

    2015-04-01

    Transpiration is controlled by evaporative demand and stomatal conductance (gs ), and there can be substantial genetic variation in gs . A key parameter in empirical models of transpiration is minimum stomatal conductance (g0 ), a trait that can be measured and has a large effect on gs and transpiration. In Arabidopsis thaliana, g0 exhibits both environmental and genetic variation, and quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been mapped. We used this information to create a genetically parameterized empirical model to predict transpiration of genotypes. For the parental lines, this worked well. However, in a recombinant inbred population, the predictions proved less accurate. When based only upon their genotype at a single g0 QTL, genotypes were less distinct than our model predicted. Follow-up experiments indicated that both genotype by environment interaction and a polygenic inheritance complicate the application of genetic effects into physiological models. The use of ecophysiological or 'crop' models for predicting transpiration of novel genetic lines will benefit from incorporating further knowledge of the genetic control and degree of independence of core traits/parameters underlying gs variation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Shape recovery and irrecoverable strain control in polyurethane shape-memory polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobushi, Hisaaki; Ejiri, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Syunichi; Hoshio, Kazumasa

    2008-01-01

    In shape-memory polymers, large strain can be fixed at a low temperature and thereafter recovered at a high temperature. If the shape-memory polymer is held at a high temperature for a long time, the irrecoverable strain can attain a new intermediate shape between the shape under the maximum stress and the primary shape. Irrecoverable strain control can be applied to the fabrication of a shape-memory polymer element with a complex shape in a simple method. In the present study, the influence of the strain-holding conditions on the shape recovery and the irrecoverable strain control in polyurethane shape-memory polymer is investigated by tension test of a film and three-point bending test of a sheet. The higher the shape-holding temperature and the longer the shape-holding time, the higher the irrecoverable strain rate. The equation that expresses the characteristics of the irrecoverable strain control is formulated

  8. [Genes of insecticidal crystal proteins with dual specificity in Bacillus thuringiensis strains, isolated in the Crimea territory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymar, S Iu; Isakova, I A; Kuznietsova, L M; Kordium, V A

    2006-01-01

    The insecticidal crystal proteins of 15 B. thuringiensis strains, isolated in the Crimea territory that are toxical for some Lepidoptera and Colorado potato beetle larvae were identified by PAGE electrophoresis. Ten strains produced the crystal proteins with high molecular weight (> 120 kD). PCR with use of broad specificity primers and DNA of these B. thuringiensis strains as template demonstrated the specific PCR products (1000 bp). Amplified DNA fragments were cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the genomes of ten strains of B. thuringiensis carried Cry1B genes, which are responsible for production of the insecticidal crystal proteins with dual specificity. The influence of the solubilization conditions on the structure and toxicity of Cry1B protein for Colorado potato beetle larvae was shown. The dual toxicity of studied B. thuringiensis strains is explained by the Cry1B genes presence in their genomes. These strains may be used to develop the broad specificity bioinsecticides.

  9. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases.

  10. Evaluation and selection of tandem repeat loci for a Brucella MLVA typing assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denoeud France

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The classification of Brucella into species and biovars relies on phenotypic characteristics and sometimes raises difficulties in the interpretation of the results due to an absence of standardization of the typing reagents. In addition, the resolution of this biotyping is moderate and requires the manipulation of the living agent. More efficient DNA-based methods are needed, and this work explores the suitability of multiple locus variable number tandem repeats analysis (MLVA for both typing and species identification. Results Eighty tandem repeat loci predicted to be polymorphic by genome sequence analysis of three available Brucella genome sequences were tested for polymorphism by genotyping 21 Brucella strains (18 reference strains representing the six 'classical' species and all biovars as well as 3 marine mammal strains currently recognized as members of two new species. The MLVA data efficiently cluster the strains as expected according to their species and biovar. For practical use, a subset of 15 loci preserving this clustering was selected and applied to the typing of 236 isolates. Using this MLVA-15 assay, the clusters generated correspond to the classical biotyping scheme of Brucella spp. The 15 markers have been divided into two groups, one comprising 8 user-friendly minisatellite markers with a good species identification capability (panel 1 and another complementary group of 7 microsatellite markers with higher discriminatory power (panel 2. Conclusion The MLVA-15 assay can be applied to large collections of Brucella strains with automated or manual procedures, and can be proposed as a complement, or even a substitute, of classical biotyping methods. This is facilitated by the fact that MLVA is based on non-infectious material (DNA whereas the biotyping procedure itself requires the manipulation of the living agent. The data produced can be queried on a dedicated MLVA web service site.

  11. Site and strain-specific variation in gut microbiota profiles and metabolism in experimental mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa K Friswell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract microbiota (GTM of mammals is a complex microbial consortium, the composition and activities of which influences mucosal development, immunity, nutrition and drug metabolism. It remains unclear whether the composition of the dominant GTM is conserved within animals of the same strain and whether stable GTMs are selected for by host-specific factors or dictated by environmental variables.The GTM composition of six highly inbred, genetically distinct strains of mouse (C3H, C57, GFEC, CD1, CBA nu/nu and SCID was profiled using eubacterial -specific PCR-DGGE and quantitative PCR of feces. Animals exhibited strain-specific fecal eubacterial profiles that were highly stable (c. >95% concordance over 26 months for C57. Analyses of mice that had been relocated before and after maturity indicated marked, reproducible changes in fecal consortia and that occurred only in young animals. Implantation of a female BDF1 mouse with genetically distinct (C57 and Agoutie embryos produced highly similar GTM profiles (c. 95% concordance between mother and offspring, regardless of offspring strain, which was also reflected in urinary metabolite profiles. Marked institution-specific GTM profiles were apparent in C3H mice raised in two different research institutions.Strain-specific data were suggestive of genetic determination of the composition and activities of intestinal symbiotic consortia. However, relocation studies and uterine implantation demonstrated the dominance of environmental influences on the GTM. This was manifested in large variations between isogenic adult mice reared in different research institutions.

  12. Using case-control designs for genome-wide screening for associations between genetic markers and disease susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q; Khoury, M J; Atkinson, M; Sun, F; Cheng, R; Flanders, W D

    1999-01-01

    We used a case-control design to scan the genome for any associations between genetic markers and disease susceptibility loci using the first two replicates of the Mycenaean population from the GAW11 (Problem 2) data. Using a case-control approach, we constructed a series of 2-by-3 tables for each allele of every marker on all six chromosomes. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated for all alleles of every marker. We selected the one allele for which the estimated OR had the minimum p-value to plot in the graph. Among these selected ORs, we calculated 95% CI for those that had a p-value Mycenaean population, the case-control design identified allele number 1 of marker 24 on chromosome 1 to be associated with a disease susceptibility gene, OR = 2.10 (95% CI 1.66-2.62). Our approach failed to show any other significant association between case-control status and genetic markers. Stratified analysis on the environmental risk factor (E1) provided no further evidence of significant association other than allele 1 of marker 24 on chromosome 1. These data indicate the absence of linkage disequilibrium for markers flanking loci A, B, and C. Finally, we examined the effect of gene x environment (G x E) interaction for the identified allele. Our results provided no evidence of G x E interaction, but suggested that the environmental exposure alone was a risk factor for the disease.

  13. Newly discovered breast cancer susceptibility loci on 3p24 and 17q23.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Shahana; Thomas, Gilles; Ghoussaini, Maya

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified seven breast cancer susceptibility loci, but these explain only a small fraction of the familial risk of the disease. Five of these loci were identified through a two-stage GWAS involving 390 familial cases and 364 controls in the first stage......, and 3,990 cases and 3,916 controls in the second stage. To identify additional loci, we tested over 800 promising associations from this GWAS in a further two stages involving 37,012 cases and 40,069 controls from 33 studies in the CGEMS collaboration and Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We found...

  14. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the whale shark (Rhincodon typus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Macias, D.; Shaw, K.; Ward, R.; Galvan-Magana, F.; Vazquez-Juarez, R.

    2009-01-01

    In preparation for a study on population structure of the whale shark (Rhincodon typus), nine species-specific polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers were developed. An initial screening of 50 individuals from Holbox Island, Mexico found all nine loci to be polymorphic, with two to 17 alleles observed per locus. Observed and expected heterozygosity per locus ranged from 0.200 to 0.826 and from 0.213 to 0.857, respectively. Neither statistically significant deviations from Hardy–Weinberg expectations nor statistically significant linkage disequilibrium between loci were observed. These microsatellite loci appear suitable for examining population structure, kinship assessment and other applications.

  15. Inheritance analysis and mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL controlling individual anthocyanin compounds in purple barley (Hordeum vulgare L. grains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Anthocyanin-rich barley can have great potential in promoting human health and in developing nutraceuticals and functional foods. As different anthocyanin compounds have different antioxidant activities, breeding cultivars with pre-designed anthocyanin compositions could be highly desirable. Working toward this possibility, we assessed and reported for the first time the genetic control of individual anthocyanin compounds in barley. Of the ten anthocyanins assessed, two, peonidin-3-glucoside (P3G and cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G, were major components in the purple pericarp barley genotype RUSSIA68. Quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping showed that both anthocyanin compounds were the interactive products of two loci, one located on chromosome arm 2HL and the other on 7HS. However, the two different anthocyanin components seem to be controlled by different interactions between the two loci. The effects of the 7HS locus on P3G and C3G were difficult to detect without removing the effect of the 2HL locus. At least one copy of the 2HL alleles from the purple pericarp parent was required for the synthesis of P3G. This does not seem to be the case for the production of C3G which was produced in each of all the different allele combinations between the two loci. Typical maternal effect was also observed in the inheritance of purple pericarp grains in barley. The varied values of different compounds, coupled with their different genetic controls, highlight the need for targeting individual anthocyanins in crop breeding and food processing.

  16. BPS Jumping Loci are Automorphic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachru, Shamit; Tripathy, Arnav

    2018-06-01

    We show that BPS jumping loci-loci in the moduli space of string compactifications where the number of BPS states jumps in an upper semi-continuous manner—naturally appear as Fourier coefficients of (vector space-valued) automorphic forms. For the case of T 2 compactification, the jumping loci are governed by a modular form studied by Hirzebruch and Zagier, while the jumping loci in K3 compactification appear in a story developed by Oda and Kudla-Millson in arithmetic geometry. We also comment on some curious related automorphy in the physics of black hole attractors and flux vacua.

  17. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Gormley, Padhraig; Kurth, Tobias; Bettella, Francesco; McMahon, George; Kallela, Mikko; Malik, Rainer; de Vries, Boukje; Terwindt, Gisela; Medland, Sarah E; Todt, Unda; McArdle, Wendy L; Quaye, Lydia; Koiranen, Markku; Ikram, M Arfan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Stam, Anine H; Ligthart, Lannie; Wedenoja, Juho; Dunham, Ian; Neale, Benjamin M; Palta, Priit; Hamalainen, Eija; Schürks, Markus; Rose, Lynda M; Buring, Julie E; Ridker, Paul M; Steinberg, Stacy; Stefansson, Hreinn; Jakobsson, Finnbogi; Lawlor, Debbie A; Evans, David M; Ring, Susan M; Färkkilä, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari A; Freilinger, Tobias; Schoenen, Jean; Frants, Rune R; Pelzer, Nadine; Weller, Claudia M; Zielman, Ronald; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Borck, Guntram; Göbel, Hartmut; Heinze, Axel; Heinze-Kuhn, Katja; Williams, Frances M K; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pouta, Anneli; van den Ende, Joyce; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Amin, Najaf; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Vink, Jacqueline M; Heikkilä, Kauko; Alexander, Michael; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schreiber, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, Heinz Erich; Aromaa, Arpo; Eriksson, Johan G; Traynor, Bryan; Trabzuni, Daniah; Rossin, Elizabeth; Lage, Kasper; Jacobs, Suzanne B R; Gibbs, J Raphael; Birney, Ewan; Kaprio, Jaakko; Penninx, Brenda W; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia; Raitakari, Olli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Zwart, John-Anker; Cherkas, Lynn; Strachan, David P; Kubisch, Christian; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Dichgans, Martin; Wessman, Maija; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Daly, Mark J; Nyholt, Dale R; Chasman, Daniel; Palotie, Aarno

    2013-08-01

    Migraine is the most common brain disorder, affecting approximately 14% of the adult population, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the results of a meta-analysis across 29 genome-wide association studies, including a total of 23,285 individuals with migraine (cases) and 95,425 population-matched controls. We identified 12 loci associated with migraine susceptibility (P<5×10(-8)). Five loci are new: near AJAP1 at 1p36, near TSPAN2 at 1p13, within FHL5 at 6q16, within C7orf10 at 7p14 and near MMP16 at 8q21. Three of these loci were identified in disease subgroup analyses. Brain tissue expression quantitative trait locus analysis suggests potential functional candidate genes at four loci: APOA1BP, TBC1D7, FUT9, STAT6 and ATP5B.

  18. Identification of nine new susceptibility loci for testicular cancer, including variants near DAZL and PRDM14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Elise; Seal, Sheila; McDonald, Heather; Zhang, Feng; Elliot, Anna; Lau, KingWai; Perdeaux, Elizabeth; Rapley, Elizabeth; Eeles, Rosalind; Peto, Julian; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Muir, Kenneth; Nsengimana, Jeremie; Shipley, Janet; Bishop, D. Timothy; Stratton, Michael R; Easton, Douglas F; Huddart, Robert A; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is the most common cancer in young men and is notable for its high familial risks1,2. To date, six loci associated with TGCT have been reported3-7. From GWAS analysis of 307,291 SNPs in 986 cases and 4,946 controls, we selected for follow-up 694 SNPs, which we genotyped in a further 1,064 TGCT cases and 10,082 controls from the UK. We identified SNPs at nine new loci showing association with TGCT (P<5×10−8), at 1q22, 1q24.1, 3p24.3, 4q24, 5q31.1, 8q13.3, 16q12.1, 17q22 and 21q22.3, which together account for an additional 4-6% of the familial risk of TGCT. The loci include genes plausibly related to TGCT development. PRDM14, at 8q13.3, is essential for early germ cell specification8 whilst DAZL, at 3p24.3, is required for regulation of germ cell development9. Furthermore, PITX1, at 5q31.1 regulates TERT expression, and is the third TGCT locus implicated in telomerase regulation10. PMID:23666240

  19. Quantification of Azospirillum brasilense FP2 Bacteria in Wheat Roots by Strain-Specific Quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stets, Maria Isabel; Alqueres, Sylvia Maria Campbell; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Cruz, Leonardo Magalhães

    2015-10-01

    Azospirillum is a rhizobacterial genus containing plant growth-promoting species associated with different crops worldwide. Azospirillum brasilense strains exhibit a growth-promoting effect by means of phytohormone production and possibly by N2 fixation. However, one of the most important factors for achieving an increase in crop yield by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria is the survival of the inoculant in the rhizosphere, which is not always achieved. The objective of this study was to develop quantitative PCR protocols for the strain-specific quantification of A. brasilense FP2. A novel approach was applied to identify strain-specific DNA sequences based on a comparison of the genomic sequences within the same species. The draft genome sequences of A. brasilense FP2 and Sp245 were aligned, and FP2-specific regions were filtered and checked for other possible matches in public databases. Strain-specific regions were then selected to design and evaluate strain-specific primer pairs. The primer pairs AzoR2.1, AzoR2.2, AzoR5.1, AzoR5.2, and AzoR5.3 were specific for the A. brasilense FP2 strain. These primer pairs were used to monitor quantitatively the population of A. brasilense in wheat roots under sterile and nonsterile growth conditions. In addition, coinoculations with other plant growth-promoting bacteria in wheat were performed under nonsterile conditions. The results showed that A. brasilense FP2 inoculated into wheat roots is highly competitive and achieves high cell numbers (∼10(7) CFU/g [fresh weight] of root) in the rhizosphere even under nonsterile conditions and when coinoculated with other rhizobacteria, maintaining the population at rather stable levels for at least up to 13 days after inoculation. The strategy used here can be applied to other organisms whose genome sequences are available. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Large-scale association analysis identifies new risk loci for coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deloukas, Panos; Kanoni, Stavroula; Willenborg, Christina; Farrall, Martin; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Thompson, John R.; Ingelsson, Erik; Saleheen, Danish; Erdmann, Jeanette; Goldstein, Benjamin A.; Stirrups, Kathleen; König, Inke R.; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Johansson, Asa; Hall, Alistair S.; Lee, Jong-Young; Willer, Cristen J.; Chambers, John C.; Esko, Tõnu; Folkersen, Lasse; Goel, Anuj; Grundberg, Elin; Havulinna, Aki S.; Ho, Weang K.; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Eriksson, Niclas; Kleber, Marcus E.; Kristiansson, Kati; Lundmark, Per; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Rafelt, Suzanne; Shungin, Dmitry; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tikkanen, Emmi; van Zuydam, Natalie; Voight, Benjamin F.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Zhang, Weihua; Ziegler, Andreas; Absher, Devin; Altshuler, David; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Barroso, Inês; Braund, Peter S.; Burgdorf, Christof; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cox, David; Dimitriou, Maria; Do, Ron; Doney, Alex S. F.; El Mokhtari, NourEddine; Eriksson, Per; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Gigante, Bruna; Groop, Leif; Gustafsson, Stefan; Hager, Jörg; Hallmans, Göran; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hunt, Sarah E.; Kang, Hyun M.; Illig, Thomas; Kessler, Thorsten; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lundmark, Anders; McCarthy, Mark I.; Meisinger, Christa; Melander, Olle; Mihailov, Evelin; Maouche, Seraya; Morris, Andrew D.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nikus, Kjell; Peden, John F.; Rayner, N. William; Rasheed, Asif; Rosinger, Silke; Rubin, Diana; Rumpf, Moritz P.; Schäfer, Arne; Sivananthan, Mohan; Song, Ci; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Wagner, Peter J.; Wells, George A.; Wild, Philipp S.; Yang, Tsun-Po; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Basart, Hanneke; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Brambilla, Paolo; Cambien, Francois; Cupples, Adrienne L.; de Faire, Ulf; Dehghan, Abbas; Diemert, Patrick; Epstein, Stephen E.; Evans, Alun; Ferrario, Marco M.; Ferrières, Jean; Gauguier, Dominique; Go, Alan S.; Goodall, Alison H.; Gudnason, Villi; Hazen, Stanley L.; Holm, Hilma; Iribarren, Carlos; Jang, Yangsoo; Kähönen, Mika; Kee, Frank; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Klopp, Norman; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Laakso, Markku; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lee, Ji-Young; Lind, Lars; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Parish, Sarah; Park, Jeong E.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Peters, Annette; Quertermous, Thomas; Rader, Daniel J.; Salomaa, Veikko; Schadt, Eric; Shah, Svati H.; Sinisalo, Juha; Stark, Klaus; Stefansson, Kari; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas; Zimmermann, Martina E.; Nieminen, Markku S.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Pastinen, Tomi; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Hovingh, G. Kees; Dedoussis, George; Franks, Paul W.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Metspalu, Andres; Zalloua, Pierre A.; Siegbahn, Agneta; Schreiber, Stefan; Ripatti, Samuli; Blankenberg, Stefan S.; Perola, Markus; Clarke, Robert; Boehm, Bernhard O.; O'Donnell, Christopher; Reilly, Muredach P.; März, Winfried; Collins, Rory; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hamsten, Anders; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Danesh, John; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Roberts, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Schunkert, Heribert; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the commonest cause of death. Here, we report an association analysis in 63,746 CAD cases and 130,681 controls identifying 15 loci reaching genome-wide significance, taking the number of susceptibility loci for CAD to 46, and a further 104 independent variants (r(2)

  1. Cognitive assessment of mice strains heterozygous for cell-adhesion genes reveals strain-specific alterations in timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallistel, C R; Tucci, Valter; Nolan, Patrick M; Schachner, Melitta; Jakovcevski, Igor; Kheifets, Aaron; Barboza, Luendro

    2014-03-05

    We used a fully automated system for the behavioural measurement of physiologically meaningful properties of basic mechanisms of cognition to test two strains of heterozygous mutant mice, Bfc (batface) and L1, and their wild-type littermate controls. Both of the target genes are involved in the establishment and maintenance of synapses. We find that the Bfc heterozygotes show reduced precision in their representation of interval duration, whereas the L1 heterozygotes show increased precision. These effects are functionally specific, because many other measures made on the same mice are unaffected, namely: the accuracy of matching temporal investment ratios to income ratios in a matching protocol, the rate of instrumental and classical conditioning, the latency to initiate a cued instrumental response, the trials on task and the impulsivity in a switch paradigm, the accuracy with which mice adjust timed switches to changes in the temporal constraints, the days to acquisition, and mean onset time and onset variability in the circadian anticipation of food availability.

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple risk loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Berndt, S.I.; Skibola, C.F.; Joseph, V.; Camp, N.J.; Nieters, A.; Wang, Z.; Cozen, W.; Monnereau, A.; Wang, S.S.; Kelly, R.S.; Lan, Q.; Teras, L.R.; Chatterjee, N.; Chung, C.C.; Yeager, M.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have previously identified 13 loci associated with risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL). To identify additional CLL susceptibility loci, we conducted the largest meta-analysis for CLL thus far, including four GWAS with a total of 3,100 individuals with CLL (cases) and 7,667 controls. In the meta-analysis, we identified ten independent associated SNPs in nine new loci at 10q23.31 (ACTA2 or FAS (ACTA2/FAS), P = 1.22 × 10...

  3. Evolutionary dynamics of mating-type loci of Mycosphaerella spp. occurring on banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzanlou, Mahdi; Crous, Pedro W; Zwiers, Lute-Harm

    2010-01-01

    The devastating Sigatoka disease complex of banana is primarily caused by three closely related heterothallic fungi belonging to the genus Mycosphaerella: M. fijiensis, M. musicola, and M. eumusae. Previous phylogenetic work showing common ancestry led us to analyze the mating-type loci of these Mycosphaerella species occurring on banana. We reasoned that this might provide better insight into the evolutionary history of these species. PCR and chromosome-walking approaches were used to clone the mating-type loci of M. musicola and M. eumusae. Sequences were compared to the published mating-type loci of M. fijiensis and other Mycosphaerella spp., and a novel organization of the MAT loci was found. The mating-type loci of the examined Mycosphaerella species are expanded, containing two additional Mycosphaerella-specific genes in a unique genomic organization. The proteins encoded by these novel genes show a higher interspecies than intraspecies homology. Moreover, M. fijiensis, M. musicola, and M. eumusae contain two additional mating-type-like loci, containing parts of both MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1. The data indicate that M. fijiensis, M. musicola, and M. eumusae share an ancestor in which a fusion event occurred between MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 sequences and in which additional genes became incorporated into the idiomorph. The new genes incorporated have since then evolved independently in the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 loci. Thus, these data are an example of the evolutionary dynamics of fungal MAT loci in general and show the great flexibility of the MAT loci of Mycosphaerella species in particular.

  4. Effective Coping With Supervisor Conflict Depends on Control: Implications for Work Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eatough, Erin M; Chang, Chu-Hsiang

    2018-01-11

    This study examined the interactive effects of interpersonal conflict at work, coping strategy, and perceived control specific to the conflict on employee work strain using multisource and time-lagged data across two samples. In Sample 1, multisource data was collected from 438 employees as well as data from participant-identified secondary sources (e.g., significant others, best friends). In Sample 2, time-lagged data from 100 full-time employees was collected in a constructive replication. Overall, findings suggested that the success of coping efforts as indicated by lower strains hinges on the combination of the severity of the stressor, perceived control over the stressor, and coping strategy used (problem-focused vs. emotion-focused coping). Results from the current study provide insights for why previous efforts to document the moderating effects of coping have been inconsistent, especially with regards to emotion-focused coping. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. A novel CpG island set identifies tissue-specific methylation at developmental gene loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Illingworth

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available CpG islands (CGIs are dense clusters of CpG sequences that punctuate the CpG-deficient human genome and associate with many gene promoters. As CGIs also differ from bulk chromosomal DNA by their frequent lack of cytosine methylation, we devised a CGI enrichment method based on nonmethylated CpG affinity chromatography. The resulting library was sequenced to define a novel human blood CGI set that includes many that are not detected by current algorithms. Approximately half of CGIs were associated with annotated gene transcription start sites, the remainder being intra- or intergenic. Using an array representing over 17,000 CGIs, we established that 6%-8% of CGIs are methylated in genomic DNA of human blood, brain, muscle, and spleen. Inter- and intragenic CGIs are preferentially susceptible to methylation. CGIs showing tissue-specific methylation were overrepresented at numerous genetic loci that are essential for development, including HOX and PAX family members. The findings enable a comprehensive analysis of the roles played by CGI methylation in normal and diseased human tissues.

  6. Genes and quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling trace element concentrations in perennial grasses grown on phytotoxic soil contaminated with heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perennial grasses cover diverse soils throughout the world, including sites contaminated with heavy metals, producing forages that must be safe for livestock and wildlife. Chromosome regions known as quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling forage mineral concentrations were mapped in a populatio...

  7. Genetic maps of polymorphic DNA loci on rat chromosome 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yan-Ping; Remmers, E.F.; Longman, R.E. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Genetic linkage maps of loci defined by polymorphic DNA markers on rat chromosome 1 were constructed by genotyping F2 progeny of F344/N x LEW/N, BN/SsN x LEW/N, and DA/Bkl x F344/Hsd inbred rat strains. In total, 43 markers were mapped, of which 3 were restriction fragment length polymorphisms and the others were simple sequence length polymorphisms. Nineteen of these markers were associated with genes. Six markers for five genes, {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor {beta}3 (Gabrb3), syntaxin 2 (Stx2), adrenergic receptor {beta}3 (Gabrb3), syntaxin 2 (Stx2), adrenergic receptor {beta}1 (Adrb1), carcinoembryonic antigen gene family member 1 (Cgm1), and lipogenic protein S14 (Lpgp), and 20 anonymous loci were not previously reported. Thirteen gene loci (Myl2, Aldoa, Tnt, Igf2, Prkcg, Cgm4, Calm3, Cgm3, Psbp1, Sa, Hbb, Ins1, and Tcp1) were previously mapped. Comparative mapping analysis indicated that the large portion of rat chromosome 1 is homologous to mouse chromosome 7, although the homologous to mouse chromosome 7, although the homologs of two rat genes are located on mouse chromosomes 17 and 19. Homologs of the rat chromosome 1 genes that we mapped are located on human chromosomes 6, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, and 19. 38 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  8. Epstein-Barr virus strains and variations: Geographic or disease-specific variants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Marco; Marinho-Dias, Joana; Ribeiro, Joana; Sousa, Hugo

    2017-03-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is associated with the development of several diseases, including infectious mononucleosis (IM), Burkitt's Lymphoma (BL), Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma, and other neoplasias. The publication of EBV genome 1984 led to several studies regarding the identification of different viral strains. Currently, EBV is divided into EBV type 1 (B95-8 strain) and EBV type 2 (AG876 strain), also known as type A and type B, which have been distinguished based upon genetic differences in the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigens (EBNAs) sequence. Several other EBV strains have been described in the past 10 years considering variations on EBV genome, and many have attempted to clarify if these variations are ethnic or geographically correlated, or if they are disease related. Indeed, there is an increasing interest to describe possible specific disease associations, with emphasis on different malignancies. These studies aim to clarify if these variations are ethnic or geographically correlated, or if they are disease related, thus being important to characterize the epidemiologic genetic distribution of EBV strains on our population. Here, we review the current knowledge on the different EBV strains and variants and its association with different diseases. J. Med. Virol. 89:373-387, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. [VNTR-genotyping of Vibrio cholerae strains isolated from objects in the territory of Russian Federation in 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodop'ianov, A S; Mazrukho, A B; Vodop'ianov, S O; Mishan'kin, B N; Kruglikov, V D; Apkhangel'skaia, I V; Oleĭnikov, I P; Zubkova, D A; Monakhova, E V; Grigorenko, L V

    2014-01-01

    VNTR-typing of Vibrio cholerae strains isolated in the territory of Russian Federation in 2012. 71 Vibrio cholerae O3 and 3 V cholerae O1/O139 strains were used in the study. Genotyping was performed by using PCR for 5 VNTR-loci. Multilocus VNTR-typing allowed to group the strains into 31 VNTR-genotypes. Genotypes were divided among 10 discrete clusters by results of a cluster analysis. The presence of tcpA gene is clearly linked with the presence of VcB locus. Each geographic region was characterized by their own VNTR-genotypes. In the course of the carried out VNTR-genotyping of V. cholerae isolated in 2012, 2 types of vibrio population formation were detected. A geographic attachment to specific regions was characteristic for most of the genotypes.

  10. A host-specific biological control of grape crown gall by Agrobacterium vitis strain F2/5: its regulation and population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewnum, Supaporn; Zheng, Desen; Reid, Cheryl L; Johnson, Kameka L; Gee, Jodi C; Burr, Thomas J

    2013-05-01

    Nontumorigenic Agrobacterium vitis strain F2/5 is able to prevent crown gall caused by tumorigenic A. vitis on grape but not on other plant species such as tobacco. Mutations in a quorum-sensing transcription factor, aviR, and in caseinolytic protease (clp) component genes clpA and clpP1 resulted in reduced or loss of biological control. All mutants were complemented; however, restoration of biological control by complemented clpA and clpP1 mutants was dependent on the copy number of vector that was used as well as timing of application of the complemented mutants to grape wounds in relation to inoculation with pathogen. Mutations in other quorum-sensing and clp genes and in a gene associated with polyketide synthesis did not affect biological control. It was determined that, although F2/5 inhibits transformation by tumorigenic A. vitis strains on grape, it does not affect growth of the pathogen in wounded grape tissue over time.

  11. Identification of genetic loci required for Campylobacter resistance to fowlicidin-1, a chicken host defense peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ky Van Hoang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are critical components of host defense limiting bacterial infections at the gastrointestinal mucosal surface. Bacterial pathogens have co-evolved with host innate immunity and developed means to counteract the effect of endogenous AMPs. However, molecular mechanisms of AMP resistance in Campylobacter, an important human food borne pathogen with poultry as a major reservoir, are still largely unknown. In this study, random transposon mutagenesis and targeted site-directed mutagenesis approaches were used to identify genetic loci contributing Campylobacter resistance to fowlicidin-1, a chicken AMP belonging to cathelicidin family. An efficient transposon mutagenesis approach (EZ::TNTM Transposome in conjunction with a microtiter plate screening identified three mutants whose susceptibilities to fowlicidin-1 were significantly increased. Backcrossing of the transposon mutations into parent strain confirmed that the AMP-sensitive phenotype in each mutant was linked to the specific transposon insertion. Direct sequencing showed that these mutants have transposon inserted in the genes encoding two-component regulator CbrR, transporter CjaB, and putative trigger factor Tig. Genomic analysis also revealed an operon (Cj1580c-1584c that is homologous to sapABCDF, an operon conferring resistance to AMP in other pathogens. Insertional inactivation of Cj1583c (sapB significantly increased susceptibility of Campylobacter to fowlicidin-1. The sapB as well as tig and cjaB mutants were significantly impaired in their ability to compete with their wild-type strain 81-176 to colonize the chicken cecum. Together, this study identified four genetic loci in Campylobacter that will be useful for characterizing molecular basis of Campylobacter resistance to AMPs, a significant knowledge gap in Campylobacter pathogenesis.

  12. Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Maize Inflorescence Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Manfei; Zhong, Wanshun; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Zuxin

    2018-03-01

    The establishment of inflorescence architecture is critical for the reproduction of flowering plant species. The maize plant generates two types of inflorescences, the tassel and the ear, and their architectures have a large effect on grain yield and yield-related traits that are genetically controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Since ear and tassel architecture are deeply affected by the activity of inflorescence meristems, key QTLs and genes regulating meristematic activity have important impacts on inflorescence development and show great potential for optimizing grain yield. Isolation of yield trait-related QTLs is challenging, but these QTLs have direct application in maize breeding. Additionally, characterization and functional dissection of QTLs can provide genetic and molecular knowledge of quantitative variation in inflorescence architecture. In this review, we summarize currently identified QTLs responsible for the establishment of ear and tassel architecture and discuss the potential genetic control of four ear-related and four tassel-related traits. In recent years, several inflorescence architecture-related QTLs have been characterized at the gene level. We review the mechanisms of these characterized QTLs.

  13. Development of a strain-specific real-time PCR assay for enumeration of a probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri in chicken feed and intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verity Ann Sattler

    Full Text Available A strain-specific real-time PCR assay was developed for quantification of a probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri (DSM 16350 in poultry feed and intestine. The specific primers were designed based on a genomic sequence of the strain derived from suppression subtractive hybridization with the type strain L. reuteri DSM 20016. Specificity was tested using a set of non-target strains from several sources. Applicability of the real-time PCR assay was evaluated in a controlled broiler feeding trial by using standard curves specific for feed and intestinal matrices. The amount of the probiotic L. reuteri was determined in feed from three feeding phases and in intestinal samples of the jejunum, ileum, and caecum of three, 14, and 39 day old birds. L. reuteri DSM 16350 cells were enumerated in all feeds supplemented with the probiotic close to the inclusion rate of 7.0 × 10(3 cfu/g, however, were not detected in L. reuteri DSM 16350 free feed. In three day old birds L. reuteri DSM 16350 was only detected in intestinal samples from probiotic fed animals ranging from 8.2 ± 7.8 × 10(5 cfu/g in the jejunum, 1.0 ± 1.1×10(7 cfu/g in the ileum, and 2.5 ± 5.7 × 10(5 cfu/g in the caecum. Similar results were obtained for intestinal samples of older birds (14 and 39 days. With increasing age of the animals the amount of L. reuteri signals in the control animals, however, also increased, indicating the appearance of highly similar bacterial genomes in the gut microbiota. The L. reuteri DSM 16350 qPCR assay could be used in future for feeding trials to assure the accurate inclusion of the supplement to the feed and to monitor it's uptake into the GIT of young chicken.

  14. Development of a strain-specific real-time PCR assay for enumeration of a probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri in chicken feed and intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Verity Ann; Mohnl, Michaela; Klose, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    A strain-specific real-time PCR assay was developed for quantification of a probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri (DSM 16350) in poultry feed and intestine. The specific primers were designed based on a genomic sequence of the strain derived from suppression subtractive hybridization with the type strain L. reuteri DSM 20016. Specificity was tested using a set of non-target strains from several sources. Applicability of the real-time PCR assay was evaluated in a controlled broiler feeding trial by using standard curves specific for feed and intestinal matrices. The amount of the probiotic L. reuteri was determined in feed from three feeding phases and in intestinal samples of the jejunum, ileum, and caecum of three, 14, and 39 day old birds. L. reuteri DSM 16350 cells were enumerated in all feeds supplemented with the probiotic close to the inclusion rate of 7.0 × 10(3) cfu/g, however, were not detected in L. reuteri DSM 16350 free feed. In three day old birds L. reuteri DSM 16350 was only detected in intestinal samples from probiotic fed animals ranging from 8.2 ± 7.8 × 10(5) cfu/g in the jejunum, 1.0 ± 1.1×10(7) cfu/g in the ileum, and 2.5 ± 5.7 × 10(5) cfu/g in the caecum. Similar results were obtained for intestinal samples of older birds (14 and 39 days). With increasing age of the animals the amount of L. reuteri signals in the control animals, however, also increased, indicating the appearance of highly similar bacterial genomes in the gut microbiota. The L. reuteri DSM 16350 qPCR assay could be used in future for feeding trials to assure the accurate inclusion of the supplement to the feed and to monitor it's uptake into the GIT of young chicken.

  15. Identification of genetic loci shared between schizophrenia and the Big Five personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeland, Olav B; Wang, Yunpeng; Lo, Min-Tzu; Li, Wen; Frei, Oleksandr; Witoelar, Aree; Tesli, Martin; Hinds, David A; Tung, Joyce Y; Djurovic, Srdjan; Chen, Chi-Hua; Dale, Anders M; Andreassen, Ole A

    2017-05-22

    Schizophrenia is associated with differences in personality traits, and recent studies suggest that personality traits and schizophrenia share a genetic basis. Here we aimed to identify specific genetic loci shared between schizophrenia and the Big Five personality traits using a Bayesian statistical framework. Using summary statistics from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on personality traits in the 23andMe cohort (n = 59,225) and schizophrenia in the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium cohort (n = 82,315), we evaluated overlap in common genetic variants. The Big Five personality traits neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness were measured using a web implementation of the Big Five Inventory. Applying the conditional false discovery rate approach, we increased discovery of genetic loci and identified two loci shared between neuroticism and schizophrenia and six loci shared between openness and schizophrenia. The study provides new insights into the relationship between personality traits and schizophrenia by highlighting genetic loci involved in their common genetic etiology.

  16. Strain diversity and host specificity in a specialized gut symbiont of honeybees and bumblebees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Elijah; Ratnayeke, Nalin; Moran, Nancy A

    2016-09-01

    Host-restricted lineages of gut bacteria often include many closely related strains, but this fine-scale diversity is rarely investigated. The specialized gut symbiont Snodgrassella alvi has codiversified with honeybees (Apis mellifera) and bumblebees (Bombus) for millions of years. Snodgrassella alvi strains are nearly identical for 16S rRNA gene sequences but have distinct gene repertoires potentially affecting host biology and community interactions. We examined S. alvi strain diversity within and between hosts using deep sequencing both of a single-copy coding gene (minD) and of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene. We sampled workers from domestic and feral A. mellifera colonies and wild-caught Bombus representing 14 species. Conventional analyses of community profiles, based on the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene, failed to expose most strain variation. In contrast, the minD analysis revealed extensive strain variation within and between host species and individuals. Snodgrassella alvi strain diversity is significantly higher in A. mellifera than in Bombus, supporting the hypothesis that colony founding by swarms of workers enables retention of more diversity than colony founding by a single queen. Most Bombus individuals (72%) are dominated by a single S. alvi strain, whereas most A. mellifera (86%) possess multiple strains. No S. alvi strains are shared between A. mellifera and Bombus, indicating some host specificity. Among Bombus-restricted strains, some are restricted to a single host species or subgenus, while others occur in multiple subgenera. Findings demonstrate that strains diversify both within and between host species and can be highly specific or relatively generalized in their host associations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Molecular Characterization of Salmonella Typhimurium Highly Successful Outbreak Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Randi Føns; Litrup, Eva; Larsson, Jonas T.

    2011-01-01

    we detected changes in three of five MLVA loci in a small fraction of isolates. These changes were mainly due to the gain or loss of single repeats. Optical Mapping of the large cluster strain indicated no increased content of virulence genes; however, Optical Mapping did reveal a large insert......, a probable prophage, in the main cluster. This probable prophage may give the cluster strain a competitive advantage. The molecular methods employed suggested that the four clusters represented four distinct strains, although they seemed to be epidemiologically linked and shared genotypic characteristics....

  18. A genome-wide association analysis of a broad psychosis phenotype identifies three loci for further investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Psychosis Endophenotypes International Consortium; Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium; Bramon, E.; Pirinen, M.; Strange, A.; Lin, K.; Freeman, C.; Bellenguez, C.; Su, Z.; Band, G.; Pearson, R.; Vukcevic, D.; Langford, C.; Deloukas, P.; Hunt, S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several loci associated with schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorder. We performed a GWAS of psychosis as a broad syndrome rather than within specific diagnostic categories. METHODS: 1239 cases with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or psychotic bipolar disorder; 857 of their unaffected relatives, and 2739 healthy controls were genotyped with the Affymetrix 6.0 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. Analyses of 69...

  19. A Genome-wide Association Analysis of a Broad Psychosis Phenotype Identifies Three Loci for Further Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Tosato, Sarah; Myin-germeys, Inez; Barroso, Ines; Bender, Stephan; Giegling, Ina; Arranz, Maria J.; Donnelly, Peter; Bellenguez, Celine; Brown, Matthew A.; Lawrie, Stephen; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Vukcevic, Damjan; Kahn, Rene S.; Dronov, Serge; Walshe, Muriel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several loci associated with schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorder. We performed a GWAS of psychosis as a broad syndrome rather than within specific diagnostic categories.Methods: 1239 cases with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or psychotic bipolar disorder; 857 of their unaffected relatives, and 2739 healthy controls were genotyped with the Affymetrix 6.0 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. Analyses of 695,19...

  20. Meta-analysis of 375,000 individuals identifies 38 susceptibility loci for migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Padhraig; Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Palta, Priit; Esko, Tonu; Pers, Tune H; Farh, Kai-How; Cuenca-Leon, Ester; Muona, Mikko; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Kurth, Tobias; Ingason, Andres; McMahon, George; Ligthart, Lannie; Terwindt, Gisela M; Kallela, Mikko; Freilinger, Tobias M; Ran, Caroline; Gordon, Scott G; Stam, Anine H; Steinberg, Stacy; Borck, Guntram; Koiranen, Markku; Quaye, Lydia; Adams, Hieab H H; Lehtimäki, Terho; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Wedenoja, Juho; Hinds, David A; Buring, Julie E; Schürks, Markus; Ridker, Paul M; Hrafnsdottir, Maria Gudlaug; Stefansson, Hreinn; Ring, Susan M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Färkkilä, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari; Vepsäläinen, Salli; Malik, Rainer; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Kurki, Mitja I; Kals, Mart; Mägi, Reedik; Pärn, Kalle; Hämäläinen, Eija; Huang, Hailiang; Byrnes, Andrea E; Franke, Lude; Huang, Jie; Stergiakouli, Evie; Lee, Phil H; Sandor, Cynthia; Webber, Caleb; Cader, Zameel; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schreiber, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Eriksson, Johan G; Salomaa, Veikko; Heikkilä, Kauko; Loehrer, Elizabeth; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Cherkas, Lynn; Pedersen, Linda M; Stubhaug, Audun; Nielsen, Christopher S; Männikkö, Minna; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Göbel, Hartmut; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Christensen, Anne Francke; Hansen, Thomas Folkmann; Werge, Thomas; Kaprio, Jaakko; Aromaa, Arpo J; Raitakari, Olli; Ikram, M Arfan; Spector, Tim; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Metspalu, Andres; Kubisch, Christian; Strachan, David P; Ferrari, Michel D; Belin, Andrea C; Dichgans, Martin; Wessman, Maija; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Zwart, John-Anker; Boomsma, Dorret I; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Eriksson, Nicholas; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Olesen, Jes; Chasman, Daniel I; Nyholt, Dale R; Palotie, Aarno

    2016-08-01

    Migraine is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting around one in seven people worldwide, but its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. There is some debate about whether migraine is a disease of vascular dysfunction or a result of neuronal dysfunction with secondary vascular changes. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have thus far identified 13 independent loci associated with migraine. To identify new susceptibility loci, we carried out a genetic study of migraine on 59,674 affected subjects and 316,078 controls from 22 GWA studies. We identified 44 independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with migraine risk (P < 5 × 10(-8)) that mapped to 38 distinct genomic loci, including 28 loci not previously reported and a locus that to our knowledge is the first to be identified on chromosome X. In subsequent computational analyses, the identified loci showed enrichment for genes expressed in vascular and smooth muscle tissues, consistent with a predominant theory of migraine that highlights vascular etiologies.

  1. Fifteen new risk loci for coronary artery disease highlight arterial wall-specific mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Howson, Joanna M.M.; Zhao, Wei; Barnes, Daniel R.; Ho, Weang-Kee; Young, Robin; Paul, Dirk S.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Fauman, Eric B.; Salfati, Elias L.; Sun, Benjamin B.; Eicher, John D.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Sheu, Wayne H.H.; Nielsen, Sune F.

    2017-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although 58 genomic regions have been associated with CAD thus far, most of the heritability is unexplained, indicating that additional susceptibility loci await identification. An efficient discovery strategy may be larger-scale evaluation of promising associations suggested by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Hence, we genotyped 56,309 participants using a targeted gene array derived from earlier G...

  2. Fifteen new risk loci for coronary artery disease highlight arterial-wall-specific mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Howson, Joanna McCammond; Zhao, W; Barnes, Daniel Robert; Ho, W-K; Young, R; Paul, Dirk Stefan; Waite, LL; Freitag, DF; Fauman, EB; Salfati, EL; Sun, Benjamin; Eicher, JD; Johnson, AD; Sheu, WHH; Nielsen, SF

    2017-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although 58 genomic regions have been associated with CAD thus far, most of the heritability is unexplained, indicating that additional susceptibility loci await identification. An efficient discovery strategy may be larger-scale evaluation of promising associations suggested by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Hence, we genotyped 56,309 participants using a targeted gene array derived from earlier G...

  3. A meta-analysis of thyroid-related traits reveals novel loci and gender-specific differences in the regulation of thyroid function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Porcu

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone is essential for normal metabolism and development, and overt abnormalities in thyroid function lead to common endocrine disorders affecting approximately 10% of individuals over their life span. In addition, even mild alterations in thyroid function are associated with weight changes, atrial fibrillation, osteoporosis, and psychiatric disorders. To identify novel variants underlying thyroid function, we performed a large meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for serum levels of the highly heritable thyroid function markers TSH and FT4, in up to 26,420 and 17,520 euthyroid subjects, respectively. Here we report 26 independent associations, including several novel loci for TSH (PDE10A, VEGFA, IGFBP5, NFIA, SOX9, PRDM11, FGF7, INSR, ABO, MIR1179, NRG1, MBIP, ITPK1, SASH1, GLIS3 and FT4 (LHX3, FOXE1, AADAT, NETO1/FBXO15, LPCAT2/CAPNS2. Notably, only limited overlap was detected between TSH and FT4 associated signals, in spite of the feedback regulation of their circulating levels by the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Five of the reported loci (PDE8B, PDE10A, MAF/LOC440389, NETO1/FBXO15, and LPCAT2/CAPNS2 show strong gender-specific differences, which offer clues for the known sexual dimorphism in thyroid function and related pathologies. Importantly, the TSH-associated loci contribute not only to variation within the normal range, but also to TSH values outside the reference range, suggesting that they may be involved in thyroid dysfunction. Overall, our findings explain, respectively, 5.64% and 2.30% of total TSH and FT4 trait variance, and they improve the current knowledge of the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis function and the consequences of genetic variation for hypo- or hyperthyroidism.

  4. A Meta-Analysis of Thyroid-Related Traits Reveals Novel Loci and Gender-Specific Differences in the Regulation of Thyroid Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Claudia B.; Wilson, Scott G.; Cappola, Anne R.; Bos, Steffan D.; Deelen, Joris; den Heijer, Martin; Freathy, Rachel M.; Lahti, Jari; Liu, Chunyu; Lopez, Lorna M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Trompet, Stella; Arnold, Alice; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beekman, Marian; Böhringer, Stefan; Brown, Suzanne J.; Buckley, Brendan M.; Camaschella, Clara; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Davies, Gail; de Visser, Marieke C. H.; Ford, Ian; Forsen, Tom; Frayling, Timothy M.; Fugazzola, Laura; Gögele, Martin; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hermus, Ad R.; Hofman, Albert; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Jensen, Richard A.; Kajantie, Eero; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Lim, Ee M.; Masciullo, Corrado; Mariotti, Stefano; Minelli, Cosetta; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Netea-Maier, Romana T.; Palotie, Aarno; Persani, Luca; Piras, Maria G.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Räikkönen, Katri; Richards, J. Brent; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sala, Cinzia; Sabra, Mona M.; Sattar, Naveed; Shields, Beverley M.; Soranzo, Nicole; Starr, John M.; Stott, David J.; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Usala, Gianluca; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; van Heemst, Diana; van Mullem, Alies; H.Vermeulen, Sita; Visser, W. Edward; Walsh, John P.; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; Widen, Elisabeth; Zhai, Guangju; Cucca, Francesco; Deary, Ian J.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fox, Caroline S.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Schlessinger, David; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Slagboom, Eline P.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vaidya, Bijay; Visser, Theo J.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Rotter, Jerome I.; Spector, Tim D.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Toniolo, Daniela; Sanna, Serena; Peeters, Robin P.; Naitza, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is essential for normal metabolism and development, and overt abnormalities in thyroid function lead to common endocrine disorders affecting approximately 10% of individuals over their life span. In addition, even mild alterations in thyroid function are associated with weight changes, atrial fibrillation, osteoporosis, and psychiatric disorders. To identify novel variants underlying thyroid function, we performed a large meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for serum levels of the highly heritable thyroid function markers TSH and FT4, in up to 26,420 and 17,520 euthyroid subjects, respectively. Here we report 26 independent associations, including several novel loci for TSH (PDE10A, VEGFA, IGFBP5, NFIA, SOX9, PRDM11, FGF7, INSR, ABO, MIR1179, NRG1, MBIP, ITPK1, SASH1, GLIS3) and FT4 (LHX3, FOXE1, AADAT, NETO1/FBXO15, LPCAT2/CAPNS2). Notably, only limited overlap was detected between TSH and FT4 associated signals, in spite of the feedback regulation of their circulating levels by the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Five of the reported loci (PDE8B, PDE10A, MAF/LOC440389, NETO1/FBXO15, and LPCAT2/CAPNS2) show strong gender-specific differences, which offer clues for the known sexual dimorphism in thyroid function and related pathologies. Importantly, the TSH-associated loci contribute not only to variation within the normal range, but also to TSH values outside the reference range, suggesting that they may be involved in thyroid dysfunction. Overall, our findings explain, respectively, 5.64% and 2.30% of total TSH and FT4 trait variance, and they improve the current knowledge of the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis function and the consequences of genetic variation for hypo- or hyperthyroidism. PMID:23408906

  5. The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) T cell receptor loci exhibit V subgroup synteny and chain-specific evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaux, Breanna; Hunter, Margaret; Cruz-Schneider, Maria Paula; Sena, Leonardo; Bonde, Robert K.; Criscitiello, Michael F.

    2018-01-01

    The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) has limited diversity in the immunoglobulin heavy chain. We therefore investigated the antigen receptor loci of the other arm of the adaptive immune system: the T cell receptor. Manatees are the first species from Afrotheria, a basal eutherian superorder, to have an in-depth characterization of all T cell receptor loci. By annotating the genome and expressed transcripts, we found that each chain has distinct features that correlates to their individual functions. The genomic organization also plays a role in modulating sequence conservation between species. There were extensive V subgroup synteny blocks in the TRA and TRB loci between T. m. latirostrisand human. Increased genomic locus complexity correlated to increased locus synteny. We also identified evidence for a VHD pseudogene for the first time in a eutherian mammal. These findings emphasize the value of including species within this basal eutherian radiation in comparative studies.

  6. A set of haploid strains available for genetic studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coi, Anna Lisa; Legras, Jean-Luc; Zara, Giacomo; Dequin, Sylvie; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-09-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been extensively studied for biofilm formation, however the lack of specific haploid model strains has limited the application of genetic approaches such as gene knockout, allelic replacement and Quantitative Trait Locus mapping for the deciphering of the molecular basis of velum formation under biological ageing. The aim of this work was to construct a set of flor isogenic haploid strains easy to manipulate genetically. The analysis of the allelic variations at 12 minisatellite loci of 174 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains allowed identifying three flor parental strains with different phylogenic positions. These strains were characterized for sporulation efficiency, growth on galactose, adherence to polystyrene, agar invasion, growth on wine and ability to develop a biofilm. Interestingly, the inability to grow on galactose was found associated with a frameshift in GAL4 gene that seems peculiar of flor strains. From these wild flor strains, isogenic haploid strains were constructed by deleting HO gene with a loxP-KanMX-loxP cassette followed by the removal of the kanamycin cassette. Haploid strains obtained were characterized for their phenotypic and genetic properties and compared with the parental strains. Preliminary results showed that the haploid strains represent new tools for genetic studies and breeding programs on biofilm formation. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Bioethanol strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae characterised by microsatellite and stress resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanda Renata Reis

    Full Text Available Abstract Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae may display characteristics that are typical of rough-type colonies, made up of cells clustered in pseudohyphal structures and comprised of daughter buds that do not separate from the mother cell post-mitosis. These strains are known to occur frequently in fermentation tanks with significant lower ethanol yield when compared to fermentations carried out by smooth strains of S. cerevisiae that are composed of dispersed cells. In an attempt to delineate genetic and phenotypic differences underlying the two phenotypes, this study analysed 10 microsatellite loci of 22 S. cerevisiae strains as well as stress resistance towards high concentrations of ethanol and glucose, low pH and cell sedimentation rates. The results obtained from the phenotypic tests by Principal-Component Analysis revealed that unlike the smooth colonies, the rough colonies of S. cerevisiae exhibit an enhanced resistance to stressful conditions resulting from the presence of excessive glucose and ethanol and high sedimentation rate. The microsatellite analysis was not successful to distinguish between the colony phenotypes as phenotypic assays. The relevant industrial strain PE-2 was observed in close genetic proximity to rough-colony although it does not display this colony morphology. A unique genetic pattern specific to a particular phenotype remains elusive.

  8. Characterization of small microsatellite loci isolated in endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) for use in non-invasive sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Fike, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Primers for 10 microsatellite loci were developed specifically to amplify low quantity and quality DNA in the endangered Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis). In a screen of 20 individuals from a population in Missouri, the 10 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from seven to 18 alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although two loci revealed significant departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. These microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses and for use in mark-recapture studies that utilize DNA collected non-invasively from fecal pellets, which will ultimately aid in management efforts.

  9. Confirmation of novel type 1 diabetes risk loci in families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, J D; Howson, J M M; Smyth, D

    2012-01-01

    Over 50 regions of the genome have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, mainly using large case/control collections. In a recent genome-wide association (GWA) study, 18 novel susceptibility loci were identified and replicated, including replication evidence from 2,319 families. Here, we......, the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC), aimed to exclude the possibility that any of the 18 loci were false-positives due to population stratification by significantly increasing the statistical power of our family study....

  10. Meningococcal genetic variation mechanisms viewed through comparative analysis of serogroup C strain FAM18.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Bentley

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Neisseria meningitidis is commonly found harmlessly colonising the mucosal surfaces of the human nasopharynx. Occasionally strains can invade host tissues causing septicaemia and meningitis, making the bacterium a major cause of morbidity and mortality in both the developed and developing world. The species is known to be diverse in many ways, as a product of its natural transformability and of a range of recombination and mutation-based systems. Previous work on pathogenic Neisseria has identified several mechanisms for the generation of diversity of surface structures, including phase variation based on slippage-like mechanisms and sequence conversion of expressed genes using information from silent loci. Comparison of the genome sequences of two N. meningitidis strains, serogroup B MC58 and serogroup A Z2491, suggested further mechanisms of variation, including C-terminal exchange in specific genes and enhanced localised recombination and variation related to repeat arrays. We have sequenced the genome of N. meningitidis strain FAM18, a representative of the ST-11/ET-37 complex, providing the first genome sequence for the disease-causing serogroup C meningococci; it has 1,976 predicted genes, of which 60 do not have orthologues in the previously sequenced serogroup A or B strains. Through genome comparison with Z2491 and MC58 we have further characterised specific mechanisms of genetic variation in N. meningitidis, describing specialised loci for generation of cell surface protein variants and measuring the association between noncoding repeat arrays and sequence variation in flanking genes. Here we provide a detailed view of novel genetic diversification mechanisms in N. meningitidis. Our analysis provides evidence for the hypothesis that the noncoding repeat arrays in neisserial genomes (neisserial intergenic mosaic elements provide a crucial mechanism for the generation of surface antigen variants. Such variation will have an

  11. Specific Detection and Identification of American Mulberry-Infecting and Italian Olive-Associated Strains of Xylella fastidiosa by Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei; Shao, Jonathan; Elbeaino, Toufic; Davis, Robert E; Zhao, Tingchang; Huang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa causes bacterial leaf scorch in many landscape trees including elm, oak, sycamore and mulberry, but methods for specific identification of a particular tree host species-limited strain or differentiation of tree-specific strains are lacking. It is also unknown whether a particular landscape tree-infecting X. fastidiosa strain is capable of infecting multiple landscape tree species in an urban environment. We developed two PCR primers specific for mulberry-infecting strains of X. fastidiosa based on the nucleotide sequence of a unique open reading frame identified only in mulberry-infecting strains among all the North and South American strains of X. fastidiosa sequenced to date. PCR using the primers allowed for detection and identification of mulberry-infecting X. fastidiosa strains in cultures and in samples collected from naturally infected mulberry trees. In addition, no mixed infections with or non-specific detections of the mulberry-infecting strains of X. fastidiosa were found in naturally X. fastidiosa-infected oak, elm and sycamore trees growing in the same region where naturally infected mulberry trees were grown. This genotype-specific PCR assay will be valuable for disease diagnosis, studies of strain-specific infections in insects and plant hosts, and management of diseases caused by X. fastidiosa. Unexpectedly but interestingly, the unique open reading frame conserved in the mulberry-infecting strains in the U. S. was also identified in the recently sequenced olive-associated strain CoDiRO isolated in Italy. When the primer set was tested against naturally infected olive plant samples collected in Italy, it allowed for detection of olive-associated strains of X. fastidiosa in Italy. This PCR assay, therefore, will also be useful for detection and identification of the Italian group of X. fastidiosa strains to aid understanding of the occurrence, evolution and biology of this new group of X. fastidiosa strains.

  12. Specific Detection and Identification of American Mulberry-Infecting and Italian Olive-Associated Strains of Xylella fastidiosa by Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guan

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa causes bacterial leaf scorch in many landscape trees including elm, oak, sycamore and mulberry, but methods for specific identification of a particular tree host species-limited strain or differentiation of tree-specific strains are lacking. It is also unknown whether a particular landscape tree-infecting X. fastidiosa strain is capable of infecting multiple landscape tree species in an urban environment. We developed two PCR primers specific for mulberry-infecting strains of X. fastidiosa based on the nucleotide sequence of a unique open reading frame identified only in mulberry-infecting strains among all the North and South American strains of X. fastidiosa sequenced to date. PCR using the primers allowed for detection and identification of mulberry-infecting X. fastidiosa strains in cultures and in samples collected from naturally infected mulberry trees. In addition, no mixed infections with or non-specific detections of the mulberry-infecting strains of X. fastidiosa were found in naturally X. fastidiosa-infected oak, elm and sycamore trees growing in the same region where naturally infected mulberry trees were grown. This genotype-specific PCR assay will be valuable for disease diagnosis, studies of strain-specific infections in insects and plant hosts, and management of diseases caused by X. fastidiosa. Unexpectedly but interestingly, the unique open reading frame conserved in the mulberry-infecting strains in the U. S. was also identified in the recently sequenced olive-associated strain CoDiRO isolated in Italy. When the primer set was tested against naturally infected olive plant samples collected in Italy, it allowed for detection of olive-associated strains of X. fastidiosa in Italy. This PCR assay, therefore, will also be useful for detection and identification of the Italian group of X. fastidiosa strains to aid understanding of the occurrence, evolution and biology of this new group of X. fastidiosa strains.

  13. Cross-species infection of specific-pathogen-free pigs by a genotype 4 strain of human hepatitis E virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feagins, A. R.; Opriessnig, T.; Huang, Y. W.; Halbur, P. G.; Meng, X. J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an important pathogen. The animal strain of HEV, swine HEV, is related to human HEV. The genotype 3 swine HEV infected humans and genotype 3 human HEV infected pigs. The genotype 4 swine and human HEV strains are genetically related, but it is unknown whether genotype 4 human HEV can infect pigs. A swine bioassay was utilized in this study to determine whether genotype 4 human HEV can infect pigs. Fifteen, 4-week-old, specific-pathogen-free pigs were divided into 3 groups of 5 each. Group 1 pigs were each inoculated intravenously with PBS buffer as negative controls, group 2 pigs similarly with genotype 3 human HEV (strain US-2), and group 3 pigs similarly with genotype 4 human HEV (strain TW6196E). Serum and fecal samples were collected at 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, and 56 days postinoculation (dpi) and tested for evidence of HEV infection. All pigs were necropsied at 56 dpi. As expected, the negative control pigs remained negative. The positive control pigs inoculated with genotype 3 human HEV all became infected as evidenced by detection of HEV antibodies, viremia and fecal virus shedding. All five pigs in group 3 inoculated with genotype 4 human HEV also became infected: fecal virus shedding and viremia were detected variably from 7 to 56 dpi, and seroconversion occurred by 28 dpi. The data indicated that genotype 4 human HEV has an expanded host range, and the results have important implications for understanding the natural history and zoonosis of HEV. PMID:18551597

  14. Meta-analysis identifies 29 additional ulcerative colitis risk loci, increasing the number of confirmed associations to 47

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Carl A; Boucher, Gabrielle; Lees, Charlie W

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies and candidate gene studies in ulcerative colitis have identified 18 susceptibility loci. We conducted a meta-analysis of six ulcerative colitis genome-wide association study datasets, comprising 6,687 cases and 19,718 controls, and followed up the top association...... signals in 9,628 cases and 12,917 controls. We identified 29 additional risk loci (P associated loci to 47. After annotating associated regions using GRAIL, expression quantitative trait loci data and correlations with non-synonymous SNPs, we...... identified many candidate genes that provide potentially important insights into disease pathogenesis, including IL1R2, IL8RA-IL8RB, IL7R, IL12B, DAP, PRDM1, JAK2, IRF5, GNA12 and LSP1. The total number of confirmed inflammatory bowel disease risk loci is now 99, including a minimum of 28 shared association...

  15. In-silico QTL mapping of postpubertal mammary ductal development in the mouse uncovers potential human breast cancer risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic background plays a dominant role in mammary gland development and breast cancer (BrCa). Despite this, the role of genetics is only partially understood. This study used strain-dependent variation in an inbred mouse mapping panel, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying structura...

  16. RAPD-SCAR Markers for Genetically Improved NEW GIFT Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus niloticus L.) and Their Application in Strain Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si-Fa; Tang, Shou-Jie; Cai, Wan-Qi

    2010-04-01

    The NEW GIFT Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus niloticus L.) is a nationally certificated new strain selected over 14 years and 9 generations from the base strain of GIFT Nile tilapia, introduced in 1994. This new variety has been extended in most of areas of China. The management of genetically improved strains, including the genetic markers for identification is needed urgently. RAPD analysis was conducted and their conversion to SCAR markers was developed. From NEW GIFT Nile tilapia, two strain-specific RAPD bands, S(304 )(624 bp ) and S(36 )(568 bp ) were identified. The strain-specific RAPD bands were gel-purified, cloned, and sequenced. Locus-specific primers were then designed to amplify the strain-specific bands. PCR amplification was conducted to test the variations in allele frequencies of two converted SCAR markers among the NEW GIFT Nile tilapia and its base strains, as well as 7 additional farmed strains worldwide. The frequency of SCAR marker I (553 bp) was 85.7% in NEW GIFT Nile tilapia, but 16.7% in the base strain. The frequency of SCAR marker II (558 bp) was 91.4% in NEW GIFT Nile tilapia, but 0% - 70% in the 7 other strains. In order to confirm the utility of these two markers, an examination was conducted for a wild population from Egypt, resulted the frequency of SCAR I and II was 10% and 70%, respectively, much lower than that of New GIFT strain. The increase in allele frequency of these two SCAR markers suggests that these markers might be genetically linked to the quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlining the performance traits by long term selection, and indicate the bright potential of SCAR marker technology for tracking generations during selection progress and for distinguishing among genetically improved strain and other strains.

  17. Large-scale association analysis identifies new lung cancer susceptibility loci and heterogeneity in genetic susceptibility across histological subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, James D; Hung, Rayjean J; Han, Younghun; Zong, Xuchen; Carreras-Torres, Robert; Christiani, David C; Caporaso, Neil E; Johansson, Mattias; Xiao, Xiangjun; Li, Yafang; Byun, Jinyoung; Dunning, Alison; Pooley, Karen A; Qian, David C; Ji, Xuemei; Liu, Geoffrey; Timofeeva, Maria N; Bojesen, Stig E; Wu, Xifeng; Le Marchand, Loic; Albanes, Demetrios; Bickeböller, Heike; Aldrich, Melinda C; Bush, William S; Tardon, Adonina; Rennert, Gad; Teare, M Dawn; Field, John K; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Lazarus, Philip; Haugen, Aage; Lam, Stephen; Schabath, Matthew B; Andrew, Angeline S; Shen, Hongbing; Hong, Yun-Chul; Yuan, Jian-Min; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Pesatori, Angela C; Ye, Yuanqing; Diao, Nancy; Su, Li; Zhang, Ruyang; Brhane, Yonathan; Leighl, Natasha; Johansen, Jakob S; Mellemgaard, Anders; Saliba, Walid; Haiman, Christopher A; Wilkens, Lynne R; Fernandez-Somoano, Ana; Fernandez-Tardon, Guillermo; van der Heijden, Henricus F M; Kim, Jin Hee; Dai, Juncheng; Hu, Zhibin; Davies, Michael P A; Marcus, Michael W; Brunnström, Hans; Manjer, Jonas; Melander, Olle; Muller, David C; Overvad, Kim; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Tumino, Rosario; Doherty, Jennifer A; Barnett, Matt P; Chen, Chu; Goodman, Gary E; Cox, Angela; Taylor, Fiona; Woll, Penella; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H-Erich; Manz, Judith; Muley, Thomas R; Risch, Angela; Rosenberger, Albert; Grankvist, Kjell; Johansson, Mikael; Shepherd, Frances A; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Arnold, Susanne M; Haura, Eric B; Bolca, Ciprian; Holcatova, Ivana; Janout, Vladimir; Kontic, Milica; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mukeria, Anush; Ognjanovic, Simona; Orlowski, Tadeusz M; Scelo, Ghislaine; Swiatkowska, Beata; Zaridze, David; Bakke, Per; Skaug, Vidar; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Duell, Eric J; Butler, Lesley M; Koh, Woon-Puay; Gao, Yu-Tang; Houlston, Richard S; McLaughlin, John; Stevens, Victoria L; Joubert, Philippe; Lamontagne, Maxime; Nickle, David C; Obeidat, Ma'en; Timens, Wim; Zhu, Bin; Song, Lei; Kachuri, Linda; Artigas, María Soler; Tobin, Martin D; Wain, Louise V; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E; Reginsson, Gunnar W; Stefansson, Kari; Hancock, Dana B; Bierut, Laura J; Spitz, Margaret R; Gaddis, Nathan C; Lutz, Sharon M; Gu, Fangyi; Johnson, Eric O; Kamal, Ahsan; Pikielny, Claudio; Zhu, Dakai; Lindströem, Sara; Jiang, Xia; Tyndale, Rachel F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Bossé, Yohan; Chanock, Stephen; Brennan, Paul; Landi, Maria Teresa; Amos, Christopher I

    2017-07-01

    Although several lung cancer susceptibility loci have been identified, much of the heritability for lung cancer remains unexplained. Here 14,803 cases and 12,262 controls of European descent were genotyped on the OncoArray and combined with existing data for an aggregated genome-wide association study (GWAS) analysis of lung cancer in 29,266 cases and 56,450 controls. We identified 18 susceptibility loci achieving genome-wide significance, including 10 new loci. The new loci highlight the striking heterogeneity in genetic susceptibility across the histological subtypes of lung cancer, with four loci associated with lung cancer overall and six loci associated with lung adenocarcinoma. Gene expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in 1,425 normal lung tissue samples highlights RNASET2, SECISBP2L and NRG1 as candidate genes. Other loci include genes such as a cholinergic nicotinic receptor, CHRNA2, and the telomere-related genes OFBC1 and RTEL1. Further exploration of the target genes will continue to provide new insights into the etiology of lung cancer.

  18. Biological insights from 108 schizophrenia-associated genetic loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden

    2014-01-01

    and 113,075 controls. We identify 128 independent associations spanning 108 conservatively defined loci that meet genome-wide significance, 83 of which have not been previously reported. Associations were enriched among genes expressed in brain, providing biological plausibility for the findings. Many...

  19. Diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from Borassus akeassii palm wines from Burkina Faso in comparison to other African beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapsoba, François; Legras, Jean-Luc; Savadogo, Aly; Dequin, Sylvie; Traore, Alfred Sababenedyo

    2015-10-15

    In South-West of Burkina Faso, palm wine is produced by spontaneous fermentation of the sap from a specific palm tree Borassus akeassii and plays an important role in people's lives. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main agent of this alcoholic fermentation but little is known about the diversity of the isolates from palm. In this work, 39 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were isolated from palm wine samples collected from 14 sites in Burkina Faso, as well as 7 isolates obtained from sorghum beer (Dolo) from 3 distant sites. Their diversity was analyzed at 12 microsatellite loci, and compared to the genotypes obtained for other African yeast populations isolated from Cocoa hulks from Ghana, sorghum beer from Ivory Coast, palm wine from Djibouti Republic, and to our database of strains from miscellaneous origins (bread, beer, wine, sake, oaks…). The ploidy of these strains has been assessed as well by flow cytometry. Our results show that B. akeassii palm wine contains a specific yeast population of diploid strains, different from Dolo produced in the same area and from other palm wine strains from Ivory Coast, Nigeria, or Djibouti Republic. In contrast, Dolo strains appeared as a group of related and mainly tetraploid strains despite being isolated from different countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel association strategy with copy number variation for identifying new risk Loci of human diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfeng Chen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Copy number variations (CNV are important causal genetic variations for human disease; however, the lack of a statistical model has impeded the systematic testing of CNVs associated with disease in large-scale cohort.Here, we developed a novel integrated strategy to test CNV-association in genome-wide case-control studies. We converted the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP signal to copy number states using a well-trained hidden Markov model. We mapped the susceptible CNV-loci through SNP site-specific testing to cope with the physiological complexity of CNVs. We also ensured the credibility of the associated CNVs through further window-based CNV-pattern clustering. Genome-wide data with seven diseases were used to test our strategy and, in total, we identified 36 new susceptible loci that are associated with CNVs for the seven diseases: 5 with bipolar disorder, 4 with coronary artery disease, 1 with Crohn's disease, 7 with hypertension, 9 with rheumatoid arthritis, 7 with type 1 diabetes and 3 with type 2 diabetes. Fifteen of these identified loci were validated through genotype-association and physiological function from previous studies, which provide further confidence for our results. Notably, the genes associated with bipolar disorder converged in the phosphoinositide/calcium signaling, a well-known affected pathway in bipolar disorder, which further supports that CNVs have impact on bipolar disorder.Our results demonstrated the effectiveness and robustness of our CNV-association analysis and provided an alternative avenue for discovering new associated loci of human diseases.

  1. Fine-mapping inflammatory bowel disease loci to single-variant resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Hailiang; Fang, Ming; Jostins, Luke; Umićević Mirkov, Maša; Boucher, Gabrielle; Anderson, Carl A; Andersen, Vibeke; Cleynen, Isabelle; Cortes, Adrian; Crins, François; D'Amato, Mauro; Deffontaine, Valérie; Dmitrieva, Julia; Docampo, Elisa; Elansary, Mahmoud; Farh, Kyle Kai-How; Franke, Andre; Gori, Ann-Stephan; Goyette, Philippe; Halfvarson, Jonas; Haritunians, Talin; Knight, Jo; Lawrance, Ian C; Lees, Charlie W; Louis, Edouard; Mariman, Rob; Meuwissen, Theo; Mni, Myriam; Momozawa, Yukihide; Parkes, Miles; Spain, Sarah L; Théâtre, Emilie; Trynka, Gosia; Satsangi, Jack; van Sommeren, Suzanne; Vermeire, Severine; Xavier, Ramnik J; Weersma, Rinse K; Duerr, Richard H; Mathew, Christopher G; Rioux, John D; McGovern, Dermot P B; Cho, Judy H; Georges, Michel; Daly, Mark J; Barrett, Jeffrey C

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders that affect millions of people worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have identified 200 inflammatory bowel disease-associated loci, but few have been conclusively resolved to specific functional variants. Here we

  2. Fine-mapping inflammatory bowel disease loci to single-variant resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Hailiang; Fang, Ming; Jostins, Luke

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders that affect millions of people worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have identified 200 inflammatory bowel disease-associated loci, but few have been conclusively resolved to specific functional variants. Here w...

  3. The N-Terminal GYPSY Motif Is Required for Pilin-Specific Sortase SrtC1 Functionality in Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain GG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François P Douillard

    Full Text Available Predominantly identified in pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, sortase-dependent pili are also found in commensal species, such as the probiotic-marketed strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG. Pili are typically associated with host colonization, immune signalling and biofilm formation. Comparative analysis of the N-terminal domains of pilin-specific sortases from various piliated Gram-positive bacteria identified a conserved motif, called GYPSY, within the signal sequence. We investigated the function and role of the GYPSY residues by directed mutagenesis in homologous (rod-shaped and heterologous (coccoid-shaped expression systems for pilus formation. Substitutions of some of the GYPSY residues, and more specifically the proline residue, were found to have a direct impact on the degree of piliation of Lb. rhamnosus GG. The present findings uncover a new signalling element involved in the functionality of pilin-specific sortases controlling the pilus biogenesis of Lb. rhamnosus GG and related piliated Gram-positive species.

  4. The N-Terminal GYPSY Motif Is Required for Pilin-Specific Sortase SrtC1 Functionality in Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain GG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillard, François P.; Rasinkangas, Pia; Bhattacharjee, Arnab; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M.

    2016-01-01

    Predominantly identified in pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, sortase-dependent pili are also found in commensal species, such as the probiotic-marketed strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG. Pili are typically associated with host colonization, immune signalling and biofilm formation. Comparative analysis of the N-terminal domains of pilin-specific sortases from various piliated Gram-positive bacteria identified a conserved motif, called GYPSY, within the signal sequence. We investigated the function and role of the GYPSY residues by directed mutagenesis in homologous (rod-shaped) and heterologous (coccoid-shaped) expression systems for pilus formation. Substitutions of some of the GYPSY residues, and more specifically the proline residue, were found to have a direct impact on the degree of piliation of Lb. rhamnosus GG. The present findings uncover a new signalling element involved in the functionality of pilin-specific sortases controlling the pilus biogenesis of Lb. rhamnosus GG and related piliated Gram-positive species. PMID:27070897

  5. Large-scale association analysis identifies new lung cancer susceptibility loci and heterogeneity in genetic susceptibility across histological subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, James D.; Hung, Rayjean J.; Han, Younghun; Zong, Xuchen; Carreras-Torres, Robert; Christiani, David C.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Johansson, Mattias; Xiao, Xiangjun; Li, Yafang; Byun, Jinyoung; Dunning, Alison; Pooley, Karen A.; Qian, David C.; Ji, Xuemei; Liu, Geoffrey; Timofeeva, Maria N.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Wu, Xifeng; Le Marchand, Loic; Albanes, Demetrios; Bickeböller, Heike; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Bush, William S.; Tardon, Adonina; Rennert, Gad; Teare, M. Dawn; Field, John K.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Lazarus, Philip; Haugen, Aage; Lam, Stephen; Schabath, Matthew B.; Andrew, Angeline S.; Shen, Hongbing; Hong, Yun-Chul; Yuan, Jian-Min; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Pesatori, Angela C.; Ye, Yuanqing; Diao, Nancy; Su, Li; Zhang, Ruyang; Brhane, Yonathan; Leighl, Natasha; Johansen, Jakob S.; Mellemgaard, Anders; Saliba, Walid; Haiman, Christopher A.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Fernandez-Somoano, Ana; Fernandez-Tardon, Guillermo; van der Heijden, Henricus F.M.; Kim, Jin Hee; Dai, Juncheng; Hu, Zhibin; Davies, Michael PA; Marcus, Michael W.; Brunnström, Hans; Manjer, Jonas; Melander, Olle; Muller, David C.; Overvad, Kim; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Tumino, Rosario; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Barnett, Matt P.; Chen, Chu; Goodman, Gary E.; Cox, Angela; Taylor, Fiona; Woll, Penella; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Manz, Judith; Muley, Thomas R.; Risch, Angela; Rosenberger, Albert; Grankvist, Kjell; Johansson, Mikael; Shepherd, Frances A.; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Arnold, Susanne M.; Haura, Eric B.; Bolca, Ciprian; Holcatova, Ivana; Janout, Vladimir; Kontic, Milica; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mukeria, Anush; Ognjanovic, Simona; Orlowski, Tadeusz M.; Scelo, Ghislaine; Swiatkowska, Beata; Zaridze, David; Bakke, Per; Skaug, Vidar; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Duell, Eric J.; Butler, Lesley M.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Gao, Yu-Tang; Houlston, Richard S.; McLaughlin, John; Stevens, Victoria L.; Joubert, Philippe; Lamontagne, Maxime; Nickle, David C.; Obeidat, Ma’en; Timens, Wim; Zhu, Bin; Song, Lei; Kachuri, Linda; Artigas, María Soler; Tobin, Martin D.; Wain, Louise V.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E.; Reginsson, Gunnar W.; Stefansson, Kari; Hancock, Dana B.; Bierut, Laura J.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Lutz, Sharon M.; Gu, Fangyi; Johnson, Eric O.; Kamal, Ahsan; Pikielny, Claudio; Zhu, Dakai; Lindströem, Sara; Jiang, Xia; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Bossé, Yohan; Chanock, Stephen; Brennan, Paul; Landi, Maria Teresa; Amos, Christopher I.

    2017-01-01

    Summary While several lung cancer susceptibility loci have been identified, much of lung cancer heritability remains unexplained. Here, 14,803 cases and 12,262 controls of European descent were genotyped on the OncoArray and combined with existing data for an aggregated GWAS analysis of lung cancer on 29,266 patients and 56,450 controls. We identified 18 susceptibility loci achieving genome wide significance, including 10 novel loci. The novel loci highlighted the striking heterogeneity in genetic susceptibility across lung cancer histological subtypes, with four loci associated with lung cancer overall and six with lung adenocarcinoma. Gene expression quantitative trait analysis (eQTL) in 1,425 normal lung tissues highlighted RNASET2, SECISBP2L and NRG1 as candidate genes. Other loci include genes such as a cholinergic nicotinic receptor, CHRNA2, and the telomere-related genes, OFBC1 and RTEL1. Further exploration of the target genes will continue to provide new insights into the etiology of lung cancer. PMID:28604730

  6. A genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies new childhood obesity loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Taal, H. Rob; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Scherag, André; Lecoeur, Cecile; Warrington, Nicole M.; Hypponen, Elina; Holst, Claus; Valcarcel, Beatriz; Thiering, Elisabeth; Salem, Rany M.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Zhao, Jianhua; Berkowitz, Robert I.; Vimaleswaran, Karani S.; Jarick, Ivonne; Pennell, Craig E.; Evans, David M.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Berry, Diane J.; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeinera, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van der Valk, Ralf J.P.; de Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Gauderman, William J.; Hassanein, Mohamed T.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Mägi, Reedik; Boreham, Colin A.G.; Neville, Charlotte E.; Moreno, Luis A.; Elliott, Paul; Pouta, Anneli; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Li, Mingyao; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Eriksson, Johan G.; Palotie, Aarno; Dallongeville, Jean; Das, Shikta; Deloukas, Panos; McMahon, George; Ring, Susan M.; Kemp, John P.; Buxton, Jessica L.; Blakemore, Alexandra I.F.; Bustamante, Mariona; Guxens, Mònica; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans; Gilliland, Frank D.; Heinrich, Joachim; Wheeler, Eleanor; Barroso, Inês; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Power, Chris; Palmer, Lyle J.; Hinney, Anke; Widen, Elisabeth; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; McCarthy, Mark I.; Froguel, Philippe; Meyre, David; Hebebrand, Johannes; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Smith, George Davey; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F.A.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple genetic variants have been associated with adult obesity and a few with severe obesity in childhood; however, less progress has been made to establish genetic influences on common early-onset obesity. We performed a North American-Australian-European collaborative meta-analysis of fourteen studies consisting of 5,530 cases (≥95th percentile of body mass index (BMI)) and 8,318 controls (<50th percentile of BMI) of European ancestry. Taking forward the eight novel signals yielding association with P < 5×10−6 in to nine independent datasets (n = 2,818 cases and 4,083 controls) we observed two loci that yielded a genome wide significant combined P-value, namely near OLFM4 on 13q14 (rs9568856; P=1.82×10−9; OR=1.22) and within HOXB5 on 17q21 (rs9299; P=3.54×10−9; OR=1.14). Both loci continued to show association when including two extreme childhood obesity cohorts (n = 2,214 cases and 2,674 controls). Finally, these two loci yielded directionally consistent associations in the GIANT meta-analysis of adult BMI1. PMID:22484627

  7. Evolutionary Dynamics of Mating-Type Loci of Mycosphaerella spp. Occurring on Banana▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzanlou, Mahdi; Crous, Pedro W.; Zwiers, Lute-Harm

    2010-01-01

    The devastating Sigatoka disease complex of banana is primarily caused by three closely related heterothallic fungi belonging to the genus Mycosphaerella: M. fijiensis, M. musicola, and M. eumusae. Previous phylogenetic work showing common ancestry led us to analyze the mating-type loci of these Mycosphaerella species occurring on banana. We reasoned that this might provide better insight into the evolutionary history of these species. PCR and chromosome-walking approaches were used to clone the mating-type loci of M. musicola and M. eumusae. Sequences were compared to the published mating-type loci of M. fijiensis and other Mycosphaerella spp., and a novel organization of the MAT loci was found. The mating-type loci of the examined Mycosphaerella species are expanded, containing two additional Mycosphaerella-specific genes in a unique genomic organization. The proteins encoded by these novel genes show a higher interspecies than intraspecies homology. Moreover, M. fijiensis, M. musicola, and M. eumusae contain two additional mating-type-like loci, containing parts of both MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1. The data indicate that M. fijiensis, M. musicola, and M. eumusae share an ancestor in which a fusion event occurred between MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 sequences and in which additional genes became incorporated into the idiomorph. The new genes incorporated have since then evolved independently in the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 loci. Thus, these data are an example of the evolutionary dynamics of fungal MAT loci in general and show the great flexibility of the MAT loci of Mycosphaerella species in particular. PMID:19915079

  8. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats Are emm Type-Specific in Highly Prevalent Group A Streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Po-Xing; Chan, Yuen-Chi; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Wang, Shu-Ying; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Lin, Yee-Shin; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are the bacterial adaptive immune system against foreign nucleic acids. Given the variable nature of CRISPR, it could be a good marker for molecular epidemiology. Group A streptococcus is one of the major human pathogens. It has two CRISPR loci, including CRISPR01 and CRISPR02. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of CRISPR-associated gene cassettes (cas) and CRISPR arrays in highly prevalent emm types. The cas cassette and CRISPR array in two CRISPR loci were analyzed in a total of 332 strains, including emm1, emm3, emm4, emm12, and emm28 strains. The CRISPR type was defined by the spacer content of each CRISPR array. All strains had at least one cas cassette or CRISPR array. More than 90% of the spacers were found in one emm type, specifically. Comparing the consistency between emm and CRISPR types by Simpson's index of diversity and the adjusted Wallace coefficient, CRISPR01 type was concordant to emm type, and CRISPR02 showed unidirectional congruence to emm type, suggesting that at least for the majority of isolates causing infection in high income countries, the emm type can be inferred from CRISPR analysis, which can further discriminate isolates sharing the same emm type.

  9. Controllable spin-charge transport in strained graphene nanoribbon devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diniz, Ginetom S., E-mail: ginetom@gmail.com; Guassi, Marcos R. [Institute of Physics, University of Brasília, 70919-970, Brasília-DF (Brazil); Qu, Fanyao [Institute of Physics, University of Brasília, 70919-970, Brasília-DF (Brazil); Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-09-21

    We theoretically investigate the spin-charge transport in two-terminal device of graphene nanoribbons in the presence of a uniform uniaxial strain, spin-orbit coupling, exchange field, and smooth staggered potential. We show that the direction of applied strain can efficiently tune strain-strength induced oscillation of band-gap of armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR). It is also found that electronic conductance in both AGNR and zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) oscillates with Rashba spin-orbit coupling akin to the Datta-Das field effect transistor. Two distinct strain response regimes of electronic conductance as function of spin-orbit couplings magnitude are found. In the regime of small strain, conductance of ZGNR presents stronger strain dependence along the longitudinal direction of strain. Whereas for high values of strain shows larger effect for the transversal direction. Furthermore, the local density of states shows that depending on the smoothness of the staggered potential, the edge states of AGNR can either emerge or be suppressed. These emerging states can be determined experimentally by either spatially scanning tunneling microscope or by scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Our findings open up new paradigms of manipulation and control of strained graphene based nanostructure for application on novel topological quantum devices.

  10. Admixture mapping of 15,280 African Americans identifies obesity susceptibility loci on chromosomes 5 and X.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yu Cheng

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity (body mass index (BMI > or =30 kg/m(2 is higher in African Americans than in European Americans, even after adjustment for socioeconomic factors, suggesting that genetic factors may explain some of the difference. To identify genetic loci influencing BMI, we carried out a pooled analysis of genome-wide admixture mapping scans in 15,280 African Americans from 14 epidemiologic studies. Samples were genotyped at a median of 1,411 ancestry-informative markers. After adjusting for age, sex, and study, BMI was analyzed both as a dichotomized (top 20% versus bottom 20% and a continuous trait. We found that a higher percentage of European ancestry was significantly correlated with lower BMI (rho = -0.042, P = 1.6x10(-7. In the dichotomized analysis, we detected two loci on chromosome X as associated with increased African ancestry: the first at Xq25 (locus-specific LOD = 5.94; genome-wide score = 3.22; case-control Z = -3.94; and the second at Xq13.1 (locus-specific LOD = 2.22; case-control Z = -4.62. Quantitative analysis identified a third locus at 5q13.3 where higher BMI was highly significantly associated with greater European ancestry (locus-specific LOD = 6.27; genome-wide score = 3.46. Further mapping studies with dense sets of markers will be necessary to identify the alleles in these regions of chromosomes X and 5 that may be associated with variation in BMI.

  11. Identification of six new susceptibility loci for invasive epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Ramus, Susan J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Lee, Andrew; Shen, Howard C; Beesley, Jonathan; Lawrenson, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Janet M; Spindler, Tassja J; Lin, Yvonne G; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Li, Qiyuan; Coetzee, Simon; Hazelett, Dennis; Miron, Alexander; Southey, Melissa; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Benitez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Garcia, Maria Jose; Komenaka, Ian; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Ganschow, Pamela; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bernard, Loris; Viel, Alessandra; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Manoukian, Siranoush; Radice, Paolo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Frost, Debra; Perkins, Jo; Platte, Radka; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Meindl, Alfons; Engel, Christoph; Sutter, Christian; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Damiola, Francesca; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Kirk, Judy; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Piedmonte, Marion; O'Malley, David M; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Collée, J Margriet; Rookus, Matti A; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Hamann, Ute; Isaccs, Claudine; Tischkowitz, Marc; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian G; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Brunet, Joan; Lazaro, Conxi; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Jakubowska, Anna; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Plante, Marie; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pankratz, Vernon S; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Szabo, Csilla I; Kauff, Noah; Vijai, Joseph; Aghajanian, Carol A; Pfeiler, Georg; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Kruse, Torben A; Thomassen, Mads; Bojesen, Anders; Zidan, Jamal; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Soller, Maria; Liljegren, Annelie; Arver, Brita; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Lu, Karen H; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Wicklund, Kristine G; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rudolph, Anja; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Moysich, Kirsten B; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston, Lara; Lele, Shashi; Wilkens, Lynne R; Goodman, Marc T; Thompson, Pamela J; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Pelttari, Liisa M; Butzow, Ralf; Modugno, Francesmary; Kelley, Joseph L; Edwards, Robert P; Ness, Roberta B; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Orsulic, Sandra; Jensen, Allan; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Hogdall, Estrid; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Woo, Yin-Ling; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Cunningham, Julie M; Vierkant, Robert A; Bruinsma, Fiona; Giles, Graham G; Liang, Dong; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Wu, Xifeng; Levine, Douglas A; Bisogna, Maria; Berchuck, Andrew; Iversen, Edwin S; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Concannon, Patrick; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Poole, Elizabeth M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Bandera, Elisa V; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H; Krakstad, Camilla; Salvesen, Helga B; Tangen, Ingvild L; Bjorge, Line; van Altena, Anne M; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Kellar, Melissa; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Kelemen, Linda E; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Cybulski, Cezary; Yang, Hannah; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise A; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Hogdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Nedergaard, Lotte; Baker, Helen; Song, Honglin; Eccles, Diana; McNeish, Ian; Paul, James; Carty, Karen; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Glasspool, Rosalind; Whittemore, Alice S; Rothstein, Joseph H; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Ji, Bu-Tian; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Rosen, Barry; Risch, Harvey A; McLaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Monteiro, Alvaro N; Chen, Ann; Lin, Hui-Yi; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Sellers, Thomas A; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Chen, Zhihua; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Harrington, Patricia; Lee, Alice W; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste L; Coetzee, Gerry; Pike, Malcolm C; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Timorek, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Freedman, Matt; Noushmehr, Houtan; Easton, Douglas F; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Gayther, Simon; Pharoah, Paul P; Antoniou, Antonis C; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2015-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 12 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) susceptibility alleles. The pattern of association at these loci is consistent in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers who are at high risk of EOC. After imputation to 1000 Genomes Project data, we assessed associations of 11 million genetic variants with EOC risk from 15,437 cases unselected for family history and 30,845 controls and from 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers (3,096 with ovarian cancer), and we combined the results in a meta-analysis. This new study design yielded increased statistical power, leading to the discovery of six new EOC susceptibility loci. Variants at 1p36 (nearest gene, WNT4), 4q26 (SYNPO2), 9q34.2 (ABO) and 17q11.2 (ATAD5) were associated with EOC risk, and at 1p34.3 (RSPO1) and 6p22.1 (GPX6) variants were specifically associated with the serous EOC subtype, all with P < 5 × 10(-8). Incorporating these variants into risk assessment tools will improve clinical risk predictions for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  12. Genetic Characterization of Bacillus anthracis 17 JB strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed-Mohamadi, Sakineh; Moradi Bidhendi, Soheila; Tadayon, Keyvan; Ghaderi, Rainak

    2015-06-01

    Bacillus anthracis is one of the most homogenous bacteria ever described. Some level of diversity. Bacillus anthracis 17JB is a laboratory strain It is broadly used as a challenge strain in guinea pigs for potency test of anthrax vaccine. This work describes genetic characterization of B. anthracis 17 JB strain using the SNPs and MLVA genotyping. In SNPs typing, the originally French 17JB strain represented the A.Br. 008/009 subgroup. In Levy's genotyping method, 843, 451 and 864 bp long fragments were identified at AA03, AJ03 and AA07 loci, respectively. In the vaccine manufacturer perspective these findings are much valuable on their own account, but similar research is required to extend molecular knowledge of B. anthracis epidemiology in Persia.

  13. Immunochip analysis identification of 6 additional susceptibility loci for Crohn's disease in Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Suk-Kyun; Hong, Myunghee; Choi, Hyunchul; Zhao, Wanting; Jung, Yusun; Haritunians, Talin; Ye, Byong Duk; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Park, Sang Hyoung; Lee, Inchul; Kim, Won Ho; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Young-Ho; Jang, Byung Ik; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Jai Hyun; Koo, Ja Seol; Lee, Ji Hyun; Jung, Sung-Ae; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Kang, Daehee; Youn, Hee-Shang; Taylor, Kent D; Rotter, Jerome I; Liu, Jianjun; McGovern, Dermot P B; Song, Kyuyoung

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an intractable inflammatory bowel disease of unknown cause. Recent genome-wide association studies of CD in Korean and Japanese populations suggested marginal sharing of susceptibility loci between Caucasian and Asian populations. As the 7 identified loci altogether explain 5.31% of the risk for CD, the objective of this study was to identify additional CD susceptibility loci in the Korean population. Using the ImmunoChip custom single-nucleotide polymorphism array designed for dense genotyping of 186 loci identified through GWAS, we analyzed 722 individuals with CD and 461 controls for 96,048 SNP markers in the discovery stage, followed by validation in an additional 948 affected individuals and 977 controls. We confirmed 6 previously reported loci in Caucasian: GPR35 at 2q37 (rs3749172; P = 5.30 × 10, odds ratio [OR] = 1.45), ZNF365 at 10q21 (rs224143; P = 2.20 × 10, OR = 1.38), ZMIZ1 at 10q22 (rs1250569; P = 3.05 × 10, OR = 1.30), NKX2-3 at 10q24 (rs4409764; P = 7.93 × 10, OR = 1.32), PTPN2 at 18p11 (rs514000; P = 9.00 × 10, OR = 1.33), and USP25 at 21q11 (rs2823256; P = 2.49 × 10, OR = 1.35), bringing the number of known CD loci (including 3 in the HLA) in Koreans to 15. The 6 additional loci increased the total genetic variance for CD risk from 5.31% to 7.27% in Koreans. Although the different genetic backgrounds of CD between Asian and Western countries has been well established for the major susceptibility genes, our findings of overlapping associations offer new insights into the genetic architecture of CD.

  14. A Constitutive Model for Strain-Controlled Strength Degradation of Rockmasses (SDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalos, A.; Kavvadas, M.

    2017-11-01

    The paper describes a continuum, rate-independent, incremental plasticity constitutive model applicable in weak rocks and heavily fractured rockmasses, where mechanical behaviour is controlled by rockmass strength rather than structural features (discontinuities). The model describes rockmass structure by a generalised Hoek-Brown Structure Envelope (SE) in the stress space. Stress paths inside the SE are nonlinear and irreversible to better simulate behaviour at strains up to peak strength and under stress reversals. Stress paths on the SE have user-controlled volume dilatancy (gradually reducing to zero at large shear strains) and can model post-peak strain softening of brittle rockmasses via a structure degradation (damage) mechanism triggered by accumulated plastic shear strains. As the SE may strain harden with plastic strains, ductile behaviour can also be modelled. The model was implemented in the Finite Element Code Simulia ABAQUS and was applied in plane strain (2D) excavation of a cylindrical cavity (tunnel) to predict convergence-confinement curves. It is shown that small-strain nonlinearity, variable volume dilatancy and post-peak hardening/softening strongly affect the predicted curves, resulting in corresponding differences of lining pressures in real tunnel excavations.

  15. Crystallization engineering as a route to epitaxial strain control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Akbashev

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The controlled synthesis of epitaxial thin films offers opportunities for tuning their functional properties via enabling or suppressing strain relaxation. Examining differences in the epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxide films, we report on an alternate, low-temperature route for strain engineering. Thin films of amorphous Bi–Fe–O were grown on (001SrTiO3 and (001LaAlO3 substrates via atomic layer deposition. In situ X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the crystallization of the amorphous films into the epitaxial (001BiFeO3 phase reveal distinct evolution profiles of crystallinity with temperature. While growth on (001SrTiO3 results in a coherently strained film, the same films obtained on (001LaAlO3 showed an unstrained, dislocation-rich interface, with an even lower temperature onset of the perovskite phase crystallization than in the case of (001SrTiO3. Our results demonstrate how the strain control in an epitaxial film can be accomplished via its crystallization from the amorphous state.

  16. Dominant Epistasis Between Two Quantitative Trait Loci Governing Sporulation Efficiency in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Juraj; Mitrikeski, Petar T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Sporulation efficiency in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a well-established model for studying quantitative traits. A variety of genes and nucleotides causing different sporulation efficiencies in laboratory, as well as in wild strains, has already been extensively characterised (mainly by reciprocal hemizygosity analysis and nucleotide exchange methods). We applied a different strategy in order to analyze the variation in sporulation efficiency of laboratory yeast strains. Coupling classical quantitative genetic analysis with simulations of phenotypic distributions (a method we call phenotype modelling) enabled us to obtain a detailed picture of the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) relationships underlying the phenotypic variation of this trait. Using this approach, we were able to uncover a dominant epistatic inheritance of loci governing the phenotype. Moreover, a molecular analysis of known causative quantitative trait genes and nucleotides allowed for the detection of novel alleles, potentially responsible for the observed phenotypic variation. Based on the molecular data, we hypothesise that the observed dominant epistatic relationship could be caused by the interaction of multiple quantitative trait nucleotides distributed across a 60--kb QTL region located on chromosome XIV and the RME1 locus on chromosome VII. Furthermore, we propose a model of molecular pathways which possibly underlie the phenotypic variation of this trait. PMID:27904371

  17. MLVA Typing of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates with Emphasis on Serotypes 14, 9N and 9V: Comparison of Previously Described Panels and Proposal of a Novel 7 VNTR Loci-Based Simplified Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Natália S; Pinto, Tatiana C A; Merquior, Vânia L C; Castro, Luciana F S; da Rocha, Filomena S P; Morais, Jaqueline M; Peralta, José M; Teixeira, Lúcia M

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae remains as an important cause of community-acquired bacterial infections, and the nasopharynx of asymptomatic carriers is the major reservoir of this microorganism. Pneumococcal strains of serotype 14 and serogroup 9 are among the most frequently isolated from both asymptomatic carriers and patients with invasive disease living in Brazil. Internationally disseminated clones belonging to such serotypes have been associated with the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance in our setting, highlighting the need for epidemiological tracking of these isolates. In this scenario, Multiple Loci VNTR Analysis (MLVA) has emerged as an alternative tool for the molecular characterization of pneumococci, in addition to more traditional techniques such as Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). In the present study, 18 VNTR loci, as well as other previously described reduced MLVA panels (7 VNTR loci), were evaluated as tools to characterize pneumococcal strains of serotypes 14, 9N and 9V belonging to international and regional clones isolated in Brazil. The 18 VNTR loci panel was highly congruent with MLST and PFGE, being also useful for indicating the genetic relationship with international clones and for discriminating among strains with indistinguishable STs and PFGE profiles. Analysis of the results also allowed deducing a novel shorter 7 VNTR loci panel, keeping a high discriminatory power for isolates of the serotypes investigated and a high congruence level with MLST and PFGE. The newly proposed simplified panel was then evaluated for typing pneumococcal strains of other commonly isolated serotypes. The results indicate that MLVA is a faster and easier to perform, reliable approach for the molecular characterization of S. pneumoniae isolates, with potential for cost-effective application, especially in resource-limited countries.

  18. Novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci implicated in epigenetic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andlauer, Till F. M.; Buck, Dorothea; Antony, Gisela; Bayas, Antonios; Bechmann, Lukas; Berthele, Achim; Chan, Andrew; Gasperi, Christiane; Gold, Ralf; Graetz, Christiane; Haas, Jürgen; Hecker, Michael; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Knop, Matthias; Kümpfel, Tania; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf A.; Loleit, Verena; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G.; Mühlau, Mark; Nischwitz, Sandra; Paul, Friedemann; Pütz, Michael; Ruck, Tobias; Salmen, Anke; Stangel, Martin; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Stürner, Klarissa H.; Tackenberg, Björn; Then Bergh, Florian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Warnke, Clemens; Weber, Frank; Wiendl, Heinz; Wildemann, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K.; Ziemann, Ulf; Zipp, Frauke; Arloth, Janine; Weber, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Scheinhardt, Markus O.; Dankowski, Theresa; Bettecken, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Czamara, Darina; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Herms, Stefan; Homuth, Georg; Ising, Marcus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kacprowski, Tim; Kloiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lill, Christina M.; Lucae, Susanne; Meitinger, Thomas; Moebus, Susanne; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nöthen, Markus M.; Petersmann, Astrid; Rawal, Rajesh; Schminke, Ulf; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wellmann, Jürgen; Porcu, Eleonora; Mulas, Antonella; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Cucca, Francesco; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmer, Bernhard; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility in German cohorts with 4888 cases and 10,395 controls. In addition to associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 15 non-MHC loci reached genome-wide significance. Four of these loci are novel MS susceptibility loci. They map to the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, ERG, and SHMT1. The lead variant at SHMT1 was replicated in an independent Sardinian cohort. Products of the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, and ERG play important roles in immune cell regulation. SHMT1 encodes a serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzing the transfer of a carbon unit to the folate cycle. This reaction is required for regulation of methylation homeostasis, which is important for establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures. Our GWAS approach in a defined population with limited genetic substructure detected associations not found in larger, more heterogeneous cohorts, thus providing new clues regarding MS pathogenesis. PMID:27386562

  19. Novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci implicated in epigenetic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andlauer, Till F M; Buck, Dorothea; Antony, Gisela; Bayas, Antonios; Bechmann, Lukas; Berthele, Achim; Chan, Andrew; Gasperi, Christiane; Gold, Ralf; Graetz, Christiane; Haas, Jürgen; Hecker, Michael; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Knop, Matthias; Kümpfel, Tania; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf A; Loleit, Verena; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G; Mühlau, Mark; Nischwitz, Sandra; Paul, Friedemann; Pütz, Michael; Ruck, Tobias; Salmen, Anke; Stangel, Martin; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Stürner, Klarissa H; Tackenberg, Björn; Then Bergh, Florian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Warnke, Clemens; Weber, Frank; Wiendl, Heinz; Wildemann, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K; Ziemann, Ulf; Zipp, Frauke; Arloth, Janine; Weber, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Scheinhardt, Markus O; Dankowski, Theresa; Bettecken, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Czamara, Darina; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Binder, Elisabeth B; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Herms, Stefan; Homuth, Georg; Ising, Marcus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kacprowski, Tim; Kloiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lill, Christina M; Lucae, Susanne; Meitinger, Thomas; Moebus, Susanne; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nöthen, Markus M; Petersmann, Astrid; Rawal, Rajesh; Schminke, Ulf; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wellmann, Jürgen; Porcu, Eleonora; Mulas, Antonella; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Cucca, Francesco; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmer, Bernhard; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility in German cohorts with 4888 cases and 10,395 controls. In addition to associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 15 non-MHC loci reached genome-wide significance. Four of these loci are novel MS susceptibility loci. They map to the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, ERG, and SHMT1. The lead variant at SHMT1 was replicated in an independent Sardinian cohort. Products of the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, and ERG play important roles in immune cell regulation. SHMT1 encodes a serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzing the transfer of a carbon unit to the folate cycle. This reaction is required for regulation of methylation homeostasis, which is important for establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures. Our GWAS approach in a defined population with limited genetic substructure detected associations not found in larger, more heterogeneous cohorts, thus providing new clues regarding MS pathogenesis.

  20. Prion propagation and toxicity occur in vitro with two-phase kinetics specific to strain and neuronal type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaoui, Samia; Maatouk, Layal; Privat, Nicolas; Levavasseur, Etienne; Faucheux, Baptiste A; Haïk, Stéphane

    2013-03-01

    Prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), are fatal neurodegenerative disorders that occur in humans and animals. The neuropathological hallmarks of TSEs are spongiosis, glial proliferation, and neuronal loss. The only known specific molecular marker of TSEs is the abnormal isoform (PrP(Sc)) of the host-encoded prion protein (PrP(C)), which accumulates in the brain of infected subjects and forms infectious prion particles. Although this transmissible agent lacks a specific nucleic acid component, several prion strains have been isolated. Prion strains are characterized by differences in disease outcome, PrP(Sc) distribution patterns, and brain lesion profiles at the terminal stage of the disease. The molecular factors and cellular mechanisms involved in strain-specific neuronal tropism and toxicity remain largely unknown. Currently, no cellular model exists to facilitate in vitro studies of these processes. A few cultured cell lines that maintain persistent scrapie infections have been developed, but only two of them have shown the cytotoxic effects associated with prion propagation. In this study, we have developed primary neuronal cultures to assess in vitro neuronal tropism and toxicity of different prion strains (scrapie strains 139A, ME7, and 22L). We have tested primary neuronal cultures enriched in cerebellar granular, striatal, or cortical neurons. Our results showed that (i) a strain-specific neuronal tropism operated in vitro; (ii) the cytotoxic effect varied among strains and neuronal cell types; (iii) prion propagation and toxicity occurred in two kinetic phases, a replicative phase followed by a toxic phase; and (iv) neurotoxicity peaked when abnormal PrP accumulation reached a plateau.

  1. Association analysis identifies 65 new breast cancer risk loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lindström, Sara; Dennis, Joe

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risk is influenced by rare coding variants in susceptibility genes, such as BRCA1, and many common, mostly non-coding variants. However, much of the genetic contribution to breast cancer risk remains unknown. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study of breast...... cancer in 122,977 cases and 105,974 controls of European ancestry and 14,068 cases and 13,104 controls of East Asian ancestry. We identified 65 new loci that are associated with overall breast cancer risk at P risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms in these loci fall......-nucleotide polymorphisms in regulatory features was 2-5-fold enriched relative to the genome-wide average, with strong enrichment for particular transcription factor binding sites. These results provide further insight into genetic susceptibility to breast cancer and will improve the use of genetic risk scores...

  2. A critical re-evaluation of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) efforts in Wolbachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleidorn, Christoph; Gerth, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria, Rickettsiales) is the most common, and arguably one of the most important inherited symbionts. Molecular differentiation of Wolbachia strains is routinely performed with a set of five multilocus sequence typing (MLST) markers. However, since its inception in 2006, the performance of MLST in Wolbachia strain typing has not been assessed objectively. Here, we evaluate the properties of Wolbachia MLST markers and compare it to 252 other single copy loci present in the genome of most Wolbachia strains. Specifically, we investigated how well MLST performs at strain differentiation, at reflecting genetic diversity of strains, and as phylogenetic marker. We find that MLST loci are outperformed by other loci at all tasks they are currently employed for, and thus that they do not reflect the properties of a Wolbachia strain very well. We argue that whole genome typing approaches should be used for Wolbachia typing in the future. Alternatively, if few loci approaches are necessary, we provide a characterisation of 252 single copy loci for a number a criteria, which may assist in designing specific typing systems or phylogenetic studies. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Genome scan for nonadditive heterotic trait loci reveals mainly underdominant effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiba, Efrat; Glikaite, Ilana; Levy, Yael; Pasternak, Zohar; Fridman, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    The overdominant model of heterosis explains the superior phenotype of hybrids by synergistic allelic interaction within heterozygous loci. To map such genetic variation in yeast, we used a population doubling time dataset of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 16 × 16 diallel and searched for major contributing heterotic trait loci (HTL). Heterosis was observed for the majority of hybrids, as they surpassed their best parent growth rate. However, most of the local heterozygous loci identified by genome scan were surprisingly underdominant, i.e., reduced growth. We speculated that in these loci adverse effects on growth resulted from incompatible allelic interactions. To test this assumption, we eliminated these allelic interactions by creating hybrids with local hemizygosity for the underdominant HTLs, as well as for control random loci. Growth of hybrids was indeed elevated for most hemizygous to HTL genes but not for control genes, hence validating the results of our genome scan. Assessing the consequences of local heterozygosity by reciprocal hemizygosity and allele replacement assays revealed the influence of genetic background on the underdominant effects of HTLs. Overall, this genome-wide study on a multi-parental hybrid population provides a strong argument against single gene overdominance as a major contributor to heterosis, and favors the dominance complementation model.

  4. LOL2 and LOL5 loci control latex production by laticifer cells in Euphorbia lathyris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelblanque, Lourdes; Balaguer, Begoña; Marti, Cristina; Orozco, Marianela; Vera, Pablo

    2018-06-07

    Laticifers are specialized plant cells capable of indefinite elongation that ramify extensively and are responsible for latex biosynthesis and accumulation. However, the mechanisms underlying laticifer cell differentiation, growth and production of latex remain largely unknown. In a search for mutants showing enhanced accumulation of latex we identified two LOT OF LATEX (LOL) loci in Euphorbia lathyris. lol2 and lol5 mutants show enhanced production of latex contained within laticifer cells. The recessive lol2 mutant carries increased biosynthesis of the plant hormone jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) and therefore establishes a genetic link between jasmonic acid (JA) signaling and latex production in laticifers. Instead, heightened production of latex in lol5 plants obeys to enhanced proliferation of laticifer cells. Phylogenetic analysis of laticifer-expressed genes in E. lathyris and in two other latex-bearing species, Euphorbia corallioides and Euphorbia palustris, allowed the identification of canonical JA responsive elements present in the gene promoter regions of laticifer marker genes. Moreover, we identified that the hormone JA functions not as a morphogen for laticifer differentiation but as a trigger for the fill out of laticifers with latex and the associated triterpenoids. The identification of LOL loci represents a further step towards the understanding of mechanisms controlling latex production in laticifer cells. No claim to original US Government works New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Fine-mapping and initial characterization of QT interval loci in African Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy L Avery

    Full Text Available The QT interval (QT is heritable and its prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden death. Most genetic studies of QT have examined European ancestral populations; however, the increased genetic diversity in African Americans provides opportunities to narrow association signals and identify population-specific variants. We therefore evaluated 6,670 SNPs spanning eleven previously identified QT loci in 8,644 African American participants from two Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE studies: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study and Women's Health Initiative Clinical Trial. Of the fifteen known independent QT variants at the eleven previously identified loci, six were significantly associated with QT in African American populations (P≤1.20×10(-4: ATP1B1, PLN1, KCNQ1, NDRG4, and two NOS1AP independent signals. We also identified three population-specific signals significantly associated with QT in African Americans (P≤1.37×10(-5: one at NOS1AP and two at ATP1B1. Linkage disequilibrium (LD patterns in African Americans assisted in narrowing the region likely to contain the functional variants for several loci. For example, African American LD patterns showed that 0 SNPs were in LD with NOS1AP signal rs12143842, compared with European LD patterns that indicated 87 SNPs, which spanned 114.2 Kb, were in LD with rs12143842. Finally, bioinformatic-based characterization of the nine African American signals pointed to functional candidates located exclusively within non-coding regions, including predicted binding sites for transcription factors such as TBX5, which has been implicated in cardiac structure and conductance. In this detailed evaluation of QT loci, we identified several African Americans SNPs that better define the association with QT and successfully narrowed intervals surrounding established loci. These results demonstrate that the same loci influence variation in QT

  6. Structure of the type IV secretion system in different strains of Anaplasma phagocytophilum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Khedery Basima

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an intracellular organism in the Order Rickettsiales that infects diverse animal species and is causing an emerging disease in humans, dogs and horses. Different strains have very different cell tropisms and virulence. For example, in the U.S., strains have been described that infect ruminants but not dogs or rodents. An intriguing question is how the strains of A. phagocytophilum differ and what different genome loci are involved in cell tropisms and/or virulence. Type IV secretion systems (T4SS are responsible for translocation of substrates across the cell membrane by mechanisms that require contact with the recipient cell. They are especially important in organisms such as the Rickettsiales which require T4SS to aid colonization and survival within both mammalian and tick vector cells. We determined the structure of the T4SS in 7 strains from the U.S. and Europe and revised the sequence of the repetitive virB6 locus of the human HZ strain. Results Although in all strains the T4SS conforms to the previously described split loci for vir genes, there is great diversity within these loci among strains. This is particularly evident in the virB2 and virB6 which are postulated to encode the secretion channel and proteins exposed on the bacterial surface. VirB6-4 has an unusual highly repetitive structure and can have a molecular weight greater than 500,000. For many of the virs, phylogenetic trees position A. phagocytophilum strains infecting ruminants in the U.S. and Europe distant from strains infecting humans and dogs in the U.S. Conclusions Our study reveals evidence of gene duplication and considerable diversity of T4SS components in strains infecting different animals. The diversity in virB2 is in both the total number of copies, which varied from 8 to 15 in the herein characterized strains, and in the sequence of each copy. The diversity in virB6 is in the sequence of each of the 4 copies in

  7. Cyclic Elastoplastic Performance of Aluminum 7075-T6 Under Strain- and Stress-Controlled Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, Dylan; Wallbrink, Chris; Kourousis, Kyriakos I.

    2017-12-01

    Elastoplastic investigations of aerospace aluminum are important in the development of an understanding of the possible cyclic transient effects and their contribution to the material performance under cyclic loading. Cyclic plasticity can occur in an aerospace aluminum component or structure depending on the loading conditions and the presence of external and internal discontinuities. Therefore, it is vital that the cyclic transient effects of aerospace aluminum are recognized and understood. This study investigates experimentally the cyclic elastoplastic performance of aluminum 7075-T6 loaded in symmetric strain control, and asymmetric stress and strain control. A combination of cyclic hardening and softening was noticed from high strain amplitude symmetric strain-controlled tests and at low stress amplitude asymmetric stress-controlled tests. From asymmetric strain control results, the extent of mean stress relaxation depended on the size of the strain amplitude. Additionally, saturation of the ratcheting strain (plastic shakedown) was also found to occur during asymmetric stress control tests. The experimental results were further analyzed using published microstructure research from the past two decades to provide added explanation of the micro-mechanism contribution to the cyclic transient behavior.

  8. Genotyping of the MTL loci and susceptibility to two antifungal agents of Candida glabrata clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Lavaniegos-Sobrino

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata is the second most common isolate from bloodstream infections worldwide and is naturally less susceptible to the antifungal drug fluconazole than other Candida species. C. glabrata is a haploid yeast that contains three mating-type like loci (MTL, although no sexual cycle has been described. Strains containing both types of mating information at the MTL1 locus are found in clinical isolates, but it is thought that strains containing type a information are more common. Here we investigated if a particular combination of mating type information at each MTLlocus is more prevalent in clinical isolates from hospitalized patients in Mexico and if there is a correlation between mating information and resistance to fluconazole and 5-fluorocytosine. We found that while both types of information at MTL1 are equally represented in a collection of 64 clinical isolates, the vast majority of isolates contain a-type information at MTL2 and α-type at MTL3. We also found no correlation of the particular combination of mating type information at the three MTL loci and resistance to fluconazole.

  9. Integrative analysis of a cross-loci regulation network identifies App as a gene regulating insulin secretion from pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhidong Tu

    Full Text Available Complex diseases result from molecular changes induced by multiple genetic factors and the environment. To derive a systems view of how genetic loci interact in the context of tissue-specific molecular networks, we constructed an F2 intercross comprised of >500 mice from diabetes-resistant (B6 and diabetes-susceptible (BTBR mouse strains made genetically obese by the Leptin(ob/ob mutation (Lep(ob. High-density genotypes, diabetes-related clinical traits, and whole-transcriptome expression profiling in five tissues (white adipose, liver, pancreatic islets, hypothalamus, and gastrocnemius muscle were determined for all mice. We performed an integrative analysis to investigate the inter-relationship among genetic factors, expression traits, and plasma insulin, a hallmark diabetes trait. Among five tissues under study, there are extensive protein-protein interactions between genes responding to different loci in adipose and pancreatic islets that potentially jointly participated in the regulation of plasma insulin. We developed a novel ranking scheme based on cross-loci protein-protein network topology and gene expression to assess each gene's potential to regulate plasma insulin. Unique candidate genes were identified in adipose tissue and islets. In islets, the Alzheimer's gene App was identified as a top candidate regulator. Islets from 17-week-old, but not 10-week-old, App knockout mice showed increased insulin secretion in response to glucose or a membrane-permeant cAMP analog, in agreement with the predictions of the network model. Our result provides a novel hypothesis on the mechanism for the connection between two aging-related diseases: Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes.

  10. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E; Looger, Loren L; Zhou, Xu-Jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-Yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Wren, Jonathan D; Harley, John B; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,478 SLE cases and 12,656 controls from six East Asian cohorts to identify new SLE susceptibility loci and better localize known loci. We identified ten new loci and confirmed 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the new loci, the most significant locus was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta = 3.75 × 10(-117), odds ratio (OR) = 2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We identified the most likely functional variants at each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene expression data. Ten candidate variants are known to alter gene expression in cis or in trans. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B cell and T cell biology. The new loci, together with previously known loci, increase the explained heritability of SLE to 24%. The new loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics.

  11. The mating type-like loci of Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez-Carrillo, Patricia; Robledo-Márquez, Karina A; Ramírez-Zavaleta, Candy Y; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a haploid and opportunistic fungal pathogen that has not known sexual cycle, has conserved the majority of the genes required for mating and cell type identity. The C. glabrata genome contains three mating-type-like loci called MTL1, MTL2 and MTL3. The three loci encode putative transcription factors, a1, α1 and α2 that regulate cell type identity and sexual reproduction in other fungi like the closely related Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MTL1 can contain either a or α information. MTL2, which contains a information and MTL3 with α information, are relatively close to two telomeres. MTL1 and MTL2 are transcriptionally active, while MTL3 is subject to an incomplete silencing nucleated at the telomere that depends on the silencing proteins Sir2, Sir3, Sir4, yKu70/80, Rif1, Rap1 and Sum1. C. glabrata does not seem to maintain cell type identity, as cell type-specific genes are expressed regardless of the type (or even absence) of mating information. These data highlight important differences in the control of mating and cell type identity between the non-pathogenic yeast S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata, which might explain the absence of a sexual cycle in C. glabrata. The fact that C. glabrata has conserved the vast majority of the genes involved in mating might suggest that some of these genes perhaps have been rewired to control other processes important for the survival inside the host as a commensal or as a human pathogen. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Enrichment of putative PAX8 target genes at serous epithelial ovarian cancer susceptibility loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kar, Siddhartha P; Adler, Emily; Tyrer, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 18 loci associated with serous ovarian cancer (SOC) susceptibility but the biological mechanisms driving these findings remain poorly characterised. Germline cancer risk loci may be enriched for target genes of transcription factors...... (TFs) critical to somatic tumorigenesis. METHODS: All 615 TF-target sets from the Molecular Signatures Database were evaluated using gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and three GWAS for SOC risk: discovery (2196 cases/4396 controls), replication (7035 cases/21 693 controls; independent from discovery...... to interact with PAX8 in the literature to the PAX8-target set and applying an alternative to GSEA, interval enrichment, further confirmed this association (P=0.006). Fifteen of the 157 genes from this expanded PAX8 pathway were near eight loci associated with SOC risk at P

  13. Bioethanol strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae characterised by microsatellite and stress resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Vanda Renata; Antonangelo, Ana Teresa Burlamaqui Faraco; Bassi, Ana Paula Guarnieri; Colombi, Débora; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae may display characteristics that are typical of rough-type colonies, made up of cells clustered in pseudohyphal structures and comprised of daughter buds that do not separate from the mother cell post-mitosis. These strains are known to occur frequently in fermentation tanks with significant lower ethanol yield when compared to fermentations carried out by smooth strains of S. cerevisiae that are composed of dispersed cells. In an attempt to delineate genetic and phenotypic differences underlying the two phenotypes, this study analysed 10 microsatellite loci of 22 S. cerevisiae strains as well as stress resistance towards high concentrations of ethanol and glucose, low pH and cell sedimentation rates. The results obtained from the phenotypic tests by Principal-Component Analysis revealed that unlike the smooth colonies, the rough colonies of S. cerevisiae exhibit an enhanced resistance to stressful conditions resulting from the presence of excessive glucose and ethanol and high sedimentation rate. The microsatellite analysis was not successful to distinguish between the colony phenotypes as phenotypic assays. The relevant industrial strain PE-2 was observed in close genetic proximity to rough-colony although it does not display this colony morphology. A unique genetic pattern specific to a particular phenotype remains elusive. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression QTL analysis of top loci from GWAS meta-analysis highlights additional schizophrenia candidate genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jong, Simone; van Eijk, Kristel R; Zeegers, Dave W L H

    2012-01-01

    of the Psychiatric GWAS consortium (PGC) yielded five novel loci for schizophrenia. In this study, we aim to highlight additional schizophrenia susceptibility loci from the PGC study by combining the top association findings from the discovery stage (9394 schizophrenia cases and 12 462 controls) with expression QTLs...

  15. Genetic fine mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaulton, Kyle J; Ferreira, Teresa; Lee, Yeji

    2015-01-01

    We performed fine mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in or near KCNQ1. 'Credible sets' of the variants most likely to drive each distinct...... signal mapped predominantly to noncoding sequence, implying that association with T2D is mediated through gene regulation. Credible set variants were enriched for overlap with FOXA2 chromatin immunoprecipitation binding sites in human islet and liver cells, including at MTNR1B, where fine mapping...... implicated rs10830963 as driving T2D association. We confirmed that the T2D risk allele for this SNP increases FOXA2-bound enhancer activity in islet- and liver-derived cells. We observed allele-specific differences in NEUROD1 binding in islet-derived cells, consistent with evidence that the T2D risk allele...

  16. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 56 bone mineral density loci and reveals 14 loci associated with risk of fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Karol; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Evangelou, Evangelos; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Duncan, Emma L; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Oei, Ling; Albagha, Omar M E; Amin, Najaf; Kemp, John P; Koller, Daniel L; Li, Guo; Liu, Ching-Ti; Minster, Ryan L; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Willner, Dana; Xiao, Su-Mei; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Alonso, Nerea; Eriksson, Joel; Kammerer, Candace M; Kaptoge, Stephen K; Leo, Paul J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wilson, Scott G; Wilson, James F; Aalto, Ville; Alen, Markku; Aragaki, Aaron K; Aspelund, Thor; Center, Jacqueline R; Dailiana, Zoe; Duggan, David J; Garcia, Melissa; Garcia-Giralt, Natàlia; Giroux, Sylvie; Hallmans, Göran; Hocking, Lynne J; Husted, Lise Bjerre; Jameson, Karen A; Khusainova, Rita; Kim, Ghi Su; Kooperberg, Charles; Koromila, Theodora; Kruk, Marcin; Laaksonen, Marika; Lacroix, Andrea Z; Lee, Seung Hun; Leung, Ping C; Lewis, Joshua R; Masi, Laura; Mencej-Bedrac, Simona; Nguyen, Tuan V; Nogues, Xavier; Patel, Millan S; Prezelj, Janez; Rose, Lynda M; Scollen, Serena; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Smith, Albert V; Svensson, Olle; Trompet, Stella; Trummer, Olivia; van Schoor, Natasja M; Woo, Jean; Zhu, Kun; Balcells, Susana; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Buckley, Brendan M; Cheng, Sulin; Christiansen, Claus; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George; Ford, Ian; Frost, Morten; Goltzman, David; González-Macías, Jesús; Kähönen, Mika; Karlsson, Magnus; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Koh, Jung-Min; Kollia, Panagoula; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt; Leslie, William D; Lips, Paul; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorenc, Roman S; Marc, Janja; Mellström, Dan; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Olmos, José M; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Reid, David M; Riancho, José A; Ridker, Paul M; Rousseau, François; Slagboom, P Eline; Tang, Nelson LS; Urreizti, Roser; Van Hul, Wim; Viikari, Jorma; Zarrabeitia, María T; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Castano-Betancourt, Martha; Grundberg, Elin; Herrera, Lizbeth; Ingvarsson, Thorvaldur; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kwan, Tony; Li, Rui; Luben, Robert; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Palsson, Stefan Th; Reppe, Sjur; Rotter, Jerome I; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Verlaan, Dominique; Williams, Frances MK; Wood, Andrew R; Zhou, Yanhua; Gautvik, Kaare M; Pastinen, Tomi; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Cauley, Jane A; Chasman, Daniel I; Clark, Graeme R; Cummings, Steven R; Danoy, Patrick; Dennison, Elaine M; Eastell, Richard; Eisman, John A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jones, Graeme; Jukema, J Wouter; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liu, Yongmei; Lorentzon, Mattias; McCloskey, Eugene; Mitchell, Braxton D; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Oostra, Ben A; Peacock, Munro; Pols, Huibert A P; Prince, Richard L; Raitakari, Olli; Reid, Ian R; Robbins, John; Sambrook, Philip N; Sham, Pak Chung; Shuldiner, Alan R; Tylavsky, Frances A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wareham, Nick J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Econs, Michael J; Evans, David M; Harris, Tamara B; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Psaty, Bruce M; Reeve, Jonathan; Spector, Timothy D; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Zillikens, M Carola; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Ohlsson, Claes; Karasik, David; Richards, J Brent; Brown, Matthew A; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; Ralston, Stuart H; Ioannidis, John P A; Kiel, Douglas P; Rivadeneira, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is the most important predictor of fracture risk. We performed the largest meta-analysis to date on lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD, including 17 genome-wide association studies and 32,961 individuals of European and East Asian ancestry. We tested the top-associated BMD markers for replication in 50,933 independent subjects and for risk of low-trauma fracture in 31,016 cases and 102,444 controls. We identified 56 loci (32 novel)associated with BMD atgenome-wide significant level (P<5×10−8). Several of these factors cluster within the RANK-RANKL-OPG, mesenchymal-stem-cell differentiation, endochondral ossification and the Wnt signalling pathways. However, we also discovered loci containing genes not known to play a role in bone biology. Fourteen BMD loci were also associated with fracture risk (P<5×10−4, Bonferroni corrected), of which six reached P<5×10−8 including: 18p11.21 (C18orf19), 7q21.3 (SLC25A13), 11q13.2 (LRP5), 4q22.1 (MEPE), 2p16.2 (SPTBN1) and 10q21.1 (DKK1). These findings shed light on the genetic architecture and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying BMD variation and fracture susceptibility. PMID:22504420

  17. Evidence of Brucella strain ST27 in bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetnić, Željko; Duvnjak, Sanja; Đuras, Martina; Gomerčić, Tomislav; Reil, Irena; Zdelar-Tuk, Maja; Špičić, Silvio

    2016-11-30

    Marine mammal brucellosis has been known for more than 20 years, but recent work suggests it is more widespread than originally thought. Brucella (B.) pinnipedialis has been isolated from pinnipeds, while B. ceti strains have been associated with cetaceans. Here we report a Brucella strain isolated from multiple lymph nodes of one bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) during routine examination of dolphin carcasses found in the Croatian part of the northern Adriatic Sea during the summer of 2015. Classical bacteriological biotyping, PCR-based techniques (single, multiplex, PCR-RFLP) and 16S rRNA DNA sequencing were used to identify Brucella spp. Multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis of 16 loci and multilocus sequence typing of 9 loci were used for genotyping and species determination. The combination of bacteriological, molecular and genotyping techniques identified our strain as ST27, previously identified as a human pathogen. This report provides, to our knowledge, the first evidence of ST27 in the Adriatic Sea in particular and in European waters in general. The zoonotic nature of the strain and its presence in the Adriatic, which is inhabited by bottlenose dolphins, suggest that the strain may pose a significant threat to human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. EXPRESSION OF GENETIC LOCI IN THE PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONONUCLEAR FRACTION FROM PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Kogan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The early diagnosis and radical treatment of aggressive prostate cancers (PC is an effective way of improving survival and quality of life in patients. To develop mini-invasive tests is one of the ways of solving the problem. The cells of a peripheral blood mononuclear fraction in the expression patterns of their genetic loci reflect the presence or absence of cancers, including information on therapeutic effectiveness. RT-PRC was used to study the relative expression of 15 genetic loci in a chromosome and one locus of mitochondrial DNA in the cells of the peripheral blood mononuclear fraction in patients with PC or benign prostate hyperplasia and in healthy men. The genetic locus patterns whose change may be of informative value for differential diagnosis in patients with different stages of PC were revealed. The authors studied the relationship and showed the prognostic role and non-relationship of the altered transcriptional activity of loci in the TP53, GSTP1, and IL10 genes in PC to the changes in prostate-specific antigen the level with 90 % specificity and 93 % specificity.

  19. Elliptical posts allow for detailed control of non-equibiaxial straining of cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Christian Gammelgaard; Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; de Zee, Mark

    2013-01-01

    tissue cells in vivo are subjected to a range of mechanical deformations including shear strain caused by activities of daily living. Shear strains are suspected to play an important role in tissue necrosis. Method The Flexcell system was redesigned using a finite element model in order to obtain large...... areas of the membrane in a controlled, uniform non-equibiaxial strain state. Results The redesign was manufactured and the resulting strains were experimentally validated by means of image analysis methods. The results showed that the system could be used for experiments varying the shear strain....... Conclusion The result allows scientists and experimentalists to apply detailed control of the strain tensor applied to tissue samples in two dimensions....

  20. Exome chip meta-analysis identifies novel loci and East Asian-specific coding variants that contribute to lipid levels and coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Xiangfeng; Peloso, Gina M; Liu, Dajiang J

    2017-01-01

    Most genome-wide association studies have been of European individuals, even though most genetic variation in humans is seen only in non-European samples. To search for novel loci associated with blood lipid levels and clarify the mechanism of action at previously identified lipid loci, we used a...

  1. Identification of genetic determinants of the sexual dimorphism in CNS autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Bearoff

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a debilitating chronic inflammatory disease of the nervous system that affects approximately 2.3 million individuals worldwide, with higher prevalence in females, and a strong genetic component. While over 200 MS susceptibility loci have been identified in GWAS, the underlying mechanisms whereby they contribute to disease susceptibility remains ill-defined. Forward genetics approaches using conventional laboratory mouse strains are useful in identifying and functionally dissecting genes controlling disease-relevant phenotypes, but are hindered by the limited genetic diversity represented in such strains. To address this, we have combined the powerful chromosome substitution (consomic strain approach with the genetic diversity of a wild-derived inbred mouse strain. Using experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model of MS, we evaluated genetic control of disease course among a panel of 26 consomic strains of mice inheriting chromosomes from the wild-derived PWD strain on the C57BL/6J background, which models the genetic diversity seen in human populations. Nineteen linkages on 18 chromosomes were found to harbor loci controlling EAE. Of these 19 linkages, six were male-specific, four were female-specific, and nine were non-sex-specific, consistent with a differential genetic control of disease course between males and females. An MS-GWAS candidate-driven bioinformatic analysis using orthologous genes linked to EAE course identified sex-specific and non-sex-specific gene networks underlying disease pathogenesis. An analysis of sex hormone regulation of genes within these networks identified several key molecules, prominently including the MAP kinase family, known hormone-dependent regulators of sex differences in EAE course. Importantly, our results provide the framework by which consomic mouse strains with overall genome-wide genetic diversity, approximating that seen in humans, can be used as a rapid and

  2. Genetic fine mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Gaulton (Kyle); T. Ferreira (Teresa); Y. Lee (Yeji); A. Raimondo (Anne); R. Mägi (Reedik); M.E. Reschen (Michael E.); A. Mahajan (Anubha); A. Locke (Adam); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); N.R. Robertson (Neil); R.A. Scott (Robert); I. Prokopenko (Inga); L.J. Scott (Laura); T. Green (Todd); T. Sparsø (Thomas); D. Thuillier (Dorothee); L. Yengo (Loic); H. Grallert (Harald); S. Wahl (Simone); M. Frånberg (Mattias); R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); H. Kestler (Hans); H. Chheda (Himanshu); L. Eisele (Lewin); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); L. Qi (Lu); L.C. Karssen (Lennart); E.M. van Leeuwen (Elisa); S.M. Willems (Sara); M. Li (Man); H. Chen (Han); C. Fuchsberger (Christian); P. Kwan (Phoenix); C. Ma (Clement); M. Linderman (Michael); Y. Lu (Yingchang); S.K. Thomsen (Soren K.); J.K. Rundle (Jana K.); N.L. Beer (Nicola L.); M. van de Bunt (Martijn); A. Chalisey (Anil); H.M. Kang (Hyun Min); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); P. Almgren (Peter); D. Baldassarre (Damiano); B. Balkau (Beverley); R. Benediktsson (Rafn); M. Blüher (Matthias); H. Boeing (Heiner); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); E.P. Bottinger (Erwin P.); N.P. Burtt (Noël); J. Carey (Jason); G. Charpentier (Guillaume); P.S. Chines (Peter); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); D.J. Couper (David J.); A. Crenshaw (Andrew); R.M. van Dam (Rob); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); M. Dorkhan (Mozhgan); T. Edkins (Ted); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); T. Esko (Tõnu); E. Eury (Elodie); J. Fadista (João); J. Flannick (Jason); P. Fontanillas (Pierre); C.S. Fox (Caroline); P.W. Franks (Paul W.); K. Gertow (Karl); C. Gieger (Christian); B. Gigante (Bruna); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); G.B. Grant (George); N. Grarup (Niels); C.J. Groves (Christopher J.); M. Hassinen (Maija); C.T. Have (Christian T.); C. Herder (Christian); O.L. Holmen (Oddgeir); A.B. Hreidarsson (Astradur); S.E. Humphries (Steve E.); D.J. Hunter (David J.); A.U. Jackson (Anne); A. Jonsson (Anna); M.E. Jørgensen (Marit E.); T. Jørgensen (Torben); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); N.D. Kerrison (Nicola D.); L. Kinnunen (Leena); N. Klopp (Norman); A. Kong (Augustine); P. Kovacs (Peter); P. Kraft (Peter); J. Kravic (Jasmina); C. Langford (Cordelia); K. Leander (Karin); L. Liang (Liming); P. Lichtner (Peter); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia M.); B. Lindholm (Bengt); A. Linneberg (Allan); C.-T. Liu (Ching-Ti); S. Lobbens (Stéphane); J. Luan (Jian'fan); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); S. Männistö (Satu); O. McLeod (Olga); J. Meyer (Jobst); E. Mihailov (Evelin); G. Mirza (Ghazala); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); C. Navarro (Carmen); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); N.N. Oskolkov (Nikolay N.); K.R. Owen (Katharine); D. Palli (Domenico); S. Pechlivanis (Sonali); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); J.R.B. Perry (John); C.P. Platou (Carl); M. Roden (Michael); D. Ruderfer (Douglas); D. Rybin (Denis); Y.T. Van Der Schouw (Yvonne T.); B. Sennblad (Bengt); G. Sigurosson (Gunnar); A. Stancáková (Alena); D. Steinbach; P. Storm (Petter); K. Strauch (Konstantin); H.M. Stringham (Heather); Q. Sun; B. Thorand (Barbara); E. Tikkanen (Emmi); A. Tönjes (Anke); J. Trakalo (Joseph); E. Tremoli (Elena); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); R. Wennauer (Roman); S. Wiltshire (Steven); A.R. Wood (Andrew); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); I. Dunham (Ian); E. Birney (Ewan); L. Pasquali (Lorenzo); J. Ferrer (Jorge); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); J. Dupuis (Josée); J.C. Florez (Jose); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); J.S. Pankow (James); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); J.B. Meigs (James B.); F.B. Hu (Frank B.); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); T.A. Lakka (Timo); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); M. Stumvoll (Michael); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy L.); L. Lind (Lars); S. Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi (Sirkka); E. Korpi-Hyövälti (Eeva); T. Saaristo (Timo); J. Saltevo (Juha); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); M. Laakso (Markku); A. Metspalu (Andres); R. Erbel (Raimund); K.-H. Jöckel (Karl-Heinz); S. Moebus (Susanne); S. Ripatti (Samuli); V. Salomaa (Veikko); E. Ingelsson (Erik); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); R.N. Bergman (Richard N.); F.S. Collins (Francis S.); K.L. Mohlke (Karen L.); H. Koistinen (Heikki); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); K. Hveem (Kristian); I. Njølstad (Inger); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); P.J. Donnelly (Peter J.); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); U. de Faire (Ulf); A. Hamsten (Anders); T. Illig (Thomas); A. Peters (Annette); S. Cauchi (Stephane); R. Sladek (Rob); P. Froguel (Philippe); T. Hansen (Torben); O. Pedersen (Oluf); A.D. Morris (Andrew); C.N.A. Palmer (Collin N. A.); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); O. Melander (Olle); P.M. Nilsson (Peter M.); L. Groop (Leif); I.E. Barroso (Inês); C. Langenberg (Claudia); N.J. Wareham (Nicholas J.); C.A. O'Callaghan (Christopher A.); A.L. Gloyn (Anna); D. Altshuler (David); M. Boehnke (Michael); T.M. Teslovich (Tanya M.); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); A.P. Morris (Andrew)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe performed fine mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in or near KCNQ1. 'Credible sets' of the variants most likely to drive each

  3. Genetic fine mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaulton, Kyle J; Ferreira, Teresa; Lee, Yeji; Raimondo, Anne; Mägi, Reedik; Reschen, Michael E; Mahajan, Anubha; Locke, Adam; William Rayner, N; Robertson, Neil; Scott, Robert A; Prokopenko, Inga; Scott, Laura J; Green, Todd; Sparso, Thomas; Thuillier, Dorothee; Yengo, Loic; Grallert, Harald; Wahl, Simone; Frånberg, Mattias; Strawbridge, Rona J; Kestler, Hans; Chheda, Himanshu; Eisele, Lewin; Gustafsson, Stefan; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Qi, Lu; Karssen, Lennart C; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Willems, Sara M; Li, Man; Chen, Han; Fuchsberger, Christian; Kwan, Phoenix; Ma, Clement; Linderman, Michael; Lu, Yingchang; Thomsen, Soren K; Rundle, Jana K; Beer, Nicola L; van de Bunt, Martijn; Chalisey, Anil; Kang, Hyun Min; Voight, Benjamin F; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Blüher, Matthias; Boeing, Heiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bottinger, Erwin P; Burtt, Noël P; Carey, Jason; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Couper, David J; Crenshaw, Andrew T; van Dam, Rob M; Doney, Alex S F; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; Edkins, Sarah; Eriksson, Johan G; Esko, Tonu; Eury, Elodie; Fadista, João; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fox, Caroline; Franks, Paul W; Gertow, Karl; Gieger, Christian; Gigante, Bruna; Gottesman, Omri; Grant, George B; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Hassinen, Maija; Have, Christian T; Herder, Christian; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hreidarsson, Astradur B; Humphries, Steve E; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Anne U; Jonsson, Anna; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Kao, Wen-Hong L; Kerrison, Nicola D; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kovacs, Peter; Kraft, Peter; Kravic, Jasmina; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Liang, Liming; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lindholm, Eero; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Lobbens, Stéphane; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; McLeod, Olga; Meyer, Julia; Mihailov, Evelin; Mirza, Ghazala; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Carmen; Nöthen, Markus M; Oskolkov, Nikolay N; Owen, Katharine R; Palli, Domenico; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Peltonen, Leena; Perry, John R B; Platou, Carl G P; Roden, Michael; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rybin, Denis; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Sennblad, Bengt; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Stančáková, Alena; Steinbach, Gerald; Storm, Petter; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Thorand, Barbara; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tonjes, Anke; Trakalo, Joseph; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Wennauer, Roman; Wiltshire, Steven; Wood, Andrew R; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Dunham, Ian; Birney, Ewan; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Ferrer, Jorge; Loos, Ruth J F; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Pankow, James S; van Duijn, Cornelia; Sijbrands, Eric; Meigs, James B; Hu, Frank B; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Stumvoll, Michael; Pedersen, Nancy L; Lind, Lars; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Saaristo, Timo E; Saltevo, Juha; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Metspalu, Andres; Erbel, Raimund; Jöcke, Karl-Heinz; Moebus, Susanne; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Ingelsson, Erik; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Koistinen, Heikki; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hveem, Kristian; Njølstad, Inger; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Donnelly, Peter J; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Illig, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Cauchi, Stephane; Sladek, Rob; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Collin N A; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Nilsson, Peter M; Groop, Leif C; Barroso, Inês; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Gloyn, Anna L; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; Teslovich, Tanya M; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    We performed fine mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in or near KCNQ1. 'Credible sets' of the variants most likely to drive each distinct

  4. Genome-wide association studies in the Japanese population identify seven novel loci for type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imamura, Minako; Takahashi, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 80 susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D), but most of its heritability still remains to be elucidated. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis of GWAS for T2D in the Japanese population. Combined data from discovery...... and subsequent validation analyses (23,399 T2D cases and 31,722 controls) identify 7 new loci with genome-wide significance (P2, rs7107784 near MIR4686 and rs67839313 near INAFM2....... Of these, the association of 4 loci with T2D is replicated in multi-ethnic populations other than Japanese (up to 65,936 T2Ds and 158,030 controls, P

  5. CYCLIC PLASTIC BEHAVIOUR OF UFG COPPER UNDER CONTROLLED STRESS AND STRAIN LOADING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Navrátilová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of stress- and strain-controlled loading on microstructure and cyclic plastic behaviour of ultrafine-grained copper prepared by equal channel angular pressing was examined. The stability of microstructure is a characteristic feature for stress-controlled test whereas grain coarsening and development of bimodal structure was observed after plastic strain-controlled tests. An attempt to explain the observed behaviour was made.

  6. [Virus strain specific serum neutralizing antibodies in children and adolescents immunized with a Russian mumps vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrashevskaia, E V; Krasil'nikov, I V; Ignat'ev, G M

    2010-01-01

    Postvaccination immunity was studied in the children and teenagers without a history of clinical mumps infection, who had been immunized with the Leningrad-3 mumps vaccine. The level of specific lgG in ELISA and that and spectrum of their neutralizing activity against a vaccine strain and three heterologous mumps virus (MV) strains (genotypes A, C, and H) were measured. The investigation included 151 sera from the vaccinees aged 3 to 17 years, possessing the detectable specific IgG titers in ELISA and the detectable neutralizing titers against the vaccine strain. 97.4% of the vaccinees had neutralizing activity against 1-3 heterologous MV strains. A preponderance of neutralizing titers against heterologous MV strains by 1-log2 in some sera (6.5-32.5 depending on age) was most likely to suggest that the vaccinees' had been in contact with these virus strains in the past. In our investigation, a combination of positive IgG titers and neutralizing titers against the vaccine strain 2-log2 or higher provided the protection of the vaccinated children and teenagers against the symptomatic infection. There was a pronounced buster effect of the second immunization and a drop in the neutralizing activity of the sera from the vaccinated children and adolescents over time after the first and second immunization.

  7. Four loci explain 83% of size variation in the horse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouh Makvandi-Nejad

    Full Text Available Horse body size varies greatly due to intense selection within each breed. American Miniatures are less than one meter tall at the withers while Shires and Percherons can exceed two meters. The genetic basis for this variation is not known. We hypothesize that the breed population structure of the horse should simplify efforts to identify genes controlling size. In support of this, here we show with genome-wide association scans (GWAS that genetic variation at just four loci can explain the great majority of horse size variation. Unlike humans, which are naturally reproducing and possess many genetic variants with weak effects on size, we show that horses, like other domestic mammals, carry just a small number of size loci with alleles of large effect. Furthermore, three of our horse size loci contain the LCORL, HMGA2 and ZFAT genes that have previously been found to control human height. The LCORL/NCAPG locus is also implicated in cattle growth and HMGA2 is associated with dog size. Extreme size diversification is a hallmark of domestication. Our results in the horse, complemented by the prior work in cattle and dog, serve to pinpoint those very few genes that have played major roles in the rapid evolution of size during domestication.

  8. Seventy-five genetic loci influencing the human red blood cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Harst, Pim; Zhang, Weihua; Mateo Leach, Irene; Rendon, Augusto; Verweij, Niek; Sehmi, Joban; Paul, Dirk S; Elling, Ulrich; Allayee, Hooman; Li, Xinzhong; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Voss, Katrin; Weichenberger, Christian X; Albers, Cornelis A; Al-Hussani, Abtehale; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Ciullo, Marina; Danjou, Fabrice; Dina, Christian; Esko, Tõnu; Evans, David M; Franke, Lude; Gögele, Martin; Hartiala, Jaana; Hersch, Micha; Holm, Hilma; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; Lagou, Vasiliki; Langenberg, Claudia; Lopez, Lorna M; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Melander, Olle; Murgia, Federico; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Reilly, Paul F; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Parsa, Afshin; Pirastu, Nicola; Porcu, Eleonora; Portas, Laura; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S; Shin, So-Youn; Tang, Clara S; Teumer, Alexander; Traglia, Michela; Ulivi, Sheila; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yang, Jian; Zhao, Jing Hua; Anni, Franco; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Attwood, Antony; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bastardot, François; Benyamin, Beben; Boehm, Bernhard O; Cookson, William O; Das, Debashish; de Bakker, Paul I W; de Boer, Rudolf A; de Geus, Eco J C; de Moor, Marleen H; Dimitriou, Maria; Domingues, Francisco S; Döring, Angela; Engström, Gunnar; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Krista; Galanello, Renzo; Garner, Stephen F; Genser, Bernd; Gibson, Quince D; Girotto, Giorgia; Gudbjartsson, Daniel Fannar; Harris, Sarah E; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hastie, Claire E; Hedblad, Bo; Illig, Thomas; Jolley, Jennifer; Kähönen, Mika; Kema, Ido P; Kemp, John P; Liang, Liming; Lloyd-Jones, Heather; Loos, Ruth J F; Meacham, Stuart; Medland, Sarah E; Meisinger, Christa; Memari, Yasin; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Kathy; Moffatt, Miriam F; Nauck, Matthias; Novatchkova, Maria; Nutile, Teresa; Olafsson, Isleifur; Onundarson, Pall T; Parracciani, Debora; Penninx, Brenda W; Perseu, Lucia; Piga, Antonio; Pistis, Giorgio; Pouta, Anneli; Puc, Ursula; Raitakari, Olli; Ring, Susan M; Robino, Antonietta; Ruggiero, Daniela; Ruokonen, Aimo; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Sala, Cinzia; Salumets, Andres; Sambrook, Jennifer; Schepers, Hein; Schmidt, Carsten Oliver; Silljé, Herman H W; Sladek, Rob; Smit, Johannes H; Starr, John M; Stephens, Jonathan; Sulem, Patrick; Tanaka, Toshiko; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tragante, Vinicius; van Gilst, Wiek H; van Pelt, L Joost; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Völker, Uwe; Whitfield, John B; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Wirnsberger, Gerald; Algra, Ale; Cucca, Francesco; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; Danesh, John; Deary, Ian J; Dominiczak, Anna F; Elliott, Paul; Fortina, Paolo; Froguel, Philippe; Gasparini, Paolo; Greinacher, Andreas; Hazen, Stanley L; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Khaw, Kay Tee; Lehtimäki, Terho; Maerz, Winfried; Martin, Nicholas G; Metspalu, Andres; Mitchell, Braxton D; Montgomery, Grant W; Moore, Carmel; Navis, Gerjan; Pirastu, Mario; Pramstaller, Peter P; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Schadt, Eric; Scott, James; Shuldiner, Alan R; Smith, George Davey; Smith, J Gustav; Snieder, Harold; Sorice, Rossella; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Stumvoll, Michael; Tang, W H Wilson; Toniolo, Daniela; Tönjes, Anke; Visscher, Peter M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Boomsma, Dorret I; Beckmann, Jacques S; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Ferreira, Manuel A; Sanna, Serena; Uda, Manuela; Hicks, Andrew A; Penninger, Josef Martin; Gieger, Christian; Kooner, Jaspal S; Ouwehand, Willem H; Soranzo, Nicole; Chambers, John C

    2012-12-20

    Anaemia is a chief determinant of global ill health, contributing to cognitive impairment, growth retardation and impaired physical capacity. To understand further the genetic factors influencing red blood cells, we carried out a genome-wide association study of haemoglobin concentration and related parameters in up to 135,367 individuals. Here we identify 75 independent genetic loci associated with one or more red blood cell phenotypes at P < 10(-8), which together explain 4-9% of the phenotypic variance per trait. Using expression quantitative trait loci and bioinformatic strategies, we identify 121 candidate genes enriched in functions relevant to red blood cell biology. The candidate genes are expressed preferentially in red blood cell precursors, and 43 have haematopoietic phenotypes in Mus musculus or Drosophila melanogaster. Through open-chromatin and coding-variant analyses we identify potential causal genetic variants at 41 loci. Our findings provide extensive new insights into genetic mechanisms and biological pathways controlling red blood cell formation and function.

  9. Quantitative trait loci for maysin synthesis in maize (Zea mays L.) lines selected for high silk maysin content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J D F; Snook, M E; Houchins, K E; Rector, B G; Widstrom, N W; McMullen, M D

    2007-06-01

    Maysin is a naturally occurring C-glycosyl flavone found in maize (Zea mays L.) silk tissue that confers resistance to corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea, Boddie). Recently, two new maize populations were derived for high silk maysin. The two populations were named the exotic populations of maize (EPM) and the southern inbreds of maize (SIM). Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was employed to determine which loci were responsible for elevated maysin levels in inbred lines derived from the EPM and SIM populations. The candidate genes consistent with QTL position included the p (pericarp color), c2 (colorless2), whp1 (white pollen1) and in1 (intensifier1) loci. The role of these loci in controlling high maysin levels in silks was tested by expression analysis and use of the loci as genetic markers onto the QTL populations. These studies support p, c2 and whp1, but not in1, as loci controlling maysin. Through this study, we determined that the p locus regulates whp1 transcription and that increased maysin in these inbred lines was primarily due to alleles at both structural and regulatory loci promoting increased flux through the flavone pathway by increasing chalcone synthase activity.

  10. Genome-wide Meta-analyses of Breast, Ovarian and Prostate Cancer Association Studies Identify Multiple New Susceptibility Loci Shared by At Least Two Cancer Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Siddhartha P.; Beesley, Jonathan; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kote-Jarai, ZSofia; Lawrenson, Kate; Lindstrom, Sara; Ramus, Susan J.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Kibel, Adam S.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Michael, Agnieszka; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wolk, Alicja; Monteiro, Alvaro; Peixoto, Ana; Kierzek, Andrzej; Cox, Angela; Rudolph, Anja; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Wu, Anna H.; Lindblom, Annika; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ekici, Arif B.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Blomqvist, Carl; Phelan, Catherine; McLean, Catriona; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Vachon, Celine; Cybulski, Cezary; Slavov, Chavdar; Stegmaier, Christa; Maier, Christiane; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Teerlink, Craig C.; Kang, Daehee; Tessier, Daniel C.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Stram, Daniel O.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Neal, David E.; Eccles, Diana; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Wokozorczyk, Dominika; Levine, Douglas A.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Høgdall, Estrid; Song, Fengju; Bruinsma, Fiona; Heitz, Florian; Modugno, Francesmary; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Giles, Graham G.; Olsson, Håkan; Wildiers, Hans; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Pandha, Hardev; Risch, Harvey A.; Darabi, Hatef; Salvesen, Helga B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Gronberg, Henrik; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Song, Honglin; Lim, Hui-Yi; McNeish, Iain; Campbell, Ian; Vergote, Ignace; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubiński, Jan; Stanford, Janet L.; Benítez, Javier; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Permuth, Jennifer B.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Donovan, Jenny L.; Dennis, Joe; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schleutker, Johanna; Hopper, John L.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Park, Jong Y.; Figueroa, Jonine; Clements, Judith A.; Knight, Julia A.; Peto, Julian; Cunningham, Julie M.; Pow-Sang, Julio; Batra, Jyotsna; Czene, Kamila; Lu, Karen H.; Herkommer, Kathleen; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Matsuo, Keitaro; Muir, Kenneth; Offitt, Kenneth; Chen, Kexin; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Odunsi, Kunle; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Fitzgerald, Liesel M.; Cook, Linda S.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Hooning, Maartje J.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Luedeke, Manuel; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Goodman, Marc T.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Riggan, Marjorie; Aly, Markus; Rossing, Mary Anne; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Moisse, Matthieu; Sanderson, Maureen; Southey, Melissa C.; Jones, Michael; Lush, Michael; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Hou, Ming-Feng; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Bogdanova, Natalia; Rahman, Nazneen; Le, Nhu D.; Orr, Nick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Pashayan, Nora; Peterlongo, Paolo; Guénel, Pascal; Brennan, Paul; Paulo, Paula; Webb, Penelope M.; Broberg, Per; Fasching, Peter A.; Devilee, Peter; Wang, Qin; Cai, Qiuyin; Li, Qiyuan; Kaneva, Radka; Butzow, Ralf; Kopperud, Reidun Kristin; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Stephenson, Robert A.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Winqvist, Robert; Ness, Roberta; Milne, Roger L.; Travis, Ruth C.; Benlloch, Sara; Olson, Sara H.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Maia, Sofia; Berndt, Sonja; Lee, Soo Chin; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Pejovic, Tanja; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Dörk, Thilo; Brüning, Thomas; Wahlfors, Tiina; Key, Tim J.; Edwards, Todd L.; Menon, Usha; Hamann, Ute; Mitev, Vanio; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Kristensen, Vessela; Arndt, Volker; Vogel, Walther; Zheng, Wei; Sieh, Weiva; Blot, William J.; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Schumacher, Fredrick; Freedman, Matthew L.; Berchuck, Andrew; Dunning, Alison M.; Simard, Jacques; Haiman, Christopher A.; Spurdle, Amanda; Sellers, Thomas A.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Hall, Per; Gayther, Simon A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Eeles, Rosalind; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Lambrechts, Diether

    2016-01-01

    Breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers are hormone-related and may have a shared genetic basis but this has not been investigated systematically by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Meta-analyses combining the largest GWA meta-analysis data sets for these cancers totaling 112,349 cases and 116,421 controls of European ancestry, all together and in pairs, identified at P cancer loci: three associated with susceptibility to all three cancers (rs17041869/2q13/BCL2L11; rs7937840/11q12/INCENP; rs1469713/19p13/GATAD2A), two breast and ovarian cancer risk loci (rs200182588/9q31/SMC2; rs8037137/15q26/RCCD1), and two breast and prostate cancer risk loci (rs5013329/1p34/NSUN4; rs9375701/6q23/L3MBTL3). Index variants in five additional regions previously associated with only one cancer also showed clear association with a second cancer type. Cell-type specific expression quantitative trait locus and enhancer-gene interaction annotations suggested target genes with potential cross-cancer roles at the new loci. Pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of death receptor signaling genes near loci with P cancer meta-analysis. PMID:27432226

  11. Influence of Different Yield Loci on Failure Prediction with Damage Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heibel, S.; Nester, W.; Clausmeyer, T.; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2017-09-01

    Advanced high strength steels are widely used in the automotive industry to simultaneously improve crash performance and reduce the car body weight. A drawback of these multiphase steels is their sensitivity to damage effects and thus the reduction of ductility. For that reason the Forming Limit Curve is only partially suitable for this class of steels. An improvement in failure prediction can be obtained by using damage mechanics. The objective of this paper is to comparatively review the phenomenological damage model GISSMO and the Enhanced Lemaitre Damage Model. GISSMO is combined with three different yield loci, namely von Mises, Hill48 and Barlat2000 to investigate the influence of the choice of the plasticity description on damage modelling. The Enhanced Lemaitre Model is used with Hill48. An inverse parameter identification strategy for a DP1000 based on stress-strain curves and optical strain measurements of shear, uniaxial, notch and (equi-)biaxial tension tests is applied to calibrate the models. A strong dependency of fracture strains on the choice of yield locus can be observed. The identified models are validated on a cross-die cup showing ductile fracture with slight necking.

  12. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association scans identifies IL18RAP, PTPN2, TAGAP, and PUS10 as shared risk loci for Crohn's disease and celiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora A M Festen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD and celiac disease (CelD are chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases, involving genetic and environmental factors in their pathogenesis. The two diseases can co-occur within families, and studies suggest that CelD patients have a higher risk to develop CD than the general population. These observations suggest that CD and CelD may share common genetic risk loci. Two such shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, have already been identified independently in these two diseases. The aim of our study was to explicitly identify shared risk loci for these diseases by combining results from genome-wide association study (GWAS datasets of CD and CelD. Specifically, GWAS results from CelD (768 cases, 1,422 controls and CD (3,230 cases, 4,829 controls were combined in a meta-analysis. Nine independent regions had nominal association p-value <1.0 x 10⁻⁵ in this meta-analysis and showed evidence of association to the individual diseases in the original scans (p-value < 1 x 10⁻² in CelD and < 1 x 10⁻³ in CD. These include the two previously reported shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, with p-values of 3.37 x 10⁻⁸ and 6.39 x 10⁻⁹, respectively, in the meta-analysis. The other seven had not been reported as shared loci and thus were tested in additional CelD (3,149 cases and 4,714 controls and CD (1,835 cases and 1,669 controls cohorts. Two of these loci, TAGAP and PUS10, showed significant evidence of replication (Bonferroni corrected p-values <0.0071 in the combined CelD and CD replication cohorts and were firmly established as shared risk loci of genome-wide significance, with overall combined p-values of 1.55 x 10⁻¹⁰ and 1.38 x 10⁻¹¹ respectively. Through a meta-analysis of GWAS data from CD and CelD, we have identified four shared risk loci: PTPN2, IL18RAP, TAGAP, and PUS10. The combined analysis of the two datasets provided the power, lacking in the individual GWAS for single diseases, to detect shared loci with a

  13. Construction of a recombinant Bacillus velezensis strain as an integrated control agent against plant diseases and insect pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jong Yul; Liu, Qin; Choi, Jae Young; Wang, Yong; Shim, Hee Jin; Xu, Hong Guang; Choi, Gyung Ja; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Je, Yeon Ho

    2009-10-01

    To construct a new recombinant strain of Bacillus velezensis that has antifungal and insecticidal activity via the expression of the insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein, a B. thuringiensis expression vector (pHT1K-1Ac) was generated that contained the B. thuringiensis cry1Ac gene under the control of its endogenous promoter in a minimal E. coli-B. thuringiensis shuttle vector (pHT1K). This vector was introduced into a B. velezensis isolate that showed high antifungal activities against several plant diseases, including rice blast (Magnaporthe grisea), rice sheath blight (Rhizotonia solani), tomato gray mold (Botrytis cinerea), tomato late blight (Phytophthora infestans), and wheat leaf rust (Puccinia recondita), by electroporation. The recombinant B. velezensis strain was confirmed by PCR using cry1Ac-specific primers. Additionally, the recombinant strain produced a protein approximately 130 kDa in size and parasporal inclusion bodies similar to B. thuringiensis. The in vivo antifungal activity assay demonstrated that the activity of the recombinant B. velezensis strain was maintained at the same level as that of wild-type B. velezensis. Furthermore, it exhibited high insecticidal activity against a lepidopteran pest, Plutella xylostella, although its activity was lower than that of a recombinant B. thuringiensis strain, whereas wild-type B. velezensis strain did not show any insecticidal activity. These results suggest that this recombinant B. velezensis strain can be used to control harmful insect pests and fungal diseases simultaneously in one crop.

  14. Field-induced strain memory with non-180 .deg. domain-reorientation control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadota, Yoichi; Hosaka, Hiroshi; Morita, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    Using non-180 .deg. domain-reorientation control, we propose the strain memory effect in ferroelectric ceramics. Electric fields with asymmetric amplitudes were applied to soft-type lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics, and the strain hysteresis and the polarization loop were measured. The butterfly curve became asymmetric under an electric field with a particular asymmetric amplitude. The asymmetric butterfly curve had two stable strain states at zero electric field. Thus, the strain memory effect was realized as the difference between the two stable strain states. An XRD analysis was carried out to verify the contribution of the non-180 .deg. domain reorientation to the strain memory effect. The non-180 .deg. domain reorientation was determined as the intensity ratio of the (002) to the (200) peak. The strain memory determined from macroscopic strain measurements had a linear relationship to the non-180 .deg. domain volume fraction. This result indicated the origin of the strain memory to be the non-180 .deg. domain reorientation.

  15. [Standard algorithm of molecular typing of Yersinia pestis strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroshenko, G A; Odinokov, G N; Kukleva, L M; Pavlova, A I; Krasnov, Ia M; Shavina, N Iu; Guseva, N P; Vinogradova, N A; Kutyrev, V V

    2012-01-01

    Development of the standard algorithm of molecular typing of Yersinia pestis that ensures establishing of subspecies, biovar and focus membership of the studied isolate. Determination of the characteristic strain genotypes of plague infectious agent of main and nonmain subspecies from various natural foci of plague of the Russian Federation and the near abroad. Genotyping of 192 natural Y. pestis strains of main and nonmain subspecies was performed by using PCR methods, multilocus sequencing and multilocus analysis of variable tandem repeat number. A standard algorithm of molecular typing of plague infectious agent including several stages of Yersinia pestis differentiation by membership: in main and nonmain subspecies, various biovars of the main subspecies, specific subspecies; natural foci and geographic territories was developed. The algorithm is based on 3 typing methods--PCR, multilocus sequence typing and multilocus analysis of variable tandem repeat number using standard DNA targets--life support genes (terC, ilvN, inv, glpD, napA, rhaS and araC) and 7 loci of variable tandem repeats (ms01, ms04, ms06, ms07, ms46, ms62, ms70). The effectiveness of the developed algorithm is shown on the large number of natural Y. pestis strains. Characteristic sequence types of Y. pestis strains of various subspecies and biovars as well as MLVA7 genotypes of strains from natural foci of plague of the Russian Federation and the near abroad were established. The application of the developed algorithm will increase the effectiveness of epidemiologic monitoring of plague infectious agent, and analysis of epidemics and outbreaks of plague with establishing the source of origin of the strain and routes of introduction of the infection.

  16. A revised nomenclature for transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and ERV-like sequences comprise 8% of the human genome. A hitherto unknown proportion of ERV loci are transcribed and thus contribute to the human transcriptome. A small proportion of these loci encode functional proteins. As the role of ERVs in normal and diseased biological processes is not yet established, transcribed ERV loci are of particular interest. As more transcribed ERV loci are likely to be identified in the near future, the development of a systematic nomenclature is important to ensure that all information on each locus can be easily retrieved. Results Here we present a revised nomenclature of transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci that sorts loci into groups based on Repbase classifications. Each symbol is of the format ERV + group symbol + unique number. Group symbols are based on a mixture of Repbase designations and well-supported symbols used in the literature. The presented guidelines will allow newly identified loci to be easily incorporated into the scheme. Conclusions The naming system will be employed by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee for naming transcribed human ERV loci. We hope that the system will contribute to clarifying a certain aspect of a sometimes confusing nomenclature for human endogenous retroviruses. The presented system may also be employed for naming transcribed loci of human non-ERV repeat loci. PMID:21542922

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of the Quality Control Strain Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus ATCC 25923.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treangen, Todd J; Maybank, Rosslyn A; Enke, Sana; Friss, Mary Beth; Diviak, Lynn F; Karaolis, David K R; Koren, Sergey; Ondov, Brian; Phillippy, Adam M; Bergman, Nicholas H; Rosovitz, M J

    2014-11-06

    Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus ATCC 25923 is commonly used as a control strain for susceptibility testing to antibiotics and as a quality control strain for commercial products. We present the completed genome sequence for the strain, consisting of the chromosome and a 27.5-kb plasmid. Copyright © 2014 Treangen et al.

  18. Development of a genetic sexing strain in Bactrocera carambolae (Diptera: Tephritidae) by introgression of sex sorting components from B. dorsalis, Salaya1 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isasawin, Siriwan; Aketarawong, Nidchaya; Lertsiri, Sittiwat; Thanaphum, Sujinda

    2014-01-01

    The carambola fruit fly, Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock is a high profile key pest that is widely distributed in the southwestern ASEAN region. In addition, it has trans-continentally invaded Suriname, where it has been expanding east and southward since 1975. This fruit fly belongs to Bactrocera dorsalis species complex. The development and application of a genetic sexing strain (Salaya1) of B. dorsalis sensu stricto (s.s.) (Hendel) for the sterile insect technique (SIT) has improved the fruit fly control. However, matings between B. dorsalis s.s. and B. carambolae are incompatible, which hinder the application of the Salaya1 strain to control the carambola fruit fly. To solve this problem, we introduced genetic sexing components from the Salaya1 strain into the B. carambolae genome by interspecific hybridization. Morphological characteristics, mating competitiveness, male pheromone profiles, and genetic relationships revealed consistencies that helped to distinguish Salaya1 and B. carambolae strains. A Y-autosome translocation linking the dominant wild-type allele of white pupae gene and a free autosome carrying a recessive white pupae homologue from the Salaya1 strain were introgressed into the gene pool of B. carambolae. A panel of Y-pseudo-linked microsatellite loci of the Salaya1 strain served as markers for the introgression experiments. This resulted in a newly derived genetic sexing strain called Salaya5, with morphological characteristics corresponding to B. carambolae. The rectal gland pheromone profile of Salaya5 males also contained a distinctive component of B. carambolae. Microsatellite DNA analyses confirmed the close genetic relationships between the Salaya5 strain and wild B. carambolae populations. Further experiments showed that the sterile males of Salaya5 can compete with wild males for mating with wild females in field cage conditions. Introgression of sex sorting components from the Salaya1 strain to a closely related B. carambolae

  19. Cooperative photoinduced metastable phase control in strained manganite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingdi; Tan, Xuelian; Liu, Mengkun; Teitelbaum, S. W.; Post, K. W.; Jin, Feng; Nelson, K. A.; Basov, D. N.; Wu, Wenbin; Averitt, R. D.

    2016-09-01

    A major challenge in condensed-matter physics is active control of quantum phases. Dynamic control with pulsed electromagnetic fields can overcome energetic barriers, enabling access to transient or metastable states that are not thermally accessible. Here we demonstrate strain-engineered tuning of La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 into an emergent charge-ordered insulating phase with extreme photo-susceptibility, where even a single optical pulse can initiate a transition to a long-lived metastable hidden metallic phase. Comprehensive single-shot pulsed excitation measurements demonstrate that the transition is cooperative and ultrafast, requiring a critical absorbed photon density to activate local charge excitations that mediate magnetic-lattice coupling that, in turn, stabilize the metallic phase. These results reveal that strain engineering can tune emergent functionality towards proximal macroscopic states to enable dynamic ultrafast optical phase switching and control.

  20. Three new loci for determining x chromosome inactivation patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Tümer, Zeynep; Ravn, Kirstine

    2011-01-01

    . The reliability of the loci was validated by showing a high correlation between the results obtained by employing the new loci and the AR locus using DNA from 15 females who were informative for all four loci. Altogether, we show that these loci can be applied easily in molecular diagnostic laboratories, either...

  1. Biodiesel Production from Selected Microalgae Strains and Determination of its Properties and Combustion Specific Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kokkinos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofuels are gaining importance as significant substitutes for the depleting fossil fuels. Recent focus is on microalgae as the third generation feedstock. In the present research work, two indigenous fresh water and two marine Chlorophyte strains have been cultivated successfully under laboratory conditions using commercial fertilizer (Nutrileaf 30-10-10, initial concentration=70 g/m3 as nutrient source. Gas chromatographic analysis data showed that microalgae biodiesel obtained from Chlorophyte strains biomass were composed of fatty acid methyl esters. The produced microalgae biodiesel achieved a range of 2.2 - 10.6 % total lipid content and an unsaturated FAME content between 49 mol% and 59 mol%. The iodine value, the cetane number, the cold filter plugging point, the oxidative stability as well as combustion specific characteristics of the final biodiesels were determined based on the compositions of the four microalgae strains. The calculated biodiesel properties compared then with the corresponding properties of biodiesel from known vegetable oils, from other algae strains and with the specifications in the EU (EN 14214 and US (ASTM D6751 standards. The derived biodiesels from indigenous Chlorophyte algae were significantly comparable in quality with other biodiesels.

  2. HIV-Specific B Cell Frequency Correlates with Neutralization Breadth in Patients Naturally Controlling HIV-Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline Rouers

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available HIV-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs have been isolated from patients with high viremia but also from HIV controllers that repress HIV-1 replication. In these elite controllers (ECs, multiple parameters contribute to viral suppression, including genetic factors and immune responses. Defining the immune correlates associated with the generation of bnAbs may help in designing efficient immunotherapies. In this study, in ECs either positive or negative for the HLA-B*57 protective allele, in treated HIV-infected and HIV-negative individuals, we characterized memory B cell compartments and HIV-specific memory B cells responses using flow cytometry and ELISPOT. ECs preserved their memory B cell compartments and in contrast to treated patients, maintained detectable HIV-specific memory B cell responses. All ECs presented IgG1+ HIV-specific memory B cells but some individuals also preserved IgG2+ or IgG3+ responses. Importantly, we also analyzed the capacity of sera from ECs to neutralize a panel of HIV strains including transmitted/founder virus. 29% and 21% of HLA-B*57+ and HLA-B*57− ECs, respectively, neutralized at least 40% of the viral strains tested. Remarkably, in HLA-B*57+ ECs the frequency of HIV-Env-specific memory B cells correlated positively with the neutralization breadth suggesting that preservation of HIV-specific memory B cells might contribute to the neutralizing responses in these patients.

  3. Cell-type-specific enrichment of risk-associated regulatory elements at ovarian cancer susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Simon G; Shen, Howard C; Hazelett, Dennis J; Lawrenson, Kate; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Tyrer, Jonathan; Rhie, Suhn K; Levanon, Keren; Karst, Alison; Drapkin, Ronny; Ramus, Susan J; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Antoniou, Antonis; Freedman, Matthew; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Noushmehr, Houtan; Gayther, Simon A

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the regulatory landscape of the human genome is a central question in complex trait genetics. Most single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with cancer risk lie in non-protein-coding regions, implicating regulatory DNA elements as functional targets of susceptibility variants. Here, we describe genome-wide annotation of regions of open chromatin and histone modification in fallopian tube and ovarian surface epithelial cells (FTSECs, OSECs), the debated cellular origins of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOCs) and in endometriosis epithelial cells (EECs), the likely precursor of clear cell ovarian carcinomas (CCOCs). The regulatory architecture of these cell types was compared with normal human mammary epithelial cells and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. We observed similar positional patterns of global enhancer signatures across the three different ovarian cancer precursor cell types, and evidence of tissue-specific regulatory signatures compared to non-gynecological cell types. We found significant enrichment for risk-associated SNPs intersecting regulatory biofeatures at 17 known HGSOC susceptibility loci in FTSECs (P = 3.8 × 10(-30)), OSECs (P = 2.4 × 10(-23)) and HMECs (P = 6.7 × 10(-15)) but not for EECs (P = 0.45) or LNCaP cells (P = 0.88). Hierarchical clustering of risk SNPs conditioned on the six different cell types indicates FTSECs and OSECs are highly related (96% of samples using multi-scale bootstrapping) suggesting both cell types may be precursors of HGSOC. These data represent the first description of regulatory catalogues of normal precursor cells for different ovarian cancer subtypes, and provide unique insights into the tissue specific regulatory variation with respect to the likely functional targets of germline genetic susceptibility variants for ovarian cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Mechanisms of Left Ventricular Dysfunction Assessed by Layer-Specific Strain Analysis in Patients With Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mariko; Takahashi, Ken; Kobayashi, Maki; Yazaki, Kana; Takayasu, Hirobumi; Akimoto, Katsumi; Kishiro, Masahiko; Inage, Akio; Yoshikawa, Tadahiro; Park, In-Sam; Nakanishi, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Shiori; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2017-05-25

    Left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF) is an important risk factor for adverse outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess the details and time course of such LV dysfunction using layer-specific strain analysis by echocardiography.Methods and Results:The 66 patients with rTOF (mean age, 16.3±9.3 years) were divided into 3 groups (T1: 4-10 years, T2: 11-20 years, T3: 21-43 years), and 113 controls of similar age (mean age, 17.2±9.3 years) were divided into 3 corresponding groups (C1, C2, and C3). Layer-specific longitudinal strain (LS) and circumferential strain (CS) of 3 myocardial layers (endocardial, midmyocardial, and epicardial) were determined by echocardiography. Basal and papillary endocardial CS values were decreased in T1 compared with C1. With the exception of papillary epicardial CS, basal/papillary CS and LS of all 3 layers decreased in T2 compared with C2. Excepting papillary epicardial CS, all other values were decreased in T3 compared with C3. Potential myocardial damage was found in the endocardium at the basal and papillary levels of the LV in young patients with rTOF, extending from the endocardium to the epicardium and from the base to the apex. This is the possible time course of LV dysfunction in patients with rTOF.

  5. Biochemical behavior of Trypanosoma cruzi strains isolated from mice submitted to specific chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesila Pinto M. Marretto

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the influence of chemotherapy on the biochemical beha vior of Trypanosoma cruzi strains, three groups of mice were infected with one of three strains of T. cruzi of different biological and isoenzymic patterns (Peruvian, 21 SF and Colombian strains. Each group was subdivided into subgroups: 1 - treated with nifurtimox; 2 - treated with benznidazole and 3 - untreated infected controls. At the end of treatment, that lasted for 90 days, xenodiagnosis, sub inoculation of blood into new born mice and haemoculture were performed as tests of cure. From the positive tests, 22 samples of T. cruzi were isolated from all subgroups. Electrophoretic analysis of the isoenzymes PGM, GP1, ALAT and AS AT failed to show any difference between parasite strains isolated from treated and untreated mice, which indicates that no detectable clonal selection or parasite genetic markers alterations concerning the isoenzymes analysed have been determined by treatment with drugs of recognized antiparasitic effect, suggesting stability of the phenotypic characteristics of the three biological types of T. cruzi strains.

  6. Characterization of small microsatellite loci for use in non invasive sampling studies of Gunnison Sage-grouse (Centrocercus minimus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; St. John, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Primers for 10 microsatellite loci were developed specifically to amplify low quantity and quality DNA for Gunnison Sage-grouse (Centrocercus minimus), a species that has been petitioned for listing under the US Endangered Species Act. In a screen of 20 individuals from the largest population in the Gunnison Basin, Colorado, the 10 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from two to seven alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although one locus revealed significant departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. These microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses and for use in mark recapture studies that utilize DNA collected non invasively from feathers and fecal pellets, which will ultimately aid in management efforts.

  7. Strain-specific patterns of autonomic nervous system activity and heart failure susceptibility in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Vladimir; Usiene, Irmute; Harrigal, Chivonne; Lee, Joon Sup; Kubota, Toru; Feldman, Arthur M; London, Barry

    2002-06-01

    Transgenic mice are widely used to study cardiac function, but strain-dependent differences in autonomic nervous system activity (ANSA) have not been explored. We compared 1) short-term pharmacological responses of cardiac rhythm in FVB vs. C57Black6/SV129 wild-type mice and 2) long-term physiological dynamics of cardiac rhythm and survival in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha transgenic mice with heart failure (TNF-alpha mice) on defined backgrounds. Ambulatory telemetry electrocardiographic recordings and response to saline, adrenergic, and cholinergic agents were examined in FVB and C57Black6/SV129 mice. In FVB mice, baseline heart rate (HR) was higher and did not change after injection of isoproterenol or atropine but decreased with propranolol. In C57Black6/SV129 mice, HR did not change with propranolol but increased with isoproterenol or atropine. Mean HR, but not indexes of HR variability, was an excellent predictor of response to autonomic agents. The proportion of surviving animals was higher in TNF-alpha mice on an FVB background than on a mixed FVB/C57Black6 background. The homeostatic states of ANSA are strain specific, which can explain the interstrain differences in mean HR, pharmacological responses, and survival of animals with congestive heart failure. Strain-specific differences should be considered in selecting the strains of mice used for transgenic and gene targeting experiments.

  8. The McMillan and Newton polygons of a feedback system and the construction of root loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, C. I.; Stevens, P. K.

    1982-01-01

    The local behaviour of root loci around zeros and poles is investigated. This is done by relating the Newton diagrams which arise in the local analysis to the McMillan structure of the open-loop system, by means of what we shall call the McMillan polygon. This geometric construct serves to clarify the precise relationship between the McMillan structure, the principal structure, and the branching patterns of the root loci. In addition, several rules are obtained which are useful in the construction of the root loci of multivariable control systems.

  9. Modulation of magnetic coercivity in Ni thin films by reversible control of strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wen-Chin, E-mail: wclin@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chia-Wei; Ting, Yi-Chieh; Lo, Fang-Yuh [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Chern, Ming-Yau [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the magnetoelectric control of magnetic thin films. (111)-textured Pd/Ni/Pd thin films were prepared on mica/lead zirconium titanate (PZT) substrates for the investigation. The reversible modulation of magnetic coercivity in Ni films was observed through the electric-voltage-controlled strain variation from the PZT substrate. For 14 nm Ni film, the applied electric field of ±350 V/m led to ±0.5% strain variation of PZT, which was transferred to ±0.4% strain variation of Pd/Ni/Pd thin films on mica, and resulted in ∓17 Oe (∓5% of the preliminary magnetic coercivity). The reversible modulation of magnetic coercivity is supposed to be caused by the voltage-controlled strain through the magneto-elastic effect. - Highlights: • The magnetoelectric control of the magnetic coercivity of Pd/Ni/Pd thin films was demonstrated. • The ±0.4% strain variation of 14 nm Ni thin films resulted in ±17 Oe change of H{sub c}. • The reversible modulation of H{sub c} is supposed to be caused by the magneto-elastic effect.

  10. Molecular Genetic Studies of Bone Mechanical Strain and of Pedigrees with Very High Bone Density

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohan, Subburaman

    2007-01-01

    .... Two hypotheses have been proposed: I) Quantitative trait loci analysis using the four point bending technique in two strains of mice exhibiting extreme differences in loading response will lead to identification of chromosomal locations...

  11. Molecular Genetic Studies of Bone Mechanical Strain and of Pedigrees with Very High Bone Density

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohan, Subburaman

    2005-01-01

    .... Two hypotheses have been proposed:1) Ouantitative trait loci analysis using the four point bending technique in two strains of mice exhibiting extreme differences in loading response will lead to identification of chromosomal locations...

  12. Strain-specific differences of the effects of stress on memory in Lymnaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Emily; Shymansky, Tamila; Swinton, Erin; Lukowiak, Kai S; Swinton, Cayley; Sunada, Hiroshi; Protheroe, Amy; Phillips, Iain; Lukowiak, Ken

    2017-03-01

    Stress alters the ability to form, recall and maintain memory according to the Yerkes-Dodson/Hebb (YDH) law. The effects of environmentally relevant stressors, such as low environmental calcium and crowding, on learning and memory have previously been described in a laboratory-reared 'average' strain of Lymnaea stagnalis (i.e. the Dutch strain) as well as two strains of freshly collected L . stagnalis with enhanced memory formation abilities (i.e. 'smart' snails). Here, we use L . stagnalis to study the effects of other environmentally relevant stressors on memory formation in two other strains of freshly collected snails, one 'smart' and one 'average'. The stressors we examined are thermal, resource restriction combined with food odour, predator detection and, for the first time, tissue injury (shell damage). We show that the same stressor has significantly different effects on memory formation depending on whether snails are 'smart' or 'average'. Specifically, our data suggest that a stressor or a combination of stressors act to enhance memory in 'average' snails but obstruct memory formation in 'smart' snails. These results are consistent with the YDH law and our hypothesis that 'smart' snails are more easily stressed than 'average' snails. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalls, Mike A.; Pankratz, Nathan; Lill, Christina M.; Do, Chuong B.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Saad, Mohamad; DeStefano, Anita L.; Kara, Eleanna; Bras, Jose; Sharma, Manu; Schulte, Claudia; Keller, Margaux F.; Arepalli, Sampath; Letson, Christopher; Edsall, Connor; Stefansson, Hreinn; Liu, Xinmin; Pliner, Hannah; Lee, Joseph H.; Cheng, Rong; Ikram, M. Arfan; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M.; Bis, Joshua C.; Martinez, Maria; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Goate, Alison; Marder, Karen; Fiske, Brian; Sutherland, Margaret; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Myers, Richard H.; Clark, Lorraine N.; Stefansson, Kari; Hardy, John A.; Heutink, Peter; Chen, Honglei; Wood, Nicholas W.; Houlden, Henry; Payami, Haydeh; Brice, Alexis; Scott, William K.; Gasser, Thomas; Bertram, Lars; Eriksson, Nicholas; Foroud, Tatiana; Singleton, Andrew B.; Plagnol, Vincent; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Lesage, Suzanne; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Sigurlaug; Barker, Roger; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berendse, Henk W.; Berg, Daniela; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bas; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Bras, Jose M.; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Cooper, J. Mark; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Günther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Durif, Frank; Dürr, Alexandra; Edkins, Sarah; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Dong, Jing; Gardner, Michelle; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Harris, Clare; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michele; Huang, Xuemei; Wurster, Isabel; Mätzler, Walter; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; Jónsson, Pálmi V.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morris, Huw R.; Morrison, Karen E.; Mudanohwo, Ese; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Pearson, Justin; Pétursson, Hjörvar; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Shaw, Karen; Shoulson, Ira; Sidransky, Ellen; Smith, Colin; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Bettella, Francesco; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Tison, François; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Velseboer, Daan; Vidailhet, Marie; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams, Nigel; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Stefánsson, Kári; Hardy, John; Factor, S.; Higgins, D.; Evans, S.; Shill, H.; Stacy, M.; Danielson, J.; Marlor, L.; Williamson, K.; Jankovic, J.; Hunter, C.; Simon, D.; Ryan, P.; Scollins, L.; Saunders-Pullman, R.; Boyar, K.; Costan-Toth, C.; Ohmann, E.; Sudarsky, L.; Joubert, C.; Friedman, J.; Chou, K.; Fernandez, H.; Lannon, M.; Galvez-Jimenez, N.; Podichetty, A.; Thompson, K.; Lewitt, P.; Deangelis, M.; O'Brien, C.; Seeberger, L.; Dingmann, C.; Judd, D.; Marder, K.; Fraser, J.; Harris, J.; Bertoni, J.; Peterson, C.; Rezak, M.; Medalle, G.; Chouinard, S.; Panisset, M.; Hall, J.; Poiffaut, H.; Calabrese, V.; Roberge, P.; Wojcieszek, J.; Belden, J.; Jennings, D.; Marek, K.; Mendick, S.; Reich, S.; Dunlop, B.; Jog, M.; Horn, C.; Uitti, R.; Turk, M.; Ajax, T.; Mannetter, J.; Sethi, K.; Carpenter, J.; Dill, B.; Hatch, L.; Ligon, K.; Narayan, S.; Blindauer, K.; Abou-Samra, K.; Petit, J.; Elmer, L.; Aiken, E.; Davis, K.; Schell, C.; Wilson, S.; Velickovic, M.; Koller, W.; Phipps, S.; Feigin, A.; Gordon, M.; Hamann, J.; Licari, E.; Marotta-Kollarus, M.; Shannon, B.; Winnick, R.; Simuni, T.; Videnovic, A.; Kaczmarek, A.; Williams, K.; Wolff, M.; Rao, J.; Cook, M.; Fernandez, M.; Kostyk, S.; Hubble, J.; Campbell, A.; Reider, C.; Seward, A.; Camicioli, R.; Carter, J.; Nutt, J.; Andrews, P.; Morehouse, S.; Stone, C.; Mendis, T.; Grimes, D.; Alcorn-Costa, C.; Gray, P.; Haas, K.; Vendette, J.; Sutton, J.; Hutchinson, B.; Young, J.; Rajput, A.; Klassen, L.; Shirley, T.; Manyam, B.; Simpson, P.; Whetteckey, J.; Wulbrecht, B.; Truong, D.; Pathak, M.; Frei, K.; Luong, N.; Tra, T.; Tran, A.; Vo, J.; Lang, A.; Kleiner- Fisman, G.; Nieves, A.; Johnston, L.; So, J.; Podskalny, G.; Giffin, L.; Atchison, P.; Allen, C.; Martin, W.; Wieler, M.; Suchowersky, O.; Furtado, S.; Klimek, M.; Hermanowicz, N.; Niswonger, S.; Shults, C.; Fontaine, D.; Aminoff, M.; Christine, C.; Diminno, M.; Hevezi, J.; Dalvi, A.; Kang, U.; Richman, J.; Uy, S.; Sahay, A.; Gartner, M.; Schwieterman, D.; Hall, D.; Leehey, M.; Culver, S.; Derian, T.; Demarcaida, T.; Thurlow, S.; Rodnitzky, R.; Dobson, J.; Lyons, K.; Pahwa, R.; Gales, T.; Thomas, S.; Shulman, L.; Weiner, W.; Dustin, K.; Singer, C.; Zelaya, L.; Tuite, P.; Hagen, V.; Rolandelli, S.; Schacherer, R.; Kosowicz, J.; Gordon, P.; Werner, J.; Serrano, C.; Roque, S.; Kurlan, R.; Berry, D.; Gardiner, I.; Hauser, R.; Sanchez-Ramos, J.; Zesiewicz, T.; Delgado, H.; Price, K.; Rodriguez, P.; Wolfrath, S.; Pfeiffer, R.; Davis, L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Dewey, R.; Hayward, B.; Johnson, A.; Meacham, M.; Estes, B.; Walker, F.; Hunt, V.; O'Neill, C.; Racette, B.; Swisher, L.; Dijamco, Cheri; Conley, Emily Drabant; Dorfman, Elizabeth; Tung, Joyce Y.; Hinds, David A.; Mountain, Joanna L.; Wojcicki, Anne; Lew, M.; Klein, C.; Golbe, L.; Growdon, J.; Wooten, G. F.; Watts, R.; Guttman, M.; Goldwurm, S.; Saint-Hilaire, M. H.; Baker, K.; Litvan, I.; Nicholson, G.; Nance, M.; Drasby, E.; Isaacson, S.; Burn, D.; Pramstaller, P.; Al-hinti, J.; Moller, A.; Sherman, S.; Roxburgh, R.; Slevin, J.; Perlmutter, J.; Mark, M. H.; Huggins, N.; Pezzoli, G.; Massood, T.; Itin, I.; Corbett, A.; Chinnery, P.; Ostergaard, K.; Snow, B.; Cambi, F.; Kay, D.; Samii, A.; Agarwal, P.; Roberts, J. W.; Higgins, D. S.; Molho, Eric; Rosen, Ami; Montimurro, J.; Martinez, E.; Griffith, A.; Kusel, V.; Yearout, D.; Zabetian, C.; Clark, L. N.; Liu, X.; Lee, J. H.; Taub, R. Cheng; Louis, E. D.; Cote, L. J.; Waters, C.; Ford, B.; Fahn, S.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Beecham, Gary W.; Martin, Eden R.; Nuytemans, Karen; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; DeStefano, Anita; Seshadri, Sudha; Choi, Seung Hoan; Frank, Samuel; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rice, Kenneth; Longstreth, W. T.; Ton, Thanh G. N.; Jain, Samay; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Verlinden, Vincent J.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Singleton, Andrew; Cookson, Mark; Hernandez, Dena; Nalls, Michael; Zonderman, Alan; Ferrucci, Luigi; Johnson, Robert; Longo, Dan; O'Brien, Richard; Traynor, Bryan; Troncoso, Juan; van der Brug, Marcel; Zielke, Ronald; Weale, Michael; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Tsimourtou, Vana; Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas; Bozi, Maria; Stefanis, Leonidas; Vassilatis, Dimitris; Koutsis, Georgios; Panas, Marios; Lunnon, Katie; Lupton, Michelle; Powell, John; Parkkinen, Laura; Ansorge, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of Parkinson's disease genome-wide association studies using a common set of 7,893,274 variants across 13,708 cases and 95,282 controls. Twenty-six loci were identified as having genome-wide significant association; these and 6 additional previously reported loci were

  14. Molecular characterization of Verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolates from Argentina by Multiple-Loci VNTR Analysis (MLVA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Ana V.; Lucchesi, Paula M.A.; Parma, Alberto E.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to adapt described MLVA protocols to the molecular typing and characterization of VTEC O157:H7 isolates from Argentina. Nine VNTR loci were amplified by PCR showing diversity values from 0.49 to 0.73. Nine MLVA profiles were observed and the cluster analysis indicated both unrelated and closely related VTEC O157:H7 strains. In spite of the limited number of isolates studied, the panel of VNTR used made it possible to perform a first approach of the high genetic diversity of native strains of O157:H7 by MLVA. PMID:24031443

  15. IMPROVEMENT OF BORASSUS AKEASSII WINES QUALITY BY CONTROLLED FERMENTATION USING SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAPSOBA François

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Palm wine produced traditionally and consumed by many people around the world and specifically in Burkina Faso posed health risks because of questionable quality of wine produced by mix culture fermentation and the use of antiseptics for the stabilization. In order to improve its quality, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from Borassus akeassii wines and identified by amplification and RFLP analysis of the 5-8S-ITS region were used for in vitro fermentation of unfermented palm sap. The physicochemical characteristics of the sap were measured before and after fermentation process by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC and the microbiological quality were also performed. HPLC analysis showed that glucose and fructose concentration in palm sap were 37.0 and 27.6 g/L respectively, ethanol content was ranged between 2.76 and 5.31 % (g/mL for controlled fermentation and 2.20 % (g/mL for spontaneous fermentation. Lactic and acetic acids were ranged between 0.1 and 0.3 g/L and 1.5 and 1.6 g/L for controlled fermentation versus 2.5 and 3.1 g/L and the spontaneous fermentation respectively. Coliforms and Staphylococcus aureus were detected only in the unfermented palm sap and the wine fermented spontaneously. Principal component analysis showed a good separation between spontaneous and controlled fermentation. Sterilization and controlled fermentation of the unfermented sap with palm wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains led to the improvement of palm wine quality.

  16. Strain-specific viral distribution and neuropathology of feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Craig; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; MacMillan, Martha; Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Henriksen, Steven; Elder, John; VandeWoude, Susan

    2011-10-15

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a naturally occurring lentivirus of domestic cats, and is the causative agent of feline AIDS. Similar to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the pathogenesis of FIV involves infection of lymphocytes and macrophages, and results in chronic progressive immune system collapse and death. Neuropathologic correlates of FIV infection have not yet been elucidated, and may be relevant to understanding HIV-associated neurologic disease (neuroAIDS). As in HIV, FIV strains have been shown to express differential tendencies towards development of clinical neuroAIDS. To interrogate viral genetic determinants that might contribute to neuropathogenicity, cats were exposed to two well-characterized FIV strains with divergent clinical phenotypes and a chimeric strain as follows: FIV(PPR) (PPR, relatively apathogenic but associated with neurologic manifestations), FIV(C36) (C36, immunopathogenic but without associated neurologic disease), and Pcenv (a chimeric virus consisting of a PPR backbone with substituted C36 env region). A sham inoculum control group was also included. Peripheral nerve conduction velocity, CNS imaging studies, viral loads and hematologic analysis were performed over a 12 month period. At termination of the study (350 days post-inoculation), brain sections were obtained from four anatomic locations known to be involved in human and primate lentiviral neuroAIDS. Histological and immunohistochemical evaluation with seven markers of inflammation revealed that Pcenv infection resulted in mild inflammation of the CNS, microglial activation, neuronal degeneration and apoptosis, while C36 and PPR strains induced minimal neuropathologic changes. Conduction velocity aberrations were noted peripherally in all three groups at 63 weeks post-infection. Pcenv viral load in this study was intermediate to the parental strains (C36 demonstrating the highest viral load and PPR the lowest). These results collectively suggest that (i) 3' C36

  17. Validity test of the IPD-Work consortium approach for creating comparable job strain groups between Job Content Questionnaire and Demand-Control Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongkyoo Choi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aims to test the validity of the IPD-Work Consortium approach for creating comparable job strain groups between the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ and the Demand-Control Questionnaire (DCQ. Material and Methods: A random population sample (N = 682 of all middle-aged Malmö males and females was given a questionnaire with the 14-item JCQ and 11-item DCQ for the job control and job demands. The JCQ job control and job demands scores were calculated in 3 different ways: using the 14-item JCQ standard scale formulas (method 1; dropping 3 job control items and using the 11-item JCQ standard scale formulas with additional scale weights (method 2; and the approach of the IPD Group (method 3, dropping 3 job control items, but using the simple 11-item summation-based scale formulas. The high job strain was defined as a combination of high demands and low control. Results: Between the 2 questionnaires, false negatives for the high job strain were much greater than false positives (37–49% vs. 7–13%. When the method 3 was applied, the sensitivity of the JCQ for the high job strain against the DCQ was lowest (0.51 vs. 0.60–0.63 when the methods 1 and 2 were applied, although the specificity was highest (0.93 vs. 0.87–0.89 when the methods 1 and 2 were applied. The prevalence of the high job strain with the JCQ (the method 3 was applied was considerably lower (4–7% than with the JCQ (the methods 1 and 2 were applied and the DCQ. The number of congruent cases for the high job strain between the 2 questionnaires was smallest when the method 3 was applied. Conclusions: The IPD-Work Consortium approach showed 2 major weaknesses to be used for epidemiological studies on the high job strain and health outcomes as compared to the standard JCQ methods: the greater misclassification of the high job strain and lower prevalence of the high job strain.

  18. Monitoring viable cells of the biological control agent Lactobacillus plantarum PM411 in aerial plant surfaces by means of a strain-specific viability quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daranas, Núria; Bonaterra, Anna; Francés, Jesús; Cabrefiga, Jordi; Montesinos, Emilio; Badosa, Esther

    2018-03-09

    A viability qPCR (v-qPCR) assay was developed for the unambiguous detection and quantification of Lactobacillus plantarum PM411 viable cells in aerial plant surfaces. A 972 bp region of a PM411 predicted prophage with mosaic architecture enabled the identification of a PM411 strain-specific molecular marker. Three primer sets, with different amplicon lengths (92, 188, and 317 bp), and one TaqMan probe were designed. All the qPCR assays showed good linearity over a 4-log range and good efficiencies, but differed in sensitivity. The nucleic acid-binding dye PEMAX was used for selectively detecting and enumerating viable bacteria by v-qPCR. The primer set amplifying a 188 bp DNA fragment was selected as the most suitable for v-qPCR. The performance of the method was assessed on apple blossoms, pear, strawberry and kiwifruit leaves in potted plants under controlled environmental conditions, and pear and apple blossoms under field conditions, by comparing v-qPCR population estimation to those obtained by qPCR and specific plate counting on MRS-rifampicin. The population estimation did not differ significantly between methods when conditions were conducive to bacterial survival. However, under stressful conditions, differences between methods were observed due to cell death or viable but non-culturable state induction. While qPCR overestimated the population level, plate counting underestimated this value in comparison to v-qPCR. PM411 attained stable population levels of viable cells on flower environment under high relative humidity. However, the unfavourable conditions onto the leaf surface and the relatively dryness in the field caused an important decrease of viable population. IMPORTANCE The v-qPCR method in combination with plate counting and qPCR is a powerful tool for studies of colonization and survival in field conditions, to improve formulations and delivery strategies of PM411, or to optimize the dose and timing of spray schedules. It is expected that PEMAX

  19. Cyclic mechanical behavior of 316L: Uniaxial LCF and strain-controlled ratcheting tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facheris, G.; Janssens, K.G.F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Characterization of cyclic plastic deformation behavior of plate and tubular 316L. ► Strain-controlled ratcheting response between room temperature and 200 °C. ► Isotropic cyclic hardening is dependent on the yield criterion used. ► Ratcheting induced hardening mostly affects the kinematic hardening component. ► Ratcheting induced hardening is related to the mean strain and the ratcheting rate. -- Abstract: With the purpose of analyzing the fatigue behavior under loading conditions relevant for the primary cooling circuit of a light water nuclear reactor, a set of uniaxial low cycle fatigue and strain-controlled ratcheting tests (also named ‘cyclic tension tests’) has been performed at room temperature and at 200 °C on specimens manufactured from two different batches of stainless steel grade 316L. The experiments have been repeated varying strain amplitude, cyclic ratcheting rate and ratcheting direction in order to investigate the influence on the cyclic deformation behavior. In strain-controlled ratcheting tests, the stress response is found to be a superposition of two hardening mechanisms: the first one due to the zero mean strain cycling and the second one linked with the monotonic drifting of mean plastic strain. An approach is proposed to distinguish the effect of each mechanism and the influence of the test parameters on the hardening mechanisms is discussed

  20. Germline mutation rates at tandem repeat loci in DNA-repair deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Ruth C.; Miccoli, Laurent; Buul, Paul P.W. van; Burr, Karen L.-A.; Duyn-Goedhart, Annemarie van; Angulo, Jaime F.; Dubrova, Yuri E.

    2004-01-01

    Mutation rates at two expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci were studied in the germline of non-exposed and irradiated severe combined immunodeficient (scid) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1 -/- ) deficient male mice. Non-exposed scid and PARP -/- male mice showed considerably elevated ESTR mutation rates, far higher than those in wild-type isogenic mice and other inbred strains. The irradiated scid and PARP-1 -/- male mice did not show any detectable increases in their mutation rate, whereas significant ESTR mutation induction was observed in the irradiated wild-type isogenic males. ESTR mutation spectra in the scid and PARP-1 -/- strains did not differ from those in the isogenic wild-type strains. Considering these data and the results of previous studies, we propose that a delay in repair of DNA damage in scid and PARP-1 -/- mice could result in replication fork pausing which, in turn, may affect ESTR mutation rate in the non-irradiated males. The lack of mutation induction in irradiated scid and PARP-1 -/- can be explained by the high cell killing effects of irradiation on the germline of deficient mice

  1. Using the Textpresso Site-Specific Recombinases Web server to identify Cre expressing mouse strains and floxed alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condie, Brian G; Urbanski, William M

    2014-01-01

    Effective tools for searching the biomedical literature are essential for identifying reagents or mouse strains as well as for effective experimental design and informed interpretation of experimental results. We have built the Textpresso Site Specific Recombinases (Textpresso SSR) Web server to enable researchers who use mice to perform in-depth searches of a rapidly growing and complex part of the mouse literature. Our Textpresso Web server provides an interface for searching the full text of most of the peer-reviewed publications that report the characterization or use of mouse strains that express Cre or Flp recombinase. The database also contains most of the publications that describe the characterization or analysis of strains carrying conditional alleles or transgenes that can be inactivated or activated by site-specific recombinases such as Cre or Flp. Textpresso SSR complements the existing online databases that catalog Cre and Flp expression patterns by providing a unique online interface for the in-depth text mining of the site specific recombinase literature.

  2. Genome-wide association studies of autoimmune vitiligo identify 23 new risk loci and highlight key pathways and regulatory variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ying; Andersen, Genevieve; Yorgov, Daniel; Ferrara, Tracey M; Ben, Songtao; Brownson, Kelly M; Holland, Paulene J; Birlea, Stanca A; Siebert, Janet; Hartmann, Anke; Lienert, Anne; van Geel, Nanja; Lambert, Jo; Luiten, Rosalie M; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Wietze van der Veen, J P; Bennett, Dorothy C; Taïeb, Alain; Ezzedine, Khaled; Kemp, E Helen; Gawkrodger, David J; Weetman, Anthony P; Kõks, Sulev; Prans, Ele; Kingo, Külli; Karelson, Maire; Wallace, Margaret R; McCormack, Wayne T; Overbeck, Andreas; Moretti, Silvia; Colucci, Roberta; Picardo, Mauro; Silverberg, Nanette B; Olsson, Mats; Valle, Yan; Korobko, Igor; Böhm, Markus; Lim, Henry W; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Zhou, Li; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Fain, Pamela R; Santorico, Stephanie A; Spritz, Richard A

    2016-11-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease in which depigmented skin results from the destruction of melanocytes, with epidemiological association with other autoimmune diseases. In previous linkage and genome-wide association studies (GWAS1 and GWAS2), we identified 27 vitiligo susceptibility loci in patients of European ancestry. We carried out a third GWAS (GWAS3) in European-ancestry subjects, with augmented GWAS1 and GWAS2 controls, genome-wide imputation, and meta-analysis of all three GWAS, followed by an independent replication. The combined analyses, with 4,680 cases and 39,586 controls, identified 23 new significantly associated loci and 7 suggestive loci. Most encode immune and apoptotic regulators, with some also associated with other autoimmune diseases, as well as several melanocyte regulators. Bioinformatic analyses indicate a predominance of causal regulatory variation, some of which corresponds to expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) at these loci. Together, the identified genes provide a framework for the genetic architecture and pathobiology of vitiligo, highlight relationships with other autoimmune diseases and melanoma, and offer potential targets for treatment.

  3. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new risk loci for gout arthritis in Han Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changgui; Li, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shiguo; Wang, Can; Han, Lin; Cui, Lingling; Zhou, Jingguo; Zou, Hejian; Liu, Zhen; Chen, Jianhua; Cheng, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Zhaowei; Ding, Chengcheng; Wang, Meng; Chen, Tong; Cui, Ying; He, Hongmei; Zhang, Keke; Yin, Congcong; Wang, Yunlong; Xing, Shichao; Li, Baojie; Ji, Jue; Jia, Zhaotong; Ma, Lidan; Niu, Jiapeng; Xin, Ying; Liu, Tian; Chu, Nan; Yu, Qing; Ren, Wei; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhang, Aiqing; Sun, Yuping; Wang, Haili; Lu, Jie; Li, Yuanyuan; Qing, Yufeng; Chen, Gang; Wang, Yangang; Zhou, Li; Niu, Haitao; Liang, Jun; Dong, Qian; Li, Xinde; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Shi, Yongyong

    2015-01-01

    Gout is one of the most common types of inflammatory arthritis, caused by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals in and around the joints. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified many genetic loci associated with raised serum urate concentrations. However, hyperuricemia alone is not sufficient for the development of gout arthritis. Here we conduct a multistage GWAS in Han Chinese using 4,275 male gout patients and 6,272 normal male controls (1,255 cases and 1,848 controls were genome-wide genotyped), with an additional 1,644 hyperuricemic controls. We discover three new risk loci, 17q23.2 (rs11653176, P=1.36 × 10−13, BCAS3), 9p24.2 (rs12236871, P=1.48 × 10−10, RFX3) and 11p15.5 (rs179785, P=1.28 × 10−8, KCNQ1), which contain inflammatory candidate genes. Our results suggest that these loci are most likely related to the progression from hyperuricemia to inflammatory gout, which will provide new insights into the pathogenesis of gout arthritis. PMID:25967671

  4. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new risk loci for gout arthritis in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changgui; Li, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shiguo; Wang, Can; Han, Lin; Cui, Lingling; Zhou, Jingguo; Zou, Hejian; Liu, Zhen; Chen, Jianhua; Cheng, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Zhaowei; Ding, Chengcheng; Wang, Meng; Chen, Tong; Cui, Ying; He, Hongmei; Zhang, Keke; Yin, Congcong; Wang, Yunlong; Xing, Shichao; Li, Baojie; Ji, Jue; Jia, Zhaotong; Ma, Lidan; Niu, Jiapeng; Xin, Ying; Liu, Tian; Chu, Nan; Yu, Qing; Ren, Wei; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhang, Aiqing; Sun, Yuping; Wang, Haili; Lu, Jie; Li, Yuanyuan; Qing, Yufeng; Chen, Gang; Wang, Yangang; Zhou, Li; Niu, Haitao; Liang, Jun; Dong, Qian; Li, Xinde; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Shi, Yongyong

    2015-05-13

    Gout is one of the most common types of inflammatory arthritis, caused by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals in and around the joints. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified many genetic loci associated with raised serum urate concentrations. However, hyperuricemia alone is not sufficient for the development of gout arthritis. Here we conduct a multistage GWAS in Han Chinese using 4,275 male gout patients and 6,272 normal male controls (1,255 cases and 1,848 controls were genome-wide genotyped), with an additional 1,644 hyperuricemic controls. We discover three new risk loci, 17q23.2 (rs11653176, P=1.36 × 10(-13), BCAS3), 9p24.2 (rs12236871, P=1.48 × 10(-10), RFX3) and 11p15.5 (rs179785, P=1.28 × 10(-8), KCNQ1), which contain inflammatory candidate genes. Our results suggest that these loci are most likely related to the progression from hyperuricemia to inflammatory gout, which will provide new insights into the pathogenesis of gout arthritis.

  5. Layer-specific systolic and diastolic strain in  hypertensive patients with and without mild diastolic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Sharif PhD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to examine layer-specific longitudinal and circumferential systolic and diastolic strain, strain rate (SR and diastolic time intervals in hypertensive patients with and without diastolic dysfunction. Fifty-eight treated hypertensive patients were assigned to normal diastolic function (NDF, N = 39 or mild diastolic dysfunction (DD, N = 19 group. Layer-specific systolic and diastolic longitudinal and circumferential strains and SR were assessed. Results showed no between-group difference in left ventricular mass index (DD: 92.1 ± 18.1 vs NDF: 88.4 ± 16.3; P = 0.44. Patients with DD had a proportional reduction in longitudinal strain across the myocardium (endocardial for DD −13 ± 4%; vs NDF −17 ± 3, P < 0.01; epicardial for DD −10 ± 3% vs NDF −13 ± 3%, P < 0.01; global for DD: −12 ± 3% vs NDF: −15 ± 3, P = 0.01, and longitudinal mechanical diastolic impairments as evidenced by reduced longitudinal strain rate of early diastole (DD 0.7 ± 0.2 L/s vs NDF 1.0 ± 0.3 L/s, P < 0.01 and absence of a transmural gradient in the duration of diastolic strain (DD endocardial: 547 ± 105 ms vs epicardial: 542 ± 113 ms, P = 0.24; NDF endocardial: 566 ± 86 ms vs epicardial: 553 ± 77 ms, P = 0.03. Patients with DD also demonstrate a longer duration of early circumferential diastolic strain (231 ± 71 ms vs 189 ± 58 ms, P = 0.02. In conclusion, hypertensive patients with mild DD demonstrate a proportional reduction in longitudinal strain across the myocardium, as well as longitudinal mechanical diastolic impairment, and prolonging duration of circumferential mechanical relaxation.

  6. [Relationship between genetic polymorphisms of 3 SNP loci in 5-HTT gene and paranoid schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Jin-Feng; Ding, Mei; Pang, Hao; Xing, Jia-Xin; Sun, Yi-Hua; Yao, Jun; Zhao, Yi; Li, Chun-Mei; Wang, Bao-Jie

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the population genetic data of 3 SNP loci (rs25533, rs34388196 and rs1042173) of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter (5-HTT) gene and the association with paranoid schizophrenia. Three SNP loci of 5-HTT gene were examined in 132 paranoid schizophrenia patients and 150 unrelated healthy individuals of Northern Chinese Han population by PCR-RFLP technique. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test was performed using the chi-square test and the data of haplotype frequency and population genetics parameters were statistically analyzed. Among these three SNP loci, four haplotypes were obtained. There were no statistically significant differences between the patient group and the control group (P > 0.05). The DP values of the 3 SNP loci were 0.276, 0.502 and 0.502. The PIC of them were 0.151, 0.281 and 0.281. The PE of them were 0.014, 0.072 and 0.072. The three SNP loci and four haplotypes of 5-HTT gene have no association with paranoid schizophrenia, while the polymorphism still have high potential application in forensic practice.

  7. Application of multi-locus analytical methods to identify interacting loci in case-control studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, S.; Heijer, M. den; Sham, P.; Knight, J.

    2007-01-01

    To identify interacting loci in genetic epidemiological studies the application of multi-locus methods of analysis is warranted. Several more advanced classification methods have been developed in the past years, including multiple logistic regression, sum statistics, logic regression, and the

  8. A genetic risk score combining ten psoriasis risk loci improves disease prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyan Chen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated skin disease affecting 2-3% of Caucasians. Recent genetic association studies have identified multiple psoriasis risk loci; however, most of these loci contribute only modestly to disease risk. In this study, we investigated whether a genetic risk score (GRS combining multiple loci could improve psoriasis prediction. Two approaches were used: a simple risk alleles count (cGRS and a weighted (wGRS approach. Ten psoriasis risk SNPs were genotyped in 2815 case-control samples and 858 family samples. We found that the total number of risk alleles in the cases was significantly higher than in controls, mean 13.16 (SD 1.7 versus 12.09 (SD 1.8, p = 4.577×10(-40. The wGRS captured considerably more risk than any SNP considered alone, with a psoriasis OR for high-low wGRS quartiles of 10.55 (95% CI 7.63-14.57, p = 2.010×10(-65. To compare the discriminatory ability of the GRS models, receiver operating characteristic curves were used to calculate the area under the curve (AUC. The AUC for wGRS was significantly greater than for cGRS (72.0% versus 66.5%, p = 2.13×10(-8. Additionally, the AUC for HLA-C alone (rs10484554 was equivalent to the AUC for all nine other risk loci combined (66.2% versus 63.8%, p = 0.18, highlighting the dominance of HLA-C as a risk locus. Logistic regression revealed that the wGRS was significantly associated with two subphenotypes of psoriasis, age of onset (p = 4.91×10(-6 and family history (p = 0.020. Using a liability threshold model, we estimated that the 10 risk loci account for only 11.6% of the genetic variance in psoriasis. In summary, we found that a GRS combining 10 psoriasis risk loci captured significantly more risk than any individual SNP and was associated with early onset of disease and a positive family history. Notably, only a small fraction of psoriasis heritability is captured by the common risk variants identified to date.

  9. Quantitative trait loci and metabolic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, M. D.; Byrne, P. F.; Snook, M. E.; Wiseman, B. R.; Lee, E. A.; Widstrom, N. W.; Coe, E. H.

    1998-01-01

    The interpretation of quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies is limited by the lack of information on metabolic pathways leading to most economic traits. Inferences about the roles of the underlying genes with a pathway or the nature of their interaction with other loci are generally not possible. An exception is resistance to the corn earworm Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) in maize (Zea mays L.) because of maysin, a C-glycosyl flavone synthesized in silks via a branch of the well characterized flavonoid pathway. Our results using flavone synthesis as a model QTL system indicate: (i) the importance of regulatory loci as QTLs, (ii) the importance of interconnecting biochemical pathways on product levels, (iii) evidence for “channeling” of intermediates, allowing independent synthesis of related compounds, (iv) the utility of QTL analysis in clarifying the role of specific genes in a biochemical pathway, and (v) identification of a previously unknown locus on chromosome 9S affecting flavone level. A greater understanding of the genetic basis of maysin synthesis and associated corn earworm resistance should lead to improved breeding strategies. More broadly, the insights gained in relating a defined genetic and biochemical pathway affecting a quantitative trait should enhance interpretation of the biological basis of variation for other quantitative traits. PMID:9482823

  10. Quantitative trait loci for broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr.) resistance in sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Vich, B; Akhtouch, B; Knapp, S J; Leon, A J; Velasco, L; Fernández-Martínez, J M; Berry, S T

    2004-06-01

    Broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr.) is a root parasite of sunflower that is regarded as one of the most important constraints of sunflower production in the Mediterranean region. Breeding for resistance is the most effective method of control. P-96 is a sunflower line which shows dominant resistance to broomrape race E and recessive resistance to the very new race F. The objective of this study was to map and characterize quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to race E and to race F of broomrape in P-96. A population from a cross between P-96 and the susceptible line P-21 was phenotyped for broomrape resistance in four experiments, two for race E and two for race F, by measuring different resistance parameters (resistance or susceptibility, number of broomrape per plant, and proportion of resistant plants per F(3) family). This population was also genotyped with microsatellite and RFLP markers. A linkage map comprising 103 marker loci distributed on 17 linkage groups was developed, and composite interval mapping analyses were performed. In total, five QTL ( or1.1, or3.1, or7.1 or13.1 and or13.2) for resistance to race E and six QTL ( or1.1, or4.1, or5.1, or13.1, or13.2 and or16.1) for resistance to race F of broomrape were detected on 7 of the 17 linkage groups. Phenotypic variance for race E resistance was mainly explained by the major QTL or3.1 associated to the resistance or susceptibility character ( R(2)=59%), while race F resistance was explained by QTL with a small to moderate effect ( R(2) from 15.0% to 38.7%), mainly associated with the number of broomrape per plant. Or3.1 was race E-specific, while or1.1, or13.1 and or13.2 of were non-race specific. Or13.1, and or13.2 were stable across the four experiments. Or3.1, and or7.1 were stable over the two race E experiments and or1.1 and or5.1 over the two race F experiments. The results from this study suggest that resistance to broomrape in sunflower is controlled by a combination of qualitative, race-specific

  11. Ancestral genes can control the ability of horizontally acquired loci to confer new traits.

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    H Deborah Chen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Horizontally acquired genes typically function as autonomous units conferring new abilities when introduced into different species. However, we reasoned that proteins preexisting in an organism might constrain the functionality of a horizontally acquired gene product if it operates on an ancestral pathway. Here, we determine how the horizontally acquired pmrD gene product activates the ancestral PmrA/PmrB two-component system in Salmonella enterica but not in the closely related bacterium Escherichia coli. The Salmonella PmrD protein binds to the phosphorylated PmrA protein (PmrA-P, protecting it from dephosphorylation by the PmrB protein. This results in transcription of PmrA-dependent genes, including those conferring polymyxin B resistance. We now report that the E. coli PmrD protein can activate the PmrA/PmrB system in Salmonella even though it cannot do it in E. coli, suggesting that these two species differ in an additional component controlling PmrA-P levels. We establish that the E. coli PmrB displays higher phosphatase activity towards PmrA-P than the Salmonella PmrB, and we identified a PmrB subdomain responsible for this property. Replacement of the E. coli pmrB gene with the Salmonella homolog was sufficient to render E. coli resistant to polymyxin B under PmrD-inducing conditions. Our findings provide a singular example whereby quantitative differences in the biochemical activities of orthologous ancestral proteins dictate the ability of a horizontally acquired gene product to confer species-specific traits. And they suggest that horizontally acquired genes can potentiate selection at ancestral loci.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of gallic acid against thermophilic Campylobacter is strain specific and associated with a loss of calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarjit, Amreeta; Wang, Yi; Dykes, Gary A

    2015-04-01

    Gallic acid has been suggested as a potential antimicrobial for the control of Campylobacter but its effectiveness is poorly studied. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of gallic acid against Campylobacter jejuni (n = 8) and Campylobacter coli (n = 4) strains was determined. Gallic acid inhibited the growth of five C. jejuni strains and three C. coli strains (MIC: 15.63-250 μg mL(-1)). Gallic acid was only bactericidal to two C. coli strains (MBC: 125 and 62.5 μg mL(-1)). The mechanism of the bactericidal effect against these two strains (and selected non-susceptible controls) was investigated by determining decimal reduction times and by monitoring the loss of cellular content and calcium ions, and changes in cell morphology. Gallic acid did not result in a loss of cellular content or morphological changes in the susceptible strains as compared to the controls. Gallic acid resulted in a loss of calcium ions (0.58-1.53 μg mL(-1) and 0.54-1.17 μg mL(-1), respectively, over a 180 min period) from the susceptible strains but not the controls. Gallic acid is unlikely to be an effective antimicrobial against Campylobacter in a practical sense unless further interventions to ensure an effective bactericidal mode of action against all strains are developed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Library Spirit and Genius Loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlkild, Nan

    2009-01-01

    The architecture and design of Nyborg Public Library in the light of the concepts "Library Spirit" and "Genius Loci", related to contemporary social and cultural movements, the development of the early welfare state and the "Scandinavian Style".......The architecture and design of Nyborg Public Library in the light of the concepts "Library Spirit" and "Genius Loci", related to contemporary social and cultural movements, the development of the early welfare state and the "Scandinavian Style"....

  14. Further genetic characterization of the two Trypanosoma cruzi Berenice strains (Be-62 and Be-78) isolated from the first human case of Chagas disease (Chagas, 1909).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, R E; Macedo, A M; Barnabé, C; Freitas, J M; Chiari, E; Veloso, V M; Carneiro, C M; Bahia, M T; Tafuri, Washington L; Lana, M

    2006-03-01

    We describe here an extension of a previous genetic characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi strains (Be-62 and Be-78) isolated from the patient Berenice, the first human case of Chagas disease [Chagas, C., 1909. Nova Tripanomíase humana. Estudos sobre morfologia e o ciclo evolutivo do Schizotrypanum cruzi, n. gen., n. sp., agente etiolójico da nova entidade morbida do homem. Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz 1, 159-218]. We wanted to verify the composition of T. cruzi populations originated from these two isolates. In the present work, 22 enzymatic loci (MLEE), nine RAPD primers and 7 microsatellite loci were analyzed. Clones from both strains were also characterized to verify whether these strains are mono or polyclonal. Be-62 and Be-78 strains were different in 3 out of 22 enzymatic systems, in 3 out of 9 RAPD primers tested and in all microsatellite loci investigated. However, our data suggests that both strains are phylogenetically closely related, belonging to genetic group 32 from Tibayrenc and Ayala [Tibayrenc, M., Ayala, F.J., 1988. Isoenzime variability in Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease: genetical, taxonomical, and epidemiological significance. Evolution 42, 277-292], equivalent to zymodeme 2 and T. cruzi II major lineage which, in Brazil, comprises parasites from the domestic cycle of the disease. Microsatellite analyses showed differences between the parental strains but suggested that both populations are monoclonal since each strain and their respective clones showed the same amplification products.

  15. Strain specific transcriptional response in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koo Mi-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB, a bacterial infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb remains a significant health problem worldwide with a third of the world population infected and nearly nine million new cases claiming 1.1 million deaths every year. The outcome following infection by Mtb is determined by a complex and dynamic host-pathogen interaction in which the phenotype of the pathogen and the immune status of the host play a role. However, the molecular mechanism by which Mtb strains induce different responses during intracellular infection of the host macrophage is not fully understood. To explore the early molecular events triggered upon Mtb infection of macrophages, we studied the transcriptional responses of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM to infection with two clinical Mtb strains, CDC1551 and HN878. These strains have previously been shown to differ in their virulence/immunogenicity in the mouse and rabbit models of pulmonary TB. Results In spite of similar intracellular growth rates, we observed that compared to HN878, infection by CDC1551 of BMM was associated with an increased global transcriptome, up-regulation of a specific early (6 hours immune response network and significantly elevated nitric oxide production. In contrast, at 24 hours post-infection of BMM by HN878, more host genes involved in lipid metabolism, including cholesterol metabolism and prostaglandin synthesis were up-regulated, compared to infection with CDC1551. In association with the differences in the macrophage responses to infection with the 2 Mtb strains, intracellular CDC1551 expressed higher levels of stress response genes than did HN878. Conclusions In association with the early and more robust macrophage activation, intracellular CDC1551 cells were exposed to a higher level of stress leading to increased up-regulation of the bacterial stress response genes. In contrast, sub-optimal activation of macrophages and induction of

  16. Multi-ethnic fine-mapping of 14 central adiposity loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, C.T.; Buchkovich, M.L.; Winkler, T.W.; Heid, I.M.; Hottenga, J.J.; Boomsma, D.I.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Willemsen, G.; Borecki, I.B.; Fox, C.S.; Mohlke, K.L.; North, K.E.; Cupples, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    The Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium identified 14 loci in European Ancestry (EA) individuals associated with waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) adjusted for body mass index. These loci are wide and narrowingthe signalsremains necessary. Twelve of 14 loci identified inGIANTEA

  17. Relevance of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats of Enterococcus faecalis strains isolated from retreatment root canals on periapical lesions, resistance to irrigants and biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhongchun; Du, Yu; Ling, Junqi; Huang, Lijia; Ma, Jinglei

    2017-12-01

    A high prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis ( E. faecalis ) is observed in teeth with root canal treatment failures. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are widely distributed in prokaryotes that have adaptive immune systems against mobile elements, including pathogenic genes. The present study investigated the relevance of the CRISPR in E. faecalis strains isolated from retreated root canals on biofilms, periapical lesions and drug resistance. A total of 20 E. faecalis strains were extracted from the root canals of teeth referred for root canal retreatment. CRISPR-Cas loci were identified by two pairs of relevant primers and polymerase chain reaction. The susceptibility of the 20 isolated strains to intracanal irrigants was evaluated by 1- and 5-minute challenges with a mixture of a tetracycline isomer, an acid and a detergent (MTAD), 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The microtiter plate assay and crystal violet staining were used to compare the biofilm formation of the E. faecalis isolate strains. Out of the 20 E. faecalis isolate strains, 5 strains that lacked CRISPR-cas determinants exhibited significant periapical lesions. Among the 15 strains containing CRISPR-cas determinants, 8 were isolated from root canals with inadequate fillings and 7 were isolated from root canals without any fillings. The five strains lacking CRISPR-cas loci were observed to be more resistant to MTAD and 2% CHX than the 15 strains that had CRISPR-cas loci. All of the strains exhibited the same susceptibility to 5.25% NaOCl. Furthermore, the 5 strains lacking CRISPR-cas determinants generated more biofilm than the other 15 strains. Thus, the results of the present study suggested that E. faecalis root canal isolates lacking CRISPR-cas exhibit higher resistance to intracanal irrigants, stronger biofilm formation and generate significant periapical lesions.

  18. Standing genetic variation in contingency loci drives the rapid adaptation of Campylobacter jejuni to a novel host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Jerome

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The genome of the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni contains multiple highly mutable sites, or contingency loci. It has been suggested that standing variation at these loci is a mechanism for rapid adaptation to a novel environment, but this phenomenon has not been shown experimentally. In previous work we showed that the virulence of C. jejuni NCTC11168 increased after serial passage through a C57BL/6 IL-10(-/- mouse model of campylobacteriosis. Here we sought to determine the genetic basis of this adaptation during passage. Re-sequencing of the 1.64 Mb genome to 200-500 X coverage allowed us to define variation in 23 contingency loci to an unprecedented depth both before and after in vivo adaptation. Mutations in the mouse-adapted C. jejuni were largely restricted to the homopolymeric tracts of thirteen contingency loci. These changes cause significant alterations in open reading frames of genes in surface structure biosynthesis loci and in genes with only putative functions. Several loci with open reading frame changes also had altered transcript abundance. The increase in specific phases of contingency loci during in vivo passage of C. jejuni, coupled with the observed virulence increase and the lack of other types of genetic changes, is the first experimental evidence that these variable regions play a significant role in C. jejuni adaptation and virulence in a novel host.

  19. Native strains of Beauveria bassiana for the control of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarchia, Claudia; Immediato, Davide; Iatta, Roberta; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Lia, Riccardo Paolo; Porretta, Daniele; Figueredo, Luciana Aguiar; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Otranto, Domenico

    2015-02-05

    Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato ticks are widespread worldwide due to their adaptability to survive under different environmental conditions. They may act as vectors of a wide range of pathogens to humans and animals and their control is based on the use of chemical products on dogs and in the environment. Alternative control strategies, such as the use of entomopathogenic fungi as bio-control agents have also been investigated. The ability of native strains of Beauveria bassiana sensu lato in causing mortality in different tick species (e.g., Amblyomma cajennense and Rhipicephalus microplus) has been demonstrated. However, limited studies have assessed the use of B. bassiana for the control of R. sanguineus s.l. and none of them have employed native strains of this fungus. Here we investigated the pathogenicity of a native strain of B. bassiana (CD1123) against all developmental stages of R. sanguineus s.l.. Batches of eggs, larvae, nymphs and adult ticks were immersed in a suspension of 10(7) conidia/ml of B. bassiana s.l., isolated from a R. sanguineus s.l. engorged female. All treatment and control groups were observed for 20 days, and the biological parameters (i.e., mortality, hatching, moulting percentage, pre-oviposition period, oviposition period and rate, eggs production efficiency, reproductive efficiency and fitness indexes) were assessed. The effect of the B. bassiana strain tested herein on eggs, larvae, nymphs and adults showed a significantly higher mortality than those of the control groups (p bassiana strain is highly virulent towards all life-cycle developmental stages of R. sanguineus s.l. and may be of potential interest as a biological control agent against these ticks.

  20. Multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis of Chinese Brucella strains isolated from 1953 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Guo-Zhong; Cui, Bu-Yun; Piao, Dong-Ri; Zhao, Hong-Yan; Li, Lan-Yu; Liu, Xi; Xiao, Pei; Zhao, Zhong-Zhi; Xu, Li-Qing; Jiang, Hai; Li, Zhen-Jun

    2017-05-02

    Brucellosis was a common human and livestock disease caused by Brucella strains, the category B priority pathogens by the US Center for Disease Control (CDC). Identified as a priority disease in human and livestock populations, the increasing incidence in recent years in China needs urgent control measures for this disease but the molecular background important for monitoring the epidemiology of Brucella strains at the national level is still lacking. A total of 600 Brucella isolates collected during 60 years (from 1953 to 2013) in China were genotyped by multiple locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and the variation degree of MLVA11 loci was calculated by the Hunter Gaston Diversity Index (HGDI) values. The charts and map were processed by Excel 2013, and cluster analysis and epidemiological distribution was performed using BioNumerics (version 5.1). The 600 representative Brucella isolates fell into 104 genotypes with 58 singleton genotypes by the MLVA11 assay, including B. melitensis biovars 2 and 3 (five main genotypes), B. abortus biovars 1 and 3 (two main genotypes), B. suis biovars 1 and 3 (three main genotypes), and B. canis (two main genotypes) respectively. While most B. suis biovar 1 and biovar 3 were respectively found in northern provinces and southern provinces, B. melitensis and B. abortus strains were dominant in China. Canine Brucellosis was only found in animals without any human cases reported. Eight Brucellosis epidemic peaks emerged during the 60 years between 1953 and 2013: 1955 - 1959, 1962 - 1969, 1971 - 1975, 1977 - 1983, 1985 - 1989, 1992 - 1997, 2000 - 2008 and 2010 - 2013 in China. Brucellosis has its unique molecular epidemiological patterns with specific spatial and temporal distribution according to MLVA. IDOP-D-16-00101.

  1. Introgression of ivermectin resistance genes into a susceptible Haemonchus contortus strain by multiple backcrossing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Redman

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Anthelmintic drug resistance in livestock parasites is already widespread and in recent years there has been an increasing level of anthelmintic drug selection pressure applied to parasitic nematode populations in humans leading to concerns regarding the emergence of resistance. However, most parasitic nematodes, particularly those of humans, are difficult experimental subjects making mechanistic studies of drug resistance extremely difficult. The small ruminant parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus is a more amenable model system to study many aspects of parasite biology and investigate the basic mechanisms and genetics of anthelmintic drug resistance. Here we report the successful introgression of ivermectin resistance genes from two independent ivermectin resistant strains, MHco4(WRS and MHco10(CAVR, into the susceptible genome reference strain MHco3(ISE using a backcrossing approach. A panel of microsatellite markers were used to monitor the procedure. We demonstrated that after four rounds of backcrossing, worms that were phenotypically resistant to ivermectin had a similar genetic background to the susceptible reference strain based on the bulk genotyping with 18 microsatellite loci and individual genotyping with a sub-panel of 9 microsatellite loci. In addition, a single marker, Hcms8a20, showed evidence of genetic linkage to an ivermectin resistance-conferring locus providing a starting point for more detailed studies of this genomic region to identify the causal mutation(s. This work presents a novel genetic approach to study anthelmintic resistance and provides a "proof-of-concept" of the use of forward genetics in an important model strongylid parasite of relevance to human hookworms. The resulting strains provide valuable resources for candidate gene studies, whole genome approaches and for further genetic analysis to identify ivermectin resistance loci.

  2. Gene-environment interaction involving recently identified colorectal cancer susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Elizabeth D.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Minnier, Jessica; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Caan, Bette J.; Campbell, Peter T.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Du, Mengmeng; Duggan, David; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gong, Jian; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jiao, Shuo; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lemire, Mathieu; Ma, Jing; Newcomb, Polly A.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Pflugeisen, Bethann M.; Potter, John D.; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Stelling, Deanna L.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Thornquist, Mark; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Warnick, Greg S.; Zanke, Brent W.; Peters, Ulrike; Hsu, Li; White, Emily

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genome-wide association studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Prior research has evaluated the presence of gene-environment interaction involving the first 10 identified susceptibility loci, but little work has been conducted on interaction involving SNPs at recently identified susceptibility loci, including: rs10911251, rs6691170, rs6687758, rs11903757, rs10936599, rs647161, rs1321311, rs719725, rs1665650, rs3824999, rs7136702, rs11169552, rs59336, rs3217810, rs4925386, and rs2423279. METHODS Data on 9160 cases and 9280 controls from the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO) and Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) were used to evaluate the presence of interaction involving the above-listed SNPs and sex, body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption, smoking, aspirin use, post-menopausal hormone (PMH) use, as well as intake of dietary calcium, dietary fiber, dietary folate, red meat, processed meat, fruit, and vegetables. Interaction was evaluated using a fixed-effects meta-analysis of an efficient Empirical Bayes estimator, and permutation was used to account for multiple comparisons. RESULTS None of the permutation-adjusted p-values reached statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS The associations between recently identified genetic susceptibility loci and CRC are not strongly modified by sex, BMI, alcohol, smoking, aspirin, PMH use, and various dietary factors. IMPACT Results suggest no evidence of strong gene-environment interactions involving the recently identified 16 susceptibility loci for CRC taken one at a time. PMID:24994789

  3. Association between glioma susceptibility loci and tumour pathology defines specific molecular etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Enciso-Mora, Victor; Marie, Yannick; Desestret, Virginie; Labussière, Marianne; Boisselier, Blandine; Mokhtari, Karima; Idbaih, Ahmed; Hoang-Xuan, Khe; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Houlston, Richard S; Sanson, Marc

    2013-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 7 loci influencing glioma risk: rs2736100 (TERT), rs11979158 and rs2252586 (EGFR), rs4295627 (CCDC26), rs4977756 (CDKN2A/CDKN2B), rs498872 (PHLDB1), and rs6010620 (RTEL1). We studied the relationship among these 7 glioma-risk SNPs and characteristics of tumors from 1374 patients, including grade, IDH (ie IDH1 or IDH2) mutation, EGFR amplification, CDKN2A-p16-INK4a homozygous deletion, 9p and 10q loss, and 1p-19q codeletion. rs2736100 (TERT) and rs6010620 (RTEL1) risk alleles were associated with high-grade disease, EGFR amplification, CDKN2A-p16-INK4a homozygous deletion, and 9p and 10q deletion; rs4295627 (CCDC26) and rs498872 (PHLDB1) were associated with low-grade disease, IDH mutation, and 1p-19q codeletion. In contrast, rs4977756 (CDKN2A/B), rs11979158 (EGFR), and to a lesser extent, rs2252586 (EGFR) risk alleles were independent of tumor grade and genetic profile. Adjusting for tumor grade showed a significant association between rs2736100 and IDH status (P = .01), 10q loss (P = .02); rs4295627 and 1p-19q codeletion (P = .04), rs498872 and IDH (P = .02), 9p loss (P = .04), and 10q loss (P = .02). Case-control analyses stratified into 4 molecular classes (defined by 1p-19q status, IDH mutation, and EGFR amplification) showed an association of rs4295627 and rs498872 with IDH-mutated gliomas (P RTEL1, CCDC26, and PHLDB1 variants were associated with different genetic profiles that annotate distinct molecular pathways. Our findings provide further insight into the biological basis of glioma etiology.

  4. Improving sensitivity of the polyurethane/CNT laminate strain sensor by controlled mechanical preload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slobodian, Petr; Olejnik, Robert; Matyas, Jiri; Babar, Dipak Gorakh

    2016-01-01

    This article describes strain detection potential of polyurethane/CNT layered composite and further possible enhance of its sensitivity to strain, expressed by value of gauge factor, GF, employing its controlled mechanical preload. In course of its fabrication a non-woven polyurethane membrane made by electro spinning was used as filtering membrane for CNT aqueous dispersion. Final CNT polyurethane laminate composite is prepared by compression molding. Produced polyurethane/CNT composite laminate is electrically conductive and high elastic. Its elongation leads to change of its macroscopic electrical resistance. Changes in resistance are further reversible, reproducible and can monitor deformation in real time. Gauge factor reaches very high values around 8 for strain reaching 3.5% comparing with conventional metallic strain gauges. Finally, controlled mechanical preload significantly increases value of GF. For example for value of 8.1% of preload value of GF reaches 23.3 for strain 3.5%. (paper)

  5. Specificity and Strain-Typing Capabilities of Nanorod Array-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Mycoplasma pneumoniae Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley C Henderson

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a cell wall-less bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract that accounts for > 20% of all community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. At present the most effective means for detection and strain-typing is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, which can exhibit excellent sensitivity and specificity but requires separate tests for detection and genotyping, lacks standardization between available tests and between labs, and has limited practicality for widespread, point-of-care use. We have developed and previously described a silver nanorod array-surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (NA-SERS biosensing platform capable of detecting M. pneumoniae with statistically significant specificity and sensitivity in simulated and true clinical throat swab samples, and the ability to distinguish between reference strains of the two main genotypes of M. pneumoniae. Furthermore, we have established a qualitative lower endpoint of detection for NA-SERS of < 1 genome equivalent (cell/μl and a quantitative multivariate detection limit of 5.3 ± 1 cells/μl. Here we demonstrate using partial least squares- discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA of sample spectra that NA-SERS correctly identified M. pneumoniae clinical isolates from globally diverse origins and distinguished these from a panel of 12 other human commensal and pathogenic mycoplasma species with 100% cross-validated statistical accuracy. Furthermore, PLS-DA correctly classified by strain type all 30 clinical isolates with 96% cross-validated accuracy for type 1 strains, 98% cross-validated accuracy for type 2 strains, and 90% cross-validated accuracy for type 2V strains.

  6. Genetic relationships between clinical and non-clinical strains of Yersinia enterocolitica biovar 1A as revealed by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and multilocus restriction typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virdi Jugsharan S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic relationships among 81 strains of Y. enterocolitica biovar 1A isolated from clinical and non-clinical sources were discerned by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE and multilocus restriction typing (MLRT using six loci each. Such studies may reveal associations between the genotypes of the strains and their sources of isolation. Results All loci were polymorphic and generated 62 electrophoretic types (ETs and 12 restriction types (RTs. The mean genetic diversity (H of the strains by MLEE and MLRT was 0.566 and 0.441 respectively. MLEE (DI = 0.98 was more discriminatory and clustered Y. enterocolitica biovar 1A strains into four groups, while MLRT (DI = 0.77 identified two distinct groups. BURST (Based Upon Related Sequence Types analysis of the MLRT data suggested aquatic serotype O:6,30-6,31 isolates to be the ancestral strains from which, clinical O:6,30-6,31 strains might have originated by host adaptation and genetic change. Conclusion MLEE revealed greater genetic diversity among strains of Y. enterocolitica biovar 1A and clustered strains in four groups, while MLRT grouped the strains into two groups. BURST analysis of MLRT data nevertheless provided newer insights into the probable evolution of clinical strains from aquatic strains.

  7. Development of an allele-specific PCR assay for simultaneous sero-typing of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli predominant O1, O2, O18 and O78 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaohui; Meng, Qingmei; Dai, Jianjun; Han, Xiangan; Han, Yue; Ding, Chan; Liu, Haiwen; Yu, Shengqing

    2014-01-01

    Systemic infections by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) are economically devastating to poultry industries worldwide. E. coli strains belonging to serotypes O1, O2, O18 and O78 are preferentially associated with avian colibacillosis. The rfb gene cluster controlling O antigen synthesis is usually various among different E. coli serotypes. In present study, the rfb gene clusters of E. coli serotypes O1, O2, O18 and O78 were characterized and compared. Based on the serotype-specific genes in rfb gene cluster, an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed. This PCR assay was highly specific and reliable for sero-typing of APEC O1, O2, O18 and O78 strains. The sensitivity of the assay was determined as 10 pg DNA or 10 colony forming units (CFUs) bacteria for serotypes O2 and O18 strains, and 500 pg DNA or 1,000 CFUs bacteria for serotypes O1 and O78 strains. Using this PCR system, APEC isolates and the infected tissue samples were categorized successfully. Furthermore, it was able to differentiate the serotypes for the samples with multi-agglutination in the traditional serum agglutination assay. Therefore, the allele-specific PCR is more simple, rapid and accurate assay for APEC diagnosis, epidemiologic study and vaccine development.

  8. Development of an allele-specific PCR assay for simultaneous sero-typing of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli predominant O1, O2, O18 and O78 strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohui Wang

    Full Text Available Systemic infections by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC are economically devastating to poultry industries worldwide. E. coli strains belonging to serotypes O1, O2, O18 and O78 are preferentially associated with avian colibacillosis. The rfb gene cluster controlling O antigen synthesis is usually various among different E. coli serotypes. In present study, the rfb gene clusters of E. coli serotypes O1, O2, O18 and O78 were characterized and compared. Based on the serotype-specific genes in rfb gene cluster, an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay was developed. This PCR assay was highly specific and reliable for sero-typing of APEC O1, O2, O18 and O78 strains. The sensitivity of the assay was determined as 10 pg DNA or 10 colony forming units (CFUs bacteria for serotypes O2 and O18 strains, and 500 pg DNA or 1,000 CFUs bacteria for serotypes O1 and O78 strains. Using this PCR system, APEC isolates and the infected tissue samples were categorized successfully. Furthermore, it was able to differentiate the serotypes for the samples with multi-agglutination in the traditional serum agglutination assay. Therefore, the allele-specific PCR is more simple, rapid and accurate assay for APEC diagnosis, epidemiologic study and vaccine development.

  9. SMAD7 loci contribute to risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and clinicopathologic development among Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jiansong; Xu, Min; Zhao, Zhongwei; Tu, Jianfei; Gao, Jun; Lu, Chenying; Song, Jingjing; Chen, Weiqian; Chen, Minjiang; Fan, Xiaoxi; Cheng, Xingyao; Lan, Xilin; Li, Jie

    2016-04-19

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified three loci at 18q21 (rs4939827, rs7240004, and rs7229639), which maps to SMAD7 loci, were associated with risk of diseases of the digestive system. However, their associations with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk remain unknown. A case-control study was conducted to assess genetic associations with HCC risk and clinicopathologic development among Chinese Han population. Three SNPs were genotyped among 1,000 HCC cases and 1,000 controls using Sequenom Mass-ARRAY technology. We observed statistically significant associations for the three SMAD7 loci and HCC risk. Each copy of minor allele was associated with a 1.24-1.36 fold increased risk of HCC. We also found that significant differences were observed between rs4939827 and clinical TNM stage and vascular invasion, as well as rs7240004 and vascular invasion. We also established a genetic risk score (GRS) by summing the risk alleles. The GRS was significantly associated with increased risk of HCC and vascular invasion. Our data revealed the SMAD7 loci is associated with HCC susceptibility and its clinicopathologic development.

  10. Investigation of population structure in Gulf of Mexico Seepiophila jonesi (Polychaeta, Siboglinidae using cross-amplified microsatellite loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunya Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Vestimentiferan tubeworms are some of the most recognizable fauna found at deep-sea cold seeps, isolated environments where hydrocarbon rich fluids fuel biological communities. Several studies have investigated tubeworm population structure; however, much is still unknown about larval dispersal patterns at Gulf of Mexico (GoM seeps. As such, researchers have applied microsatellite markers as a measure for documenting the transport of vestimentiferan individuals. In the present study, we investigate the utility of microsatellites to be cross-amplified within the escarpiid clade of seep vestimentiferans, by determining if loci originally developed for Escarpia spp. could be amplified in the GoM seep tubeworm, Seepiophila jonesi. Additionally, we determine if cross-amplified loci can reliably uncover the same signatures of high gene flow seen in a previous investigation of S. jonesi. Methods Seventy-seven S. jonesi individuals were collected from eight seep sites across the upper Louisiana slope (<1,000 m in the GoM. Forty-eight microsatellite loci that were originally developed for Escarpia laminata (18 loci and Escarpia southwardae (30 loci were tested to determine if they were homologous and polymorphic in S. jonesi. Loci found to be both polymorphic and of high quality were used to test for significant population structuring in S. jonesi. Results Microsatellite pre-screening identified 13 (27% of the Escarpia loci were homologous and polymorphic in S. jonesi, revealing that microsatellites can be amplified within the escarpiid clade of vestimentiferans. Our findings uncovered low levels of heterozygosity and a lack of genetic differentiation amongst S. jonesi from various sites and regions, in line with previous investigations that employed species-specific polymorphic loci on S. jonesi individuals retrieved from both the same and different seep sites. The lack of genetic structure identified from these populations supports the

  11. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies discovers multiple loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Camp, Nicola J.; Skibola, Christine F.; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Zhaoming; Gu, Jian; Nieters, Alexandra; Kelly, Rachel S.; Smedby, Karin E.; Monnereau, Alain; Cozen, Wendy; Cox, Angela; Wang, Sophia S.; Lan, Qing; Teras, Lauren R.; Machado, Moara; Yeager, Meredith; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Ye, Yuanqing; Call, Timothy G.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Novak, Anne J.; Kay, Neil E.; Liebow, Mark; Cunningham, Julie M.; Allmer, Cristine; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T.; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K.; Weiner, George J.; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M.; Riby, Jacques; Arnett, Donna K.; Zhi, Degui; Leach, Justin M.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Tinker, Lesley F.; Benavente, Yolanda; Sala, Núria; Casabonne, Delphine; Becker, Nikolaus; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Staines, Anthony; Chaffee, Kari G.; Achenbach, Sara J.; Vachon, Celine M.; Goldin, Lynn R.; Strom, Sara S.; Leis, Jose F.; Weinberg, J. Brice; Caporaso, Neil E.; Norman, Aaron D.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Severson, Richard K.; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Masala, Giovanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Chirlaque, María- Dolores; Vermeulen, Roel C. H.; Travis, Ruth C.; Southey, Melissa C.; Milne, Roger L.; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Clavel, Jacqueline; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R.; Villano, Danylo J.; Maria, Ann; Spinelli, John J.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Ferri, Giovanni M.; Miligi, Lucia; Liang, Liming; Ma, Baoshan; Huang, Jinyan; Crouch, Simon; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; North, Kari E.; Snowden, John A.; Wright, Josh; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cerhan, James R.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common lymphoid malignancy with strong heritability. To further understand the genetic susceptibility for CLL and identify common loci associated with risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies (GWAS) composed of 3,100 cases and 7,667 controls with follow-up replication in 1,958 cases and 5,530 controls. Here we report three new loci at 3p24.1 (rs9880772, EOMES, P=2.55 × 10−11), 6p25.2 (rs73718779, SERPINB6, P=1.97 × 10−8) and 3q28 (rs9815073, LPP, P=3.62 × 10−8), as well as a new independent SNP at the known 2q13 locus (rs9308731, BCL2L11, P=1.00 × 10−11) in the combined analysis. We find suggestive evidence (P<5 × 10−7) for two additional new loci at 4q24 (rs10028805, BANK1, P=7.19 × 10−8) and 3p22.2 (rs1274963, CSRNP1, P=2.12 × 10−7). Pathway analyses of new and known CLL loci consistently show a strong role for apoptosis, providing further evidence for the importance of this biological pathway in CLL susceptibility. PMID:26956414

  12. Isolation and characterization of a pseudoautosomal region-specific genetic marker in C57BL/6 mice using genomic representational difference analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalcheva, I D; Matsuda, Y; Plass, C; Chapman, V M

    1995-12-19

    Representational difference analysis was used to identify strain-specific differences in the pseudoautosomal region (PAR) of mouse X and Y chromosomes. One second generation (C57BL/6 x Mus spretus) x Mus spretus interspecific backcross male carrying the C57BL/6 (B6) PAR was used for tester DNA. DNA from five backcross males from the same generation that were M. spretus-type for the PAR was pooled for the driver. A cloned probe designated B6-38 was recovered that is B6-specific in Southern analysis. Analysis of genomic DNA from several inbred strains of laboratory mice and diverse Mus species and subspecies identified a characteristic Pst I pattern of fragment sizes that is present only in the C57BL family of strains. Hybridization was observed with sequences in DBA/2J and to a limited extent with Mus musculus (PWK strain) and Mus castaneus DNA. No hybridization was observed in DNA of different Mus species, M. spretus, M. hortulanus, and M. caroli. Genetic analyses of B6-38 was conducted using C57BL congenic males that carry M. spretus alleles for distal X chromosome loci and the PAR and outcrosses of heterozygous congenic females with M. spretus. These analyses demonstrated that the B6-38 sequences were inherited with both the X and Y chromosome. B6-38 sequences were genetically mapped as a locus within the PAR using two interspecific backcrosses. The locus defined by B6-38 is designated DXYRp1. Preliminary analyses of recombination between the distal X chromosome gene amelogenin (Amg) and the PAR loci for either TelXY or sex chromosome association (Sxa) suggest that the locus DXYRp1 maps to the distal portion of the PAR.

  13. Amplification Biases and Consistent Recovery of Loci in a Double-Digest RAD-seq Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaCosta, Jeffrey M.; Sorenson, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    A growing variety of “genotype-by-sequencing” (GBS) methods use restriction enzymes and high throughput DNA sequencing to generate data for a subset of genomic loci, allowing the simultaneous discovery and genotyping of thousands of polymorphisms in a set of multiplexed samples. We evaluated a “double-digest” restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (ddRAD-seq) protocol by 1) comparing results for a zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) sample with in silico predictions from the zebra finch reference genome; 2) assessing data quality for a population sample of indigobirds (Vidua spp.); and 3) testing for consistent recovery of loci across multiple samples and sequencing runs. Comparison with in silico predictions revealed that 1) over 90% of predicted, single-copy loci in our targeted size range (178–328 bp) were recovered; 2) short restriction fragments (38–178 bp) were carried through the size selection step and sequenced at appreciable depth, generating unexpected but nonetheless useful data; 3) amplification bias favored shorter, GC-rich fragments, contributing to among locus variation in sequencing depth that was strongly correlated across samples; 4) our use of restriction enzymes with a GC-rich recognition sequence resulted in an up to four-fold overrepresentation of GC-rich portions of the genome; and 5) star activity (i.e., non-specific cutting) resulted in thousands of “extra” loci sequenced at low depth. Results for three species of indigobirds show that a common set of thousands of loci can be consistently recovered across both individual samples and sequencing runs. In a run with 46 samples, we genotyped 5,996 loci in all individuals and 9,833 loci in 42 or more individuals, resulting in <1% missing data for the larger data set. We compare our approach to similar methods and discuss the range of factors (fragment library preparation, natural genetic variation, bioinformatics) influencing the recovery of a consistent set of loci among

  14. Role of 108 schizophrenia-associated loci in modulating psychopathological dimensions in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Chiara; Serretti, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    The Schizophrenia Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) identified 108 loci associated with schizophrenia, but their role in modulating specific psychopathological dimensions of the disease is unknown. This study investigated which symptom dimensions may be affected by these loci in schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Positive, negative and depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, cognition, violent behaviors, quality of life, and early onset were investigated in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using the clinical antipsychotic trials of intervention effectiveness (CATIE) and systematic treatment enhancement program for bipolar disorder (STEP-BD) studies. Individual loci were investigated, then genes within 50 Kbp from polymorphisms with p schizophrenia-associated variant (rs75059851) may modulate negative symptoms. Multi-locus models may provide interesting insights about the biological mechanisms that mediate psychopathological dimensions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Interaction of Coxiella burnetii Strains of Different Sources and Genotypes with Bovine and Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

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    Katharina Sobotta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Most human Q fever infections originate from small ruminants. By contrast, highly prevalent shedding of Coxiella (C. burnetii by bovine milk rarely results in human disease. We hypothesized that primary bovine and human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM represent a suitable in vitro model for the identification of strain-specific virulence properties at the cellular level. Twelve different C. burnetii strains were selected to represent different host species and multiple loci variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA genotypes. Infection efficiency and replication of C. burnetii were monitored by cell culture re-titration and qPCR. Expression of immunoregulatory factors after MDM infection was measured by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. Invasion, replication and MDM response differed between C. burnetii strains but not between MDMs of the two hosts. Strains isolated from ruminants were less well internalized than isolates from humans and rodents. Internalization of MLVA group I strains was lower compared to other genogroups. Replication efficacy of C. burnetii in MDM ranged from low (MLVA group III to high (MLVA group IV. Infected human and bovine MDM responded with a principal up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-12, and TNF-α. However, MLVA group IV strains induced a pronounced host response whereas infection with group I strains resulted in a milder response. C. burnetii infection marginally affected polarization of MDM. Only one C. burnetii strain of MLVA group IV caused a substantial up-regulation of activation markers (CD40, CD80 on the surface of bovine and human MDM. The study showed that replication of C. burnetii in MDM and the subsequent host cell response is genotype-specific rather than being determined by the host species pointing to a clear distinction in C. burnetii virulence between the genetic groups.

  16. Substrate specificity of glucose dehydrogenase and carbon source utilization pattern of pantoea dispersa strain P2 and its radiation induced mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Keun; Murugesan, Senthilkumar

    2009-01-01

    Mineral phosphate solubilizing pantoea dispersa strain P2 produced 5.5 mM and 42.6 mM of gluconic acid on 24 h and 72 h incubation, respectively. Strain P2 exhibited glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) specific activity of 0.32 IU mg -1 protein. We have studied the substrate specificity of GDH as well as carbon source utilization pattern of strain P2. GDH of strain P2 did not use ribose as substrate. Utilization of lactose with specific activity of 0.65 IU mg -1 protein indicated that the enzyme belongs to GDH type B isozyme. Arabinose, galactose, ribose, sucrose and xylose did not induce the synthesis of GDH enzyme while mannose induced the synthesis of GDH with highest specific activity of 0.58 IU mg -1 protein. Through radiation mutagenesis, the substrate specificity of GDH was modified in order to utilize side range of sugars available in root exudates. Ribose, originally not a substrate for GDH of strain P2 was utilized as substrate by mutants P2-M5 with specific activity of 0.44 and 0.57 IU mg -1 protein, respectively. Specific activity of GDH on the media containing lactose and galactose was also improved to 1.2 and 0.52 IU mg -1 protein in P2-M5 and P2-M6 respectively. Based on the carbon source availability in root exudate, the mutants can be selected and utilized as efficient biofertilizer under P-deficient soil conditions

  17. Activation of int-1 and int-2 loci in GRf mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, D A; Jackson, D P; Percy, D H; Morris, V L

    1986-10-30

    The Mtv-2 locus is known to be associated with a high mammary tumor incidence (97%) and early development of mammary tumors (3-13 months) in GR mice. However, it was not previously known whether the provirus which resides at the Mtv-2 locus is tumorigenic in and of itself or whether reintegration of proviruses generated from Mtv-2 is required for tumorigenesis. Foster-nursing GR mice on C57/BL mice eliminates the milk-borne source of GR virus, and allows the study of Mtv-2 derived proviruses alone. Using this approach, we have tested predictions which follow from the "positional" versus "reintegrational" models of tumorigenesis. Specifically, we have examined tumors from primary foster-nursed (GRf) mice to determine if MMTV proviruses derived from Mtv-2 were scattered randomly throughout the genome or were clustered in the vicinity of the int-1 and int-2 loci, which are thought to be associated with mammary tumorigenesis. It was found that the majority of spontaneous GRf mammary tumors that were tested have MMTV proviral integrations in either or both of the int-1 and int-2 loci and have transcription of either or both of the int loci. Tumors induced by Mtv-2, therefore, appear to have arisen via a mechanism similar to the activation of the int loci by exogenous (milk-borne) MMTV proviruses.

  18. Site-specific weed control technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Svend; Søgaard, Henning Tangen; Kudsk, Per

    2009-01-01

    Site-specific weed control technologies are defined as machinery or equipment embedded with technologies that detect weeds growing in a crop and, taking into account predefined factors such as economics, takes action to maximise the chances of successfully controlling them. In the article, we...... describe the basic parts of site specific weed control technologies, comprising of weed sensing systems, weed management models and precision weed control implements. A review of state-of-the-art technologies shows that several weed sensing systems and precision implements have been developed over the last...... of knowledge about the economic and environmental potential for increasing the resolution of weed control. The integration of site-specific information on weed distribution, weed species composition and density, and the effect on crop yield, is decisive for successful site-specific weed management.   Keywords...

  19. Strain and displacement controls by fibre bragg grating and digital image correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldbjørn, Jacob Paamand; Høgh, Jacob Herold; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2014-01-01

    the test based on measurements performed directly on the test specimen. In this paper, fibre Bragg grating (FBG) and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) are used to control a test. The FBG sensors offer the possibility of measuring strains inside the specimen, while the DIC system measures strains...

  20. Height control of self-assembled quantum dots by strain engineering during capping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossi, D.; Smereka, P.; Keizer, J.G.; Ulloa, J.M.; Koenraad, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Strain engineering during the capping of III-V quantum dots has been explored as a means to control the height of strained self-assembled quantum dots. Results of Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations are confronted with cross-sectional Scanning Tunnel Microscopy (STM) measurements performed on InAs

  1. Microsatellite loci isolated from the scleractinian coral, Acropora nobilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomura, Naoko; Hidaka, Michio

    2008-05-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of eight microsatellite loci from the scleractinian coral, Acropora nobilis. The microsatellite loci were obtained using compound SSR primers or an enrichment protocol. All the loci were polymorphic with four to eight alleles per locus and observed heterozygosities ranging from 0.22 to 0.76. Some of the primers developed for the two congeners, Acropora palmata and Acropora millepora were applicable to A. nobilis. These loci are useful for studying the connectivity among A. nobilis populations in Okinawa, southern Japan. © 2007 The Authors.

  2. Assessment of the genetic and phenotypic diversity among rhizogenic Agrobacterium biovar 1 strains infecting solanaceous and cucurbit crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Lien; Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; Moerkens, Rob; Wittemans, Lieve; Van Calenberge, Bart; Kerckhove, Stefan Van; Paeleman, Anneleen; De Mot, René; Rediers, Hans; Lievens, Bart

    2015-08-01

    Rhizogenic Agrobacterium biovar 1 strains have been found to cause extensive root proliferation on hydroponically grown Cucurbitaceae and Solanaceae crops, resulting in substantial economic losses. As these agrobacteria live under similar ecological conditions, infecting a limited number of crops, it may be hypothesized that genetic and phenotypic variation among such strains is relatively low. In this study we assessed the phenotypic diversity as well as the phylogenetic and evolutionary relationships of several rhizogenic Agrobacterium biovar 1 strains from cucurbit and solanaceous crops. A collection of 41 isolates was subjected to a number of phenotypic assays and characterized by MLSA targeting four housekeeping genes (16S rRNA gene, recA, rpoB and trpE) and two loci from the root-inducing Ri-plasmid (part of rolB and virD2). Besides phenotypic variation, remarkable genotypic diversity was observed, especially for some chromosomal loci such as trpE. In contrast, genetic diversity was lower for the plasmid-borne loci, indicating that the studied chromosomal housekeeping genes and Ri-plasmid-borne loci might not exhibit the same evolutionary history. Furthermore, phylogenetic and network analyses and several recombination tests suggested that recombination could be contributing in some extent to the evolutionary dynamics of rhizogenic Agrobacterium populations. Finally, a genomospecies-level identification analysis revealed that at least four genomospecies may occur on cucurbit and tomato crops (G1, G3, G8 and G9). Together, this study gives a first glimpse at the genetic and phenotypic diversity within this economically important plant pathogenic bacterium. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Molecular typing of mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates circulating in Jiangsu Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Haiyan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, China is the second place with high burden of tuberculosis (TB. To explore the characteristics of the pathogens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB circulating in this area is helpful for understanding and controlling the spread of the strains. Recent developments in molecular biology have allowed prompt identification and tracking specific strains of MTB spreading through the population. Methods Spacer-oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR were performed in combination to yield specific genetic profiles of 260 MTB strains isolated from 30 counties of Jiangsu province in China between June and July 2010. The spoligotyping results were in comparison to the world Spoligotyping Database of Institute Pasteur de Guadeloupe (SpolDB4. Drug susceptibility test (DST was performed on all strains by proportion method on Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ culture media. Results Based on the spoligotyping method, 246 strains displayed known patterns and 14 were absent in the database. Predominant spoligotypes belonged to the Beijing family (80.4%. By using the 24-loci VNTR typing scheme, 224 different patterns were identified, including 20 clusters and 204 unique patterns. The largest clade comprised 195 strains belonging to the Beijing family. The combination of spoligotyping and 24-loci MIRU-VNTR demonstrated maximal discriminatory power. Furthermore, we observed a significant association between Beijing family strains and drug-resistant phenotypes. The Beijing family strains presented increased risks for developing multi-drug resistant TB, with the OR (95% CI of 11.07(1.45-84.50. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that Beijing family isolates were the most prevalent strains circulating in Jiangsu province of China. The utility of spoligotyping in combination with 24-loci MIRU-VNTR might be a useful tool for epidemiological analysis of MTB

  4. A diagnostic PCR assay for the detection of an Australian epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic lung infection with the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the hallmarks of cystic fibrosis (CF) and is associated with worsening lung function, increased hospitalisation and reduced life expectancy. A virulent clonal strain of P. aeruginosa (Australian epidemic strain I; AES-I) has been found to be widespread in CF patients in eastern Australia. Methods Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was employed to identify genetic sequences that are present in the AES-I strain but absent from the sequenced reference strain PAO1. We used PCR to evaluate the distribution of several of the AES-I loci amongst a collection of 188 P. aeruginosa isolates which was comprised of 35 AES-I isolates (as determined by PFGE), 78 non-AES-I CF isolates including other epidemic CF strains as well as 69 P. aeruginosa isolates from other clinical and environmental sources. Results We have identified a unique AES-I genetic locus that is present in all 35 AES-I isolates tested and not present in any of the other 153 P. aeruginosa strains examined. We have used this unique AES-I locus to develop a diagnostic PCR and a real-time PCR assay to detect the presence of P. aeruginosa and AES-I in patient sputum samples. Conclusions We have developed diagnostic PCR assays that are 100% sensitive and 100% specific for the P. aeruginosa strain AES-I. We have also shown that Whatman FTA® Elute cards may be used with PCR-based assays to rapidly detect the presence of P. aeruginosa strains in CF sputum. PMID:20637114

  5. A diagnostic PCR assay for the detection of an Australian epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Anna

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic lung infection with the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the hallmarks of cystic fibrosis (CF and is associated with worsening lung function, increased hospitalisation and reduced life expectancy. A virulent clonal strain of P. aeruginosa (Australian epidemic strain I; AES-I has been found to be widespread in CF patients in eastern Australia. Methods Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH was employed to identify genetic sequences that are present in the AES-I strain but absent from the sequenced reference strain PAO1. We used PCR to evaluate the distribution of several of the AES-I loci amongst a collection of 188 P. aeruginosa isolates which was comprised of 35 AES-I isolates (as determined by PFGE, 78 non-AES-I CF isolates including other epidemic CF strains as well as 69 P. aeruginosa isolates from other clinical and environmental sources. Results We have identified a unique AES-I genetic locus that is present in all 35 AES-I isolates tested and not present in any of the other 153 P. aeruginosa strains examined. We have used this unique AES-I locus to develop a diagnostic PCR and a real-time PCR assay to detect the presence of P. aeruginosa and AES-I in patient sputum samples. Conclusions We have developed diagnostic PCR assays that are 100% sensitive and 100% specific for the P. aeruginosa strain AES-I. We have also shown that Whatman FTA® Elute cards may be used with PCR-based assays to rapidly detect the presence of P. aeruginosa strains in CF sputum.

  6. Genome-wide association studies of autoimmune vitiligo identify 23 new risk loci and highlight key pathways and regulatory variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ying; Andersen, Genevieve; Yorgov, Daniel; Ferrara, Tracey M; Ben, Songtao; Brownson, Kelly M; Holland, Paulene J; Birlea, Stanca A; Siebert, Janet; Hartmann, Anke; Lienert, Anne; van Geel, Nanja; Lambert, Jo; Luiten, Rosalie M; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; van der Veen, JP Wietze; Bennett, Dorothy C; Taïeb, Alain; Ezzedine, Khaled; Kemp, E Helen; Gawkrodger, David J; Weetman, Anthony P; Kõks, Sulev; Prans, Ele; Kingo, Külli; Karelson, Maire; Wallace, Margaret R; McCormack, Wayne T; Overbeck, Andreas; Moretti, Silvia; Colucci, Roberta; Picardo, Mauro; Silverberg, Nanette B; Olsson, Mats; Valle, Yan; Korobko, Igor; Böhm, Markus; Lim, Henry W.; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Zhou, Li; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Fain, Pamela R.; Santorico, Stephanie A; Spritz, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease in which depigmented skin results from destruction of melanocytes1, with epidemiologic association with other autoimmune diseases2. In previous linkage and genome-wide association studies (GWAS1, GWAS2), we identified 27 vitiligo susceptibility loci in patients of European (EUR) ancestry. We carried out a third GWAS (GWAS3) in EUR subjects, with augmented GWAS1 and GWAS2 controls, genome-wide imputation, and meta-analysis of all three GWAS, followed by an independent replication. The combined analyses, with 4,680 cases and 39,586 controls, identified 23 new loci and 7 suggestive loci, most encoding immune and apoptotic regulators, some also associated with other autoimmune diseases, as well as several melanocyte regulators. Bioinformatic analyses indicate a predominance of causal regulatory variation, some corresponding to eQTL at these loci. Together, the identified genes provide a framework for vitiligo genetic architecture and pathobiology, highlight relationships to other autoimmune diseases and melanoma, and offer potential targets for treatment. PMID:27723757

  7. Strain-controlled magnetic domain wall propagation in hybrid piezoelectric/ferromagnetic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Na; Devolder, Thibaut; Agnus, Guillaume; Aubert, Pascal; Daniel, Laurent; Kim, Joo-Von; Zhao, Weisheng; Trypiniotis, Theodossis; Cowburn, Russell P; Chappert, Claude; Ravelosona, Dafiné; Lecoeur, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The control of magnetic order in nanoscale devices underpins many proposals for integrating spintronics concepts into conventional electronics. A key challenge lies in finding an energy-efficient means of control, as power dissipation remains an important factor limiting future miniaturization of integrated circuits. One promising approach involves magnetoelectric coupling in magnetostrictive/piezoelectric systems, where induced strains can bear directly on the magnetic anisotropy. While such processes have been demonstrated in several multiferroic heterostructures, the incorporation of such complex materials into practical geometries has been lacking. Here we demonstrate the possibility of generating sizeable anisotropy changes, through induced strains driven by applied electric fields, in hybrid piezoelectric/spin-valve nanowires. By combining magneto-optical Kerr effect and magnetoresistance measurements, we show that domain wall propagation fields can be doubled under locally applied strains. These results highlight the prospect of constructing low-power domain wall gates for magnetic logic devices.

  8. Validity test of the IPD-Work consortium approach for creating comparable job strain groups between Job Content Questionnaire and Demand-Control Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bongkyoo; Ko, Sangbaek; Ostergren, Per-Olof

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to test the validity of the IPD-Work Consortium approach for creating comparable job strain groups between the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) and the Demand-Control Questionnaire (DCQ). A random population sample (N = 682) of all middle-aged Malmö males and females was given a questionnaire with the 14-item JCQ and 11-item DCQ for the job control and job demands. The JCQ job control and job demands scores were calculated in 3 different ways: using the 14-item JCQ standard scale formulas (method 1); dropping 3 job control items and using the 11-item JCQ standard scale formulas with additional scale weights (method 2); and the approach of the IPD Group (method 3), dropping 3 job control items, but using the simple 11-item summation-based scale formulas. The high job strain was defined as a combination of high demands and low control. Between the 2 questionnaires, false negatives for the high job strain were much greater than false positives (37-49% vs. 7-13%). When the method 3 was applied, the sensitivity of the JCQ for the high job strain against the DCQ was lowest (0.51 vs. 0.60-0.63 when the methods 1 and 2 were applied), although the specificity was highest (0.93 vs. 0.87-0.89 when the methods 1 and 2 were applied). The prevalence of the high job strain with the JCQ (the method 3 was applied) was considerably lower (4-7%) than with the JCQ (the methods 1 and 2 were applied) and the DCQ. The number of congruent cases for the high job strain between the 2 questionnaires was smallest when the method 3 was applied. The IPD-Work Consortium approach showed 2 major weaknesses to be used for epidemiological studies on the high job strain and health outcomes as compared to the standard JCQ methods: the greater misclassification of the high job strain and lower prevalence of the high job strain. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  9. Regulatory T cells control strain specific resistance to Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breser, Maria L.; Lino, Andreia C.; Motrich, Ruben D.; Godoy, Gloria J.; Demengeot, Jocelyne; Rivero, Virginia E.

    2016-01-01

    Susceptibility to autoimmune diseases results from the encounter of a complex and long evolved genetic context with a no less complex and changing environment. Major actors in maintaining health are regulatory T cells (Treg) that primarily dampen a large subset of autoreactive lymphocytes escaping thymic negative selection. Here, we directly asked whether Treg participate in defining susceptibility and resistance to Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis (EAP). We analyzed three common laboratory strains of mice presenting with different susceptibility to autoimmune prostatitis upon immunization with prostate proteins. The NOD, the C57BL/6 and the BALB/c mice that can be classified along a disease score ranging from severe, mild and to undetectable, respectively. Upon mild and transient depletion of Treg at the induction phase of EAP, each model showed an increment along this score, most remarkably with the BALB/c mice switching from a resistant to a susceptible phenotype. We further show that disease associates with the upregulation of CXCR3 expression on effector T cells, a process requiring IFNγ. Together with recent advances on environmental factors affecting Treg, these findings provide a likely cellular and molecular explanation to the recent rise in autoimmune diseases incidence. PMID:27624792

  10. Association analysis identifies 65 new breast cancer risk loci

    OpenAIRE

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lindström, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Beesley, Jonathan; Hui, Shirley; Kar, Siddhartha; Lemaçon, Audrey; Soucy, Penny; Glubb, Dylan; Rostamianfar, Asha; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Tyrer, Jonathan; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risk is influenced by rare coding variants in susceptibility genes, such as BRCA1, and many common, mostly non-coding variants. However, much of the genetic contribution to breast cancer risk remains unknown. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study of breast cancer in 122,977 cases and 105,974 controls of European ancestry and 14,068 cases and 13,104 controls of East Asian ancestry. We identified 65 new loci that are associated with overall breast cancer ri...

  11. Controlled fermentation of Moroccan picholine green olives by oleuropein-degrading Lactobacilli strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghabbour, N.; Rokni, Y.; Lamzira, Z.; Thonart, P.; Chihib, N.E.; Peres, C.; Asehraou, A.

    2016-07-01

    The control of the spontaneous fermentation process of un-debittered Moroccan Picholine green olives was undertaken basing the inoculation with two lactobacilli strains (Lactobacillus plantarum S175 and Lactobacillus pentosus S100). These strains, previously selected in our laboratory for their oleuropein-degrading capacity, were inoculated in olives brined at 5% of NaCl, and then incubated at 30 °C. The physico-chemical parameters (pH, free acidity, reducing sugars, sodium chloride, oleuropein and its hydrolysis products), and the microbiological parameters (mesophilic aerobic bacteria, coliforms, Staphylococcus, lactic acid bacteria and yeasts and moulds), were regularly analyzed during the fermentation time. The results obtained showed the effectiveness of the lactic acid bacteria strains to develop suitable oleuropein biodegradation and controlled lactic fermentation processes more than the un-inoculated olives (control). This result was confirmed by the rapid elimination of coliforms and staphylococcus, the accumulation of hydroxytyrosol as a result of oleuropein biodegradation, and a drastic reduction in spoiled olives with good quality fermented olives. (Author)

  12. High-density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothee; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I.; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E. M.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E.; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S.; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Arlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert M.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Using the Immunochip custom SNP array, which was designed for dense genotyping of 186 loci identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we analyzed 11,475 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (cases) of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. We combined these data

  13. Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of 21,000 cases and 95,000 controls identifies new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Waage, Johannes; Baurecht, Hansjoerg; Hotze, Melanie; Strachan, David P.; Curtin, John A.; Bonnelykke, Klaus; Tian, Chao; Takahashi, Atsushi; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Thyssen, Jacob P.; den Dekker, Herman T.; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Xiao, Feng Li; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Marenholz, Ingo; Kalb, Birgit; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Xu, Chengjian; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M.; Venturini, Cristina; Pennell, Craig E.; Barton, Sheila J.; Levin, Albert M.; Curjuric, Ivan; Bustamante, Mariona; Kreiner-Moller, Eskil; Lockett, Gabrielle A.; Bacelis, Jonas; Bunyavanich, Supinda; Myers, Rachel A.; Matanovic, Anja; Kumar, Ashish; Tung, Joyce Y.; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Kubo, Michiaki; McArdle, Wendy L.; Henderson, A. John; Kemp, John P.; Zheng, Jie; Smith, George Davey; Rueschendorf, Franz; Postma, Dirkje S.; Weiss, Scott T.; Koppelman, Gerard H.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 21 loci associated with atopic dermatitis risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify further susceptibility loci for this common, complex skin disease, we performed a meta-analysis of >15 million genetic variants in 21,399 cases

  14. Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of 21,000 cases and 95,000 controls identifies new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Waage, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 21 loci associated with atopic dermatitis risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify further susceptibility loci for this common, complex skin disease, we performed a meta-analysis of >15 million genetic variants in 21,399 cases...

  15. Genome-wide analysis reveals loci encoding anti-macrophage factors in the human pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea J Dowling

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important human pathogen whose infection biology is still poorly understood. The bacterium is endemic to tropical regions, including South East Asia and Northern Australia, where it causes melioidosis, a serious disease associated with both high mortality and antibiotic resistance. B. pseudomallei is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that is able to replicate in macrophages. However despite the critical nature of its interaction with macrophages, few anti-macrophage factors have been characterized to date. Here we perform a genome-wide gain of function screen of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 to identify loci encoding factors with anti-macrophage activity. We identify a total of 113 such loci scattered across both chromosomes, with positive gene clusters encoding transporters and secretion systems, enzymes/toxins, secondary metabolite, biofilm, adhesion and signal response related factors. Further phenotypic analysis of four of these regions shows that the encoded factors cause striking cellular phenotypes relevant to infection biology, including apoptosis, formation of actin 'tails' and multi-nucleation within treated macrophages. The detailed analysis of the remaining host of loci will facilitate genetic dissection of the interaction of this important pathogen with host macrophages and thus further elucidate this critical part of its infection cycle.

  16. Genetic fine-mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Anubha; Locke, Adam; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil; Scott, Robert A; Prokopenko, Inga; Scott, Laura J; Green, Todd; Sparso, Thomas; Thuillier, Dorothee; Yengo, Loic; Grallert, Harald; Wahl, Simone; Frånberg, Mattias; Strawbridge, Rona J; Kestler, Hans; Chheda, Himanshu; Eisele, Lewin; Gustafsson, Stefan; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Qi, Lu; Karssen, Lennart C; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Willems, Sara M; Li, Man; Chen, Han; Fuchsberger, Christian; Kwan, Phoenix; Ma, Clement; Linderman, Michael; Lu, Yingchang; Thomsen, Soren K; Rundle, Jana K; Beer, Nicola L; van de Bunt, Martijn; Chalisey, Anil; Kang, Hyun Min; Voight, Benjamin F; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Almgren, Peter; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Blüher, Matthias; Boeing, Heiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borringer, Erwin P; Burtt, Noël P; Carey, Jason; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Couper, David J; Crenshaw, Andrew T; van Dam, Rob M; Doney, Alex SF; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; Edkins, Sarah; Eriksson, Johan G; Esko, Tonu; Eury, Elodie; Fadista, João; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fox, Caroline; Franks, Paul W; Gertow, Karl; Gieger, Christian; Gigante, Bruna; Gottesman, Omri; Grant, George B; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Hassinen, Maija; Have, Christian T; Herder, Christian; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hreidarsson, Astradur B; Humphries, Steve E; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Anne U; Jonsson, Anna; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Kerrison, Nicola D; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kovacs, Peter; Kraft, Peter; Kravic, Jasmina; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Liang, Liming; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lindholm, Eero; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Lobbens, Stéphane; Luan, Jian’an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; McLeod, Olga; Meyer, Julia; Mihailov, Evelin; Mirza, Ghazala; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Carmen; Nöthen, Markus M; Oskolkov, Nikolay N; Owen, Katharine R; Palli, Domenico; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perry, John RB; Platou, Carl GP; Roden, Michael; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rybin, Denis; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Sennblad, Bengt; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Stančáková, Alena; Steinbach, Gerald; Storm, Petter; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Thorand, Barbara; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tonjes, Anke; Trakalo, Joseph; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Wennauer, Roman; Wood, Andrew R; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Dunham, Ian; Birney, Ewan; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Ferrer, Jorge; Loos, Ruth JF; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Pankow, James S; van Duijn, Cornelia; Sijbrands, Eric; Meigs, James B; Hu, Frank B; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Stumvoll, Michael; Pedersen, Nancy L; Lind, Lars; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Saaristo, Timo E; Saltevo, Juha; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Metspalu, Andres; Erbel, Raimund; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Moebus, Susanne; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Ingelsson, Erik; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Koistinen, Heikki; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hveem, Kristian; Njølstad, Inger; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Donnelly, Peter J; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Illig, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Cauchi, Stephane; Sladek, Rob; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Collin NA; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Nilsson, Peter M; Groop, Leif C; Barroso, Inês; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; O’Callaghan, Christopher A; Gloyn, Anna L; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; Teslovich, Tanya M; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    We performed fine-mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in/near KCNQ1. “Credible sets” of variants most likely to drive each distinct signal mapped predominantly to non-coding sequence, implying that T2D association is mediated through gene regulation. Credible set variants were enriched for overlap with FOXA2 chromatin immunoprecipitation binding sites in human islet and liver cells, including at MTNR1B, where fine-mapping implicated rs10830963 as driving T2D association. We confirmed that this T2D-risk allele increases FOXA2-bound enhancer activity in islet- and liver-derived cells. We observed allele-specific differences in NEUROD1 binding in islet-derived cells, consistent with evidence that the T2D-risk allele increases islet MTNR1B expression. Our study demonstrates how integration of genetic and genomic information can define molecular mechanisms through which variants underlying association signals exert their effects on disease. PMID:26551672

  17. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tönu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have raised the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q fasting insulin showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional follow-up of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  18. Genome-wide association analysis of more than 120,000 individuals identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Lindstrom, Sara; Canisius, Sander; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael J; Maranian, Mel J; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Shah, Mitulkumar Nandlal; Perkins, Barbara J; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Darabi, Hatef; Brand, Judith S

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ~14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising 15,748 breast cancer cases and 18,084 controls together with 46,785 cases and 42,892 controls from 41 studies genotyped on a 211,155-marker custom array (iCOGS). Analyses were restricted to women of Europea...

  19. Genome-wide association analysis of more than 120,000 individuals identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Lindstrom, Stephen; Canisius, Sander; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael; Maranian, Melanie; Bolla, Manjeet; Wang, Qing; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Darabi, Hatef; Brand, Judith S.

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGenome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ∼14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising 15,748 breast cancer cases and 18,084 controls together with 46,785 cases and 42,892 controls from 41 studies genotyped on a 211,155-marker custom array (iCOGS). Analyses were restricted to wome...

  20. Polyploidy Enhances F1 Pollen Sterility Loci Interactions That Increase Meiosis Abnormalities and Pollen Sterility in Autotetraploid Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinwen; Shahid, Muhammad Qasim; Chen, Lin; Chen, Zhixiong; Wang, Lan; Liu, Xiangdong; Lu, Yonggen

    2015-12-01

    Intersubspecific autotetraploid rice (Oryza sativa ssp. indica × japonica) hybrids have greater biological and yield potentials than diploid rice. However, the low fertility of intersubspecific autotetraploid hybrids, which is largely caused by high pollen abortion rates, limits their commercial utility. To decipher the cytological and molecular mechanisms underlying allelic interactions in autotetraploid rice, we developed an autotetraploid rice hybrid that was heterozygous (S(i)S(j)) at F1 pollen sterility loci (Sa, Sb, and Sc) using near-isogenic lines. Cytological studies showed that the autotetraploid had higher percentages (>30%) of abnormal chromosome behavior and aberrant meiocytes (>50%) during meiosis than did the diploid rice hybrid control. Analysis of gene expression profiles revealed 1,888 genes that were differentially expressed between the autotetraploid and diploid hybrid lines at the meiotic stage, among which 889 and 999 were up- and down-regulated, respectively. Of the 999 down-regulated genes, 940 were associated with the combined effect of polyploidy and pollen sterility loci interactions (IPE). Gene Ontology enrichment analysis identified a prominent functional gene class consisting of seven genes related to photosystem I (Gene Ontology 0009522). Moreover, 55 meiosis-related or meiosis stage-specific genes were associated with IPE in autotetraploid rice, including Os02g0497500, which encodes a DNA repair-recombination protein, and Os02g0490000, which encodes a component of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. These results suggest that polyploidy enhances epistatic interactions between alleles of pollen sterility loci, thereby altering the expression profiles of important meiosis-related or meiosis stage-specific genes and resulting in high pollen sterility. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Multiferroic Properties of o-LuMnO3 Controlled by b-Axis Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Y. W.; Huang, S. W.; Hu, Y.; Rettig, L.; Alberca, A.; Shimamoto, K.; Scagnoli, V.; Lippert, T.; Schneider, C. W.; Staub, U.

    2014-10-01

    Strain is a leading candidate for controlling magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroics. Here, we use x-ray diffraction to study the coupling between magnetic order and structural distortion in epitaxial films of the orthorhombic (o-) perovskite LuMnO3. An antiferromagnetic spin canting in the E-type magnetic structure is shown to be related to the ferroelectrically induced structural distortion and to a change in the magnetic propagation vector. By comparing films of different orientations and thicknesses, these quantities are found to be controlled by b-axis strain. It is shown that compressive strain destabilizes the commensurate E-type structure and reduces its accompanying ferroelectric distortion.

  2. Human active X-specific DNA methylation events showing stability across time and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Jihoon Eric; Novakovic, Boris; Cruickshank, Mark; Doyle, Lex W; Craig, Jeffrey M; Saffery, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of X chromosome inactivation in female mammals is well characterised and remains the archetypal example of dosage compensation via monoallelic expression. The temporal series of events that culminates in inactive X-specific gene silencing by DNA methylation has revealed a ‘patchwork' of gene inactivation along the chromosome, with approximately 15% of genes escaping. Such genes are therefore potentially subject to sex-specific imbalance between males and females. Aside from XIST, the non-coding RNA on the X chromosome destined to be inactivated, very little is known about the extent of loci that may be selectively silenced on the active X chromosome (Xa). Using longitudinal array-based DNA methylation profiling of two human tissues, we have identified specific and widespread active X-specific DNA methylation showing stability over time and across tissues of disparate origin. Our panel of X-chromosome loci subject to methylation on Xa reflects a potentially novel mechanism for controlling female-specific X inactivation and sex-specific dimorphisms in humans. Further work is needed to investigate these phenomena. PMID:24713664

  3. [Comparative genomics and evolutionary analysis of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kai; Liang, Xin-le; Li, Yu-dong

    2015-12-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) is a widespread adaptive immunity system that exists in most archaea and many bacteria against foreign DNA, such as phages, viruses and plasmids. In general, CRISPR system consists of direct repeat, leader, spacer and CRISPR-associated sequences. Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role in industrial fermentation of vinegar and bioelectrochemistry. To investigate the polymorphism and evolution pattern of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria, bioinformatic analyses were performed on 48 species from three main genera (Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter and Gluconobacter) with whole genome sequences available from the NCBI database. The results showed that the CRISPR system existed in 32 species of the 48 strains studied. Most of the CRISPR-Cas system in AAB belonged to type I CRISPR-Cas system (subtype E and C), but type II CRISPR-Cas system which contain cas9 gene was only found in the genus Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The repeat sequences of some CRISPR were highly conserved among species from different genera, and the leader sequences of some CRISPR possessed conservative motif, which was associated with regulated promoters. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of cas1 demonstrated that they were suitable for classification of species. The conservation of cas1 genes was associated with that of repeat sequences among different strains, suggesting they were subjected to similar functional constraints. Moreover, the number of spacer was positively correlated with the number of prophages and insertion sequences, indicating the acetic acid bacteria were continually invaded by new foreign DNA. The comparative analysis of CRISR loci in acetic acid bacteria provided the basis for investigating the molecular mechanism of different acetic acid tolerance and genome stability in acetic acid bacteria.

  4. Genome sequences of three strains of Aspergillus flavus for the biological control of Aflatoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genomes of three strains of Aspergillus flavus with demonstrated utility for the biological control of aflatoxin were sequenced. These sequences were assembled with MIRA and annotated with Augustus using A. flavus strain 3357 (NCBI EQ963472) as a reference. Each strain had a genome of 36.3 to ...

  5. Genome-Wide Search for Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Important Plant and Flower Traits in Petunia Using an Interspecific Recombinant Inbred Population of Petunia axillaris and Petunia exserta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhe; Guo, Yufang; Yang, Qian; He, Yanhong; Fetouh, Mohammed; Warner, Ryan M; Deng, Zhanao

    2018-05-15

    A major bottleneck in plant breeding has been the much limited genetic base and much reduced genetic diversity in domesticated, cultivated germplasm. Identification and utilization of favorable gene loci or alleles from wild or progenitor species can serve as an effective approach to increasing genetic diversity and breaking this bottleneck in plant breeding. This study was conducted to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) in wild or progenitor petunia species that can be used to improve important horticultural traits in garden petunia. An F 7 recombinant inbred population derived between Petunia axillaris and P. exserta was phenotyped for plant height, plant spread, plant size, flower counts, flower diameter, flower length, and days to anthesis, in Florida in two consecutive years. Transgressive segregation was observed for all seven traits in both years. The broad-sense heritability estimates for the traits ranged from 0.20 (days to anthesis) to 0.62 (flower length). A genome-wide genetic linkage map consisting 368 single nucleotide polymorphism bins and extending over 277 cM was searched to identify QTL for these traits. Nineteen QTL were identified and localized to five linkage groups. Eleven of the loci were identified consistently in both years; several loci explained up to 34.0% and 24.1% of the phenotypic variance for flower length and flower diameter, respectively. Multiple loci controlling different traits are co-localized in four intervals in four linkage groups. These intervals contain desirable alleles that can be introgressed into commercial petunia germplasm to expand the genetic base and improve plant performance and flower characteristics in petunia. Copyright © 2018, G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics.

  6. Substrate specificity of glucose dehydrogenase and carbon source utilization pattern of pantoea dispersa strain P2 and its radiation induced mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Keun; Murugesan, Senthilkumar [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Mineral phosphate solubilizing pantoea dispersa strain P2 produced 5.5 mM and 42.6 mM of gluconic acid on 24 h and 72 h incubation, respectively. Strain P2 exhibited glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) specific activity of 0.32 IU mg{sup -1} protein. We have studied the substrate specificity of GDH as well as carbon source utilization pattern of strain P2. GDH of strain P2 did not use ribose as substrate. Utilization of lactose with specific activity of 0.65 IU mg{sup -1} protein indicated that the enzyme belongs to GDH type B isozyme. Arabinose, galactose, ribose, sucrose and xylose did not induce the synthesis of GDH enzyme while mannose induced the synthesis of GDH with highest specific activity of 0.58 IU mg{sup -1} protein. Through radiation mutagenesis, the substrate specificity of GDH was modified in order to utilize side range of sugars available in root exudates. Ribose, originally not a substrate for GDH of strain P2 was utilized as substrate by mutants P2-M5 with specific activity of 0.44 and 0.57 IU mg{sup -1} protein, respectively. Specific activity of GDH on the media containing lactose and galactose was also improved to 1.2 and 0.52 IU mg{sup -1} protein in P2-M5 and P2-M6 respectively. Based on the carbon source availability in root exudate, the mutants can be selected and utilized as efficient biofertilizer under P-deficient soil conditions.

  7. Genomic survey of pathogenicity determinants and VNTR markers in the cassava bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. Manihotis strain CIO151.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta-Ortiz, Mario L; Rodríguez-R, Luis M; Pérez-Quintero, Álvaro L; Poulin, Lucie; Díaz, Ana C; Arias Rojas, Nathalia; Trujillo, Cesar; Restrepo Benavides, Mariana; Bart, Rebecca; Boch, Jens; Boureau, Tristan; Darrasse, Armelle; David, Perrine; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Fontanilla, Paula; Gagnevin, Lionel; Guérin, Fabien; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Medina, Cesar; Medina, Edgar; Montenegro, Nathaly; Muñoz Bodnar, Alejandra; Noël, Laurent D; Ortiz Quiñones, Juan F; Osorio, Daniela; Pardo, Carolina; Patil, Prabhu B; Poussier, Stéphane; Pruvost, Olivier; Robène-Soustrade, Isabelle; Ryan, Robert P; Tabima, Javier; Urrego Morales, Oscar G; Vernière, Christian; Carrere, Sébastien; Verdier, Valérie; Szurek, Boris; Restrepo, Silvia; López, Camilo; Koebnik, Ralf; Bernal, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam) is the causal agent of bacterial blight of cassava, which is among the main components of human diet in Africa and South America. Current information about the molecular pathogenicity factors involved in the infection process of this organism is limited. Previous studies in other bacteria in this genus suggest that advanced draft genome sequences are valuable resources for molecular studies on their interaction with plants and could provide valuable tools for diagnostics and detection. Here we have generated the first manually annotated high-quality draft genome sequence of Xam strain CIO151. Its genomic structure is similar to that of other xanthomonads, especially Xanthomonas euvesicatoria and Xanthomonas citri pv. citri species. Several putative pathogenicity factors were identified, including type III effectors, cell wall-degrading enzymes and clusters encoding protein secretion systems. Specific characteristics in this genome include changes in the xanthomonadin cluster that could explain the lack of typical yellow color in all strains of this pathovar and the presence of 50 regions in the genome with atypical nucleotide composition. The genome sequence was used to predict and evaluate 22 variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) loci that were subsequently demonstrated as polymorphic in representative Xam strains. Our results demonstrate that Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis strain CIO151 possesses ten clusters of pathogenicity factors conserved within the genus Xanthomonas. We report 126 genes that are potentially unique to Xam, as well as potential horizontal transfer events in the history of the genome. The relation of these regions with virulence and pathogenicity could explain several aspects of the biology of this pathogen, including its ability to colonize both vascular and non-vascular tissues of cassava plants. A set of 16 robust, polymorphic VNTR loci will be useful to develop a multi-locus VNTR analysis

  8. Silencing Agrobacterium oncogenes in transgenic grapevine results in strain-specific crown gall resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galambos, A; Zok, A; Kuczmog, A; Oláh, R; Putnoky, P; Ream, W; Szegedi, E

    2013-11-01

    Grapevine rootstock transformed with an Agrobacterium oncogene-silencing transgene was resistant to certain Agrobacterium strains but sensitive to others. Thus, genetic diversity of Agrobacterium oncogenes may limit engineering crown gall resistance. Crown gall disease of grapevine induced by Agrobacterium vitis or Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes serious economic losses in viticulture. To establish crown gall-resistant lines, somatic proembryos of Vitis berlandieri × V. rupestris cv. 'Richter 110' rootstock were transformed with an oncogene-silencing transgene based on iaaM and ipt oncogene sequences from octopine-type, tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid pTiA6. Twenty-one transgenic lines were selected, and their transgenic nature was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These lines were inoculated with two A. tumefaciens and three A. vitis strains. Eight lines showed resistance to octopine-type A. tumefaciens A348. Resistance correlated with the expression of the silencing genes. However, oncogene silencing was mostly sequence specific because these lines did not abolish tumorigenesis by A. vitis strains or nopaline-type A. tumefaciens C58.

  9. Association of eGFR-Related Loci Identified by GWAS with Incident CKD and ESRD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten A Böger

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Family studies suggest a genetic component to the etiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD and end stage renal disease (ESRD. Previously, we identified 16 loci for eGFR in genome-wide association studies, but the associations of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for incident CKD or ESRD are unknown. We thus investigated the association of these loci with incident CKD in 26,308 individuals of European ancestry free of CKD at baseline drawn from eight population-based cohorts followed for a median of 7.2 years (including 2,122 incident CKD cases defined as eGFR <60ml/min/1.73m(2 at follow-up and with ESRD in four case-control studies in subjects of European ancestry (3,775 cases, 4,577 controls. SNPs at 11 of the 16 loci (UMOD, PRKAG2, ANXA9, DAB2, SHROOM3, DACH1, STC1, SLC34A1, ALMS1/NAT8, UBE2Q2, and GCKR were associated with incident CKD; p-values ranged from p = 4.1e-9 in UMOD to p = 0.03 in GCKR. After adjusting for baseline eGFR, six of these loci remained significantly associated with incident CKD (UMOD, PRKAG2, ANXA9, DAB2, DACH1, and STC1. SNPs in UMOD (OR = 0.92, p = 0.04 and GCKR (OR = 0.93, p = 0.03 were nominally associated with ESRD. In summary, the majority of eGFR-related loci are either associated or show a strong trend towards association with incident CKD, but have modest associations with ESRD in individuals of European descent. Additional work is required to characterize the association of genetic determinants of CKD and ESRD at different stages of disease progression.

  10. Rapid identification of Mycobacterium avium ssp paratuberculosis laboratory strains by IS900-Nested polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Mohammad Mohammad; Mosavari, Nader; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tadayon, Keyvan; Keshavarz, Rouholah; Pajoohi, Reza Aref; Soleimani, Kioomars; Pour, Shojaat Dashti

    2016-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp paratuberculosis (MAP) causes paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) in ruminants. As a species, M. avium comprises M. avium subsp. hominissuis and a number of clones that are known to have evolved from this subspecies, namely M. avium subsp. avium (MAA), M. avium subsp. silvaticum, and MAP. Despite the very high genomic similarity of MAP and MAA, the insertion sequence IS900, which is 1,451-bp long, is now understood to be exclusively present in 10-20 copies in the genome of MAP. In the present study, a multidiscipline polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based algorithm targeting16SrRNA, IS6110, IS901, IS1245, and IS900 markers has been employed to differentiate between six laboratory strains of M. avium complex (including MAP 316F, III&V, and 2e plus MAA D4), Mycobacterium tuberculosis DT, and Mycobacterium bovis AN5 strains used at the Razi Institute (Tehran, Iran) for the preparation of paratuberculin, avian, human, and bovine tuberculin, respectively. Three laboratory strains of III&V, 2e, and 316F were subcultured on Herrold's egg yolk medium, whereas the MAA strain of D4 along with M. bovis AN5 and M. tuberculosis DT were subcultured on Lowenstein-Jensen slopes. All the inoculated culture tubes were incubated for 8weeks at 37°C. Eventually, their genomic DNA was extracted according to the method of van Soolingen. Five individual PCRs were conducted on these templates to amplify 16SrRNA (genus-specific marker shared by all mycobacteria), IS900 (MAP-specific marker), IS901 (MAA-specific marker), IS1245 (M. avium complex (MAC)-specific marker), and IS6110 (M. tuberculosis complex (MTC)-specific marker) loci. Consequently, a 543-bp amplicon was amplified by all the six strains in PCR against 16SrRNA, an indication of their identity as members of Mycobacterium genus. A 245-bp fragment was detected in only IS6110-PCR with M. bovis AN5 as well as M. tuberculosis DT. In the IS1245 assessment, the MAA strain of D4 produced a 427-bp amplicon, whereas

  11. Cloning of the Lentinula edodes B mating-type locus and identification of the genetic structure controlling B mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; van Peer, Arend; Song, Wenhua; Wang, Hong; Chen, Mingjie; Tan, Qi; Song, Chunyan; Zhang, Meiyan; Bao, Dapeng

    2013-12-01

    During the life cycle of heterothallic tetrapolar Agaricomycetes such as Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Pegler, the mating type system, composed of unlinked A and B loci, plays a vital role in controlling sexual development and resulting formation of the fruit body. L. edodes is produced worldwide for consumption and medicinal purposes, and understanding its sexual development is therefore of great importance. A considerable amount of mating type factors has been indicated over the past decades but few genes have actually been identified, and no complete genetic structures of L. edodes B mating-type loci are available. In this study, we cloned the matB regions from two mating compatible L. edodes strains, 939P26 and 939P42. Four pheromone receptors were identified on each new matB region, together with three and four pheromone precursor genes in the respective strains. Gene polymorphism, phylogenetic analysis and distribution of pheromone receptors and pheromone precursors clearly indicate a bipartite matB locus, each sublocus containing a pheromone receptor and one or two pheromone precursors. Detailed sequence comparisons of genetic structures between the matB regions of strains 939P42, 939P26 and a previously reported strain SUP2 further supported this model and allowed identification of the B mating type subloci borders. Mating studies confirmed the control of B mating by the identified pheromone receptors and pheromones in L. edodes. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ripke, Stephan

    2011-10-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated (6p21.32-p22.1 and 18q21.2). The strongest new finding (P = 1.6 × 10(-11)) was with rs1625579 within an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10(-9)), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10(-8)) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10(-9)).

  13. Polyploidy Enhances F1 Pollen Sterility Loci Interactions That Increase Meiosis Abnormalities and Pollen Sterility in Autotetraploid Rice1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinwen; Chen, Lin; Chen, Zhixiong; Wang, Lan; Lu, Yonggen

    2015-01-01

    Intersubspecific autotetraploid rice (Oryza sativa ssp. indica × japonica) hybrids have greater biological and yield potentials than diploid rice. However, the low fertility of intersubspecific autotetraploid hybrids, which is largely caused by high pollen abortion rates, limits their commercial utility. To decipher the cytological and molecular mechanisms underlying allelic interactions in autotetraploid rice, we developed an autotetraploid rice hybrid that was heterozygous (SiSj) at F1 pollen sterility loci (Sa, Sb, and Sc) using near-isogenic lines. Cytological studies showed that the autotetraploid had higher percentages (>30%) of abnormal chromosome behavior and aberrant meiocytes (>50%) during meiosis than did the diploid rice hybrid control. Analysis of gene expression profiles revealed 1,888 genes that were differentially expressed between the autotetraploid and diploid hybrid lines at the meiotic stage, among which 889 and 999 were up- and down-regulated, respectively. Of the 999 down-regulated genes, 940 were associated with the combined effect of polyploidy and pollen sterility loci interactions (IPE). Gene Ontology enrichment analysis identified a prominent functional gene class consisting of seven genes related to photosystem I (Gene Ontology 0009522). Moreover, 55 meiosis-related or meiosis stage-specific genes were associated with IPE in autotetraploid rice, including Os02g0497500, which encodes a DNA repair-recombination protein, and Os02g0490000, which encodes a component of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. These results suggest that polyploidy enhances epistatic interactions between alleles of pollen sterility loci, thereby altering the expression profiles of important meiosis-related or meiosis stage-specific genes and resulting in high pollen sterility. PMID:26511913

  14. Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willer, C. J.; Schmidt, E. M.; Sengupta, S.

    2013-01-01

    Levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,577 individ...... of using genetic data from individuals of diverse ancestry and provide insights into the biological mechanisms regulating blood lipids to guide future genetic, biological and therapeutic research.......Levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188......,577 individuals using genome-wide and custom genotyping arrays. We identify and annotate 157 loci associated with lipid levels at P lipid levels in humans. Using dense genotyping in individuals of European, East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry...

  15. Strain-specific battery of tests for domains of mania: effects of valproate, lithium and imipramine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlomit Flaisher-Grinberg

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The lack of efficient animal models for bipolar disorder (BPD, especially for the manic pole, is a major factor hindering the research of its pathophysiology and the development of improved drug treatments. The present study was designed to identify an appropriate mouse strain for modeling some behavioral domains of mania and to evaluate the effects of drugs using this strain. The study compared the behavior of four strains: Black Swiss, C57Bl/6, CBA/J and A/J mice in a battery of tests that included spontaneous activity; sweet solution preference; light/dark box; resident-intruder; forced-swim and amphetamine-induced hyperactivity. Based on the ‘manic-like’ behavior demonstrated by the Black Swiss strain, the study evaluated the effects of the mood stabilizers valproate and lithium and of the antidepressant imipramine in the same tests using this strain. Results indicated that lithium and valproate attenuate the ‘manic-like’ behavior of Black Swiss mice whereas imipramine had no effects. These findings suggest that Black Swiss mice might be a good choice for modeling several domains of mania and distinguishing the effects of drugs on these specific domains. However, the relevance of the behavioral phenotype of Black Swiss mice to the biology of BPD is unknown at this time and future studies will investigate molecular differences between Black Swiss mice and other strains and asess the interaction between strain and mood stabilizing treatment.

  16. A two-stage meta-analysis identifies several new loci for Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plagnol, V.; Nalls, M.A.; Bras, J.M.; Hernandez, D.; Sharma, M.; Sheerin, U.M.; Saad, M.; Simon-Sanchez, J.; Schulte, C.; Lesage, S.; Sveinbjornsdottir, S.; Amouyel, P.; Arepalli, S.; Band, G.; Barker, R.A.; Bellinguez, C.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Berendse, H.W.; Berg, D; Bhatia, K.P.; Bie, R.M. de; Biffi, A.; Bloem, B.R.; Bochdanovits, Z.; Bonin, M.; Brockmann, K.; Brooks, J.; Burn, D.J.; Charlesworth, G.; Chen, H.; Chinnery, P.F.; Chong, S.; Clarke, C.E.; Cookson, M.R.; Cooper, J.M.; Corvol, J.C.; Counsell, J.; Damier, P.; Dartigues, J.F.; Deloukas, P.; Deuschl, G.; Dexter, D.T.; Dijk, K.D. van; Dillman, A.; Durif, F.; Durr, A.; Edkins, S.; Evans, J.R.; Foltynie, T.; Freeman, C.; Gao, J.; Gardner, M.; Gibbs, J.R.; Goate, A.; Gray, E.; Guerreiro, R.; Gustafsson, O.; Harris, C.; Hellenthal, G.; Hilten, J.J. van; Hofman, A.; Hollenbeck, A.; Holton, J.L.; Hu, M.; Huang, X.; Huber, H; Hudson, G.; Hunt, S.E.; Huttenlocher, J.; Illig, T.; Jonsson, P.V.; Langford, C.; Lees, A.J.; Lichtner, P.; Limousin, P.; Lopez, G.; McNeill, A.; Moorby, C.; Moore, M.; Morris, H.A.; Morrison, K.E.; Mudanohwo, E.; O'Sullivan, S.S; Pearson, J.; Pearson, R.; Perlmutter, J.; Petursson, H.; Pirinen, M.; Polnak, P.; Post, B.; Potter, S.C.; Ravina, B.; Revesz, T.; Riess, O.; Rivadeneira, F.; Rizzu, P.; Ryten, M.; Sawcer, S.J.; Schapira, A.; Scheffer, H.; Shaw, K.; Shoulson, I.; Sidransky, E.; Silva, R. de; Smith, C.; Spencer, C.C.; Stefansson, H.; Steinberg, S.; Stockton, J.D.; Strange, A.; Su, Z.; Talbot, K.; Tanner, C.M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, A.; Tison, F.; Trabzuni, D.; Traynor, B.J.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Vandrovcova, J.; Velseboer, D.; Vidailhet, M.; Vukcevic, D.; Walker, R.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Weale, M.E.; Wickremaratchi, M.; Williams, N.; Williams-Gray, C.H.; Winder-Rhodes, S.; Stefansson, K.; Martinez, M.; Donnelly, P.; Singleton, A.B.; Hardy, J.; Heutink, P.; Brice, A.; Gasser, T.; Wood, N.W.

    2011-01-01

    A previous genome-wide association (GWA) meta-analysis of 12,386 PD cases and 21,026 controls conducted by the International Parkinson's Disease Genomics Consortium (IPDGC) discovered or confirmed 11 Parkinson's disease (PD) loci. This first analysis of the two-stage IPDGC study

  17. Sensitivity of the green alga Pediastrum duplex Meyen to allelochemicals is strain-specific and not related to co-occurrence with allelopathic macrophytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falk Eigemann

    Full Text Available Interspecific differences in the response of microalgae to stress have numerous ecological implications. However, little is known of intraspecific sensitivities and the potential role of local genetic adaptation of populations. We compared the allelochemical sensitivity of 23 Pediastrum duplex Meyen strains, a common component of the freshwater phytoplankton. In order to test for local genetic adaptation, strains were isolated from water bodies with and without the allelopathically-active submerged macrophyte Myriophyllum. Strains were assigned to P. duplex on the basis of cell shape and colony morphology and only P. duplex strains that belonged to the same lineage in an ITS rDNA phylogeny were used. Inhibition of strain growth rates and maximum quantum yields of photosystem II were measured after exposure to tannic acid (TA and co-culture with Myriophyllum spicatum. Growth rate inhibition varied over one order of magnitude between the P. duplex strains. There was no correlation between the presence of Myriophyllum in the source location and the sensitivity of the strains to TA or the presence of Myriophyllum, suggesting that at least strong unidirectional local adaptation to Myriophyllum had not taken place in the studied water bodies. The maximum quantum yield of photosystem II of TA exposed algae decreased, whereas the yield of algae exposed to M. spicatum was slightly higher than that of the controls. The ranking of P. duplex strain sensitivities differed between the types of exposure (single additions of TA versus co-existence with M. spicatum and the parameter measured (growth rate versus maximum quantum yield, emphasizing the importance of measuring multiple traits when analysing strain-specific sensitivities towards allelochemicals. The observation that sensitivities to allelochemicals vary widely among strains of a single freshwater algal species should be taken into account if evaluating ecological consequences of allelopathic

  18. Tissue- and stage-specific Wnt target gene expression is controlled subsequent to beta-catenin recruitment to cis-regulatory modules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakamura, Y.; de Paiva Alves, E.; Veenstra, G.J.C.; Hoppler, S.

    2016-01-01

    Key signalling pathways, such as canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signalling, operate repeatedly to regulate tissue- and stage-specific transcriptional responses during development. Although recruitment of nuclear beta-catenin to target genomic loci serves as the hallmark of canonical Wnt signalling,

  19. Identification of ssDNA aptamers specific to clinical isolates of Streptococcus mutans strains with different cariogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wei; Liu, Jiaojiao; Su, Donghua; Hu, Danyang; Hou, Shuai; Hu, Tongnan; Yang, Jiyong; Luo, Yanping; Xi, Qing; Chu, Bingfeng; Wang, Chenglong

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a Gram-positive facultative anaerobic bacterium, is considered to be a major etiological factor for dental caries. In this study, plaques from dental enamel surfaces of caries-active and caries-free individuals were obtained and cultivated for S. mutans isolation. Morphology examination, biochemical characterization, and polymerase chain reaction were performed to identify S. mutans The cariogenicity of S. mutans strains isolated from clinical specimens was evaluated by testing the acidogenicity, aciduricity, extracellular polysaccharide production, and adhesion ability of the bacteria. Finally, subtractive SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) technology targeting whole intact cells was used to screen for ssDNA aptamers specific to the strains with high cariogenicity. After nine rounds of subtractive SELEX, sufficient pool enrichment was achieved as shown by radioactive isotope analysis. The enriched pool was cloned and sequenced randomly, followed by MEME online and RNA structure software analysis of the sequences. Results from the flow cytometry indicated that aptamers H1, H16, H4, L1, L10, and H19 could discriminate highly cariogenic S. mutans strains from poorly cariogenic strains. Among these, Aptamer H19 had the strongest binding capacity with cariogenic S. mutans strains with a dissociation constant of 69.45 ± 38.53 nM. In conclusion, ssDNA aptamers specific to highly cariogenic clinical S. mutans strains were successfully obtained. These ssDNA aptamers might be used for the early diagnosis and treatment of dental caries. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Determination of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and transmission patterns among TB patients in Iran, using 15 loci MIRU-VNTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Zamani

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: MIRU-VNTR typing showed a high genetic diversity and suggests the possibility of transmission from Sistan–Baluchestan to other provinces of Iran. This method could be considered a suitable tool for studying the transmission routes of TB and leading to more appropriate measures for TB control. MIRU-VNTR typing leads to a much better understanding of the bacterial population structure and phylogenetic relationships between strains of MTB in different regions of Iran.

  1. Monitoring Leptospira strain collections: the need for quality control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerqueira, Gustavo M.; McBride, Alan J. A.; Queiroz, Adriano; Pinto, Luciano S.; Silva, Everton F.; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Ko, Albert I.; Dellagostin, Odir A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a 16S sequence-based quality control of two Leptospira strain collections. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to verify two Leptospira reference collections provided by the World Health Organization and maintained at a reference laboratory for leptospirosis in

  2. Tumor-targeted delivery of IL-2 by NKG2D leads to accumulation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in the tumor loci and enhanced anti-tumor effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Heung Kang

    Full Text Available Interleukin-2 (IL-2 has been shown to promote tumor-specific T-cell proliferation and differentiation but systemic administration of IL-2 results in significant toxicity. Therefore, a strategy that can specifically deliver IL-2 to the tumor location may alleviate concerns of toxicity. Because NKG2D ligands have been shown to be highly expressed in many cancer cells but not in healthy cells, we reason that a chimeric protein consisting of NKG2D linked to IL-2 will lead to the specific targeting of IL-2 to the tumor location. Therefore, we created chimeric proteins consisting of NKG2D linked to Gaussia luciferase (GLuc; a marker protein or IL-2 to form NKG2D-Fc-GLuc and NKG2D-Fc-IL2, respectively. We demonstrated that NKG2D linked to GLuc was able to deliver GLuc to the tumor location in vivo. Furthermore, we showed that TC-1 tumor-bearing mice intramuscularly injected with DNA encoding NKG2D-Fc-IL2, followed by electroporation, exhibited an increased number of luciferase-expressing E7-specific CD8+ T cells at the tumor location. More importantly, treatment with the DNA construct encoding NKG2D-Fc-IL2 significantly enhanced the therapeutic anti-tumor effects generated by intradermal vaccination with therapeutic HPV DNA in tumor-bearing mice. Therefore, by linking NKG2D to IL2, we are able to specifically deliver IL-2 to the tumor location, enhancing antigen-specific T-cell immune response and controlling tumor growth. Our approach represents a platform technology to specifically deliver proteins of interest to tumor loci.

  3. Control of biaxial strain in single-layer molybdenite using local thermal expansion of the substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plechinger, Gerd; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Buscema, Michele; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Steele, Gary A.; Kuc, Agnieszka; Heine, Thomas; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Single-layer MoS2 is a direct-gap semiconductor whose electronic band structure strongly depends on the strain applied to its crystal lattice. While uniaxial strain can be easily applied in a controlled way, e.g., by bending of a flexible substrate with the atomically thin MoS2 layer on top, experimental realization of biaxial strain is more challenging. Here, we exploit the large mismatch between the thermal expansion coefficients of MoS2 and a silicone-based substrate to apply a controllable biaxial tensile strain by heating the substrate with a focused laser. The effect of this biaxial strain is directly observable in optical spectroscopy as a redshift of the MoS2 photoluminescence. We also demonstrate the potential of this method to engineer more complex strain patterns by employing highly absorptive features on the substrate to achieve non-uniform heat profiles. By comparison of the observed redshift to strain-dependent band structure calculations, we estimate the biaxial strain applied by the silicone-based substrate to be up to 0.2%, corresponding to a band gap modulation of 105 meV per percentage of biaxial tensile strain.

  4. Comparative Analysis of the Relationship between Trichloroethylene Metabolism and Tissue-Specific Toxicity among Inbred Mouse Strains: Kidney Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hong Sik; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Uehara, Takeki; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Collins, Leonard B.; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Ball, Louise M.; Gold, Avram; Rusyn, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a well-known environmental and occupational toxicant that is classified as carcinogenic to humans based on the epidemiological evidence of an association with higher risk of renal cell carcinoma. A number of scientific issues critical for assessing human health risks from TCE remain unresolved, such as the amount of kidney-toxic glutathione conjugation metabolites formed, inter-species and -individual differences, and the mode of action for kidney carcinogenicity. We hypothesized that TCE metabolite levels in the kidney are associated with kidney-specific toxicity. Oral dosing with TCE was conducted in sub-acute (600 mg/kg/d; 5 days; 7 inbred mouse strains) and sub-chronic (100 or 400 mg/kg/d; 1, 2, or 4 weeks; 2 inbred mouse strains) designs. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between strain-, dose-, and time-dependent formation of TCE metabolites from cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation [trichloroacetic acid (TCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), and trichloroethanol] and glutathione conjugation [S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione], and various kidney toxicity phenotypes. In sub-acute study, we observed inter-strain differences in TCE metabolite levels in the kidney. In addition, we found that in several strains kidney-specific effects of TCE included induction of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes Cyp4a10 and Acox1, increased cell proliferation, and expression of KIM-1, a marker of tubular damage and regeneration. In sub-chronic study, peroxisome proliferator-marker gene induction and kidney toxicity diminished while cell proliferative response was elevated in a dose-dependent manner in NZW/LacJ, but not C57BL/6J mice. Overall, we show that TCE metabolite levels in the kidney are associated with kidney-specific toxicity and that these effects are strain-dependent. PMID:25424545

  5. Evaluation of six candidate DNA barcode loci for identification of five important invasive grasses in eastern Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisuo Wang

    Full Text Available Invasive grass weeds reduce farm productivity, threaten biodiversity, and increase weed control costs. Identification of invasive grasses from native grasses has generally relied on the morphological examination of grass floral material. DNA barcoding may provide an alternative means to identify co-occurring native and invasive grasses, particularly during early growth stages when floral characters are unavailable for analysis. However, there are no universal loci available for grass barcoding. We herein evaluated the utility of six candidate loci (atpF intron, matK, ndhK-ndhC, psbE-petL, ETS and ITS for barcode identification of several economically important invasive grass species frequently found among native grasses in eastern Australia. We evaluated these loci in 66 specimens representing five invasive grass species (Chloris gayana, Eragrostis curvula, Hyparrhenia hirta, Nassella neesiana, Nassella trichotoma and seven native grass species. Our results indicated that, while no single locus can be universally used as a DNA barcode for distinguishing the grass species examined in this study, two plastid loci (atpF and matK showed good distinguishing power to separate most of the taxa examined, and could be used as a dual locus to distinguish several of the invasive from the native species. Low PCR success rates were evidenced among two nuclear loci (ETS and ITS, and few species were amplified at these loci, however ETS was able to genetically distinguish the two important invasive Nassella species. Multiple loci analyses also suggested that ETS played a crucial role in allowing identification of the two Nassella species in the multiple loci combinations.

  6. Conserved loci of leaf and stem rust fungi of wheat share synteny interrupted by lineage-specific influx of repeat elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fellers John P

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wheat leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks; Pt and stem rust fungi (P. graminis f.sp. tritici; Pgt are significant economic pathogens having similar host ranges and life cycles, but different alternate hosts. The Pt genome, currently estimated at 135 Mb, is significantly larger than Pgt, at 88 Mb, but the reason for the expansion is unknown. Three genomic loci of Pt conserved proteins were characterized to gain insight into gene content, genome complexity and expansion. Results A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library was made from P. triticina race 1, BBBD and probed with Pt homologs of genes encoding two predicted Pgt secreted effectors and a DNA marker mapping to a region of avirulence. Three BACs, 103 Kb, 112 Kb, and 166 Kb, were sequenced, assembled, and open reading frames were identified. Orthologous genes were identified in Pgt and local conservation of gene order (microsynteny was observed. Pairwise protein identities ranged from 26 to 99%. One Pt BAC, containing a RAD18 ortholog, shares syntenic regions with two Pgt scaffolds, which could represent both haplotypes of Pgt. Gene sequence is diverged between the species as well as within the two haplotypes. In all three BAC clones, gene order is locally conserved, however, gene shuffling has occurred relative to Pgt. These regions are further diverged by differing insertion loci of LTR-retrotransposon, Gypsy, Copia, Mutator, and Harbinger mobile elements. Uncharacterized Pt open reading frames were also found; these proteins are high in lysine and similar to multiple proteins in Pgt. Conclusions The three Pt loci are conserved in gene order, with a range of gene sequence divergence. Conservation of predicted haustoria expressed secreted protein genes between Pt and Pgt is extended to the more distant poplar rust, Melampsora larici-populina. The loci also reveal that genome expansion in Pt is in part due to higher occurrence of repeat-elements in this species.

  7. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis on agarose gel as an aid to the identification of entomopathogenic Bacillus sphaericus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahner, V; Rabinovitch, L; Cavados, C F; Momen, H

    1994-04-01

    Sixty strains of Bacillus sphaericus, including 31 insect pathogens were studied by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and were classified into 44 zymovars (electrophoretic types). Among the entomopathogenic strains, 11 belong to the same zymovar (Z59) indicating a widespread frequent genotype. Bands of enzyme activity were not detected among the strains for the loci GPI (E.C.5.3.1.9), G6P (E.C.1.1.1.49), 6PG (E.C.1.1.1.44) and ME (E.C.1.1.1.40). The enzymatic loci NP (E.C.2.4.2.1) and ACON (E.C.4.2.1.3) were monomorphic while the other enzymes, MDH (E.C.1.1.1.37), LeDH (E.C.1.4.1.9), ADH (E.C.1.4.1.1), EST (E.C.3.1.1.1), PEP-2 (E.C.3.4.11.1), PEP-3 (E.C.3.4.11) and PEP-D (E.C. 3.4.13.9) were polymorphic. The genetic variation in the non-insect pathogenic group seemed to be greater than in the entomopathogenic group. This latter group appears to be distinct from other strains of these species. All insect pathogens were recovered in the same phenetic cluster and a diagnostic allele is reported for the identification of entomopathogenic strains.

  8. An evolutionary reduction principle for mutation rates at multiple Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenberg, Lee

    2011-06-01

    A model of mutation rate evolution for multiple loci under arbitrary selection is analyzed. Results are obtained using techniques from Karlin (Evolutionary Biology, vol. 14, pp. 61-204, 1982) that overcome the weak selection constraints needed for tractability in prior studies of multilocus event models.A multivariate form of the reduction principle is found: reduction results at individual loci combine topologically to produce a surface of mutation rate alterations that are neutral for a new modifier allele. New mutation rates survive if and only if they fall below this surface-a generalization of the hyperplane found by Zhivotovsky et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91, 1079-1083, 1994) for a multilocus recombination modifier. Increases in mutation rates at some loci may evolve if compensated for by decreases at other loci. The strength of selection on the modifier scales in proportion to the number of germline cell divisions, and increases with the number of loci affected. Loci that do not make a difference to marginal fitnesses at equilibrium are not subject to the reduction principle, and under fine tuning of mutation rates would be expected to have higher mutation rates than loci in mutation-selection balance.Other results include the nonexistence of 'viability analogous, Hardy-Weinberg' modifier polymorphisms under multiplicative mutation, and the sufficiency of average transmission rates to encapsulate the effect of modifier polymorphisms on the transmission of loci under selection. A conjecture is offered regarding situations, like recombination in the presence of mutation, that exhibit departures from the reduction principle. Constraints for tractability are: tight linkage of all loci, initial fixation at the modifier locus, and mutation distributions comprising transition probabilities of reversible Markov chains.

  9. Developmental and internal validation of a novel 13 loci STR multiplex method for Cannabis sativa DNA profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Rachel; Birck, Matthew; Hughes-Stamm, Sheree; Gangitano, David

    2017-05-01

    Marijuana (Cannabis sativa L.) is a plant cultivated and trafficked worldwide as a source of fiber (hemp), medicine, and intoxicant. The development of a validated method using molecular techniques such as short tandem repeats (STRs) could serve as an intelligence tool to link multiple cases by means of genetic individualization or association of cannabis samples. For this purpose, a 13 loci STR multiplex method was developed, optimized, and validated according to relevant ISFG and SWGDAM guidelines. The STR multiplex consists of 13 previously described C. sativa STR loci: ANUCS501, 9269, 4910, 5159, ANUCS305, 9043, B05, 1528, 3735, CS1, D02, C11, and H06. A sequenced allelic ladder consisting of 56 alleles was designed to accurately genotype 101 C. sativa samples from three seizures provided by a U.S. Customs and Border Protection crime lab. Using an optimal range of DNA (0.5-1.0ng), validation studies revealed well-balanced electropherograms (inter-locus balance range: 0.500-1.296), relatively balanced heterozygous peaks (mean peak height ratio of 0.83 across all loci) with minimal artifacts and stutter ratio (mean stutter of 0.021 across all loci). This multi-locus system is relatively sensitive (0.13ng of template DNA) with a combined power of discrimination of 1 in 55 million. The 13 STR panel was found to be species specific for C. sativa; however, non-specific peaks were produced with Humulus lupulus. The results of this research demonstrate the robustness and applicability of this 13 loci STR system for forensic DNA profiling of marijuana samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. SPECIFIC DIFFERENTIATION AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL MARKING OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS STRAINS DISTINGUISHED FROM THE CARRIERS OF MEDICAL PERSONNEL AND OBJECTS OF EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT IN CURATIVE INSTITUTIONS OF THE SOUTH RAILWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grechishkina Y.A.,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Carried out specific differentiation of pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus aureus, which were isolated from various environmental objects surgical hospital, biomaterials from patients. The results of the research brought together strains of pathogenic staphylococci in the lytic group and 4 show the frequency of detection of each analytic group in the particular material. Received the rationale for the introduction of phage-typing method in the practical work of bacteriological laboratories, epidemiological control software in the hospital for bacteriological indicators to effectively combat nosocomial infections.

  11. Bio-Technological Characterization of the Saccharomyces bayanus Yeast Strains in Order to Preserve the Local Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enikő Gaspar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The wine yeasts have multiple and important applications in the industry, aiming to obtain pure cultures and the selection of those strains which, according to the lab investigations, present superior bio-technological properties. In this study we monitored three types of Saccharomyces bayanus yeast strains, isolated from indigenous grapes varieties, Apold Iordana, Italian Blaj Riesling and Royal Feteasca from Jidvei area, which are present in the collection of the Biotechnologies and Microbiology Research Center of SAIAPM University. The yeast strains were subject to alcoholic fermentation in malt must at different temperatures, in the presence of alcohol, sugar and SO2 in various concentrations. The obtained results led to selecting of those strains which had best results regarding the alcoholic tolerance, osmo-tolerance, fermentation speed under stress conditions and resistance to SO2. These results can have practical applications in using the indigenous strains, isolated from grapes which are from inside the country, so that we preserve the local specificity, and reduce imports regarding this area.

  12. A genome-wide association analysis of a broad psychosis phenotype identifies three loci for further investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Bramon, Elvira; Pirinen, Matti; Strange, Amy; Lin, Kuang; Freeman, Colin; Bellenguez, Céline; Su, Zhan; Band, Gavin; Pearson, Richard; Vukcevic, Damjan; Langford, Cordelia; Deloukas, Panos; Hunt, Sarah; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several loci associated with schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorder. We performed a GWAS of psychosis as a broad syndrome rather than within specific diagnostic categories.

  13. [A population genetic study of 22 autosomal loci of single nucleotide polymorphisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian-pin; Jiang, Feng-hui; Shi, Mei-sen; Xu, Chuan-chao; Chen, Rui; Lai, Xiao-pin

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate polymorphisms and forensic efficiency of 22 non-binary single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci. One hundred ethnic Han Chinese individuals were recruited from Dongguan, Guangdong. The 22 loci were genotyped with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Nine loci were found with a single allele, 4 loci were found to be biallelic, whilst 9 loci were found to have 3 alleles. For 13 polymorphic loci, the combined discrimination power and power of exclusion were 0.999 98 and 0.9330, respectively. For the 9 non-biallelic loci, the combined discrimination power and power of exclusion were 0.9998 and 0.8956, respectively. For motherless cases, the combined power of exclusion was 0.6405 for 13 polymorphic SNPs and 0.6405 for 9 non-binary SNPs. Non-binary loci have a greater discrimination power and exclusion power per SNP.

  14. Evaluation of European Schizophrenia GWAS Loci in Asian Populations via Comprehensive Meta-Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao; Luo, Xiong-Jian; Chang, Hong; Liu, Zichao; Li, Ming

    2017-08-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe and highly heritable neuropsychiatric disorder. Recent genetic analyses including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have implicated multiple genome-wide significant variants for schizophrenia among European populations. However, many of these risk variants were not largely validated in other populations of different ancestry such as Asians. To validate whether these European GWAS significant loci are associated with schizophrenia in Asian populations, we conducted a systematic literature search and meta-analyses on 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Asian populations by combining all available case-control and family-based samples, including up to 30,000 individuals. We employed classical fixed (or random) effects inverse variance weighted methods to calculate summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Among the 19 GWAS loci, we replicated the risk associations of nine markers (e.g., SNPs at VRK2, ITIH3/4, NDST3, NOTCH4) surpassing significance level (two-tailed P Asian replication samples and initial European GWAS findings, and the successful replications of these GWAS loci in a different ethnic group provide stronger evidence for their clinical associations with schizophrenia. Further studies, focusing on the molecular mechanisms of these GWAS significant loci, will become increasingly important for understanding of the pathogenesis to schizophrenia.

  15. Unraveling possible association between quantitative trait loci (QTL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unraveling possible association between quantitative trait loci (QTL) for partial resistance and nonhost resistance in food barley ( Hordeum vulgaris L.) ... Abstract. Many quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in different barley populations were discovered for resistance to Puccinia hordei and heterologous rust species. Partial ...

  16. Genetic evidence that two independent S-loci control RNase-based self-incompatibility in diploid strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosković, Radovan I; Sargent, Daniel J; Tobutt, Kenneth R

    2010-03-01

    The self-incompatibility mechanism that reduces inbreeding in many plants of the Rosaceae is attributed to a multi-allelic S locus which, in the Prunoideae and Maloideae subfamilies, comprises two complementary genes, a stylar-expressed S-RNase and a pollen-expressed SFB. To elucidate incompatibility in the subfamily Rosoideae, stylar-specific RNases and self-(in)compatibility status were analysed in various diploid strawberries, especially Fragaria nubicola and F. viridis, both self-incompatible, and F. vesca, self-compatible, and in various progenies derived from them. Unexpectedly, two unlinked RNase loci, S and T, were found, encoding peptides distinct from Prunoideae and Maloideae S-RNases; the presence of a single active allele at either is sufficient to confer self-incompatibility. By contrast, in diploid Maloideae and Prunoideae a single locus encodes S-RNases that share several conserved regions and two active alleles are required for self-incompatibility. Our evidence implicates the S locus in unilateral inter-specific incompatibility and shows that S and T RNases can, remarkably, confer not only allele-specific rejection of cognate pollen but also unspecific rejection of Sn Tn pollen, where n indicates a null allele, consistent with the the presence of the pollen component, SFB, activating the cognitive function of these RNases. Comparison of relevant linkage groups between Fragaria and Prunus suggests that Prunus S-RNases, unique in having two introns, may have resulted from gene conversion in an ancestor of Prunus. In addition, it is shown that there is a non-S locus that is essential for self-incompatibility in diploid Fragaria.

  17. Genius loci / Madis Kõiv

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kõiv, Madis, 1929-2014

    2005-01-01

    Ettekanne 37. Kreutzwaldi päevadel Tartu Kirjandusmuuseumis 18.-19. dets. 1993, pealkirjaga "Kus on see Valga, kus on see Tartu...: Genius loci B. Kangro ja V. Uibopuu romaanides". Varem ilmunud: Akadeemia, 1994, nr. 4

  18. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping Problem: An Extinction-Based Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithm Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas S. Flann

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL mapping problem aims to identify regions in the genome that are linked to phenotypic features of the developed organism that vary in degree. It is a principle step in determining targets for further genetic analysis and is key in decoding the role of specific genes that control quantitative traits within species. Applications include identifying genetic causes of disease, optimization of cross-breeding for desired traits and understanding trait diversity in populations. In this paper a new multi-objective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA method is introduced and is shown to increase the accuracy of QTL mapping identification for both independent and epistatic loci interactions. The MOEA method optimizes over the space of possible partial least squares (PLS regression QTL models and considers the conflicting objectives of model simplicity versus model accuracy. By optimizing for minimal model complexity, MOEA has the advantage of solving the over-fitting problem of conventional PLS models. The effectiveness of the method is confirmed by comparing the new method with Bayesian Interval Mapping approaches over a series of test cases where the optimal solutions are known. This approach can be applied to many problems that arise in analysis of genomic data sets where the number of features far exceeds the number of observations and where features can be highly correlated.

  19. Mapping Loci That Control Tuber and Foliar Symptoms Caused by PVY in Autotetraploid Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Washington L; Ingram, Jason; Hackett, Christine A; Coombs, Joseph J; Douches, David; Bryan, Glenn J; De Jong, Walter; Gray, Stewart

    2017-11-06

    Potato tuber necrotic ringspot disease (PTNRD) is a tuber deformity associated with infection by the tuber necrotic strain of Potato virus Y (PVY NTN ). PTNRD negatively impacts tuber quality and marketability, and poses a serious threat to seed and commercial potato production worldwide. PVY NTN symptoms differ in the cultivars Waneta and Pike: Waneta expresses severe PTNRD and foliar mosaic with vein and leaf necrosis, whereas Pike does not express PTNRD and mosaic is the only foliar symptom. To map loci that influence tuber and foliar symptoms, 236 F 1 progeny of a cross between Waneta and Pike were inoculated with PVY NTN isolate NY090029 and genotyped using 12,808 potato SNPs. Foliar symptom type and severity were monitored for 10 wk, while tubers were evaluated for PTNRD expression at harvest and again after 60 d in storage. Pairwise correlation analyses indicate a strong association between PTNRD and vein necrosis (τ = 0.4195). QTL analyses revealed major-effect QTL on chromosomes 4 and 5 for mosaic, 4 for PTNRD, and 5 for foliar necrosis symptoms. Locating QTL associated with PVY-related symptoms provides a foundation for breeders to develop markers that can be used to eliminate potato clones with undesirable phenotypes, e.g. , those likely to develop PTNRD or to be symptomless carriers of PVY. Copyright © 2017 Silva et al.

  20. A Two-Stage Meta-Analysis Identifies Several New Loci for Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plagnol, Vincent; Nalls, Michael A.; Bras, Jose M.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Sharma, Manu; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Saad, Mohamad; Simon-Sanchez, Javier; Schulte, Claudia; Lesage, Suzanne; Sveinbjornsdottir, Sigurlaug; Amouyel, Philippe; Arepalli, Sampath; Band, Gavin; Barker, Roger A.; Bellinguez, Celine; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berendse, Henk W.; Berg, Daniela; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bas; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chen, Honglei; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Cooper, J. Mark; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-Francois; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Guenther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Durif, Frank; Duerr, Alexandra; Edkins, Sarah; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Freeman, Colin; Gao, Jianjun; Gardner, Michelle; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Goate, Alison; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Gustafsson, Omar; Harris, Clare; Hellenthal, Garrett; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michele; Huang, Xuemei; Huber, Heiko; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morris, Huw; Morrison, Karen E.; Mudanohwo, Ese; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Pearson, Justin; Pearson, Richard; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Petursson, Hjoervar; Pirinen, Matti; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Shaw, Karen; Shoulson, Ira; Sidransky, Ellen; de Silva, Rohan; Smith, Colin; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Su, Zhan; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Tison, Francois; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vandrovcova, Jana; Velseboer, Daan; Vidailhet, Marie; Vukcevic, Damjan; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Weale, Michael E.; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams, Nigel; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Stefansson, Kari; Martinez, Maria; Donnelly, Peter; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hardy, John; Heutink, Peter; Brice, Alexis; Gasser, Thomas; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2011-01-01

    A previous genome-wide association (GWA) meta-analysis of 12,386 PD cases and 21,026 controls conducted by the International Parkinson's Disease Genomics Consortium (IPDGC) discovered or confirmed 11 Parkinson's disease (PD) loci. This first analysis of the two-stage IPDGC study focused on the set

  1. Genetic variation of twenty autosomal STR loci and evaluate the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-03-12

    Mar 12, 2014 ... the second objective of the study was to evaluate the importance of these loci for forensic genetic purposes. ... of discrimination values for all tested loci was from 75 to 96%; therefore, those loci can be safely used to establish a ..... lists the frequency distribution of individual alleles within a given genetic ...

  2. radEq Add-On Module for CFD Solver Loci-CHEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloud, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Loci-CHEM to be applied to flow velocities where surface radiation due to heating from compression and friction becomes significant. The module adds a radiation equilibrium boundary condition to the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to produce accurate results. The module expanded the upper limit for accurate CFD solutions of Loci-CHEM from Mach 4 to Mach 10 based on Space Shuttle Orbiter Re-Entry trajectories. Loci-CHEM already has a very promising architecture and performance, but absence of radiation equilibrium boundary condition limited the application of Loci-CHEM to below Mach 4. The immediate advantage of the add-on module is that it allows Loci-CHEM to work with supersonic flows up to Mach 10. This transformed Loci-CHEM from a rocket engine- heritage CFD code with general subsonic and low-supersonic applications, to an aeroheating code with hypersonic applications. The follow-on advantage of the module is that it is a building block for additional add-on modules that will solve for the heating generated at Mach numbers higher than 10.

  3. Functional interrelationship between TFII-I and E2F transcription factors at specific cell cycle gene loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yong; Nar, Rukiye; Fan, Alex X; Aryan, Mahmoud; Hossain, Mir A; Gurumurthy, Aishwarya; Wassel, Paul C; Tang, Ming; Lu, Jianrong; Strouboulis, John; Bungert, Jörg

    2018-01-01

    Transcription factor TFII-I is a multifunctional protein implicated in the regulation of cell cycle and stress-response genes. Previous studies have shown that a subset of TFII-I associated genomic sites contained DNA-binding motifs for E2F family transcription factors. We analyzed the co-association of TFII-I and E2Fs in more detail using bioinformatics, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. The data show that TFII-I interacts with E2F transcription factors. Furthermore, TFII-I, E2F4, and E2F6 interact with DNA-regulatory elements of several genes implicated in the regulation of the cell cycle, including DNMT1, HDAC1, CDKN1C, and CDC27. Inhibition of TFII-I expression led to a decrease in gene expression and in the association of E2F4 and E2F6 with these gene loci in human erythroleukemia K562 cells. Finally, TFII-I deficiency reduced the proliferation of K562 cells and increased the sensitivity toward doxorubicin toxicity. The results uncover novel interactions between TFII-I and E2Fs and suggest that TFII-I mediates E2F function at specific cell cycle genes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Association analysis identifies 65 new breast cancer risk loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lindström, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Beesley, Jonathan; Hui, Shirley; Kar, Siddhartha; Lemaçon, Audrey; Soucy, Penny; Glubb, Dylan; Rostamianfar, Asha; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Tyrer, Jonathan; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Wang, Zhaoming; Allen, Jamie; Keeman, Renske; Eilber, Ursula; French, Juliet D; Qing Chen, Xiao; Fachal, Laura; McCue, Karen; McCart Reed, Amy E; Ghoussaini, Maya; Carroll, Jason S; Jiang, Xia; Finucane, Hilary; Adams, Marcia; Adank, Muriel A; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Arndt, Volker; Aronson, Kristan J; Arun, Banu; Auer, Paul L; Bacot, François; Barrdahl, Myrto; Baynes, Caroline; Beckmann, Matthias W; Behrens, Sabine; Benitez, Javier; Bermisheva, Marina; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Broberg, Per; Brock, Ian W; Broeks, Annegien; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brucker, Sara Y; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butterbach, Katja; Cai, Qiuyin; Cai, Hui; Caldés, Trinidad; Canzian, Federico; Carracedo, Angel; Carter, Brian D; Castelao, Jose E; Chan, Tsun L; David Cheng, Ting-Yuan; Seng Chia, Kee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Christiansen, Hans; Clarke, Christine L; Collée, Margriet; Conroy, Don M; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Cornelissen, Sten; Cox, David G; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Devilee, Peter; Doheny, Kimberly F; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Durcan, Lorraine; Dwek, Miriam; Eccles, Diana M; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, A Heather; Ellberg, Carolina; Elvira, Mingajeva; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fritschi, Lin; Gaborieau, Valerie; Gabrielson, Marike; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; García-Sáenz, José A; Gaudet, Mia M; Georgoulias, Vassilios; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe I; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Grundy, Anne; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Hahnen, Eric; Haiman, Christopher A; Håkansson, Niclas; Hamann, Ute; Hamel, Nathalie; Hankinson, Susan; Harrington, Patricia; Hart, Steven N; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Hartman, Mikael; Hein, Alexander; Heyworth, Jane; Hicks, Belynda; Hillemanns, Peter; Ho, Dona N; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Hou, Ming-Feng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Huang, Guanmengqian; Humphreys, Keith; Ishiguro, Junko; Ito, Hidemi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Iwata, Hiroji; Jakubowska, Anna; Janni, Wolfgang; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Kristine; Jones, Michael; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kabisch, Maria; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Kang, Daehee; Kasuga, Yoshio; Kerin, Michael J; Khan, Sofia; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kiiski, Johanna I; Kim, Sung-Won; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela N; Krüger, Ute; Kwong, Ava; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jong Won; Neng Lee, Chuen; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Li, Jingmei; Lilyquist, Jenna; Lindblom, Annika; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lo, Wing-Yee; Loibl, Sibylle; Long, Jirong; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Luccarini, Craig; Lux, Michael P; Ma, Edmond S K; MacInnis, Robert J; Maishman, Tom; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Kostovska, Ivana Maleva; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Manson, JoAnn E; Margolin, Sara; Mariapun, Shivaani; Martinez, Maria Elena; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; McKay, James; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Menéndez, Primitiva; Menon, Usha; Meyer, Jeffery; Miao, Hui; Miller, Nicola; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Mulot, Claire; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nielsen, Sune F; Noh, Dong-Young; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Norman, Aaron; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Olsson, Håkan; Olswold, Curtis; Orr, Nick; Pankratz, V Shane; Park, Sue K; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Lloyd, Rachel; Perez, Jose I A; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pinchev, Mila; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Prentice, Ross; Presneau, Nadege; Prokofyeva, Darya; Pugh, Elizabeth; Pylkäs, Katri; Rack, Brigitte; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rennert, Gadi; Rennert, Hedy S; Rhenius, Valerie; Romero, Atocha; Romm, Jane; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Ruebner, Matthias; Rutgers, Emiel J T; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Sandler, Dale P; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schürmann, Peter; Scott, Rodney J; Scott, Christopher; Seal, Sheila; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Sharma, Priyanka; Shen, Chen-Yang; Sheng, Grace; Sherman, Mark E; Shrubsole, Martha J; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Smeets, Ann; Sohn, Christof; Southey, Melissa C; Spinelli, John J; Stegmaier, Christa; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Stone, Jennifer; Stram, Daniel O; Surowy, Harald; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tamimi, Rulla; Taylor, Jack A; Tengström, Maria; Teo, Soo H; Beth Terry, Mary; Tessier, Daniel C; Thanasitthichai, Somchai; Thöne, Kathrin; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Tong, Ling; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Ursin, Giske; Untch, Michael; Vachon, Celine; van Asperen, Christi J; Van Den Berg, David; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Kolk, Lizet; van der Luijt, Rob B; Vincent, Daniel; Vollenweider, Jason; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weinberg, Clarice R; Wendt, Camilla; Whittemore, Alice S; Wildiers, Hans; Willett, Walter; Winqvist, Robert; Wolk, Alicja; Wu, Anna H; Xia, Lucy; Yamaji, Taiki; Yang, Xiaohong R; Har Yip, Cheng; Yoo, Keun-Young; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Zhu, Bin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ziv, Elad; Lakhani, Sunil R; Antoniou, Antonis C; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Amos, Christopher I; Couch, Fergus J; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hall, Per; Hunter, David J; Milne, Roger L; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chanock, Stephen J; Dunning, Alison M; Edwards, Stacey L; Bader, Gary D; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Simard, Jacques; Kraft, Peter; Easton, Douglas F

    2017-11-02

    Breast cancer risk is influenced by rare coding variants in susceptibility genes, such as BRCA1, and many common, mostly non-coding variants. However, much of the genetic contribution to breast cancer risk remains unknown. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study of breast cancer in 122,977 cases and 105,974 controls of European ancestry and 14,068 cases and 13,104 controls of East Asian ancestry. We identified 65 new loci that are associated with overall breast cancer risk at P < 5 × 10 -8 . The majority of credible risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms in these loci fall in distal regulatory elements, and by integrating in silico data to predict target genes in breast cells at each locus, we demonstrate a strong overlap between candidate target genes and somatic driver genes in breast tumours. We also find that heritability of breast cancer due to all single-nucleotide polymorphisms in regulatory features was 2-5-fold enriched relative to the genome-wide average, with strong enrichment for particular transcription factor binding sites. These results provide further insight into genetic susceptibility to breast cancer and will improve the use of genetic risk scores for individualized screening and prevention.

  5. Large-scale genotyping identifies 41 new loci associated with breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hall, Per; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ghoussaini, Maya; Dennis, Joe; Milne, Roger L; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel; van der Luijt, Rob B; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckman, Lars; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Tessier, Daniel C; Canisius, Sander; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Haiman, Christopher A; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Luccarini, Craig; Schoof, Nils; Humphreys, Keith; Li, Jingmei; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Vachon, Celine; Stevens, Kristen N; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Paridaens, Robert; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Johnson, Nichola; Aitken, Zoe; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Broeks, Annegien; Veer, Laura J Van't; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Jager, Agnes; Bui, Quang M; Stone, Jennifer; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Tsimiklis, Helen; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Figueroa, Jonine; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Brüning, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Dörk, Thilo; Kristensen, Vessela N; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Edge, Stephen; Fostira, Florentia; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Sueta, Aiko; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Phuah, Sze Yee; Cornes, Belinda K; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Ding, Shian-Ling; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Simard, Jacques; Garcia-Closas, Montse; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Benitez, Javier; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Common variants at 27 loci have been identified as associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, and these account for ∼9% of the familial risk of the disease. We report here a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies, including 10,052 breast cancer cases and 12,575 controls of European ancestry, from which we selected 29,807 SNPs for further genotyping. These SNPs were genotyped in 45,290 cases and 41,880 controls of European ancestry from 41 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). The SNPs were genotyped as part of a collaborative genotyping experiment involving four consortia (Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study, COGS) and used a custom Illumina iSelect genotyping array, iCOGS, comprising more than 200,000 SNPs. We identified SNPs at 41 new breast cancer susceptibility loci at genome-wide significance (P breast cancer susceptibility.

  6. Specific strain work as a failure criterion in plane stress state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuchowski, R.; Zietkowski, L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental verification of failure criterion based on specific strain work was performed. Thin-walled cylindrical specimens were examined by loading with constant force and constant torque moment, assuming different values for particular tests, at the same time keeping stress intensity constant, and by subjecting to thermal cycling. It was found that the critical value of failure did not depend on axial-to-shearing stresses ratio, i.e., on the type of state of stress. Thereby, the validity of the analysed failure criterion in plane stress was confirmed. Besides, a simple description of damage development in plane stress was suggested. (orig./RF)

  7. Multi-locus genotyping of bottom fermenting yeasts by single nucleotide polymorphisms indicative of brewing characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikushima, Shigehito; Tateishi, Yoshiyuki; Kanai, Keiko; Shimada, Emiko; Tanaka, Misa; Ishiguro, Tatsuji; Mizutani, Satoru; Kobayashi, Osamu

    2012-04-01

    Yeast plays a capital role in brewing fermentation and has a direct impact on flavor and aroma. For the evaluation of competent brewing strains during quality control or development of novel strains it is standard practice to perform fermentation tests, which are costly and time-consuming. Here, we have categorized DNA markers which enable to distinguish and to screen brewing strains more efficiently than ever before. Sequence analysis at 289 loci in the genomes of six bottom fermenting Saccharomyces pastorianus strains revealed that 30 loci contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). By determining the nucleotide sequences at the SNP-loci in 26 other S. pastorianus strains and 20 strains of the top fermenting yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, almost all these strains could be discriminated solely on the basis of the SNPs. By comparing the fermentative phenotypes of these strains we found that some DNA markers showed a strong association with brewing characteristics, such as the production of ethyl acetate and hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Therefore, the DNA markers we identified will facilitate quality control and the efficient development of brewing yeast strains. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. SNIT: SNP identification for strain typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reifman Jaques

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With ever-increasing numbers of microbial genomes being sequenced, efficient tools are needed to perform strain-level identification of any newly sequenced genome. Here, we present the SNP identification for strain typing (SNIT pipeline, a fast and accurate software system that compares a newly sequenced bacterial genome with other genomes of the same species to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and small insertions/deletions (indels. Based on this information, the pipeline analyzes the polymorphic loci present in all input genomes to identify the genome that has the fewest differences with the newly sequenced genome. Similarly, for each of the other genomes, SNIT identifies the input genome with the fewest differences. Results from five bacterial species show that the SNIT pipeline identifies the correct closest neighbor with 75% to 100% accuracy. The SNIT pipeline is available for download at http://www.bhsai.org/snit.html

  9. Learning and strain among newcomers: a three-wave study on the effects of job demands and job control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taris, Toon W; Feij, Jan A

    2004-11-01

    The present 3-wave longitudinal study was an examination of job-related learning and strain as a function of job demand and job control. The participants were 311 newcomers to their jobs. On the basis of R. A. Karasek and T. Theorell's (1990) demand-control model, the authors predicted that high demand and high job control would lead to high levels of learning; low demand and low job control should lead to low levels of learning; high demand and low job control should lead to high levels of strain; and low demand and high job control should lead to low levels of strain. The relation between strain and learning was also examined. The authors tested the hypotheses using ANCOVA and structural equation modeling. The results revealed that high levels of strain have an adverse effect on learning; the reverse effect was not confirmed. It appears that Karasek and Theorell's model is very relevant when examining work socialization processes.

  10. Partial Diversity Generates Effector Immunity Specificity of the Bac41-Like Bacteriocins of Enterococcus faecalis Clinical Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurushima, Jun; Ike, Yasuyoshi; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriocin 41 (Bac41) is the plasmid-encoded bacteriocin produced by the opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis Its genetic determinant consists of bacL1 (effector), bacL2 (regulator), bacA (effector), and bacI (immunity). The secreted effectors BacL1 and BacA coordinate to induce the lytic cell death of E. faecalis Meanwhile, the immunity factor BacI provides self-resistance to the Bac41 producer, E. faecalis, against the action of BacL1 and BacA. In this study, we demonstrated that more than half of the 327 clinical strains of E. faecalis screened had functional Bac41 genes. Analysis of the genetic structure of the Bac41 genes in the DNA sequences of the E. faecalis strains revealed that the Bac41-like genes consist of a relatively conserved region and a variable region located downstream from bacA Based on similarities in the variable region, the Bac41-like genes could be classified into type I, type IIa, and type IIb. Interestingly, the distinct Bac41 types had specific immunity factors for self-resistance, BacI1 or BacI2, and did not show cross-immunity to the other type of effector. We also demonstrated experimentally that the specificity of the immunity was determined by the combination of the C-terminal region of BacA and the presence of the unique BacI1 or BacI2 factor. These observations suggested that Bac41-like bacteriocin genes are extensively disseminated among E. faecalis strains in the clinical environment and can be grouped into at least three types. It was also indicated that the partial diversity results in specificity of self-resistance which may offer these strains a competitive advantage. Bacteriocins are antibacterial effectors produced by bacteria. In general, a bacteriocin-coding gene is accompanied by a cognate immunity gene that confers self-resistance on the bacteriocin-producing bacterium itself. We demonstrated that one of the bacteriocins, Bac41, is disseminated among E. faecalis clinical strains and the Bac41 subtypes with

  11. Loss of lager specific genes and subtelomeric regions define two different Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineages for Saccharomyces pastorianus Group I and II strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monerawela, Chandre; James, Tharappel C; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Bond, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Lager yeasts, Saccharomyces pastorianus, are interspecies hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus and are classified into Group I and Group II clades. The genome of the Group II strain, Weihenstephan 34/70, contains eight so-called 'lager-specific' genes that are located in subtelomeric regions. We evaluated the origins of these genes through bioinformatic and PCR analyses of Saccharomyces genomes. We determined that four are of cerevisiae origin while four originate from S. eubayanus. The Group I yeasts contain all four S. eubayanus genes but individual strains contain only a subset of the cerevisiae genes. We identified S. cerevisiae strains that contain all four cerevisiae 'lager-specific' genes, and distinct patterns of loss of these genes in other strains. Analysis of the subtelomeric regions uncovered patterns of loss in different S. cerevisiae strains. We identify two classes of S. cerevisiae strains: ale yeasts (Foster O) and stout yeasts with patterns of 'lager-specific' genes and subtelomeric regions identical to Group I and II S. pastorianus yeasts, respectively. These findings lead us to propose that Group I and II S. pastorianus strains originate from separate hybridization events involving different S. cerevisiae lineages. Using the combined bioinformatic and PCR data, we describe a potential classification map for industrial yeasts. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  12. H2DB: a heritability database across multiple species by annotating trait-associated genomic loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminuma, Eli; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Tanizawa, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Naoko; Kurata, Nori; Shimizu, Tokurou; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2013-01-01

    H2DB (http://tga.nig.ac.jp/h2db/), an annotation database of genetic heritability estimates for humans and other species, has been developed as a knowledge database to connect trait-associated genomic loci. Heritability estimates have been investigated for individual species, particularly in human twin studies and plant/animal breeding studies. However, there appears to be no comprehensive heritability database for both humans and other species. Here, we introduce an annotation database for genetic heritabilities of various species that was annotated by manually curating online public resources in PUBMED abstracts and journal contents. The proposed heritability database contains attribute information for trait descriptions, experimental conditions, trait-associated genomic loci and broad- and narrow-sense heritability specifications. Annotated trait-associated genomic loci, for which most are single-nucleotide polymorphisms derived from genome-wide association studies, may be valuable resources for experimental scientists. In addition, we assigned phenotype ontologies to the annotated traits for the purposes of discussing heritability distributions based on phenotypic classifications.

  13. Multiple loci associated with renal function in African Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Shriner

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic kidney disease varies by ethnic group in the USA, with African Americans displaying a two-fold higher rate than European Americans. One of the two defining variables underlying staging of chronic kidney disease is the glomerular filtration rate. Meta-analysis in individuals of European ancestry has identified 23 genetic loci associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. We conducted a follow-up study of these 23 genetic loci using a population-based sample of 1,018 unrelated admixed African Americans. We included in our follow-up study two variants in APOL1 associated with end-stage kidney disease discovered by admixture mapping in admixed African Americans. To address confounding due to admixture, we estimated local ancestry at each marker and global ancestry. We performed regression analysis stratified by local ancestry and combined the resulting regression estimates across ancestry strata using an inverse variance-weighted fixed effects model. We found that 11 of the 24 loci were significantly associated with eGFR in our sample. The effect size estimates were not significantly different between the subgroups of individuals with two copies of African ancestry vs. two copies of European ancestry for any of the 11 loci. In contrast, allele frequencies were significantly different at 10 of the 11 loci. Collectively, the 11 loci, including four secondary signals revealed by conditional analyses, explained 14.2% of the phenotypic variance in eGFR, in contrast to the 1.4% explained by the 24 loci in individuals of European ancestry. Our findings provide insight into the genetic basis of variation in renal function among admixed African Americans.

  14. Identification of 23 new prostate cancer susceptibility loci using the iCOGS custom genotyping array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeles, Rosalind A; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Benlloch, Sara; Saunders, Edward J; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Ghoussaini, Maya; Luccarini, Craig; Dennis, Joe; Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah; Dadaev, Tokhir; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L; Muir, Ken; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J; Gapstur, Susan; Chanock, Stephen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Albanes, Demetrius; Andriole, Gerald; Schleutker, Johanna; Weischer, Maren; Canzian, Federico; Riboli, Elio; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth; Campa, Daniele; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Hayes, Richard B; Pharoah, Paul DP; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet; Ostrander, Elaine A; Signorello, Lisa B; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Schaid, Dan; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan; Cannon-Albright; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong Y; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Spurdle, Amanda B; Clements, Judith A; Teixeira, Manuel R; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Dunning, Alison; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Maranian, Melanie J; Ahmed, Shahana; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Sawyer, Emma J; Morgan, Angela; Dearnaley, David P; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A; Khoo, Vincent S; Parker, Christopher C; Van As, Nicholas J; Woodhouse, J; Thompson, Alan; Dudderidge, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Cox, Angela; Southey, Melissa; Hopper, John L; English, Dallas R; Aly, Markus; Adolfsson, Jan; Xu, Jiangfeng; Zheng, Siqun; Yeager, Meredith; Kaaks, Rudolf; Diver, W Ryan; Gaudet, Mia M; Stern, Mariana; Corral, Roman; Joshi, Amit D; Shahabi, Ahva; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo J; Auvinen, Anssi; Virtamo, Jarmo; Klarskov, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Røder, Andreas; Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Siddiq, Afshan; FitzGerald, Liesel; Kolb, Suzanne; Kwon, Erika; Karyadi, Danielle; Blot, William J; Zheng, Wei; Cai, Qiuyin; McDonnell, Shannon K; Rinckleb, Antje; Drake, Bettina; Colditz, Graham; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Stephenson, Robert A; Teerlink, Craig; Muller, Heiko; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Sellers, Thomas A; Lin, Hui-Yi; Slavov, Chavdar; Mitev, Vanio; Lose, Felicity; Srinivasan, Srilakshmi; Maia, Sofia; Paulo, Paula; Lange, Ethan; Cooney, Kathleen A; Antoniou, Antonis; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Tessier; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in males in developed countries. To identify common prostate cancer susceptibility alleles, we genotyped 211,155 SNPs on a custom Illumina array (iCOGS) in blood DNA from 25,074 prostate cancer cases and 24,272 controls from the international PRACTICAL Consortium. Twenty-three new prostate cancer susceptibility loci were identified at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8). More than 70 prostate cancer susceptibility loci, explaining ~30% of the familial risk for this disease, have now been identified. On the basis of combined risks conferred by the new and previously known risk loci, the top 1% of the risk distribution has a 4.7-fold higher risk than the average of the population being profiled. These results will facilitate population risk stratification for clinical studies. PMID:23535732

  15. Susceptibility loci for sporadic brain arteriovenous malformation; a replication study and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, P.H.; Koeleman, B.P.C.; Rinkel, G.J.; Diekstra, F.P.; Berg, L.H. van den; Veldink, J.H.; Klijn, C.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Case-control studies have reported multiple genetic loci to be associated with sporadic brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) but most of these have not been replicated in independent populations. The aim of this study was to find additional evidence for these reported associations

  16. Replication of prostate cancer risk loci in a Japanese case-control association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroki; Penney, Kathryn L; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Katoh, Takahiko; Yamano, Yuko; Yamakado, Minoru; Kimura, Takahiro; Kuruma, Hidetoshi; Kamata, Yuko; Egawa, Shin; Freedman, Matthew L

    2009-10-07

    Two prostate cancer genome-wide scans in populations of European ancestry identified several genetic variants that are strongly associated with prostate cancer risk. The effect of these risk variants and their cumulative effect in other populations are unknown. We evaluated the association of 23 risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with prostate cancer risk and clinical covariates (Gleason score, tumor aggressiveness, and age at diagnosis) in men of Japanese ancestry (311 case subjects and 1035 control subjects) using unconditional logistic regression. We also used logistic regression to test the association between increasing numbers of independently associated risk alleles and the risk of prostate cancer, prostate cancer aggressiveness, and age at diagnosis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Seven of the 23 SNPs (five independent loci) were associated with prostate cancer risk (P values ranged from .0084 to 2.3 x 10(-8) and effect sizes [estimated as odds ratios, ORs] ranged from 1.35 to 1.82). None of the seven SNPs was associated with Gleason score or aggressive disease. rs6983561 and rs4430796 were associated with age at diagnosis (Ps = .0188 and .0339, respectively). Men with six or more risk alleles (27% of case patients and 11% of control subjects) had a higher risk of prostate cancer than men with two or fewer risk alleles (7% of case patients and 20% of control subjects) (OR = 6.22, P = 1.5 x 10(-12)). These results highlight the critical importance of considering ancestry in understanding how risk alleles influence disease and suggest that risk estimates and variants differ across populations. It is important to perform studies in multiple ancestral populations so that the composite genetic architecture of prostate cancer can be rigorously addressed.

  17. Limited genetic diversity among Sarcocystis neurona strains infecting southern sea otters precludes distinction between marine and terrestrial isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendte, J M; Miller, M A; Nandra, A K; Peat, S M; Crosbie, P R; Conrad, P A; Grigg, M E

    2010-04-19

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite identified as a cause of fatal neurological disease in the threatened southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis). In an effort to characterize virulent S. neurona strains circulating in the marine ecosystem, this study developed a range of markers relevant for molecular genotyping. Highly conserved sequences within the 18S ribosomal gene array, the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (RPOb) and the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 mitochondrial gene (CO1) were assessed for their ability to distinguish isolates at the genus and species level. For within-species comparisons, five surface antigens (SnSAG1-SnSAG5) and one high resolution microsatellite marker (Sn9) were developed as genotyping markers to evaluate intra-strain diversity. Molecular analysis at multiple loci revealed insufficient genetic diversity to distinguish terrestrial isolates from strains infecting marine mammals. Furthermore, SnSAG specific primers applied against DNA from the closely related species, Sarcocystis falcatula, lead to the discovery of highly similar orthologs to SnSAG2, 3, and 4, calling into question the specificity of diagnostic tests based on these antigens. The results of this study suggest a population genetic structure for S. neurona similar to that reported for the related parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, dominated by a limited number of successful genotypes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Aeroelastic Control of a Segmented Trailing Edge Using Fiber Optic Strain Sensing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Corbin Jay; Martins, Benjamin; Suppanade, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Currently, design of aircraft structures incorporate a safety factor which is essentially an over design to mitigate the risk of structure failure during operation. Typically this safety factor is to design the structure to withstand loads much greater than what is expected to be experienced during flight. NASA Dryden Flight Research Centers has developed a Fiber Optic Strain Sensing (FOSS) system which can measure strain values in real-time. The Aeroelastics Lab at the AERO Institute is developing a segmented trailing edged wing with multiple control surfaces that can utilize the data from the FOSS system, in conjunction with an adaptive controller to redistribute the lift across a wing. This redistribution can decrease the amount of strain experienced by the wing as well as be used to dampen vibration and reduce flutter.

  19. Two genetic loci produce distinct carbohydrate-rich structural components of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lisa; Kolter, Roberto

    2004-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms, which are cellular aggregates encased in an extracellular matrix. Molecular genetics studies of three common autoaggregative phenotypes, namely wrinkled colonies, pellicles, and solid-surface-associated biofilms, led to the identification of two loci, pel and psl, that are involved in the production of carbohydrate-rich components of the biofilm matrix. The pel gene cluster is involved in the production of a glucose-rich matrix material in P. aeruginosa strain PA14 (L. Friedman and R. Kolter, Mol. Microbiol. 51:675-690, 2004). Here we investigate the role of the pel gene cluster in P. aeruginosa strain ZK2870 and identify a second genetic locus, termed psl, involved in the production of a mannose-rich matrix material. The 11 predicted protein products of the psl genes are homologous to proteins involved in carbohydrate processing. P. aeruginosa is thus able to produce two distinct carbohydrate-rich matrix materials. Either carbohydrate-rich matrix component appears to be sufficient for mature biofilm formation, and at least one of them is required for mature biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa strains PA14 and ZK2870. Copyright 2004 American Society for Microbiology

  20. Heterogeneity of breast cancer associations with five susceptibility loci by clinical and pathological characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Closas, M.; Hall, P.; Nevanlinna, H.

    2008-01-01

    A three-stage genome-wide association study recently identified single nucleotide polymorphisms ( SNPs) in five loci ( fibroblast growth receptor 2 ( FGFR2), trinucleotide repeat containing 9 ( TNRC9), mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 K1 (MAP3K1), 8q24, and lymphocyte- specific protein 1 ( LSP1...

  1. Heterogeneity of breast cancer associations with five susceptibility loci by clinical and pathological characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Hall, Per; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pooley, Karen; Morrison, Jonathan; Richesson, Douglas A.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Axelsson, Christen K.; Arias, Jose I.; Milne, Roger L.; Ribas, Gloria; González-Neira, Anna; Benítez, Javier; Zamora, Pilar; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Bruening, Thomas; Haas, Susanne; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Hillemanns, Peter; Bogdanova, Natalia; Bremer, Michael; Karstens, Johann Hinrich; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Aittomäki, Kristiina; von Smitten, Karl; Blomqvist, Carl; Mannermaa, Arto; Uusitupa, Matti; Eskelinen, Matti; Tengström, Maria; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Devilee, Peter; van Asperen, Christi J.; Jacobi, Catharina E.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Huijts, Petra E. A.; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Kropp, Silke; Slanger, Tracy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Mutschelknauss, Elke; Salazar, Ramona; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Couch, Fergus; Goode, Ellen L.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Hopper, John L.; English, Dallas R.; Southey, Melissa C.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Stram, Daniel O.; Hunter, David J.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Cox, David G.; Tamimi, Rulla; Kraft, Peter; Sherman, Mark E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise A.; Peplonska, Beata; Hooning, Maartje J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Han; Collee, J. Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Liu, Jianjun; Lin, Low Yen; Yuqing, Li; Humphreys, Keith; Czene, Kamila; Cox, Angela; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Dunning, Alison; Tyrer, Jonathan; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gabrieau, Valerie; Sigurdson, Alice; Doody, Michele; Struewing, Jeffrey P.; Alexander, Bruce; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D.

    2008-01-01

    A three-stage genome-wide association study recently identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five loci (fibroblast growth receptor 2 (FGFR2), trinucleotide repeat containing 9 (TNRC9), mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 K1 (MAP3K1), 8q24, and lymphocyte-specific protein 1 (LSP1))

  2. Heterogeneity of breast cancer associations with five susceptibility loci by clinical and pathological characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. García-Closas (Montserrat); P. Hall (Per); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K.A. Pooley (Karen); J. Morrison (Jonathan); D.A. Richesson (Douglas); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); C.K. Axelsson (Christen); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); R.L. Milne (Roger); G. Ribas (Gloria); A. González-Neira (Anna); J. Benítez (Javier); P. Zamora (Pilar); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); C. Justenhoven (Christina); U. Hamann (Ute); Y-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); T. Bruening (Thomas); S. Haas (Susanne); T. Dörk (Thilo); P. Schürmann (Peter); P. Hillemanns (Peter); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); M. Bremer (Michael); J.H. Karstens (Johann); R. Fagerholm (Rainer); K. Aaltonen (Kirsimari); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); K. von Smitten (Karl); C. Blomqvist (Carl); A. Mannermaa (Arto); M. Uusitupa (Matti); M. Eskelinen (Matti); M. Tengström (Maria); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); V. Kataja (Vesa); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); P. Devilee (Peter); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); C.E. Jacobi (Catharina); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); P. Huijts (Petra); J.G.M. Klijn (Jan); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S. Kropp (Silke); T. Slanger (Tracy); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); E. Mutschelknauss (Elke); R. Salazar (Ramona); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); F.J. Couch (Fergus); E.L. Goode (Ellen); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); G.G. Giles (Graham); L. Baglietto (Laura); G. Severi (Gianluca); J.L. Hopper (John); D.R. English (Dallas); M.C. Southey (Melissa); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); L.N. Kolonel (Laurence); L. Le Marchand (Loic); D.O. Stram (Daniel); D. Hunter (David); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); A. Cox (Angela); R. Tamimi (Rulla); P. Kraft (Peter); M.E. Sherman (Mark); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); L.A. Brinton (Louise); B. Peplonska (Beata); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.M. Collée (Margriet); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J. Liu (Jianjun); Y.L. Low; L. Yuqing (Li); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); K. Czene (Kamila); S. Balasubramanian (Sabapathy); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); F. Blows (Fiona); K. Driver (Kristy); A.M. Dunning (Alison); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); B.A.J. Ponder (Bruce); S. Sangrajrang (Suleeporn); P. Brennan (Paul); J.D. McKay (James); F. Odefrey (Fabrice); V. Gabrieau (Valerie); A.J. Sigurdson (Alice); M. Doody (Michele); J.P. Struewing (Jeffrey); B.H. Alexander (Bruce); D.F. Easton (Douglas); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractA three-stage genome-wide association study recently identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five loci (fibroblast growth receptor 2 (FGFR2), trinucleotide repeat containing 9 (TNRC9), mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 K1 (MAP3K1), 8q24, and lymphocyte-specific protein 1

  3. iLOCi: a SNP interaction prioritization technique for detecting epistasis in genome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piriyapongsa Jittima

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS do not provide a full account of the heritability of genetic diseases since gene-gene interactions, also known as epistasis are not considered in single locus GWAS. To address this problem, a considerable number of methods have been developed for identifying disease-associated gene-gene interactions. However, these methods typically fail to identify interacting markers explaining more of the disease heritability over single locus GWAS, since many of the interactions significant for disease are obscured by uninformative marker interactions e.g., linkage disequilibrium (LD. Results In this study, we present a novel SNP interaction prioritization algorithm, named iLOCi (Interacting Loci. This algorithm accounts for marker dependencies separately in case and control groups. Disease-associated interactions are then prioritized according to a novel ranking score calculated from the difference in marker dependencies for every possible pair between case and control groups. The analysis of a typical GWAS dataset can be completed in less than a day on a standard workstation with parallel processing capability. The proposed framework was validated using simulated data and applied to real GWAS datasets using the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC data. The results from simulated data showed the ability of iLOCi to identify various types of gene-gene interactions, especially for high-order interaction. From the WTCCC data, we found that among the top ranked interacting SNP pairs, several mapped to genes previously known to be associated with disease, and interestingly, other previously unreported genes with biologically related roles. Conclusion iLOCi is a powerful tool for uncovering true disease interacting markers and thus can provide a more complete understanding of the genetic basis underlying complex disease. The program is available for download at http://www4a.biotec.or.th/GI/tools/iloci.

  4. Identification of 12 new susceptibility loci for different histotypes of epithelial ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phelan, Catherine M.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Kar, Siddhartha P.; Lawrenson, Kate; Winham, Stacey J.; Dennis, Joe; Pirie, Ailith; Riggan, Marjorie J.; Chornokur, Ganna; Earp, Madalene A.; Lyra, Paulo C.; Lee, Janet M.; Coetzee, Simon; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley; Soucy, Penny; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lecarpentier, Julie; Leslie, Goska; Aalfs, Cora M.; Aben, Katja K. H.; Adams, Marcia; Adlard, Julian; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Azzollini, Jacopo; Balmaña, Judith; Banerjee, Susana N.; Barjhoux, Laure; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bermisheva, Marina; Bernardini, Marcus Q.; Birrer, Michael J.; Bjorge, Line; Black, Amanda; Blankstein, Kenneth; Blok, Marinus J.; Bodelon, Clara; Bogdanova, Natalia; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borg, Åke; Bradbury, Angela R.; Brenton, James D.; Brewer, Carole; Brinton, Louise; Broberg, Per; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Brunet, Joan; Buecher, Bruno; Butzow, Ralf; Buys, Saundra S.; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Cannioto, Rikki; Carney, Michael E.; Cescon, Terence; Chan, Salina B.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Xiao Qing; Chiew, Yoke-Eng; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Conner, Thomas; Cook, Linda S.; Cook, Jackie; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; D'Aloisio, Aimee A.; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Damirovna, Sakaeva Dina; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Dao, Fanny; Davidson, Rosemarie; Defazio, Anna; Delnatte, Capucine; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Dörk, Thilo; Dossus, Laure; Duran, Mercedes; Dürst, Matthias; Dworniczak, Bernd; Eccles, Diana; Edwards, Todd; Eeles, Ros; Eilber, Ursula; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ekici, Arif B.; Ellis, Steve; Elvira, Mingajeva; Eng, Kevin H.; Engel, Christoph; Evans, D. Gareth; Fasching, Peter A.; Ferguson, Sarah; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Flanagan, James M.; Fogarty, Zachary C.; Fortner, Renée T.; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Fountzilas, George; Fridley, Brooke L.; Friebel, Tara M.; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; García, María J.; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gehrig, Andrea; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldgar, David E.; Goranova, Teodora; Gore, Martin; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Gruber, Stephen; Hahnen, Eric; Haiman, Christopher A.; Håkansson, Niclas; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Harrington, Patricia A.; Harris, Holly R.; Hauke, Jan; Hein, Alexander; Henderson, Alex; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hodgson, Shirley; Høgdall, Claus K.; Høgdall, Estrid; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Holland, Helene; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hosking, Karen; Huang, Ruea-Yea; Hulick, Peter J.; Hung, Jillian; Hunter, David J.; Huntsman, David G.; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Iversen, Edwin S.; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jernetz, Mats; Jensen, Allan; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Johnatty, Sharon; Jones, Michael E.; Kannisto, Päivi; Karlan, Beth Y.; Karnezis, Anthony; Kast, Karin; Kennedy, Catherine J.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Kim, Sung-Won; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Köbel, Martin; Kopperud, Reidun K.; Kruse, Torben A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Larrañaga, Nerea; Larson, Melissa C.; Lazaro, Conxi; Le, Nhu D.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Jong Won; Lele, Shashikant B.; Leminen, Arto; Leroux, Dominique; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Liebrich, Clemens; Lilyquist, Jenna; Lipworth, Loren; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen H.; Lubinński, Jan; Luccarini, Craig; Lundvall, Lene; Mai, Phuong L.; Mendoza-Fandiño, Gustavo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; May, Taymaa; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McAlpine, Jessica N.; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Iain; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Menon, Usha; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Merritt, Melissa A.; Milne, Roger L.; Mitchell, Gillian; Modugno, Francesmary; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Moffitt, Melissa; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Musinsky, Jacob; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Odunsi, Kunle; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olsson, Håkan; Olswold, Curtis; O'Malley, David M.; Ong, Kai-Ren; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Orr, Nicholas; Orsulic, Sandra; Osorio, Ana; Palli, Domenico; Papi, Laura; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Peissel, Bernard; Peixoto, Ana; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth, Jennifer B.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pezzani, Lidia; Pfeiler, Georg; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Piedmonte, Marion; Pike, Malcolm C.; Piskorz, Anna M.; Poblete, Samantha R.; Pocza, Timea; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Poppe, Bruce; Porteous, Mary E.; Prieur, Fabienne; Prokofyeva, Darya; Pugh, Elizabeth; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Pujol, Pascal; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Rhiem, Kerstin; Rice, Patricia; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Rodríguez-Antona, Cristina; Romm, Jane; Rookus, Matti A.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Sandler, Dale P.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Senter, Leigha; Setiawan, V. Wendy; Severi, Gianluca; Sharma, Priyanka; Shelford, Tameka; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Side, Lucy E.; Sieh, Weiva; Singer, Christian F.; Sobol, Hagay; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Stadler, Zsofia; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E.; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutphen, Rebecca; Sutter, Christian; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Szafron, Lukasz; Tan, Yen Y.; Taylor, Jack A.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R.; teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Thomsen, Liv Cecilie Vestrheim; Thull, Darcy L.; Tihomirova, Laima; Tinker, Anna V.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tone, Alicia; Trabert, Britton; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Tung, Nadine; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; van den Berg, David; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Heetvelde, Mattias; van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vega, Ana; Edwards, Digna Velez; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vijai, Joseph; Vratimos, Athanassios; Walker, Lisa; Walsh, Christine; Wand, Dorothea; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Webb, Penelope M.; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wolk, Alicja; Woo, Michelle; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zorn, Kristin K.; Narod, Steven A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Amos, Christopher I.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Ottini, Laura; Goodman, Marc T.; Park, Sue K.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Risch, Harvey A.; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Simard, Jacques; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Hazelett, Dennis; Monteiro, Alvaro N.; Couch, Fergus J.; Berchuck, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Goode, Ellen L.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2017-01-01

    To identify common alleles associated with different histotypes of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), we pooled data from multiple genome-wide genotyping projects totaling 25,509 EOC cases and 40,941 controls. We identified nine new susceptibility loci for different EOC histotypes: six for serous EOC

  5. Identification of 12 new susceptibility loci for different histotypes of epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phelan, Catherine M; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Tyrer, Jonathan P

    2017-01-01

    To identify common alleles associated with different histotypes of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), we pooled data from multiple genome-wide genotyping projects totaling 25,509 EOC cases and 40,941 controls. We identified nine new susceptibility loci for different EOC histotypes: six for serous E...

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies novel loci associated with circulating phospho- and sphingolipid concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Demirkan

    Full Text Available Phospho- and sphingolipids are crucial cellular and intracellular compounds. These lipids are required for active transport, a number of enzymatic processes, membrane formation, and cell signalling. Disruption of their metabolism leads to several diseases, with diverse neurological, psychiatric, and metabolic consequences. A large number of phospholipid and sphingolipid species can be detected and measured in human plasma. We conducted a meta-analysis of five European family-based genome-wide association studies (N = 4034 on plasma levels of 24 sphingomyelins (SPM, 9 ceramides (CER, 57 phosphatidylcholines (PC, 20 lysophosphatidylcholines (LPC, 27 phosphatidylethanolamines (PE, and 16 PE-based plasmalogens (PLPE, as well as their proportions in each major class. This effort yielded 25 genome-wide significant loci for phospholipids (smallest P-value = 9.88×10(-204 and 10 loci for sphingolipids (smallest P-value = 3.10×10(-57. After a correction for multiple comparisons (P-value<2.2×10(-9, we observed four novel loci significantly associated with phospholipids (PAQR9, AGPAT1, PKD2L1, PDXDC1 and two with sphingolipids (PLD2 and APOE explaining up to 3.1% of the variance. Further analysis of the top findings with respect to within class molar proportions uncovered three additional loci for phospholipids (PNLIPRP2, PCDH20, and ABDH3 suggesting their involvement in either fatty acid elongation/saturation processes or fatty acid specific turnover mechanisms. Among those, 14 loci (KCNH7, AGPAT1, PNLIPRP2, SYT9, FADS1-2-3, DLG2, APOA1, ELOVL2, CDK17, LIPC, PDXDC1, PLD2, LASS4, and APOE mapped into the glycerophospholipid and 12 loci (ILKAP, ITGA9, AGPAT1, FADS1-2-3, APOA1, PCDH20, LIPC, PDXDC1, SGPP1, APOE, LASS4, and PLD2 to the sphingolipid pathways. In large meta-analyses, associations between FADS1-2-3 and carotid intima media thickness, AGPAT1 and type 2 diabetes, and APOA1 and coronary artery disease were observed. In conclusion, our

  7. A TaqMan-based real time PCR assay for specific detection and quantification of Xylella fastidiosa strains causing bacterial leaf scorch in oleander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei; Shao, Jonathan; Singh, Raghuwinder; Davis, Robert E; Zhao, Tingchang; Huang, Qi

    2013-02-15

    A TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay was developed for specific detection of strains of X. fastidiosa causing oleander leaf scorch. The assay uses primers WG-OLS-F1 and WG-OLS-R1 and the fluorescent probe WG-OLS-P1, designed based on unique sequences found only in the genome of oleander strain Ann1. The assay is specific, allowing detection of only oleander-infecting strains, not other strains of X. fastidiosa nor other plant-associated bacteria tested. The assay is also sensitive, with a detection limit of 10.4fg DNA of X. fastidiosa per reaction in vitro and in planta. The assay can also be applied to detect low numbers of X. fastidiosa in insect samples, or further developed into a multiplex real-time PCR assay to simultaneously detect and distinguish diverse strains of X. fastidiosa that may occupy the same hosts or insect vectors. Specific and sensitive detection and quantification of oleander strains of X. fastidiosa should be useful for disease diagnosis, epidemiological studies, management of oleander leaf scorch disease, and resistance screening for oleander shrubs. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Nonequivalence of classical MHC class I loci in ability to direct effective antiviral immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D Pavelko

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Structural diversity in the peptide binding sites of the redundant classical MHC antigen presenting molecules is strongly selected in humans and mice. Although the encoded antigen presenting molecules overlap in antigen presenting function, differences in polymorphism at the MHC I A, B and C loci in humans and higher primates indicate these loci are not functionally equivalent. The structural basis of these differences is not known. We hypothesize that classical class I loci differ in their ability to direct effective immunity against intracellular pathogens. Using a picornavirus infection model and chimeric H-2 transgenes, we examined locus specific functional determinants distinguishing the ability of class I sister genes to direct effective anti viral immunity. Whereas, parental FVB and transgenic FVB mice expressing the H-2K(b gene are highly susceptible to persisting Theiler's virus infection within the CNS and subsequent demyelination, mice expressing the D(b transgene clear the virus and are protected from demyelination. Remarkably, animals expressing a chimeric transgene, comprised primarily of K(b but encoding the peptide binding domain of D(b, develop a robust anti viral CTL response yet fail to clear virus and develop significant demyelination. Differences in expression of the chimeric K(bα1α2D(b gene (low and D(b (high in the CNS of infected mice mirror expression levels of their endogenous H-2(q counterparts in FVB mice. These findings demonstrate that locus specific elements other than those specifying peptide binding and T cell receptor interaction can determine ability to clear virus infection. This finding provides a basis for understanding locus-specific differences in MHC polymorphism, characterized best in human populations.

  9. Estimating phylogenetic relationships despite discordant gene trees across loci: the species tree of a diverse species group of feather mites (Acari: Proctophyllodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Lacey L; Klimov, Pavel B

    2011-11-01

    With the increased availability of multilocus sequence data, the lack of concordance of gene trees estimated for independent loci has focused attention on both the biological processes producing the discord and the methodologies used to estimate phylogenetic relationships. What has emerged is a suite of new analytical tools for phylogenetic inference--species tree approaches. In contrast to traditional phylogenetic methods that are stymied by the idiosyncrasies of gene trees, approaches for estimating species trees explicitly take into account the cause of discord among loci and, in the process, provides a direct estimate of phylogenetic history (i.e. the history of species divergence, not divergence of specific loci). We illustrate the utility of species tree estimates with an analysis of a diverse group of feather mites, the pinnatus species group (genus Proctophyllodes). Discord among four sequenced nuclear loci is consistent with theoretical expectations, given the short time separating speciation events (as evident by short internodes relative to terminal branch lengths in the trees). Nevertheless, many of the relationships are well resolved in a Bayesian estimate of the species tree; the analysis also highlights ambiguous aspects of the phylogeny that require additional loci. The broad utility of species tree approaches is discussed, and specifically, their application to groups with high speciation rates--a history of diversification with particular prevalence in host/parasite systems where species interactions can drive rapid diversification.

  10. Strain-Specific Virolysis Patterns of Human Noroviruses in Response to Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Geun Woo; Collins, Nikail; Barclay, Leslie; Hu, Liya; Prasad, B V Venkataram; Lopman, Benjamin A; Vinjé, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are widely used to disinfect hands to prevent the spread of pathogens including noroviruses. Alcohols inactivate norovirus by destruction of the viral capsid, resulting in the leakage of viral RNA (virolysis). Since conflicting results have been reported on the susceptibility of human noroviruses against alcohols, we exposed a panel of 30 human norovirus strains (14 GI and 16 GII strains) to different concentrations (50%, 70%, 90%) of ethanol and isopropanol and tested the viral RNA titer by RT-qPCR. Viral RNA titers of 10 (71.4%), 14 (100%), 3 (21.4%) and 7 (50%) of the 14 GI strains were reduced by > 1 log10 RNA copies/ml after exposure to 70% and 90% ethanol, and 70% and 90% isopropanol, respectively. RNA titers of 6 of the 7 non-GII 4 strains remained unaffected after alcohol exposure. Compared to GII strains, GI strains were more susceptible to ethanol than to isopropanol. At 90%, both alcohols reduced RNA titers of 8 of the 9 GII.4 strains by ≥ 1 log10 RNA copies/ml. After exposure to 70% ethanol, RNA titers of GII.4 Den Haag and Sydney strains decreased by ≥ 1.9 log10, whereas RNA reductions for GII.4 New Orleans strains were alcohol susceptibility patterns between different norovirus genotypes vary widely and that virolysis data for a single strain or genotype are not representative for all noroviruses.

  11. Ancient conservation of trinucleotide microsatellite loci in polistine wasps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezenwa, V O; Peters, J M; Zhu, Y

    1998-01-01

    Microsatellites have proven to be very useful genetic markers for studies of kinship, parentage, and gene mapping. If microsatellites are conserved among species, then those developed for one species can be used on related species, which would save the time and effort of developing new loci. We...... evaluated conservation of 27 trinucleotide loci that were derived from 2 species of Polistes wasps in cross-species applications on 27 species chosen from the major lineages of the Vespidae, which diverged as much as 144 million years ago. We further investigated cross-species polymorphism levels for 18...... of the loci. There was a clear relationship between cladistic distance and both conservation of the priming sites and heterozygosity. However the loci derived from P. bellicosus were much more widely conserved and polymorphic than were those derived from P. annularis. The disparity in cross-species utility...

  12. Sequencing chromosomal abnormalities reveals neurodevelopmental loci that confer risk across diagnostic boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talkowski, Michael E.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Blumenthal, Ian; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Chiang, Colby; Heilbut, Adrian; Ernst, Carl; Hanscom, Carrie; Rossin, Elizabeth; Lindgren, Amelia; Pereira, Shahrin; Ruderfer, Douglas; Kirby, Andrew; Ripke, Stephan; Harris, David; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Ha, Kyungsoo; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Solomon, Benjamin D.; Gropman, Andrea L.; Lucente, Diane; Sims, Katherine; Ohsumi, Toshiro K.; Borowsky, Mark L.; Loranger, Stephanie; Quade, Bradley; Lage, Kasper; Miles, Judith; Wu, Bai-Lin; Shen, Yiping; Neale, Benjamin; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Daly, Mark J.; Morton, Cynthia C.; Gusella, James F.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs) represent a reservoir of single gene disruptions in neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD). We sequenced BCAs in autism and related NDDs, revealing disruption of 33 loci in four general categories: 1) genes associated with abnormal neurodevelopment (e.g., AUTS2, FOXP1, CDKL5), 2) single gene contributors to microdeletion syndromes (MBD5, SATB2, EHMT1, SNURF-SNRPN), 3) novel risk loci (e.g., CHD8, KIRREL3, ZNF507), and 4) genes associated with later onset psychiatric disorders (e.g., TCF4, ZNF804A, PDE10A, GRIN2B, ANK3). We also discovered profoundly increased burden of copy number variants among 19,556 neurodevelopmental cases compared to 13,991 controls (p = 2.07×10−47) and enrichment of polygenic risk alleles from autism and schizophrenia genome-wide association studies (p = 0.0018 and 0.0009, respectively). Our findings suggest a polygenic risk model of autism incorporating loci of strong effect and indicate that some neurodevelopmental genes are sensitive to perturbation by multiple mutational mechanisms, leading to variable phenotypic outcomes that manifest at different life stages. PMID:22521361

  13. Biology and applications of human minisatellite loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A; Jeffreys, A J

    1992-12-01

    Highly repetitive minisatellites' include the most variable human loci described to date. They have proved invaluable in a wide variety of genetic analyses, and despite some controversies surrounding their practical implementation, have been extensively adopted in civil and forensic casework. Molecular analysis of internal allelic structure has provided detailed insights into the repeat-unit turnover mechanisms operating in germline mutations, which are ultimately responsible for the extreme variability seen at these loci.

  14. "Byrummets ånd. Genius Loci/The Spirit of Urban Spaces"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    byrum, Genius loci, Christian Norberg-Schulz, Sønder Boulevard, Berlin, nykultur, fortove, barndomserindringer......byrum, Genius loci, Christian Norberg-Schulz, Sønder Boulevard, Berlin, nykultur, fortove, barndomserindringer...

  15. A Genome-wide Association Analysis of a Broad Psychosis Phenotype Identifies Three Loci for Further Investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bramon, Elvira; Pirinen, Matti; Strange, Amy; Lin, Kuang; Freeman, Colin; Bellenguez, Celine; Su, Zhan; Band, Gavin; Pearson, Richard; Vukcevic, Damjan; Langford, Cordelia; Deloukas, Panos; Hunt, Sarah; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Potter, Simon C.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Edkins, Sarah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Arranz, Maria J.; Bakker, Steven; Bender, Stephan; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; Chandler, David; Collier, David A.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dazzan, Paola; de Haan, Lieuwe; di Forti, Marta; Dragovic, Milan; Giegling, Ina; Hall, Jeremy; Iyegbe, Conrad; Jablensky, Assen; Kahn, Rene S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Kravariti, Eugenia; Lawrie, Stephen; Lins-Zen, Don H.; Mata, Ignacio; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pariante, Carmine M.; Paunio, Tiina; Picchioni, Marco; Ripke, Stephan; Wiersma, Durk

    2014-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several loci associated with schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorder. We performed a GWAS of psychosis as a broad syndrome rather than within specific diagnostic categories. Methods: 1239 cases with schizophrenia, schizoaffective

  16. Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willer, Cristen J.; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Sengupta, Sebanti; Peloso, Gina M.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; den Hertog, Heleen M.; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A.; Ehret, G