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Sample records for str loci frequencies

  1. Allele frequency distribution for 15 autosomal STR loci in Afridi Pathan population of Uttar Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Sabahat; Ali, Shahnaz; Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Haque, Ikramul

    2009-11-01

    Allele frequencies of the 15 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D3S1358, THO1, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D5S818 and FGA were determined in Afridi Pathan population of Uttar Pradesh, India. All the 15 STR loci studied were found to be highly polymorphic with respect to observed heterozygosity values. Adherence to the expectations of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was confirmed for all the loci with an exception of TPOX and FGA. The allele 12 in CSF1PO was found to be most frequent. The power of discrimination was found to be high ranging from a minimum of 0.858 for the locus CSFIPO to maximum of 0.962 for the locus FGA, thereby facilitating the validation and efficiency of these STR markers in human identification. Population differentiation test between the studied and neighboring populations revealed significant differences at several loci suggesting the endogamous nature of the studied population. To the best of our knowledge, Afridi Pathan population has not been explored genetically for generating forensic data on STR markers. Therefore, STR allele frequency data of this unique population is a valuable contribution to the existing DNA database on Indian populations.

  2. Population Difference Analysis of Allele Frequencies of 24 Y-STR Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, R X; Liu, J H; Zhao, Q; Lin, Y; Li, L

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the population genetic polymorphisms of 24 Y-STR loci in unrelated individuals in Eastern Chinese Han population, and to compare the difference of Han group between Eastern China and Guangdong. The population genetics of 24 Y-STR loci in 268 unrelated Han individuals from Eastern China were analyzed by GFS 24 Y-STR amplification kit. The allele frequencies in Eastern Chinese Han population were compared with the data in Guangdong Han population, and the difference analysis between two groups was performed. Among the 24 Y-STR loci of 268 unrelated Han individuals from Eastern China, 235 alleles and 267 haplotypes were observed. GD value ranged from 0.564 9 to 0.966 8. The difference between 12 loci ( DYS622 , DYS552 , DYS443 , et al. ) of Han population in Eastern China and in Guangdong was statistically significance. GFS 24Y STR amplification system shows favorable polymorphisms, which can be used in patrilineal genetic relationship identification. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  3. Allele frequencies of 18 autosomal STR loci in the Uyghur population living in Kashgar Prefecture, Northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Zhenghui; Mo, Xiaoting; Ma, Wenhua; Zhang, Hantao; Lin, Ziqing; Ye, Jian

    2018-03-10

    There is currently no large population data-based data set in Kashgar Prefecture Uyghur. The allele frequencies of 18 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci included in the DNATyper™ 19 kit were evaluated in 2600 Uyghur individuals living in Kashgar Prefecture, Northwest China. The values of combined power of discrimination (CPD) and combined probability of exclusion (CPE) of all 18 autosomal STR loci were 0.99999999999999999998235 and 0.99999998670, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the Uyghur population has a closer relationship with the Xinjiang-Kazakh, Inner Mongolia-Mongolian, and other three Uyghur populations. In addition, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that Uyghur population is an admixture of Eastern Asian and European populations.

  4. Allele frequencies of 15 autosomal STR loci in the Caymanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Jonathan S; Tanzillo-Swarts, Angela

    2015-05-01

    Allele frequency distributions in the Caymanian population were determined using the AmpFlSTR® Identifiler® PCR amplification kit. Little evidence of departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium or the association of alleles of different loci was detected. Comparison with relevant population groups supports the Caymanian population having a distinct allelic distribution. The 15 Identifiler® loci provide combined power of discrimination and exclusion values of 0.999999999999999995 and 0.9999992, respectively, proving suitable for the forensic and paternity testing requirements of the Cayman Islands.

  5. Population data for 15 autosomal STR loci from Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemeljanova, V; Gobrusjonoka, O; Bergere, O; Latisheva, K; Podovšovnik Axelsson, E; Zupanič Pajnič, I

    2015-07-01

    Population data of 15 short tandem repeat (STR) loci were determined from 500 unrelated Latvian individuals. The samples were amplified using the AmpFlSTR® NGM™ PCR Amplification Kit and the PowerPlex® ESX 16 System. No significant deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was detected, except for locus D3S1358. Calculated forensically relevant population statistics show that the investigated loci are very discriminating in the Latvian population, with a combined discrimination power of 0.9999999999999999998. A comparison with previously published allele frequency data from other populations is presented.

  6. Genetics analysis of 38 STR loci in Uygur population from Southern Xinjiang of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Liu, Haibo; Liao, Qinxiang; Xu, Xu; Chen, Wen; Hao, Shicheng

    2016-05-01

    The allele frequencies and statistical parameters of 38 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci were analyzed in the Uygur population from Southern Xinjiang of China with 290 unrelated individuals. The results show these 38 STR loci have high or medium power of discrimination and probabilities of exclusion. All loci are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The genetic distances between the Uygur population and other Chinese populations were also estimated.

  7. Identification of variant alleles at AmpFlSTR SGM Plus STR loci in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... It is therefore important that forensic science community shares information on the occurrence of these variants and reduces complications during STR typing. In this study, we report 5 variant alleles at AmpFlSTR SGM. Plus loci in a sample population of Bangladesh. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Samples ...

  8. Genetic variation of twenty autosomal STR loci and evaluate the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was of twofold. One was to determine the genetic structure of Iraq population and the second objective of the study was to evaluate the importance of these loci for forensic genetic purposes. FTA® Technology (FTA™ paper DNA extraction) utilized to extract DNA. Twenty (20) STR loci and Amelogenin), ...

  9. Allele frequencies of the 15 AmpF/Str Identifiler loci in the population of Metztitlán (Estado de Hidalgo), México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorostiza, A; González-Martín, A; Ramírez, C López; Sánchez, C; Barrot, C; Ortega, M; Huguet, E; Corbella, J; Gené, M

    2007-03-02

    The 15 AmpF/STR Identifiler loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818 and FGA) were analyzed in the sample of 180 unrelated autochthonous healthy adults born in Meztitlán City from the valley of Metztitlán (Estado de Hidalgo, México). The agreement with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was confirmed for all loci. From the forensic point of view, the heterozygosity value, power of discrimination and the a priori chance of exclusion were calculated.

  10. Diversity study of 12 X-chromosomal STR loci in Hui ethnic from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hao-Tian; Han, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Liu, Wen-Juan; Wang, Tian-Ju; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Huang, Jing-Feng; Du, Wei-An; Guo, Jian-Xin; Wang, Hong-Dan; Zhang, Yu-Hong; Zhou, Ru-Hua; Zhu, Bo-Feng; Wei, Xing

    2014-07-01

    X-chromosomal STRs (X-STRs) have been used as complements of autosomal STR application in recent years. In this work, we present population genetic data of 12 X-STRs including DXS101, DXS10159, DXS10162, DXS10164, DXS6789, DXS7133, DXS7423, DXS7424, DXS8378, DXS981, GATA165B12, and GATA31E08 loci in a sample of 231 unrelated healthy individuals from the Hui ethnic group in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, China. Allelic frequencies of the 12 X-STR loci and haplotypic frequencies of the reported linkage groups (DXS7424-DXS101 and DXS10159-DXS10164-DXS10162) were investigated in the group, respectively. No STR loci showed significant deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibriums and no linkage disequilibriums of pairwise loci were found after Bonferroni correction, respectively. A combined power of discrimination in female individuals was 0.999999999985 and that in male individuals was 0.99999967, respectively. The combined mean exclusion chance in deficiency cases, normal trios and duo cases were 0.999934, 0.995754, and 0.999796, respectively. Significant differences were observed from 0 to 8 loci, when making comparisons between the data of Hui ethnic group and previously reported data from other 16 populations. The results indicated the new panel of 12 X-STR loci might be useful for forensic science application. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Genetic variation of twenty autosomal STR loci and evaluate the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-03-12

    Mar 12, 2014 ... the second objective of the study was to evaluate the importance of these loci for forensic genetic purposes. ... of discrimination values for all tested loci was from 75 to 96%; therefore, those loci can be safely used to establish a ..... lists the frequency distribution of individual alleles within a given genetic ...

  12. Y-STR frequency surveying method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willuweit, Sascha; Caliebe, Amke; Andersen, Mikkel Meyer

    2011-01-01

    Reasonable formalized methods to estimate the frequencies of DNA profiles generated from lineage markers have been proposed in the past years and were discussed in the forensic community. Recently, collections of population data on the frequencies of variations in Y chromosomal STR profiles have ...

  13. Population genetic analysis of the GlobalFiler STR loci in 748 individuals from the Kazakh population of Xinjiang in northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honghua; Yang, Shuping; Guo, Wei; Ren, Bo; Pu, Liwen; Ma, Teng; Xia, Mingying; Jin, Li; Li, Liming; Li, Shilin

    2016-09-01

    The six-dye GlobalFiler™ Express PCR amplification kit incorporates 21 commonly used autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci and three gender determination loci. In this study, we analyzed the GlobalFiler STR loci on 748 unrelated individuals from a Chinese Kazakh population of Xinjiang, China. No significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and linkage disequilibrium were observed within and between 21 autosomal STR loci. SE33 showed the greatest power of discrimination in Kazakh population. The combined power of discrimination of Kazakh was 99.999999999999999999999996797 %. No significant differences of allele frequencies were observed between Kazakh and Uyghur at all 15 tested STR loci, as well as Mongolian. Significant differences were only observed between Kazakh and the other Chinese populations at TH01. Multiple STR loci showed significant differences between Kazakh and Arab, as well as South Portuguese. The multidimensional scaling plot (MDS) plot and neighbor-joining tree also showed Kazakh is genetically close to Uyghur.

  14. STR data for the AmpFlSTR Profiler loci from the three main ethnic population groups (Malay, Chinese and Indian) in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K B; Jeevan, N H; Jaya, P; Othman, M I; Lee, Y H

    2001-06-01

    Allele frequencies for the nine STRs genetic loci included in the AmpFlSTR Profiler kit were obtained from samples of unrelated individuals comprising 139-156 Malays, 149-153 Chinese and 132-135 Indians, residing in Malaysia.

  15. Population genetic data for 15 STR loci (Identifiler kit) in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocabado, Omar; Taboada, Patricia; Inda, Francisco Javier; Yurrebaso, Inaki; García, Oscar

    2009-11-01

    Allele frequencies for 15 STR autosomal loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, VWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818 and FGA) were obtained from a sample of 200 unrelated individuals from Bolivia, South America.

  16. Population genetic data for 15 STR loci (Identifiler kit) in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros, Mireya; Pinto, Yessica; Inda, Francisco Javier; García, Oscar

    2008-09-01

    Allele frequencies for 15 STR autosomal loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, VWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818 and FGA) were obtained from a sample of 198 unrelated individuals from Honduras, Central America.

  17. Development of the 16 X-STR loci typing system and genetic analysis in a Shanghai Han population from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kuan; Zhao, Shumin; Tian, Huaizhou; Zhang, Suhua; Li, Chengtao

    2013-11-01

    This study developed a new multiplex PCR system that simultaneously amplifies 16 X-STR loci in the same PCR reaction, and the polymorphism and mutation rates of these 16 X-STR loci were explored in a Shanghai Han population from China. These loci included DXS10134, DXS10159, DXS6789, DXS6795, DXS6800, DXS6803, DXS6807, DXS6810, DXS7132, DXS7424, DXS8378, DXS9902, GATA165B12, GATA172D05, GATA31E08, and HPRTB. Samples from 591 unrelated individuals (293 males and 298 females) and 400 two-generation families were successfully analyzed using this multiplex system. Allele frequencies and mutation rates of the 16 loci were investigated, with the comparison of allele frequency distributions among different populations performed. Polymorphism information contents of these loci were all >0.6440 except the locus DXS6800 (0.4706). Nine cases of mutations were detected in the 16 loci from the investigation of 9232 meioses. Pairwise comparisons of allele frequency distributions showed significant differences for most loci among populations from different countries and ethnic groups but not among the Han population living in other areas of China. These results suggest that the 16 X-STR loci system provides highly informative polymorphic data for paternity testing and forensic identification in the Han population in Shanghai, China, as a complementary tool. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Haplotypes for 13 Y-chromosomal STR loci in South Tunisian population (Sfax region).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, Imen; Ammar-Keskes, Leila; Rebai, Ahmed

    2006-12-20

    Nine Y-STR loci from the "minimal haplotype" (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393) included in Y-STR Haplotype Reference Databases (YHRD) with 4 additional Y-STRs (DYS436, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439) were analyzed by PCR using duplex and Y-PLEX 12 kit, followed by automatic genotyping in a sample of 105 Tunisian males originating from Sfax region (south Tunisia). Allelic frequencies and gene diversities for each Y-STR locus were determined. The high haplotype diversity (0.9932) and discrimination capacity (0.7714) show the usefulness of these loci for human identification in forensic studies and paternity tests in Tunisia. The most common haplotype was shared by 4.7% (5 individuals) of the sample was only found in samples from the Tunisian population reported in YHRD. One private allele for DYS392 (allele 17) was discovered and duplications were observed for five loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS393, DYS437 and DYS439).

  19. Reconstructing recent human phylogenies with forensic STR loci: A statistical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Faisal

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Forensic Short Tandem Repeat (STR loci are effective for the purpose of individual identification, and other forensic applications. Most of these markers have high allelic variability and mutation rate because of which they have limited use in the phylogenetic reconstruction. In the present study, we have carried out a meta-analysis to explore the possibility of using only five STR loci (TPOX, FES, vWA, F13A and Tho1 to carry out phylogenetic assessment based on the allele frequency profile of 20 world population and north Indian Hindus analyzed in the present study. Results Phylogenetic analysis based on two different approaches – genetic distance and maximum likelihood along with statistical bootstrapping procedure involving 1000 replicates was carried out. The ensuing tree topologies and PC plots were further compared with those obtained in earlier phylogenetic investigations. The compiled database of 21 populations got segregated and finely resolved into three basal clusters with very high bootstrap values corresponding to three geo-ethnic groups of African, Orientals, and Caucasians. Conclusion Based on this study we conclude that if appropriate and logistic statistical approaches are followed then even lesser number of forensic STR loci are powerful enough to reconstruct the recent human phylogenies despite of their relatively high mutation rates.

  20. Evaluation of 12 Y-chromosome STR loci in Western Mediterranean populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, V.; Tomas, Carmen; Sanchez, Juan J.

    2008-01-01

    With the aim to establish a Y-STR haplotype database, a total of 554 males from seven Western Mediterranean populations were genotyped for the 12 Y-chromosome STR loci (minimal haplotype extended by loci DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439) included in the Powerplex Y System (Promega). Among the 554 males...

  1. Population data on 15 STR loci using AmpF/STR Identifiler kit in a Malay population living in and around Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, S; Minaguchi, K; Takezaki, N; Nambiar, P

    2008-05-01

    Allele frequencies for 15 short tandem repeat (STR) loci D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818 and FGA (AmpF/STR Identifiler PCR Amplification kit, PE Applied Biosystems) were obtained from a sample of 110 unrelated individuals from the Malay population living in and around Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and the characteristics of the population was compared with other East Asian populations.

  2. Genetic polymorphism study on 12 X STR loci of investigator Argus X STR kit in Bhil tribal population of Madhya Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Pankaj; Jain, Toshi; Gupta, Umang; Trivedi, Veena Ben

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of 12 X STR loci (DXS10103, DXS8378, DXS7132, DXS10134, DXS10074, DXS10101, DXS10135, DXS7423, DXS10146, DXS10079, HPRTB and DXS10148) belonging to four linkage group was done in 183 (100 males and 83 females) unrelated members of Bhil population. Heterozygosity among the studied 12 X STR loci showed a distribution of from 59.7% to 92.8%. No significant difference was recorded in the allele frequencies of males and females. The loci DXS10135 and DXS10101 were found to be most polymorphic. Haplotype diversity was found to be higher than 0.990 for all the four linkage groups. A total of 86, 69, 71 and 71 haplotypes were observed for linkage group I, II, III and IV, respectively. The results showed departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with respect to three loci DXS10079, DXS10135 and DXS10101. This is first report on these 12 X STR markers from India. All the loci in the Argus X 12 kit were fairly informative in the Bhil population and the population showed significant genetic variation with all the compared populations from other parts of the world. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of the 19 Y-STR and 16 X-STR loci system in the Han population of Shandong province, China.

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    Gao, H M; Wang, C; Han, S Y; Sun, S H; Xiao, D J; Wang, Y S; Li, C T; Zhang, M X

    2017-03-30

    The sex-linked short tandem repeats (STR), Y-STR and X-STR, are important for autosomal STRs in forensic paternity testing. We evaluated the forensic parameters of 19 Y-STRs and 16 X-STRs in the Han population of Shandong province, China. A Goldeneye 20Y kit (DYS391, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS389II, DYS348, DYS456, Y-GATA-H4, DYS447, DYS19, DYS392, DYS393, DYS388, DYS439, DYS635, DYS448, DYS460, DYS458, DYS437, DYS385 a/b) was used to analyze the forensic parameters of 534 unrelated males. A Goldeneye17X system (DXS6795, DXS9902, DXS8378, HPRTB, GATA165B12, DXS7132, DXS7424, DXS6807, DXS6803, GATA172D05, DXS6800, DXS10134, GATA31E08, DXS10159, DXS6789, DXS6810, amelogenin) was used to analyze 97 unrelated males and 214 females. In addition, we used the kits to examine 5 cases with abnormal amelogenin test results, as well as a male child with agenosomia typed by autosomal STR. We found 203 Y-STR haplotypes with allele frequencies ranging from 0.0019 to 0.7959, and GD ranging from 0.3429 to 0.9667. Expect in DXS6803, the allele frequencies of the other 15 X-STR loci showed no differences between females and males. PD F ranged from 0.5504 to 0.9638, while PD M ranged from 0.3176 to 0.8377. With the exception of DXS6803 and DXS6810, the allele frequencies of other X-STR loci were in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in females. One amelogenin negative case was characterized as a deletion of Y-DYS458. This paper provided data regarding the genetic polymorphism of Y-STRs and X-STRs in the Han population, and demonstrated the importance of Y-STR and X-STR in forensic autosomal STR analysis.

  4. Genetic variation of 17 STR loci in a Mexican Mestizo population from Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, Maria; Rios-Rivas, Ricardo Jesús; Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Lorente, José Antonio; Villegas-Carmona, Dora; Ramirez-Flores, Erika; Vega-Navarrete, Lourdes

    2016-11-01

    Genetic data from 17 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci found in the Powerplex® ESX 17 System (Promega, Madison, WI, USA) was evaluated in 162 unrelated Mexican Mestizo individuals from Mexico City. Allele frequencies and forensic parameters were estimated for the 17 STRs. All loci analyzed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the studied population and showed not any signs of linkage between loci. The combined power of discrimination and the power of exclusion for the 16 aSTRs studied were 1-2.56409·10 -19 and 99.999938 %, respectively. Genetic distances reveal a close relationship within different populations of Mexican Mestizos. The obtained data might be useful for population genetics research and for individual identification and paternity testing in forensic science.

  5. Y-STR frequency surveying method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willuweit, Sascha; Caliebe, Amke; Andersen, Mikkel Meyer

    2011-01-01

    reached a new quality with the establishment of the comprehensive neatly quality-controlled reference database YHRD. Grounded on such unrivalled empirical material from hundreds of populations studies the core assumption of the Haplotype Frequency Surveying Method originally described 10 years ago can...... be tested and improved. Here we provide new approaches to calculate the parameters used in the frequency surveying method: a maximum likelihood estimation of the regression parameters (r1, r2, s1 and s2) and a revised Frequency Surveying framework with variable binning and a database preprocessing to take......Reasonable formalized methods to estimate the frequencies of DNA profiles generated from lineage markers have been proposed in the past years and were discussed in the forensic community. Recently, collections of population data on the frequencies of variations in Y chromosomal STR profiles have...

  6. Analysis of 16 autosomal STR loci in Uyghur and Kazakh populations from Xinjiang, China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simayijiang, Halimurat; Pereira, Vania; Børsting, Claus

    2017-01-01

    . In order to evaluate the kit and get population data for Chinese Uyghurs and Kazakhs, the genetic polymorphisms of 16 autosomal STR loci included in the NGM SElect™ Kit: D3S1358, vWA, D16S539, D2S1338, D8S1179, D21S11, D18S51, D19S433, TH01, FGA, D10S1248, D22S1045, D2S441, D1S1656 D12S391, SE33......, and Amelogenin were studied in 324 unrelated Uyghur and 124 unrelated Kazakh individuals from the Xinjiang Autonomous Region of China. Allele frequencies and forensic relevant parameters were calculated using the Arlequin software and DNAVIEW. The genotype frequency distribution of each locus did not deviate...... from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium in any of the two populations. The forensic parameters indicated that the kit is suitable for personal identification, paternity testing, and complex kinship analysis in Uyghur and Kazakh populations. Allele frequency data for the STR loci were compared with other...

  7. Genetic analysis of two STR loci (VWA and TPOX in the Iranian province of Khuzestan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Foroughmand

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: The examined STR loci in this study have proven a relatively high genetic variation in the Iranian population. The data could be used for construction of a forensic genetic database for the Iranian population.

  8. Patterns of genetic diversity at the nine forensically approved STR loci in the Indian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Ranjan; Reddy, B Mohan; Chattopadhyay, P; Kashyap, V K; Sun, Guangyun; Deka, Ranjan

    2002-02-01

    Genetic diversity at the nine short tandem repeat (STR) loci, which are universally approved and widely used for forensic investigations, has been studied among nine Indian populations with diverse ethnic, linguistic, and geographic backgrounds. The nine STR loci were profiled on 902 individuals using fluorescent detection methods on an ABI377 System, with the aid of an Amp-F1 Profiler Plus Kit. The studied populations include two upper castes, Brahmin and Kayastha; a tribe, Garo, from West Bengal; a Hindu caste, Meitei, with historical links to Bengal Brahmins; a migrant group of Muslims; three tribal groups, Naga, Kuki and Hmar, from Manipur in northeast India; and a middle-ranking caste, Golla, who are seminomadic herders from Andhra Pradesh. Gene diversity analysis suggests that the average heterozygosity is uniformly high (>0.8) in the studied populations, with the coefficient of gene differentiation at 0.050 +/- 0.0054. Both neighbor-joining (NJ) and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) trees based on DA distances bring out distinct clusters that are consistent with ethnic, linguistic, and/or geographic backgrounds of the populations. The fit of the Harpending and Ward model of regression of average heterozygosity on the gene frequency centroid is found to be good, and the observed outliers are consistent with the population structure and history of the studied populations. Our study suggests that the nine STR loci, used so far mostly for forensic investigations, can be used fruitfully for microevolutionary studies as well, and for reconstructing the phylogenetic history of human populations, at least at the local level.

  9. High-throughput sequencing of core STR loci for forensic genetic investigations using the Roche Genome Sequencer FLX platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fordyce, Sarah Louise; Avila Arcos, Maria del Carmen; Rockenbauer, Eszter

    2011-01-01

    The analysis and profiling of short tandem repeat (STR) loci is routinely used in forensic genetics. Current methods to investigate STR loci, including PCR-based standard fragment analyses and capillary electrophoresis, only provide amplicon lengths that are used to estimate the number of STR rep...

  10. Population data for 12 Y-chromosome STR loci in a sample from Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros, Mireya; Yurrebaso, Iñaki; Gusmão, Leonor; García, Oscar

    2009-09-01

    Haplotype, allele frequencies and population data of 12 Y-chromosome STR loci DYS19, DYS385, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 were determined from a sample of 128 unrelated male individuals from Honduras, Central America. A total of 112 haplotypes were identified by the 12 Y-STR loci of which 98 were unique. The haplotype diversity (98.99%) and the proportion of different haplotypes (87.50%) were estimated. Genetic distances were calculated between Honduras and other populations from Southern and Central America, Europe and Africa. The analysis of a Multi Dimensional Scaling (MDS) plot, based on pairwise R(ST) genetic distances, allowed to conclude that Honduras is highly differentiated from the African samples (0.343Honduras showed a lower genetic distance to the European cluster (composed by European and South American general population samples from Brazil, Argentina, Colombia and Venezuela) than to the Central American cluster (Mexico and El Salvador).

  11. Haplotype and genetic relationship of 27 Y-STR loci in Han population of Chaoshan area of China

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    Qing-hua TIAN

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the genetic polymorphisms of 27 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STR loci included in Yfiler® Plus kit in Han population of Chaoshan area, and explore the population genetic relationships and evaluate its application value on forensic medicine. Methods  By detecting 795 unrelated Chaoshan Han males with Yfiler® Plus kit, haplotype frequencies and population genetics parameters of the 27 Y-STR loci were statistically analyzed and compared with available data of other populations from different races and regions for analyzing the genetic distance and clustering relation of Chaoshan Han population. Results  Seven hundred and eighty-seven different haplotypes were observed in 795 unrelated male individuals, of which 779 haplotypes were unique, and 8 haplotypes occurred twice. The haplotype diversity (HD was 0.999975 with discriminative capacity (DC of 98.99%. The gene diversity (GD at the 27 Y-STR loci ranged from 0.3637(DYS391 to 0.9559(DYS385a/b. Comparing with Asian reference populations, the genetic distance (Rst between Chaoshan Han and Guangdong Han was the smallest (0.0036, while it was relatively larger between Chaoshan Han and Gansu Tibetan population (0.0935. The multi-dimensional scaling (MDS plot based on Rst values was similar to the results of clustering analysis. Conclusion  Multiplex detection of the 27 Y-STR loci reveals a highly polymorphic genetic distribution in Chaoshan Han population, which demonstrates the important significance of Yfiler® Plus kit for establishing a Y-STR database, studying population genetics, and for good practice in forensic medicine. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.03.08

  12. Population genetic data for 12 X-STR loci in the Northern Han Chinese and StatsX package as tools for population statistics on X-STR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fei

    2017-01-01

    The X-chromosomal short tandem repeat (X-STR) has the advantage in female traces identification against male contamination and in complex kinship cases. In this study, a total of 516 Northern Han Chinese were genotyped using the Investigator ® Argus X-12 QS Kit and pairwise genetic distances (F ST ) were measured between Northern Han Chinese and 35 published populations using the same 12 X-STR loci in four presumed linkage groups (LG). Meanwhile, the StatsX package was compiled to aid the analysis of population statistics on X-STR. Off-ladder alleles were investigated by Sanger sequencing or next generation sequencing (NGS). The results showed that high combined PD M , PD F , MEC Krüger , MEC Kishida , MEC Desmarais and MEC Desmarais Duo based on allele frequencies were achieved as 0.999999998, >0.999999999, 0.999996425, 0.999999993, 0.999999993 and 0.999998732, respectively, so did they based on haplotype frequencies. Averaged F ST and multidimensional scaling (MDS) plot generally mirrored with the biogeography distribution of the studied populations and their historical relationships. A total of 16 unique off-ladder alleles were observed in this experiment, four of which have not been reported yet. The StatsX package could obtain full concordance with established software. Overall, the Investigator ® Argus X-12 QS Kit may provide high polymorphic information for forensic identification and kinship analysis in the Northern Han Chinese population, and the StatsX package can make the workflow smoother for researchers to do population statistical analysis on X-STR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Allelic structure and distribution of 103 STR loci in a Southern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 83; Issue 1. Allelic structure and distribution of 103 STR loci in a Southern Tunisian population. Abdellatif ... This demonstrated that in spite of a high inbreeding level in the population, few markers showed evidence for a different pattern of allelic distribution compared to CEPH.

  14. Diversity of five novel Y-STR loci and their application in studies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -STR loci and their application in studies of north Chinese populations. Zhaoyang Xu Haiming Sun Yang Yu Yan Jin Xaingning Meng Donglin Sun Jing Bai Feng Chen Songbin Fu. Research Article Volume 89 Issue 1 April 2010 pp 29-36 ...

  15. Diversity of five novel Y-STR loci and their application in studies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081, People's Republic of China. 2Bio-Pharmaceutical Key Laboratory of Heilongjiang ... of geographical differentiation, so their polymorphic character makes them especially suited for population genetic studies. In this study, five novel Y-STR loci were ...

  16. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DY...

  17. Genetic polymorphisms of nine X-STR loci in four population groups from Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qiao-Fang; Yu, Bin; Li, Sheng-Bin

    2007-02-01

    Nine short tandem repeat (STR) markers on the X chromosome (DXS101, DXS6789, DXS6799, DXS6804, DXS7132, DXS7133, DXS7423, DXS8378, and HPRTB) were analyzed in four population groups (Mongol, Ewenki, Oroqen, and Daur) from Inner Mongolia, China, in order to learn about the genetic diversity, forensic suitability, and possible genetic affinities of the populations. Frequency estimates, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and other parameters of forensic interest were computed. The results revealed that the nine markers have a moderate degree of variability in the population groups. Most heterozygosity values for the nine loci range from 0.480 to 0.891, and there are evident differences of genetic variability among the populations. A UPGMA tree constructed on the basis of the generated data shows very low genetic distance between Mongol and Han (Xi'an) populations. Our results based on genetic distance analysis are consistent with the results of earlier studies based on linguistics and the immigration history and origin of these populations. The minisatellite loci on the X chromosome studied here are not only useful in showing significant genetic variation between the populations, but also are suitable for human identity testing among Inner Mongolian populations.

  18. Evaluation of a 13-loci STR multiplex system for Cannabis sativa genetic identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Rachel; Birck, Matthew; Hughes-Stamm, Sheree; Gangitano, David

    2016-05-01

    Marijuana (Cannabis sativa) is the most commonly used illicit substance in the USA. The development of a validated method using Cannabis short tandem repeats (STRs) could aid in the individualization of samples as well as serve as an intelligence tool to link multiple cases. For this purpose, a modified 13-loci STR multiplex method was optimized and evaluated according to ISFG and SWGDAM guidelines. A real-time PCR quantification method for C. sativa was developed and validated, and a sequenced allelic ladder was also designed to accurately genotype 199 C. sativa samples from 11 U.S. Customs and Border Protection seizures. Distinguishable DNA profiles were generated from 127 samples that yielded full STR profiles. Four duplicate genotypes within seizures were found. The combined power of discrimination of this multilocus system is 1 in 70 million. The sensitivity of the multiplex STR system is 0.25 ng of template DNA. None of the 13 STR markers cross-reacted with any of the studied species, except for Humulus lupulus (hops) which generated unspecific peaks. Phylogenetic analysis and case-to-case pairwise comparison of 11 cases using F st as genetic distance revealed the genetic association of four groups of cases. Moreover, due to their genetic similarity, a subset of samples (N = 97) was found to form a homogeneous population in Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium. The results of this research demonstrate the applicability of this 13-loci STR system in associating Cannabis cases for intelligence purposes.

  19. A comparison of SNP and STR loci for delineating population structure and performing individual genetic assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Høyheim Bjørn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technological advances have lead to the rapid increase in availability of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in a range of organisms, and there is a general optimism that SNPs will become the marker of choice for a range of evolutionary applications. Here, comparisons between 300 polymorphic SNPs and 14 short tandem repeats (STRs were conducted on a data set consisting of approximately 500 Atlantic salmon arranged in 10 samples/populations. Results Global FST ranged from 0.033-0.115 and -0.002-0.316 for the 14 STR and 300 SNP loci respectively. Global FST was similar among 28 linkage groups when averaging data from mapped SNPs. With the exception of selecting a panel of SNPs taking the locus displaying the highest global FST for each of the 28 linkage groups, which inflated estimation of genetic differentiation among the samples, inferred genetic relationships were highly similar between SNP and STR data sets and variants thereof. The best 15 SNPs (30 alleles gave a similar level of self-assignment to the best 4 STR loci (83 alleles, however, addition of further STR loci did not lead to a notable increase assignment whereas addition of up to 100 SNP loci increased assignment. Conclusion Whilst the optimal combinations of SNPs identified in this study are linked to the samples from which they were selected, this study demonstrates that identification of highly informative SNP loci from larger panels will provide researchers with a powerful approach to delineate genetic relationships at the individual and population levels.

  20. Improving complex kinship analyses with additional STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carboni, Ilaria; Iozzi, Sara; Nutini, Anna Lucia; Torricelli, Francesca; Ricci, Ugo

    2014-11-01

    In a standard paternity testing, mother, child, and alleged father are analyzed with STR markers using commercially available kits. Since Italian civil legislation does not have thresholds to confirm a paternity, paternity is practically proven when likelihood ratio increases prior probability of paternity to posterior, accepted by court as sufficient. However, in some cases the number of markers included in a commercial kit may be insufficient to conclusively prove or disprove a relationship between individuals, especially when complex family scenarios are suspected or indirect analyses are required. Additional genetic information can increase the values of the likelihood ratio regarding the detection of true parental relationships in a pedigree, while reducing the chances of false attributions (e.g. false paternities). In these cases the introduction of a 26Plex amplification system allows to examine 23-26 additional markers depending on the commercial kit used, thus increasing the statistical power of the kinship analysis. The PCR conditions were optimized for a multiplex amplification system and a new generation CE instrument. In order to demonstrate the utility of additional STRs markers, four complex kinship cases are presented. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Genetic polymorphisms, forensic efficiency and phylogenetic analysis of 15 autosomal STR loci in the Kazak population of Ili Kazak Autonomous Prefecture, northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunmei; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiaolong; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Guohua

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the frequencies of 15 autosomal STR loci in the Kazak population of the Ili Kazak Autonomous Prefecture with the aim of expanding the available population information in human genetic databases and for forensic DNA analysis. Genetic polymorphisms of 15 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci were analysed in 456 individuals of the Kazak population from Ili Kazakh Autonomous Prefecture, northwestern China. A total of 173 alleles at 15 autosomal STR loci were found; the allele frequencies ranged from 0.5022-0.0011. The combined power of discrimination and exclusion statistics for the 15 STR loci were 0.999 999 999 85 and 0.999 998 800 65, respectively. In addition, phylogenetic analysis involving the Ili Uygur population and other relevant populations was carried out. A neighbour-joining tree and multidimensional scaling plot were generated based on Nei's standard genetic distance. Results of the population comparison indicated that the Ili Uygur population was most closely related genetically to the Uygur populations from other regions in China. These findings are consistent with the historical and geographic backgrounds of these populations.

  2. Genetic polymorphisms in 18 autosomal STR loci in the Tibetan population living in Tibet Chamdo, Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenghui; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Hantao; Lin, Ziqing; Ye, Jian

    2018-05-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) play a vitally important role in forensics. Population data is needed to improve the field. There is currently no large population data-based data set in Chamdo Tibetan. In our study, the allele frequencies and forensic statistical parameters of 18 autosomal STR loci (D5S818, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D2S1338, D3S1358, VWA, D8S1179, D16S539, PentaE, TPOX, TH01, D19S433, D18S51, FGA, D6S1043, D13S317, and D12S391) included in the DNATyper™19 kit were investigated in 2249 healthy, unrelated Tibetan subjects living in Tibet Chamdo, Southwest China. The combined power of discrimination and the combined probability of exclusion of all 18 loci were 0.9999999999999999999998174 and 0.99999994704, respectively. Furthermore, the genetic relationship between our Tibetan group and 33 previously published populations was also investigated. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the Chamdo Tibetan population is more closely related genetically with the Lhasa Tibetan group. Our results suggest that these autosomal STR loci are highly polymorphic in the Tibetan population living in Tibet Chamdo and can be used as a powerful tool in forensics, linguistics, and population genetic analyses.

  3. Characterization of genetic sequence variation of 58 STR loci in four major population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novroski, Nicole M M; King, Jonathan L; Churchill, Jennifer D; Seah, Lay Hong; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-11-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) can identify sequence variation within short tandem repeat (STR) alleles as well as their nominal allele lengths that traditionally have been obtained by capillary electrophoresis. Using the MiSeq FGx Forensic Genomics System (Illumina), STRait Razor, and in-house excel workbooks, genetic variation was characterized within STR repeat and flanking regions of 27 autosomal, 7 X-chromosome and 24 Y-chromosome STR markers in 777 unrelated individuals from four population groups. Seven hundred and forty six autosomal, 227 X-chromosome, and 324 Y-chromosome STR alleles were identified by sequence compared with 357 autosomal, 107 X-chromosome, and 189 Y-chromosome STR alleles that were identified by length. Within the observed sequence variation, 227 autosomal, 156 X-chromosome, and 112 Y-chromosome novel alleles were identified and described. One hundred and seventy six autosomal, 123 X-chromosome, and 93 Y-chromosome sequence variants resided within STR repeat regions, and 86 autosomal, 39 X-chromosome, and 20 Y-chromosome variants were located in STR flanking regions. Three markers, D18S51, DXS10135, and DYS385a-b had 1, 4, and 1 alleles, respectively, which contained both a novel repeat region variant and a flanking sequence variant in the same nucleotide sequence. There were 50 markers that demonstrated a relative increase in diversity with the variant sequence alleles compared with those of traditional nominal length alleles. These population data illustrate the genetic variation that exists in the commonly used STR markers in the selected population samples and provide allele frequencies for statistical calculations related to STR profiling with MPS data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic polymorphism at 15 STR loci among three important subpopulation of Bihar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashma, R; Kashyap, V K

    2002-11-05

    Genotype polymorphism studies at 15 highly polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) loci were carried out in three genetically important minor caste groups (Yadav, Kurmi and Baniya) of Bihar, a eastern state of India to evaluate their significance in human identification and population genetics study. The selected communities practice endogamy. Despite of same geographical area, the physical features of Yadavs and Baniyas resemble North Indian Indo-Caucasoids whereas Kurmis resemble more to Indo-Austroloids. Among the chosen 15 loci, two are penta-nucleotide repeat: Penta-D and Penta-E, and 13 are tetra-nucleotide repeat: vWA D8S1179, TPOX, FGA, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820, D16S539, D3S1358, THO1, CSF1PO, D21S11, D18S51 and are validated for other population of India and world for forensic testing and human population study. Thirteen of these STR loci are present in the combined DNA index system (CODIS) [J. Forensic Sci. 44 (1999) 1277] and world-wide data is available.

  5. A comparison of SNP and STR loci for delineating population structure and performing individual genetic assignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glover, Kevin A.; Hansen, Michael Møller; Lien, Sigbjørn

    2010-01-01

    SNPs and 14 short tandem repeats (STRs) were conducted on a data set consisting of approximately 500 Atlantic salmon arranged in 10 samples/populations. Results Global FST ranged from 0.033-0.115 and -0.002-0.316 for the 14 STR and 300 SNP loci respectively. Global FST was similar among 28 linkage...... groups when averaging data from mapped SNPs. With the exception of selecting a panel of SNPs taking the locus displaying the highest global FST for each of the 28 linkage groups, which inflated estimation of genetic differentiation among the samples, inferred genetic relationships were highly similar....... Conclusion Whilst the optimal combinations of SNPs identified in this study are linked to the samples from which they were selected, this study demonstrates that identification of highly informative SNP loci from larger panels will provide researchers with a powerful approach to delineate genetic...

  6. Genetic characterisation of 19 autosomal STR loci in a population sample from the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozman, Nazli; Gurkan, Cemal; Sevay, Huseyin; Demirdov, Damla Kanliada; Ozbas-Gerceker, Filiz

    2018-03-14

    Southeastern Anatolia is the smallest, yet the most densely populated region among the seven major geographic constituents of Turkey. Situated in the Upper Mesopotamia, Southeastern Anatolia was also the northernmost extension of the Fertile Crescent, which is often considered as the earliest cradle of civilisation. To investigate the autosomal STR polymorphisms associated with a truly representative population sample pool from Southeastern Anatolia. Samples from a total of 257 volunteers were analysed by 19-loci autosomal STRs using the commercially available COrDIS Plus Kit. Allele frequencies, statistical parameters of forensic interest and Nei's D A distances with respect to the nearby and distant populations were calculated, besides performing exact tests of population differentiation with the same populations. A combined matching probability of 1.49978 × 10 -23 and a combined power of exclusion of 0.999999961 were obtained for the novel Southeastern Anatolian autosomal STR dataset. Furthermore, the Southeastern Anatolia population was found to have close genetic affinities with the other regional populations from Turkey, along with those from an apparent genetic continuum extending from the Near East to Southeastern Europe. The novel Southeastern Anatolian dataset is expected to be useful in regional forensic genetics investigations and molecular anthropology applications.

  7. Retrospective genetic study of germinative mutations in Str loci of individuals potentially exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Emilia Oliveira Alves

    2010-01-01

    21S11 loeus and 03 mutations on FGA loeus, comprising a total of 11 mutations and a mutation rate of 0.008. In such context, we did not find significant differences (p= 0.15), indicating a possible exposure effect on the mutation rates of the STR loci, in the group accidentally exposed to Cesium-137. (author)

  8. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha; Nagy, Marion; Alves, Cíntia; Salazar, Renato; Angustia, Sheila M.T.; Santos, Lorna H.; Anslinger, Katja; Bayer, Birgit; Ayub, Qasim; Wei, Wei; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Bafalluy, Miriam Baeta; Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña; Egyed, Balazs; Balitzki, Beate; Tschumi, Sibylle; Ballard, David; Court, Denise Syndercombe; Barrantes, Xinia; Bäßler, Gerhard; Wiest, Tina; Berger, Burkhard; Niederstätter, Harald; Parson, Walther; Davis, Carey; Budowle, Bruce; Burri, Helen; Borer, Urs; Koller, Christoph; Carvalho, Elizeu F.; Domingues, Patricia M.; Chamoun, Wafaa Takash; Coble, Michael D.; Hill, Carolyn R.; Corach, Daniel; Caputo, Mariela; D’Amato, Maria E.; Davison, Sean; Decorte, Ronny; Larmuseau, Maarten H.D.; Ottoni, Claudio; Rickards, Olga; Lu, Di; Jiang, Chengtao; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Jonkisz, Anna; Frank, William E.; Furac, Ivana; Gehrig, Christian; Castella, Vincent; Grskovic, Branka; Haas, Cordula; Wobst, Jana; Hadzic, Gavrilo; Drobnic, Katja; Honda, Katsuya; Hou, Yiping; Zhou, Di; Li, Yan; Hu, Shengping; Chen, Shenglan; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Lessig, Rüdiger; Jakovski, Zlatko; Ilievska, Tanja; Klann, Anja E.; García, Cristina Cano; de Knijff, Peter; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Kondili, Aikaterini; Miniati, Penelope; Vouropoulou, Maria; Kovacevic, Lejla; Marjanovic, Damir; Lindner, Iris; Mansour, Issam; Al-Azem, Mouayyad; Andari, Ansar El; Marino, Miguel; Furfuro, Sandra; Locarno, Laura; Martín, Pablo; Luque, Gracia M.; Alonso, Antonio; Miranda, Luís Souto; Moreira, Helena; Mizuno, Natsuko; Iwashima, Yasuki; Neto, Rodrigo S. Moura; Nogueira, Tatiana L.S.; Silva, Rosane; Nastainczyk-Wulf, Marina; Edelmann, Jeanett; Kohl, Michael; Nie, Shengjie; Wang, Xianping; Cheng, Baowen; Núñez, Carolina; Pancorbo, Marian Martínez de; Olofsson, Jill K.; Morling, Niels; Onofri, Valerio; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Pamjav, Horolma; Volgyi, Antonia; Barany, Gusztav; Pawlowski, Ryszard; Maciejewska, Agnieszka; Pelotti, Susi; Pepinski, Witold; Abreu-Glowacka, Monica; Phillips, Christopher; Cárdenas, Jorge; Rey-Gonzalez, Danel; Salas, Antonio; Brisighelli, Francesca; Capelli, Cristian; Toscanini, Ulises; Piccinini, Andrea; Piglionica, Marilidia; Baldassarra, Stefania L.; Ploski, Rafal; Konarzewska, Magdalena; Jastrzebska, Emila; Robino, Carlo; Sajantila, Antti; Palo, Jukka U.; Guevara, Evelyn; Salvador, Jazelyn; Ungria, Maria Corazon De; Rodriguez, Jae Joseph Russell; Schmidt, Ulrike; Schlauderer, Nicola; Saukko, Pekka; Schneider, Peter M.; Sirker, Miriam; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Oh, Yu Na; Skitsa, Iulia; Ampati, Alexandra; Smith, Tobi-Gail; Calvit, Lina Solis de; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Capal, Thomas; Tillmar, Andreas; Nilsson, Helena; Turrina, Stefania; De Leo, Domenico; Verzeletti, Andrea; Cortellini, Venusia; Wetton, Jon H.; Gwynne, Gareth M.; Jobling, Mark A.; Whittle, Martin R.; Sumita, Denilce R.; Wolańska-Nowak, Paulina; Yong, Rita Y.Y.; Krawczak, Michael; Nothnagel, Michael; Roewer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643) and using the PowerPlex Y23 System (PPY23, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI). Locus-specific allelic spectra of these markers were determined and a consistently high level of allelic diversity was observed. A considerable number of null, duplicate and off-ladder alleles were revealed. Standard single-locus and haplotype-based parameters were calculated and compared between subsets of Y-STR markers established for forensic casework. The PPY23 marker set provides substantially stronger discriminatory power than other available kits but at the same time reveals the same general patterns of population structure as other marker sets. A strong correlation was observed between the number of Y-STRs included in a marker set and some of the forensic parameters under study. Interestingly a weak but consistent trend toward smaller genetic distances resulting from larger numbers of markers became apparent. PMID:24854874

  9. Flanking region variation of ForenSeq™ DNA Signature Prep Kit STR and SNP loci in Yavapai Native Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Frank R; King, Jonathan L; Novroski, Nicole M M; Churchill, Jennifer D; Ng, Jillian; Oldt, Robert F; McCulloh, Kelly L; Weise, Jessica A; Smith, David Glenn; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Budowle, Bruce

    2017-05-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) offers advantages over current capillary electrophoresis-based analysis of short tandem repeat (STR) loci for human identification testing. In particular STR repeat motif sequence information can be obtained, thereby increasing the discrimination power of some loci. While sequence variation within the repeat region is observed relatively frequently in some of the commonly used STRs, there is an additional degree of variation found in the flanking regions adjacent to the repeat motif. Repeat motif and flanking region sequence variation have been described for major population groups, however, not for more isolated populations. Flanking region sequence variation in STR and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci in the Yavapai population was analyzed using the ForenSeq™ DNA Signature Prep Kit and STRait Razor v2s. Seven and 14 autosomal STRs and identity-informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (iiSNPs), respectively, had some degree of flanking region variation. Three and four of these identity-informative loci, respectively, showed ≥5% increase in expected heterozygosity. The combined length- and sequence-based random match probabilities (RMPs) for 27 autosomal STRs were 6.11×10 -26 and 2.79×10 -29 , respectively. When combined with 94 iiSNPs (a subset of which became microhaplotypes) the combined RMP was 5.49×10 -63 . Analysis of length-based and sequence-based autosomal STRs in STRUCTURE indicated that the Yavapai are most similar to the Hispanic population. While producing minimal increase in X- and Y-STR discrimination potential, access to flanking region data enabled identification of one novel X-STR and three Y-STR alleles relative to previous reports. Five ancestry-informative SNPs (aiSNPs) and two phenotype-informative SNPs (piSNPs) exhibited notable flanking region variation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Population data and phylogenetic structure of Han population from Jiangsu province of China on GlobalFiler STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Atif; Zhan, Xiaoni; Kasim, Kadirya; Rakha, Allah; Xin, Xing Jia

    2018-03-02

    Forensic statistical parameters based on allelic frequencies of commonly used short tandem repeats were estimated for the Han population of Jiangsu province from P.R. China. The 6-dye GlobalFiler™ PCR amplification kit incorporates 21 autosomal STRs, providing reliable DNA typing results with enhanced the power of discrimination. Here, we analyzed the GlobalFiler™ STR loci in 516 unrelated individuals from Jiangsu Han population. A total of 256 alleles were observed ranging between 5 and 35.2 repeat units, and SE33 showed the greatest power of discrimination (34 alleles) in Jiangsu Han population. Most of the loci were found to be in the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after the Bonferroni correction with the exception of D3S1358. The combined power of exclusion (CPE) was 0.999999996353609, and the combined match probability (CMP) was 3.64 × 10 -25 . Phylogenetic parameters including pairwise genetic distances showed that Han population living in Jiangsu had closest genetic relationship with other East Asian populations. The present study provides precise reference database for forensic applications and population genetic studies.

  11. Analysis of 15 autosomal STR loci from Mar del Plata and Bahia Blanca (Central Region of Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolin, María Laura; Carreras-Torres, Robert; Sambuco, Lorena Andrea; Jaureguiberry, Stella Maris; Iudica, Celia Estela

    2014-05-01

    Allele frequencies for the 15 short tandem repeats (STRs) loci included in the AmpFlSTR® Identifiler kit were estimated in a sample of unrelated individuals from Mar del Plata (MDQ; N = 180) and Bahia Blanca (BB; N = 85) (Buenos Aires, Argentina). Biological samples were obtained from voluntary donors and forensic cases. Both populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction, except for locus vWA in MDQ and D2S1338 in BB. FGA was the most informative locus, and the least discriminating locus was TPOX in both samples. The combined power of discrimination (PDc) and the combined probability of exclusion (PEc) were similar in MDQ and BB samples (0.999999998 < PDc < 0.999999999 and 0.999999979 < PEc < 0.999999989). The multidimentional scaling plot from Rst genetic distance matrix and the interethnic admixture estimation supported a higher European contribution in populations of the central region compared with populations from other regions of Argentina with higher Amerindian composition. These results enlarge the Argentine databases of autosomal STR loci, revealed as an excellent tool for human identification tests and population genetic analysis.

  12. Population genetics of 26 Y-STR loci for the Han ethnic in Hunan province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weibo; Gong, Zheng; Rong, Haibo; Guan, Hua; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Yihe; Fu, Xiaoliang; Zha, Lagabaiyila; Jin, Chuan; Ding, Yanjun

    2017-01-01

    To study the population data of Y-chromosome STRs (Y-STRs) of Han population resided in Hunan province, we analyzed haplotypes of 26 Y-STRs (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, DYS635, DYS643, DYS388, DYS449, DYS460, and YGATAH4) in 310 unrelated male individuals using a commercially available Goldeneye® DNA ID 26Y system. The calculated average gene diversity values ranged from 0.4211 to 0.9590 for DYS438 and DYS385a/b loci, respectively. The discriminatory capacity was 96.77 % with 300 observed haplotypes. Population relationships between Hunan Han and eight other populations available from Y-chromosome haplotype reference database (YHRD) were compared. The results showed that the Han population resided in the Hunan district is significantly different from other populations. Our results also indicated that these 26 Y-STR loci were highly genetically polymorphic in the Hunan Han population and of great value in forensic application.

  13. Further characterization of six miniSTR loci in the Han population from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-jun JIA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To describe the characteristics of two miniplex sets: NC01 (D10S1248, D14S1434 and D22S1045, which was recommended by EDNAP/ENFSI, and a new miniplex one (D2S2944, D18S872 and D19S591. Methods  DNA was extracted using the Chelex-100 extraction method. The products were genotyped by ABI PRISM® 310 Genetic Analyzer and the results were analyzed with GeneScan 3.7 and GenoTyper 3.7 software. Results  All loci meet Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The combined power of discrimination for the six loci in Chinese population was 0.9999 and the cumulative probability of exclusion was 0.9793. We also compared the sequencing data of NC01 with other different ethic groups. Conclusion  Two miniplex sets were constructed. These miniSTR makers have different characteristics in different ethic groups.

  14. Polymorphisms of eight STR loci in Chinese and African (Xhosa)populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baojie; Pang, Hao; Koda, Yoshiro; Soejima, Mikiko; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2002-02-18

    Allele frequencies for eight short tandem repeal loci (D16S539, D7S820, D13S317, D5S818, CSF1PO, TPOX, TH01 and vWA) were obtained from samples of 100 Chinese and 96 African (Xhosa) unrelated individuals.

  15. Genetic diversity of 21 autosomal STR loci in the Han population from Sichuan province, Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guanglin; Li, Ye; Wang, Zheng; Liang, Weibo; Luo, Haibo; Liao, Miao; Zhang, Ji; Yan, Jing; Li, Yingbi; Hou, Yiping; Wu, Jin

    2017-11-01

    Exploration of the ethnic origin and genetic differentiation of 56 Chinese officially recognized nationalities populations played a fundamental role in the research field of population genetics, forensic science, linguistics, anthropology, and archaeology. In the present study, population data of 21 autosomal STR loci (CSF1PO, D10S1248, D12S391, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, D2S1338, D2S441, D3S1358, D5S818, D6S1043, D7S820, D8S1179, FGA, Penta D, Penta E, TH01, TPOX, and vWA) included in the AGCU EX22 kit in 2793 Southwest Han Chinese individuals was obtained and population genetic relationships among 28 Chinese populations were investigated. Our study indicated that the twenty-one autosomal STRs are highly polymorphic in the Sichuan Han population and can be used as a powerful tool in the routine forensic usage. MDS and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Sichuan Han population kept a close genetic relationship with the southwest populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic analysis of eight population groups living in Taiwan using a 13 X-chromosomal STR loci multiplex system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Hsiao-Lin; Lee, James Chun-I; Chang, Yih-Yuan; Yin, Hsiang-Yi; Chen, Ya-Hui; Tseng, Li-Hui; Su, Yi-Ning; Ko, Tsang-Ming

    2011-01-01

    A 13 X-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) multiplex system (DXS6807, DXS8378, DSX9902, DXS7132, DXS9898, DXS6809, DXS6789, DXS7424, DXS101, GATA172D05, HPRTB, DXS8377, and DXS7423) was tested on 1,037 DNA samples from eight population groups currently living in Taiwan. Different distributions of the allelic frequencies in different populations were presented. DXS8377 and DXS101 were the two most polymorphic loci in these eight populations, whereas DXS7423 was the least informative marker in most of the populations studied. The genetic distances between the populations and the constructed phylogenetic tree revealed a long genetic distance between Asian and Caucasian populations as well as isolation of the Tao population. The phylogenetic tree grouped populations into clusters compatible with their ethnogeographic relationships. This 13 X-chromosomal short tandem repeat multiplex system offers a considerable number of polymorphic patterns in different populations. This system can be useful in forensic identification casework and ethnogeographic research.

  17. Forensic characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of Hubei Han population in central China using 17 Y-STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Du, Weian; He, Guanglin; Liu, Jing; Hou, Yiping

    2017-07-01

    Currently, the largest national database within the Y chromosome haplotype reference database (YHRD, https://yhrd.org, release 53) is China, which has approximately 38000 Y chromosomal 17-marker (Yfiler) haplotypes. These haplotype profiles derived from the vast majority of Chinese administrative divisions, but no haplotype data was available for Hubei province, which is located in the Central China region. Herein, 429 unrelated male Chinese Han individuals residing in Hubei province were recruited and genotyped with 17 Y-STR loci. 115 alleles were identified with corresponding allele frequencies spanned from 0.0023 to 07506. The gene diversity (GD) values ranged from 0.3988 at DYS438 to 0.9573 at DYS385a/b. A total of 410 distinct haplotypes were obtained with the overall haplotype diversity (HD) and discrimination capacity (DC) was 0.9995 and 0.9557, respectively. Additionally, genetic relationships along administrative (Han Chinese from different provinces) and ethnic divisions (minority ethnic groups) were analyzed using analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) tests and visualized by multidimensional scaling plots (MDS). The Han ethnicity including the Hubei Han shows a high genetic homogeneity all across China and significant genetic differences existed between the Hubei Han and some ethnic groups, most prominently for the Kazakhs and the Tibetans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Population genetics for 23 Y-STR loci in Tibetan in China and confirmation of DYS448 null allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yi; Gao, Jingshang; Fan, Guangyao; Liao, Linchuan; Hou, Yiping

    2015-05-01

    Tibetan is one of 56 ethnic groups in China, where a level of genetic sub-structure might be expected. Although a global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci and Y-STR databases with PPY23 kit were created with collaborative effort, there was a lack of data for Tibetan population. In this study we evaluated 248 unrelated male individuals of Chinese Tibetan living in the Tibet Autonomous Region to explore the underlying genetic structure of Tibetan populations. These samples were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643) by using PPY23 kit. A total of 224 different haplotypes were found. Haplotype diversity was 0.9990. Both Rst pairwise analyses and multidimensional scaling plot showed the genetic structure of Tibetan population was significantly different from some of Chinese ethnic groups and neighboring populations. There were few interesting null features at DYS448 observed by PPY23 that deserved some comment. It revealed that PPY23 marker set provided substantially stronger discriminatory power in Tibetan population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. My-Forensic-Loci-queries (MyFLq) framework for analysis of forensic STR data generated by massive parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, Christophe; Vandewoestyne, Mado; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2014-03-01

    Forensic scientists are currently investigating how to transition from capillary electrophoresis (CE) to massive parallel sequencing (MPS) for analysis of forensic DNA profiles. MPS offers several advantages over CE such as virtually unlimited multiplexy of loci, combining both short tandem repeat (STR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci, small amplicons without constraints of size separation, more discrimination power, deep mixture resolution and sample multiplexing. We present our bioinformatic framework My-Forensic-Loci-queries (MyFLq) for analysis of MPS forensic data. For allele calling, the framework uses a MySQL reference allele database with automatically determined regions of interest (ROIs) by a generic maximal flanking algorithm which makes it possible to use any STR or SNP forensic locus. Python scripts were designed to automatically make allele calls starting from raw MPS data. We also present a method to assess the usefulness and overall performance of a forensic locus with respect to MPS, as well as methods to estimate whether an unknown allele, which sequence is not present in the MySQL database, is in fact a new allele or a sequencing error. The MyFLq framework was applied to an Illumina MiSeq dataset of a forensic Illumina amplicon library, generated from multilocus STR polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on both single contributor samples and multiple person DNA mixtures. Although the multilocus PCR was not yet optimized for MPS in terms of amplicon length or locus selection, the results show excellent results for most loci. The results show a high signal-to-noise ratio, correct allele calls, and a low limit of detection for minor DNA contributors in mixed DNA samples. Technically, forensic MPS affords great promise for routine implementation in forensic genomics. The method is also applicable to adjacent disciplines such as molecular autopsy in legal medicine and in mitochondrial DNA research. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by

  20. Determination of allele frequencies in nine short tandem repeat loci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... out the human genome. These loci are a rich source of highly polymorphic markers that may be detected using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR is a mimic of the normal cellular process of replication of DNA molecules. Each STR is distinguished by the number of times a sequence is repeated, ...

  1. Population data of 19 autosomal STR loci in the Li population from Hainan Province in southernmost China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Haoliang; Wang, Xiao; Ren, Zheng; He, Guanglin; Long, Ren; Liang, Anwen; Song, Tao; Deng, Jianqiang

    2018-03-20

    In the present study, population data of 19 autosomal STR loci included in the Goldeneye™ DNA ID System 20A in 653 Li individuals was obtained and population genetic relationships among 13 populations were investigated. MDS and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Hainan Li population kept a close genetic relationship with the Chinese Han populations, especially for Southern Han populations (Guangdong Han, Sichuan Han, and Hunan Han). Our results indicated that the 19 autosomal STRs are highly discriminative and polymorphic in the Hainan Li population suitable for personal forensic identification and paternity testing.

  2. Population data and mutation rates of 19 STR loci in seven provinces from China based on Goldeneye™ DNA ID System 20A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiu-Ling; Chen, Ye-Fei; Huang, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Kai-Yan; Zhao, Hu; Lu, De-Jian

    2017-05-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis is a primary tool in forensic casework. Population data and mutation rates of STRs are very important for paternity testing and forensic genetics. However, the population data and mutation rates of STRs in Han nationality based on large samples have still not been fully described in China. In this study, the allelic frequencies, forensic parameters, and mutation rate of 19 STR loci (D19S433, D5S818, D21S11, D18S51, D6S1043, D3S1358, D13S317, D7S820, D16S539, CSFIPO, PentaD, vWA, D8S1179, TPOX, Penta E, TH01, D12S391, D2S1338, and FGA) based on the Goldeneye™ DNA ID System 20A in Southern China Han nationality among seven provinces were investigated. Furthermore, population stratification of Southern China Han nationality among seven provinces was established. The multidimensional scaling (MDS) plot based on genetic distances (Fst) showed that the studied populations can be clustered into two major groups. However, relationships among populations were weak (Fst < 0.0043). A total of 376 cases of mutation were detected from the 19 selected loci in 15,396 meioses. The average mutation rate for the 19 loci was estimated to be 1.3 × 10 -3 per meiosis. The mutation was mainly single step; the paternal mutation rate was higher than the maternal; and paternal mutation rate increases with paternal age.

  3. Genetic polymorphism of 23 Y-STR loci in the Zhuang minority population in Guangxi of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haibo; Song, Feng; Zhang, Lushun; Hou, Yiping

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, 23 Y-STR loci (DYS576, DYS389I, DYS389 II, DYS448, DYS19, DYS391, DYS481, DYS549, DYS533, DYS438, DYS437, DYS570, DYS635, DYS390, DYS439, DYS392, DYS393, DYS458 DYS456, DYS643, YGATAH4, and DYS385ab) were investigated in 266 unrelated, healthy autochthonous individuals from the Zhuang minority population residing in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. One hundred and eighty-nine alleles and 245 haplotypes were found in the Zhuang group. Two hundred and twenty-four haplotypes among them were unique, and the remaining 21 haplotypes were found in two individuals. Discrimination capacity was 0.9211. Haplotype diversity was 0.9993 and gene diversity ranged from 0.4173 (DYS437) to 0.9678 (DYS385ab). Populations' differentia was calculated and compared with Tibetan, Bai, Dai, Minnan Han, Beijing Han, Chengdu Han, Xuanwei Han, and Southern Han ethnic groups in China, the Singapore Han population, and the Kinh group from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, in the same 23 Y-STR loci. Our results showed that these 23 Y-STRs are highly genetically polymorphic in the Zhuang group and can also enrich Chinese ethnic genetic information.

  4. Genetic polymorphism of 21 non-CODIS STR loci in Chengdu Han population and its interpopulation analysis between 25 populations in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Li, Hepei; He, Guanglin; Liang, Weibo; Luo, Haibo; Liao, Miao; Zhang, Ji; Yan, Jing; Li, Yingbi; Hou, Yiping; Wu, Jin

    2018-03-01

    AGCU 21+1 STR kit contains 21 non-combined DNA index system (non-CODIS) short tandem repeats (STR) loci and a sex-determining locus amelogenin. In this study, we evaluated the genetic diversity and forensically relevant population statistics of 21 non-CODIS loci in 210 Chinese Han individuals from Chengdu city, Sichuan province, Southwest China. No significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed within the 21 non-CODIS STR loci. The combined power of discrimination (CPD) and combined power of exclusion (CPE) were 0.99999999999999999994278, 0.999999355 respectively. To reveal interpopulation differentiations of mainland population of China, a neighbor-joining (N-J) phylogenetic tree was constructed based on Nei's genetic distances among Chengdu Han and 25 published populations. The phylogenetic analyses indicated that Chengdu Han population keeps a close genetic relationship with other Han populations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Allelic structure and distribution of 103 STR loci in a Southern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ,Tunisia. 3Dispensaire de Bir ElHfai, Sidi Bouzid, Tunisia. Abstract. Genotypes of 103 short tandem repeat (STR) markers distributed at an average of 40 cM intervals throughout the genome were determined for 40 individuals from the village ...

  6. Retrospective genetic study of germinative mutations in Str loci of individuals potentially exposed to ionizing radiation;Estudo genetico retrospectivo de mutacoes germinativas em Loci Str de individuos potencialmente expostos a radiacao ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Emilia Oliveira Alves

    2010-07-01

    21S11 loeus and 03 mutations on FGA loeus, comprising a total of 11 mutations and a mutation rate of 0.008. In such context, we did not find significant differences (p= 0.15), indicating a possible exposure effect on the mutation rates of the STR loci, in the group accidentally exposed to Cesium-137. (author)

  7. Genetic Variation of 25 Y-Chromosomal and 15 Autosomal STR Loci in the Han Chinese Population of Liaoning Province, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Wang, Bao-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the genetic characteristics of 25 Y-chromosomal and 15 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci in 305 unrelated Han Chinese male individuals from Liaoning Province using AmpFISTR® Yfiler® Plus and IdentifilerTM PCR amplification kits. Population comparison was performed between Liaoning Han population and different ethnic groups to better understand the genetic background of the Liaoning Han population. For Y-STR loci, the overall haplotype diversity was 0.9997 and the discrimination capacity was 0.9607. Gene diversity values ranged from 0.4525 (DYS391) to 0.9617 (DYS385). Rst and two multi-dimensional scaling plots showed that minor differences were observed when the Liaoning Han population was compared to the Jilin Han Chinese, Beijing Han Chinese, Liaoning Manchu, Liaoning Mongolian, Liaoning Xibe, Shandong Han Chinese, Jiangsu Han Chinese, Anhui Han Chinese, Guizhou Han Chinese and Liaoning Hui populations; by contrast, major differences were observed when the Shanxi Han Chinese, Yunnan Bai, Jiangxi Han Chinese, Guangdong Han Chinese, Liaoning Korean, Hunan Tujia, Guangxi Zhuang, Gansu Tibetan, Xishuangbanna Dai, South Korean, Japanese and Hunan Miao populations. For autosomal STR loci, DP ranged from 0.9621 (D2S1338) to 0.8177 (TPOX), with PE distributing from 0.7521 (D18S51) to 0.2988 (TH01). A population comparison was performed and no statistically significant differences were detected at any STR loci between Liaoning Han, China Dong, and Shaanxi Han populations. The results showed that the 25 Y-STR and 15 autosomal STR loci in the Liaoning Han population were valuable for forensic applications and human genetics, and Liaoning Han was an independent endogenous ethnicity with a unique subpopulation structure.

  8. Genetic analysis of allelic variants, single-step mutations, three allelic variants of the 15 STR loci in the population of Northeast Bosnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadžiavdić Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of nuclear DNA microsatellite markers were analyzed in a reference sample of the population of northeast Bosnia. 437 samples taken from unrelated individuals were processed and three samples of paternity proof were shown. Detection effectiveness profile of the research, points to a valid choice of method of extraction, amplification and genotyping STR loci with PowerPlextm16. Genetic analysis of allelic variants of the 15 STR loci detected 17 samples determined as microvariants. Samples were divided into 15 different allelic variants at 7 different loci, and are: in locus D7S820, D16S539, D3S1358, D18S51, PENTA D, PENTA E and in locus vWA. Genetic analysis of mutations in cases of paternity determined three examples of single-step mutations in the loci FGA, Penta D and D3S1358. Genetic analysis of observed STR loci detected three allelic variant of genotype combination 7/10/11.3 in locus D7S820 Type II.

  9. Population studies on two native Mongolian population groups in China using STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiulan; Li, Dongxia; Lifu, Shuping Liu Bi; Yun, Peiyu Wang Tuoya Wu; Yun, Sheng

    2004-05-10

    The allelic distribution of nine short tandem repeats (STRs) loci (vWA, FGA, PentaE, D3S1358, D13S317, D5S818, D6S1043, D2S1772 and D7S3048) was examined in 286 Ximeng-Mongolian and 293 Wumeng-Mongolian unrelated individuals living in the Inner Mongolia province, PR China.

  10. Allele and haplotype diversity of new multiplex of 19 ChrX-STR loci in Han population from Guanzhong region (China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Dang; Shen, Chun-Mei; Meng, Hao-Tian; Guo, Yu-Xin; Dong, Qian; Yang, Guang; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Liu, Yao-Shun; Mei, Ting; Huang, Rui-Zhe; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2016-07-01

    X-chromosomal short tandem repeats (X-STRs) have been proved to be useful for some deficiency paternity cases in recent years. Here, we studied the genetic polymorphisms of 19 X-STR loci (DXS10148-DXS10135-DXS8378, DXS10159-DXS10162-DXS10164, DXS7132-DXS10079-DXS10074-DXS10075, DXS6809-DXS6789, DXS7424-DXS101, DXS10103-HPRTB-DXS10101 and DXS7423-DXS10134) in 252 male and 222 female individuals from Guanzhong Han population, China. No deviation for all 19 loci was observed from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The polymorphism information content values of the panel of 19 loci were more than 0.5 with the exception of the locus DXS7423. The combined power of discrimination were 0.9999999999999999999994340 in females and 0.9999999999997662 in males, respectively; and the combined mean exclusion chances were 0.999999993764 in duos and 0.999999999997444 in trios, respectively. The haplotype diversities for all the seven clusters of linked loci were more than 0.9. The results showed that the panel of 19 X-STR loci were powerful for forensic applications in Guanzhong Han population. Locus by locus population comparisons showed significant differences at more than seven loci between Guanzhong Han population and the groups from North America, Europe and Africa. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Genetic data on 15 STR autosomal loci for a sample population of the Northern Region of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Eduardo Leal; Machado, Filipe Brum; Arruda, Marilia Mothé; de Moura-Neto, Rodrigo Soares; Medina-Acosta, Enrique

    2009-12-01

    Allele frequencies data, paternity and forensic parameters for 15 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) autosomal markers (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D5S818, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, TPOX, D19S433, vWA, D18S51, FGA) were determined for a sample of 494 unrelated individuals undergoing kinship analysis and molecular cytogenetic testing from the population of the city of Campos dos Goytacazes, Northern State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The loci with the highest polymorphism information content were D18S51 (0.874), D2S1338 (0.853), FGA (0.852), D21S11 (0.838). The combined power of discrimination and the combined power of exclusion were 0.999999999999999 and 0.999526684, respectively. At the available common loci CSF1PO, TH01, TPOX, vWA, D16S539, D7S820 and D13S317, allele frequencies were compared with population databases from State of Alagoas, State of Amazonas, State of São Paulo (Brazilian mulattoes, descendants of Europeans, Africans or Asians), State of Mato Grosso do Sul and State of Rio de Janeiro. No significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distance (Fst coefficients) to the present database, ranged 0.0022 (p=0.446) (Northern State Rio de Janeiro-State of São Paulo European-descendants) to 0.0138 (p=0.993) (Northern State Rio de Janeiro-State of São Paulo Asian-descendants). The Asian-descendants Brazilians are the least admixed. All other groups are admixed as one unique population.

  12. Further characterization of six miniSTR loci in the Han population from China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen-jun JIA; Mei-sen SHI; Shi JIANG; Wei WU; Ying-bi LI; Jin WU; Yi-ping HOU

    2012-01-01

    Objective  To describe the characteristics of two miniplex sets: NC01 (D10S1248, D14S1434 and D22S1045), which was recommended by EDNAP/ENFSI, and a new miniplex one (D2S2944, D18S872 and D19S591). Methods  DNA was extracted using the Chelex-100 extraction method. The products were genotyped by ABI PRISM® 310 Genetic Analyzer and the results were analyzed with GeneScan 3.7 and GenoTyper 3.7 software. Results  All loci meet Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The combined power of discrimination for t...

  13. Population data on the expanded CODIS core STR loci for eleven populations of significance for forensic DNA analyses in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Tamyra R; Moreno, Lilliana I; Smerick, Jill B; Pignone, Michelle L; Hizon, Rosana; Buckleton, John S; Bright, Jo-Anne; Onorato, Anthony J

    2016-11-01

    Allele distributions for twenty-three autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci - D1S1656, D2S441, D2S1338, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D10S1248, D12S391, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, D22S1045, CSF1PO, FGA, Penta D, Penta E, SE33, TH01, TPOX and vWA - were determined in Caucasians, Southwestern Hispanics, Southeastern Hispanics, African Americans, Bahamians, Jamaicans, Trinidadians, Chamorros, Filipinos, Apaches, and Navajos. The data are included in the FBI PopStats software for calculating statistical estimates of DNA typing results and cover the expanded CODIS Core STR Loci required of U.S. laboratories that participate in the National DNA Index System (NDIS). Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Developmental Validation of a novel 5 dye Y-STR System comprising the 27 YfilerPlus loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Rufeng; Liu, Yaju; Li, Zheng; Jin, Haiying; Tian, Qinghua; Shi, Meisen; Ma, Shuhua

    2016-07-13

    In this study, a new STRtyper-27 system, including the same Yfiler Plus loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385a/b, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, Y-GATA H4, DYS449, DYS460, DYS481, DYS518, DYS533, DYS570, DYS576, DYS627 and DYF387S1a/b), was established using a set of 5 fluorescent dye labels. Primers, internal size standard, allelic ladders and matrix standard set were designed and created in-house for this multiplex system. This paper describes the validation studies conducted with the STRtyper-27Y system using a 3130XL genetic analyzer for fragment length detection that included the analysis of the following parameters and aspects: sensitivity, species specificity, inhibition, haplotype concordance, precision, stutter, DNA mixtures, and stability studies with crime scene samples. The studies demonstrated, that the STRtyper-27Y system provided equivalent overall performance comparable to the latest Yfiler Plus kit, but with enhanced compatibility in terms of instrument platforms and software allowing forensic laboratories to conduct its forensic application and evaluate its performance, all in their own 5 dye Y-STR chemistry system /environment without software or instrument upgrades.

  15. Allelic structure and distribution of 103 STR loci in a Southern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    In particular, the use of DNA typing systems in forensic identification has been criticized, in part, on the grounds that the calculations used for asses- sing likelihood of matches were allele frequency depen- dent, which raised the question of what constituted a proper reference population for determining allele frequencies.

  16. An incest case with three biological brothers as alleged fathers: Even 22 autosomal STR loci analysis would not suffice without the mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canturk, Kemal Murat; Emre, Ramazan; Gurkan, Cemal; Komur, Ilhami; Muslumanoglu, Omer; Dogan, Muhammed

    2016-07-01

    Here, we report an incest paternity case involving three biological brothers as alleged fathers (AFs), their biological sister and her child that was investigated using the Investigator ESSplex Plus, AmpFLSTR Identifiler Plus/Investigator IDplex Plus and PowerPlex 16 kits. Initial duo paternity investigations using 15-loci autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) analyses failed to exclude any of the AFs. Despite the fact that one of the brothers, AF1, had a mismatch with the child at a single locus (D2S1338), the possibility of a single-step mutation could not be ruled out. When the number of autosomal STR loci analysed was increased to 22 without the inclusion of the mother, AF2 and AF3 still could not be excluded, since both of them again had no mismatches with the child. A breakthrough was possible only upon inclusion of the mother so that trio paternity investigations were carried out. This time AF1 and AF2 could be excluded at two loci (D2S1338 and D1S1656) and six loci (vWa, D1S1656, D12S391, FGA, PENTA E and PENTA D), respectively, and AF3 was then the only brother who could not be excluded from paternity. Subsequent statistical analyses suggested that AF3 could be the biological father of the child with a combined paternity index >100 billion and a probability of paternity >99.99999999%. These findings consolidate the fact that complex paternity cases such as those involving incest could benefit more from the inclusion of the mother than simply increasing the number of STR loci analysed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Genetic variation of 12 X-chromosomal STR loci in an East Timor sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Helena; Costa, Helena; Tavares, Filipa; Souto, Luís

    2015-03-01

    East Timor (República Democrática de Timor Leste) is a country with a population around 1 million inhabitants located in Southeast Asia and composed of 13 districts, including the eastern half of the Timor Island, Ataúro and Jaco islands, and the coastal enclave of Oecusse-Ambeno located in West Timor. Examples of the importance of X-chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) analysis include parentage identification, namely in cases involving father/daughter relationships, paternity in close relative deficiency cases without access to the putative father, maternity testing, and in rape or incest cases. In this study, 149 saliva samples were collected from unrelated individuals from East Timor and 12 X-chromosomal STRs genotyped using Investigator® Argus X-12 kit (Qiagen). A total of 13 alleles not included in Investigator Argus X-12 allelic ladder (off-ladder alleles) were found, four of which never reported (alleles 34.1 and 38.1 at DXS10134, allele 17.2 at DXS10074, and allele 28.1 at DXS10146). Allele 27.3 at DXS10101 and alleles 26, 28, and 29 at DXS10148 have already been observed in other populations but their frequencies are considerably higher in East Timor population. Allele frequencies and population statistic parameters were calculated for East Timor population and data contextualized in Southeast Asia/Pacific Region.

  18. Evaluation of 15 biparental STR loci in human identification and genetic study of the Kannada-speaking groups of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Revathi; Kashyap, V K

    2003-06-01

    Thirteen tetranucleotide and 2 pentanucleotide repeat units were analyzed in 167 unrelated Kannada-speaking individuals belonging to 3 important communities, namely, Kuruva, Bhovi, and Christians, residing in different districts of Karnataka, India. Allele frequency data obtained from the analysis of 15 short tandem report (STR) markers of the subpopulation groups included in the study were observed to be similar, indicating a common ancestry or gene flow among these communities. Departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed in Kuruva population at locus D5S818 and D18S51 and at locus CSF1PO in the Christian community. The data of these communities were analyzed with allele frequency data of 4 other populations from Karnataka, India-Iyengar Brahmin, Gowda, Lingayat, and Muslim-to compute the combined power of discrimination, ranged from 0.962 to 0.974, with negligible difference between populations. The combined power of exclusion, however, remained constant at 0.999 for all populations evaluated in the study. Thus, the 15 markers selected for this study were found to be highly suitable in human identification and for providing information on genetic polymorphism.

  19. Y-Chromosome Haplogroups in the Bosnian-Herzegovinian Population Based on 23 Y-STR Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Serkan; Ašić, Adna; Doğan, Gulsen; Besic, Larisa; Marjanovic, Damir

    2016-07-01

    In a study of the Bosnian-Herzegovinian (B&H) population, Y-chromosome marker frequencies for 100 individuals, generated using the PowerPlex Y23 kit, were used to perform Y-chromosome haplogroup assignment via Whit Athey's Haplogroup Predictor. This algorithm determines Y-chromosome haplogroups from Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (Y-STR) data using a Bayesian probability-based approach. The most frequent haplogroup appeared to be I2a, with a prevalence of 49%, followed by R1a and E1b1b, each accounting for 17% of all haplogroups within the population. Remaining haplogroups were J2a (5%), I1 (4%), R1b (4%), J2b (2%), G2a (1%), and N (1%). These results confirm previously published preliminary B&H population data published over 10 years ago, especially the prediction about the B&H population being a part of the Western Balkan area, which served as the Last Glacial Maximum refuge for the Paleolithic human European population. Furthermore, the results corroborate the hypothesis that this area was a significant stopping point on the "Middle East-Europe highway" during the Neolithic farmer migrations. Finally, since these results are almost completely in accordance with previously published data on B&H and neighboring populations generated by Y-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphism analysis, it can be concluded that in silico analysis of Y-STRs is a reliable method for approximation of the Y-chromosome haplogroup diversity of an examined population.

  20. Determination of allele frequencies in nine short tandem repeat loci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of allele frequencies in nine short tandem repeat loci of five human sub-populations in Botswana. ... use in individual identification. ... Targeted regions of DNA (vWA, FGA, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D18S51, D21S11 and the sex determining locus Amelogenin) were amplified using ...

  1. DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

    2006-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

  2. Mutation Rates of STR Systems in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil; Bøttcher, Susanne Gammelgaard; Christensen, Susanne

    Danish paternity cases in the period 1999 to 2005 were investigated regarding mutation rates in STR loci. STR-typing was performed by the Applied Biosystems AmplfStr Profiler Plus kit in the period 1999 to early 2005, hereafter named the PP9, and by Applied Biosystems AmplfStr Identifier kit...... for the rest of 2005, hereafter named the IDFL. All cases with one to four genetic inconsistencies were manually inspected by two forensic geneticists and statistically analyzed by five statisticians. We found no significant effect of kits and no interaction of kits and STRA loci, but differences in mutation...... rates on different STR loci. In the cases where mutations had occured, we found no interaction between kits, STRA loci or sexes. However, we found differences in the mutation rates between the sexes, meaning that the differences in male and female mutation rates can be assumed constant over STR loci...

  3. Allele frequencies of 23 autosomal short tandem repeat loci in the Philippine population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jae Joseph Russell Beltran; Salvador, Jazelyn M; Calacal, Gayvelline C; Laude, Rita P; De Ungria, Maria Corazon A

    2015-07-01

    We characterized diversity and forensic descriptive parameters of 23 autosomal STR loci (CSF1PO, D13S317, D16S539, D5S818, D7S820, TPOX, D18S51, D21S11, D3S1358, D8S1179, FGA, TH01, vWA, D1S1656, D10S1248, D12S391, D2S441, D22S1045, D19S433, D2S1338, D6S1043, Penta D and Penta E) among 167 unrelated Filipinos. The most variable autosomal STR loci observed is Penta E (observed heterozygosity: 0.9222, match probability: 0.0167). Results reveal matching probability of 8.21×10(-28) for 23 autosomal STR loci. This dataset for the Philippine population may now be used in evaluating the weight of DNA evidence for forensic applications such as in human identification, parentage/kinship testing, and interpretation of DNA mixtures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Allelic frequencies for the seventeen Y-STR loci observed in Iraqi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prostate cancer is a significant disease in men and a large number of individuals would benefit if risk factors that increase the susceptibility to develop this neoplasia could be established, which could aid in the early detection of the disease that is crucial for successful treatment. The first objective of this study was detection ...

  5. Population data of 13 nonCODIS STR markers located inside the 6 nonsyndromic oculocutaneous albinism genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordadpoor Deilamani, Faravareh; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi

    2016-11-01

    Allele frequencies and forensic statistics of 13 autosomal short tandem repeat loci were estimated in 56 unrelated Iranian individuals. Except for two loci which were monomorph, a total of 5-11 alleles at each locus were observed and altogether 94 alleles for all selected loci were found. Our results show that 11 out of 13 nonCODIS STR loci are polymorphic and can be useful for human identification and kinship analysis and relationship investigations in Iran.

  6. X-Chromosomal short tandem repeat loci in the Turkish population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the importance and utility of polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) found on the human X chromosome and to provide the first allelic frequency data of X-STR (X chromosomal) loci in the Turkish population. Blood samples were taken from unrelated individuals (135 males and 129 ...

  7. Forensic molecular genetic diversity analysis of Chinese Hui ethnic group based on a novel STR panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yating; Guo, Yuxin; Xie, Tong; Jin, Xiaoye; Lan, Qiong; Zhou, Yongsong; Zhu, Bofeng

    2018-03-26

    In present study, the genetic polymorphisms of 22 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci were analyzed in 496 unrelated Chinese Xinjiang Hui individuals. These autosomal STR loci were multiplex amplified and genotyped based on a novel STR panel. There were 246 observed alleles with the allele frequencies ranging from 0.0010 to 0.3609. All polymorphic information content values were higher than 0.7. The combined power of discrimination and the combined probability of exclusion were 0.999999999999999999999999999426766 and 0.999999999860491, respectively. Based on analysis of molecular variance method, genetic differentiation analysis between the Xinjiang Hui and other reported groups were conducted at these 22 loci. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in statistics between Hui group and Northern Han group (including Han groups from Hebei, Henan, Shaanxi provinces), and significant deviations with Southern Han group (including those from Guangdong, Guangxi provinces) at 7 loci, and Uygur group at 10 loci. To sum up, these 22 autosomal STR loci were high genetic polymorphic in Xinjiang Hui group.

  8. Development of a Y-STR 12-plex PCR system and haplotype ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) dodecaplex. PCR system for 12 loci has been developed, and using this system allele frequencies and haplotypes were determined in a Korean male population. From a study of 320 unre- lated Korean males, 254 different haplotypes were identi- fied. The haplotype diversity ...

  9. Genetic data and de novo mutation rates in father-son pairs of 23 Y-STR loci in Southern Brazil population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Fré, Nicole Nascimento; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gastaldo, André Zoratto; Hanson, Erin; Ballantyne, Jack; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated haplotype and allele frequencies, as well as statistical forensic parameters, for 23 Y-chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs) loci of the PowerPlex®Y23 system (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, Y-GATA-H4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, DYS643) in a sample of 150 apparently healthy males, resident in South Brazil. A total of 150 different haplotypes were identified. The highest gene diversity (GD) was observed for the single locus marker DYS570 (GD = 0.7888) and for a two-locus system DYS385 (GD = 0.9009). We also examined 150 father-son pairs by the same system, and a total of 13 mutations were identified in the 3450 father-son allelic transfers, with an overall mutation rate across the 23 loci of 3.768 × 10(-3) (95% CI: 3.542 × 10(-3) to 3.944 × 10(-3)). In all cases there was only one locus mutated with gain/loss of repeats in the son (5 one-repeat gains, and 7 one-repeat and 1 two-repeat losses); we observed no instances of mutations involving a non-integral number of repeats.

  10. Allele frequency distribution of D8S592 (STR) and PDGFA (VNTR) among five endogamous population groups of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shazia; Seshadri, M

    2004-07-01

    Allele frequency distribution have been analyzed at D8S592 (short tandem repeat) and PDGFA (variable number of tandem repeat) among five distinct endogamous groups of India namely Ezhavas, Nayers, Arayas, Vishwakarma and Muslims. Muslims are religio-ethnic group while other populations mentioned above belong to distinct section of Hindu religion. All these populations are from Kollam district of Kerala in Southern India and speak Malayalam, an Indo-Dravidian language. A total of 228 for D8S592 and 212 for PDGFA loci, random, healthy individuals were analyzed.

  11. The discrete Laplace exponential family and estimation of Y-STR haplotype frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Meyer; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Morling, Niels

    2013-01-01

    of the Fisher-Wright model of evolution for haploid lineage DNA markers. An exponential family (a class of probability distributions that is well understood in probability theory such that inference is easily made by using existing software) called the 'discrete Laplace distribution' is described. We illustrate...... how well the discrete Laplace distribution approximates a more complicated distribution that arises by investigating the well-known population genetic Fisher-Wright model of evolution by a single-step mutation process. It was shown how the discrete Laplace distribution can be used to estimate...... haplotype frequencies for haploid lineage DNA markers (such as Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats), which in turn can be used to assess the evidential weight of a DNA profile found at a crime scene. This was done by making inference in a mixture of multivariate, marginally independent, discrete Laplace...

  12. Allozyme frequency distribution patterns at two gene loci of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allele frequencies for PGM1*-1, PGM2*-1 and FH1*-1 were highest in the deciduous forest zone. The alleles PGM1*-2, PGM2*-2 and FH1*-2 were highest in the Guinea savanna zone, while the highest frequencies for alleles PGM1*-3, PGM2*-3, PGM2*-4 and FH1*-3 occurred in the Sudan savanna zone. Alleles PGM2*-3 ...

  13. Allele frequencies of ten short tandem repeats loci in the central ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-04-03

    Apr 3, 2009 ... c Indian Academy of Sciences. RESEARCH NOTE. Allele frequencies of ten short tandem ... Statistical parameters of forensic importance, the power of discrimination (PD), observed and expected ... rameters indicated the usefulness of the loci in forensic per- sonal identification and paternity testing among ...

  14. Y chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci in a representative group of males living in South Württemberg: a database for application in forensic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graw, M; Seitz, T

    2000-09-11

    In this study, we resolved the allelic distribution of three Y chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs), DYS19 (n=218), DYS390 (n=257) and DYS393 (n=215), in a population study of 257 unrelated men living in the area of South Wüerttemberg/Hohenzollern. In DYS19 and in DYS393, five different alleles were discovered, and in DYS390, six different alleles. Forty-nine different haplotypes were found in 202 unrelated male individuals. By investigating each of the three STR systems separately, the most powerful results were found in DYS390, with a PE (power of exclusion) of 0.74, followed by DYS19 (PE: 0.65) and DYS393 (PE: 0.47). Using a combination of two systems (n=202), the PEs ranged from 0.79 (DYS19 and DYS393) to 0.89 (DYS19 and DYS390). The combination of all three STR systems revealed a PE of 0.93.

  15. Polymorphism of 15 short tandem repeat loci in Hui population of Ningxia Tongxin district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiuzi; Sun, Runguang; Hao, Changchun

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the polymorphism of 15 STR loci in Hui population from Ningxia Tongxin district. Identifiler Plus kit used to detect the allelic frequencies of 15 STR loci in 598 unrelated Tongxin Hui individuals, and the population genetics parameters were calculated by using statistic software. The results demonstrated that all loci were found to be no deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.05), Heterozygosity (H) ranged from 0.637 to 0.868, matching probability (Pm) ranged from 0.034 to 0.213, power of discrimination (DP) ranged from 0.787 to 0.966, polymorphism information content (PIC) ranged from 0.560 to 0.850, power of exclusion (PE) ranged from 0.338 to 0.730. The 15 STR loci are relatively abundant in polymorphic information and suitable for paternity testing and personal identification. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Utility of the Y-STR typing systems Y-PLEX 6 and Y-PLEX 5 in forensic casework and 11 Y-STR haplotype database for three major population groups in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sudhir K; Budowle, Bruce; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Paunovic, Ana; Guidry, Robin DeVille; Larsen, Chris; Lal, Amrita; Shaffer, Megan; Pineda, Gina; Sinha, Siddhartha K; Schneida, Elaine; Nasir, Huma; Shewale, Jaiprakash G

    2004-07-01

    The Y-PLEX 6 and Y-PLEX 5 systems enable analysis for 11 Y-STR loci. We present here the utility of these systems in forensic casework. A total of 188 samples, including 127 evidence samples, were analyzed using either or both of the systems. The evidence sample types included fingernail scrapings, sperm or seminal fluid, epithelial cells, blood and other tissues. The Y-STR typing systems provided useful probative results in difficult cases. A reference database for Caucasian (n = 517), African American (n = 535), and Hispanic (n = 245) population groups within the United States was generated for estimating the haplotype frequency in forensic casework. Among the individuals profiled, 311 Caucasians, 412 African Americans, and 194 Hispanics provided unique profiles in their respective population datasets. This is the first report describing the haplotype database for the set of 11 Y-STR loci recommended by the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM). Linkage analysis reveals that the frequencies from forensically important autosomal loci can be multiplied with the Y-STR haplotype frequency. The results from Y-PLEX systems have been accepted in courts in the United States.

  17. [Y-STR Poland--a database for evaluation of evidence value in forensic genetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacewicz, Renata; Krajewski, Paweł; Ulewicz, Danuta; Piatek, Jarosław; Jedrzejczyk, Maciej; Babol-Pokora, Katarzyna; Prośniak, Adam; Konarzewska, Magdalena; Ossowski, Andrzej; Parafiniuk, Mirosław; Berent, Jarosław

    2011-01-01

    The "Y-STR Poland" is a multicenter project, the aim of which is the construction of a widely available database of Y chromosome haplotypes determined in the Polish population in a range of sixteen loci in AmpFISTR Y-filer system. The database will be regularly updated and it will be used in assessment of evidence value in forensic genetics. The starting base "Y-STR Poland" contains 1600 Y-STR haplotypes and encompasses data collected in Lodz (two independent centers), Warsaw and Szczecin regions. The present report contains as an attachment the data in an Excel-type file, which serves as a tool in frequency determination of a given Y haplotype in the Polish population. The file will be updated on a regular basis along with updating the database, and will be freely available from www.genetyka-sadowa.pl.

  18. Nine-locus Y-chromosome STR profiling of Caucasian and Xhosa populations from Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leat, Neil; Benjeddou, Mongi; Davison, Sean

    2004-08-11

    Y-chromosome STR markers are not widely used in forensic case work in South Africa. To begin assessing the forensic value of these markers in South Africa, samples were collected from 100 English-speaking Caucasian males and 99 Xhosa males, living in the Cape Town metropolitan area. Allele and haplotype frequencies were determined for nine Y-chromosome STR loci (DYS19, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, and the duplicated locus DYS385). Unique haplotypes were obtained for 47 Xhosa males and 66 Caucasians.

  19. Introduction of the Python script STRinNGS for analysis of STR regions in FASTQ or BAM files and expansion of the Danish STR sequence database to 11 STRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Susanne L; Buchard, Anders; Rockenbauer, Eszter

    2016-01-01

    This work introduces the in-house developed Python application STRinNGS for analysis of STR sequence elements in BAM or FASTQ files. STRinNGS identifies sequence reads with STR loci by their flanking sequences, it analyses the STR sequence and the flanking regions, and generates a report with the......This work introduces the in-house developed Python application STRinNGS for analysis of STR sequence elements in BAM or FASTQ files. STRinNGS identifies sequence reads with STR loci by their flanking sequences, it analyses the STR sequence and the flanking regions, and generates a report...

  20. Frequencies of mutagen-induced coincident mitotic recombination at unlinked loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Kathryn M. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States); Hoffmann, George R. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States)]. E-mail: ghoffmann@holycross.edu

    2007-03-01

    Frequencies of coincident genetic events were measured in strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This diploid strain permits the detection of mitotic gene conversion involving the trp5-12 and trp5-27 alleles, mitotic crossing-over and gene conversion leading to the expression of the ade2-40 and ade2-119 alleles as red and pink colonies, and reversion of the ilv1-92 allele. The three genes are on different chromosomes, and one might expect that coincident (simultaneous) genetic alterations at two loci would occur at frequencies predicted by those of the single alterations acting as independent events. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that ade2 recombinants induced by bleomycin, {beta}-propiolactone, and ultraviolet radiation occur more frequently among trp5 convertants than among total colonies. This excess among trp5 recombinants indicates that double recombinants are more common than expected for independent events. No similar enrichment was found among Ilv{sup +} revertants. The possibility of an artifact in which haploid yeasts that mimic mitotic recombinants are generated by a low frequency of cryptic meiosis has been excluded. Several hypotheses that can explain the elevated incidence of coincident mitotic recombination have been evaluated, but the cause remains uncertain. Most evidence suggests that the excess is ascribable to a subset of the population being in a recombination-prone state.

  1. Frequencies of mutagen-induced coincident mitotic recombination at unlinked loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Kathryn M.; Hoffmann, George R.

    2007-01-01

    Frequencies of coincident genetic events were measured in strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This diploid strain permits the detection of mitotic gene conversion involving the trp5-12 and trp5-27 alleles, mitotic crossing-over and gene conversion leading to the expression of the ade2-40 and ade2-119 alleles as red and pink colonies, and reversion of the ilv1-92 allele. The three genes are on different chromosomes, and one might expect that coincident (simultaneous) genetic alterations at two loci would occur at frequencies predicted by those of the single alterations acting as independent events. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that ade2 recombinants induced by bleomycin, β-propiolactone, and ultraviolet radiation occur more frequently among trp5 convertants than among total colonies. This excess among trp5 recombinants indicates that double recombinants are more common than expected for independent events. No similar enrichment was found among Ilv + revertants. The possibility of an artifact in which haploid yeasts that mimic mitotic recombinants are generated by a low frequency of cryptic meiosis has been excluded. Several hypotheses that can explain the elevated incidence of coincident mitotic recombination have been evaluated, but the cause remains uncertain. Most evidence suggests that the excess is ascribable to a subset of the population being in a recombination-prone state

  2. Population data of 15 autosomal STR markers from Afro-Bolivians of Nor Yungas Province (Bolivia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolin, María Laura; Iudica, Celia Estela; Lancelotti, Julio Lucio; Sambuco, Lorena Andrea; Jaureguiberry, Stella Maris; Avena, Sergio Alejandro; Carnese, Francisco Raúl

    2015-05-01

    Allele frequencies and forensic parameters for 15 autosomal loci included in the AmpFlSTR® Identifiler kit were estimated in a sample of 57 unrelated Afro-descendants from Nor Yungas (Bolivia). Buccal swabs samples were obtained from voluntary donors, after consent was given. All loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction. D21S11 was the most informative locus, while the least discriminating locus was D3S1358. The combined power of discrimination and the combined probability of exclusion were >0.99999999 and >0.99997, respectively. The multidimensional scaling (MDS) plot generated by Rst matrix supported that Afro-Bolivians of Nor Yungas preserved a stronger African descent compared to other admixed Latin American populations. These results amplified the Bolivian databases of autosomal STR loci and may provide a useful tool for human identification tests and population genetic studies.

  3. Evaluation of 13 short tandem repeated loci for use in personal identification applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, H.A.; Caskey, C.T. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Jin, L.; Zhong, Y.; Chakraborty, R. (Univ. of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-07-01

    Personal identification by using DNA typing methodologies has been an issue in the popular and scientific press for several years. The authors present a PCR-based DNA-typing method using 13 unlinked short tandem repeat (STR) loci. Validation of the loci and methodology has been performed to meet standards set by the forensic community and the accrediting organization for parentage testing. Extensive statistical analysis has addressed the issues surrounding the presentation of [open quotes]match[close quotes] statistics. The authors have found STR loci to provide a rapid, sensitive, and reliable method of DNA typing for parentage testing, forensic identification, and medical diagnostics. Valid statistical analysis is generally simpler than similar analysis of RFLP-VNTR results and provides powerful statistical evidence of the low frequency of random multilocus genotype matching. 54 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Signatures of positive selection: from selective sweeps at individual loci to subtle allele frequency changes in polygenic adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In the past 15 years, numerous methods have been developed to detect selective sweeps underlying adaptations. These methods are based on relatively simple population genetic models, including one or two loci at which positive directional selection occurs, and one or two marker loci at which the impact of selection on linked neutral variation is quantified. Information about the phenotype under selection is not included in these models (except for fitness). In contrast, in the quantitative genetic models of adaptation, selection acts on one or more phenotypic traits, such that a genotype-phenotype map is required to bridge the gap to population genetics theory. Here I describe the range of population genetic models from selective sweeps in a panmictic population of constant size to evolutionary traffic when simultaneous sweeps at multiple loci interfere, and I also consider the case of polygenic selection characterized by subtle allele frequency shifts at many loci. Furthermore, I present an overview of the statistical tests that have been proposed based on these population genetics models to detect evidence for positive selection in the genome. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Identifying the most likely contributors to a Y-STR mixture using the discrete Laplace method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Meyer; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2015-01-01

    demonstrate how the discrete Laplace method can be used to separate a two person Y-STR mixture, where the Y-STR profiles of the true contributors are not present in the reference dataset, which is often the case for Y-STR profiles in real case work. We also briefly discuss how to calculate the weight...... of the number of loci. For each of these datasets, an out of sample simulation study was performed: A total of 550 mixtures were composed by randomly sampling two haplotypes, h1 and h2, from the dataset. We then used the discrete Laplace method on the remaining data (excluding h1 and h2) to rank the contributor...... or less depending on the dataset and how the discrete Laplace model was chosen. Y-STR mixtures with many loci are difficult to separate, but even haplotypes with 21 Y-STR loci can be separated....

  6. Ethnically distinct populations of historical Tibet exhibit distinct autosomal STR compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsering, Thupten; Gayden, Tenzin; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Bukhari, Areej; Garcia-Bertrand, Ralph; Herrera, Rene J

    2016-03-01

    At an average altitude of 4000m above sea level, the Tibetan plateau is one of the highest plains on the planet. It is surrounded on three sides by massive mountain ranges: the Kunlun, the Karakoram and the Himalayas. These natural barriers have kept Tibet relatively isolated. In the present study, 15 autosomal STR loci were genotyped in 338 unrelated individuals from three traditional provinces of historical Tibet: Amdo (86), Kham (101) and U-Tsang (151). All the studied loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium except for the D19S433 locus in the Kham province. FGA, D21S11 and D2S1338 show the highest observed heterozygosity values in Amdo (0.8954), Kham (0.9208) and U-Tsang (0.8940), respectively, whereas TPOX is the least variable marker displaying the lowest value for the same parameter. U-Tsang exhibits the highest total numbers of alleles (139) followed by Kham (130) and Amdo (128) groups. The allele frequency data from this study were compared to relevant global reference populations. Our results indicate that although these three Tibetan populations group together in both the Correspondence Analysis (CA) plot and the Neighbor Joining (NJ) tree, they exhibit some degree of genetic differentiation among themselves congruent with their unique dialects, cultures and traditions. The 15 autosomal STR loci studied were found to be informative and discriminating, thereby providing a useful set of markers for population genetic studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Population data of 17 short tandem repeat loci in 2923 individuals from the Han population of Nantong in East China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Li, Liming; Han, Haijun; Jin, Li; Jia, Dongtao; Li, Shilin

    2016-09-01

    Nantong is located in mid-eastern China, and the Han population in Nantong may be greatly affected by population admixture between northern and southern Han Chinese populations. In this study, we analyzed 17 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci on 2923 unrelated individuals collected from the Han population of Nantong. No significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed at all STR loci, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.6184 to 0.9187. The combined match probability (CMP) was 3.87 × 10(-21), and the combined power of discrimination (CPD) was 99.999999999999999999613 %. No significant difference of allele frequencies was observed between Nantong and other Han populations at all STR loci, as well as Dai, Mongolian, and Tibetan. Significant differences were only observed between Nantong Han and Uyghur at TH01, as well as Nantong Han and Dong at CSF1PO and FGA. Nantong Han showed significant differences between She, Bouyei, and Miao at multiple STR loci.

  8. A framework for the development of STR genotyping in domestic animal species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Asch, Barbara; Pinheiro, Raquel; Pereira, Rui

    2010-01-01

    This study reports the methodology used to search, select and characterize STR loci on the canine X chromosome using publicly available genome resources and following the current guidelines for human and non-human forensic testing. After several rounds of selection, 12 X-STR markers were optimized...... offspring. Its use may complement the information obtained by autosomal STR analysis and contribute to the resolution of complex cases of kinship in dogs. The presented methodology for the de novo construction of an STR multiplex may also provide a helpful framework for analogous work in other animal...... species. As an increasing number of reference genomes become available, convenient tools for individual identification and parentage testing based on STR loci selected from autosomes or sex chromosomes' sequences may be created following this strategy....

  9. Y chromosome STR typing in crime casework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roewer, Lutz

    2009-01-01

    Since the beginning of the nineties the field of forensic Y chromosome analysis has been successfully developed to become commonplace in laboratories working in crime casework all over the world. The ability to identify male-specific DNA renders highly variable Y-chromosomal polymorphisms, the STR sequences, an invaluable addition to the standard panel of autosomal loci used in forensic genetics. The male-specificity makes the Y chromosome especially useful in cases of male/female cell admixture, namely in sexual assault cases. On the other hand, the haploidy and patrilineal inheritance complicates the interpretation of a Y-STR match, because male relatives share for several generations an identical Y-STR profile. Since paternal relatives tend to live in the geographic and cultural territory of their ancestors, the Y chromosome analysis has a potential to make inferences on the population of origin of a given DNA profile. This review addresses the fields of application of Y chromosome haplotyping, the interpretation of results, databasing efforts and population genetics aspects.

  10. The value of Non-CODIS miniSTR genotyping systems in forensic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic identity testing is achieved by examining polymorphic regions of DNA. Currently, STR markers are the most commonly used loci for human identification from which several commercial genotyping systems have been developed based on the 13 core CODIS loci. However, identification of degraded or compromised ...

  11. The value of Non-CODIS miniSTR genotyping systems in forensic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-30

    Dec 30, 2011 ... Genetic identity testing is achieved by examining polymorphic regions of DNA. Currently, STR markers are the most commonly used loci for human identification from which several commercial genotyping systems have been developed based on the 13 core CODIS loci. However, identification of degraded ...

  12. I-DNASE21 system: development and SWGDAM validation of a new STR 21-plex reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Jose María; Celorrio, David; Odriozola, Adrian; Köhnemann, Stephan; Bravo, María Luisa; Builes, Juan Jose; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Herrera, René J; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2014-01-01

    I-DNASE21 is a new STR multiplex system that amplifies 21 STR autosomal loci, plus the amelogenin locus in one reaction. This system has been designed to analyze all the STR loci included in the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), Interpol Standard Set of Loci (ISSL), Extended European Standard Set (ESS-Extended), UK National Criminal Intelligence DNA Database (NDNAD) and German Core loci (GCL). This manuscript presents the validation of the I-DNASE21 system according to the revised guidelines issued by the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM). The results of this validation, added to the extremely high discriminatory power showed, suggest that I-DNASE21 could be a potentially helpful tool for identification and kinship determination even in complex paternity cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Analysis of genetic diversity of Russian regional populations based on common STR markers used in DNA identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesik, V Yu; Fedunin, A A; Agdzhoyan, A T; Utevska, O M; Chukhraeva, M I; Evseeva, I V; Churnosov, M I; Lependina, I N; Bogunov, Yu V; Bogunova, A A; Ignashkin, M A; Yankovsky, N K; Balanovska, E V; Orekhov, V A; Balanovsky, O P

    2014-06-01

    We conducted the first genetic analysis of a wide a range of rural Russian populations in European Russia with a panel of common DNA markers commonly used in criminalistics genetic identification. We examined a total of 647 samples from indigenous ethnic Russian populations in Arkhangelsk, Belgorod, Voronezh, Kursk, Rostov, Ryazan, and Orel regions. We employed a multiplex genotyping kit, COrDIS Plus, to genotype Short Tandem Repeat (STR) loci, which included the genetic marker panel officially recommended for DNA identification in the Russian Federation, the United States, and the European Union. In the course of our study, we created a database of allelic frequencies, examined the distribution of alleles and genotypes in seven rural Russian populations, and defined the genetic relationships between these populations. We found that, although multidimensional analysis indicated a difference between the Northern gene pool and the rest of the Russian European populations, a pairwise comparison using 19 STR markers among all populations did not reveal significant differences. This is in concordance with previous studies, which examined up to 12 STR markers of urban Russian populations. Therefore, the database of allelic frequencies created in this study can be applied for forensic examinations and DNA identification among the ethnic Russian population over European Russia. We also noted a decrease in the levels of heterozygosity in the northern Russian population compared to ethnic populations in southern and central Russia, which is consistent with trends identified previously using classical gene markers and analysis of mitochondrial DNA.

  14. Genetic diversity and haplotype structure of 24 Y-chromosomal STR in Chinese Hui ethnic group and its genetic relationships with other populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bo-Feng; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Liu, Wen-Juan; Meng, Hao-Tian; Yuan, Guo-Lian; Lv, Zhe; Dong, Nan; Li, Qiong; Yang, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Yu-Hong; Hou, Yin-Ling; Qian, Li; Fan, Shuan-Liang; Xu, Peng

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, 24 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) loci were analyzed in 115 unrelated Hui male individuals from Haiyuan county or Tongxin county, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, China, to evaluate the forensic application of the 24 STR loci and to analyze interpopulation differentiations by making comparisons between the Hui group data and previously published data of other 13 populations. A total of 115 different haplotypes were observed on these 24 Y-STR loci. The gene diversities ranged from 0.4049 (DYS437) to 0.9729 (DYS385a, b). The overall haplotype diversity was 1 at AGCU 24 Y-STR loci level, while the values were reduced to 0.999237, 0.996949, and 0.996644 at the Y-filer 17 loci, 11 Y-STR loci of extended haplotype and 9 Y-STR loci of minimal haplotype levels, respectively; whereas, haplotype diversity for additional 7 loci (not included in Y-filer 17 loci) was 0.995271. The pairwise FST , multidimensional scaling plot and neighbor-joining tree indicated the Hui group had the closest genetic relationship with Sala in the paternal lineage in the present study. In summary, the results in our study indicated the 24 Y-STRs had a high level of polymorphism in Hui group and hence could be a powerful tool for forensic application and population genetic study. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Short tandem repeat (STR) based genetic diversity and relationship of indigenous Niger cattle

    OpenAIRE

    M. Grema; M. Grema; A. Traoré; A. Traoré; M. Issa; M. Hamani; M. Abdou; A. Soudré; M. Sanou; M. Sanou; R. Pichler; H. H. Tamboura; Y. Alhassane; K. Periasamy

    2017-01-01

    The diversity of cattle in Niger is predominantly represented by three indigenous breeds: Zebu Arabe, Zebu Bororo and Kuri. This study aimed at characterizing the genetic diversity and relationship of Niger cattle breeds using short tandem repeat (STR) marker variations. A total of 105 cattle from all three breeds were genotyped at 27 STR loci. High levels of allelic and gene diversity were observed with an overall mean of 8.7 and 0.724 respectively. The mean inbreeding esti...

  16. Population genetic study of 10 short tandem repeat loci from 600 domestic dogs in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seo Hyun; Jang, Yoon-Jeong; Han, Myun Soo; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-09-30

    Dogs have long shared close relationships with many humans. Due to the large number of dogs in human populations, they are often involved in crimes. Occasionally, canine biological evidence such as saliva, bloodstains and hairs can be found at crime scenes. Accordingly, canine DNA can be used as forensic evidence. The use of short tandem repeat (STR) loci from biological evidence is valuable for forensic investigations. In Korea, canine STR profiling-related crimes are being successfully analyzed, leading to diverse crimes such as animal cruelty, dog-attacks, murder, robbery, and missing and abandoned dogs being solved. However, the probability of random DNA profile matches cannot be analyzed because of a lack of canine STR data. Therefore, in this study, 10 STR loci were analyzed in 600 dogs in Korea (344 dogs belonging to 30 different purebreds and 256 crossbred dogs) to estimate canine forensic genetic parameters. Among purebred dogs, a separate statistical analysis was conducted for five major subgroups, 97 Maltese, 47 Poodles, 31 Shih Tzus, 32 Yorkshire Terriers, and 25 Pomeranians. Allele frequencies, expected (Hexp) and observed heterozygosity (Hobs), fixation index (F), probability of identity (P(ID)), probability of sibling identity (P(ID)sib) and probability of exclusion (PE) were then calculated. The Hexp values ranged from 0.901 (PEZ12) to 0.634 (FHC2079), while the P(ID)sib values were between 0.481 (FHC2079) and 0.304 (PEZ12) and the P(ID)sib was about 3.35 × 10(-)⁵ for the combination of all 10 loci. The results presented herein will strengthen the value of canine DNA to solving dog-related crimes.

  17. Variation of autosomes and X chromosome STR in breast cancer and gynecological cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Youxiang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses 1000 cases of patients with breast cancer and 2000 cases of patients with gynecological cancer (1000 cases of malignant tumor, 1000 cases of benign tumors, where breast cancer and malignant tumor patients comprise the observation group, while patients with benign tumors comprise the control group. Through DNA extraction, STR genotyping and variation verification, microdissection, individual STR mutation rate and loci STR mutation rate of the two groups of patients were calculated. Results show that there are no significant (P > 0.05 differences in the STR variation of autosomes and X chromosome between patients in the observation group and those in the reference group. However, significant (P < 0.05 intergroup differences were found for STR variation typing between patients with malignant and benign tumors. Using STR genotyping for autosomes and X chromosomes, gynecological cancer patients were found to be more likely to mutate, with a clear relationship between STR variation and tumor differentiation degrees. The study on the variation analysis of autosomes and X chromosome STR in breast and gynecological cancer tissues is expected to have a high application value when applied to medical research and identification processes.

  18. Analysis of 17 STR data on 5362 southern Portuguese individuals-an update on reference database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas Silva, Raquel; Ribeiro, Teresa; Lucas, Isabel; Porto, Maria João; Costa Santos, Jorge; Dario, Paulo

    2016-03-01

    The main objective of this work consisted of the updating of allele frequencies and other relevant forensic parameters for the 17 autosomal STR loci provided by the combination of the two types of kits used routinely in our laboratory casework: AmpF/STR Identifiler(®) and the Powerplex(®) 16 Systems. This aim was of significant importance, given that the last study on these kits within the southern Portuguese population dates back to 2006, and, as a consequence, it was necessary to correct the deviation caused by population evolution over the last ten years so that they might be better applied to our forensic casework. For this reason genetic data from 5362 unrelated Caucasian Portuguese individuals from the south of Portugal who were involved in paternity testing casework from 2005 to 2014 was used. Of all the markers, TPOX proved to be the least polymorphic, and Penta E the most. Secondly, this up-to-date southern Portuguese population was compared not only with the northern and central Portuguese populations, but also with that of southern Portugal in 2006, along with populations from Spain, Italy, Greece, Romania, Morocco, Angola and Korea in order to infer information about the relatedness of these respective populations, and the variation of the southern Portuguese population over time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A forensic perspective on the genetic identification of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) varieties using STR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sara; Oliveira, Manuela; Amorim, António; van Asch, Barbara

    2014-11-01

    The grapevine (Vitis vinifera subsp. vinifera) is one of the most important agricultural crops worldwide. A long interest in the historical origins of ancient and cultivated current grapevines, as well as the need to establish phylogenetic relationships and parentage, solve homonymies and synonymies, fingerprint cultivars and clones, and assess the authenticity of plants and wines has encouraged the development of genetic identification methods. STR analysis is currently the most commonly used method for these purposes. A large dataset of grapevines genotypes for many cultivars worldwide has been produced in the last decade using a common set of recommended dinucleotide nuclear STRs. This type of marker has been replaced by long core-repeat loci in standardized state-of-the-art human forensic genotyping. The first steps toward harmonized grapevine genotyping have already been taken to bring the genetic identification methods closer to human forensic STR standards by previous authors. In this context, we bring forward a set of basic suggestions that reinforce the need to (i) guarantee trueness-to-type of the sample; (ii) use the long core-repeat markers; (iii) verify the specificity and amplification consistency of PCR primers; (iv) sequence frequent alleles and use these standardized allele ladders; (v) consider mutation rates when evaluating results of STR-based parentage and pedigree analysis; (vi) genotype large and representative samples in order to obtain allele frequency databases; (vii) standardize genotype data by establishing allele nomenclature based on repeat number to facilitate information exchange and data compilation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Fixed bin frequency distribution for the VNTR Loci D2S44, D4S139, D5S110, and D8S358 in a population sample from Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parreira Kleber Simônio

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fixed bin frequencies for the VNTR loci D2S44, D4S139, D5S110, and D8S358 were determined in a Minas Gerais population sample. The data were generated by RFLP analysis of HaeIII-digested genomic DNA and chemiluminescent detection. The four VNTR loci have met Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and there was no association of alleles among VNTR loci. The frequency data can be used in forensic analyses and paternity tests to estimate the frequency of a DNA profile in the general Brazilian population.

  1. Development and validation of I-DNA1: a 15-Loci multiplex system for identity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odriozola, A; Aznar, J M; Celorrio, D; Bravo, M L; Builes, J J; Val-Bernal, J F; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a system for the multiplex amplification of 15 loci, known as I-DNA1, which combines mini and midiSTR technology, with amplicon sizes ranging from 49 to 297 bp. I-DNA1 analyses all the STR loci included in the CODIS and the Interpol Standard Set of loci, nine of the ten European core loci and seven of the eight German core loci, making it suitable for use in identifying humans. Moreover, its high sensitivity and the small size of its amplicons mean that I-DNA1 is potentially highly useful for analysing highly degraded and/or very small DNA samples.

  2. [Association of aggressive behaviors of schizophrenia with short tandem repeats loci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; Ba, Huajie; Tan, Xingqi; Zhao, Hanqing; Zhang, Shuyou; Yu, Haiying

    2017-12-10

    To assess the association of short tandem repeats (STRs) loci with aggressive behaviors of schizophrenia. Blood samples from 123 schizophrenic patients with aggressive behaviors and 489 schizophrenic patients without aggressive behaviors were collected. DNA from all samples was amplified with a PowerPlex 21 system and separated by electrophoresis to determine the genotypes and allelic frequencies of 20 STR loci including D3S1368, D1S1656, D6S1043, D13S317, Penta E, D16S639, D18S51, D2S1338, CSF1PO, Penta D, TH01, vWA, D21S11, D7S820, D5S818, TPOX, D8S1179, D12S391, D19S433, and FGA. All of the 20 STR loci have reached Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both groups. A significant difference was found in allelic and genotypic frequencies of loci Penta D between the two groups (alleles: P=0.042; genotypes: P=0.014) but not for the remaining 19 loci (P> 0.05). Univariate analysis also showed a significant difference for allele 10 and genotypes 10-12 of Penta D between the two groups (P=0.0027, P=0.0001), with the OR being 1.81 (95%CI: 1.22-2.67) and 4.33 (95%CI: 1.95-9.59), respectively. Penta D may be associated with aggressive behaviors of schizophrenia. Allele 10 and genotypes 10-12 of Penta D may confer a risk for the disease.

  3. Development of a Y-STR 12-plex PCR system and haplotype ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Department of Biological Science, Kongju National University, 182 Gongju, Chungnam 314-701, Korea. 2Dowgene Research Center ... power and will be suitable for practical forensic uses. Short tandem repeat (STR) loci ..... Education, Science and Technology) (KOSEF Grant no: R01-2008-. 000-20604-0). References.

  4. Genetic variation observed at three tetrameric short tandem repeat loci HumTHO1, TPOX, and CSF1PO--in five ethnic population groups of northeastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, D; Kashyap, V K

    2001-01-01

    This paper portrays the genetic variation observed at three tetrameric short tandem repeat (STR) loci HumTHO1, TPOX, and CSF1PO in five ethnic population groups from northeastern India. The study also specifies the suitability of use of these markers for forensic testing. The populations studied included three tribal groups (Kuki, Naga and Hmar), one Mongoloid caste group (Meitei), and a religious caste group (Manipuri Muslims). The loci were highly polymorphic in the populations, and all loci met Hardy-Weinberg expectations. No evidence for association of alleles among the loci was detected. The probability of match for the three loci of the most frequent genotype in the five population groups ranged between 2.6 x 10(-4) and 6.6 x 10(-5). The average heterozygosity among the population groups was approximately 70% with the overall extent of gene differentiation among the five groups being high (Gst = 0.046). Genetic affinity among the populations reveal very close association between the Kuki, Hmar, Naga, and Meitei. The Manipuri Muslims, despite being found in the same region, have had no admixture with these populations and maintain a substantial distance with the other groups. The genetic polymorphism data suggest that the studied systems can be used for human identity testing to estimate the frequency of a multiple locus STR DNA profile in population groups of northeastern India.

  5. Concordance study between the ParaDNA® Intelligence Test, a rapid DNA profiling assay, and a conventional STR typing kit (AmpFlSTR® SGM Plus®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, G; Dawnay, N; Stafford-Allen, B; Panasiuk, M; Rendell, P; Blackman, S; Duxbury, N; Wells, S

    2015-05-01

    The ParaDNA® Intelligence Test enables STR profiling directly from human biological samples and evidence items collected from crime scene in 75min. Designed for non-expert use this system allows DNA information to be available to investigators before it would typically be available from a laboratory. The ParaDNA Intelligence Test system amplifies D3S1358, D8S119, D16S539, D18S1358 and TH01 STR loci and the gender typing locus amelogenin and detects the alleles present with HyBeacon® probes. Individual DNA samples from 381 UK Caucasian individuals were analysed using AmpFlSTR® SGM Plus® and the ParaDNA Intelligence Test with the derived STR profiles compared. Here we describe the high level of concordance demonstrated between the two systems and discuss this with reference to allele frequencies and the discriminatory power offered by the ParaDNA Intelligence Test. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antiproton Stråleterapi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    omkringliggende normalvæv sammenlignet med konventionel strålebehandling eller IMRT. Højenergetiske antiprotoner opfører sig som protoner under nedbremsning i vævet. Når antiprotonen er fuldstændigt nedbremset indfanges den af en kerne og annihilerer med en nucleon herfra. Derved frigives hvilemasseenergien på 2...

  7. Discrepancy in the degree of population differentiation between color-morph frequencies and neutral genetic loci in the damselfly Ischnura senegalensis in Okinawa Island, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Nobuyuki; Hironaka, Kumiko; Sawada, Kouji; Kuriwada, Takashi; Yamahira, Kazunori

    2015-06-01

    Evaluation of relative contribution of natural selection and stochastic processes to population differentiation has been of great interest in evolutionary biology. In a damselfly, Ischnura senegalensis, females show color dimorphism (gynochrome vs. androchrome), and color-morph frequencies are known to greatly vary among local populations within Okinawa Island, a small island of Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan. In this study, to examine the effects of natural selection and stochastic processes on the within-island variation in color-morph frequencies, we compared the degree of population differentiation at the color-morph locus with that at a mitochondrial DNA region and ten nuclear microsatellite loci. F ST values at the neutral loci were close to zero, indicating presence of sufficient gene flow (dispersal of adult individuals) between the local populations. In contrast, F ST values at the color-morph locus were significantly different from zero. These results suggest that variation in female color-morph frequencies observed among local populations in Okinawa Island has been caused by divergent selection acting on the phenotype and/or genes tightly linked with the color locus.

  8. Evaluation of reliability on STR typing at leukemic patients used for forensic purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filoglu, G; Bulbul, O; Rayimoglu, G; Yediay, F E; Zorlu, T; Ongoren, S; Altuncul, H

    2014-06-01

    Over the past decades, main advances in the field of molecular biology, coupled with benefits in genomic technologies, have led to detailed molecular investigations in the genetic diversity generated by researchers. Short tandem repeat (STR) loci are polymorphic loci found throughout all eukaryotic genome. DNA profiling identification, parental testing and kinship analysis by analysis of STR loci have been widely used in forensic sciences since 1993. Malignant tissues may sometimes be the source of biological material for forensic analysis, including identification of individuals or paternity testing. There are a number of studies on microsatellite instability in different types of tumors by comparing the STR profiles of malignant and healthy tissues on the same individuals. Defects in DNA repair pathways (non-repair or mis-repair) and metabolism lead to an accumulation of microsatellite alterations in genomic DNA of various cancer types that result genomic instabilities on forensic analyses. Common forms of genomic instability are loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI). In this study, the applicability of autosomal STR markers, which are routinely used in forensic analysis, were investigated in order to detect genotypes in blood samples collected from leukemic patients to estimate the reliability of the results when malignant tissues are used as a source of forensic individual identification. Specimens were collected from 90 acute and 10 chronic leukemia volunteers with oral swabs as well as their paired peripheral blood samples from the Oncology Centre of the Department of Hematology at Istanbul University, during the years 2010-2011. Specimens were tested and compared with 16 somatic STR loci (CSFIPO, THO1, TPOX, vWA, D2S1338, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11 and FGA) widely used in forensic identification and kinship. Only two STR instabilities were encountered among 100 specimens. An MSI in

  9. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphism loci susceptible to degradation by ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Mitsuyo; Taki, Takashi; Shimada, Ryo; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-10-01

    DNA in biological fluids is often degraded by environmental factors. Given that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses require shorter amplicons than short tandem repeat (STR) analyses do, their use in human identification using degraded samples has recently attracted attention. Although various SNP loci are used to analyze degraded samples, it is unclear which ones are more appropriate. To characterize and identify SNP loci that are susceptible or resistant to degradation, we artificially degraded DNA, obtained from buccal swabs from 11 volunteers, by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light for different durations (254 nm for 5, 15, 30, 60, or 120 min) and analyzed the resulting SNP loci. DNA degradation was assessed using gel electrophoresis, STR, and SNP profiling. DNA fragmentation occurred within 5 min of UV irradiation, and successful STR and SNP profiling decreased with increasing duration. However, 73% of SNP loci were still detected correctly in DNA samples irradiated for 120 min, a dose that rendered STR loci undetectable. The unsuccessful SNP typing and the base call failure of nucleotides neighboring the SNPs were traced to rs1031825, and we found that this SNP was susceptible to UV light. When comparing the detection efficiencies of STR and SNP loci, SNP typing was more successful than STR typing, making it effective when using degraded DNA. However, it is important to use rs1031825 with caution when interpreting SNP analyses of degraded DNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  10. Donor verification using Short Tandem Repeat (STR) analysis directly from blood collected in PAXgene RNA tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Victoria R; Jones, Susan P; Sammartino, Holly L; Arocena, Dennis Ian S; Madore, Steven J

    2014-06-01

    Biorepository processing includes nucleic acid extractions in batch mode from a large number of blood samples from many different donors. Handling such a large number of biospecimens presents the challenge of ensuring that samples are not switched or mislabeled during processing. One approach for confirming donor identity from DNA samples is the use of multiplexed fluorescent PCR for detecting Short Tandem Repeat (STR) allelic-size polymorphisms for a set of common autosomal loci. While donor identity of DNA extracted directly from blood collected in standard tubes containing anticoagulants can be easily verified by generating STR profiles, RNA from blood collected in PAXgene Blood RNA tubes (PAXgene RNA tubes) is depleted of DNA and is not amenable to STR fingerprinting for donor identity verification. We investigated the feasibility of isolating DNA directly from blood collected in PAXgene RNA tubes for use as template for STR DNA fingerprinting for blood donor identity verification. We determined that DNA extraction can be performed manually with the QIAamp DNA Blood Minikit or on the QIAxtractor instrument with minimal pre-processing protocol additions, and that DNA isolated from blood collected in PAXgene RNA tubes is of sufficient quantity and quality for successful STR fingerprint analysis. Adaptation of quality assurance methods such as the PAXgene RNA tube DNA extraction/STR fingerprinting assay described here is a good practice that ensures that biobanking collections provide scientists with high quality, donor-verified biomaterial.

  11. Estimating the probability of allelic drop-out of STR alleles in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2009-01-01

    In crime cases with available DNA evidence, the amount of DNA is often sparse due to the setting of the crime. In such cases, allelic drop-out of one or more true alleles in STR typing is possible. We present a statistical model for estimating the per locus and overall probability of allelic drop......-out using the results of all STR loci in the case sample as reference. The methodology of logistic regression is appropriate for this analysis, and we demonstrate how to incorporate this in a forensic genetic framework....

  12. Davis Strædet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Råstofdirektoratet planlægger at udbyde flere licensområder med henblik på efterforskning og udvinding af olie og gas i den grønlandske del af Davis Stræde. Som en del af beslutningsgrundlaget har Råstofdirektoratet bedt DCE – Nationalt Center for Miljø og Energi og Grønlands Naturinstitut om at ...

  13. STRait Razor: a length-based forensic STR allele-calling tool for use with second generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshauer, David H; Lin, David; Hari, Kumar; Jain, Ravi; Davis, Carey; Larue, Bobby; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the capability of second generation sequencing (SGS) to provide coverage of short tandem repeats (STRs) found within the human genome. However, there are relatively few bioinformatic software packages capable of detecting these markers in the raw sequence data. The extant STR-calling tools are sophisticated, but are not always applicable to the analysis of the STR loci commonly used in forensic analyses. STRait Razor is a newly developed Perl-based software tool that runs on the Linux/Unix operating system and is designed to detect forensically-relevant STR alleles in FASTQ sequence data, based on allelic length. It is capable of analyzing STR loci with repeat motifs ranging from simple to complex without the need for extensive allelic sequence data. STRait Razor is designed to interpret both single-end and paired-end data and relies on intelligent parallel processing to reduce analysis time. Users are presented with a number of customization options, including variable mismatch detection parameters, as well as the ability to easily allow for the detection of alleles at new loci. In its current state, the software detects alleles for 44 autosomal and Y-chromosome STR loci. The study described herein demonstrates that STRait Razor is capable of detecting STR alleles in data generated by multiple library preparation methods and two Illumina(®) sequencing instruments, with 100% concordance. The data also reveal noteworthy concepts related to the effect of different preparation chemistries and sequencing parameters on the bioinformatic detection of STR alleles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Population estimators or progeny tests: what is the best method to assess null allele frequencies at SSR loci?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oddou-Muratorio, S.; Vendramin, G.G.; Buiteveld, J.; Fady, B.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear SSRs are notorious for having relatively high frequencies of null alleles, i.e. alleles that fail to amplify and are thus recessive and undetected in heterozygotes. In this paper, we compare two kinds of approaches for estimating null allele frequencies at seven nuclear microsatellite

  15. The validation of a 15 STR multiplex PCR for Cannabis species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhnemann, Stephan; Nedele, Johanna; Schwotzer, Daniela; Morzfeld, Julia; Pfeiffer, Heidi

    2012-07-01

    Trade and acquisition of Cannabis drugs are illegal in many countries worldwide; nevertheless, crimes related with these drugs are a major problem for the investigative authorities. With this manuscript, we want to introduce a 15 short tandem repeat (STR) Cannabis marker set that can be amplified in one PCR reaction. This multiplex PCR is specific to Cannabis species and combines highly informative STR markers. The 15 STR multiplex is easy to use and was validated according to common laboratory quality standards. Due to the fact that a lot of Cannabis plants are cultivated by clonal propagation and may show aneuploidy, polyploidy or multiple gene loci, it is not possible to apply biostatistics that follow the Hardy-Weinberg law. However, this multiplex will help the police to trace back trade routes of drug syndicates or dealers and it can help to link Cannabis plants to a crime scene.

  16. Determining Y-STR mutation rates in deep-routing genealogies: Identification of haplogroup differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claerhout, Sofie; Vandenbosch, Michiel; Nivelle, Kelly; Gruyters, Leen; Peeters, Anke; Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Decorte, Ronny

    2018-05-01

    Knowledge of Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) mutation rates is essential to determine the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) in familial searching or genealogy research. Up to now, locus-specific mutation rates have been extensively examined especially for commercially available forensic Y-STRs, while haplogroup specific mutation rates have not yet been investigated in detail. Through 450 patrilineally related namesakes distributed over 212 deep-rooting genealogies, the individual mutation rates of 42 Y-STR loci were determined, including 27 forensic Y-STR loci from the Yfiler ® Plus kit and 15 additional Y-STR loci (DYS388, DYS426, DYS442, DYS447, DYS454, DYS455, DYS459a/b, DYS549, DYS607, DYS643, DYS724a/b and YCAIIa/b). At least 726 mutations were observed over 148,596 meiosis and individual Y-STR mutation rates varied from 2.83 × 10 -4 to 1.86 × 10 -2 . The mutation rate was significantly correlated with the average allele size, the complexity of the repeat motif sequence and the age of the father. Significant differences in average Y-STR mutations rates were observed when haplogroup 'I & J' (4.03 × 10 -3 mutations/generation) was compared to 'R1b' (5.35 × 10 -3 mutations/generation) and to the overall mutation rate (5.03 × 10 -3 mutations/generation). A difference in allele size distribution was identified as the only cause for these haplogroup specific mutation rates. The haplogroup specific mutation rates were also present within the commercially available Y-STR kits (Yfiler ® , PowerPlex ® Y23 System and Yfiler ® Plus). This observation has consequences for applications where an average Y-STR mutation rate is used, e.g. tMRCA estimations in familial searching and genealogy research. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Observed and predicted changes in virulence gene frequencies at 11 loci in a local barley powdery mildew population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovmøller, M.S.; Munk, L.; Østergård, H.

    1993-01-01

    a survey comprising 11 virulence loc. Predictions were based on a model where selection forces were estimated through detailed mapping in the local area of host cultivars and their resistance genes, and taking into account the changes in distribution of host cultivars during the year caused by growth......The aim of the present study was to investigate observed and predicted changes in virulence gene frequencies in a local aerial powdery mildew population subject to selection by different host cultivars in a local barley area. Observed changes were based on genotypic frequencies obtained through...... with a constant distribution of host cultivars. Significant changes in gene frequencies were observed for virulence genes subject to strong direct selection as well as for genes subject mainly to indirect selection (hitchhiking). These patterns of changes were generally as predicted from the model. The influence...

  18. Y-STR genetic screening by high-resolution melting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, J Q; Liu, B Q; Wang, Y; Liu, W; Cai, J F; Long, R; Li, W H

    2016-02-05

    Currently, the widely used automated capillary electrophoresis-based short tandem repeat (STR) genotyping method for genetic screening in forensic practice is laborious, time-consuming, expensive, and technically challenging in some cases. Thus, new molecular-based strategies for conclusively identifying forensically relevant biological evidence are required. Here, we used high-resolution melting analysis (HRM) for Y-chromosome STR genotyping for forensic genetic screening. The reproducibility of the melting profile over dilution, sensitivity, discrimination power, and other factors was preliminarily studied in 10 Y-STR loci. The results showed that HRM-based approaches revealed more genotypes (compared to capillary electrophoresis), showed higher uniformity in replicate tests and diluted samples, and enabled successful detection of DNA at concentrations as low as 0.25 ng. For mixed samples, the melting curve profiles discriminated between mixed samples based on reference samples with high efficiency. The triplex Y-chromosome STR HRM assay was performed and provided a foundation for further studies such as a multiplex HRM assay. The HRM approach is a one-step application and the entire procedure can be completed within 2 h at a low cost. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the HRM-based Y-STR assay is a useful screening tool that can be used in forensic practice.

  19. Online verification of human cell line identity by STR DNA typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Wilhelm G; Drexler, Hans G

    2011-01-01

    The main prerequisition for any research, development, or production programs involving cell lines is whether a cell line is authentic or not. Microsatellites in the human genome harboring short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers allow the identification of individual cell lines at the DNA level. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of eight highly polymorphic microsatellite STR loci and gender determination have been proven to be the best tools for screening the uniqueness of DNA profiles in an STR database. The main Biological Resource Centers (BRCs), ATCC, DSMZ, JCRB, and RIKEN, have generated large databases of STR cell line profiles for identity control. In cooperation with the Japanese BRCs, DSMZ has piloted the generation of the most comprehensive international reference database, which is linked to a simple search engine for interrogating STR cell line profiles. The tool of online -verification of cell line identities is available on the respective homepages of JCRB and DSMZ ( http://cellbank.nibio.go.jp/cellbank_e.html , http://www.dsmz.de/STRanalysis ). The following sections describe a rapid, practical, inexpensive, and reliable method available to students, technicians, and scientists.

  20. The association of 22 Y chromosome short tandem repeat loci with initiative-aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; Ba, Huajie; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Shuyou; Zhao, Hanqing; Yu, Haiying; Gao, Zhiqin; Wang, Binbin

    2018-02-13

    Aggressive behavior represents an important public concern and a clinical challenge to behaviorists and psychiatrists. Aggression in humans is known to have an important genetic basis, so to investigate the association of Y chromosome short tandem repeat (Y-STR) loci with initiative-aggressive behavior, we compared allelic and haplotypic distributions of 22 Y-STRs in a group of Chinese males convicted of premeditated extremely violent crimes (n = 271) with a normal control group (n = 492). Allelic distributions of DYS533 and DYS437 loci differed significantly between the two groups (P Y-STR loci between these two groups. Our results indicate a genetic role for Y-STR loci in the development of initiative aggression in non-psychiatric subjects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. An integrated system of ABO typing and multiplex STR testing for forensic DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xianhua; He, Juan; Jia, Fei; Shen, Hongying; Zhao, Jinling; Chen, Chuguang; Bai, Liping; Liu, Feng; Hou, Guangwei; Guo, Faye

    2012-12-01

    A new amplification system for ABO and STR genotyping in a single reaction has been successfully developed. Two types of information can be obtained from a biological sample at one time. One is the classical information of ABO blood group typing for screening suspects and the other is STR information for individual identification. The system allows for the simultaneous detection of 15 autosomal STR loci (containing all CODIS STR loci as well as Penta D and Penta E), six ABO genotypes (O/O, B/B, A/A, A/O, A/B, and B/O) and the gender-determining locus Amelogenin. Primers are designed so that the amplicons are distributed ranging from 75bp to 500bp within a four-dye fluorescent design, leaving a fourth dye for the internal size standard. With 30 cycles, the results showed that the optimal amount of DNA template for this multiplex ranges from 250pg to 2ng and the lowest detection threshold is 125pg (as low as 63pg for ABO loci). For the DNA template outside the optimal detection range, we could adjust the number of cycles to obtain the robust profiles. Mixture studies showed that over 83% of minor alleles were detected at 1:9 ratios. The full profiles were still observed when 4ng of degraded DNA was digested by DNase I and 1ng undegraded DNA was added to 40μM haematin. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based conditions including the concentrations of primers, magnesium and the Taq polymerase as well as volume, cycle numbers and annealing temperature were examined and optimised. In addition, the system was validated by 364 bloodstain samples and 32 common casework samples. According to the Chinese National Standards and Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) guidelines, our system demonstrates good detection performance and is an ideal tool for forensic DNA typing with potential application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiplex PCR for 17 Y-Chromosome Specific Short Tandem Repeats (STR to Enhance the Reliability of Fetal Sex Determination in Maternal Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zheng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to demonstrate the influence of target gene and amplification product length on the performance of fetal gender determination systems using maternal plasma. A total of 40 pairs of plasma DNA samples from pregnant women and genomic DNA samples from maternal blood, amniotic fluid and paternal blood were isolated for gender determination by amplification of the amelogenin gene and 17 Y-chromosome STR loci, using three different commercial kits. The gender of the fetuses was confirmed by cytogenetic analysis or phenotype at birth. Both the AmpFℓSTR-Identifiler amplification kit and the Mini-STR Amplification kit for amelogenin gene detection were reliable in determining fetal gender (92.0% and 96.0%, respectively, but false negatives were present in both systems. AmpFℓSTR-Yfiler was found to be fully reliable as it amplified Y-STR in all cases of pregnancies with male fetuses and thus was 100% correct in determining fetal gender. The results demonstrated that multiple fluorescent PCR for 17 Y-STR loci was more reliable than AMELY gene testing in fetal sex determination with maternal plasma. We also found that the shorter amplification products could improve the performance of fetal gender determination systems.

  3. Cluster analysis of European Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes using the discrete Laplace method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Meyer; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Morling, Niels

    2014-01-01

    method can be used for cluster analysis to further validate the discrete Laplace method. A very important practical fact is that the calculations can be performed on a normal computer. We identified two sub-clusters of the Eastern and Western European Y-STR haplotypes similar to results of previous......The European Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) haplotype distribution has previously been analysed in various ways. Here, we introduce a new way of analysing population substructure using a new method based on clustering within the discrete Laplace exponential family that models...... the probability distribution of the Y-STR haplotypes. Creating a consistent statistical model of the haplotypes enables us to perform a wide range of analyses. Previously, haplotype frequency estimation using the discrete Laplace method has been validated. In this paper we investigate how the discrete Laplace...

  4. Serum Levels of MicroRNA-206 and Novel Mini-STR Assays for Carrier Detection in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya-Segura, Mónica Alejandra; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; Martínez-Cortés, Gabriela; Gómez-Díaz, Benjamín; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio; Zamora-González, Edgar Oswaldo; García, Silvia; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked neuromuscular disorder in which the detection of female carriers is of the utmost importance for genetic counseling. Haplotyping with polymorphic markers and quantitation of creatine kinase levels (CK) allow tracking of the at-risk haplotype and evidence muscle damage, respectively. Such approaches are useful for carrier detection in cases of unknown mutations. The lack of informative markers and the inaccuracy of CK affect carrier detection. Therefore, herein we designed novel mini-STR (Short Tandem Repeats) assays to amplify 10 loci within the DMD gene and estimated allele frequencies and the polymorphism information content among other parameters in 337 unrelated individuals from three Mexican populations. In addition, we tested the utility of the assays for carrier detection in three families. Moreover, given that serum levels of miR-206 discern between DMD patients and controls with a high area under the curve (AUC), the potential applicability for carrier detection was assessed. The serum levels of miR-206 of non-carriers (n = 24) and carriers (n = 23) were compared by relative quantitation using real-time PCR (p < 0.05), which resulted in an AUC = 0.80 in the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis. In conclusion, miR-206 has potential as a “liquid biopsy” for carrier detection and genetic counseling in DMD. PMID:27529242

  5. A hypervariable STR polymorphism in the CFI gene: southern origin of East Asian-specific group H alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Isao; Jin, Feng; Harihara, Shinji; Matsusue, Aya; Fujihara, Junko; Takeshita, Haruo; Akane, Atsushi; Umetsu, Kazuo; Saitou, Naruya; Chattopadhyay, Prasanta K

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies of four populations revealed that a hypervariable short tandem repeat (iSTR) in intron 7 of the human complement factor I (CFI) gene on chromosome 4q was unique, with 17 possible East Asian-specific group H alleles observed at relatively high frequencies. To develop a deeper anthropological and forensic understanding of iSTR, 1161 additional individuals from 11 Asian populations were investigated. Group H alleles of iSTR and c.1217A allele of a SNP in exon 11 of the CFI gene were associated with each other and were almost entirely confined to East Asian populations. Han Chinese in Changsha, southern China, showed the highest frequency for East Asian-specific group H alleles (0.201) among 15 populations. Group H alleles were observed to decrease gradually from south to north in 11 East Asian populations. This expansion of group H alleles provides evidence that southern China and Southeast Asia are a hotspot of Asian diversity and a genetic reservoir of Asians after they entered East Asia. The expected heterozygosity values of iSTR ranged from 0.927 in Thais to 0.874 in Oroqens, higher than those of an STR in the fibrinogen alpha chain (FGA) gene on chromosome 4q. Thus, iSTR is a useful marker for anthropological and forensic genetics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Analysis of linkage disequilibrium and linkage for 12 short tandem repeat loci on chromosome X].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qiansu; Tang, Jianpin; Chen, Zucong; Li, Fagui; Yu, Xin; Wang, Ping; Lin, Hanguang; Shi, Meisen

    2014-12-01

    To analyze linkage disequilibrium of 12 short tandem repeat loci on chromosome X (X-STR) among an ethnic Han population from Guilin, Guangxi, and to study the genetic linkage and haplotype distributions of such loci in 2 linkage groups. 12 X-STR loci including DXS8378, DXS10159, DXS10162, DXS10164, DXS981, DXS6789, DXS7424, DXS101, DXS7133, GATA165B12, GATA31E08 and DXS7423 were genotyped using an AGCU X12 STR PCR Amplification kit. A total of 119 pedigrees were analyzed for linkage and linkage disequilibrium. Two mutations were found at DXS7424, and 1 mutation was found at DXS10164. A total of 93 haplotypes of DXS10159-DXS10162-DXS10164 were constructed for 261 unrelated males and females, in addition with 167 haplotypes of DXS6789-DXS7424-DXS101-DXS7133. The values of recombination fraction between DXS10159 and DXS10162, DXS10162 and DXS10164, DXS6789 and DXS7424, and DXS7424 and DXS101 were 0.0269, 0.0236, 0.0505 and 0.0438, respectively. Linkage disequilibrium of X-STR does not only depend on physical and genetic distances. There was incomplete linkage relationship between loci on DXS10159-DXS1016-DXS10164 and DXS6789-DXS7424-DXS101 linkage groups.

  7. Short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers are hypervariable and informative in Cannabis sativa: implications for forensic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Simon; Peakall, Rod; Robertson, James

    2003-01-09

    Short tandem repeat (STR) markers are the DNA marker of choice in forensic analysis of human DNA. Here we extend the application of STR markers to Cannabis sativa and demonstrate their potential for forensic investigations. Ninety-three individual cannabis plants, representing drug and fibre accessions of widespread origin were profiled with five STR makers. A total of 79 alleles were detected across the five loci. All but four individuals from a single drug-type accession had a unique multilocus genotype. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed significant genetic variation among accessions, with an average of 25% genetic differentiation. By contrast, only 6% genetic difference was detected between drug and fibre crop accessions and it was not possible to unequivocally assign plants as either drug or fibre type. However, our results suggest that drug strains may typically possess lower genetic diversity than fibre strains, which may ultimately provide a means of genetic delineation. Our findings demonstrate the promise of cannabis STR markers to provide information on: (1) agronomic type, (2) the geographical origin of drug seizures, and (3) evidence of conspiracy in production of clonally propagated drug crops.

  8. Inner and inter population structure construction of Chinese Jiangsu Han population based on Y23 STR system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huipin Wang

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyzed the genetic polymorphisms of 23 Y-STR loci from PowerPlex® Y23 system in 916 unrelated healthy male individuals from Chinese Jiangsu Han, and observed 912 different haplotypes including 908 unique haplotypes and 4 duplicate haplotypes. The haplotype diversity reached 0.99999 and the discrimination capacity and match probability were 0.9956 and 0.0011, respectively. The gene diversity values ranged from 0.3942 at DYS438 to 0.9607 at DYS385a/b. Population differentiation within 10 Jiangsu Han subpopulations were evaluated by RST values and visualized in Neighbor-Joining trees and Multi-Dimensional Scaling plots as well as population relationships between the Jiangsu Han population and other 18 Eastern Asian populations. Such results indicated that the 23 Y-STR loci were highly polymorphic in Jiangsu Han population and played crucial roles in forensic application as well as population genetics. For the first time, we reported the genetic diversity of male lineages in Jiangsu Han population at a high-resolution level of 23 Y-STR set and consequently contributed to familial searching, offender tracking, and anthropology analysis of Jiangsu Han population.

  9. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Level Forensic Science, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biology Courses: Human DNA Amplification Using STR Single Locus Primers by Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M.; Kadunc, Raelynn E.

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was conducted using published human TPOX single-locus DNA primers for validation and various student-designed short tandem repeat (STR) primers for Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) loci. SYBR Green was used to detect the amplification of the expected amplicons. The…

  10. Concordance of the ForenSeq™ system and characterisation of sequence-specific autosomal STR alleles across two major population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devesse, Laurence; Ballard, David; Davenport, Lucinda; Riethorst, Immy; Mason-Buck, Gabriella; Syndercombe Court, Denise

    2018-05-01

    By using sequencing technology to genotype loci of forensic interest it is possible to simultaneously target autosomal, X and Y STRs as well as identity, ancestry and phenotypic informative SNPs, resulting in a breadth of data obtained from a single run that is considerable when compared to that generated with standard technologies. It is important however that this information aligns with the genotype data currently obtained using commercially available kits for CE-based investigations such that results are compatible with existing databases and hence can be of use to the forensic community. In this work, 400 samples were typed using commercially available STR kits and CE, as well as using the Ilumina ForenSeq™ DNA Signature Prep Kit and MiSeq ® FGx to assess concordance of autosomal STRs and population variability. Results show a concordance rate between the two technologies exceeding 99.98% while numerous novel sequence based alleles are described. In order to make use of the sequence variation observed, sequence specific allele frequencies were generated for White British and British Chinese populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of the LUS in sequence allele designations to facilitate probabilistic genotyping of NGS-based STR typing results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Rebecca S; Irwin, Jodi A

    2018-05-01

    Some of the expected advantages of next generation sequencing (NGS) for short tandem repeat (STR) typing include enhanced mixture detection and genotype resolution via sequence variation among non-homologous alleles of the same length. However, at the same time that NGS methods for forensic DNA typing have advanced in recent years, many caseworking laboratories have implemented or are transitioning to probabilistic genotyping to assist the interpretation of complex autosomal STR typing results. Current probabilistic software programs are designed for length-based data, and were not intended to accommodate sequence strings as the product input. Yet to leverage the benefits of NGS for enhanced genotyping and mixture deconvolution, the sequence variation among same-length products must be utilized in some form. Here, we propose use of the longest uninterrupted stretch (LUS) in allele designations as a simple method to represent sequence variation within the STR repeat regions and facilitate - in the nearterm - probabilistic interpretation of NGS-based typing results. An examination of published population data indicated that a reference LUS region is straightforward to define for most autosomal STR loci, and that using repeat unit plus LUS length as the allele designator can represent greater than 80% of the alleles detected by sequencing. A proof of concept study performed using a freely available probabilistic software demonstrated that the LUS length can be used in allele designations when a program does not require alleles to be integers, and that utilizing sequence information improves interpretation of both single-source and mixed contributor STR typing results as compared to using repeat unit information alone. The LUS concept for allele designation maintains the repeat-based allele nomenclature that will permit backward compatibility to extant STR databases, and the LUS lengths themselves will be concordant regardless of the NGS assay or analysis tools

  12. One year variability of peak heights, heterozygous balance and inter-locus balance for the DNA positive control of AmpFℓSTR© Identifiler© STR kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debernardi, A; Suzanne, E; Formant, A; Pène, L; Dufour, A B; Lobry, J R

    2011-01-01

    Multivariate analyses of 205 positive control experiments in an AmpFℓSTR© Identifiler© STR kit were used to analyze the factors affecting peak heights at 16 loci. Peak heights were found to be highly correlated between loci and there was evidence for a difference in sensitivity of the two genetic analyzers in the blue channel. Heterozygous balance response at 10 loci was found to behave as a random variable following a beta-distribution with typical median values of 90%, without locus or genetic analyzer effect. Inter-locus balance at 16 loci was influenced by the blue channel effect and a temporal switch of unexplained origin. The implications of these results for the choice of minimum threshold values in quality control are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Short tandem repeat (STR based genetic diversity and relationship of indigenous Niger cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grema

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of cattle in Niger is predominantly represented by three indigenous breeds: Zebu Arabe, Zebu Bororo and Kuri. This study aimed at characterizing the genetic diversity and relationship of Niger cattle breeds using short tandem repeat (STR marker variations. A total of 105 cattle from all three breeds were genotyped at 27 STR loci. High levels of allelic and gene diversity were observed with an overall mean of 8.7 and 0.724 respectively. The mean inbreeding estimate within breeds was found to be moderate with 0.024, 0.043 and 0.044 in Zebu Arabe, Zebu Bororo and Kuri cattle respectively. The global F statistics showed low genetic differentiation among Niger cattle with about 2.6 % of total variation being attributed to between-breed differences. Neighbor-joining tree derived from pairwise allele sharing distance revealed Zebu Arabe and Kuri clustering together while Zebu Bororo appeared to be relatively distinct from the other two breeds. High levels of admixture were evident from the distribution of pairwise inter-individual allele sharing distances that showed individuals across populations being more related than individuals within populations. Individuals were assigned to their respective source populations based on STR genotypes, and the percent correct assignment of Zebu Bororo (87.5 to 93.8 % was consistently higher than Zebu Arabe (59.3 to 70.4 % and Kuri (80.0 to 83.3 % cattle. The qualitative and quantitative tests for mutation drift equilibrium revealed absence of genetic bottleneck events in Niger cattle in the recent past. High genetic diversity and poor genetic structure among indigenous cattle breeds of Niger might be due to historic zebu–taurine admixture and ongoing breeding practices in the region. The results of the present study are expected to help in formulating effective strategies for conservation and genetic improvement of indigenous Niger cattle breeds.

  14. Diversity of five novel Y-STR loci and their application in studies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The original meaning of Kazak is 'refugee'. In 1456 AD, group of people from the Uzbek Khanate mi- grated to the east and became known as Kazak. The Kirgiz are the descendents of the Jian Kuen mixed with some parts of the Khitan, Turkic, Mongolian and Uygur ethnic groups. (Ruofu 1994). Thus, there was significant ...

  15. Selection pressure on human STR loci and its relevance in repeat expansion disease

    KAUST Repository

    Shimada, Makoto K.

    2016-06-11

    Short Tandem Repeats (STRs) comprise repeats of one to several base pairs. Because of the high mutability due to strand slippage during DNA synthesis, rapid evolutionary change in the number of repeating units directly shapes the range of repeat-number variation according to selection pressure. However, the remaining questions include: Why are STRs causing repeat expansion diseases maintained in the human population; and why are these limited to neurodegenerative diseases? By evaluating the genome-wide selection pressure on STRs using the database we constructed, we identified two different patterns of relationship in repeat-number polymorphisms between DNA and amino-acid sequences, although both patterns are evolutionary consequences of avoiding the formation of harmful long STRs. First, a mixture of degenerate codons is represented in poly-proline (poly-P) repeats. Second, long poly-glutamine (poly-Q) repeats are favored at the protein level; however, at the DNA level, STRs encoding long poly-Qs are frequently divided by synonymous SNPs. Furthermore, significant enrichments of apoptosis and neurodevelopment were biological processes found specifically in genes encoding poly-Qs with repeat polymorphism. This suggests the existence of a specific molecular function for polymorphic and/or long poly-Q stretches. Given that the poly-Qs causing expansion diseases were longer than other poly-Qs, even in healthy subjects, our results indicate that the evolutionary benefits of long and/or polymorphic poly-Q stretches outweigh the risks of long CAG repeats predisposing to pathological hyper-expansions. Molecular pathways in neurodevelopment requiring long and polymorphic poly-Q stretches may provide a clue to understanding why poly-Q expansion diseases are limited to neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  16. The development and application of a multiplex short tandem repeat (STR) system for identifying subspecies, individuals and sex in tigers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zheng-Ting; Uphyrkina, Olga V; Fomenko, Pavel; Luo, Shu-Jin

    2015-07-01

    Poaching and trans-boundary trafficking of tigers and body parts are threatening the world's last remaining wild tigers. Development of an efficient molecular genetic assay for tracing the origins of confiscated specimens will assist in law enforcement and wildlife forensics for this iconic flagship species. We developed a multiplex genotyping system "tigrisPlex" to simultaneously assess 22 short tandem repeat (STR, or microsatellite) loci and a gender-identifying SRY gene, all amplified in 4 reactions using as little as 1 ng of template DNA. With DNA samples used for between-run calibration, the system generates STR genotypes that are directly compatible with voucher tiger subspecies genetic profiles, hence making it possible to identify subspecies via bi-parentally inherited markers. We applied "tigrisPlex" to 12 confiscated specimens from Russia and identified 6 individuals (3 females and 3 males), each represented by duplicated samples and all designated as Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) with high confidence. This STR multiplex system can serve as an effective and versatile approach for genetic profiling of both wild and captive tigers as well as confiscated tiger products, fulfilling various conservation needs for identifying the origins of tiger samples. © 2015 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Analysis of 24 Y chromosomal STR haplotypes in a Chinese Han population sample from Henan Province, Central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Meisen; Liu, Yaju; Zhang, Juntao; Bai, Rufeng; Lv, Xiaojiao; Ma, Shuhua

    2015-07-01

    We analyzed haplotypes for 24 Y chromosomal STRs (Y-STRs), including 17 Yfiler loci (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DY438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and Y-GATA-H4) and 7 additional STRs (DYS388, DYS444, DYS447, DYS449, DYS522 and DYS527a/b) in 1100 unrelated Chinese Han individuals from Henan Province using AGCU Y24 STR kit systems. The calculated average gene diversity (GD) values ranged from 0.4105 to 0.9647 for the DYS388 and DYS385a/b loci, respectively. The discriminatory capacity (DC) was 72.91% with 802 observed haplotypes using 17 Yfiler loci, by the addition of 7 Y-STRs to the Yfiler system, the DC was increased to 79.09% while showing 870 observed haplotypes. Among the additional 7 Y-STRs, DYS449, DYS527a/b, DYS444 and DYS522 were major contributors to enhancing discrimination. In the analysis of molecular variance, the Henan Han population clustered with Han origin populations and showed significant differences from other Non-Han populations. In the present study, we report 24 Y-STR population data in Henan Han population, and we emphasize the need for adding additional markers to the commonly used 17 Yfiler loci to achieve more improved discriminatory capacity in a population with low genetic diversity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Investigation of a Gamma model for mixture STR samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Susanne; Bøttcher, Susanne Gammelgaard; Lauritzen, Steffen L.

    The behaviour of PCR Amplification Kit, when used for mixture STR samples, is investigated. A model based on the Gamma distribution is fitted to the amplifier output for constructed mixtures, and the assumptions of the model is evaluated via residual analysis.......The behaviour of PCR Amplification Kit, when used for mixture STR samples, is investigated. A model based on the Gamma distribution is fitted to the amplifier output for constructed mixtures, and the assumptions of the model is evaluated via residual analysis....

  19. StatsX v2.0: the interactive graphical software for population statistics on X-STR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Yubo; Guo, Fei; Niu, Qingshan

    2018-03-21

    StatsX (Statistics for X-STR) v2.0 is developed to facilitate the workflow for analysis of population data on X-chromosomal short tandem repeat (X-STR) marker. The interactive graphical and installable software can estimate allele/haplotype frequencies from female, male, and pooled samples and calculate forensic parameters by importing a single file. In addition, it is able to filter out the invalid raw data and export a series of pre-formatted Arlequin input files that are directly used for testing the significance of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), linkage disequilibrium (LD), and gender differentiation. As expected, all results of frequencies and forensic parameters can be saved as EXCEL workbooks and also plotted as bar or line graphs. Further, full concordance was obtained by recalculating frequencies and forensic parameters with other established software from a published Han Chinese population.

  20. Analysis of genetic polymorphism of nine short tandem repeat loci in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate the genetic polymorphism of nine short tandem repeat (STR) loci including D2S1772, D6S1043, D7S3048, D8S1132, D11S2368, D12S391, D13S325, D18S1364 and D22GATA198B05 in Chinese Han population of Henan province and to assess its value in forensic science.

  1. Genius loci / Madis Kõiv

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kõiv, Madis, 1929-2014

    2005-01-01

    Ettekanne 37. Kreutzwaldi päevadel Tartu Kirjandusmuuseumis 18.-19. dets. 1993, pealkirjaga "Kus on see Valga, kus on see Tartu...: Genius loci B. Kangro ja V. Uibopuu romaanides". Varem ilmunud: Akadeemia, 1994, nr. 4

  2. Choroba Gerstmanna-Sträusslera-Scheinkera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł P. Liberski

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Choroba Gerstmanna-Sträusslera-Scheinkera (GSS jest genetycznie uwarunkowaną chorobą wywoływaną przez priony. Jest ona unikalna, ponieważ udało się przepasażować GSS na naczelne i gryzonie przynajmniej z mózgu obarczonego mutacją kodonu 102. Tym samym jest to jedyne schorzenie jednocześnie genetycznie uwarunkowane i zakaźne, aczkolwiek natura czynnika infekcyjnego (prionu nadal stanowi przedmiot dyskusji. W obrazie klinicznym GSS dominuje postępująca ataksja móżdżkowa z towarzyszącym otępieniem i objawami piramidowo-pozapiramidowymi. Jest to jednak choroba heterogenna, o różnym obrazie klinicznym u nosicieli różnych mutacji, a nawet u nosicieli tej samej mutacji. Obraz neuropatologiczny obejmuje obecność PrPd – immunododatnich złogów amyloidu pod postacią blaszek, zwłaszcza tzw. blaszek wielordzeniowych. Istnieje kilka modeli GSS. U myszy transgenicznych z nadekspresją zmutowanego genu kodującego PrP obserwuje się spontaniczną chorobę zwyrodnieniową, pasażowalną na myszy transgeniczne o niskiej liczbie transgenu. U myszy transgenicznych uzyskanych drogą wzajemnej rekombinacji, a więc bez nadeskpresji, nie występuje choroba spontaniczna, niemniej stają się one wrażliwe na zakażenie GSS.

  3. Statistical analyses to support forensic interpretation for a new ten-locus STR profiling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, L A; Evett, I W

    2001-01-01

    A new ten-locus STR (short tandem repeat) profiling system was recently introduced into casework by the Forensic Science Service (FSS) and statistical analyses are described here based on data collected using this new system for the three major racial groups of the UK: Caucasian. Afro-Caribbean and Asian (of Indo-Pakistani descent). Allele distributions are compared and the FSS position with regard to routine significance testing of DNA frequency databases is discussed. An investigation of match probability calculations is carried out and the consequent analyses are shown to provide support for proposed changes in how the FSS reports DNA results when very small match probabilities are involved.

  4. Neutrality of miniSTR D22S1045 marker by Ewing's sarcoma phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Deborah S B S; Raimann, Paulo E; Moro, Tatiane; Picanço, Juliane B; Abujamra, Ana L; de Farias, Caroline B; Roesler, Rafael; Brunetto, Algemir L; Alho, Clarice S

    2013-11-01

    Neutrality investigations of markers with forensic use are important to see if a phenotypic trait is being expressed in relation to the alleles of the marker. MiniSTR marker D22S1045 (locus 22q12.3) is localized near the breakpoint region of the EWS gene (22q12.2), which leads to the development of Ewing's Sarcoma. Analyzing allele frequencies and linkage disequilibrium in Ewing's sarcoma patients and non-affected populations, we found that the marker mD22S1045 was neutral when related to Ewing's Sarcoma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. StrAuto: automation and parallelization of STRUCTURE analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatre, Vikram E; Emerson, Kevin J

    2017-03-24

    Population structure inference using the software STRUCTURE has become an integral part of population genetic studies covering a broad spectrum of taxa including humans. The ever-expanding size of genetic data sets poses computational challenges for this analysis. Although at least one tool currently implements parallel computing to reduce computational overload of this analysis, it does not fully automate the use of replicate STRUCTURE analysis runs required for downstream inference of optimal K. There is pressing need for a tool that can deploy population structure analysis on high performance computing clusters. We present an updated version of the popular Python program StrAuto, to streamline population structure analysis using parallel computing. StrAuto implements a pipeline that combines STRUCTURE analysis with the Evanno Δ K analysis and visualization of results using STRUCTURE HARVESTER. Using benchmarking tests, we demonstrate that StrAuto significantly reduces the computational time needed to perform iterative STRUCTURE analysis by distributing runs over two or more processors. StrAuto is the first tool to integrate STRUCTURE analysis with post-processing using a pipeline approach in addition to implementing parallel computation - a set up ideal for deployment on computing clusters. StrAuto is distributed under the GNU GPL (General Public License) and available to download from http://strauto.popgen.org .

  6. Characteristics of Populations of the Russian Federation over the Panel of Fifteen Loci Used for DNA Identification and in Forensic Medical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Stepanov, V; Balanovsky, O P; Melnikov, A V; Lash-Zavada, A Yu; Khar'kov, V N; Tyazhelova, T V; Akhmetova, V L; Zhukova, O V; Shneider, Yu V; Shil'nikova, I N; Borinskaya, S A; Marusin, A V; Spiridonova, M G; Simonova, K V; Khitrinskaya, I Yu; Radzhabov, M O; Romanov, A G; Shtygasheva, O V; Koshel', S M; Balanovskaya, E V; Rybakova, A V; Khusnutdinova, E K; Puzyrev, V P; Yankovsky, N K

    2011-04-01

    Seventeen population groups within the Russian Federation were characterized for the first time using a panel of 15 genetic markers that are used for DNA identification and in forensic medical examinations. The degree of polymorphism and population diversity of microsatellite loci within the Power Plex system (Promega) in Russian populations; the distribution of alleles and genotypes within the populations of six cities and 11 ethnic groups of the Russian Federation; the levels of intra- and interpopulation genetic differentiation of population; genetic relations between populations; and the identification and forensic medical characteristics of the system of markers under study were determined. Significant differences were revealed between the Russian populations and the U.S. reference base that was used recently in the forensic medical examination of the RF. A database of the allelic frequencies of 15 microsatellite loci that are used for DNA identification and forensic medical examination was created; the database has the potential of becoming the reference for performing forensic medical examinations in Russia. The spatial organization of genetic diversity over the panel of the STR markers that are used for DNA identification was revealed. It represents the general regularities of geographical clusterization of human populations over various types of genetic markers. The necessity to take into account a population's genetic structure during forensic medical examinations and DNA identification of criminal suspects was substantiated.

  7. Pilot study for early prognosis of Azoospermia in relation to Y-STR Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Refaat

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: There was a significant correlation of Y-STR Profiling results and the prevalence of Azoospermia condition, which supports the idea of using Y-STR Profiling in early prognosis of Azoospermia.

  8. Short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms in Turkish population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    RESEARCH NOTE. Short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms in Turkish population. ÜNER ÜLKÜER 1 * , MELAHAT KURTULU Ş -ÜLKÜER 2 , CÜNEYT ELMA 1 ,. TAHS İ N KES İ C İ 3 and SEVDA MENEV Ş E 4. 1General Directory of Security, Criminal Police Laboratories, Biyoloji Bölümü,. Aniteppe, Ankara, Turkey.

  9. Estimating stutter rates for Y-STR alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Meyer; Olofsson, Jill Katharina; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2011-01-01

    Stutter peaks are artefacts that arise during PCR amplification of short tandem repeats. Stutter peaks are especially important in forensic case work with DNA mixtures. The aim of the study was primarily to estimate the stutter rates of the AmpFlSTR Yfiler kit. We found that the stutter rates...

  10. Fetal gender determination through Y-STR analysis of maternal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hanaa M.H. Aal-Hamdan

    2014-10-01

    Oct 1, 2014 ... Fetal gender determination through Y-STR analysis of maternal plasma during the third trimester of pregnancy. Hanaa M.H. Aal-Hamdan, Ahmed M. Refaat *, Saranya R. Babu,. Abdul Rauf Choudhry. Department of Forensic Biology, College of Forensic Sciences, Naif Arab University for Security Sciences, ...

  11. Serological identification of Streptococcus sanguis and Str mitior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, L C

    1985-04-01

    A total of 165 strains of Streptococcus sanguis and Str mitior were selected on the basis of their biochemical reactions using established identification procedures. These strains were also classified using API Database and were then screened against five candidate grouping sera. Biochemical tests and serological identification were in general complementary, but no regular associations between biotype and serological reaction were observed.

  12. Serological identification of Streptococcus sanguis and Str mitior.

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, L C

    1985-01-01

    A total of 165 strains of Streptococcus sanguis and Str mitior were selected on the basis of their biochemical reactions using established identification procedures. These strains were also classified using API Database and were then screened against five candidate grouping sera. Biochemical tests and serological identification were in general complementary, but no regular associations between biotype and serological reaction were observed.

  13. Genetic polymorphisms of 18 short tandem repeat loci in 3550 individuals from the Han population of Changchun, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhen; Xia, Mingying; Bao, Helai; Wang, Linlin; Jin, Li; Li, Liming; Li, Shilin

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed 18 autosomal STRs on 3550 unrelated individuals collected from the Han population of Changchun. No significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed at all STR loci, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.6275 to 0.9207. The combined match probability (CMP) was 2.42 × 10 - 22 , and the combined power of discrimination (CPD) was 99.9999999999999999999758 %. Changchun Han showed no significant difference between northern and eastern Han populations at nearly all STR loci, but had significant differences between southern Han at multiple STRs, as well as other Chinese ethnic populations. The phylogenetic analysis also showed that Changchun Han is genetically close to northern Hans, suggesting that the Han population of Changchun could mainly come from northern China.

  14. STR analysis of human DNA from maggots fed on decomposing bodies: Assessment of the time period for successful analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gachuiri Njau

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Frequently, forensic entomology is applied in the use of insect maggots for the identification of specimens or remains of humans. Maggot crop analysis could be valuable in criminal investigations when maggots are found at a crime scene and a corpse is absent. Human short tandem repeat (STR has previously been used to support the association of maggots to a specific corpse but not in the period at which the body has been decomposing. The aim of this research was to assess the time period for successful STR analyses of human DNA from third instar maggots (Protophormia terraenovae obtained from decomposing human corpses as well as to investigate the human DNA turnover and degradation in the maggot crop after they are removed from food and/or are fed on a beef (a new/different food source. Results showed that the amount of human DNA recovered from maggots decreased with time in all cases. For maggots fed on beef, the human DNA could only be recovered up to day two and up to day four for the starved maggots. STR analyses of human DNA from maggots’ crop content using 16 loci generated profiles that matched those of reference samples although some of the alleles were not amplifiable therefore generating partial profiles for the samples starved for 4 days and those fed on beef. This may be due to nuclease activity present in the gut of larvae that may have caused degradation of DNA and consequently reduction in DNA yield. It was possible to identify the decomposing body using STRs as markers.

  15. The Dynamic Phenomena of Strékan Music From Colonial to Contemporary Era in Situbondo

    OpenAIRE

    Hidayatullah, Panakajaya

    2017-01-01

    This research is an anthropology of music which discusses the dynamics of strékan music from colonial to contemporary era in Situbondo. In Situbondo, strékan is a term which refers to music for welcoming guests. By ethnography method and postcolonial perspective, this research will discuss social problems and phenomena of strékan music. The result of this research shows that a change of strékan music signifies a change of social condition in Situbondo. In colonial era strékan is assumed by pe...

  16. Y-STR variation in the Basque diaspora in the Western USA: evolutionary and forensic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Laura; Rosique, Melania; Köhnemann, Stephan; Cardoso, Sergio; García, Ainara; Odriozola, Adrián; Aznar, Jose María; Celorrio, David; Schuerenkamp, Marianne; Zubizarreta, Josu; Davis, Michael C; Hampikian, Greg; Pfeiffer, Heidi; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2012-03-01

    Individuals of Basque origin migrated in large numbers to the Western USA in the second half of the nineteenth century, and the flow continued with less intensity during the last century. The European source population, that of the Basque Country, has long been a cultural and geographical isolate. Previous studies have demonstrated that Y-STR frequencies of Basques are different from those of other Spanish and European populations [1]. The Basque diaspora in the Western USA is a recent migration, but the founder effect and the incorporation of new American Y chromosomes into the paternal genetic pool of the Basque diaspora could have influenced its genetic structure and could thus have practical implications for forensic genetics. To check for genetic substructure among the European source and Basque diaspora populations and determine the most suitable population database for the Basque diaspora in the Western USA, we have analysed the haplotype distribution of 17 Y-STRs in both populations. We have found that the Basque diaspora in the Western USA largely conserve the Y chromosome lineage characteristic of the autochthonous European Basque population with no statistically significant differences. This implies that a common 17 Y-STR Basque population database could be used to calculate identification or kinship parameters regardless of whether the Basque individuals are from the European Basque Country or from the Basque diaspora in the Western USA.

  17. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrova, Y.E.; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of γ-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure 137 Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed

  18. Origen geno-geográfico de haplotipos STR del cromosoma Y en una muestra caucásico-mestiza y afrodescendiente de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Yunis

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Los haplotipos STR de cromosoma Y han sido ampliamente utilizados en estudios de poblaciones para establecer el origen de diversas poblaciones. Objetivo. Se analizaron haplotipos STR del cromosoma Y (8 loci en 134 afrodescendientes y caucásico-mestizos no relacionados de Colombia, para correlacionar el origen geográfico con los datos históricos, así como las relaciones genéticas y posibles patrones de mezcla. Materiales y métodos. Se analizaron los haplotipos STR del cromosoma Y mediante PCR seguidas de electroforesis en acrilamida, de 134 muestras de afrodescendientes y 137 muestras de caucásicos mestizos. Resultados. No se encontró evidencia de subestructuración de la población afrodescendiente. El 2,59 % de los haplotipos eran compartidos en los dos grupos analizados, con la posible existencia deflujo génico de caucásico-mestizos hacia los afrodescendientes. Conclusión. La población caucásico-mestiza colombiana se agrupa con otras poblaciones de la península Ibérica y Europa, mientras que la población afrodescendiente colombiana se agrupa conotras poblaciones africanas reportadas.   doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7705/biomedica.v33i3.807

  19. Genetic polymorphism of 22 autosomal STR markers in a Han population of Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiu-Ling; Chen, Zi-Xiang; Chen, Chu-Guang; Lu, De-Jian

    2016-09-01

    Population genetic data and forensic statistics of 22 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci (D1S1656, D2S1338, D3S3045, D4S2366, D5S2500, D6S477, D7S3048, D8S1132, D9S925, D10S1435, D11S2368, D12S391, D13S325, D14S608, D15S659, D16S539, D17S1290, D18S535, D19S253, D20S470, D21S1270 and GATA198B05) were determined for a sample of 515 unrelated individuals from Han population in Southern China. The expected heterozygosity and the discrimination power varied from 0.7358 to 0.8733 and 0.8915 to 0.9702, respectively. The probability of excluding an unrelated man as the true father (assuming no background relatedness in the population) for trios and for duos ranged from 0.5126 to 0.7415 and 0.3331 to 0.5864, respectively. The studied STRs appear to provide a significant improvement in the statistical power of kinship analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. BliStrTune: Hierarchical Invention of Theorem Proving Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Jakubuv, Jan; Urban, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Inventing targeted proof search strategies for specific problem sets is a difficult task. State-of-the-art automated theorem provers (ATPs) such as E allow a large number of user-specified proof search strategies described in a rich domain specific language. Several machine learning methods that invent strategies automatically for ATPs were proposed previously. One of them is the Blind Strategymaker (BliStr), a system for automated invention of ATP strategies. In this paper we introduce BliSt...

  1. Detection of the introgression loci in Triticum aestivum transferred ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Significant changes of the distribution frequency for the same introgression loci between BC1F2 and BC1F2-F7 populations were observed, and seven selective advantage loci from A. tauschii (Xgdm128-3D, Xgdm8-3D, Xgdm72-3D, Xgwm341-3D, Xgdm63-5D, Xgdm132-6D and Xgdm36-6D) were found, which ...

  2. Genetic characterization of an X-STR decaplex system in the State of Mato Grosso, Brazil: distribution, forensic efficiency and population structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Joyce A; Martins, Denise P; Oliveira-Brancati, Camila I F; Martinez, Juliana; Cicarelli, Regina M B; Souza, Dorotéia R S

    2017-11-01

    Studies with X-STR loci show population genetic substructure, which makes necessary the characterization of such markers in the different geographical and/or ethnic populations. Therefore, this study assessed the distribution and forensic efficiency of an X-STR decaplex system in the population of the State of Mato Grosso, as well as analysed the population structure of this State based on the aforementioned system. All X-STR markers were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and linkage equilibrium, and the DXS6809 was the most informative marker. The power of discrimination value in females and males was 0.99999999995 and 0.9999994, respectively. Analysis of molecular variance indicated 1.10% (p population of the State of Mato Grosso showed lower genetic variation when compared with the Brazilian group (-0.10%, p = 0.67327). The genetic distance analysis showed lower values of F ST (0.0004 ≤ F ST  ≤ 0.00331), with non-significant p value (p > 0.00024), between the populations of Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul, Paraná and the Southeast region of Brazil (except for one sample of Rio de Janeiro). F ST values with significant p values (p ≤ 0.00024) were obtained between the population of Mato Grosso and Iberian, African and some Latin American populations. The X-STR decaplex system proved to be extremely useful in the population of the State of Mato Grosso, and the data obtained does not show the need for a specific forensic database for this State in relation to the Brazilian populations compared in this study, except for population of Rio de Janeiro.

  3. Strålskydd för personal som arbetar inom Interventionell Radiologi

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Johanna; Gustavsson, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Bakgrund: Trots en snabb utveckling av undersökningsmetoderna inom IR har inte strålskydden utvecklats i samma takt. Den joniserande strålning som förekommer på modaliteten kan medföra en hälsorisk för personalen därav finns det stråldosgränser att hålla sig inom för att minimera risken för yrkesrelaterade strålskador. För att förebygga risken för strålningsrelaterade skador är det viktigt att undersöka olika metoder av skydd för att optimera personalens strålsäkerhet.Syfte: Syftet med studie...

  4. Minimal sharing of Y-chromosome STR haplotypes among five endogamous population groups from western and southwestern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Birajalaxmi; Chauhan, P S; Seshadri, M

    2004-10-01

    We attempt to address the issue of genetic variation and the pattern of male gene flow among and between five Indian population groups of two different geographic and linguistic affiliations using Y-chromosome markers. We studied 221 males at three Y-chromosome biallelic loci and 184 males for the five Y-chromosome STRs. We observed 111 Y-chromosome STR haplotypes. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) based on Y-chromosome STRs showed that the variation observed between the population groups belonging to two major regions (western and southwestern India) was 0.17%, which was significantly lower than the level of genetic variance among the five populations (0.59%) considered as a single group. Combined haplotype analysis of the five STRs and the biallelic locus 92R7 revealed minimal sharing of haplotypes among these five ethnic groups, irrespective of the similar origin of the linguistic and geographic affiliations; this minimal sharing indicates restricted male gene flow. As a consequence, most of the haplotypes were population specific. Network analysis showed that the haplotypes, which were shared between the populations, seem to have originated from different mutational pathways at different loci. Biallelic markers showed that all five ethnic groups have a similar ancestral origin despite their geographic and linguistic diversity.

  5. Analysis of matches and partial-matches in a Danish STR data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Curan, James Michael

    2012-01-01

    monozygotic twins (0.09%), 6 redundant STR profiles of unknown cause and 1283 STR profiles from repeated testing of individuals were removed leaving 51,517 complete 10 locus STR profiles for analysis. The number corresponds to approximately 1% of the Danish population. We compared all STR profiles to each....... [3] to compare the observed and expected number of matches and near matches in the data set. We extended the methods by computing the covariance matrix of the summary statistic and used it for the estimation of the identical-by-descent parameter, θ. The analysis demonstrated a number of close...

  6. Analysis of transcriptional and upstream regulatory sequence activity of two environmental stress-inducible genes, NBS-Str1 and BLEC-Str8, of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Swatismita; Kapoor, Sanjay; Tyagi, Akhilesh K

    2012-04-01

    Two abiotic stress-inducible upstream regulatory sequences (URSs) from rice have been identified and functionally characterized in rice. NBS-Str1 and BLEC-Str8 genes have been identified, by analysing the transcriptome data of cold, salt and desiccation stress-treated 7-day-old rice (Oryza sativa L. var. IR64) seedling, to be preferentially responsive to desiccation and salt stress, respectively. NBS-Str1 and BLEC-Str8 genes code for putative NBS (nucleotide binding site)-LRR (leucine rich repeat) and β-lectin domain protein, respectively. NBS-Str1 URS is induced in root tissue, preferentially in vascular bundle, during 3 and 24 h of desiccation stress condition in transgenic 7-day-old rice seedling. In mature transgenic plants, this URS shows induction in root and shoot tissue under desiccation stress as well as under prolonged (1 and 2 day) salt stress. BLEC-Str8 URS shows basal activity under un-stressed condition, however, it is inducible under salt stress condition in both root and leaf tissues in young seedling and mature plants. Activity of BLEC-Str8 URS has been found to be vascular tissue preferential, however, under salt stress condition its activity is also found in the mesophyll tissue. NBS-Str1 and BLEC-Str8 URSs are inducible by heavy metal, copper and manganese. Interestingly, both the URSs have been found to be non responsive to ABA treatment, implying them to be part of ABA-independent abiotic stress response pathway. These URSs could prove useful for expressing a transgene in a stress responsive manner for development of stress tolerant transgenic systems.

  7. Large allele frequency differences between human continental groups are more likely to have occurred by drift during range expansions than by selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, T; Ray, N; Wegmann, D; Excoffier, L

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have found strikingly different allele frequencies between continents. This has been mainly interpreted as being due to local adaptation. However, demographic factors can generate similar patterns. Namely, allelic surfing during a population range expansion may increase the frequency of alleles in newly colonised areas. In this study, we examined 772 STRs, 210 diallelic indels, and 2834 SNPs typed in 53 human populations worldwide under the HGDP-CEPH Diversity Panel to determine to which extent allele frequency differs among four regions (Africa, Eurasia, East Asia, and America). We find that large allele frequency differences between continents are surprisingly common, and that Africa and America show the largest number of loci with extreme frequency differences. Moreover, more STR alleles have increased rather than decreased in frequency outside Africa, as expected under allelic surfing. Finally, there is no relationship between the extent of allele frequency differences and proximity to genes, as would be expected under selection. We therefore conclude that most of the observed large allele frequency differences between continents result from demography rather than from positive selection.

  8. Genetic polymorphism of milk protein loci in Argentinian Holstein cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonvillani Adriana Gloria

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Some alleles of milk protein loci are associated with superior cheese production characteristics. The genetic polymorphism of the milk protein loci alphas1-casein, beta-casein, k-casein and beta-lactoglobulin was examined in Argentinian Holstein cattle. Samples from 12 herds of four regions of Córdoba were analyzed by starch gel electrophoresis. The chi² test was used to assess whether the populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Genotypic diversity was analyzed by the Shannon-Weaver index. The observed genotypic frequencies were analyzed by Hedrick's genetic identity and the genetic distance of Balakrishnan and Sanghvi. The allelic and genotypic frequencies were similar to those of other Holstein populations. The genotypic frequencies of the alphas1-casein and beta-casein loci were in equilibrium, whereas in some populations the k-casein and beta-lactoglobulin loci were not. According to the Shannon-Weaver index the total genetic diversity within each herd was greater than 96%. The high values of identity agreed with the low genetic distances among populations. We conclude that there is extensive genetic homogeneity in Holstein cattle in Córdoba Province and that it would be feasible to select for B alleles at the k-casein and b-lactoglobulin loci in order to improve the quality of milk available for cheese manufacturing.

  9. Revised Strömgren metallicity calibration for red giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilker, Michael

    2000-03-01

    A new calibration of the Strömgren (b-y),m_1 diagram in terms of iron abundance of red giants is presented. This calibration is based on a homogeneous sample of giants in the globular clusters omega Centauri, M 22, and M 55 as well as field giants from the list of Anthony-Twarog & Twarog (\\cite{anth98}). Towards high metallicities, the new calibration is connected to a previous calibration by Grebel & Richtler (\\cite{greb92}), which was unsatisfactory for iron abudances lower than -1.0 dex. The revised calibration is valid for CN-weak/normal red giants in the abundance range of -2.0 <[Fe/H]< 0.0 dex, and a color range of 0.5 < (b-y) < 1.1 mag. As shown for red giants in omega Centauri, CN-weak stars with Strömgren metallicities higher than -1.0 dex cannot be distinguished in the (b-y),m_1 diagram from stars with lower iron abundances but higher CN band strengths. Based on data collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile

  10. Cesta tvorbou webových stránek

    OpenAIRE

    Krčál Martin

    2012-01-01

    Článek v první části popisuje proces tvorby webových stránek od stanovení cílů a definování cílové skupiny přes návrh až po samotnou realizaci. Autor zdůrazňuje důležitost dostatečně velkého a nadšeného vývojového týmu a připomíná nezbytnost průběžného uživatelského testování. Zmiňovány jsou i některé nástroje pro testování stránek z pohledu SEO, použitelnosti a přístupnosti, stejně jako vzrůstající význam mobilních technologií. Druhá část článku je věnována uživatelskému testování a analzýze...

  11. Comparison of Y-STR polymorphisms in three different Slovak population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrejcíková, Eva; Siváková, Daniela; Soták, Miroslav; Bernasovská, Jarmila; Bernasovský, Ivan; Rebała, Krzysztof; Boronová, Iveta; Bôziková, Alexandra; Sovicová, Adriana; Gabriková, Dana; Maceková, Sona; Svícková, Petra; Carnogurská, Jana

    2010-01-01

    Eleven Y-chromosomal microsatellite loci included in the Powerplex Y multiplex kit were analyzed in different Slovak population samples: Habans (n = 39), Romanies (n = 100) and Slovak Caucasian (n = 148) individuals, respectively, from different regions of Slovakia. The analysis of molecular variance between populations indicated that 89.27% of the haplotypic variations were found within populations and only 10.72% between populations (Fst = 0.1027; p = 0.0000). The haplotype diversities were ranging from 0.9258 to 0.9978, and indicated a high potential for differentiating between male individuals. The study reports differences in allele frequencies between the Romanies, Habans and Slovak Caucasian men. Selected loci showed that both the Romany and Haban population belonged to endogamous and relatively small founder population groups, which developed in relatively reproductive isolated groups surrounded by the Slovak Caucasian population.

  12. The dynamic phenomena of strékan music from colonial to contemporary era in Situbondo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panakajaya Hidayatullah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This research is an anthropology of music which discusses the dynamics of strékan music from colonial to contemporary era in Situbondo. In Situbondo, strékan is a term which refers to music for welcoming guests. By ethnography method and postcolonial perspective, this research will discuss social problems and phenomena of strékan music. The result of this research shows that a change of strékan music signifies a change of social condition in Situbondo. In colonial era strékan is assumed by people like music for elite class. The field data show that there is unequal power relation between colonized and colonizer. In pasca-colonial era the hierarchy relation becomes ambivalent. It appears negotiation space between colonial signs and Madurese culture of Situbondo people, considered to be symbolic resistance. Strékan music is reinterpreted as music for low class. In the contemporary era, strékan music tends to market oriented. Strékan music includes dangdut music, following market taste as a consequence of commercialization of art.

  13. Bengt Strömgren: Growing up with astronomy, 1908-1932

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebsdorf, S.O.

    2003-01-01

    Bengt Strömgren's (1908-1987) early career is examined down to 1932, the year of his first landmark article on astrophysics, in which, continuing the numerical tradition at the Copenhagen Observatory, Strömgren applied the still novel quantum mechanics with great faith in its validity. In additio...

  14. Modellering af strømningsforhold og kanaldannelse i fixed bed koksbed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Kvist; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Gøbel, Benny

    2003-01-01

    For at kunne undersøge stabiliteten af en koksbed er der blevet udviklet forskellige modeller til beskrivelse af strømningsforholdene i bedden under iltfri forgasning af biomassekoks. Strømningsforholdene er blevet undersøgt på simple modeller og CFD-modeller...

  15. Population genetics of 23 Y-STR loci in the Mongolian minority population in Inner Mongolia of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tianzhen; Yun, Libing; Gao, Shuang; Gu, Yan; He, Wang; Luo, Haibo; Hou, Yiping

    2016-11-01

    In this study, 23 Y chromosomal STRs (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385a, DYS385b, DYS438, DYS439, DYS437, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, YGATAH4, DYS576, DYS481, DYS549, DYS533, DYS570, and DYS643) were investigated in 258 unrelated individuals of Mongolian descent living in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. A total of 233 different haplotypes were found, and 209 of them were unique. Haplotype diversity was 0.9992 and gene diversity ranged from 0.4840 (DYS391) to 0.9679 (DYS385ab). Both R st pairwise analysis and multidimensional scaling plot showed that the genetic structure of the Mongolian population was significantly different from some Chinese ethnic groups and neighboring populations. It is notable that there were null features existing at DYS448 as observed by the PowerPlex® Y23 System, which could be also obtained by sequencing in the Tibetan population.

  16. Library Spirit and Genius Loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlkild, Nan

    2009-01-01

    The architecture and design of Nyborg Public Library in the light of the concepts "Library Spirit" and "Genius Loci", related to contemporary social and cultural movements, the development of the early welfare state and the "Scandinavian Style".......The architecture and design of Nyborg Public Library in the light of the concepts "Library Spirit" and "Genius Loci", related to contemporary social and cultural movements, the development of the early welfare state and the "Scandinavian Style"....

  17. Måling på ikke sinusformede AC strømme og spændinger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Arne Hejde

    1998-01-01

    Målinger på en- og trefasede spændinger og strømme i elforsyningen. Specielt gennemgås forholdene ved ikke symetriske systemer med overtoner i spændinger og strømme.......Målinger på en- og trefasede spændinger og strømme i elforsyningen. Specielt gennemgås forholdene ved ikke symetriske systemer med overtoner i spændinger og strømme....

  18. LA FAMILIA APOCYNACEAE S. STR. (APOCYNOIDEAE, RAUVOLFIOIDEAE EN URUGUAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Francisco Morales

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un tratamiento de las Apocynaceae s. str. (Apocynoideae, Rauvolfioideae de Uruguay. Se reconocen diez especies de un total de siete géneros: Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco, Condylocarpon isthmicum, Forsteronia glabrescens, Mandevilla coccinea, M. emarginata, M. longiflora, M. petraea, Rhabdadenia madida, Tabernaemontana catharinensis, Vinca major. Se incluyen descripciones, claves, datos de distribución y especimenes examinados. Se seleccionan lectotipos para Dipladenia xanthosoma var. major, Echites emarginatus, E. erectus, E. grandiflorus var. minor, E. pinifolius, Laseguea erecta var. guilleminia f. griseo-olivacea , L. erecta var. obliquinervia f. ovata subf. griseofusca y subf. griseo-olivacea, L. guilleminiana, Macrosiphonia verticillata var. intermedia, M. verticillata var. peduncularis, M. pinifolia f. glabrata y M. pinifolia f. setosa Se designa un neotipo para Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco.

  19. Homozygosity mapping in albinism patients using a novel panel of 13 STR markers inside the nonsyndromic OCA genes: introducing 5 novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordadpoor-Deilamani, Faravareh; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Karimipoor, Morteza; Javadi, Gholam Reza

    2016-05-01

    Albinism is a heterogeneous genetic disorder of melanin synthesis that results in hypopigmented hair, skin and eyes. It is associated with decreased visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus and photophobia. Six genes are known to be involved in nonsyndromic oculocutaneous albinism (OCA). In this study, we aimed to find the disease causing mutations in albinism patients using homozygosity mapping. Twenty three unrelated patients with nonsyndromic OCA or autosomal recessive ocular albinism were recruited in this study. All of the patients' parents had consanguineous marriage and all were screened for TYR mutations previously. At first, we performed homozygosity mapping using fluorescently labeled primers to amplify a novel panel of 13 STR markers inside the OCA genes and then the screened loci in each family were studied using PCR and cycle sequencing methods. We found five mutations including three mutations in OCA2, one mutation in SLC45A2 and one mutation in C10ORF11 genes, all of which were novel. In cases where the disease causing mutations are identical by descent due to a common ancestor, these STR markers can enable us to screen for the responsible genes.

  20. OzPythonPlex: An optimised forensic STR multiplex assay set for the Australasian carpet python (Morelia spilota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavaglia, Sherryn; Linacre, Adrian

    2018-03-02

    Reptile species, and in particular snakes, are protected by national and international agreements yet are commonly handled illegally. To aid in the enforcement of such legislation, we report on the development of three 11-plex assays from the genome of the carpet python to type 24 loci of tetra-nucleotide and penta-nucleotide repeat motifs (pure, compound and complex included). The loci range in size between 70 and 550 bp. Seventeen of the loci are newly characterised with the inclusion of seven previously developed loci to facilitate cross-comparison with previous carpet python genotyping studies. Assays were optimised in accordance with human forensic profiling kits using one nanogram template DNA. Three loci are included in all three of the multiplex reactions as quality assurance markers, to ensure sample identity and genotyping accuracy is maintained across the three profiling assays. Allelic ladders have been developed for the three assays to ensure consistent and precise allele designation. A DNA reference database of allele frequencies is presented based on 249 samples collected from throughout the species native range. A small number of validation tests are conducted to demonstrate the utility of these multiplex assays. We suggest further appropriate validation tests that should be conducted prior to the application of the multiplex assays in criminal investigations involving carpet pythons. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Multiple loci associated with renal function in African Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Shriner

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic kidney disease varies by ethnic group in the USA, with African Americans displaying a two-fold higher rate than European Americans. One of the two defining variables underlying staging of chronic kidney disease is the glomerular filtration rate. Meta-analysis in individuals of European ancestry has identified 23 genetic loci associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. We conducted a follow-up study of these 23 genetic loci using a population-based sample of 1,018 unrelated admixed African Americans. We included in our follow-up study two variants in APOL1 associated with end-stage kidney disease discovered by admixture mapping in admixed African Americans. To address confounding due to admixture, we estimated local ancestry at each marker and global ancestry. We performed regression analysis stratified by local ancestry and combined the resulting regression estimates across ancestry strata using an inverse variance-weighted fixed effects model. We found that 11 of the 24 loci were significantly associated with eGFR in our sample. The effect size estimates were not significantly different between the subgroups of individuals with two copies of African ancestry vs. two copies of European ancestry for any of the 11 loci. In contrast, allele frequencies were significantly different at 10 of the 11 loci. Collectively, the 11 loci, including four secondary signals revealed by conditional analyses, explained 14.2% of the phenotypic variance in eGFR, in contrast to the 1.4% explained by the 24 loci in individuals of European ancestry. Our findings provide insight into the genetic basis of variation in renal function among admixed African Americans.

  2. Short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms in Turkish population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    PIC = 0.880) were higher than the others, whereas the PE value of the D5S818 locus was the lowest (PE = 0.512; PIC. = 0.699). The combined PD, PE and PIC values of nine loci in Turk- ish population were also .... personal identification applications. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 55,. 175–89. Hochmeister M. N., Budowle B., Jung J., ...

  3. Optimizing direct amplification of forensic commercial kits for STR determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, M; Bobillo, M C; Sala, A; Corach, D

    2017-04-01

    Direct DNA amplification in forensic genotyping reduces analytical time when large sample sets are being analyzed. The amplification success depends mainly upon two factors: on one hand, the PCR chemistry and, on the other, the type of solid substrate where the samples are deposited. We developed a workflow strategy aiming to optimize times and cost when starting from blood samples spotted onto diverse absorbent substrates. A set of 770 blood samples spotted onto Blood cards, Whatman ® 3 MM paper, FTA™ Classic cards, and Whatman ® Grade 1 was analyzed by a unified working strategy including a low-cost pre-treatment, a PCR amplification volume scale-down, and the use of the 3500 Genetic Analyzer as the analytical platform. Samples were analyzed using three different commercial multiplex STR direct amplification kits. The efficiency of the strategy was evidenced by a higher percentage of high-quality profiles obtained (over 94%), a reduced number of re-injections (average 3.2%), and a reduced amplification failure rate (lower than 5%). Average peak height ratio among different commercial kits was 0.91, and the intra-locus balance showed values ranging from 0.92 to 0.94. A comparison with previously reported results was performed demonstrating the efficiency of the proposed modifications. The protocol described herein showed high performance, producing optimal quality profiles, and being both time and cost effective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  4. Does the evolutionary conservation of microsatellite loci imply function?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriver, M.D.; Deka, R.; Ferrell, R.E. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellites are highly polymorphic tandem arrays of short (1-6 bp) sequence motifs which have been found widely distributed in the genomes of all eukaryotes. We have analyzed allele frequency data on 16 microsatellite loci typed in the great apes (human, chimp, orangutan, and gorilla). The majority of these loci (13) were isolated from human genomic libraries; three were cloned from chimpanzee genomic DNA. Most of these loci are not only present in all apes species, but are polymorphic with comparable levels of heterozygosity and have alleles which overlap in size. The extent of divergence of allele frequencies among these four species were studies using the stepwise-weighted genetic distance (Dsw), which was previously shown to conform to linearity with evolutionary time since divergence for loci where mutations exist in a stepwise fashion. The phylogenetic tree of the great apes constructed from this distance matrix was consistent with the expected topology, with a high bootstrap confidence (82%) for the human/chimp clade. However, the allele frequency distributions of these species are 10 times more similar to each other than expected when they were calibrated with a conservative estimate of the time since separation of humans and the apes. These results are in agreement with sequence-based surveys of microsatellites which have demonstrated that they are highly (90%) conserved over short periods of evolutionary time (< 10 million years) and moderately (30%) conserved over long periods of evolutionary time (> 60-80 million years). This evolutionary conservation has prompted some authors to speculate that there are functional constraints on microsatellite loci. In contrast, the presence of directional bias of mutations with constraints and/or selection against aberrant sized alleles can explain these results.

  5. Genetic polymorphisms of short tandem repeat loci D13S305, D13S631 and D13S634 in the Han population of Tianjin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunfang; Li, Xiaozhou; Ju, Duan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiuling; Zhang, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) markers, also known as microsatellites, are extensively used in mapping studies, forensics and disease diagnosis due to their small dimension and low mutation and high polymorphism rates. In recent years quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR) has been successfully used to amplify STR markers in the prenatal diagnosis of common chromosomal abnormalities. This method provides a diagnosis of common aneuploidies 24-48 h after sampling with low error rates and cost; however, the size of different alleles, frequency, heterozygosity and distribution of STR markers vary among different populations. In the present study three STR markers, D13S305, D13S631 and D13S634, on chromosome 13 were analyzed in 350 unrelated individuals (200 males and 150 females) from the Han population of Tianjin, China using QF-PCR. Eleven, seven and 11 alleles of each marker were observed, respectively. The frequencies of the genotypes were in good agreement with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P>0.05). The results showed that these three STR markers were highly polymorphic in the Han population of Tianjin, China. The study has provided basic data for use in the prenatal diagnosis of Patau syndrome.

  6. Frequency-Difference Source Localization and Blind Deconvolution in Shallow Ocean Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    successful, the STR work might make underwater acoustic communications more efficient and reliable since sound-channel calibration would not be...specific objectives are to: a) assess the performance of STR using 4-by-4 planar hydrophone array recordings in a reverberant laboratory water tank...and ii) to understand and quantify the utility of the frequency-difference concept for remote underwater source localization when applied to MFP

  7. Allele Frequency Data for 17 Short Tandem Repeats in a Czech Population Sample

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimková, H.; Faltus, Václav; Marván, Richard; Pexa, T.; Stenzl, V.; Brouček, J.; Hořínek, A.; Mazura, Ivan; Zvárová, Jana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2009), e15-e17 ISSN 1872-4973 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : short tandem repeat (STR) * allelic frequency * PowerPlex 16 System * AmpflSTR Identifiler * population genetics * Czech Republic Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.421, year: 2009

  8. STRSeq: A catalog of sequence diversity at human identification Short Tandem Repeat loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettings, Katherine Butler; Borsuk, Lisa A; Ballard, David; Bodner, Martin; Budowle, Bruce; Devesse, Laurence; King, Jonathan; Parson, Walther; Phillips, Christopher; Vallone, Peter M

    2017-11-01

    The STR Sequencing Project (STRSeq) was initiated to facilitate the description of sequence-based alleles at the Short Tandem Repeat (STR) loci targeted in human identification assays. This international collaborative effort, which has been endorsed by the ISFG DNA Commission, provides a framework for communication among laboratories. The initial data used to populate the project are the aggregate alleles observed in targeted sequencing studies across four laboratories: National Institute of Standards and Technology (N=1786), Kings College London (N=1043), University of North Texas Health Sciences Center (N=839), and University of Santiago de Compostela (N=944), for a total of 4612 individuals. STRSeq data are maintained as GenBank records at the U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), which participates in a daily data exchange with the DNA DataBank of Japan (DDBJ) and the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA). Each GenBank record contains the observed sequence of a STR region, annotation ("bracketing") of the repeat region and flanking region polymorphisms, information regarding the sequencing assay and data quality, and backward compatible length-based allele designation. STRSeq GenBank records are organized within a BioProject at NCBI (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/380127), which is sub-divided into: commonly used autosomal STRs, alternate autosomal STRs, Y-chromosomal STRs, and X-chromosomal STRs. Each of these categories is further divided into locus-specific BioProjects. The BioProject hierarchy facilitates access to the GenBank records by browsing, BLAST searching, or ftp download. Future plans include user interface tools at strseq.nist.gov, a pathway for submission of additional allele records by laboratories performing population sample sequencing and interaction with the STRidER web portal for quality control (http://strider.online). Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. STARVATION RESISTANCE IN DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER IN RELATION TO THE POLYMORPHISMS AT THE ADH AND ALPHA-GPDH LOCI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OUDMAN, L; VANDELDEN, W; KAMPING, A; BIJLSMA, R

    In view of the world-wide latitudinal cline of the Adh and alpha Gpdh allozyme frequencies of Drosophila melanogaster and the interactions between these loci, experiments were performed to study the phenotypic effects of these loci. Starvation resistance, oxygen consumption, body weight, protein

  10. High density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I.; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E.M.; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Summary Using the Immunochip custom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, designed for dense genotyping of 186 genome wide association study (GWAS) confirmed loci we analysed 11,475 rheumatoid arthritis cases of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. The data were combined in meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n=2,363) and controls (n=17,872). We identified fourteen novel loci; nine were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and 5 specifically in anti-citrillunated peptide antibody positive disease, bringing the number of confirmed European ancestry rheumatoid arthritis loci to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at six loci and association to low frequency variants (minor allele frequency <0.05) at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analysis of the data generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations. PMID:23143596

  11. Microsatellite loci isolated from the tropical tree Hymenaea courbaril L. (Fabaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonamici, Anna; Cavers, Stephen; Vendramin, G G

    2008-09-01

    We developed 11 microsatellite markers for Hymenaea courbaril for the purpose of studying spatial genetic structure and gene flow. The microsatellite loci were screened in 44 trees from two populations. All loci were polymorphic, exhibiting between two and 16 alleles, and levels of expected heterozygosity from 0.174 to 0.909. Departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were detected for all loci in one population. The estimated null allele frequency is low or moderate. No locus combinations exhibited linkage disequilibrium. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Developmental validation of QIAGEN Investigator®24plex QS Kit and Investigator®24plex GO! Kit: Two 6-dye multiplex assays for the extended CODIS core loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Melanie; Prochnow, Anke; Bussmann, Michael; Scherer, Mario; Peist, Ralf; Steffen, Carolyn

    2017-07-01

    The original CODIS database based on 13 core STR loci has been overwhelmingly successful for matching suspects with evidence. In order to increase the power of discrimination, reduce the possibility of adventitious matches, and expand global data sharing, the CODIS Core Loci Working Group determined the expansion of the CODIS core loci to 20 STR plus three additional "highly recommended" loci (SE33, DY391, Amelogenin) Hares, 2015, 2012 [1,2]. The QIAGEN Investigator 24plex QS and Investigator 24plex GO! Kits are 6-dye multiplex assays that contain all markers of the expanded 23 CODIS core loci along with a unique internal performance control that is co-amplified with the STR markers. The "Quality Sensor" generates additional information for quality control and performance checks. Investigator 24plex QS is designed for purified DNA from casework and reference samples, whereas 24plex GO! is dedicated to direct amplification of reference samples, like blood or buccal cells on FTA or swabs. A developmental validation study was performed on both assays. Here, we report the results of this study which followed the recommendations of the European Network of Forensic Science Institutes (ENFSI) [3] and the Revised Validation Guidelines of the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) [4]. Data included are for PCR-based procedures e.g. reaction conditions, effects of PCR annealing temperature variations, amplification cycles or cyclers, sensitivity (also in the context of the Quality Sensor), performance with simulated inhibition, stability and efficiency, precision, reproducibility, mixture study, concordance, stutter, species specificity, and case-type samples. The validation results demonstrate that the Investigator 24plex QS and Investigator 24plex GO! Kits are robust and reliable identification assays as required for forensic DNA typing in forensic casework analysis and databasing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  13. Y-STR analysis of digital and/or penile penetration cases with no detected spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Andrew; Jones, Emma; Lewis, Jennie; O'Rourke, Paula

    2015-03-01

    This forensic casework trial involved Yfiler(®) testing samples from 47 digital and/or penile penetration cases where the medical examination had occurred within 48h of the alleged incident and no spermatozoa had been detected following Sperm Elution(©). 30% of these cases yielded at least one Y-STR profile comprising three or more alleles per profile and 21% yielded at least one Y-STR profile of ten or more alleles per profile. This trial further investigated the persistence of male DNA in different case types, the location of samples submitted for testing and whether samples from different locations benefit from being combined prior to testing. The data supports the use of Y-STR profiling to provide scientific evidence to investigate whether the alleged sexual activity had occurred as well as to obtain probative evidence in spermatozoa negative penetration cases. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Caelifera and crickets (Orthoptera: Ensifera from slopes of Macošská stráň and Vilémovická stráň (Moravský kras Protected landscape area, Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Niedobová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2008 we found 21 species of grasshoppers and crickets on Macošská stráň slope and 18 species on Vilémovická stráň slope. Both slopes are located in the northern part of the Moravský kras Protected landscape area and have xerothermic character. Both slopes are influenced by pasture management. For the most comprehensive picture of Orthoptera we used a standard method (sweeping of vegetation and nonstandard methods (pitfall traps and Möricke yellow cups. Termophilous species of Orthoptera on Macošská stráň (47% were dominating. On Vilémovická stráň mezophilous species (46% were dominating. The most common species were Stenobothrus lineatus (Panzer, 1796 on Macošská stráň slope and Chorthippus parallelus (Zetterstedt, 1821, Stenobothrus lineatus, Chorthippus bigutulus (Linné, 1758 and Chorthippus dorsatus (Zetterstedt, 1821 on Vilémovická stráň slope. Rare species of this assemblage were Stenobothrus nigromaculatus (Herrich-Schaffer, 1840 which was on Macošská stráň slope only and Tetrix bipunctata (Linnaeus, 1758 which has much bigger abundances also on Macošská stráň slope.

  15. Comparison of DNA yield and STR success rates from different tissues in embalmed bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Amanda; Czado, Natalia; Gangitano, David; Turnbough, Meredith; Hughes-Stamm, Sheree

    2017-01-01

    Formalin fixation is commonly used to preserve tissue sections for pathological testing and embalming cadavers for medical dissection or burial. DNA extracted from formalin-fixed tissues may also provide an alternative source of genetic material for medical diagnosis and forensic casework, such as identifying unknown embalmed human remains. Formaldehyde causes DNA damage, chemical modifications, and degradation, thereby reducing the quantity and quality of DNA available for downstream genetic analyses. By comparing the DNA yield, level of DNA degradation, and short tandem repeat (STR) success of various tissue types, this study is the first of its kind to provide some guidance on which samples from embalmed bodies are likely to generate more complete STR profiles. Tissue samples were dissected from three male embalmed cadavers and included bone, cartilage, hair, muscle, internal organs, skin, teeth, and nail clippings. DNA was purified from all samples using the QIAamp® FFPE Tissue Kit (Qiagen), quantified using the QuantiFiler® Trio DNA Quantification kit (Life Technologies), and genotyped using the GlobalFiler® PCR Amplification Kit (Life Technologies). Results of this study showed variation in DNA quantity and STR success between different types of tissues and some variation between cadavers. Overall, bone marrow samples resulted in the highest DNA yields, the least DNA degradation, and greatest STR success. However, several muscle, hair, and nail samples generated higher STR success rates than traditionally harvested bone and tooth samples. A key advantage to preferentially using these tissue samples over bone (and marrow) and teeth is their comparative ease and speed of collection from the cadaver and processing during DNA extraction. Results also indicate that soft tissues affected by lividity (blood pooling) may experience greater exposure to formalin, resulting in more DNA damage and reduced downstream STR success than tissues under compression. Overall

  16. Detection and Characterization of Streptomycin Resistance (strA-strB) in a Honeybee Gut Symbiont (Snodgrassella alvi) and the Associated Risk of Antibiotic Resistance Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvigsen, Jane; Amdam, Gro V; Rudi, Knut; L'Abée-Lund, Trine M

    2018-03-08

    Use of antibiotics in medicine and farming contributes to increasing numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in diverse environments. The ability of antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) to transfer between bacteria genera contributes to this spread. It is difficult to directly link antibiotic exposure to the spread of ARG in a natural environment where environmental settings and study populations cannot be fully controlled. We used managed honeybees in environments with contrasting streptomycin exposure (USA: high exposure, Norway: low exposure) and mapped the prevalence and spread of transferrable streptomycin resistance genes. We found a high prevalence of strA-strB genes in the USA compared to Norway with 17/90 and 1/90 positive samples, respectively (p resistance genes increases the risk of the spread to new environments as honeybees are moved to new pollination sites.

  17. Y-STR analysis on DNA mixture samples--results of a collaborative project of the ENFSI DNA Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parson, Walther; Niederstätter, Harald; Lindinger, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    The ENFSI (European Network of Forensic Science Institutes) DNA Working Group undertook a collaborative project on Y-STR typing of DNA mixture samples that were centrally prepared and thoroughly tested prior to the shipment. Four commercial Y-STR typing kits (Y-Filer, Applied Biosystems, Foster...

  18. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases.

  19. StrBioLib: a Java library for development of custom computational structural biology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandonia, John-Marc

    2007-08-01

    StrBioLib is a library of Java classes useful for developing software for computational structural biology research. StrBioLib contains classes to represent and manipulate protein structures, biopolymer sequences, sets of biopolymer sequences, and alignments between biopolymers based on either sequence or structure. Interfaces are provided to interact with commonly used bioinformatics applications, including (psi)-blast, modeller, muscle and Primer3, and tools are provided to read and write many file formats used to represent bioinformatic data. The library includes a general-purpose neural network object with multiple training algorithms, the Hooke and Jeeves non-linear optimization algorithm, and tools for efficient C-style string parsing and formatting. StrBioLib is the basis for the Pred2ary secondary structure prediction program, is used to build the astral compendium for sequence and structure analysis, and has been extensively tested through use in many smaller projects. Examples and documentation are available at the site below. StrBioLib may be obtained under the terms of the GNU LGPL license from http://strbio.sourceforge.net/

  20. FaSTR DNA: a new expert system for forensic DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Timothy; McCabe, Brendan; Harbison, Sally Ann

    2008-06-01

    The automation of DNA profile analysis of reference and crime samples continues to gain pace driven in part by a realisation by the criminal justice system of the positive impact DNA technology can have in aiding in the solution of crime and the apprehension of suspects. Expert systems to automate the profile analysis component of the process are beginning to be developed. In this paper, we report the validation of a new expert system FaSTR DNA, an expert system suitable for the analysis of DNA profiles from single source reference samples and from crime samples. We compare the performance of FaSTR DNA with that of other equivalent systems, GeneMapper ID v3.2 (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA) and FSS-i(3) v4 (The Forensic Science Service((R)) DNA expert System Suite FSS-i(3), Forensic Science Service, Birmingham, UK) with GeneScan Analysis v3.7/Genotyper v3.7 software (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA) with manual review. We have shown that FaSTR DNA provides an alternative solution to automating DNA profile analysis and is appropriate for implementation into forensic laboratories. The FaSTR DNA system was demonstrated to be comparable in performance to that of GeneMapper ID v3.2 and superior to that of FSS-i(3) v4 for the analysis of DNA profiles from crime samples.

  1. Canine-specific STR typing of saliva traces on dog bite wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Cordula; Berger, Burkhard; Reinhold, Maximilian; Lutz, Martin; Parson, Walther

    2004-12-01

    Forensic investigations in dog attacks usually involve the examination of bite marks and toothprints, the dog's stomach and pathological methods. For identification of the offending dog we evaluated canine STR typing of saliva traces on dog bite marks. The specificity of 15 canine-specific STRs was tested on human-canine DNA mixtures prior to an applied study in which 52 cases of dog bites were investigated. The first-aid wound bandages as well as swab samples from the surrounding area of the wound were used for DNA analyses. Generally, it was possible to obtain a canine-specific STR profile from the dog's saliva left on the wound area, even when high background of human DNA was present (blood). Interestingly, we found canine STR typing to be more successful when the bandages and swabs showed high amounts of human blood, i.e. when the dog bite was severe. Canine saliva was then sometimes visible as white-coloured secretion on the human blood surface. Less severe bite cases, which did not result in bleeding wounds, showed less success in obtaining useful STR results, probably due to the fact that the surface of the wounds may have been treated before the victims consulted medical aid which therefore removed the canine cells.

  2. Pilot study for early prognosis of Azoospermia in relation to Y-STR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed M. Refaat

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Pilot study for early prognosis of Azoospermia in relation to Y-STR Profiling. Ahmed M. Refaat *. Department of Forensic Biology, College of Forensic Sciences, Naif Arab University for Security Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Received 7 May 2015; accepted 15 June 2015. Available online 6 July 2015.

  3. Molluscan fauna of the lower Gelingseh Beds s. str., Sangkulirang area, Kalimantan Timur (East Borneo)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beets, C.

    1986-01-01

    A compilation is given of the results of an investigation of all the molluscs collected by L.M.R. Rutten some seventy years ago, at five localities in the type area of the Gelingseh Beds s. str., Late Miocene. Thirteen new species are described, viz, Smaragdia gelingsehensis, Rissoina maduparensis,

  4. Prediction of autosomal STR typing success in ancient and Second World War bone samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanič Pajnič, Irena; Zupanc, Tomaž; Balažic, Jože; Geršak, Živa Miriam; Stojković, Oliver; Skadrić, Ivan; Črešnar, Matija

    2017-03-01

    Human-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) has been developed for forensic use in the last 10 years and is the preferred DNA quantification technique since it is very accurate, sensitive, objective, time-effective and automatable. The amount of information that can be gleaned from a single quantification reaction using commercially available quantification kits has increased from the quantity of nuclear DNA to the amount of male DNA, presence of inhibitors and, most recently, to the degree of DNA degradation. In skeletal remains samples from disaster victims, missing persons and war conflict victims, the DNA is usually degraded. Therefore the new commercial qPCR kits able to assess the degree of degradation are potentially able to predict the success of downstream short tandem repeat (STR) typing. The goal of this study was to verify the quantification step using the PowerQuant kit with regard to its suitability as a screening method for autosomal STR typing success on ancient and Second World War (WWII) skeletal remains. We analysed 60 skeletons excavated from five archaeological sites and four WWII mass graves from Slovenia. The bones were cleaned, surface contamination was removed and the bones ground to a powder. Genomic DNA was obtained from 0.5g of bone powder after total demineralization. The DNA was purified using a Biorobot EZ1 device. Following PowerQuant quantification, DNA samples were subjected to autosomal STR amplification using the NGM kit. Up to 2.51ng DNA/g of powder were extracted. No inhibition was detected in any of bones analysed. 82% of the WWII bones gave full profiles while 73% of the ancient bones gave profiles not suitable for interpretation. Four bone extracts yielded no detectable amplification or zero quantification results and no profiles were obtained from any of them. Full or useful partial profiles were produced only from bone extracts where short autosomal (Auto) and long degradation (Deg) PowerQuant targets were detected. It is

  5. Overlap of disease susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Ke, Xiayi; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Packham, Jon; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extremely successful in the search for susceptibility risk factors for complex genetic autoimmune diseases. As more studies are published, evidence is emerging of considerable overlap of loci between these diseases. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), another complex genetic autoimmune disease, the strategy of using information from autoimmune disease GWAS or candidate gene studies to help in the search for novel JIA susceptibility loci has been successful, with confirmed association with two genes, PTPN22 and IL2RA. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that shares similar clinical and pathological features with JIA and, therefore, recently identified confirmed RA susceptibility loci are also excellent JIA candidate loci. Objective To determine the overlap of disease susceptibility loci for RA and JIA. Methods Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at nine RA-associated loci were genotyped in Caucasian patients with JIA (n=1054) and controls (n=3531) and tested for association with JIA. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls using the genetic analysis software, PLINK. Results Two JIA susceptibility loci were identified, one of which was a novel JIA association (STAT4) and the second confirmed previously published associations of the TRAF1/C5 locus with JIA. Weak evidence of association of JIA with three additional loci (Chr6q23, KIF5A and PRKCQ) was also obtained, which warrants further investigation. Conclusion All these loci are good candidates in view of the known pathogenesis of JIA, as genes within these regions (TRAF1, STAT4, TNFAIP3, PRKCQ) are known to be involved in T-cell receptor signalling or activation pathways. PMID:19674979

  6. Involvement of BcStr2 in methionine biosynthesis, vegetative differentiation, multiple stress tolerance and virulence in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wenyong; Yang, Yalan; Zhang, Yu; Lv, Chiyuan; Ren, Weichao; Chen, Changjun

    2016-04-01

    The Str2 gene encodes a cystathionine γ-synthase that is a key enzyme in methionine (Met) biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Met plays a critical role in protein synthesis and diverse cellular processes in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In this study, we characterized the Str2 orthologue gene BcStr2 in Botrytis cinerea. The BcStr2 mutant was unable to grow on minimal medium (MM). In addition, conidia of the mutant were unable to germinate in water-agar medium within 15 h of incubation. Supplementation with 1 mm Met or 0.5 mg/mL homocysteine, but not 1 mm cysteine or 0.5 mg/mL glutathione, rescued the defect in mycelial growth of the BcStr2 deletion mutant. These results indicate that the enzyme encoded by BcStr2 is involved in the conversion of cysteine into homocysteine. The mutant exhibited decreased conidiation and impaired sclerotium development. In addition, the BcStr2 mutant exhibited increased sensitivity to osmotic and oxidative stresses, cell wall-damaging agents and thermal stress. The mutant demonstrated dramatically decreased virulence on host plant tissues. All of the defects were restored by genetic complementation of the mutant with wild-type BcStr2. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that BcStr2 plays a critical role in the regulation of various cellular processes in B. cinerea. © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The Red Queen lives: Epistasis between linked resistance loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, César M J A; Luijckx, Pepijn; Bento, Gilberto; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Ebert, Dieter

    2016-02-01

    A popular theory explaining the maintenance of genetic recombination (sex) is the Red Queen Theory. This theory revolves around the idea that time-lagged negative frequency-dependent selection by parasites favors rare host genotypes generated through recombination. Although the Red Queen has been studied for decades, one of its key assumptions has remained unsupported. The signature host-parasite specificity underlying the Red Queen, where infection depends on a match between host and parasite genotypes, relies on epistasis between linked resistance loci for which no empirical evidence exists. We performed 13 genetic crosses and tested over 7000 Daphnia magna genotypes for resistance to two strains of the bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa. Results reveal the presence of strong epistasis between three closely linked resistance loci. One locus masks the expression of the other two, while these two interact to produce a single resistance phenotype. Changing a single allele on one of these interacting loci can reverse resistance against the tested parasites. Such a genetic mechanism is consistent with host and parasite specificity assumed by the Red Queen Theory. These results thus provide evidence for a fundamental assumption of this theory and provide a genetic basis for understanding the Red Queen dynamics in the Daphnia-Pasteuria system. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. Quantitative Trait Loci in Inbred Lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    Quantitative traits result from the influence of multiple genes (quantitative trait loci) and environmental factors. Detecting and mapping the individual genes underlying such 'complex' traits is a difficult task. Fortunately, populations obtained from crosses between inbred lines are relatively

  9. Forensic potential of the STR DXYS156 in Mexican populations: inference of X-linked allele null.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Rodríguez, M; Martínez-Cortes, G; Páez-Riberos, L A; Sandoval, L; Muñoz-Valle, J F; Ceballos-Quintal, J M; Pinto-Escalante, D; Rangel-Villalobos, H

    2006-01-01

    The pentanucleotide STR (TAAAA)n DXYS156 offers advantages for genetic identity testing. In addition to establish the gender, DXYS156 expands the DNA profile and is able to indicate the possible geographic origin of the individual. We analyzed DXYS156 in 757 individuals of both sexes from Mexican populations. We studied the cosmopolitan Mestizo population and six Mexican ethnic groups: Tarahumaras, Purépechas, Nahuas, Mayas, Huicholes and Mezcala Indians. The six shorter (4-10) and the three larger alleles (11-13) were specific for the X and Y-chromosomes, respectively. A random distribution of alleles into genotypes was observed in males and females from each population. We estimated the power of exclusion for paternity testing according to the son's gender, and the power of discrimination in forensic casework. In addition, we detected a relatively high frequency of an X-linked allele null, principally in Mexican-Mestizos (3.6%), which must be considered when DXYS156 be applied for identification purposes.

  10. Dissociation of peptidyl-tRNA from ribosomes is perturbed by streptomycin and by strA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, A B; Menninger, J R

    1984-01-01

    Peptidyl-tRNA may dissociate preferentially from ribosomes during protein synthesis when it is inappropriate to, does not correctly complement, the messenger RNA. To test this idea, growing cultures of Escherichia coli were treated with streptomycin to increase the frequency of errors during protein synthesis. Since the treated cells had a temperature-sensitive peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase and could not destroy dissociated peptidyl-tRNA, it was possible to measure the rate of its accumulation after raising the temperature to non-permissive conditions. Both low and high doses of streptomycin enhanced the rate of dissociation and accumulation of peptidyl-tRNA. The rank order of rates of dissociation/accumulation of various isoaccepting tRNA families was not significantly altered by the drug treatment. We concluded that streptomycin stimulated a normal pathway for dissociation of peptidyl-tRNA. Two streptomycin- resistant strains of E. coli had higher rates of dissociation of peptidyl-tRNA than did their sensitive parent strain. When treated with high doses of the drug, the resistant strains showed slightly reduced rates of dissociation of peptidyl-tRNA. These results were interpreted in terms of a two state, two site model for protein synthesis: streptomycin enhances the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA to a tight state of the ribosome A site; the strA mutation enhances translocation to a loose state of the ribosome P site.

  11. Second-generation sequencing of forensic STRs using the Ion Torrent™ HID STR 10-plex and the Ion PGM™

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fordyce, Sarah L; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Børsting, Claus

    2015-01-01

    by Ion Torrent™ software. Hence, the combination of the STR 10-plex and the Ion PGM™ represents the first fully integrated SGS STR typing solution from PCR to data analysis. In this study, four experiments were performed to evaluate the alpha-version of the STR 10-plex: (1) typing of control samples; (2...... drop-out in one of the 100pg dilutions. Mixtures were easily deconvoluted down to 20:1, although alleles from the minor contributor had to be identified manually as some signals were not called by the Ion Torrent™ software. Interestingly, full profiles were obtained for all biological samples from real...... crime and identification cases, in which only partial profiles were obtained with PCR-CE assays. In conclusion, the Ion Torrent™ HID STR 10-plex panel offers an all-in-one solution from amplification of STRs and amelogenin, and sequencing to data analysis....

  12. Fetal gender determination through Y-STR analysis of maternal plasma during the third trimester of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaa M.H. Aal-Hamdan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: It is recommended to use Y-STR profiling as an alternative technique for fetal gender determination during the third trimester of pregnancy, in addition to its significance in forensic casework.

  13. An unusual occurrence of repeated single allele variation on Y-STR locus DYS458

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Shrivastava

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Six brothers were accused of gagging and raping a woman. A single male Y-STR profile was obtained from vaginal smear swab and clothes of the victim, which did not match with the DNA profile of the accused brothers. As a reference point, the blood sample of their father (aged 87 years was also analyzed with the same kit. The Y-STR haplotype of all six brothers was found to be the same as that of their father except at locus DYS458. At this locus, while the eldest, second and fourth siblings share allele 18 with their father, a loss of one repeat (allele 17 instead of 18 is observed in the third son while fifth and sixth siblings have allele 19 representing a gain of one repeat. Thus, two changes viz. a gain (twice and loss of one repeat at this locus in one generation is both interesting and unusual.

  14. The STR/ort mouse model of spontaneous osteoarthritis - an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, K A; Poulet, B; Wentworth, D N; Pitsillides, A A

    2017-06-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease and a world-wide healthcare burden. Characterized by cartilage degradation, subchondral bone thickening and osteophyte formation, osteoarthritis inflicts much pain and suffering, for which there are currently no disease-modifying treatments available. Mouse models of osteoarthritis are proving critical in advancing our understanding of the underpinning molecular mechanisms. The STR/ort mouse is a well-recognized model which develops a natural form of osteoarthritis very similar to the human disease. In this Review we discuss the use of the STR/ort mouse in understanding this multifactorial disease with an emphasis on recent advances in its genetics and its bone, endochondral and immune phenotypes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Validation of a model to estimate personalised screening frequency to monitor diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Amber A W A; Walraven, Iris; van 't Riet, Esther; Aspelund, Thor; Lund, Sigrún H; Elders, Petra; Polak, Bettine C P; Moll, Annette C; Keunen, Jan E E; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Nijpels, Giel

    2014-07-01

    Our study aimed to validate a model to determine a personalised screening frequency for diabetic retinopathy. A model calculating a personalised screening interval for monitoring retinopathy based on patients' risk profile was validated using the data of 3,319 type 2 diabetic patients in the Diabetes Care System West-Friesland, the Netherlands. Two-field fundus photographs were graded according to the EURODIAB coding system. Sight-threatening retinopathy (STR) was considered to be grades 3-5. Validity of the model was assessed using calibration and discrimination measures. We compared model-based time of screening with time of STR diagnosis and calculated the differences in the number of fundus photographs using the model compared with those in annual or biennial screening. During a mean of 53 months of follow-up, 76 patients (2.3%) developed STR. Using the model, the mean screening interval was 31 months, leading to a reduced screening frequency of 61% compared with annual screening and 23% compared with biennial screening. STR incidence occurred after a mean of 26 months after the model-based time of screening in 67 patients (88.2%). In nine patients (11.8%), STR had developed before the model-based time of screening. The discriminatory ability of the model was good (C-statistic 0.83; 95% CI 0.74, 0.92). Calibration showed that the model overestimated STR risk. A large reduction in retinopathy screening was achieved using the model in this population of patients with a very low incidence of retinopathy. Considering the number of potentially missed cases of STR, there is room for improvement in the model. Use of the model for personalised screening may eventually help to reduce healthcare use and costs of diabetes care.

  16. GLUTENIN LOCI VARIABILITY OF CROATIAN WHEAT GERMPLASM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Rukavina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Glutenins loci were used for variability estimation in 50 varieties of hexaploid winter wheat originated from Croatian breeding centres. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE in presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS was used for determination of high molecular weight glutenins (HMW-GS. Number of allels per loci ranged from 3 at Glu-A1 to 5 at Glu-B1 and Glu-D1, the average number of allels was 4.33. The highest genetic diversity was found at loci Glu-B1 (He=0.687. The most frequent subunit at loci Glu-A1 was 2* (56%. At loci Glu-B1 the most common combination of subunits was 7+8 with 40%, and at loci Glu-D1 5+10 with 68%. The study also defines high quality varieties with largest number of Glu-scores. The results attained from this study allow further development of specific breeding programs for winter wheat quality improvement and improvers creation.

  17. El subgénero Trigona S. Str. Jurine 1808 (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Meliponinae) en Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Édgar Javier Hernández Martínez; Guiomar Nates Parra

    2004-01-01

    Para Colombia se registran 28 de los 29 taxones descritos para el subgénero Trigona s. str. T. (T.) albipennis Almeida, 1992; T. (T.) amalthea Olivier, 1789; T. (T.) hyalinata var. amazonensis Ducke, 1916; T. (T.) hyalinata var. branneri Cockerell, 1912; T. (T.) chanchamayoënsis Schwarz, 1948; T. (T.) cilipes Fabricius, 1804; T. (T.) corvina Cockerell, 1913; T. (T.) crassipes Fabricius, 1793; T. (T.) dallatorreana Friese, 1900; T. (T.) dimidiata var. venezuelana Schwarz, 1948; T. (T.) dimi...

  18. El subgénero Trigona S. Str. Jurine 1808 (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Meliponinae) en Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Martínez Édgar Javier; Nates Parra Guiomar

    2004-01-01

    Para Colombia se registran 28 de los 29 taxones descritos para el subgénero Trigona s. str. T. (T.) albipennis Almeida, 1992; T. (T.) amalthea Olivier, 1789; T. (T.) hyalinata var. amazonensis
    Ducke, 1916; T. (T.) hyalinata var. branneri Cockerell, 1912; T. (T.) chanchamayoënsis Schwarz, 1948; T. (T.) cilipes Fabricius, 1804; T. (T.) corvina Cockerell, 1913; T. (T.) crassipes Fabricius, 1793; T. (T.) dallatorreana Friese, 1900; T. (T.) dimidiata var. venezuelana Schwarz, 1948; T. (...

  19. Object-oriented Bayesian networks for evaluating DIP-STR profiling results from unbalanced DNA mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereda, G; Biedermann, A; Hall, D; Taroni, F

    2014-01-01

    The genetic characterization of unbalanced mixed stains remains an important area where improvement is imperative. In fact, with current methods for DNA analysis (Polymerase Chain Reaction with the SGM Plus multiplex kit), it is generally not possible to obtain a conventional autosomal DNA profile of the minor contributor if the ratio between the two contributors in a mixture is smaller than 1:10. This is a consequence of the fact that the major contributor's profile 'masks' that of the minor contributor. Besides known remedies to this problem, such as Y-STR analysis, a new compound genetic marker that consists of a Deletion/Insertion Polymorphism (DIP), linked to a Short Tandem Repeat (STR) polymorphism, has recently been developed and proposed elsewhere in literature. The present paper reports on the derivation of an approach for the probabilistic evaluation of DIP-STR profiling results obtained from unbalanced DNA mixtures. The procedure is based on object-oriented Bayesian networks (OOBNs) and uses the likelihood ratio as an expression of the probative value. OOBNs are retained in this paper because they allow one to provide a clear description of the genotypic configuration observed for the mixed stain as well as for the various potential contributors (e.g., victim and suspect). These models also allow one to depict the assumed relevance relationships and perform the necessary probabilistic computations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Design and validation of a highly discriminatory 10-locus Y-chromosome STR multiplex system

    KAUST Repository

    D'Amato, María Eugenia

    2011-03-01

    The Y-chromosome STRs (short tandem repeat) markers are routinely utilized in the resolution of forensic casework related to sexual assault. For this, the forensic community has adopted a set of eleven (core) Y-STR that is incorporated in all commercial diagnostic systems. Our previous studies of Y-STR polymorphisms in the South African population identified low levels of diversity and discrimination capacity for many commercial marker sets, determining a limited applicability of these systems to the local population groups. To overcome this shortcoming, we designed a Y-STR 10-plex system that shows higher discriminatory capacity (DC) than available commercial systems. The markers were selected from a population group of 283 individuals with African, European and Asian ancestry genotyped at 45 Y-STRs, applying an optimization based selection procedure to achieve the highest possible DC with the minimal number of markers. The 10-plex was satisfactorily subjected to developmental validation tests following the SWGDAM guidelines and shows potential for its application to genealogical and evolutionary studies. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. 1000 Genomes-based meta-analysis identifies 10 novel loci for kidney function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorski, Mathias; Van der Most, Peter J.; Teumer, Alexander; Chu, Audrey Y.; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Nolte, Ilja M.; Cocca, Massimiliano; Taliun, Daniel; Gomez, Felicia; Li, Yong; Tayo, Bamidele; Tin, Adrienne; Feitosa, Mary F.; Aspelund, Thor; Attia, John; Biffar, Reiner; Bochud, Murielle; Boerwinkle, Eric; Borecki, Ingrid; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Chouraki, Vincent; Ciullo, Marina; Coresh, Josef; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Curhan, Gary C.; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; Dehghan, Abbas; Dengler, Laura; Ding, Jingzhong; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Endlich, Karlhans; Enroth, Stefan; Esko, Tonu; Franco, Oscar H.; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Girotto, Giorgia; Gottesman, Omri; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hancock, Stephen J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Helmer, Catherine; Hoellerer, Simon; Hofer, Edith; Hofman, Albert; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Homuth, Georg; Hu, Frank B.; Huth, Cornelia; Hutri-Kahonen, Nina; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Imboden, Medea; Johansson, Asa; Kahonen, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraemer, Holly; Kramer, Bernhard K.; Kumar, Ashish; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehtimaki, Terho; de Borst, Martin; Navis, Gerjan; Swertz, Morris; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Lu, Yingchang; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; McEvoy, Mark A.; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Metzger, Marie; Mihailov, Evelin; Mitchell, Paul; Nauck, Matthias; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Olden, Matthias; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Pistis, Giorgio; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rettig, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Ruderfer, Douglas; Ruggiero, Daniela; Saba, Yasaman; Sala, Cinzia; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Scott, Rodney J.; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Smith, Albert V.; Sorice, Rossella; Stengel, Benedicte; Stracke, Sylvia; Strauch, Konstantin; Toniolo, Daniela; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Ulivi, Sheila; Viikari, Jorma S.; Voelker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Voelzke, Henry; Vuckovic, Dragana; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Jie Jin; Yang, Qiong; Chasman, Daniel I.; Tromp, Gerard; Snieder, Harold; Heid, Iris M.; Fox, Caroline S.; Koettgen, Anna; Pattaro, Cristian; Boeger, Carsten A.; Fuchsberger, Christian

    2017-01-01

    HapMap imputed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed > 50 loci at which common variants with minor allele frequency > 5% are associated with kidney function. GWAS using more complete reference sets for imputation, such as those from The 1000 Genomes project, promise to identify novel

  2. Rare coding variants and X-linked loci associated with age at menarche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Day, Felix R.; Sulem, Patrick; Ruth, Katherine S.; Tung, Joyce Y.; Hinds, David A.; Esko, Tonu; Elks, Cathy E.; Altmaier, Elisabeth; He, Chunyan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M.; Schick, Ursula M.; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Thompson, Deborah J.; Traglia, Michela; Wang, Carol A.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Barbieri, Caterina; Coviello, Andrea D.; Cucca, Francesco; Demerath, Ellen W.; Dunning, Alison M.; Gandin, Ilaria; Grove, Megan L.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Hofman, Albert; Huang, Jinyan; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Karasik, David; Kriebel, Jennifer; Lange, Ethan M.; Lange, Leslie A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, Xin; Luan, Jian'an; Maegi, Reedik; Morrison, Alanna C.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pirie, Ailith; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David; Reiner, Alex P.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia F.; Schlessinger, David; Scott, Robert A.; Stoeckl, Doris; Visser, Jenny A.; Voelker, Uwe; Vozzi, Diego; Wilson, James G.; Zygmunt, Marek; Boerwinkle, Eric; Buring, Julie E.; Crisponi, Laura; Easton, Douglas F.; Hayward, Caroline; Hu, Frank B.; Liu, Simin; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E.; Ridker, Paul M.; Strauch, Konstantin; Streeten, Elizabeth A.; Toniolo, Daniela; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Ulivi, Sheila; Voelzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Wellons, Melissa; Franceschini, Nora; Chasman, Daniel I.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Murray, Anna; Stefansson, Kari; Murabito, Joanne M.; Ong, Ken K.; Perry, John R. B.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Kerrison, Nicola D.; Sharp, Stephen J.; Sims, Matt; Barroso, Ines; Deloukas, Panos; McCarthy, Mark I.; Arriola, Larraitz; Balkau, Beverley; Barricarte, Aurelio; Boeing, Heiner; Franks, Paul W.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Grioni, Sara; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J.; Navarro, Carmen; Nilsson, Peter M.; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Ramon Quiros, J.; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Slimani, Nadia; Tjonneland, Anne; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Riboli, Elio; Smith, Blair H.; Campbell, Archie; Deary, Ian J.; McIntosh, Andrew M.

    More than 100 loci have been identified for age at menarche by genome-wide association studies; however, collectively these explain only similar to 3% of the trait variance. Here we test two overlooked sources of variation in 192,974 European ancestry women: low-frequency proteincoding variants and

  3. Rare coding variants and X-linked loci associated with age at menarche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); F.R. Day (Felix); P. Sulem (Patrick); K.S. Ruth (Katherine S.); J.Y. Tung (Joyce Y.); D.A. Hinds (David A.); T. Esko (Tõnu); C.E. Elks (Cathy); E.L. Altmaier (Elizabeth); C. He (Chunyan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); E. Mihailov (Evelin); E. Porcu (Eleonora); A. Robino (Antonietta); L.M. Rose (Lynda); U.M. Schick (Ursula); L. Stolk (Lisette); A. Teumer (Alexander); D. Thompson (Deborah); M. Traglia (Michela); C.A. Wang (Carol A.); L.M. Yerges-Armstrong (Laura); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); C. Barbieri (Caterina); A.D. Coviello (Andrea); F. Cucca (Francesco); E.W. Demerath (Ellen); A.M. Dunning (Alison); I. Gandin (Ilaria); M.L. Grove (Megan L.); D.F. Gudbjartsson (Daniel); L.J. Hocking (Lynne); A. Hofman (Albert); J. Huang (Jian); R.D. Jackson (Rebecca); D. Karasik (David); J. Kriebel (Jennifer); E.M. Lange (Ethan); L.A. Lange (Leslie); C. Langenberg (Claudia); X. Li (Xin); J. Luan; R. Mägi (Reedik); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); A. Pirie (Ailith); O. Polasek (Ozren); D.J. Porteous (David J.); A. Reiner (Alexander); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); I. Rudan (Igor); C. Sala (Cinzia); D. Schlessinger (David); R.A. Scott (Robert); D. Stöckl (Doris); J.A. Visser (Jenny); U. Völker (Uwe); D. Vozzi (Diego); J.G. Wilson (James); M. Zygmunt (Marek); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); J.E. Buring (Julie); L. Crisponi (Laura); D.F. Easton (Douglas); C. Hayward (Caroline); F.B. Hu (Frank); S. Liu (Simin); A. Metspalu (Andres); C.E. Pennell (Craig); P.M. Ridker (Paul); K. Strauch (Konstantin); E.A. Streeten (Elizabeth); D. Toniolo (Daniela); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S. Ulivi (Shelia); H. Völzke (Henry); N.J. Wareham (Nick); M. Wellons (Melissa); N. Franceschini (Nora); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); A. Murray (Anna); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); J. Murabito (Joanne); K.K. Ong (Ken); J.R.B. Perry (John); N.G. Forouhi (Nita G.); N.D. Kerrison (Nicola D.); S.J. Sharp (Stephen J.); M.A. Sims (Matthew); I. Barroso (Inês); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); L. Arriola (Larraitz); B. Balkau (Beverley); A. Barricarte (Aurelio); H. Boeing (Heiner); P.W. Franks; C. Gonzalez (Carlos); S. Grioni (Sara); R. Kaaks (Rudolf); T.J. Key (Timothy J.); C. Navarro (Carmen); P.M. Nilsson (Peter M.); K. Overvad (Kim); D. Palli (Domenico); S. Panico (Salvatore); J.R. Quirós; O. Rolandsson (Olov); C. Sacerdote (Carlotta); M.-J. Sánchez (María-José); N. Slimani (Nadia); A. Tjonneland (Anne); R. Tumino (Rosario); D.L. Van Der A (Daphne L.); Y.T. van der Schouw (Yvonne); E. Riboli (Elio); B.H. Smith (Blair); A. Campbell (Archie); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); A.M. McIntosh (Andrew)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMore than 100 loci have been identified for age at menarche by genome-wide association studies; however, collectively these explain only ∼ 3% of the trait variance. Here we test two overlooked sources of variation in 192,974 European ancestry women: low-frequency protein-coding variants

  4. Allele and haplotype distribution for 16 Y-STRs (AmpFlSTR Y-filer kit) in the state of Chihuahua at North Center of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Alarcón, A B; Moguel-Torres, M; León-Jiménez, A K; Cuéllar-Nevárez, G E; Rangel-Villalobos, H

    2007-05-01

    The AmpFlSTR Y-filer kit, including 16 Y-STRs was analyzed in 326 males from Chihuahua, at North Central, Mexico. Allele frequencies and gene diversity for each locus were estimated. Four allele duplications, namely DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391 and DYS439; and one allele null at DYS448 were observed in the sample. The haplotype diversity was 99.97+/-0.3%. The AMOVA results, including a previous report from West of Mexico (Jalisco), showed that most of the genetic variability between these Mexican populations is attributable to intrapopulational differences (99.87%). This result supports a low-genetic differentiation between males from North and West regions of Mexico.

  5. Evaluation of the MeltPro TB/STR assay for rapid detection of streptomycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Hu, Siyu; Li, Guoli; Li, Hui; Liu, Xiaoli; Niu, Jianjun; Wang, Feng; Wen, Huixin; Xu, Ye; Li, Qingge

    2015-03-01

    Rapid and comprehensive detection of drug-resistance is essential for the control of tuberculosis, which has facilitated the development of molecular assays for the detection of drug-resistant mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We hereby assessed the analytical and clinical performance of an assay for streptomycin-resistant mutations. MeltPro TB/STR is a closed-tube, dual-color, melting curve analysis-based, real-time PCR test designed to detect 15 streptomycin-resistant mutations in rpsL 43, rpsL 88, rrs 513, rrs 514, rrs 517, and rrs 905-908 of M. tuberculosis. Analytical studies showed that the accuracy was 100%, the limit of detection was 50-500 bacilli per reaction, the reproducibility in the form of Tm variation was within 1.0 °C, and we could detect 20% STR resistance in mixed bacterial samples. The cross-platform study demonstrated that the assay could be performed on six models of real-time PCR instruments. A multicenter clinical study was conducted using 1056 clinical isolates, which were collected from three geographically different healthcare units, including 709 STR-susceptible and 347 STR-resistant isolates characterized on Löwenstein-Jensen solid medium by traditional drug susceptibility testing. The results showed that the clinical sensitivity and specificity of the MeltPro TB/STR was 88.8% and 95.8%, respectively. Sequencing analysis confirmed the accuracy of the mutation types. Among all the 8 mutation types detected, rpsL K43R (AAG → AGG), rpsL K88R (AAG → AGG) and rrs 514 A → C accounted for more than 90%. We concluded that MeltPro TB/STR represents a rapid and reliable assay for the detection of STR resistance in clinical isolates. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Population database on: D1S1656, D2S441, D2S1338, D3S1358, D8S1179, D10S1248, D22S1045, D12S391, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, FGA, TH01, vWA loci included in NGM system based on one thousand unrelated individuals from Lodz region of Central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Jacewicz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A population data obtained on the basis of sample of 1000 unrelated individuals of Polish ancestry living in Lodz region of Central Poland with use of fluorescent multiplex-PCR and capillary electrophoresis were presented. Evaluation included 15 polymorphic loci DNA – STR from NGM multiplex-PCR set, ie. D1S1656, D2S441, D2S1338, D3S1358, D8S1179, D10S1248, D12S391, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, D22S1045, FGA, TH01, vWA. The allele frequency distribution and crucial statistical parameters for the investigated markers and the whole set were calculated. The compliance of the studied population with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, independence of inheritance and high parameters of the usefulness in forensic genetics have been demonstrated. The interpopulation comparison performed by the „neighbor-joining” method as well as multidimensional scaling depicted the genetic distances dividing the examined Polish population from other populations of Poland, Europe and the world.

  7. Positive Selection on Loci Associated with Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke Sadler

    Full Text Available Much of the evolution of human behavior remains a mystery, including how certain disadvantageous behaviors are so prevalent. Nicotine addiction is one such phenotype. Several loci have been implicated in nicotine related phenotypes including the nicotinic receptor gene clusters (CHRNs on chromosomes 8 and 15. Here we use 1000 Genomes sequence data from 3 populations (Africans, Asians and Europeans to examine whether natural selection has occurred at these loci. We used Tajima's D and the integrated haplotype score (iHS to test for evidence of natural selection. Our results provide evidence for strong selection in the nicotinic receptor gene cluster on chromosome 8, previously found to be significantly associated with both nicotine and cocaine dependence, as well as evidence selection acting on the region containing the CHRNA5 nicotinic receptor gene on chromosome 15, that is genome wide significant for risk for nicotine dependence. To examine the possibility that this selection is related to memory and learning, we utilized genetic data from the Collaborative Studies on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA to test variants within these regions with three tests of memory and learning, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS Block Design, WAIS Digit Symbol and WAIS Information tests. Of the 17 SNPs genotyped in COGA in this region, we find one significantly associated with WAIS digit symbol test results. This test captures aspects of reaction time and memory, suggesting that a phenotype relating to memory and learning may have been the driving force behind selection at these loci. This study could begin to explain why these seemingly deleterious SNPs are present at their current frequencies.

  8. The Adaptive Change of HLA-DRB1 Allele Frequencies Caused by Natural Selection in a Mongolian Population That Migrated to the South of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Sun

    Full Text Available Pathogen-driven balancing selection determines the richness of human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles. Changes in the pathogen spectrum may cause corresponding changes in HLA loci. Approximately 700 years ago, a Mongolian population moved from the north of China to the Yunnan region in the south of China. The pathogen spectrum in the south of China differs from that in the north. In this study, changes in the HLA genes in the Yunnan Mongolian population, as well as the underlying mechanism, were investigated. A sequence-based typing method (SBT was used to genotype HLA-DRB1 in 470 individuals from two Mongolian populations and another five ethnic groups. Meanwhile, 10 autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs were genotyped to assess the influence of genetic background on HLA-DRB1 frequencies. The frequencies of certain alleles changed significantly in the Mongolian population that migrated to Yunnan. For example, DRB1*12:02:01 increased from 6.1% to 35.4%. STR analysis excluded the possibility of a recent bottleneck and indicated that 50% of the genetic consistency between northern and southern Mongolians; Tajima's D value for HLA-DRB1 exon2 and dN/dS analysis showed that the HLA-DRB1 genes in both Mongolian populations were under balancing selection. However, the sites under natural selection changed. We proposed that the dramatically change of HLA frequencies in southern Mongolian was caused by a combination of inter-population gene flow and natural selection. Certain diseases specific to the south of China, such as malaria, may be the driving force behind the enhanced DRB1*12:02:01 frequency.

  9. Efficient assembly of de novo human artificial chromosomes from large genomic loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stromberg Gregory

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Artificial Chromosomes (HACs are potentially useful vectors for gene transfer studies and for functional annotation of the genome because of their suitability for cloning, manipulating and transferring large segments of the genome. However, development of HACs for the transfer of large genomic loci into mammalian cells has been limited by difficulties in manipulating high-molecular weight DNA, as well as by the low overall frequencies of de novo HAC formation. Indeed, to date, only a small number of large (>100 kb genomic loci have been reported to be successfully packaged into de novo HACs. Results We have developed novel methodologies to enable efficient assembly of HAC vectors containing any genomic locus of interest. We report here the creation of a novel, bimolecular system based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs for the construction of HACs incorporating any defined genomic region. We have utilized this vector system to rapidly design, construct and validate multiple de novo HACs containing large (100–200 kb genomic loci including therapeutically significant genes for human growth hormone (HGH, polycystic kidney disease (PKD1 and ß-globin. We report significant differences in the ability of different genomic loci to support de novo HAC formation, suggesting possible effects of cis-acting genomic elements. Finally, as a proof of principle, we have observed sustained ß-globin gene expression from HACs incorporating the entire 200 kb ß-globin genomic locus for over 90 days in the absence of selection. Conclusion Taken together, these results are significant for the development of HAC vector technology, as they enable high-throughput assembly and functional validation of HACs containing any large genomic locus. We have evaluated the impact of different genomic loci on the frequency of HAC formation and identified segments of genomic DNA that appear to facilitate de novo HAC formation. These genomic loci

  10. Seasonally fluctuating selection can maintain polymorphism at many loci via segregation lift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Meike J; Bergland, Alan O; Feldman, Marcus W; Schmidt, Paul S; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2017-11-14

    Most natural populations are affected by seasonal changes in temperature, rainfall, or resource availability. Seasonally fluctuating selection could potentially make a large contribution to maintaining genetic polymorphism in populations. However, previous theory suggests that the conditions for multilocus polymorphism are restrictive. Here, we explore a more general class of models with multilocus seasonally fluctuating selection in diploids. In these models, the multilocus genotype is mapped to fitness in two steps. The first mapping is additive across loci and accounts for the relative contributions of heterozygous and homozygous loci-that is, dominance. The second step uses a nonlinear fitness function to account for the strength of selection and epistasis. Using mathematical analysis and individual-based simulations, we show that stable polymorphism at many loci is possible if currently favored alleles are sufficiently dominant. This general mechanism, which we call "segregation lift," requires seasonal changes in dominance, a phenomenon that may arise naturally in situations with antagonistic pleiotropy and seasonal changes in the relative importance of traits for fitness. Segregation lift works best under diminishing-returns epistasis, is not affected by problems of genetic load, and is robust to differences in parameters across loci and seasons. Under segregation lift, loci can exhibit conspicuous seasonal allele-frequency fluctuations, but often fluctuations may be small and hard to detect. An important direction for future work is to formally test for segregation lift in empirical data and to quantify its contribution to maintaining genetic variation in natural populations.

  11. Comparative mapping reveals quantitative trait loci that affect spawning time in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Araneda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spawning time in salmonids is a sex-limited quantitative trait that can be modified by selection. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, various quantitative trait loci (QTL that affect the expression of this trait have been discovered. In this study, we describe four microsatellite loci associated with two possible spawning time QTL regions in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch. The four loci were identified in females from two populations (early and late spawners produced by divergent selection from the same base population. Three of the loci (OmyFGT34TUF, One2ASC and One19ASC that were strongly associated with spawning time in coho salmon (p < 0.0002 were previously associated with QTL for the same trait in rainbow trout; a fourth loci (Oki10 with a suggestive association (p = 0.00035 mapped 10 cM from locus OmyFGT34TUF in rainbow trout. The changes in allelic frequency observed after three generations of selection were greater than expected because of genetic drift. This work shows that comparing information from closely-related species is a valid strategy for identifying QTLs for marker-assisted selection in species whose genomes are poorly characterized or lack a saturated genetic map.

  12. Strömgren photometry in globular clusters: M55 & M22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, P.; Hilker, M.; Richtler, T.

    1999-10-01

    We present Strömgren CCD photometry for the two galactic globular clusters M55 (NGC 6809) and M22 (NGC 6656). We find average Strömgren metallicities of -1.71+/- 0.04 dex for M55 and -1.62+/- 0.08 dex for M22. The determination of metal abundances in cluster giants with the Strömgren m_1 index in comparison with spectroscopic data from Briley et al. (1993) and Norris & Freeman (1982, 1983) shows that M55 and M22 have different distributions of cyanogen strengths. In M55, no CN abundance variations are visible among the giant-branch stars. In striking contrast, a large dispersion of cyanogen strengths is seen in M22. For M22 we find patchily distributed variations in the foreground reddening of Delta E(B-V) ~ 0.07, which explain the colour dispersion among the giant-branch stars. There is no evidence for a spread in iron within M22 since the variations in m_1 are dominated by the large range in CN abundances, as already found by Anthony-Twarog et al. (1995). The difference between M55 and M22 may resemble the difference in integral CN band strength between M31 globular clusters and the galactic system. The colour-magnitude diagram of M55 shows the presence of a population of 56 blue-straggler stars that are more centrally concentrated than the red giant-branch stars. Based on data collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile

  13. DNA persistence of bite marks on food and its relevance for STR typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Céline M; Gass, Anja; Klein-Unseld, Rachel; Wiegand, Peter

    2017-09-01

    In forensic DNA analysis, salivary traces at crime scenes are a promising way to identify a person. However, crime scenes are oftentimes investigated a while after the crime and recovered samples might have been degraded leading to poor PCR amplification. Probably due to decomposition and negative visual impression of spoiled food, bite mark samples make up only a small part of our casework routine. In this study, bite marks on apples and chocolate bars as well as on an inert surface (microscope slide) were stored up to 3 weeks indoors and outdoors during different seasons and analyzed for amylase activity and DNA quantity and quality. The results underlined the stability of human nuclear DNA not only on inert but also on biological surfaces and their forensic usefulness even when bite marks are stored 21 days under adverse but realistic conditions at a crime scene. Overall, amylase activity as well as DNA quantity decreased over time depending on storage environment with a certain inter- and intrapersonal variation. But amylase activity testing was not found to be an appropriate screening tool for further analysis. Apple bite marks resulted in generally higher DNA amounts than chocolate bars and microscope slides. Although mold reduced the DNA quantity, complete STR profiles could be analyzed. High air humidity and cold temperatures were found to act preservative on raw food with high water content but caused loss of information over time for smooth inert surfaces and hygroscopic foods like sweets. Many factors are involved in the stability of DNA in bite marks and its resulting quality and quantity available for an STR analysis. However, since there was a substantial proportion of informative STR profiles even from bite marks stored for 21 days, the results encourage the analysis of those even if their visual appearance seems unfavorable.

  14. New satellite DNA in Lacerta s. str. lizards (Sauria: Lacertidae): evolutionary pathways and phylogenetic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, Doina; Grechko, Vernata V; Darevsky, Ilya S; Kramerov, Dmitri A

    2004-11-15

    A new tandemly repeated (satellite) DNA family namely Agi160, from Lacerta agilis and Lacerta strigata (Lacerta sensu stricto (s. str.), Linnaeus 1758) have been cloned and sequenced. Agi160 is found in the above two species, as well as two other representatives of the same genus, L. viridis and L. media. DNA hybridization did not reveal it in Darevskia, Podarcis, Zootoca, Eremias, Ophisops, and Gallotia - the other genera of the family Lacertidae. The results suggest that Agi160 is a Lacerta s. str. specific family of tandem DNA repeats. However, a comparison between sequences of Agi160 and CLsat repeat units revealed 60 bp regions 62-74% identical. The latter is a satellite DNA family typical for Darevskia (syn. "L. saxicola complex") (Grechko et al., Molecular-genetic classification and phylogenetic relatedness of some species of Lacertidae lizards by taxonoprint data. Mol Biol 32:172-183, 1988.). Both Agi160 and CLsat tandem repeats share several common features (e.g., the same AT content and distribution of multiple short A-T runs, internal structure of repeated units, the presence of conservative regions). These data are indicative of their common origin and a possibly strong selective pressure upon conserving both satellites. A comparative analysis of structure, organization, and abundance of these two families of satDNA reveals evolutionary pathways that led to their formation and divergence. The data are consistent with the hypotheses of the concerted evolution of satellite DNA families. The possibility of use of Agi160 as a phylogenetic tool, defining relationships within Lacerta s. str., as well as within the whole family of Lacertidae is discussed. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Strømmålinger ved Sæby Udløbsledning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    Med henblik på at vurdere tidevandsstrømningens amplitude i det kystnære område ud for Sæby har man i ca. 14 dage fra 25.5.81 til 11.6.81 haft udlagt en Aanderraa RCM 4 strømmåler ca. 1 m under overfladen på ca. 4 m vanddybde. Måleren la ca. 900 m fra land i en linje, som var en forlængelse af...

  16. A new autosomal STR nineplex for canine identification and parentage testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Asch, Barbara; Alves, Cíntia; Gusmão, Leonor

    2009-01-01

    power (matching probability=1.63/10(10) and matching probability among siblings=4.9/10(3)). Allele sequences and a proposal for standardized nomenclature are also herein presented, aiming at implementing the use of this system in forensic DNA typing and population genetic studies. This approach resulted...... in an optimized and well-characterized canine DNA genotyping system that is highly performing and straightforward to integrate and employ routinely. Although this STR multiplex was developed for use and tested in a case-study population, the Portuguese breed Cão de Gado Transmontano, it proved to be useful...

  17. Vurdering av strømforhold og partikkelspredning ved etablering av ny dypvannskai ved Rana Industriterminal

    OpenAIRE

    Staalstrøm, Andre; Kempa, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Det skal etableres en ny dypvannskai ved Rana Industriterminal, og i den forbindelse har NIVA gjort vurderinger av strømforhold i området og partikkelspredning i anleggsperioden. I denne rapporten er det tatt utgangspunkt i at 135 000 m³ med masse skal mudres opp. Det er videre antatt at 2 % av denne massen spres i Ranfjorden, og dette utgjør 1620 tonn tørr masse. Denne mengden tilsvarer den samme mengden partikler som kan tilføres fjorden fra Ranelva i løpet av en ukes tid, og anses ikke som...

  18. Etnokartografie v díle Drahomíry Stránské

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vařeka, Josef; Plessingerová, A.

    15[57]-16[58], - (1999), s. 69-78 ISSN 1211-8117. [Lidová kultura 20. století, její výzkum, dokumentace a prezentace. Věnováno 100. výročí narození doc. dr. Drahomíry Stránské. Rožnov pod Radhoštěm, 08.09.1999] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA0058803 Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  19. Detection of quantitative trait loci in broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaam, van J.T.

    2000-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the development and application of methods for the detection of genes with a substantial influence on quantitative traits, so called quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in broilers. For the purpose of detection of QTLs, an experiment was initiated. A three generation

  20. 52 Genetic Loci Influencing Myocardial Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Harst, Pim; van Setten, Jessica; Verweij, Niek; Vogler, Georg; Franke, Lude; Maurano, Matthew T.; Wang, Xinchen; Leach, Irene Mateo; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Hayward, Caroline; Sorice, Rossella; Meirelles, Osorio; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Polašek, Ozren; Tanaka, Toshiko; Arking, Dan E.; Ulivi, Sheila; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, Albert V.; Dörr, Marcus; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Magnani, Jared W.; Fabiola Del Greco, M.; Zhang, Weihua; Nolte, Ilja M.; Silva, Claudia T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tragante, Vinicius; Esko, Tõnu; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Adriaens, Michiel E.; Andersen, Karl; Barnett, Phil; Bis, Joshua C.; Bodmer, Rolf; Buckley, Brendan M.; Campbell, Harry; Cannon, Megan V.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Lin Y.; Delitala, Alessandro; Devereux, Richard B.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B.; Haugen, Eric; Heinig, Matthias; Hernandez, Dena G.; Hillege, Hans L.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hubner, Norbert; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Iorio, Annamaria; Kähönen, Mika; Kellis, Manolis; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooner, Ishminder K.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kors, Jan A.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Lage, Kasper; Launer, Lenore J.; Levy, Daniel; Lundby, Alicia; Macfarlane, Peter W.; May, Dalit; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Nappo, Stefania; Naitza, Silvia; Neph, Shane; Nord, Alex S.; Nutile, Teresa; Okin, Peter M.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Oostra, Ben A.; Penninger, Josef M.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Pers, Tune H.; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Pinto, Yigal M.; Pfeufer, Arne; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prins, Bram P.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rice, Ken M.; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Schafer, Sebastian; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Sehmi, Jobanpreet; Silljé, Herman H.W.; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Sinner, Moritz F.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Spector, Timothy D.; Spiering, Wilko; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Strauch, Konstantin; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Trinh, Bosco; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van den Boogaard, Malou; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Visscher, Peter M.; Vitart, Veronique; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Weichenberger, Christian X.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.; Yang, Jian; Bezzina, Connie R.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Snieder, Harold; Wright, Alan F.; Rudan, Igor; Boyer, Laurie A.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Ciullo, Marina; Sanna, Serena; Lehtimäki, Terho; Wilson, James F.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Alonso, Alvaro; Gasparini, Paolo; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kääb, Stefan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Felix, Stephan B.; Heckbert, Susan R.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Hicks, Andrew A.; Chambers, John C.; Jamshidi, Yalda; Visel, Axel; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Isaacs, Aaron; Samani, Nilesh J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Myocardial mass is a key determinant of cardiac muscle function and hypertrophy. Myocardial depolarization leading to cardiac muscle contraction is reflected by the amplitude and duration of the QRS complex on the electrocardiogram (ECG). Abnormal QRS amplitude or duration reflect changes in myocardial mass and conduction, and are associated with increased risk of heart failure and death. OBJECTIVES This meta-analysis sought to gain insights into the genetic determinants of myocardial mass. METHODS We carried out a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 4 QRS traits in up to 73,518 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. RESULTS We identified 52 genomic loci, of which 32 are novel, that are reliably associated with 1 or more QRS phenotypes at p < 1 × 10−8. These loci are enriched in regions of open chromatin, histone modifications, and transcription factor binding, suggesting that they represent regions of the genome that are actively transcribed in the human heart. Pathway analyses provided evidence that these loci play a role in cardiac hypertrophy. We further highlighted 67 candidate genes at the identified loci that are preferentially expressed in cardiac tissue and associated with cardiac abnormalities in Drosophila melanogaster and Mus musculus. We validated the regulatory function of a novel variant in the SCN5A/SCN10A locus in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, our findings provide new insights into genes and biological pathways controlling myocardial mass and may help identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27659466

  1. Transposon Tn5393e carrying the aphA1-containing transposon Tn6023 upstream of strAB does not confer resistance to streptomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Amy K; Hall, Ruth M

    2011-09-01

    The simplest form of transposon Tn5393 carries the strA and strB genes that confer resistance to streptomycin, in addition to its transposition determinants. Tn5393e, made up of Tn5393 and a second transposon, Tn6023, was found in an IncHI2 plasmid, pSRC125, recovered from a multiply antibiotic-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolate of bovine origin. Tn6023 is made up of the aphA1b gene flanked by two inversely oriented copies of insertion sequence (IS) IS26 and is flanked by an 8 bp duplication. It is related to several other transposons that carry aphA1b in fragments of differing length, also flanked by copies of IS26. Tn6023 is located in the tnpR gene of Tn5393, which lies upstream of the strA and strB genes, and the combined structure was designated Tn5393e. Although neither strA nor strB contain any mutations that would inactivate them, pSRC125 does not confer resistance to streptomycin, indicating that the strA and strB genes are not expressed. In Tn5393, strA and strB are transcribed from the tnpR promoter, and in Tn5393e neither this transcript nor the transcript from the aphA1b promoter in Tn6023 must reach strAB. Tn5393e was previously found in different locations in Corynebacteria, indicating that it can move and suggesting a wide distribution. The structures of several further variants of Tn5393 found in GenBank were analyzed and assigned variant designations Tn5393f-Tn5393i.

  2. [Genetic diversity of microsatellite loci in captive Amur tigers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Gaung; Li, Di-Qiang; Xiao, Qi-Ming; Rao, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Wen

    2004-09-01

    The tiger is one of the most threatened wildlife species since the abundance and distribution of tiger have decreased dramatically in the last century. The wild Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) only distributed in northeast China, the far east area of Russia and the north Korea and its size of wild population is about 450 in the world and 20 in China. Several hundred captive populations of Amur tigers are the main source to protect gene library of tiger and the source of recovering the wild populations. The Breeding Center for Felidae at Hengdaohezi and Haoerbin Tiger Park in Heilongjiang Province is the biggest captive breeding base in China. How to make clear the genetic pedigree and establish reasonable breeding system is the urgent issues. So we use the microsatellite DNA markers and non-invasive technology to research on the genetic diversity of captive Amur tiger in this study. Ten microsatellite loci (Fca005, Fca075, Fca094, Fca152, Fca161, Fca294, Pti002, Pti003, Pti007 and Pti010), highly variable nuclear markers, were studied their genetic diversity in 113 captive Amur tigers. The PCR amplified products of microsatellite loci were detected by non-denatured polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Allele numbers, allelic frequency, gene heterozygosity(H(e)), polymorphism information content(PIC) and effective number of allele(N(e)) were calculated. 41 alleles were found and their size were ranged from 110bp to 250bp in ten microsatellite loci, Fca152 had 6 alleles, Fca075, Fca094 and Fca294 had 5 alleles, Fca005 and Pti002 had 4 alleles and the others had 3 alleles in all tiger samples, respectively. The allelic frequencies were from 0.009 to 0.767; The He ranged from 0.385 to 0.707, and Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value; the PIC were from 0.353 to 0.658, Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value; and N(e) were from 1.626 to 3.409, Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value, which showed the ten

  3. M13 multiple stellar populations seen with the eyes of Strömgren photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, A.; Massari, D.; Bragaglia, A.; Dalessandro, E.; Tolstoy, E.

    2018-03-01

    We present a photometric study of M13 multiple stellar populations over a wide field of view, covering approximately 6.5 half-light radii, using archival Isaac Newton Telescope observations to build an accurate multiband Strömgren catalogue. The use of the Strömgren index cy permits us to separate the multiple populations of M13 on the basis of their position on the red giant branch. The comparison with medium and high resolution spectroscopic analysis confirms the robustness of our selection criterion. To determine the radial distribution of stars in M13, we complemented our data set with Hubble Space Telescope observations of the cluster core, to compensate for the effect of incompleteness affecting the most crowded regions. From the analysis of the radial distributions, we do not find any significant evidence of spatial segregation. Some residuals may be present in the external regions where we observe only a small number of stars. This finding is compatible with the short dynamical time-scale of M13 and represents, to date, one of the few examples of fully spatially mixed multiple populations in a massive globular cluster.

  4. Strömgren survey for asteroseismology and galactic archaeology: Let the saga begin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casagrande, L.; Dotter, A.; Milone, A. P.; Marino, A. F.; Asplund, M.; Schlesinger, K. J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Aguirre, V. Silva; Lund, M. N.; Grundahl, F.; Nissen, P. E. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Stello, D. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Huber, D. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Serenelli, A. M. [Institute of Space Sciences (IEEC-CSIC), Campus UAB, Fac. Ciéncies, Torre C5 parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Cassisi, S.; Pietrinferni, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, via Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Hodgkin, S. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Feltzing, S. [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 43, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Flynn, C. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Schönrich, R. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States); Wang, W., E-mail: luca.casagrande@anu.edu.au [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Asteroseismology has the capability of precisely determining stellar properties that would otherwise be inaccessible, such as radii, masses, and thus ages of stars. When coupling this information with classical determinations of stellar parameters, such as metallicities, effective temperatures, and angular diameters, powerful new diagnostics for Galactic studies can be obtained. The ongoing Strömgren survey for Asteroseismology and Galactic Archaeology has the goal of transforming the Kepler field into a new benchmark for Galactic studies, similar to the solar neighborhood. Here we present the first results from a stripe centered at a Galactic longitude of 74° and covering latitude from about 8° to 20°, which includes almost 1000 K giants with seismic information and the benchmark open cluster NGC 6819. We describe the coupling of classical and seismic parameters, the accuracy as well as the caveats of the derived effective temperatures, metallicities, distances, surface gravities, masses, and radii. Confidence in the achieved precision is corroborated by the detection of the first and secondary clumps in a population of field stars with a ratio of 2 to 1 and by the negligible scatter in the seismic distances among NGC 6819 member stars. An assessment of the reliability of stellar parameters in the Kepler Input Catalog is also performed, and the impact of our results for population studies in the Milky Way is discussed, along with the importance of an all-sky Strömgren survey.

  5. The young open cluster NGC 7067 using Strömgren photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monguió, M.; Negueruela, I.; Marco, A.; González-Fernández, C.; Alonso-Santiago, J.; Costado, M. T.; Casamiquela, L.; López-Corredoira, M.; Molgó, J.; Vilardell, F.; Alfaro, E. J.; Antoja, T.; Figueras, F.; Garcia, M.; Jordi, C.; Romero-Gómez, M.

    2017-04-01

    NGC 7067 is a young open cluster located in the direction between the first and the second Galactic quadrants and close to the Perseus spiral arm. This makes it useful for studies of the nature of the Milky Way spiral arms. Strömgren photometry taken with the Wide Field Camera at the Isaac Newton Telescope allowed us to compute individual physical parameters for the observed stars and hence to derive the cluster's physical parameters. Spectra from the 1.93-m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence helped to check and improve the results. We obtained photometry for 1233 stars, individual physical parameters for 515 and spectra for 9 of them. The 139 selected cluster members lead to a cluster distance of 4.4 ± 0.4 kpc, with an age below log10(t(yr)) = 7.3 and a present mass of 1260 ± 160 M⊙. The morphology of the data reveals that the centre of the cluster is at (α, δ) = (21: 24: 13.69, +48: 00: 39.2) J2000, with a radius of 6.1 arcmin. Strömgren and spectroscopic data allowed us to improve the previous parameters available for the cluster in the literature.

  6. STRAF-A convenient online tool for STR data evaluation in forensic genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouy, Alexandre; Zieger, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Population data in forensic genetics has to be checked for a variety of statistical parameters before it can be employed for case work. A lot of very powerful statistical tools are available for this task, most of them developed by labs having their research focus on population genetics or evolution. However, most of these programs require a substantial amount of experience. In addition, to our knowledge, none of the freely available programs calculates all the common parameters for a population study in forensic genetics at once, based on a single input file. We present here a convenient online tool that fills this gap. STRAF (STR Analysis for Forensics) provides an intuitive interface and input file format and computes all the relevant parameters for a classical population study based on autosomal STR data at once and in a convenient way. In addition, STRAF includes a PCA module that can be used for population substructure detection or quality control. The results generated by the program were verified by recalculating parameters from an already published population study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Linkage analysis: Inadequate for detecting susceptibility loci in complex disorders?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, L.L.; Nagatomi, J. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) may provide valuable clues about approaches to detecting susceptibility loci in other oligogenic disorders. Numerous studies have demonstrated significant association between IDDM and a VNTR in the 5{prime} flanking region of the insulin (INS) gene. Paradoxically, all attempts to demonstrate linkage of IDDM to this VNTR have failed. Lack of linkage has been attributed to insufficient marker locus information, genetic heterogeneity, or high frequency of the IDDM-predisposing allele in the general population. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is located 2.7 kb from INS on the 5` side of the VNTR and shows linkage disequilibrium with INS region loci. We typed a highly polymorphic microsatellite within TH in 176 multiplex families, and performed parametric (lod score) linkage analysis using various intermediate reduced penetrance models for IDDM (including rare and common disease allele frequencies), as well as non-parametric (affected sib pair) linkage analysis. The scores significantly reject linkage for recombination values of .05 or less, excluding the entire 19 kb region containing TH, the 5{prime} VNTR, the INS gene, and IGF2 on the 3{prime} side of INS. Non-parametric linkage analysis also provided no significant evidence for linkage (mean TH allele sharing 52.5%, P=.12). These results have important implications for efforts to locate genes predisposing to complex disorders, strongly suggesting that regions which are significantly excluded by linkage methods may nevertheless contain predisposing genes readily detectable by association methods. We advocate that investigators routinely perform association analyses in addition to linkage analyses.

  8. Nondetectability of restriction fragments and independence of DNA fragment sizes within and between loci in RFLP typing of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, R.; Zhong, Y.; Jin, L. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States)); Budowle, B. (FBI Academy, Quantico, VA (United States))

    1994-08-01

    The authors provide experimental evidence showing that, during the restriction-enzyme digestion of DNA samples, some of the HaeIII-digested DNA fragments are small enough to prevent their reliable sizing on a Southern gel. As a result of such nondetectability of DNA fragments, individuals who show a single-band DNA profile at a VNTR locus may not necessarily be true homozygotes. In a population database, when the presence of such nondetectable alleles is ignored, they show that a pseudodependence of alleles within as well as across loci may occur. Using a known statistical method, under the hypothesis of independence of alleles within loci, they derive an efficient estimate of null allele frequency, which may be subsequently used for testing allelic independence within and across loci. The estimates of null allele frequencies, thus derived, are shown to agree with direct experimental data on the frequencies of HaeIII-null alleles. Incorporation of null alleles into the analysis of the forensic VNTR database suggests that the assumptions of allelic independence within and between loci are appropriate. In contrast, a failure to incorporate the occurrence of null alleles would provide a wrong inference regarding the independence of alleles within and between loci. 47 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume

    OpenAIRE

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Jahanshad, Neda; Chauhan, Ganesh; Stein, Jason L.; Hofer, Edith; Renteria, Miguel E.; Bis, Joshua C.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Ikram, M. Kamran; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Vernooij, Meike W.; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpinnings of hippocampal structure here we perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 33,536 individuals and discover six independent loci significantly associated with hippocampal ...

  10. Two genetic loci associated with ankle injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Stuart K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Fredericson, Michael; Dragoo, Jason L.; Ioannidis, John P. A.

    2017-01-01

    Ankle injuries, including sprains, strains and other joint derangements and instability, are common, especially for athletes involved in indoor court or jumping sports. Identifying genetic loci associated with these ankle injuries could shed light on their etiologies. A genome-wide association screen was performed using publicly available data from the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH) including 1,694 cases of ankle injury and 97,646 controls. An indel (chr21:47156779:...

  11. A rapid nuclear staining test using cationic dyes contributes to efficient STR analysis of telogen hair roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-Yeon; Ha, Eun-Ju; Woo, Seung-Kyun; Lee, So-Min; Lim, Kyung-Hee; Eom, Yong-Bin

    2017-07-01

    Telogen hairs presented in the crime scene are commonly encountered as trace evidence. However, short tandem repeat (STR) profiling of the hairs currently have low and limited use due to poor success rate. To increase the success rate of STR profiling of telogen hairs, we developed a rapid and cost-effective method to estimate the number of nuclei in the hair roots. Five cationic dyes, Methyl green (MG), Harris hematoxylin (HH), Methylene blue (MB), Toluidine blue (TB), and Safranin O (SO) were evaluated in this study. We conducted a screening test based on microscopy and the percentage of loss with nuclear DNA, in order to select the best dye. MG was selected based on its specific nuclei staining and low adverse effect on the hair-associated nuclear DNA. We examined 330 scalp and 100 pubic telogen hairs with MG. Stained hairs were classified into five groups and analyzed by STR. The fast staining method revealed 70% (head hair) and 33.4% (pubic hair) of full (30 alleles) and high partial (18-29 alleles) STR profiling proportion from the lowest nuclei count group (one to ten nuclei). The results of this study demonstrated a rapid, specific, nondestructive, and high yield DNA profiling method applicable for screening telogen hairs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Multiple stellar populations in the globular cluster M3 (NGC 5272) : a Strömgren perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massari, Davide; Lapenna, Emilio; Bragaglia, Angela; Dalessandro, Emanuele; Contreras Ramos, Rodrigo; Amigo, Pía

    2016-01-01

    We present Strömgren photometry of the Galactic Globular Cluster M3 to study its multiple generations phenomenon. The use of different colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and especially of the notoriously efficient cy index allowed us to detect a double red giant branch in the cluster CMD. After

  13. Developmental validation of a Cannabis sativa STR multiplex system for forensic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Christopher; Gilmore, Simon; Robertson, James; Peakall, Rod

    2008-09-01

    A developmental validation study based on recommendations of the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) was conducted on a multiplex system of 10 Cannabis sativa short tandem repeat loci. Amplification of the loci in four multiplex reactions was tested across DNA from dried root, stem, and leaf sources, and DNA from fresh, frozen, and dried leaf tissue with a template DNA range of 10.0-0.01 ng. The loci were amplified and scored consistently for all DNA sources when DNA template was in the range of 10.0-1.0 ng. Some allelic dropout and PCR failure occurred in reactions with lower template DNA amounts. Overall, amplification was best using 10.0 ng of template DNA from dried leaf tissue indicating that this is the optimal source material. Cross species amplification was observed in Humulus lupulus for three loci but there was no allelic overlap. This is the first study following SWGDAM validation guidelines to validate short tandem repeat markers for forensic use in plants.

  14. STR analysis of artificially degraded DNA-results of a collaborative European exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Peter M; Bender, Klaus; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2004-01-01

    Degradation of human DNA extracted from forensic stains is, in most cases, the result of a natural process due to the exposure of the stain samples to the environment. Experiences with degraded DNA from casework samples show that every sample may exhibit different properties in this respect......, and that it is difficult to systematically assess the performance of routinely used typing systems for the analysis of degraded DNA samples. Using a batch of artificially degraded DNA with an average fragment size of approx. 200 bp a collaborative exercise was carried out among 38 forensic laboratories from 17 European...... countries. The results were assessed according to correct allele detection, peak height and balance as well as the occurrence of artefacts. A number of common problems were identified based on these results such as strong peak imbalance in heterozygous genotypes for the larger short tandem repeat (STR...

  15. Population genetic studies in the Balkans. II. DNA-STR-systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckenbeck, W; Scheil, H G; Schmidt, H D; Efremovska, L; Xirotiris, N

    2001-09-01

    Within a study of the genetics of Southeastern European populations four DNA-STR-systems (D21S11, FGA, TH01, VWA) were examined in seven samples (samples of three Aromuns and four other Balkan populations). The results have been compared to data from four samples from literature (Austrians, Germans, Hungarians, Slovenians). The results show three clusters: a) the Aromuns from Albania (Andon Poci) and Macedonia (Stip region), b) the Romanian Aromuns (Kogalniceanu), Romanians (Constanta, Ploiesti) and Albanians (Tirana) und c) the data from literature. A sample of Northeastern Greece clearly differs from these three clusters. Including seven serum protein polymorphisms (without the populations from literature) results in two clusters: a) the three Aromun populations and b) Albanians and Romanians. Again the sample of Northeastern Greece clearly differs from these clusters.

  16. Oligomerisation of C. elegans Olfactory Receptors, ODR-10 and STR-112, in Yeast

    KAUST Repository

    Tehseen, Muhammad

    2014-09-25

    It is widely accepted that vertebrate G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) associate with each other as homo- or hetero-dimers or higher-order oligomers. The C. elegans genome encodes hundreds of olfactory GPCRs, which may be expressed in fewer than a dozen chemosensory neurons, suggesting an opportunity for oligomerisation. Here we show, using three independent lines of evidence: co-immunoprecipitation, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and a yeast two-hybrid assay that nematode olfactory receptors (ORs) oligomerise when heterologously expressed in yeast. Specifically, the nematode receptor ODR-10 is able to homo-oligomerise and can also form heteromers with the related nematode receptor STR-112. ODR-10 also oligomerised with the rat I7 OR but did not oligomerise with the human somatostatin receptor 5, a neuropeptide receptor. In this study, the question of functional relevance was not addressed and remains to be investigated.

  17. Determination of genetic polymorphism in Guney Karaman local Turkish sheep breed by using STR markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karslı, Taki; Balcıoǧlu, Murat Soner

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess genetic diversity of Güney Karaman Turkish local sheep breed. A total of 29 samples were genotyped by using 14 STR markers. All markers were polymorphic. The number of alleles in Güney Karaman sheep breed ranged from 3 to 11 per locus, with a mean of 7.42. The average observed and expected heterozygosity was 0.659 and 0.794, respectively. Mean inbreeding coefficient (Fis) value was found 0.175. The PIC values ranged from 0.569 to 0.860 with a mean of 0.743. The findings of this research demonstrate at moderate level gene diversity and heterozygosity with lower inbreeding in Güney Karaman sheep breed.

  18. First evidence of multiple populations along the AGB from Strömgren photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruyters, Pieter; Casagrande, Luca; Milone, Antonino P.; Hodgkin, Simon T.; Serenelli, Aldo; Feltzing, Sofia

    2017-07-01

    Spectroscopic studies have demonstrated that nearly all Galactic globular clusters (GCs) harbour multiple stellar populations with different chemical compositions. Moreover, colour-magnitude diagrams based exclusively on Strömgrem photometry have allowed us to identify and characterise multiple populations along the RGB of a large number of clusters. In this paper we show for the first time that Strömgren photometry is also very efficient at identifying multiple populations along the AGB, and demonstrate that the AGB of M 3, M 92, NGC 362, NGC 1851, and NGC 6752 are not consistent with a single stellar population. We also provide a catalogue of RGB and AGB stars photometrically identified in these clusters for further spectroscopic follow-up studies. We combined photometry and elemental abundances from the literature for RGB and AGB stars in NGC 6752 where the presence of multiple populations along the AGB has been widely debated. We find that, while the MS, SGB, and RGB host three stellar populations with different helium and light element abundances, only two populations of AGB stars are present in the cluster. These results are consistent with standard evolutionary theory. Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.Full Tables B.1 and B.2 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/603/A37

  19. A revised nomenclature for transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and ERV-like sequences comprise 8% of the human genome. A hitherto unknown proportion of ERV loci are transcribed and thus contribute to the human transcriptome. A small proportion of these loci encode functional proteins. As the role of ERVs in normal and diseased biological processes is not yet established, transcribed ERV loci are of particular interest. As more transcribed ERV loci are likely to be identified in the near future, the development of a systematic nomenclature is important to ensure that all information on each locus can be easily retrieved. Results Here we present a revised nomenclature of transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci that sorts loci into groups based on Repbase classifications. Each symbol is of the format ERV + group symbol + unique number. Group symbols are based on a mixture of Repbase designations and well-supported symbols used in the literature. The presented guidelines will allow newly identified loci to be easily incorporated into the scheme. Conclusions The naming system will be employed by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee for naming transcribed human ERV loci. We hope that the system will contribute to clarifying a certain aspect of a sometimes confusing nomenclature for human endogenous retroviruses. The presented system may also be employed for naming transcribed loci of human non-ERV repeat loci. PMID:21542922

  20. PUTATIVE LOCI ASSOCIATED TO POLYEMBRYONY IN MAIZE POPULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Gerardo Gaona-Lozano

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyembryony (PE is a reproductive phenomenon that produces more than one plant per seed in maize and other species. The objective of this study was to identify polymorphic DNA bands associated to the genetic expression of this trait using AFLPs. The genetic materials used in this study were 19 Polyembryonic experimental maize lines from two populations, identified as BAP (dwarf, high PE frequency genotypes and NAP (normal height, high PE frequency and 16 non-polyembryonic commercial genotypes (NPE. Results showed that the PE seeds had a germination rate of 89.47 %, where 28.23 % were single seedlings and 71.76 % were polyembryonic seedlings. Most of the polyembryonic seeds produced double plants although some triple plants cases were also observed. In addition, twenty nine putative loci were identified associated to the maize polyembryony; this association may be related to the differential origins of the maize populations. In addition, the rate of genetic diversity between the groups PE and NPE was estimated at the locus level using the Shannon index, getting a range of polymorphism from 29% to 53%, this could be related to the origin of the tested samples and their phenotypic and genotypic traits. These results suggest that the polymorphic bands may be related to the expression of genes linked to polyembryony in maize.

  1. Brugada syndrome risk loci seem protective against atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Laura; Nielsen, Jonas B; Darkner, Stine

    2014-01-01

    genotyped using TaqMan assays. The frequencies of risk alleles in the AF population and the control population were compared in two-by-two models. One variant, rs10428132 at SCN10A, was associated with a statistically significant decreased risk of AF (odds ratio (OR)=0.77, P=0.001). A meta......-analysis was performed by enriching the control population with allele frequencies from controls in the recently published BrS GWAS (2230 alleles). In this meta-analysis, both rs10428132 at SCN10A (OR=0.73, P=5.7 × 10(-6)) and rs11708996 at SCN5A (OR=0.80, P=0.02) showed a statistically significant decreased risk of AF...... associated with BrS was lower in AF patients than in patients free of AF, suggesting a protective role of these loci in developing AF.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 26 March 2014; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.46....

  2. A large conjugative Acinetobacter baumannii plasmid carrying the sul2 sulphonamide and strAB streptomycin resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidian, Mohammad; Ambrose, Stephanie J; Hall, Ruth M

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that often complicates treatment because of its high level of resistance to antibiotics. Though plasmids can potentially introduce various genes into bacterial strains, compared to other Gram-negative bacteria, information about the unique A. baumannii plasmid repertoire is limited. Here, whole genome sequence data was used to determine the plasmid content of strain A297 (RUH875), the reference strain for the globally disseminated multiply resistant A. baumannii clone, global clone 1(GC1). A297 contains three plasmids. Two known plasmids were present; one, pA297-1 (pRAY*), carries the aadB gentamicin, kanamycin and tobramycin resistance gene and another is an 8.7kb cryptic plasmid often found in GC1 isolates. The third plasmid, pA297-3, is 200kb and carries the sul2 sulphonamide resistance gene and strAB streptomycin resistance gene within Tn6172 and a mer mercuric ion resistance module elsewhere. pA297-3 transferred sulphonamide, streptomycin and mercuric ion resistance at high frequency to a susceptible A. baumannii recipient, and contains several genes potentially involved in conjugative transfer. However, a relaxase gene was not found. It also includes several genes encoding proteins involved in DNA metabolism such as partitioning. However, a gene encoding a replication initiation protein could not be found. pA297-3 includes two copies of a Miniature Inverted-Repeat Transposable Element (MITE), named MITE-297, bracketing a 77.5kb fragment, which contains several IS and the mer module. Several plasmids related to but smaller than pA297-3 were found in the GenBank nucleotide database. They were found in different A. baumannii clones and are wide spread. They all contain either Tn6172 or a variant in the same position in the backbone as Tn6172 in pA297-3. Some related plasmids have lost the segment between the MITE-297 copies and retain only one MITE-297. Others have segments of various lengths between

  3. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P; Adams, Hieab H H; Jahanshad, Neda; Chauhan, Ganesh; Stein, Jason L; Hofer, Edith; Renteria, Miguel E; Bis, Joshua C; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Ikram, M Kamran; Desrivières, Sylvane; Vernooij, Meike W; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beecham, Ashley H; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Blanton, Susan H; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Chouraki, Vincent; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Crivello, Fabrice; Den Braber, Anouk; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gutman, Boris A; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Jørgensen, Kjetil N; Karbalai, Nazanin; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre F; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; McKay, David R; Milaneschi, Yuri; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; Nyquist, Paul; Loohuis, Loes M Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Ropele, Stefan; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G; Saremi, Arvin; Satizabal, Claudia L; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trompet, Stella; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Lee, Sven J; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; Van Eijk, Kristel R; Van Erp, Theo G M; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Windham, Beverly G; Winkler, Anderson M; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Yanek, Lisa R; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P; Agartz, Ingrid; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E; Becker, Diane M; Becker, James T; Bennett, David A; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; De Craen, Anton J M; De Geus, Eco J C; De Jager, Philip L; De Zubicaray, Greig I; Deary, Ian J; Debette, Stéphanie; DeCarli, Charles; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Enzinger, Christian; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fedko, Iryna O; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E; Fleischman, Debra A; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Glahn, David C; Gollub, Randy L; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Håberg, Asta K; Hansell, Narelle K; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huentelman, Matthew; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahn, René S; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; Lopez, Oscar L; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Mosley, Thomas H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E; Niessen, Wiro J; Nöthen, Markus M; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Psaty, Bruce M; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schmidt, Helena; Schofield, Peter R; Sigursson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andrew; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soininen, Hilkka; Steen, Vidar M; Stott, David J; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Tsolaki, Magda; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hernández, Maria C Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; van der Lugt, Aad; van der Wee, Nic J A; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; van 't Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N; Vellas, Bruno; Veltman, Dick J; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wassink, Thomas H; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Clinton B; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Martin, Nicholas G; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wright, Margaret J; Longstreth, W T; Schumann, Gunter; Grabe, Hans J; Franke, Barbara; Launer, Lenore J; Medland, Sarah E; Seshadri, Sudha; Thompson, Paul M; Ikram, M Arfan

    2017-01-18

    The hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpinnings of hippocampal structure here we perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 33,536 individuals and discover six independent loci significantly associated with hippocampal volume, four of them novel. Of the novel loci, three lie within genes (ASTN2, DPP4 and MAST4) and one is found 200 kb upstream of SHH. A hippocampal subfield analysis shows that a locus within the MSRB3 gene shows evidence of a localized effect along the dentate gyrus, subiculum, CA1 and fissure. Further, we show that genetic variants associated with decreased hippocampal volume are also associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (r g =-0.155). Our findings suggest novel biological pathways through which human genetic variation influences hippocampal volume and risk for neuropsychiatric illness.

  4. Discovery of novel heart rate-associated loci using the Exome Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Marten E.; Warren, Helen R.; Cabrera, Claudia P.; Verweij, Niek; Mifsud, Borbala; Haessler, Jeffrey; Bihlmeyer, Nathan A.; Fu, Yi-Ping; Weiss, Stefan; Lin, Henry J.; Grarup, Niels; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Pistis, Giorgio; Shah, Nabi; Brody, Jennifer A.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lin, Honghuang; Mei, Hao; Smith, Albert V.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Hall, Leanne M.; van Setten, Jessica; Trompet, Stella; Prins, Bram P.; Isaacs, Aaron; Radmanesh, Farid; Marten, Jonathan; Entwistle, Aiman; Kors, Jan A.; Silva, Claudia T.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bis, Joshua C.; de Boer, Rudolf; de Haan, Hugoline G.; de Mutsert, Renée; Dedoussis, George; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Eppinga, Ruben N.; Felix, Stephan B.; Guo, Xiuqing; Hagemeijer, Yanick; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Huang, Paul L.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kähönen, Mika; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Kolcic, Ivana; Launer, Lenore J.; Li, Man; Yao, Jie; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Simin; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Mangino, Massimo; Morris, Andrew D.; Mulas, Antonella; Murray, Alison D.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Orrú, Marco; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peters, Annette; Porteous, David J.; Poulter, Neil; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lihong; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Roselli, Carolina; Rudan, Igor; Sattar, Naveed; Sever, Peter; Sinner, Moritz F.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stanton, Alice V.; Stirrups, Kathleen E.; Taylor, Kent D.; Tobin, Martin D.; Uitterlinden, André; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Hoes, Arno W.; van der Meer, Peter; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Xie, Zhijun; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Tinker, Andrew; Polasek, Ozren; Rosand, Jonathan; Jamshidi, Yalda; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Jukema, J. Wouter; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Wilson, James; Lubitz, Steven A.; Kääb, Stefan; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Caulfield, Mark J.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Sanna, Serena; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Deloukas, Panos; Pedersen, Oluf; Rotter, Jerome I.; Dörr, Marcus; O'Donnell, Chris J.; Hayward, Caroline; Arking, Dan E.; Kooperberg, Charles; van der Harst, Pim; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Stricker, Bruno H.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Resting heart rate is a heritable trait, and an increase in heart rate is associated with increased mortality risk. Genome-wide association study analyses have found loci associated with resting heart rate, at the time of our study these loci explained 0.9% of the variation. This study aims to discover new genetic loci associated with heart rate from Exome Chip meta-analyses. Heart rate was measured from either elecrtrocardiograms or pulse recordings. We meta-analysed heart rate association results from 104 452 European-ancestry individuals from 30 cohorts, genotyped using the Exome Chip. Twenty-four variants were selected for follow-up in an independent dataset (UK Biobank, N = 134 251). Conditional and gene-based testing was undertaken, and variants were investigated with bioinformatics methods. We discovered five novel heart rate loci, and one new independent low-frequency non-synonymous variant in an established heart rate locus (KIAA1755). Lead variants in four of the novel loci are non-synonymous variants in the genes C10orf71, DALDR3, TESK2 and SEC31B. The variant at SEC31B is significantly associated with SEC31B expression in heart and tibial nerve tissue. Further candidate genes were detected from long-range regulatory chromatin interactions in heart tissue (SCD, SLF2 and MAPK8). We observed significant enrichment in DNase I hypersensitive sites in fetal heart and lung. Moreover, enrichment was seen for the first time in human neuronal progenitor cells (derived from embryonic stem cells) and fetal muscle samples by including our novel variants. Our findings advance the knowledge of the genetic architecture of heart rate, and indicate new candidate genes for follow-up functional studies. PMID:28379579

  5. Microsatellite loci isolated from the scleractinian coral, Acropora nobilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomura, Naoko; Hidaka, Michio

    2008-05-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of eight microsatellite loci from the scleractinian coral, Acropora nobilis. The microsatellite loci were obtained using compound SSR primers or an enrichment protocol. All the loci were polymorphic with four to eight alleles per locus and observed heterozygosities ranging from 0.22 to 0.76. Some of the primers developed for the two congeners, Acropora palmata and Acropora millepora were applicable to A. nobilis. These loci are useful for studying the connectivity among A. nobilis populations in Okinawa, southern Japan. © 2007 The Authors.

  6. Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with effects on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with effects on resistance to flower bud thrips ( Megalurothrips sjostedti ) identified in recombinant inbred lines of cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp)

  7. Evaluation of discriminating power of 13 Y chromosome markers with high rate of mutation (RM Y-STR) in the Costa Rican population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solano Matamoros, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The Y chromosome microsatellites analysis has had among its purposes the obtaining of a male haplotype from mixtures with high prevalence of female genetic material, such as sexual offenses. The currently available markers set as AmpFISTR® Yfiler® have offered haplotype resolution to level of incomplete patrilineal line. This limitation has been particularly important when is needed to supplement paternity studies. The implementation expected of the 13 Y chromosome microsatellites with high mutation rate (RM Y-STR) recently described, has improved the discriminating power of microsatellite analysis of Y in the forensic context. However, for implemetation it has been necessary to obtain the frequencies of haplotypes in the Costa Rican population. In addition, the discriminating power of the new markers is evaluated and compared with current markers set, such as AmpFISTR® Yfile®, to determine whether the former have an advantage over the latter. The use of a powerful new tool has been claimed for a more efficient and effective application of justice in Costa Rica, specially in sexual offenses [es

  8. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, ANA; Long: 145.70271, Lat: 16.33289 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 3.65m; Data Range: 20070527-20090506.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  9. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.16911, Lat: 05.88415 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 32.92m; Data Range: 20080331-20100411.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  10. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.53975, Lat: 25.38410 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.52m; Data Range: 20060909-20080919.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  11. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.83974, Lat: 27.78486 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 22.86m; Data Range: 20081002-20100915.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  12. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, OAH; Long: -158.21747, Lat: 21.46010 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 7.32m; Data Range: 20050723-20070305.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  13. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, FDP; Long: 144.88580, Lat: 20.54513 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 12.50m; Data Range: 20070603-20070826.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  14. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.86298, Lat: 27.79097 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 11.60m; Data Range: 20100520-20100915.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  15. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, LAN; Long: -156.87525, Lat: 20.74163 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 11.58m; Data Range: 20081020-20101022.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  16. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.56225, Lat: -14.28368 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 8.84m; Data Range: 20080223-20090529.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  17. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, OAH; Long: -158.13684, Lat: 21.35468 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 17.68m; Data Range: 20090903-20100715.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  18. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, OFU; Long: -169.62662, Lat: -14.18175 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 9.80m; Data Range: 20040207-20060226.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  19. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.77935, Lat: 27.80267 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.52m; Data Range: 20080924-20100914.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  20. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, JOH; Long: -169.49963, Lat: 16.75956 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 7.92m; Data Range: 20060120-20070618.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  1. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, WAK; Long: 166.60452, Lat: 19.30868 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.52m; Data Range: 20070505-20090325.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  2. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, FDP; Long: 144.90023, Lat: 20.53725 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 31.70m; Data Range: 20070603-20090428.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  3. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MID; Long: -177.40181, Lat: 28.19361 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20030729-20041001.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  4. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81595, Lat: 27.85396 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 7.62m; Data Range: 20060914-20080922.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  5. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, MAI; Long: -156.42031, Lat: 20.59198 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 14.90m; Data Range: 20060805-20071009.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  6. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, NEC; Long: -164.69775, Lat: 23.57152 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 17.07m; Data Range: 20050414-20060904.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  7. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, LAN; Long: -156.83705, Lat: 20.87186 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 13.11m; Data Range: 20081019-20101021.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  8. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, JAR; Long: -159.99113, Lat: -00.36327 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 9.75m; Data Range: 20060321-20080327.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  9. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, SAI; Long: 145.78947, Lat: 15.17485 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 19.20m; Data Range: 20080815-20090419.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  10. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.72247, Lat: -14.28437 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 8.23m; Data Range: 20060220-20080219.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  11. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.72348, Lat: -14.27155 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 17.68m; Data Range: 20080219-20100223.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  12. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, FDP; Long: 144.89860, Lat: 20.53790 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 11.28m; Data Range: 20070603-20090427.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  13. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, OFU; Long: -169.62662, Lat: -14.18168 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 10.67m; Data Range: 20060226-20071216.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  14. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.76360, Lat: -14.36325 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 16.70m; Data Range: 20070406-20080206.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  15. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.15342, Lat: -14.53775 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 2.40m; Data Range: 20080311-20100303.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  16. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81593, Lat: 27.85397 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 7.90m; Data Range: 20040928-20060912.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  17. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16016, Lat: -14.55127 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 3.40m; Data Range: 20080312-20090714.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  18. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16871, Lat: -14.54870 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 16.50m; Data Range: 20080313-20091225.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  19. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, SWA; Long: -171.09121, Lat: -11.05861 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 28.96m; Data Range: 20080316-20090702.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  20. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.66011, Lat: -14.24481 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 13.41m; Data Range: 20070410-20080219.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  1. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, FDP; Long: 144.88558, Lat: 20.54516 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 18.59m; Data Range: 20070603-20070611.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  2. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, PAG; Long: 145.76486, Lat: 18.09636 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 14.63m; Data Range: 20070606-20081006.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  3. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, HOW; Long: -176.62150, Lat: 00.80653 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 17.98m; Data Range: 20080207-20100203.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  4. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.83352, Lat: -14.32833 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 27.74m; Data Range: 20080224-20100227.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  5. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.00206, Lat: 05.87637 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 32.61m; Data Range: 20080402-20100412.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  6. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, OFU; Long: -169.62484, Lat: -14.16394 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 6.40m; Data Range: 20060227-20070530.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  7. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.76310, Lat: -14.36348 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 13.41m; Data Range: 20080225-20100220.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  8. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.75803, Lat: -14.37495 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 30.78m; Data Range: 20080224-20100228.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  9. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27187, Lat: 23.85676 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 7.92m; Data Range: 20070925-20091009.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  10. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, KIN; Long: -162.38180, Lat: 06.42888 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 5.18m; Data Range: 20080407-20100415.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  11. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, OFU; Long: -169.65265, Lat: -14.17770 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.22m; Data Range: 20080228-20100311.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  12. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.56222, Lat: -14.28368 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 8.23m; Data Range: 20050804-20060218.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  13. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.51372, Lat: 25.36697 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 4.27m; Data Range: 20040921-20060909.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  14. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.64291, Lat: 25.47130 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 14.33m; Data Range: 20060908-20080905.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  15. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 8.53m; Data Range: 20040924-20060907.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  16. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.53972, Lat: 25.38417 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.50m; Data Range: 20030720-20040920.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  17. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.51376, Lat: 25.36694 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 4.27m; Data Range: 20060909-20080919.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  18. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, JAR; Long: -160.00832, Lat: -00.36893 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 32.30m; Data Range: 20060321-20080328.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  19. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.11364, Lat: 05.86635 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 19.20m; Data Range: 20090918-20100408.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  20. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, HOW; Long: -176.62152, Lat: 00.80650 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 18.60m; Data Range: 20040121-20060125.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  1. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, WAK; Long: 166.59808, Lat: 19.31609 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 10.97m; Data Range: 20051022-20070430.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  2. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, WAK; Long: 166.60453, Lat: 19.30868 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.52m; Data Range: 20051021-20070430.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  3. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, JOH; Long: -169.48513, Lat: 16.74071 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 2.13m; Data Range: 20080201-20100125.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  4. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.08592, Lat: 05.88624 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 3.70m; Data Range: 20040402-20060325.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  5. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.06183, Lat: 05.88278 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 4.26m; Data Range: 20060324-20080330.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  6. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, TIN; Long: 145.65074, Lat: 15.03548 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 7.32m; Data Range: 20050926-20070519.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  7. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, KAU; Long: -159.29895, Lat: 22.16533 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 14.94m; Data Range: 20050715-20060808.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  8. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, PAG; Long: 145.75748, Lat: 18.12728 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 5.79m; Data Range: 20070605-20080513.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  9. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.26140, Lat: 23.76891 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 4.00m; Data Range: 20021005-20030715.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  10. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, LIS; Long: -173.96097, Lat: 26.06337 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.61m; Data Range: 20060925-20081005.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  11. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, HOW; Long: -176.62216, Lat: 00.82351 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 18.90m; Data Range: 20040122-20060226.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  12. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.83339, Lat: -14.32838 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 27.13m; Data Range: 20050805-20060221.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  13. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.21967, Lat: 23.86611 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 2.00m; Data Range: 20020912-20030714.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  14. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, BAK; Long: -176.47574, Lat: 00.20538 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 18.90m; Data Range: 20040124-20050605.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  15. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.86298, Lat: 27.79096 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 11.58m; Data Range: 20090920-20100518.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  16. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, FFP; Long: -160.60318, Lat: 21.68678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 18.90m; Data Range: 20081111-20100928.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  17. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.86492, Lat: 27.94435 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 35.05m; Data Range: 20060923-20070726.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  18. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, JAR; Long: -159.97228, Lat: -00.37500 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 30.70m; Data Range: 20060320-20080328.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  19. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MID; Long: -177.34437, Lat: 28.21823 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 9.14m; Data Range: 20050701-20060915.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  20. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, KIN; Long: -162.38440, Lat: 06.38252 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 6.40m; Data Range: 20060330-20080404.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  1. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.86165, Lat: 27.94069 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 13.11m; Data Range: 20070806-20080923.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  2. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, MID; Long: -177.34429, Lat: 28.21795 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 9.45m; Data Range: 20060915-20080925.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  3. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, JOH; Long: -169.48513, Lat: 16.74080 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 2.10m; Data Range: 20040116-20060120.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  4. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, MAU; Long: 145.20772, Lat: 20.01772 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 2.13m; Data Range: 20070530-20090430.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  5. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.73123, Lat: 27.86606 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 22.25m; Data Range: 20080924-20100914.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  6. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, TAU; Long: -169.44661, Lat: -14.25073 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 6.10m; Data Range: 20060303-20080302.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  7. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.26134, Lat: 23.76895 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 4.57m; Data Range: 20080915-20100908.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  8. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.88108, Lat: 27.78202 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 22.86m; Data Range: 20080923-20081110.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  9. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, JAR; Long: -159.99670, Lat: -00.38208 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 32.30m; Data Range: 20060321-20080327.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  10. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.16685, Lat: 23.73815 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 2.13m; Data Range: 20060906-20081008.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  11. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.17350, Lat: 23.64478 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 2.00m; Data Range: 20030717-20040919.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  12. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.35620, Lat: 28.45155 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 20.12m; Data Range: 20081001-20100918.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  13. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, LIS; Long: -173.99797, Lat: 26.10004 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 22.56m; Data Range: 20090929-20100517.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  14. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, OFU; Long: -169.65220, Lat: -14.18020 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 6.10m; Data Range: 20060228-20080228.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  15. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, TIN; Long: 145.65072, Lat: 15.03548 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 6.71m; Data Range: 20070519-20070905.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  16. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); PRIA, HOW; Long: -176.62401, Lat: 00.81480 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 14.63m; Data Range: 20080207-20100203.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  17. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, AGR; Long: 145.63819, Lat: 18.76656 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.52m; Data Range: 20070528-20090502.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  18. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, GAR; Long: -167.99958, Lat: 24.99883 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 10.36m; Data Range: 20040920-20060705.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  19. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.78082, Lat: 27.95763 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.22m; Data Range: 20080923-20100916.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  20. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); AMSM, OFU; Long: -169.62661, Lat: -14.18177 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 11.28m; Data Range: 20080229-20100311.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  1. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, MAI; Long: -156.42033, Lat: 20.59195 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 14.63m; Data Range: 20081018-20101020.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  2. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, MAI; Long: -156.15120, Lat: 20.86456 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 14.63m; Data Range: 20081018-20101016.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  3. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, MAI; Long: -156.42031, Lat: 20.59198 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 14.90m; Data Range: 20071009-20081018.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  4. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, MAI; Long: -156.58458, Lat: 20.79070 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 14.60m; Data Range: 20050806-20070402.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  5. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, MAI; Long: -156.49718, Lat: 20.63030 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 11.58m; Data Range: 20050807-20101017.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  6. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, MAI; Long: -156.58448, Lat: 20.79079 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 11.89m; Data Range: 20081024-20100326.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  7. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, LAY; Long: -171.72929, Lat: 25.75915 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.91m; Data Range: 20060910-20080920.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  8. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, MAU; Long: 145.20730, Lat: 20.01768 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 10.67m; Data Range: 20050911-20070530.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  9. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); MHI, MOL; Long: -157.25236, Lat: 21.20307 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 10.36m; Data Range: 20081024-20101023.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  10. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, ZEA; Long: 145.85335, Lat: 16.89749 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 24.68m; Data Range: 20070526-20090505.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  11. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, ROT; Long: 145.20680, Lat: 14.18284 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 10.36m; Data Range: 20070516-20090409.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  12. lociNGS: a lightweight alternative for assessing suitability of next-generation loci for evolutionary analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Hird

    Full Text Available Genomic enrichment methods and next-generation sequencing produce uneven coverage for the portions of the genome (the loci they target; this information is essential for ascertaining the suitability of each locus for further analysis. lociNGS is a user-friendly accessory program that takes multi-FASTA formatted loci, next-generation sequence alignments and demographic data as input and collates, displays and outputs information about the data. Summary information includes the parameters coverage per locus, coverage per individual and number of polymorphic sites, among others. The program can output the raw sequences used to call loci from next-generation sequencing data. lociNGS also reformats subsets of loci in three commonly used formats for multi-locus phylogeographic and population genetics analyses - NEXUS, IMa2 and Migrate. lociNGS is available at https://github.com/SHird/lociNGS and is dependent on installation of MongoDB (freely available at http://www.mongodb.org/downloads. lociNGS is written in Python and is supported on MacOSX and Unix; it is distributed under a GNU General Public License.

  13. Validation of the AmpFlSTR« SEfiler Plus(TM) PCR Amplification kit for forensic STR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredslund, Stine Frisk; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Morling, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Validation of the AmpFlSTR« SEfiler Plus(TM) PCR Amplification kit with 29 and 30 PCR cycles for forensic STR analysis demonstrated that the kit had fewer artefacts than the AmpFlSTR« SGM Plus(TM) kit (28 PCR cycles). The SEfiler Plus kit was more sensitive and devoid of colour artefacts, but sho......Validation of the AmpFlSTR« SEfiler Plus(TM) PCR Amplification kit with 29 and 30 PCR cycles for forensic STR analysis demonstrated that the kit had fewer artefacts than the AmpFlSTR« SGM Plus(TM) kit (28 PCR cycles). The SEfiler Plus kit was more sensitive and devoid of colour artefacts...

  14. Účast D. Stránské na Soupisovém výzkumu NSČ

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Motyčková, Dana

    15[57]-16[58], - (1999), s. 99-102 ISSN 1211-8117. [Lidová kultura 20. století, její výzkum, dokumentace a prezentace. Věnováno 100. výročí narození doc. dr. Drahomíry Stránské. Rožnov pod Radhoštěm, 08.09.1999] Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  15. Validation of the AmpFlSTR« SEfiler Plus(TM) PCR Amplification kit for forensic STR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredslund, Stine Frisk; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Morling, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Validation of the AmpFlSTR« SEfiler Plus(TM) PCR Amplification kit with 29 and 30 PCR cycles for forensic STR analysis demonstrated that the kit had fewer artefacts than the AmpFlSTR« SGM Plus(TM) kit (28 PCR cycles). The SEfiler Plus kit was more sensitive and devoid of colour artefacts, but sho......, but showed more stutters, drop-ins, drop-outs and allelic imbalances...

  16. STR Profiling for Discrimination between Wild and Domestic Swine Specimens and between Main Breeds of Domestic Pigs Reared in Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rębała, Krzysztof; Rabtsava, Alina A; Kotova, Svetlana A; Kipen, Viachaslau N; Zhurina, Natalja V; Gandzha, Alla I; Tsybovsky, Iosif S

    2016-01-01

    A panel comprising 16 short tandem repeats (STRs) and a gender-specific amelogenin marker was worked out and tested for robustness in discrimination between wild and domestic swine subspecies encountered in Europe, between regional populations of wild boars and between main breeds of domestic pigs reared in Belarus. The STR dataset comprised 310 wild boars, inhabiting all administrative regions of Belarus, and 313 domestic pigs, representing three local and three cosmopolitan lines. Additionally, a total of 835 wild boars were genotyped for the presence of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) alleles specific for domestic pigs. Correctness of assignment of STR profiles to appropriate populations was measured by log-likelihood ratios (log-LRs). All samples were correctly identified as wild boars or domestic pigs with average log-LR of 42.4 (LR = 2.6×1018). On the other hand, as many as 50 out of 835 (6.0%) genotyped wild boars from Belarus possessed MC1R alleles specific to domestic pigs, demonstrating supremacy of our STR profiling system over traditional differentiation between wild boars and domestic pigs, based on single binary markers. Mean log-LRs for allocation of wild boars to their regions of origin and of domestic pigs to appropriate breeds were 2.3 (LR = 9.7) and 13.4 (LR = 6.6×105), respectively. Our results demonstrate the developed STR profiling system to be a highly efficient tool for differentiation between wild and domestic swine subspecies and between diverse breeds of domestic pigs as well as for verification of genetic identity of porcine specimens for the purpose of forensic investigations of wildlife crimes, assurance of veterinary public health, parentage control in animal husbandry, food safety management and traceability of livestock products.

  17. Population structure and paternal admixture landscape on present-day Mexican-Mestizos revealed by Y-STR haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Flores, J; Dondiego-Aldape, R; Rubi-Castellanos, R; Anaya-Palafox, M; Nuño-Arana, I; Canseco-Avila, L M; Flores-Flores, G; Morales-Vallejo, M E; Barojas-Pérez, N; Muñoz-Valle, J F; Campos-Gutiérrez, R; Rangel-Villalobos, H

    2010-01-01

    Mestizos currently represent most of the Mexican population (>90%); they are defined as individuals born in the country having a Spanish-derived last name, with family antecedents of Mexican ancestors back at least to the third generation. Mestizos are result of 500 years of admixture mainly among Spaniards, Amerindians, and African slaves. Consequently, a complex genetic pattern has been generated throughout the country that has been scarcely studied from the paternal point of view. This fact is important, taking into account that gene flow toward the New World comprised largely males. We analyzed the population structure and paternal admixture of present-day Mexican-Mestizo populations based on Y-STRs. We genotyped at least 12 Y-STRs in DNA samples of 986 males from five states: Aguascalientes (n = 293); Jalisco (n = 185); Guanajuato (n = 168); Chiapas (n = 170); and Yucatán (n = 170). AmpFlSTR Y-filer and Powerplex-Y(R) kits were used. Inclusion of North and Central Y-STR databases in the analyses allowed obtaining a Y-STR variability landscape from Mexico. Results confirmed the population differentiation gradient previously noted in Mestizos with SNPs and autosomal STRs throughout the Mexican territory: European ancestry increments to the Northwest and, correspondingly, Amerindian ancestry increments to the Center and Southeast. In addition, SAMOVA test and Autocorrelation Index for DNA Analysis autocorrelogram plot suggested preferential gene flow of males with neighboring populations in agreement with the isolation-by-distance model. Results are important for disease-risk studies (principally male-related) and for human identification purposes, because Y-STR databases are not available on the majority of Mexican-Mestizo populations.

  18. Nonparametric functional mapping of quantitative trait loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Wu, Rongling; Casella, George

    2009-03-01

    Functional mapping is a useful tool for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) that control dynamic traits. It incorporates mathematical aspects of biological processes into the mixture model-based likelihood setting for QTL mapping, thus increasing the power of QTL detection and the precision of parameter estimation. However, in many situations there is no obvious functional form and, in such cases, this strategy will not be optimal. Here we propose to use nonparametric function estimation, typically implemented with B-splines, to estimate the underlying functional form of phenotypic trajectories, and then construct a nonparametric test to find evidence of existing QTL. Using the representation of a nonparametric regression as a mixed model, the final test statistic is a likelihood ratio test. We consider two types of genetic maps: dense maps and general maps, and the power of nonparametric functional mapping is investigated through simulation studies and demonstrated by examples.

  19. Evaluation and In-House Validation of Five DNA Extraction Methods for PCR-based STR Analysis of Bloodstained Denims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Perdigon

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available One type of crime scene evidence commonly submitted for analysis is bloodstain on denim. However, chemicals (e.g., indigo used to produce denim materials may co-purify with DNA and hence, affect subsequent DNA analysis. The present study compared five methods (e.g., standard organic, organic with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, modified FTA™, organic/Chelex®-Centricon®, and QIAamp® DNA Mini Kit-based procedures for the isolation of blood DNA from denim. A Short Tandem Repeat (STR-based analysis across two to nine STR markers, namely, HUMvWA, HUMTH01, D8S306, HUMFES/FPS, HUMDHFRP2, HUMF13A01, HUMFGA, HUMTPOX, and HUMCSF1PO, was used to evaluate successful amplification of blood DNA extracted from light indigo, dark indigo, indigo-sulfur, pure indigo, sulfur-top, and sulfur-bottom denim materials. The results of the present study support the utility of organic/Chelex®-Centricon® and QIAamp® Kit procedures in extracting PCR-amplifiable DNA from five different types of denim materials for STR analysis. Furthermore, a solid-based method using FTA™ classic cards was modified to provide a simple, rapid, safe, and cost-effective procedure for extracting blood DNA from light, dark indigo and pure indigo denim materials. However, DNA eluted from bloodstained sulfur-dyed denims (e.g., sulfur-top and sulfur-bottom using FTA™ procedure was not readily amplifiable.

  20. Borodáč’s Chlapci na Stráži

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maťašík Andrej

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the production of the play Chlapci na stráži [Boys on Guard], which was awarded in a competition organized on the occasion of the twentieth anniversary of the establishment of Czechoslovakia in the spring of 1938. It was written by Ján Borodáč, the artistic director of the Drama Company of the Slovak National Theatre under the pseudonym of Ján Debnár. By the time it was premiered on 29 October 1939, there had been significant political changes. Following the Munich Agreement, Czechoslovakia, based on the decision of the prime ministers of France, Great Britain, Italy and Germany, had lost ethnically mixed Czech-German borderlands, President Eduard Beneš had offered his resignation and had gone into exile, and Slovakia had got the autonomy it was promised by the Pittsburgh Agreement (an obligation that had gone unfulfilled for long. The play which was supposed to celebrate the anniversary of the Czechoslovak Republic paradoxically acquired a new meaning under the pressure of these changes - it celebrated the autonomy and called for a defiance of revisionist pressures from Horthy’s Hungary.

  1. High phenotypic variability in Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerusa Smid

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker is a genetic prion disease and the most common mutation is p.Pro102Leu. We report clinical, molecular and neuropathological data of seven individuals, belonging to two unrelated Brazilian kindreds, carrying the p.Pro102Leu. Marked differences among patients were observed regarding age at onset, disease duration and clinical presentation. In the first kindred, two patients had rapidly progressive dementia and three exhibited predominantly ataxic phenotypes with variable ages of onset and disease duration. In this family, age at disease onset in the mother and daughter differed by 39 years. In the second kindred, different phenotypes were also reported and earlier ages of onset were associated with 129 heterozygosis. No differences were associated with apoE genotype. In these kindreds, the codon 129 polymorphism could not explain the clinical variability and 129 heterozygosis was associated with earlier disease onset. Neuropathological examination in two patients confirmed the presence of typical plaques and PrPsc immunopositivity.

  2. Effects of heavy metal pollution on red wood ant (Formica s. str.) populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eeva, T.; Sorvari, J.; Koivunen, V.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the species composition, mound population densities, relative abundance and colony sizes of red wood ants along a well known air pollution gradient of a copper smelter in Southwest Finland. The dominant species, Formica aquilonia, was further studied for heavy metal (Al, Cu, Cd, Ni, Zn, As, Pb, Hg) levels and morphological characters (body mass, head width, labial gland disease) of workers. We found five species belonging to Formica s. str., and two of them showed changes in their relative abundance, which could not be explained by natural habitat differences. Nest mound volumes were 34% smaller in the polluted area, suggesting that smaller colonies can be maintained there. The heavy metal levels in F. aquilonia workers were higher in the polluted area for all metals, except Hg. The largest relative differences between the study areas (polluted/unpolluted) were found for As (4.1), Ni (2.4), Cu (2.1) and Pb (1.8). Morphological characters of workers were not related to the heavy metal levels. Our data showed that red wood ants can tolerate relatively high amounts of heavy metals and maintain reproducing colonies even in a heavily polluted area, but on the basis of smaller colony sizes, pollution stress may also cause trade-offs in reproduction. - Capsule: Five species of red wood ants vary in their sensitivity to heavy metal pollution but all of them had smaller colonies in a polluted area

  3. Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stancáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Kathiresan, Sekar; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2013-01-01

    Levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,577

  4. Cross-genus amplification and characterisation of microsatellite loci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jennifer Lamb

    Microsatellite loci for Chaerephon pumilus sensu lato from south eastern Africa were cross-amplified using primers developed for the Mexican free-tailed bat, Tadarida brasiliensis. Two dinucleotide and four tetranucleotide loci were recovered and genotyped for 74 bats, yielding 9 to 15 alleles per locus. The observed and ...

  5. Cross-genus amplification and characterisation of microsatellite loci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taryn

    Primers developed for the Brazilian free-tailed bat, Tadarida brasiliensis, were successfully used to cross-amplify microsatellite loci in two Afro-tropical Otomops species. Seventy one (71) bats from two species were genotyped for two dinucleotide and four tetranucleotide loci, yielding 1 to 15 alleles per locus. For the ...

  6. Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willer, C. J.; Schmidt, E. M.; Sengupta, S.

    2013-01-01

    , we narrow association signals in 12 loci. We find that loci associated with blood lipid levels are often associated with cardiovascular and metabolic traits, including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, waist-hip ratio and body mass index. Our results demonstrate the value...

  7. Detection and utilisation of quantitative trait loci in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spelman, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The focus of the thesis is on the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL) in dairy cattle and their utilisation in breeding programmes. Analysis of one bovine chromosome for quantitative trait loci for milk production traits is described and a QTL for protein percent was identified that

  8. Cross-genus amplification and characterisation of microsatellite loci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was no evidence of linkage disequilibrium among pairs of loci, or of deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These six loci were informative in studies of population genetic structure of C. pumilus sensu lato. Keywords: Bats, Chaerephon pumilus, Chiroptera, microsatellites, Molossidae, cross-genus amplification

  9. Unraveling possible association between quantitative trait loci (QTL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unraveling possible association between quantitative trait loci (QTL) for partial resistance and nonhost resistance in food barley ( Hordeum vulgaris L.) ... Abstract. Many quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in different barley populations were discovered for resistance to Puccinia hordei and heterologous rust species. Partial ...

  10. Frequency of thermostability variants: estimation of total rare variant frequency in human populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohrenweiser, H.W.; Neel, J.V.

    1981-09-01

    Eight erythrocyte enzymes were examine for thermostability in an unselected sample of 100 newborn infants. Three thermolabile variants, one each of lactate dehydrogenase, glucosephosphate isomerase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, were identified, none of which was detectable as a variant by standard electrophoretic techniques. All were inherited. This frequency of 3.8 heritable thermostability variants per 1000 determinations is to be compared with a frequency of electrophoretically detectable variants of 1.1 per 1000 determinations, a frequency of 2.4 enzyme-deficiency variants per 1000 determinations, and a frequency of individuals with rare enzyme deficiency or electrophoretic or thermostability (or both) variants at these loci is 8.4 per 1000 determinations. A similar distribution and frequency is seen when the comparison is limited to the seven loci studied by all techniques. it is clear that not all of the electrophoretic and thermostability variants present in the population are detected by the techniques used in this study. Accordingly, it is estimated that the true frequency of carriers of a rare variant for each of these enzyme-coding loci averages greater than 10/1000. Some implications of these frequencies for human disease are discussed.

  11. Candidate loci involved in domestication and improvement detected by a published 90K wheat SNP array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lifeng; Zhao, Guangyao; Huang, Dawei; Jia, Jizeng

    2017-01-01

    Selection is one of the most important forces in crop evolution. Common wheat is a major world food crop and a typical allopolyploid with a huge and complex genome. We applied four approaches to detect loci selected in wheat during domestication and improvement. A total of 7,984 candidate loci were detected, accounting for 23.3% of all 34,317 SNPs analysed, a much higher proportion than estimated in previous reports. We constructed a first generation wheat selection map which revealed the following new insights on genome-wide selection: (1) diversifying selection acted by increasing, decreasing or not affecting gene frequencies; (2) the number of loci under selection during domestication was much higher than that during improvement; (3) the contribution to wheat improvement by the D sub-genome was relatively small due to the bottleneck of hexaploidisation and diversity can be expanded by using synthetic wheat and introgression lines; and (4) clustered selection regions occur throughout the wheat genome, including the centromere regions. This study will not only help future wheat breeding and evolutionary studies, but will also accelerate study of other crops, especially polyploids. PMID:28327671

  12. Autosomal STR variations reveal genetic heterogeneity in the Mon-Khmer speaking group of Northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampuansai, Jatupol; Völgyi, Antónia; Kutanan, Wibhu; Kangwanpong, Daoroong; Pamjav, Horolma

    2017-03-01

    Since prehistoric times, Mon-Khmer speaking people have been recognized as indigenous ethnic groups living in northern Thailand. After the period of Tai colonization in the thirteenth century CE, the Mon-Khmer inhabitants were fragmented; some were expelled to rural areas while some were integrated into the mainstream of Tai society. Autosomal STR variations revealed that the present-day Mon-Khmer people could be genetically divided into two clusters. This finding appears to be consistent with the level of historical contact with the Tai majority ethnic groups. The cluster consisting of the Khamu, Lua, Paluang and Htin people, indicate that they have lived in remote areas and have had little historical contact with the Tai people. In this way, they appeared to have maintained aspects of their Mon-Khmer ancestral genetic bloodline but have genetically diverged from the Tai people. The cluster comprised of the Mon and Lawa people had an exclusively close relationship with the Tai people during the establishment of the prosperous Lan Na Kingdom. A fraction of the Tai genetic component investigated among the Mon people and some Lawa populations reflected the evidence of genetic admixture. However, some Lawa people, who have lived in the mountainous area of Mae Hong Son Province have exhibited a unique gene pool, which might have been shaped by the founder effect that occurred during their historical fragmentation. The rise of the genetic assimilation of the hill-tribe Karen people into the Mon-Khmer and the Tai gene pools indicated that different languages, cultures, and geographical distances have lost their power as barriers of inter-ethnic marriages in the present day. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic structure and diversity of three Colombian southwest afrodescendent populations using 8 STR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guauque Olarte, Sandra; Fuentes Pardo, Angela Patricia; Cardenas Henao, Heiber; Barreto, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    To estimate the diversity, structure and genetic flow in three Colombian southwest afrodescendent populations (Buenaventura, Mulalo y Tumaco), the alleles revealed by 8 autosomal STR's were analyzed in 78 no-related individuals, by the use of PCR and comparison with specific allelic ladders for every system resolved by polyacrylamide gel (8%). the results were compared with 2 Amerindian populations (Awa-Kuaikier and Coyaima) and 2 mixed Colombian populations (Valle del Cauca and Cauca). For the afrodescendent and Amerindian populations was found moderate diversity (h between 0.768±0.414 and 0.796±0.424), in contrast, the mixed population showed higher rates (>0.803), which is probably caused by mixing with Amerindians, that also can explain the high endogamy seen in mixed populations. The AMOVA exhibited moderate genetic structure between the afrodescendent populations (FST= 0.098; p<0.05), but higher between the three ethnical groups compared (FST=0.26723; p<0.05). The closer genetics distances are in favor of Tumaco and Buenaventura, supported for the migration rate found (34.298), which was the same inside of Amerindian and mixed populations. Maybe, because Mulalo is a closed isolated population, its differences in front others afrodescendent populations are explained. The neighbor-joining tree showed nearest relations among Amerindian and mixed populations, furthermore, the ancestral character for the afrodescendents. That sustains the idea of genetic flow maintained between the 3 ethnical groups, principally between Amerindian and mixed populations, supported because the genetic differences, migration rates and Amerindian matrilineality reported in the literature

  14. [(11)C]PiB PET in Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deters, Kacie D; Risacher, Shannon L; Yoder, Karmen K; Oblak, Adrian L; Unverzagt, Frederick W; Murrell, Jill R; Epperson, Francine; Tallman, Eileen F; Quaid, Kimberly A; Farlow, Martin R; Saykin, Andrew J; Ghetti, Bernardino

    2016-01-01

    Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker Disease (GSS) is a familial neurodegenerative disorder characterized clinically by ataxia, parkinsonism, and dementia, and neuropathologically by deposition of diffuse and amyloid plaques composed of prion protein (PrP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate if [(11)C]Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) positron emission tomography (PET) is capable of detecting PrP-amyloid in PRNP gene carriers. Six individuals at risk for GSS and eight controls underwent [(11)C]PiB PET scans using standard methods. Approximately one year after the initial scan, each of the three asymptomatic carriers (two with PRNP P102L mutation, one with PRNP F198S mutation) underwent a second [(11)C]PiB PET scan. Three P102L carriers, one F198S carrier, and one non-carrier of the F198S mutation were cognitively normal, while one F198S carrier was cognitively impaired during the course of this study. No [(11)C]PiB uptake was observed in any subject at baseline or at follow-up. Neuropathologic study of the symptomatic individual revealed PrP-immunopositive plaques and tau-immunopositive neurofibrillary tangles in cerebral cortex, subcortical nuclei, and brainstem. PrP deposits were also numerous in the cerebellar cortex. This is the first study to investigate the ability of [(11)C]PiB PET to bind to PrP-amyloid in GSS F198S subjects. This finding suggests that [(11)C]PiB PET is not suitable for in vivo assessment of PrP-amyloid plaques in patients with GSS.

  15. [11C]PiB PET in Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deters, Kacie D; Risacher, Shannon L; Yoder, Karmen K; Oblak, Adrian L; Unverzagt, Frederick W; Murrell, Jill R; Epperson, Francine; Tallman, Eileen F; Quaid, Kimberly A; Farlow, Martin R; Saykin, Andrew J; Ghetti, Bernardino

    2016-01-01

    Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker Disease (GSS) is a familial neurodegenerative disorder characterized clinically by ataxia, parkinsonism, and dementia, and neuropathologically by deposition of diffuse and amyloid plaques composed of prion protein (PrP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate if [11C]Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) positron emission tomography (PET) is capable of detecting PrP-amyloid in PRNP gene carriers. Six individuals at risk for GSS and eight controls underwent [11C]PiB PET scans using standard methods. Approximately one year after the initial scan, each of the three asymptomatic carriers (two with PRNP P102L mutation, one with PRNP F198S mutation) underwent a second [11C]PiB PET scan. Three P102L carriers, one F198S carrier, and one non-carrier of the F198S mutation were cognitively normal, while one F198S carrier was cognitively impaired during the course of this study. No [11C]PiB uptake was observed in any subject at baseline or at follow-up. Neuropathologic study of the symptomatic individual revealed PrP-immunopositive plaques and tau-immunopositive neurofibrillary tangles in cerebral cortex, subcortical nuclei, and brainstem. PrP deposits were also numerous in the cerebellar cortex. This is the first study to investigate the ability of [11C]PiB PET to bind to PrP-amyloid in GSS F198S subjects. This finding suggests that [11C]PiB PET is not suitable for in vivo assessment of PrP-amyloid plaques in patients with GSS. PMID:27069768

  16. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueling Sim

    Full Text Available Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8. This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12 in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts. In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  17. Two genetic loci associated with ankle injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stuart K; Kleimeyer, John P; Ahmed, Marwa A; Avins, Andrew L; Fredericson, Michael; Dragoo, Jason L; Ioannidis, John P A

    2017-01-01

    Ankle injuries, including sprains, strains and other joint derangements and instability, are common, especially for athletes involved in indoor court or jumping sports. Identifying genetic loci associated with these ankle injuries could shed light on their etiologies. A genome-wide association screen was performed using publicly available data from the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH) including 1,694 cases of ankle injury and 97,646 controls. An indel (chr21:47156779:D) that lies close to a collagen gene, COL18A1, showed an association with ankle injury at genome-wide significance (p = 3.8x10-8; OR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.75-2.23). A second DNA variant (rs13286037 on chromosome 9) that lies within an intron of the transcription factor gene NFIB showed an association that was nearly genome-wide significant (p = 5.1x10-8; OR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.46-1.80). The ACTN3 R577X mutation was previously reported to show an association with acute ankle sprains, but did not show an association in this cohort. This study is the first genome-wide screen for ankle injury that yields insights regarding the genetic etiology of ankle injuries and provides DNA markers with the potential to inform athletes about their genetic risk for ankle injury.

  18. Two genetic loci associated with ankle injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart K Kim

    Full Text Available Ankle injuries, including sprains, strains and other joint derangements and instability, are common, especially for athletes involved in indoor court or jumping sports. Identifying genetic loci associated with these ankle injuries could shed light on their etiologies. A genome-wide association screen was performed using publicly available data from the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH including 1,694 cases of ankle injury and 97,646 controls. An indel (chr21:47156779:D that lies close to a collagen gene, COL18A1, showed an association with ankle injury at genome-wide significance (p = 3.8x10-8; OR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.75-2.23. A second DNA variant (rs13286037 on chromosome 9 that lies within an intron of the transcription factor gene NFIB showed an association that was nearly genome-wide significant (p = 5.1x10-8; OR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.46-1.80. The ACTN3 R577X mutation was previously reported to show an association with acute ankle sprains, but did not show an association in this cohort. This study is the first genome-wide screen for ankle injury that yields insights regarding the genetic etiology of ankle injuries and provides DNA markers with the potential to inform athletes about their genetic risk for ankle injury.

  19. Three new loci for determining x chromosome inactivation patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Tümer, Zeynep; Ravn, Kirstine

    2011-01-01

    on two differentially methylated restriction enzyme sites (HpaII) and a polymorphic repeat located within this locus. Although highly informative, this locus is not always sufficient to evaluate the X-inactivation status in X-linked disorders. We have identified three new loci that can be used...... to determine XCI patterns in a methylation-sensitive PCR-based assay. All three loci contain polymorphic repeats and a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme (HpaII) site, methylation of which was shown to correlate with XCI. DNA from 60 females was used to estimate the heterozygosity of these new loci...

  20. Discovery and fine-mapping of adiposity loci using high density imputation of genome-wide association studies in individuals of African ancestry: African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie C Y Ng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified >300 loci associated with measures of adiposity including body mass index (BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI, but few have been identified through screening of the African ancestry genomes. We performed large scale meta-analyses and replications in up to 52,895 individuals for BMI and up to 23,095 individuals for WHRadjBMI from the African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium (AAAGC using 1000 Genomes phase 1 imputed GWAS to improve coverage of both common and low frequency variants in the low linkage disequilibrium African ancestry genomes. In the sex-combined analyses, we identified one novel locus (TCF7L2/HABP2 for WHRadjBMI and eight previously established loci at P < 5×10-8: seven for BMI, and one for WHRadjBMI in African ancestry individuals. An additional novel locus (SPRYD7/DLEU2 was identified for WHRadjBMI when combined with European GWAS. In the sex-stratified analyses, we identified three novel loci for BMI (INTS10/LPL and MLC1 in men, IRX4/IRX2 in women and four for WHRadjBMI (SSX2IP, CASC8, PDE3B and ZDHHC1/HSD11B2 in women in individuals of African ancestry or both African and European ancestry. For four of the novel variants, the minor allele frequency was low (<5%. In the trans-ethnic fine mapping of 47 BMI loci and 27 WHRadjBMI loci that were locus-wide significant (P < 0.05 adjusted for effective number of variants per locus from the African ancestry sex-combined and sex-stratified analyses, 26 BMI loci and 17 WHRadjBMI loci contained ≤ 20 variants in the credible sets that jointly account for 99% posterior probability of driving the associations. The lead variants in 13 of these loci had a high probability of being causal. As compared to our previous HapMap imputed GWAS for BMI and WHRadjBMI including up to 71,412 and 27,350 African ancestry individuals, respectively, our results suggest that 1000 Genomes imputation showed modest improvement

  1. The Wolbachia WO bacteriophage proteome in the Aedes albopictus C/wStr1 cell line: evidence for lytic activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Gerald D; Markowski, Todd W; Witthuhn, Bruce A; Higgins, LeeAnn; Baldridge, Abigail S; Fallon, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis (Rickettsiales), an obligate intracellular alphaproteobacterium in insects, manipulates host reproduction to maximize invasion of uninfected insect populations. Modification of host population structure has potential applications for control of pest species, particularly if Wolbachia can be maintained, manipulated, and genetically engineered in vitro. Although Wolbachia maintains an obligate mutualism with genome stability in nematodes, arthropods can be co-infected with distinct Wolbachia strains, and horizontal gene transfer between strains is potentially mediated by WO phages encoded within Wolbachia genomes. Proteomic analysis of a robust, persistent infection of a mosquito cell line with wStr from the planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus, revealed expression of a full array of WO phage genes, as well as nine of ten non-phage genes that occur between two distinct clusters of WOMelB genes in the genome of wMel, which infects Drosophila melanogaster. These non-phage genes encode potential host-adaptive proteins and are expressed in wStr at higher levels than phage structural proteins. A subset of seven of the non-phage genes is flanked by highly conserved non-coding sequences, including a putative promoter element, that are not present in a syntenically arranged array of homologs in plasmids from three tick-associated Rickettsia spp. These studies expand our understanding of wStr in a host cell line derived from the mosquito, Aedes albopictus, and provide a basis for investigating conditions that favor the lytic phase of the WO phage life cycle and recovery of infectious phage particles.

  2. Discovery and Fine-Mapping of Glycaemic and Obesity-Related Trait Loci Using High-Density Imputation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momoko Horikoshi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Reference panels from the 1000 Genomes (1000G Project Consortium provide near complete coverage of common and low-frequency genetic variation with minor allele frequency ≥0.5% across European ancestry populations. Within the European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE Consortium, we have undertaken the first large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS, supplemented by 1000G imputation, for four quantitative glycaemic and obesity-related traits, in up to 87,048 individuals of European ancestry. We identified two loci for body mass index (BMI at genome-wide significance, and two for fasting glucose (FG, none of which has been previously reported in larger meta-analysis efforts to combine GWAS of European ancestry. Through conditional analysis, we also detected multiple distinct signals of association mapping to established loci for waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (RSPO3 and FG (GCK and G6PC2. The index variant for one association signal at the G6PC2 locus is a low-frequency coding allele, H177Y, which has recently been demonstrated to have a functional role in glucose regulation. Fine-mapping analyses revealed that the non-coding variants most likely to drive association signals at established and novel loci were enriched for overlap with enhancer elements, which for FG mapped to promoter and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic islets, in particular. Our study demonstrates that 1000G imputation and genetic fine-mapping of common and low-frequency variant association signals at GWAS loci, integrated with genomic annotation in relevant tissues, can provide insight into the functional and regulatory mechanisms through which their effects on glycaemic and obesity-related traits are mediated.

  3. Allele distributions at hybrid incompatibility loci facilitate the potential for gene flow between cultivated and weedy rice in the US.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Craig

    Full Text Available The accumulation of independent mutations over time in two populations often leads to reproductive isolation. Reproductive isolation between diverging populations may be reinforced by barriers that occur either pre- or postzygotically. Hybrid sterility is the most common form of postzygotic isolation in plants. Four postzygotic sterility loci, comprising three hybrid sterility systems (Sa, s5, DPL, have been recently identified in Oryza sativa. These loci explain, in part, the limited hybridization that occurs between the domesticated cultivated rice varieties, O. sativa spp. japonica and O. sativa spp. indica. In the United States, cultivated fields of japonica rice are often invaded by conspecific weeds that have been shown to be of indica origin. Crop-weed hybrids have been identified in crop fields, but at low frequencies. Here we examined the possible role of these hybrid incompatibility loci in the interaction between cultivated and weedy rice. We identified a novel allele at Sa that seemingly prevents loss of fertility in hybrids. Additionally, we found wide-compatibility type alleles at strikingly high frequencies at the Sa and s5 loci in weed groups, and a general lack of incompatible alleles between crops and weeds at the DPL loci. Our results suggest that weedy individuals, particularly those of the SH and BRH groups, should be able to freely hybridize with the local japonica crop, and that prezygotic factors, such as differences in flowering time, have been more important in limiting weed-crop gene flow in the past. As the selective landscape for weedy rice changes due to increased use of herbicide resistant strains of cultivated rice, the genetic barriers that hinder indica-japonica hybridization cannot be counted on to limit the flow of favorable crop genes into weeds.

  4. Development of 14 polymorphic microsatellite loci for Ficus tikoua (Moraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu-Shui; Tan, Lu; Hu, Dai-Mei; Chen, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed to facilitate studies on the fine-scale population genetic structure of Ficus tikoua (Moraceae), a prostrate shrub known to have highly restricted gene flow. Microsatellite primers were developed using the biotin-streptavidin capture method and scanned for polymorphism within 76 individuals sampled from three natural F. tikoua populations. Fourteen loci were shown to be polymorphic, with allele numbers ranging from three to 16. The observed and expected heterozygosity in the three populations ranged from 0 to 1 and from 0 to 0.87, respectively. Substantial divergence was found among the populations at some loci. All loci can be successfully amplified in at least eight other Ficus species, indicating good transferability within the genus. The 14 microsatellite loci will be a helpful tool for assessing the fine-scale genetic structure of F. tikoua.

  5. Identification of quantitative trait loci for salinity tolerance in rice ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. B. BIZIMANA

    2017-08-16

    indica), and a salt tolerant, Hasawi (aus), were used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) linked to salinity tolerance. One hundred and ninety four polymorphic SNP markers were used to construct a genetic linkage map ...

  6. Massively parallel sequencing of 32 forensic markers using the Precision ID GlobalFiler™ NGS STR Panel and the Ion PGM™ System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Zhou, Di; Wang, Hui; Jia, Zhenjun; Liu, Jing; Qian, Xiaoqin; Li, Chengtao; Hou, Yiping

    2017-11-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies have proved capable of sequencing the majority of the key forensic STR markers. By MPS, not only the repeat-length size but also sequence variations could be detected. Recently, Thermo Fisher Scientific has designed an advanced MPS 32-plex panel, named the Precision ID GlobalFiler™ NGS STR Panel, where the primer set has been designed specifically for the purpose of MPS technologies and the data analysis are supported by a new version HID STR Genotyper Plugin (V4.0). In this study, a series of experiments that evaluated concordance, reliability, sensitivity of detection, mixture analysis, and the ability to analyze case-type and challenged samples were conducted. In addition, 106 unrelated Han individuals were sequenced to perform genetic analyses of allelic diversity. As expected, MPS detected broader allele variations and gained higher power of discrimination and exclusion rate. MPS results were found to be concordant with current capillary electrophoresis methods, and single source complete profiles could be obtained stably using as little as 100pg of input DNA. Moreover, this MPS panel could be adapted to case-type samples and partial STR genotypes of the minor contributor could be detected up to 19:1 mixture. Aforementioned results indicate that the Precision ID GlobalFiler™ NGS STR Panel is reliable, robust and reproducible and have the potential to be used as a tool for human forensics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Association analyses of East Asian individuals and trans-ancestry analyses with European individuals reveal new loci associated with cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, Cassandra N; Chen, Peng; Kim, Young Jin; Wang, Xu; Cai, Hui; Li, Shengxu; Long, Jirong; Wu, Ying; Wang, Ya Xing; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Jung, Keum-Ji; Hu, Cheng; Akiyama, Koichi; Zhang, Yonghong; Moon, Sanghoon; Johnson, Todd A; Li, Huaixing; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; He, Meian; Cannon, Maren E; Roman, Tamara S; Salfati, Elias; Lin, Keng-Hung; Guo, Xiuqing; Sheu, Wayne H H; Absher, Devin; Adair, Linda S; Assimes, Themistocles L; Aung, Tin; Cai, Qiuyin; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Du, Shufa; Fan, Qiao; Fann, Cathy S J; Feranil, Alan B; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Gu, Dongfeng; Gui, Lixuan; Guo, Zhirong; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Hixson, James; Hou, Xuhong; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Yao; Hwang, Mi Yeong; Hwu, Chii-Min; Isono, Masato; Juang, Jyh-Ming Jimmy; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kubo, Michiaki; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Sun-Ju; Lee, Wen-Jane; Liang, Kae-Woei; Lim, Blanche; Lim, Sing-Hui; Liu, Jianjun; Nabika, Toru; Pan, Wen-Harn; Peng, Hao; Quertermous, Thomas; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Sandow, Kevin; Shi, Jinxiu; Sun, Liang; Tan, Pok Chien; Tan, Shu-Pei; Taylor, Kent D; Teo, Yik-Ying; Toh, Sue-Anne; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; van Dam, Rob M; Wang, Aili; Wang, Feijie; Wang, Jie; Wei, Wen Bin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yao, Jie; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zhang, Rong; Zhao, Wanting; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Rich, Stephen S; Rotter, Jerome I; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Wu, Tangchun; Lin, Xu; Han, Bok-Ghee; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Cho, Yoon Shin; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Jia, Weiping; Jee, Sun-Ha; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Kato, Norihiro; Jonas, Jost B; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Shu, Xiao-Ou; He, Jiang; Zheng, Wei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Huang, Wei; Kim, Bong-Jo; Tai, E-Shyong; Mohlke, Karen L; Sim, Xueling

    2017-05-01

    Large-scale meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified >175 loci associated with fasting cholesterol levels, including total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglycerides (TG). With differences in linkage disequilibrium (LD) structure and allele frequencies between ancestry groups, studies in additional large samples may detect new associations. We conducted staged GWAS meta-analyses in up to 69,414 East Asian individuals from 24 studies with participants from Japan, the Philippines, Korea, China, Singapore, and Taiwan. These meta-analyses identified (P Asian meta-analysis with association results from up to 187,365 European individuals from the Global Lipids Genetics Consortium in a trans-ancestry meta-analysis. This analysis identified (log10Bayes Factor ≥6.1) eight additional novel lipid loci. Among the twelve total loci identified, the index variants at eight loci have demonstrated at least nominal significance with other metabolic traits in prior studies, and two loci exhibited coincident eQTLs (P < 1 × 10-5) in subcutaneous adipose tissue for BPTF and PDGFC. Taken together, these analyses identified multiple novel lipid loci, providing new potential therapeutic targets. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Genius loci jako estetický problém

    OpenAIRE

    Křížová, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    (in English): Diploma thesis Genius loci as an aesthetic problem is addressed by defining the concept of genius loci and exploring its aesthetic implications and parallels. After clarification of the ontological nature of this phenomenon its commonalities will be monitored with selected concepts of environmental philosophy and aesthetics, especially the aesthetic dimension of the environmental experience. Publications of Christian Norberg-Schulz and David E. Cooper are used as a starting mate...

  9. Frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Riehle, Fritz

    2006-01-01

    Of all measurement units, frequency is the one that may be determined with the highest degree of accuracy. It equally allows precise measurements of other physical and technical quantities, whenever they can be measured in terms of frequency.This volume covers the central methods and techniques relevant for frequency standards developed in physics, electronics, quantum electronics, and statistics. After a review of the basic principles, the book looks at the realisation of commonly used components. It then continues with the description and characterisation of important frequency standards

  10. High-throughput next-generation sequencing to genotype six classical HLA loci from 96 donors in a single MiSeq run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, P K; Geretz, A; Sindhu, R K; Vayntrub, T; Fernández Viña, M A; Apps, R; Michael, N L; Thomas, R

    2017-11-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) methods have been established as an efficient approach for HLA typing because unlike traditional Sanger sequencing, they provide unambiguous results at a reasonable cost. We previously developed a multi-locus index method to genotype four HLA loci (A, B, C, and DRB1) on the Illumina MiSeq platform. We have now expanded this method to include two additional loci, HLA-DPB1 and DQB1. Contiguous full-length amplicons from 5'UTR through 3'UTR regions were generated using one long-range PCR reaction per locus for each of the six loci from 96 individuals of different ethnicities. The six amplicons from each donor were pooled, enzymatically fragmented and given a donor-specific index. This approach enabled sequencing of 576 loci from 96 individuals in a single MiSeq run. Donor-specific sequence reads were demultiplexed, and allele calls were generated from FASTQ files using commercially available software. Comparison to HLA genotypes generated from Sanger sequence-based typing (SBT) identified no discordances among any of the alleles analyzed in this study. Importantly, this method was able to resolve 22 DPB1 and 20 DQB1 alleles that were ambiguous with the SBT method. Furthermore, a novel allele in each of these two loci was identified, with the DQB1*05:01:24 allele having a frequency of greater than five percent. This method was subsequently validated against a blinded panel of 22 samples from the 17th International HLA and Immunogenetics Workshop. The flexibility of the method is further highlighted by successful genotyping of eight loci comprising all classical HLA loci for a subset of the samples. We now present a high-throughput, high-resolution, scalable NGS HLA typing method to accurately and efficiently genotype all classical HLA class I and II loci. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Targeted Sequencing of Lung Function Loci in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Cases and Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas, María Soler; Wain, Louise V; Shrine, Nick; McKeever, Tricia M; Sayers, Ian; Hall, Ian P; Tobin, Martin D

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death worldwide; smoking is the main risk factor for COPD, but genetic factors are also relevant contributors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of the lung function measures used in the diagnosis of COPD have identified a number of loci, however association signals are often broad and collectively these loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability. In order to examine the association with COPD risk of genetic variants down to low allele frequencies, to aid fine-mapping of association signals and to explain more of the missing heritability, we undertook a targeted sequencing study in 300 COPD cases and 300 smoking controls for 26 loci previously reported to be associated with lung function. We used a pooled sequencing approach, with 12 pools of 25 individuals each, enabling high depth (30x) coverage per sample to be achieved. This pooled design maximised sample size and therefore power, but led to challenges during variant-calling since sequencing error rates and minor allele frequencies for rare variants can be very similar. For this reason we employed a rigorous quality control pipeline for variant detection which included the use of 3 independent calling algorithms. In order to avoid false positive associations we also developed tests to detect variants with potential batch effects and removed them before undertaking association testing. We tested for the effects of single variants and the combined effect of rare variants within a locus. We followed up the top signals with data available (only 67% of collapsing methods signals) in 4,249 COPD cases and 11,916 smoking controls from UK Biobank. We provide suggestive evidence for the combined effect of rare variants on COPD risk in TNXB and in sliding windows within MECOM and upstream of HHIP. These findings can lead to an improved understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the development of COPD.

  12. Targeted Sequencing of Lung Function Loci in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Cases and Controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Soler Artigas

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is the third leading cause of death worldwide; smoking is the main risk factor for COPD, but genetic factors are also relevant contributors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS of the lung function measures used in the diagnosis of COPD have identified a number of loci, however association signals are often broad and collectively these loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability. In order to examine the association with COPD risk of genetic variants down to low allele frequencies, to aid fine-mapping of association signals and to explain more of the missing heritability, we undertook a targeted sequencing study in 300 COPD cases and 300 smoking controls for 26 loci previously reported to be associated with lung function. We used a pooled sequencing approach, with 12 pools of 25 individuals each, enabling high depth (30x coverage per sample to be achieved. This pooled design maximised sample size and therefore power, but led to challenges during variant-calling since sequencing error rates and minor allele frequencies for rare variants can be very similar. For this reason we employed a rigorous quality control pipeline for variant detection which included the use of 3 independent calling algorithms. In order to avoid false positive associations we also developed tests to detect variants with potential batch effects and removed them before undertaking association testing. We tested for the effects of single variants and the combined effect of rare variants within a locus. We followed up the top signals with data available (only 67% of collapsing methods signals in 4,249 COPD cases and 11,916 smoking controls from UK Biobank. We provide suggestive evidence for the combined effect of rare variants on COPD risk in TNXB and in sliding windows within MECOM and upstream of HHIP. These findings can lead to an improved understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the development of COPD.

  13. Allele distribution and genetic diversity of VNTR loci in Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates from different sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartkus Joanne M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis is a zoonotic pathogen, which can be found in many sources including animals and the environment. However, little is known about the molecular relatedness among S. Enteritidis isolates from different sources. We have applied multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA to study the genetic diversity of S. Enteritidis isolates from human and non-human sources. Results We identified 38 unique MLVA types using nine VNTR loci markers for discrimination between 145 S. Enteritidis isolates from different sources including humans (n = 41, chickens (n = 45, and eggs (n = 40. There were 20 distinct MLVA types identified from human isolates, 17 distinct MLVA types from chicken isolates, and 5 from egg isolates. We compared allele distribution and frequency for each VNTR marker and measured allelic polymorphism within each VNTR locus of S. Enteritidis isolates from the sources using Nei's diversity index (D. Differences in allele distribution and frequency were detected in most loci of study isolates. Different genetic diversity for certain loci was identified in isolates from different sources. The average of genetic diversity (D was lower in egg isolates (0.16 compared to human (0.41 and chicken (0.30. However, for loci SE3, SE7, and SE9, human isolates showed significantly higher diversity than both chicken and egg isolates. Whereas for loci SE5 and SE10, chicken isolates had significantly higher diversity than both human and egg isolates. Minimum-spanning tree (MST comprised one major cluster, a minor cluster, and four clonal expansions. MLVA application enabled a cluster analysis by the MST of the S. Enteritidis isolates by sources, which allows a great insight into the genetic relatedness and the possible flow of these organisms between different reservoirs and humans. Conclusion Differences in allele distribution and genetic diversity of VNTR loci in S

  14. Association analyses identify 38 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease and highlight shared genetic risk across populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hailiang; Ng, Siew C; Alberts, Rudi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ripke, Stephan; Lee, James C; Jostins, Luke; Shah, Tejas; Abedian, Shifteh; Cheon, Jae Hee; Cho, Judy; Dayani, Naser E; Franke, Lude; Fuyuno, Yuta; Hart, Ailsa; Juyal, Ramesh C; Juyal, Garima; Kim, Won Ho; Morris, Andrew P; Poustchi, Hossein; Newman, William G; Midha, Vandana; Orchard, Timothy R; Vahedi, Homayon; Sood, Ajit; Sung, Joseph Y; Malekzadeh, Reza; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yamazaki, Keiko; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Parkes, Miles; BK, Thelma; Daly, Mark J; Kubo, Michiaki; Anderson, Carl A; Weersma, Rinse K

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here, we report the first trans-ethnic association study of IBD, with genome-wide or Immunochip genotype data from an extended cohort of 86,640 European individuals and Immunochip data from 9,846 individuals of East-Asian, Indian or Iranian descent. We implicate 38 loci in IBD risk for the first time. For the majority of IBD risk loci, the direction and magnitude of effect is consistent in European and non-European cohorts. Nevertheless, we observe genetic heterogeneity between divergent populations at several established risk loci driven by a combination of differences in allele frequencies (NOD2), effect sizes (TNFSF15, ATG16L1) or a combination of both (IL23R, IRGM). Our results provide biological insights into the pathogenesis of IBD, and demonstrate the utility of trans-ethnic association studies for mapping complex disease loci and understanding genetic architecture across diverse populations. PMID:26192919

  15. CTCF and ncRNA regulate the 3-dimensional structure of antigen receptor loci to facilitate V(DJ recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy M Choi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available At both the immunoglobulin (Ig heavy and kappa light chain loci, there are >100 functional variable (V genes spread over >2 Mb that must move into close proximity in 3D space to the (DJ genes to create a diverse repertoire of antibodies. Similar events take place at the T cell receptor (TCR loci to create a wide repertoire of TCRs. In this review, we will discuss the role of CTCF in forming rosette-like structures at the antigen receptor (AgR loci, and the varied roles it plays in alternately facilitating and repressing V(DJ rearrangements. In addition, non-coding RNAs (ncRNA, also known as germline transcription, can shape the 3D configuration of the Igh locus, and presumably that of the other AgR loci. At the Igh locus, this could occur by gathering the regions being transcribed in the VH locus into the same transcription factory where Iμ is being transcribed. Since the Iμ promoter, Eμ, is adjacent to the DJH rearrangement to which one V gene will ultimately rearrange, the process of germline transcription itself, prominent in the distal half of the VH locus, may play an important and direct role in locus compaction. Finally, we will discuss the impact of the transcriptional and epigenetic landscape of the Igh locus on VH gene rearrangement frequencies.

  16. Association analyses identify 38 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease and highlight shared genetic risk across populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jimmy Z; van Sommeren, Suzanne; Huang, Hailiang; Ng, Siew C; Alberts, Rudi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ripke, Stephan; Lee, James C; Jostins, Luke; Shah, Tejas; Abedian, Shifteh; Cheon, Jae Hee; Cho, Judy; Dayani, Naser E; Franke, Lude; Fuyuno, Yuta; Hart, Ailsa; Juyal, Ramesh C; Juyal, Garima; Kim, Won Ho; Morris, Andrew P; Poustchi, Hossein; Newman, William G; Midha, Vandana; Orchard, Timothy R; Vahedi, Homayon; Sood, Ajit; Sung, Joseph Y; Malekzadeh, Reza; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yamazaki, Keiko; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Parkes, Miles; Bk, Thelma; Daly, Mark J; Kubo, Michiaki; Anderson, Carl A; Weersma, Rinse K

    2015-09-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here we report the first trans-ancestry association study of IBD, with genome-wide or Immunochip genotype data from an extended cohort of 86,640 European individuals and Immunochip data from 9,846 individuals of East Asian, Indian or Iranian descent. We implicate 38 loci in IBD risk for the first time. For the majority of the IBD risk loci, the direction and magnitude of effect are consistent in European and non-European cohorts. Nevertheless, we observe genetic heterogeneity between divergent populations at several established risk loci driven by differences in allele frequency (NOD2) or effect size (TNFSF15 and ATG16L1) or a combination of these factors (IL23R and IRGM). Our results provide biological insights into the pathogenesis of IBD and demonstrate the usefulness of trans-ancestry association studies for mapping loci associated with complex diseases and understanding genetic architecture across diverse populations.

  17. Characterization of EST-based SSR loci in the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.M.T. Brunet; D. Doucet; B.R. Sturtevant; F.A.H. Sperling

    2013-01-01

    After identifying 114 microsatellite loci from Choristoneura fumiferana expressed sequence tags, 87 loci were assayed in a panel of 11 wild-caught individuals, giving 29 polymorphic loci. Further analysis of 20 of these loci on 31 individuals collected from a single population in northern Minnesota identified 14 in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

  18. Frequency Synthesiser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drago, Salvatore; Sebastiano, Fabio; Leenaerts, Dominicus M.W.; Breems, Lucien J.; Nauta, Bram

    2016-01-01

    A low power frequency synthesiser circuit (30) for a radio transceiver, the synthesiser circuit comprising: a digital controlled oscillator configured to generate an output signal having a frequency controlled by an input digital control word (DCW); a feedback loop connected between an output and an

  19. Frequency synthesiser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drago, S.; Sebastiano, Fabio; Leenaerts, Dominicus Martinus Wilhelmus; Breems, Lucien Johannes; Nauta, Bram

    2010-01-01

    A low power frequency synthesiser circuit (30) for a radio transceiver, the synthesiser circuit comprising: a digital controlled oscillator configured to generate an output signal having a frequency controlled by an input digital control word (DCW); a feedback loop connected between an output and an

  20. PCR typing of DNA fragments of the two short tandem repeat (STR) systems upstream of the human myelin basic protein (MBP) gene in Danes and Greenland Eskimos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, L J; Frederiksen, J; Morling, N

    1996-01-01

    the Eskimo and Danish populations. Significant differences were observed between the distribution of fragments ('alleles') in Greenland Eskimos and in Danes. The allele MBP-A7 was considerably more frequent in Eskimos (0.2214) than in Danes (0.0775) and also the allele MBP-B9 was considerably more frequent......DNA from the double short tandem repeat (STR) system MBP (locus 18q23-pter) was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the two polymorphic repeat systems were separated by cutting with the restriction enzyme NlaIII. The lengths of the DNA fragments of the two MBP STR systems MBP...

  1. Molecular epidemiology of human sporotrichosis in Venezuela reveals high frequency of Sporothrix globosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Emma; León-Navarro, Isabel; Rodríguez-Brito, Sabrina; Mendoza, Mireya; Niño-Vega, Gustavo A

    2015-02-25

    Sporotrichosis is a cutaneous and subcutaneous fungal disease of humans and other mammals, known to be caused by the Sporothrix schenckii species complex, which comprises four species of clinical importance: S. brasiliensis, S. globosa, S. luriei, and S. schenckii sensu stricto. Of them, S. globosa and S. schenckii s. str. show global distribution and differences in global frequency as causal agents of the disease. In the Americas, only three species are present: S. schenckii s. str., S. brasiliensis (so far, only reported in Brazil), and S. globosa. In Venezuela, since the first case of sporotrichosis reported in 1935, S. schenckii have been considered its unique etiological agent. In the present work, the presence of more than one species in the country was evaluated. By phenotypic key features and molecular phylogeny analyses, we re-examined 30 isolates from diverse Venezuelan regions belonging to the fungi collection of Instituto de Biomedicina, Caracas, Venezuela, and national reference center for skin diseases. All isolates were collected between 1973 and 2013, and maintained in distilled water. Sporotrichosis in Venezuela is mainly caused by S. schenckii s. str. (70%). However, a significant proportion (30%) of sporotrichosis cases in the country can be attributable to S. globosa. A correlation between intraspecific genotypes and clinical presentation is proposed. Our data suggest that sporotrichosis various clinical forms might be related to genetic diversity of isolates, and possibly, to diverse virulence profiles previously reported in the S. schenckii species complex. Sporothrix globosa was found to be the causative agent of 30% of sporotrichosis for the Venezuelan cases re-examined, the highest frequency of this species so far reported in the Americas. The high genetic variability presented by S. schenckii s. str. indicates that species distinction based on phenotypic key features could be a challenging and uncertain task; molecular identification

  2. Hierarchical modeling of genome-wide Short Tandem Repeat (STR) markers infers native American prehistory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cecil M

    2010-02-01

    This study examines a genome-wide dataset of 678 Short Tandem Repeat loci characterized in 444 individuals representing 29 Native American populations as well as the Tundra Netsi and Yakut populations from Siberia. Using these data, the study tests four current hypotheses regarding the hierarchical distribution of neutral genetic variation in native South American populations: (1) the western region of South America harbors more variation than the eastern region of South America, (2) Central American and western South American populations cluster exclusively, (3) populations speaking the Chibchan-Paezan and Equatorial-Tucanoan language stock emerge as a group within an otherwise South American clade, (4) Chibchan-Paezan populations in Central America emerge together at the tips of the Chibchan-Paezan cluster. This study finds that hierarchical models with the best fit place Central American populations, and populations speaking the Chibchan-Paezan language stock, at a basal position or separated from the South American group, which is more consistent with a serial founder effect into South America than that previously described. Western (Andean) South America is found to harbor similar levels of variation as eastern (Equatorial-Tucanoan and Ge-Pano-Carib) South America, which is inconsistent with an initial west coast migration into South America. Moreover, in all relevant models, the estimates of genetic diversity within geographic regions suggest a major bottleneck or founder effect occurring within the North American subcontinent, before the peopling of Central and South America. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Strömgren uvby photometry of the peculiar globular cluster NGC 2419

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Matthias J.; Koch, Andreas; Feltzing, Sofia; Kacharov, Nikolay; Wilkinson, Mark I.; Irwin, Mike

    2015-09-01

    NGC 2419 is a peculiar Galactic globular cluster offset from the others in the size-luminosity diagram, and showing several chemical abundance anomalies. Here, we present Strömgren uvby photometry of the cluster. Using the gravity- and metallicity-sensitive c1 and m1 indices, we identify a sample of likely cluster members extending well beyond the formal tidal radius. The estimated contamination by cluster non-members is only one per cent, making our catalogue ideally suited for spectroscopic follow-up. We derive photometric [Fe/H] of red giants, and depending on which metallicity calibration from the literature we use, we find reasonable to excellent agreement with spectroscopic [Fe/H], both for the cluster mean metallicity and for individual stars. We demonstrate explicitly that the photometric uncertainties are not Gaussian and this must be accounted for in any analysis of the metallicity distribution function. Using a realistic, non-Gaussian model for the photometric uncertainties, we find a formal internal [Fe/H] spread of σ=0.11+0.02-0.01 dex. This is an upper limit to the cluster's true [Fe/H] spread and may partially, and possibly entirely, reflect the limited precision of the photometric metallicity estimation and systematic effects. The lack of correlation between spectroscopic and photometric [Fe/H] of individual stars is further evidence against a [Fe/H] spread on the 0.1 dex level. Finally, the CN-sensitive δ4, among other colour indices, anti-correlates strongly with magnesium abundance, indicating that the second-generation stars are nitrogen enriched. The absence of similar correlations in some other CN-sensitive indices supports the second generation being enriched in He, which in these indices approximately compensates the shift due to CN. Compared to a single continuous distribution with finite dispersion, the observed δ4 distribution of red giants is slightly better fit by two distinct populations with no internal spread, with the nitrogen

  4. High-density genotyping of immune loci in Koreans and Europeans identifies eight new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Kang, Young Mo; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Nath, Swapan K; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Kremer, Joel M; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothée; Liao, Katherine P; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Plenge, Robert M; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2015-03-01

    A highly polygenic aetiology and high degree of allele-sharing between ancestries have been well elucidated in genetic studies of rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, the high-density genotyping array Immunochip for immune disease loci identified 14 new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci among individuals of European ancestry. Here, we aimed to identify new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci using Korean-specific Immunochip data. We analysed Korean rheumatoid arthritis case-control samples using the Immunochip and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) array to search for new risk alleles of rheumatoid arthritis with anticitrullinated peptide antibodies. To increase power, we performed a meta-analysis of Korean data with previously published European Immunochip and GWAS data for a total sample size of 9299 Korean and 45,790 European case-control samples. We identified eight new rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci (TNFSF4, LBH, EOMES, ETS1-FLI1, COG6, RAD51B, UBASH3A and SYNGR1) that passed a genome-wide significance threshold (p<5×10(-8)), with evidence for three independent risk alleles at 1q25/TNFSF4. The risk alleles from the seven new loci except for the TNFSF4 locus (monomorphic in Koreans), together with risk alleles from previously established RA risk loci, exhibited a high correlation of effect sizes between ancestries. Further, we refined the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that represent potentially causal variants through a trans-ethnic comparison of densely genotyped SNPs. This study demonstrates the advantage of dense-mapping and trans-ancestral analysis for identification of potentially causal SNPs. In addition, our findings support the importance of T cells in the pathogenesis and the fact of frequent overlap of risk loci among diverse autoimmune diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. New Microsatellite Loci for Prosopis alba and P. chilensis (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia F. Bessega

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: As only six useful microsatellite loci that exhibit broad cross-amplification are so far available for Prosopis species, it is necessary to develop a larger number of codominant markers for population genetic studies. Simple sequence repeat (SSR markers obtained for Prosopis species from a 454 pyrosequencing run were optimized and characterized for studies in P. alba and P. chilensis. Methods and Results: Twelve markers that were successfully amplified showed polymorphism in P. alba and P. chilensis. The number of alleles per locus ranged between two and seven and heterozygosity estimates ranged from 0.2 to 0.8. Most of these loci cross-amplify in P. ruscifolia, P. flexuosa, P. kuntzei, P. glandulosa, and P. pallida. Conclusions: These loci will enable genetic diversity studies of P. alba and P. chilensis and contribute to fine-scale population structure, indirect estimation of relatedness among individuals, and marker-assisted selection.

  6. New microsatellite loci for Prosopis alba and P. chilensis (Fabaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessega, Cecilia F; Pometti, Carolina L; Miller, Joe T; Watts, Richard; Saidman, Beatriz O; Vilardi, Juan C

    2013-05-01

    As only six useful microsatellite loci that exhibit broad cross-amplification are so far available for Prosopis species, it is necessary to develop a larger number of codominant markers for population genetic studies. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers obtained for Prosopis species from a 454 pyrosequencing run were optimized and characterized for studies in P. alba and P. chilensis. • Twelve markers that were successfully amplified showed polymorphism in P. alba and P. chilensis. The number of alleles per locus ranged between two and seven and heterozygosity estimates ranged from 0.2 to 0.8. Most of these loci cross-amplify in P. ruscifolia, P. flexuosa, P. kuntzei, P. glandulosa, and P. pallida. • These loci will enable genetic diversity studies of P. alba and P. chilensis and contribute to fine-scale population structure, indirect estimation of relatedness among individuals, and marker-assisted selection.

  7. Isolation of human simple repeat loci by hybridization selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A; Neumann, R; Gobert, S; Jeffreys, A J

    1994-04-01

    We have isolated short tandem repeat arrays from the human genome, using a rapid method involving filter hybridization to enrich for tri- or tetranucleotide tandem repeats. About 30% of clones from the enriched library cross-hybridize with probes containing trimeric or tetrameric tandem arrays, facilitating the rapid isolation of large numbers of clones. In an initial analysis of 54 clones, 46 different tandem arrays were identified. Analysis of these tandem repeat loci by PCR showed that 24 were polymorphic in length; substantially higher levels of polymorphism were displayed by the tetrameric repeat loci isolated than by the trimeric repeats. Primary mapping of these loci by linkage analysis showed that they derive from 17 chromosomes, including the X chromosome. We anticipate the use of this strategy for the efficient isolation of tandem repeats from other sources of genomic DNA, including DNA from flow-sorted chromosomes, and from other species.

  8. Confirmation of novel type 1 diabetes risk loci in families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, J D; Howson, J M M; Smyth, D

    2012-01-01

    Over 50 regions of the genome have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, mainly using large case/control collections. In a recent genome-wide association (GWA) study, 18 novel susceptibility loci were identified and replicated, including replication evidence from 2,319 families. Here, we, th......, the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC), aimed to exclude the possibility that any of the 18 loci were false-positives due to population stratification by significantly increasing the statistical power of our family study.......Over 50 regions of the genome have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, mainly using large case/control collections. In a recent genome-wide association (GWA) study, 18 novel susceptibility loci were identified and replicated, including replication evidence from 2,319 families. Here, we...

  9. Cultivar identification by means of isoenzymes 2. Genetic variation at 4 enzyme loci in diploid ryegrass lolium-spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, G.; Østergaard, H.; Johansen, Henrik

    1985-01-01

    in Italian ryegrass was unsatisfactory at any single locus. By summing the test values for each locus, a combined evaluation of distinctness was obtained. Then cultivars could be pairwise distinguished with 99% confidence in 96% of pairs of perennial ryegrass and in 80% of pairs of Italian ryegrass......Fifteen cultivars of perennial ryegrass (L. perenne) and 6 cultivars of Italian ryegrass (L. multiflorum) have been scored for four enzyme loci, Pgi-2, Got-3, Pgm-1 and Pgd-1 [phosphoglucoisomerase, glutamate oxalacetate transaminase, phosphoglucomutase and 6-phosphogluconate isomerase] by starch...... gel electrophoresis. Cultivars were pairwise compared by means of allelic frequencies assuming Hardy-Weinberg proportions. At first, the comparisons were carried out for each locus separately. The 2 loci Pgi-2 and Got-3 distinguished perennial ryegrass cultivars fairly well, but the discrimination...

  10. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for flesh colour and growth traits in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moen Thomas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flesh colour and growth related traits in salmonids are both commercially important and of great interest from a physiological and evolutionary perspective. The aim of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL affecting flesh colour and growth related traits in an F2 population derived from an isolated, landlocked wild population in Norway (Byglands Bleke and a commercial production population. Methods One hundred and twenty-eight informative microsatellite loci distributed across all 29 linkage groups in Atlantic salmon were genotyped in individuals from four F2 families that were selected from the ends of the flesh colour distribution. Genotyping of 23 additional loci and two additional families was performed on a number of linkage groups harbouring putative QTL. QTL analysis was performed using a line-cross model assuming fixation of alternate QTL alleles and a half-sib model with no assumptions about the number and frequency of QTL alleles in the founder populations. Results A moderate to strong phenotypic correlation was found between colour, length and weight traits. In total, 13 genome-wide significant QTL were detected for all traits using the line-cross model, including three genome-wide significant QTL for flesh colour (Chr 6, Chr 26 and Chr 4. In addition, 32 suggestive QTL were detected (chromosome-wide P Conclusions A large number of significant and suggestive QTL for flesh colour and growth traits were found in an F2 population of Atlantic salmon. Chr 26 and Chr 4 presented the strongest evidence for significant QTL affecting flesh colour, while Chr 10, Chr 5, and Chr 4 presented the strongest evidence for significant QTL affecting growth traits (length and weight. These QTL could be strong candidates for use in marker-assisted selection and provide a starting point for further characterisation of the genetic components underlying flesh colour and growth.

  11. Isolation and identification of a new set of microsatellite loci from Ucides cordatus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araújo Erlane S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new set of microsatellite loci (simple sequence repeats, SSRs from the overexploited mangrove crab Ucides cordatus is described in this study. Microsatellite isolation used a highly simplified and inexpensive protocol based on (i multiple enzyme digestion/ligation; (ii mixed biotin-labeled probes and streptavidin-coated magnetic bead hybridization capture strategy, and (iii a double-repeat-enrichment procedure. A genomic library, double-enriched for inserts containing tetranucleotide repeat motifs [(GACA6, (GATA7, (GGAT5 and (GTAT5], was constructed to increase the chance of recovering SSR-containing sequences within DNA fragments. Amplified enriched DNA was cloned and transformed into competent E. coli. Then, positive clones were identified by 'white/blue plaque selection’. One hundred and five colonies were PCR-screened for sequencing, and 72 of these were found to have unique SSR inserts. Microsatellite motifs contained more than five repeats, and most loci were found to have perfect tandem repeats (51.4%, of which 94.4% were dinucleotide and 5.5% trinucleotide. Only 20% of all loci were compound and 28.6% were imperfect repeats containing di-, tri- and/or tetranucleotides. The high frequency of perfect repeat motifs after enrichment is additional evidence of the importance of adopting this procedure for the isolation of SSR. The novel 34 SSRs described in this study are expected to be highly polymorphic and, therefore, useful in population/stocks discrimination of this valuable mangrove species throughout its range, currently subjected to excessive fishing efforts.

  12. A taxonomic revision of the western Palaearctic species of the subgenera Zimmermannia Hering and Ectoedemia Busck s.str. (Lepidoptera, Nepticulidae), with notes on their phylogeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieukerken, van E.J.

    1985-01-01

    The subgenera Zimmermannia Hering and Ectoedemia s.str., together forming the genus Ectoedemia Busck sensu Wilkinson & Newton (1981) are described and redefined, and the Western Palaearctic species are revised. In total 50 species are recognised, including the new species hispanica, monemvasiae,

  13. Draft genome sequence of Lactococcus garvieae str. PAQ102015-99, an outbreak strain isolated from a commercial trout farm in the Northwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    We announce the draft genome assembly of Lactococcus garvieae str. PAQ102015-99, a recently isolated strain from an outbreak of lactococcosis at a commercial trout farm in the Northwestern US. The draft genome comprises 14 contigs totaling 2,068,357 bp with an N50 of 496,618 bp and average G+C conte...

  14. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for Cornus sanguinea (Cornaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadl, Phillip A; Hatmaker, E Anne; Fussi, Barbara; Scheffler, Brian E; Trigiano, Robert N

    2013-09-01

    To facilitate genetic and conservation research of Cornus sanguinea, microsatellite loci were isolated and 29 individuals from 11 German populations were genotyped. • Sixteen microsatellite loci were characterized from an enriched small insert genomic library. The number of alleles detected ranged from five to 11 per locus, observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.00 to 1.00, expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.65 to 0.90, and polymorphic information content ranged from 0.59 to 0.88. • The markers described in the study will allow further investigation of population dynamics and the degree of clonal reproduction within populations of C. sanguinea.

  15. Strategie di spazializzazione dei contenuti nel GeniusLoci Digitale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Gasperi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available GeniusLoci Digitale is a software architecture of virtual tour that integrates various multimedia technologies (3D computer graphics, panoramas, dynamic maps, movies, pictures to represent the identity of places. The designer is interested in reproducing virtually complex aspects that define a context, which means the effect of meaning that distinguishes one place. GeniusLoci Digitale is in fact an architecture that evolves in search of a reproductive and communicative function which is recognizable to extend its development to the Open Source community.

  16. Allele frequencies of ten short tandem repeats loci in the central ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-04-03

    Apr 3, 2009 ... Laboratoire de Biologie Moléculaire, Hôpital Ibn El Jazzar, Avenue Ibn El Jazzar, Kairouan 3140, Tunisia. Introduction. Different methodologies have been used in studies on genetic variability in human populations to assess their genetic com- position and the evolutionary factors to which they are sub-.

  17. Time and frequency-dependent modulation of local field potential synchronization by deep brain stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clinton B McCracken

    Full Text Available High-frequency electrical stimulation of specific brain structures, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS, is an effective treatment for movement disorders, but mechanisms of action remain unclear. We examined the time-dependent effects of DBS applied to the entopeduncular nucleus (EP, the rat homolog of the internal globus pallidus, a target used for treatment of both dystonia and Parkinson's disease (PD. We performed simultaneous multi-site local field potential (LFP recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats to assess the effects of high-frequency (HF, 130 Hz; clinically effective, low-frequency (LF, 15 Hz; ineffective and sham DBS delivered to EP. LFP activity was recorded from dorsal striatum (STR, ventroanterior thalamus (VA, primary motor cortex (M1, and the stimulation site in EP. Spontaneous and acute stimulation-induced LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed at baseline, and after 30, 60, and 90 minutes of stimulation. HF EP DBS produced widespread alterations in spontaneous and stimulus-induced LFP oscillations, with some effects similar across regions and others occurring in a region- and frequency band-specific manner. Many of these changes evolved over time. HF EP DBS produced an initial transient reduction in power in the low beta band in M1 and STR; however, phase synchronization between these regions in the low beta band was markedly suppressed at all time points. DBS also enhanced low gamma synchronization throughout the circuit. With sustained stimulation, there were significant reductions in low beta synchronization between M1-VA and STR-VA, and increases in power within regions in the faster frequency bands. HF DBS also suppressed the ability of acute EP stimulation to induce beta oscillations in all regions along the circuit. This dynamic pattern of synchronizing and desynchronizing effects of EP DBS suggests a complex modulation of activity along cortico-BG-thalamic circuits underlying the therapeutic

  18. Measurement of the rate of production of bacteria in the rumen of buffalo calves using 14C Str. Bovis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, D.N.; Singh, U.B.; Srivastava, S.K.; Srivastava, R.V.N.

    1976-01-01

    A technique has been developed for the in vivo estimation of the rate of production of bacteria in the rumen of buffalo calves. Three male buffalo calves (Des bubalis) of about 2 years of age were taken for these experiments. The animals were given 20 kg. of green maize in 12 equal amounts at 2 hourly intervals. The streptococcus bovis isolated from the rumen were labelled with 14 C by in vitro incubation in the presence of (U- 14 C) DL-leucine. Labelled streptococcus bovis were injected in a single dose in the rumen. Tracer dilution kinetics for open system were applied to the data obtained as a result of dilution of Str. bovis in the rumen to obtained production rates. The average turnover time and production rates were 424.54 minute and 87.43mg/minute. (author)

  19. The Growth Trade-off between Direct and Indirect Taxes in South Africa: Evidence from a STR Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Phiri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The tax system forms the backbone to the functioning of the South African fiscal authorities and it is has been recently questioned whether alterations in the existing tax mix could promote economic growth. Using quarterly data from 1990:Q1 and 2015:Q2, this study investigated the effects of direct and indirect taxes on economic growth for South Africa using the recently developed smooth transition regression (STR model. Our findings suggest an optimal tax of 10.27 percent on the indirect tax-growth ratio, of which below this rate indirect taxes are positively related with economic growth whereas direct taxes are negatively related with growth. Above the optimal tax rate, taxation bears no significant relationship with economic growth. We therefore suggest that policymakers place a greater burden on indirect taxes and yet ensure that the contribution of indirect taxes to economic growth does not exceed the threshold of 10.27 percent.

  20. ACR-SPR-STR Practice Parameter for the Performance of Cardiac Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Rathan M; Janowitz, Warren R; Johnson, Geoffrey B; Lodge, Martin A; Parisi, Marguerite T; Ferguson, Mark R; Hellinger, Jeffrey C; Gladish, Gregory W; Gupta, Narainder K

    2017-12-01

    This clinical practice parameter has been developed collaboratively by the American College of Radiology (ACR), the Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR), and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR). This document is intended to act as a guide for physicians performing and interpreting positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) of cardiac diseases in adults and children. The primary value of cardiac PET/CT imaging include evaluation of perfusion, function, viability, inflammation, anatomy, and risk stratification for cardiac-related events such as myocardial infarction and death. Optimum utility of cardiac PET/CT is achieved when images are interpreted in conjunction with clinical information and laboratory data. Measurement of myocardial blood flow, coronary flow reserve and detection of balanced ischemia are significant advantages of cardiac PET perfusion studies. Increasingly cardiac PET/CT is used in diagnosis and treatment response assessment for cardiac sarcoidosis.

  1. PCR typing of DNA fragments of the short tandem repeat (STR) system HUMTH01 in Danes and Greenland Eskimos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, L J; Møller, A; Morling, N

    1994-01-01

    Forensic Science Research and Training Center (FSRTC), Quantico, and at the Institut für Rechtsmedizin, Münster, Germany. Concordant HUMTH01 types were found in 39 out of 40 individuals. The allele which led to discrepant typing results was assigned type 9.3 in two laboratories and type 10 in one......DNA from the short tandem repeat (STR) system HUMTH01 was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and analyzed by vertical electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels followed by silver staining. DNA samples from 100 unrelated Danes, 147 unrelated Greenland Eskimos, and 89 Danish mother....../child pairs were analyzed. Significant differences were observed between the distribution of fragments ('alleles'), whereby allele number 7 was considerably more frequent in Eskimos (0.687) than in Danes (0.201). The distributions of HUMTH01 phenotypes were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both the Eskimo...

  2. Discovery and fine-mapping of adiposity loci using high density imputation of genome-wide association studies in individuals of African ancestry: African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Maggie C Y; Graff, Mariaelisa; Lu, Yingchang; Justice, Anne E; Mudgal, Poorva; Liu, Ching-Ti; Young, Kristin; Yanek, Lisa R; Feitosa, Mary F; Wojczynski, Mary K; Rand, Kristin; Brody, Jennifer A; Cade, Brian E; Dimitrov, Latchezar; Duan, Qing; Guo, Xiuqing; Lange, Leslie A; Nalls, Michael A; Okut, Hayrettin; Tajuddin, Salman M; Tayo, Bamidele O; Vedantam, Sailaja; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Chen, Guanjie; Chen, Wei-Min; Chesi, Alessandra; Irvin, Marguerite R; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Smith, Jennifer A; Zheng, Wei; Allison, Matthew A; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; Bartz, Traci M; Berndt, Sonja I; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J; Bottinger, Erwin P; Carpten, John; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Conti, David V; Cooper, Richard S; Fornage, Myriam; Freedman, Barry I; Garcia, Melissa; Goodman, Phyllis J; Hsu, Yu-Han H; Hu, Jennifer; Huff, Chad D; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Kittles, Rick; Klein, Eric; Li, Jin; McKnight, Barbara; Nayak, Uma; Nemesure, Barbara; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Olshan, Andrew; Press, Michael F; Rohde, Rebecca; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Salako, Babatunde; Sanderson, Maureen; Shao, Yaming; Siscovick, David S; Stanford, Janet L; Stevens, Victoria L; Stram, Alex; Strom, Sara S; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Witte, John S; Yao, Jie; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ziegler, Regina G; Zonderman, Alan B; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Ambs, Stefan; Cushman, Mary; Faul, Jessica D; Hakonarson, Hakon; Levin, Albert M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Ware, Erin B; Weir, David R; Zhao, Wei; Zhi, Degui; Arnett, Donna K; Grant, Struan F A; Kardia, Sharon L R; Oloapde, Olufunmilayo I; Rao, D C; Rotimi, Charles N; Sale, Michele M; Williams, L Keoki; Zemel, Babette S; Becker, Diane M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Evans, Michele K; Harris, Tamara B; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Li, Yun; Patel, Sanjay R; Psaty, Bruce M; Rotter, Jerome I; Wilson, James G; Bowden, Donald W; Cupples, L Adrienne; Haiman, Christopher A; Loos, Ruth J F; North, Kari E

    2017-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified >300 loci associated with measures of adiposity including body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), but few have been identified through screening of the African ancestry genomes. We performed large scale meta-analyses and replications in up to 52,895 individuals for BMI and up to 23,095 individuals for WHRadjBMI from the African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium (AAAGC) using 1000 Genomes phase 1 imputed GWAS to improve coverage of both common and low frequency variants in the low linkage disequilibrium African ancestry genomes. In the sex-combined analyses, we identified one novel locus (TCF7L2/HABP2) for WHRadjBMI and eight previously established loci at P African ancestry individuals. An additional novel locus (SPRYD7/DLEU2) was identified for WHRadjBMI when combined with European GWAS. In the sex-stratified analyses, we identified three novel loci for BMI (INTS10/LPL and MLC1 in men, IRX4/IRX2 in women) and four for WHRadjBMI (SSX2IP, CASC8, PDE3B and ZDHHC1/HSD11B2 in women) in individuals of African ancestry or both African and European ancestry. For four of the novel variants, the minor allele frequency was low (African ancestry sex-combined and sex-stratified analyses, 26 BMI loci and 17 WHRadjBMI loci contained ≤ 20 variants in the credible sets that jointly account for 99% posterior probability of driving the associations. The lead variants in 13 of these loci had a high probability of being causal. As compared to our previous HapMap imputed GWAS for BMI and WHRadjBMI including up to 71,412 and 27,350 African ancestry individuals, respectively, our results suggest that 1000 Genomes imputation showed modest improvement in identifying GWAS loci including low frequency variants. Trans-ethnic meta-analyses further improved fine mapping of putative causal variants in loci shared between the African and European ancestry populations.

  3. Analysis of eleven Y-chromosomal STR markers in Middle and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , data and statistics which might be so ultimately helpful practically in forensic science and criminology and to let evaluate and present the DNA weight evidences in Iraq medico-legal institute and courts of law. Keywords: Allele frequency, gene ...

  4. Multiancestry association study identifies new asthma risk loci that colocalize with immune-cell enhancer marks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demenais, Florence; Margaritte-Jeannin, Patricia; Barnes, Kathleen C

    2018-01-01

    We examined common variation in asthma risk by conducting a meta-analysis of worldwide asthma genome-wide association studies (23,948 asthma cases, 118,538 controls) of individuals from ethnically diverse populations. We identified five new asthma loci, found two new associations at two known...... asthma loci, established asthma associations at two loci previously implicated in the comorbidity of asthma plus hay fever, and confirmed nine known loci. Investigation of pleiotropy showed large overlaps in genetic variants with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The enrichment in enhancer marks...... at asthma risk loci, especially in immune cells, suggested a major role of these loci in the regulation of immunologically related mechanisms....

  5. Contrasting roles of interallelic recombination at the HLA-A and HLA-B loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, A.L.; Hughes, M.K. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)); Watkins, D.I. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1993-03-01

    A statistical study of DNA sequences of alleles at the highly polymorphic class I MHC loci of humans, HLA-A and HLA-B, showed evidence of both large-scale recombination events(involving recombination of exons 1-2 of one allele with exons 3-8 of another) and small scale recombination events (involving apparent exchange of short DNA segments). The latter events occurred disproportionately in the region of the gene encoding the antigen recognition site (ARS) of the class I molecule. Furthermore, they involved the ARS codons which are under the strongest selection favoring allelic diversity at the amino acid level. Thus, the frequency of recombinant alleles appears to have been increased by some form of balancing selection (such as overdominant selection) favoring heterozygosity in the ARS. These analyses also revealed a striking difference between the A and B loci. Recombination events appear to have occurred about twice as frequently at the B locus, and recombinants at the B locus were significantly more likely to affect polymorphic sites in the ARS. At the A locus, there are well-defined allelic lineages that have persisted since prior to the human-chimpanzee divergence; but at the B locus, there is no evidence for such long-lasting allelic lineages. Thus, relatively frequent interallelic recombination has apparently been a feature of the long-term evolution of the B locus but not of the A locus. 45 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Interactions Between SNP Alleles at Multiple Loci and Variation in Skin Pigmentation in 122 Caucasians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumiko Anno

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to clarify the molecular basis for human skin color variation and the environmental adaptability to ultraviolet irradiation, with the ultimate goal of predicting the impact of changes in future environments on human health risk. One hundred twenty-two Caucasians living in Toledo, Ohio participated. Back and cheek skin were assayed for melanin as a quantitative trait marker. Buccal cell samples were collected and used for DNA extraction. DNA was used for SNP genotyping using the Masscode™ system, which entails two-step PCR amplification and a platform chemistry which allows cleavable mass spectrometry tags. The results show gene-gene interaction between SNP alleles at multiple loci (not necessarily on the same chromosome contributes to inter-individual skin color variation while suggesting a high probability of linkage disequilibrium. Confirmation of these findings requires further study with other ethic groups to analyze the associations between SNP alleles at multiple loci and human skin color variation. Our overarching goal is to use remote sensing data to clarify the interaction between atmospheric environments and SNP allelic frequency and investigate human adaptability to ultraviolet irradiation. Such information should greatly assist in the prediction of the health effects of future environmental changes such as ozone depletion and increased ultraviolet exposure. If such health effects are to some extent predictable, it might be possible to prepare for such changes in advance and thus reduce the extent of their impact.

  7. Two sex-chromosome-linked microsatellite loci show geographic variance among North American Ostrinia nubilalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad S. Coates

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available PCR-based O. nubilalis population and pedigree analysis indicated female specificity of a (GAAAATn microsatellite, and male specificity of a CAYCARCGTCACTAA repeat unit marker. These loci were respectively named Ostrinia nubilalis W-chromosome 1 (ONW1 and O. nubilalis Z-chromosome 1 (ONZ1. Intact repeats of three, four, or five GAAAAT units are present among ONW1 alleles, and biallelic variation exists at the ONZ1 locus. Screening of 493 male at ONZ1 and 448 heterogametic females at ONZ1 and ONW1 loci from eleven North American sample sites was used to construct genotypic data. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA and F-statistics indicated no female haplotype or male ONZ1 allele frequency differentiation between voltinism ecotypes. Four subpopulations from northern latitudes, Minnesota and South Dakota, showed the absence of a single female haplotype, a significant deviation of ONZ1 data from Hardy-Weinberg expectation, and low-level geographic divergence from other subpopulations. Low ONZ1 and ONW1 allele diversity could be attributed either to large repeat unit sizes, low repeat number, reduced effective population (Ne size of sex chromosomes, or the result of recent O. nubilalis introduction and population expansion, but likely could not be due to inbreeding. These sequences have been deposited in GenBank AF442958, and AY102618 to AY102620.

  8. Mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling Orobanche foetida Poir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study we have identified and map the quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling resistance to O. foetida in faba bean (Vicia faba) and studied their stability in two different environments. One hundred and forty four Recombinant Inbred Lines (RILs) derived from the cross between a susceptible and a resistant parent were ...

  9. Supplementary data: Mapping of shoot fly tolerance loci in sorghum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mapping of shoot fly tolerance loci in sorghum using SSR markers. D. B. Apotikar, D. Venkateswarlu, R. B. Ghorade, R. M. Wadaskar, J. V. Patil and P. L. Kulwal. J. Genet. 90, 59–66. Table 1. List of SSR primers for sorghum. Primer code. Forward and reverse. Annealing temperature (°C). Product size (bp). Linkage group.

  10. Hidden landscapes : The metropolitan garden and the genius loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De wit, S.I.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis aims at the landscape architecture of the enclosed garden as an expression of the genius loci: definition, analysis, typology and transformation. The process of metropolisation tends to eliminate, or at least hide, the underlying landscape. The research addresses the question of how the

  11. Quantitative trait loci analysis of individual and total isoflavone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soybean isoflavones play diverse roles in human health, including cancers, osteoporosis, heart disease, menopausal symptoms and pabulums. The objective of this study was to identify the quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with the isoflavones daidzein (DC), genistein (GeC), glycitein (GlC) and total isoflavone ...

  12. Dinucleotide microsatellite DNA loci from the ant Myrmica scabrinodis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeisset, Inga; Ebsen, Jon R.; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    2005-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of five dinucleotide microsatellite loci in the ant Myrmica scabrinodis, which were obtained using a magnetic bead hybridization selection protocol. The PCR primers were tested on nine to 11 individuals. The number of alleles ranged from two to 13...

  13. Quantitative Trait Loci Affecting Calving Traits in Danish Holstein Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomasen, J R; Guldbrandtsen, B; Sørensen, P

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting direct and maternal calving traits at first calving in the Danish Holstein population, 2) to distinguish between pleiotropic and linked QTL for chromosome regions affecting more than one trait, and 3) to detect...

  14. Novel loci and pathways significantly associated with longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yi; Nie, Chao; Min, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Only two genome-wide significant loci associated with longevity have been identified so far, probably because of insufficient sample sizes of centenarians, whose genomes may harbor genetic variants associated with health and longevity. Here we report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of Han ...

  15. Development of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the tomato leaf ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    during invasion. Materials and methods. Total genomic DNA of T. absoluta was extracted using the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) protocol described by Doyle and Doyle (1987). Microsatellite loci were isolated following the method of (Glenn and Sch- able 2005). Genomic DNA was digested with the restriction.

  16. Molecular and genetic analyses of potato cyst nematode resistance loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, E.H.

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes the genomic localisation and organisation of loci that harbour resistance to the potato cyst nematode species Globodera pallida and G. rostochiensis . Resistance to the potato cyst nematodes G. pallida and G. rostochiensis is an important aspect in potato breeding. To gain

  17. Description of electrophoretic loci and tissue specific gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protein electrophoresis was used to study the distributions and tissue specificity of gene expression of enzymes encoded by 42 loci in Rhinolophus clivosus and R. landeri, the genetically most divergent of the ten species of southern African horseshoe bats. No differences in gene expression were found between R.

  18. Description of electrophoretic loci and tissue specific gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-02-09

    Feb 9, 1994 ... cificity of gene expression of enzymes encoded by 42 loci in Rhinolophus clivosus and R. landeri, the genetically most divergent of the ten species of southern African horseshoe bats. No differences in gene expression were found between R. clivosus and R. landeri and isozyme patterns may be compared ...

  19. Development of twenty-nine polymorphic microsatellite loci from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Avenue, Wuhan 430079, People's Republic of China. [Xiong M. ... populations. In this study 29 novel microsatellites including. 27 polynucleotide repeats were isolated from C. guichenoti. These loci could be useful for the studies of genetic diversity, population genetic structure, estimating relatedness between individuals in ...

  20. Cross-genus amplification and characterisation of microsatellite loci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jennifer Lamb

    Unknown. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. Three of the nine loci initially tested were discarded, as it was either not possible to amplify them across all sam- ples, or because the banding pattern was too ambiguous to score. The data were checked for errors in scoring due to stuttering, large allele dropout or null alleles using.

  1. Ancient conservation of trinucleotide microsatellite loci in polistine wasps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezenwa, V O; Peters, J M; Zhu, Y

    1998-01-01

    Microsatellites have proven to be very useful genetic markers for studies of kinship, parentage, and gene mapping. If microsatellites are conserved among species, then those developed for one species can be used on related species, which would save the time and effort of developing new loci. We e...

  2. Testing independence of fragment lengths within VNTR loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisser, S. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)); Johnson, W. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Methods that were devised to test independence of the bivariate fragment lengths obtained from VNTR loci are applied to several population databases. It is shown that for many of the probes independence (Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium) cannot be sustained. 3 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Description of electrophoretic loci and tissue specific gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Description of electrophoretic loci and tissue specific gene expression in the horseshoe bat genus Rhinolophus (Rhinolophidae). Sarita Maree* and W.S. Grant. Department of Genetics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, 2050 Repubfic of South Africa. Received 9 February 1994; accepted 19 Ouober 1995.

  4. Isolation and characterization of 37 polymorphic microsatellite loci of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wen Song

    morphic microsatellite DNA loci in the blue shark, Prionace glauca, isolated by next generation sequencing approach. Con- serv. Genet. Resour. 5, 117–119. Tan X. C., Li X. H., Lin J. Z., Zhou D. H., Gao X. and Li. J. M. 2009 Ecological differentiation between two breeding populations of Megalobrama hoffmanni in the Pearl ...

  5. Isolation and characterization of ten microsatellite loci for wild Citrus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    subsequent studies. Materials and methods. Genomic DNA was extracted from silica-gel-dried leaf tissue of one C. japonica individual (former F. hindsii) using a modified CTAB method (Doyle 1991). Microsatellite loci were isolated using the fast isolation by AFLP of sequences containing repeats (FIASCO) protocol from an.

  6. Subanalytic Bundles and Tubular Neighbourhoods of Zero-Loci

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We introduce the natural and fairly general notion of a subanalytic bundle (with a finite dimensional vector space of sections) on a subanalytic subset of a real analytic manifold , and prove that when is compact, there is a Baire subset of sections in whose zero-loci in have tubular neighbourhoods, ...

  7. Polymorphic microsatellite loci in Chinese piebald odorous frog ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... for Endangered Wildlife, Ministry of Education, Hangzhou 310058,. People's Republic of China. [Wang Y. and Ding P. 2011 Polymorphic microsatellite loci in Chinese piebald odorous frog (Odorrana schmackeri). J. Genet. 90, e44–e46. Online only: http://www.ias.ac.in/jgenet/OnlineResources/90/e44.pdf]. Introduction.

  8. Quantitative trait loci mapping and genetic dissection for lint ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-08-01

    Aug 1, 2014 ... Quantitative trait loci mapping and genetic dissection for lint percentage in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). MIN WANG1, CHENGQI LI2 and QINGLIAN WANG2∗. 1Beijing Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Research and Development, Beijing Technology and Business University,. Beijing 100048 ...

  9. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for inflorescence length traits in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A molecular linkage map was constructed using a F2 population derived from the cross (Meidou2012 × Nanhui 23). The map covers 1302.4 cm with 131 loci (122 RAPD and nine morphological markers) and consist 14 linkage groups. In the F2 population and derived F3 families, a total of 46 QTLs explained from 8.1 to ...

  10. Supplementary data: Mapping of shoot fly tolerance loci in sorghum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Mapping of shoot fly tolerance loci in sorghum using SSR markers. D. B. Apotikar, D. Venkateswarlu, R. B. Ghorade, R. M. Wadaskar, J. V. Patil and P. L. Kulwal. J. Genet. 90, 59–66. Table 1. List of SSR primers for sorghum. Primer code. Forward and reverse. Annealing temperature (°C). Product.

  11. Chromosomal localization of microsatellite loci in Drosophila mediopunctata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Cavasini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila mediopunctata has been used as a model organism for genetics and evolutionary studies in the last three decades. A linkage map with 48 microsatellite loci recently published for this species showed five syntenic groups, which had their homology determined to Drosophila melanogaster chromosomes. Then, by inference, each of the groups was associated with one of the five major chromosomes of D. mediopunctata. Our objective was to carry out a genetic (chromosomal analysis to increase the number of available loci with known chromosomal location. We made a simultaneous analysis of visible mutant phenotypes and microsatellite genotypes in a backcross of a standard strain and a mutant strain, which had each major autosome marked. Hence, we could establish the chromosomal location of seventeen loci; including one from each of the five major linkage groups previously published, and twelve new loci. Our results were congruent with the previous location and they open new possibilities to future work integrating microsatellites, chromosomal inversions, and genetic determinants of physiological and morphological variation.

  12. Development of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the tomato leaf ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Higher Institute of Animation for Youth and Culture, University of Tunis, 2055 Bir El Bey, Tunisia. [Bettaibi A., Mezghani-Khemakhem M., Soltani Z., Makni H. and Makni M. 2013 Development of polymorphic microsatel- lite loci for the tomato leaf miner, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). J. Genet. 92, e110–e112.

  13. Isolation and characterization of fourteen novel microsatellite loci ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    premierbiosoft.com/primerdesign/index.html) was used to design primers. The polymorphism of microsatellite loci .... 31302189), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Uni- versity (grant no. NQ2013027), and the Postdoctoral Fund of. Shaanxi province (grant no. K3332021320). References. Froufe E., Sefc K. M., ...

  14. Quantitative trait loci analysis of individual and total isoflavone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-08-19

    Aug 19, 2014 ... Abstract. Soybean isoflavones play diverse roles in human health, including cancers, osteoporosis, heart disease, menopausal symptoms and pabulums. The objective of this study was to identify the quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with the isoflavones daidzein (DC), genistein (GeC), glycitein (GlC) ...

  15. Blood Pressure Loci Identified with a Gene-Centric Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T.; Poulter, Neil R.; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C.; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G.; Whincup, Peter H.; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Dobson, Richard J.; Howard, Philip J.; Mein, Charles A.; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N. M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Goodall, Alison H.; Fowkes, F. Gerald; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Tobin, Martin D.; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A.; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-Francois; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sober, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Hastie, Claire E.; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K.; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Bjoern; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A.; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Wells, George A.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G. M.; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F.; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V.; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J.; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Mans; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2011-01-01

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a

  16. Homothetic Transformations and Geometric Loci: Properties of Triangles and Quadrilaterals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammana, Maria Flavia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we use geometric transformations to find some interesting properties related with geometric loci. In particular, given a triangle or a cyclic quadrilateral, the locus generated by the centroid or by the orthocentre (for triangles) or by the anticentre (for cyclic quadrilaterals) when one vertex moves on the circumcircle of the…

  17. "Byrummets ånd. Genius Loci/The Spirit of Urban Spaces"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    byrum, Genius loci, Christian Norberg-Schulz, Sønder Boulevard, Berlin, nykultur, fortove, barndomserindringer......byrum, Genius loci, Christian Norberg-Schulz, Sønder Boulevard, Berlin, nykultur, fortove, barndomserindringer...

  18. Linkage Analysis of Quantitative Trait Loci in the Presence of Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrøm, Claus Thorn; Dalgaard, Peter

    2003-01-01

    EM-algorithm; Gaussian mixture; Heterogeneity; Linkage; Population admixture; Quantitative trait loci (QTL); Variance components......EM-algorithm; Gaussian mixture; Heterogeneity; Linkage; Population admixture; Quantitative trait loci (QTL); Variance components...

  19. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sherman, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtype...

  20. [Autosegregation of enzyme loci in agamospermous progenies of triploid plants of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levites, E V; Kirikovich, S S

    2011-07-01

    The ratios of the phenotypic classes of glucosephosphate isomerase (GP12) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH1 and MDH2) were studied in agamospermous progenies of triploid sugar beet plants. The ratio of the phenotypic classes of these enzymes corresponds to the calculations based on the assumption of polyteny of chromosomes carrying alleles of the enzyme loci accompanied by the loss of extra copies of the alleles in the first division of a cell entering embryogenesis. An increase in the gene dosage due to polyteny leads to the appearance in the progeny with a definite frequency of alleles that were absent in the original parental plant. The notions of meiotic autosegregation and mitotic autosegregation characteristic of meiotic and mitotic agamospermy are introduced, as well as the term locus polygenotype characterizing not only the allelic composition and the number of chromosomes, but also the number of chromatids carrying alleles of the marker locus in the cell before its entry into embryogenesis.