WorldWideScience

Sample records for stowaways

  1. 8 CFR 241.11 - Detention and removal of stowaways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... include, but are not limited to, sanitation, health, and safety concerns for the crew and/or stowaway... determines, in the exercise of discretion, that parole is required to meet a medical emergency or is... detain or parole the alien, the Service shall consider the likelihood that the alien will abscond or pose...

  2. 8 CFR 1208.30 - Credible fear determinations involving stowaways and applicants for admission found inadmissible...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Credible fear determinations involving..., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEDURES FOR ASYLUM AND WITHHOLDING OF REMOVAL Credible Fear of Persecution § 1208.30 Credible fear determinations involving stowaways and applicants for...

  3. Characterization of a new high copy Stowaway family MITE, BRAMI-1 in Brassica genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are expected to play important roles in evolution of genes and genome in plants, especially in the highly duplicated plant genomes. Various MITE families and their roles in plants have been characterized. However, there have been fewer studies of MITE families and their potential roles in evolution of the recently triplicated Brassica genome. Results We identified a new MITE family, BRAMI-1, belonging to the Stowaway super-family in the Brassica genome. In silico mapping revealed that 697 members are dispersed throughout the euchromatic regions of the B. rapa pseudo-chromosomes. Among them, 548 members (78.6%) are located in gene-rich regions, less than 3 kb from genes. In addition, we identified 516 and 15 members in the 470 Mb and 15 Mb genomic shotgun sequences currently available for B. oleracea and B. napus, respectively. The resulting estimated copy numbers for the entire genomes were 1440, 1464 and 2490 in B. rapa, B. oleracea and B. napus, respectively. Concurrently, only 70 members of the related Arabidopsis ATTIRTA-1 MITE family were identified in the Arabidopsis genome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BRAMI-1 elements proliferated in the Brassica genus after divergence from the Arabidopsis lineage. MITE insertion polymorphism (MIP) was inspected for 50 BRAMI-1 members, revealing high levels of insertion polymorphism between and within species of Brassica that clarify BRAMI-1 activation periods up to the present. Comparative analysis of the 71 genes harbouring the BRAMI-1 elements with their non-insertion paralogs (NIPs) showed that the BRAMI-1 insertions mainly reside in non-coding sequences and that the expression levels of genes with the elements differ from those of their NIPs. Conclusion A Stowaway family MITE, named as BRAMI-1, was gradually amplified and remained present in over than 1400 copies in each of three Brassica species. Overall, 78% of the members were identified in

  4. Stowaways in the history of science: the case of simian virus 40 and clinical research on federal prisoners at the US National Institutes of Health, 1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Laura; Campbell, Nancy D

    2014-12-01

    In 1960, J. Anthony Morris, a molecular biologist at the US National Institutes of Health conducted one of the only non-therapeutic clinical studies of the cancer virus SV40. Morris and his research team aimed to determine whether SV40 was a serious harm to human health, since many scientists at the time suspected that SV40 caused cancer in humans based on evidence from in vivo animal studies and experiments with human tissue. Morris found that SV40 had no significant effect but his claim has remained controversial among scientists and policymakers through the present day--both on scientific and ethical grounds. Why did Morris only conduct one clinical study on the cancer-causing potential of SV40 in healthy humans? We use the case to explain how empirical evidence and ethical imperatives are, paradoxically, often dependent on each other and mutually exclusive in clinical research, which leaves answers to scientific and ethical questions unsettled. This paper serves two goals: first, it documents a unique--and uniquely important--study of clinical research on SV40. Second, it introduces the concept of "the stowaway," which is a special type of contaminant that changes the past in the present moment. In the history of science, stowaways are misfortunes that nonetheless afford research that otherwise would have been impossible specifically by creating new pasts. This case (Morris' study) and concept (the stowaway) bring together history of science and philosophy of history for productive dialog. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Imported emissions. The world trade stowaway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, Meike; Gautier, Celia

    2013-05-01

    This study first gives an overview of existing tools and methodological challenges to account emissions included in consumed products fabricated elsewhere. It notably discusses the passage from a methodology based on a production principle to a methodology based on a consumption principle, outlines the different methodologies associated with the different analysis levels, and the importance of uncertainty sources. The second part proposes a view on emission flows included in exports and imports. It addresses the following issues: the international level, increasing importance of emissions transferred via world trade, emissions related to consumption per capita and per social class, carbon and energy intensity of products at the origin of emissions, composition of imported and exported products and intensity of their emissions, impact of a methodological change on greenhouse gas emissions by France, extent of emissions imported in France, and Germany as the first trade partner and emission importer of France. The third part discusses the political implications of an accounting of emissions related to consumption and to world trade

  6. Mice as stowaways? Colonization history of Danish striped field mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Liselotte Wesley; Jacobsen, Magnus; Vedel-Smith, Christina; Jensen, Thomas Secher

    2017-07-01

    Species from the steppe region of Eastern Europe likely colonized northwestern Europe in connection with agriculture after 6500 BP. The striped field mouse ( Apodemus agrarius Pallas, 1783), is a steppe-derived species often found in human crops. It is common on the southern Danish islands of Lolland and Falster, which have been isolated from mainland Europe since approximately 10 300-8000 BP. Thus, this species could have been brought in with humans in connection with agriculture, or it could be an earlier natural invader. We sequenced 86 full mitochondrial genomes from the northwestern range of the striped field mouse, analysed phylogenetic relationships and estimated divergence time. The results supported human-induced colonization of Denmark in the Subatlantic or Subboreal period. A newly discovered population from Central Jutland in Denmark diverged from Falster approximately 100-670 years ago, again favouring human introduction. One individual from Sweden turned out to be a recent introduction from Central Jutland. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Meiotic recombination breakpoints are associated with open chromatin and enriched with Stowaway transposons in potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiotic recombination is the foundation for genetic variation in natural and artificial populations of eukaryotes. Although genetic recombination maps have been developed in numerous plant species since late the 1980s, very few of these maps have provided the necessary resolution needed to investiga...

  8. Prioritising surveillance for alien organisms transported as stowaways on ships travelling to South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katelyn T Faulkner

    Full Text Available The global shipping network facilitates the transportation and introduction of marine and terrestrial organisms to regions where they are not native, and some of these organisms become invasive. South Africa was used as a case study to evaluate the potential for shipping to contribute to the introduction and establishment of marine and terrestrial alien species (i.e. establishment debt and to assess how this varies across shipping routes and seasons. As a proxy for the number of species introduced (i.e. 'colonisation pressure' shipping movement data were used to determine, for each season, the number of ships that visited South African ports from foreign ports and the number of days travelled between ports. Seasonal marine and terrestrial environmental similarity between South African and foreign ports was then used to estimate the likelihood that introduced species would establish. These data were used to determine the seasonal relative contribution of shipping routes to South Africa's marine and terrestrial establishment debt. Additionally, distribution data were used to identify marine and terrestrial species that are known to be invasive elsewhere and which might be introduced to each South African port through shipping routes that have a high relative contribution to establishment debt. Shipping routes from Asian ports, especially Singapore, have a particularly high relative contribution to South Africa's establishment debt, while among South African ports, Durban has the highest risk of being invaded. There was seasonal variation in the shipping routes that have a high relative contribution to the establishment debt of the South African ports. The presented method provides a simple way to prioritise surveillance effort and our results indicate that, for South Africa, port-specific prevention strategies should be developed, a large portion of the available resources should be allocated to Durban, and seasonal variations and their consequences for prevention strategies should be explored further.

  9. Pseudoxylaria as stowaway of the fungus-growing termite nest:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Anna A.; Kooij, Pepijn Wilhelmus; Debets, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    overlapped, indicating potential for competition. One-to-one interactions between Pseudoxylaria, Termitomyces and free-living relatives showed that Pseudoxylaria and Termitomyces strains interacted differently with each other than with each other’s free-living relatives. Both fungi grew less together than...

  10. 8 CFR 208.30 - Credible fear determinations involving stowaways and applicants for admission found inadmissible...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the Act. 208.30 Section 208.30 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION... Immigration Review has exclusive jurisdiction to review such determinations. Except as otherwise provided in... summary with the alien and provide the alien with an opportunity to correct any errors therein. (e...

  11. Microbial stowaways: Addressing oil spill impacts and the artificial reef effect on deep-sea microbiomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, L. J.; Salerno, J. L.; Blackwell, C. A.; Little, B.; McGown, C.; Fitzgerald, L. A.; Damour, M.

    2016-02-01

    Shipwrecks enhance macro-biological diversity in the deep ocean, but, to date, studies have not explored the reef effect on deep-sea microbiological diversity. This is an important concept to address in a restoration framework, as microbial biogeochemical function impacts recruitment and adhesion of higher trophic levels on artificial reefs. In addition, microbial biofilms influence the preservation of shipwrecks through biologically mediated corrosion. Oil and gas-related activities have potential to disrupt the base of the reef trophic web; therefore, bacterial diversity and gene function at six shipwrecks (3 steel-hulled; 3 wood-hulled) in the northern Gulf of Mexico was investigated as part of the GOM-SCHEMA (Shipwreck Corrosion, Hydrocarbon Exposure, Microbiology, and Archaeology) project. Sites were selected based on proximity to the Deepwater Horizon spill's subsurface plume, depth, hull type, and existing archaeological data. Classification of taxa in sediments adjacent to and at distance from wrecks, in water, and on experimental steel coupons was used to evaluate how the presence of shipwrecks and spill contaminants in the deep biosphere influenced diversity. At all sites, and in all sample types, Proteobacteria were most abundant. Biodiversity was highest in surface sediments and in coupon biofilms adjacent to two steel-hulled wrecks in the study (Halo and Anona) and decreased with sediment depth and distance from the wrecks. Sequences associated with the iron oxidizing Mariprofundus genus were elevated at steel-hulled sites, indicating wreck-specific environmental selection. Despite evidence of the reef effect on microbiomes, bacterial composition was structured primarily by proximity to the spill and secondarily by hull material at all sites. This study provides the first evidence of an artificial reef effect on deep-sea microbial communities and suggests that biodiversity and function of primary colonizers of shipwrecks may be impacted by the spill.

  12. Tiny Stowaways: Analyzing the Economic Benefits of a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Permit Regulating Ballast Water Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Sabrina J.; Drake, Lisa A.

    2009-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed permitting ballast water discharges—a benefit of which would be to reduce the economic damages associated with the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species. Research on ship-borne aquatic invasive species has been conducted in earnest for decades, but determining the economic damages they cause remains troublesome. Furthermore, with the exception of harmful algal blooms, the economic consequences of microscopic invaders have not been studied, despite their potentially great negative effects. In this paper, we show how to estimate the economic benefits of preventing the introduction and spread of harmful bacteria, microalgae, and viruses delivered in U.S. waters. Our calculations of net social welfare show the damages from a localized incident, cholera-causing bacteria found in shellfish in the Gulf of Mexico, to be approximately 706,000 (2006). On a larger scale, harmful algal species have the potential to be transported in ships’ ballast tanks, and their effects in the United States have been to reduce commercial fisheries landings and impair water quality. We examine the economic repercussions of one bloom-forming species. Finally, we consider the possible translocation within the Great Lakes of a virus that has the potential to harm commercial and recreational fisheries. These calculations illustrate an approach to quantifying the benefits of preventing invasive aquatic microorganisms from controls on ballast water discharges.

  13. Global Invasion History of the Tropical Fire Ant, Solenopsis geminata: A Stowaway on the First Global Trade Routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological invasions are largely thought to be contemporary, having recently increased sharply in the wake of globalization. However, human commerce had already become global in scope by the mid-16th century, when the Spanish connected the New World with Europe and Asia via their Manila galleon and ...

  14. GenBank blastx search result: AK242295 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e cds; transposons Ophelia2, Angela3s, and XJ3, complete sequence; LRR protein WM1.3 (WM1.3) gene, complete cds; Stowaway... MITE, transposons XJ1, Jody, Angela, and XJ and Stowaway MITE, comp

  15. GenBank blastx search result: AK241352 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e cds; transposons Ophelia2, Angela3s, and XJ3, complete sequence; LRR protein WM1.3 (WM1.3) gene, complete cds; Stowaway... MITE, transposons XJ1, Jody, Angela, and XJ and Stowaway MITE, comp

  16. GenBank blastn search result: AK241152 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e cds; transposons Ophelia2, Angela3s, and XJ3, complete sequence; LRR protein WM1.3 (WM1.3) gene, complete cds; Stowaway... MITE, transposons XJ1, Jody, Angela, and XJ and Stowaway MITE, comp

  17. GenBank blastx search result: AK241749 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e cds; transposons Ophelia2, Angela3s, and XJ3, complete sequence; LRR protein WM1.3 (WM1.3) gene, complete cds; Stowaway... MITE, transposons XJ1, Jody, Angela, and XJ and Stowaway MITE, comp

  18. GenBank blastx search result: AK241418 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e cds; transposons Ophelia2, Angela3s, and XJ3, complete sequence; LRR protein WM1.3 (WM1.3) gene, complete cds; Stowaway... MITE, transposons XJ1, Jody, Angela, and XJ and Stowaway MITE, comp

  19. GenBank blastx search result: AK241200 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e cds; transposons Ophelia2, Angela3s, and XJ3, complete sequence; LRR protein WM1.3 (WM1.3) gene, complete cds; Stowaway... MITE, transposons XJ1, Jody, Angela, and XJ and Stowaway MITE, comp

  20. GenBank blastx search result: AK240882 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e cds; transposons Ophelia2, Angela3s, and XJ3, complete sequence; LRR protein WM1.3 (WM1.3) gene, complete cds; Stowaway... MITE, transposons XJ1, Jody, Angela, and XJ and Stowaway MITE, comp

  1. 8 CFR 235.1 - Scope of examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... inspected as an alien. A U.S. citizen must present a valid unexpired U.S. passport book upon entering the... that an alien stowaway who indicates an intention to apply for asylum, or expresses a fear of...

  2. Molecular biology. A Swiss army knife of immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, S.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Selfish genetic elements are more than a daily nuisance in the life of prokaryotes. Whereas viruses can multiply by reprogramming host cells, or integrate in the host genome as “stowaways,” conjugative plasmids (transferrable extrachromosomal DNA) make cells addicted to plasmid-encoded antitoxin

  3. New York's battle with the Asian long-horned beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Kenneth R. Law; Victor C. Mastro; H. Sharon Ossenburgen; Bernard J. Raimo

    1997-01-01

    A wide variety of organisms are unintentionally transported from country to country each year, primarily as a result of world trade. Practically all classes of plants and animals can be stowaways. Aquatic organisms travel in the ballast water of ships; land organisms move with the cargo. Some organisms hitch rides inside the cargo, while others travel on or inside...

  4. Multiple homoplasious insertions and deletions of a Triticeae (Poaceae DNA transposon: a phylogenetic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason-Gamer Roberta J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stowaway elements are short, non-autonomous DNA transposons categorized as miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs. The high MITE copy number in grass genomes suggests an active history of amplification and insertion, but ongoing MITE activity has only rarely been seen, and ongoing Stowaway activity has never been observed. Thus, a phylogenetic perspective on presence vs. absence of elements in an aligned data set can provide valuable historical insights into the dynamics of MITE acquisition and loss. Results A Stowaway-like element resides within the fourth intron of a β-amylase gene in representatives of five genera in the wheat tribe, Triticeae. Its presence vs. absence was examined with reference to the β-amylase gene tree topology, and in light of sequence comparisons of the β-amylase elements to Triticeae Stowaway elements in the Entrez nucleotide database. Among the sequences lacking the element, there are five distinct putative excision footprints (one widespread and four restricted to unrelated lineages and two flanking deletions. The sequences that do contain elements are polyphyletic on the β-amylase tree, and their elements are divergent at the sequence level. The β-amylase elements do not form a monophyletic group relative to other Stowaway elements in Entrez; most are more similar to elements from other loci in other Triticeae genomes than they are to one another. Conclusion Combined, the phylogenetic distribution, sequence variation, and Entrez database comparisons indicate that a Stowaway-like element has undergone multiple deletions from and insertions into the same site in β-amylase intron 4 during the history of the tribe. The elements currently at the site represent multiple, distinct lineages that transcend generic boundaries. While patterns of Stowaway polymorphism across a phylogenetic data set do not allow evolutionary mechanisms to be inferred with certainty, they do provide

  5. Ormonde

    OpenAIRE

    Lowe, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    This is a cycle of poems presented alongside personal and historical archives to chart the 1947 journey of SS Ormonde, the first post-WW2 ship (followed within a year by the Almanzora and the more famous Empire Windrush) to carry significant numbers of immigrants from Jamaica to the UK. On board was the poet’s father; his daughter writes poignantly of his and his fellow passengers’ hopes and aspirations, and the issues they faced. Alongside poems written in voices ranging from a stowaway to a...

  6. Determination of balloon gas mass and revised estimates of drag and virtual mass coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, E.; Martone, M.

    1993-01-01

    In support of the NASA Balloon Program, small-scale balloons were flown with varying lifting gas and total system mass. Instrument packages were developed to measure and record acceleration and temperature data during these tests. Top fitting and instrument payload accelerations were measured from launch to steady state ascent and through ballast drop transients. The development of the small lightweight self-powered Stowaway Special instrument packages is discussed along with mathematical models developed to determine gas mass, drag and virtual mass coefficients.

  7. The Brown Tree Snake on Guam: How the Arrival of One Invasive Species Damaged the Ecology, Commerce, Electrical Systems and Human Health on Guam: A Comprehensive Information Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, Thomas H.; Leasman-Tanner, Dawn

    2001-01-01

    Synopsis -- Shortly after World War II, and before 1952, the brown tree snake was accidentally transported from its native range in the South Pacific to Guam, probably as a stowaway in ship cargo. As a result of abnormally abundant prey resources on Guam and the absence of natural predators and other population controls, brown tree snake populations reached unprecedented numbers. Snakes caused the extirpation of most of the native forest vertebrate species; thousands of power outages affecting private, commercial, and military activities; widespread loss of domestic birds and pets; and considerable emotional trauma to residents and visitors alike when snakes invaded human habitats with the potential for severe envenomation of small children. Since Guam is a major transportation hub in the Pacific, numerous opportunities exist for the brown tree snakes on Guam to be introduced accidentally to other Pacific islands as passive stowaways in ship and air traffic from Guam. Numerous sightings of this species have been reported on other islands, and an incipient population is probably established on Saipan. It is important that people who may come in contact with the brown tree snake, particularly on neighboring islands and other high-risk sites, understand the scope of this problem and how to identify the snake so proper action can be taken. This resource has been developed to provide source materials on the history of the invasion, continuing threats, research results, and containment and management of the brown tree snake (Boiga irregularis) in Guam and its relevance to other islands and mild continental environments.

  8. [Active miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements transposon in plants: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bingjie; Zhou, Mingbing

    2018-02-25

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements transposon is a special transposon that could transpose by "cut-paste" mechanism, which is one of characteristics of DNA transposons. Otherwise, the copy number of MITEs is very high, which is one of characteristics of RNA transposons. Many MITE families have been reported, but little about active MITEs. We summarize recent advances in studying active MITEs. Most the MITEs belong to the Tourist-like family, such as mPing, mGing, PhTourist1, Tmi1 and PhTst-3. Additionally, DTstu1 and MITE-39 belong to Stowaway-like family, and AhMITEs1 belongs to Mutator-like family. Moreover, we summarize the structure (terminal inverse repeats and target site duplications), copy number, evolution pattern and transposition characteristics of these active MITEs, to provide the foundation for the identification of other active MITEs and subsequent research on MITE transposition and amplification mechanism.

  9. Anthrax Cases Associated with Animal-Hair Shaving Brushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szablewski, Christine M; Hendricks, Kate; Bower, William A; Shadomy, Sean V; Hupert, Nathaniel

    2017-05-01

    During the First World War, anthrax cases in the United States and England increased greatly and seemed to be associated with use of new shaving brushes. Further investigation revealed that the source material and origin of shaving brushes had changed during the war. Cheap brushes of imported horsehair were being made to look like the preferred badger-hair brushes. Unfortunately, some of these brushes were not effectively disinfected and brought with them a nasty stowaway: Bacillus anthracis. A review of outbreak summaries, surveillance data, and case reports indicated that these cases originated from the use of ineffectively disinfected animal-hair shaving brushes. This historical information is relevant to current public health practice because renewed interest in vintage and animal-hair shaving brushes has been seen in popular culture. This information should help healthcare providers and public health officials answer questions on this topic.

  10. Radiological risks from irradiation of cargo contents with EURITRACK neutron inspection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giroletti, E.; Bonomi, G.; Donzella, A.; Viesti, G.; Zenoni, A.

    2012-01-01

    The radiological risk for the population related to the neutron irradiation of cargo containers with a tagged neutron inspection system has been studied. Two possible effects on the public health have been assessed: the modification of the nutritional and organoleptic properties of the irradiated materials, in particular foodstuff, and the neutron activation of consumer products (i.e. food and pharmaceuticals). The result of this study is that irradiation of food and foodstuff, pharmaceutical and medical devices in container cargoes would neither modify the properties of the irradiated material nor produce effective doses of concern for public health. Furthermore, the dose received by possible stowaways present inside the container during the inspection is less than the annual effective dose limit defined by European Legislation for the public. - Highlights: ► Neutron irradiation of cargo containers implies a radiological risk. ► The risk is about the modification of food properties and the products activation. ► Assessment is made about the EURITRACK neutron irradiation system. ► Results show that the EURITRACK scanning is not dangerous for the population.

  11. The European Union climate and energy package. Assessment and perspectives for 2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, Celia; Loiseaux, Damien

    2014-03-01

    After having presented the three pillars of the climate and energy package of the European Union, this publication recalls the genesis of its adoption and its components in the 2009 package (directives on the European carbon market, on renewable energies, on CO 2 capture and storage). It indicates and comments the objectives of the package by 2020 (reduction of emissions, share of renewable energies, reduction of energy consumption, share of renewable energies in transports). It proposes an assessment of the 2009 climate and energy package in terms of objectives, presents a status of the package implementation (notably in France and in Germany), outlines its benefits (for the European society and economy, impacts at the world level, fragile development of renewable energies), and drawbacks (insufficient objective, ETS dysfunction, impact of the economic crisis, lack of integration of package policies and energy and tax policies, limitations of directives on products and sub-sectors, imported emissions as the undetected stowaway). It reports the recommendations of the Action Climat network to strengthen the action on climate before 2020 and for the package by 2030

  12. Eleutherodactylus frog introductions to Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Fred; Campbell, Earl W.; Allison, Allen; Pratt, Thane K.

    1999-01-01

    As an oceanic archipelago isolated from continental source areas, Hawaii lacks native terrestrial reptiles and amphibians, Polynesians apparently introduced seven gecko and skink species after discovering the islands approximately 1500 years ago, and another 15 reptiles and five frogs have been introduced in the last century and a half (McKeown 1996). The Polynesian introductions are probably inadvertent because the species involved are known stowaway dispersers (Gibbons 1985; Dye and Steadman 1990), In contrast, most of the herpetological introductions since European contact with Hawaii have been intentional. Several frog species were released for biocontrol of insects (e.g., Dendrobates auratus, Bufo marinus, Rana rugosa, Bryan 1932; Oliver and Shaw 1953), and most of the remaining species are released or escaped pets (e.g., Phelsuma spp., Chamaeleo jacksonii, Iguana iguana, McKeown 1996), Government-approved releases have not occurred for many years, but the rate of establishment of new species has increased in the past few decades because of the importation and subsequent release of pets.

  13. EU Outer Borders and Radiation - An Urgent Need for Standardization, New Detector Technologies and Education Harmonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prlic, Ivica; Suric Mihic, Marija; Kosmina, Domagoj; Shaw, Peter; Hajdinjak, Mladen; Cerovac, Zdravko; Bozina, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    It appears that new IAEA transport regulations are s tarting to bite - as now there is a definite requirement for assessments of all relevant radio-nuclides in n on-equilibrium mixes': It is heard that several shipments that were either delayed significantly or rejected all together in ports in the EU. Things like synthetic rutile, zirconia, copper concentrates, and so on... Devise a NORM Passport for NORM shipments : including a text description of the material and photographs, radionuclide content plus some radiological data (dose rates, gamma spectrum and maybe also something on trigger levels for border monitoring alarms). Produce a guidance booklet for border control authorities. The two suggestions are connected, and Ii is suggested that they form a single project of how to equip the EU border contort facilities. Denial of shipment due to border alarms is an issue that affects industry- that is why it is hoped that they would be interested in being involved. Clearly it is needed to address world-wide transport (i.e. because that's where most of the NORM comes from). The whole EU outer border customs protocol is th be added to above mentioned monitoring of NORM. The new radiation technologies are used to fulfill the security issues (like stowaways, smuggling, ilicit trafficking etc..). All above mentioned forces us to standardize the customs protocols, to upgrade the education of involved workers and fo harmonize the issue throughout the EU. Croatia is a front point in the moment because of the very long and 'soft' outer EU border. (authors)

  14. Forensics, radiology, society. X-rays. Tool and document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, Beatrice; Vogel, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    During the last years, the individual specialities of forensic medicine and diagnostic imaging have increasingly cooperated to create the interdisciplinary entity of forensic radiology. The book demonstrates the potential of this speciality: It has become evident that the combination of diagnostic imaging and forensic medicine solves more cases of death of unknown cause than each alone, and that a radiograph can be read like a document describing forces of modern time and its effects on current society. The posters of 6 exhibitions demonstrate the actual cause of death and its preceding violence. They aim at the medical as well as the interested lay-public: Causes of natural and of violent death become visible. For instance, stab- and gunshot wounds into a person's rear are contradictory of self-defence. Stab wounds with penetration of ribs indicate great force and, therefore, intentional homicide. The same is valid for multiple stabs, stabs through silicon prosthesis of a mammoplasty, and stabs into the breast cage of a defenceless toddler. X-rays of the living can indicate preceding torture. X-rays are part of the security technology employed at airports and countries' borders. They help to detect drugs, explosives, and human stow-aways. The x-ray examination of the deceased visualises success and failure of the preceding therapy. After reanimation, the position of a tracheal tube, the effects of a vascular puncture, and potential fractures of the breast cage can be evaluated. After cardiac and aortic interventions, the procedure of choice and its effects can be seen. Concerning general or intensive care, diagnostic imaging shows the position of urinary catheters, gastric tubes and vascular catheters. Prenatal diagnostic imaging can determine the sex of the foetus and possible malformations; and in peri- and postnatal death, it may show the effects of iatrogenic actions, and later on, of child-abuse.

  15. Simulation of gamma irradiation system for a ballast water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faez, T. P.; Sarkar, S.

    2006-01-01

    Invasion by different kinds of ballast the water microorganisms is one of the most important marine environment problems around the world therefore preventing the invasion of these unwanted and harmful stowaways is one of the main strategies of responsible agencies. Some of these methods such as ocean exchange, heating, filtration, hydro cyclones, UV irradiation and chemical treatment, have various problems such as technical deficiency, high costs, lack of safety and environmental side effects. Materials and Methods: A novel system of treatment by Gamma irradiation is designed to irradiate the blast water uniformly and effectively. To determine the dose distribution as a function of distance from the irradiation source, the MCNP code was used. The systems used for source implant in this simulation were Paterson-Parker, Paris and Network systems. In each system, Sivert-integral and inverse square law were used in MATLAB program to determine the dose distribution. Results: Results of initial laboratory tests on offshore water samples of Siri Island indicated that the appropriate dose for deactivation of organisms of water samples is approximately one kGy. It has been demonstrated that the dose can be provided by twenty five 100,000 Ci line sources of ' 60 Co in a triangle implant arranged in a 1*1*1 m3 cubic shape water pipe. In order to increase efficiency and radiation safety, water passed from two other coaxial and bigger cubes, after passing from the first cube. A one meter thick wall of concrete around the cubes was adequate to shield the system completely. Conclusion: The main advantages of this system such as high efficiency, safety, reliability, minimum environmental adverse effects, proves that this novel method not only can be used for ballast water treatment, but is also effective for drinking water purification

  16. Initial results from a multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography system for nuclear security

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Buckley E.; Hartwig, Zachary S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Danagoulian, Areg

    2016-10-01

    The detection of assembled nuclear devices and concealed special nuclear materials (SNM) such as plutonium or uranium in commercial cargo traffic is a major challenge in mitigating the threat of nuclear terrorism. Currently available radiographic and active interrogation systems use ∼1-10 MeV bremsstrahlung photon beams. Although simple to build and operate, bremsstrahlung-based systems deliver high radiation doses to the cargo and to potential stowaways. To eliminate problematic issues of high dose, we are developing a novel technique known as multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography (MMGR). MMGR uses ion-induced nuclear reactions to produce two monoenergetic gammas for dual-energy radiography. This allows us to image the areal density and effective atomic number (Zeff) of scanned cargo. We present initial results from the proof-of-concept experiment, which was conducted at the MIT Bates Research and Engineering Center. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the capabilities of MMGR to measure areal density and Zeff of container cargo mockups. The experiment used a 3.0 MeV radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator to create sources of 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas from the 11B(d,nγ)12C reaction in a thick natural boron target; the gammas are detected by an array of NaI(Tl) detectors after transmission through cargo mockups . The measured fluxes of transmitted 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas were used to assess the areal density and Zeff. Initial results show that MMGR is capable of discriminating the presence of high-Z materials concealed in up to 30 cm of iron shielding from low- and mid-Z materials present in the cargo mockup.

  17. Evolutionary genomics of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) in Brassica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouroz, Faisal; Noreen, Shumaila; Heslop-Harrison, J S

    2015-12-01

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are truncated derivatives of autonomous DNA transposons, and are dispersed abundantly in most eukaryotic genomes. We aimed to characterize various MITEs families in Brassica in terms of their presence, sequence characteristics and evolutionary activity. Dot plot analyses involving comparison of homoeologous bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequences allowed identification of 15 novel families of mobile MITEs. Of which, 5 were Stowaway-like with TA Target Site Duplications (TSDs), 4 Tourist-like with TAA/TTA TSDs, 5 Mutator-like with 9-10 bp TSDs and 1 novel MITE (BoXMITE1) flanked by 3 bp TSDs. Our data suggested that there are about 30,000 MITE-related sequences in Brassica rapa and B. oleracea genomes. In situ hybridization showed one abundant family was dispersed in the A-genome, while another was located near 45S rDNA sites. PCR analysis using primers flanking sequences of MITE elements detected MITE insertion polymorphisms between and within the three Brassica (AA, BB, CC) genomes, with many insertions being specific to single genomes and others showing evidence of more recent evolutionary insertions. Our BAC sequence comparison strategy enables identification of evolutionarily active MITEs with no prior knowledge of MITE sequences. The details of MITE families reported in Brassica enable their identification, characterization and annotation. Insertion polymorphisms of MITEs and their transposition activity indicated important mechanism of genome evolution and diversification. MITE families derived from known Mariner, Harbinger and Mutator DNA transposons were discovered, as well as some novel structures. The identification of Brassica MITEs will have broad applications in Brassica genomics, breeding, hybridization and phylogeny through their use as DNA markers.

  18. Photonuclear-based Detection of Nuclear Smuggling in Cargo Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. L.; Haskell, K. J.; Hoggan, J. M.; Norman, D. R.; Yoon, W. Y.

    2003-08-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have performed experiments in La Honda, California and at the Idaho Accelerator Center in Pocatello, Idaho to assess and develop a photonuclear-based detection system for shielded nuclear materials in cargo containers. The detection system, measuring photonuclear-related neutron emissions, is planned for integration with the ARACOR Eagle Cargo Container Inspection System (Sunnyvale, CA). The Eagle Inspection system uses a nominal 6-MeV electron accelerator and operates with safe radiation exposure limits to both container stowaways and to its operators. The INEEL has fabricated custom-built, helium-3-based, neutron detectors for this inspection application and is performing an experimental application assessment. Because the Eagle Inspection system could not be moved to LANL where special nuclear material was available, the response of the Eagle had to be determined indirectly so as to support the development and testing of the detection system. Experiments in California have successfully matched the delayed neutron emission performance of the ARACOR Eagle with that of the transportable INEEL electron accelerator (i.e., the Varitron) and are reported here. A demonstration test is planned at LANL using the Varitron and shielded special nuclear materials within a cargo container. Detector results are providing very useful information regarding the challenges of delayed neutron counting near the photofission threshold energy of 5.5 - 6.0 MeV, are identifying the possible utilization of prompt neutron emissions to allow enhanced signal-to-noise measurements, and are showing the overall benefits of using higher electron beam energies.

  19. Case Study on the Use of X Ray or Gamma Radiation Scanning for the Detection of People Seeking to Enter a State Illegally in Vehicles or Freight Containers. Annex III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This summary describes the main elements of the justification case for the use of X ray or gamma radiation scanning for the detection of stowaways as published by the UK Home Office]. In the United Kingdom, the rate of clandestine entry by people concealed in vehicles or freight containers at ferry ports and the Eurotunnel Folkestone Terminal is very high. People who have been detected attempting to enter illegally in east Kent alone, including the Port of Dover, numbered over 17 000 in 1999 and 19 700 in 2000. Detection measures in use include carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sensors, which give a quick and generally reliable indication of concealed human presence, and search teams of dogs. Both these measures, however, have fairly significant limitations. For example, certain types of freight emit CO 2 , thus masking the presence of humans. Also, the construction of some containers prevents examination by CO 2 sensors. Alternative measures are sometimes employed, such as the physical unloading of full freight loads. This is a very costly and time consuming process, and can only be used in a limited number of cases. As a consequence, the UK immigration service is planning to deploy X ray or gamma radiation scanners at UK ports and control zones to detect people seeking to circumvent UK immigration controls. This practice would be integrated with other search techniques to provide a balanced and effective search regime. In most cases, scanners would be used as a second phase of checking, that is, as a form of confirmation where a first phase of checking (e.g. CO 2 sensors) has provided inconclusive results

  20. Case Study on the Use of X Ray or Gamma Radiation Scanning for the Detection of People Seeking to Enter a State Illegally in Vehicles or Freight Containers. Annex III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    This summary describes the main elements of the justification case for the use of X ray or gamma radiation scanning for the detection of stowaways as published by the UK Home Office]. In the United Kingdom, the rate of clandestine entry by people concealed in vehicles or freight containers at ferry ports and the Eurotunnel Folkestone Terminal is very high. People who have been detected attempting to enter illegally in east Kent alone, including the Port of Dover, numbered over 17 000 in 1999 and 19 700 in 2000. Detection measures in use include carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sensors, which give a quick and generally reliable indication of concealed human presence, and search teams of dogs. Both these measures, however, have fairly significant limitations. For example, certain types of freight emit CO 2 , thus masking the presence of humans. Also, the construction of some containers prevents examination by CO 2 sensors. Alternative measures are sometimes employed, such as the physical unloading of full freight loads. This is a very costly and time consuming process, and can only be used in a limited number of cases. As a consequence, the UK immigration service is planning to deploy X ray or gamma radiation scanners at UK ports and control zones to detect people seeking to circumvent UK immigration controls. This practice would be integrated with other search techniques to provide a balanced and effective search regime. In most cases, scanners would be used as a second phase of checking, that is, as a form of confirmation where a first phase of checking (e.g. CO 2 sensors) has provided inconclusive results

  1. The validity of compliance monitors to assess wearing time of thoracic-lumbar-sacral orthoses in children with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Louis N; Sison-Williamson, Mitell; Mendoza, Melissa M; McDonald, Craig M; Molitor, Fred; Mulcahey, M J; Betz, Randal R; Vogel, Lawrence C; Bagley, Anita

    2008-06-15

    Prospective multicenter observation. To determine the validity of 3 commercially available at recording thoracic-lumbar-sacral orthosis (TLSO) wearing time of children with spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess each monitor's function during daily activities. A major limitation to studies assessing the effectiveness of spinal prophylactic bracing is the patient's compliance with the prescribed wearing time. Although some studies have begun to use objective compliance monitors, there is little documentation of the validity of the monitors during activities of daily life and no comparisons of available monitors. Fifteen children with SCI who wore a TLSO for paralytic scoliosis were observed for 4 days during their rehabilitation stay. Three compliance monitors (2 temperature and 1 pressure sensitive) were mounted onto each TLSO. Time of brace wear from the monitors was compared with the wear time per day recorded in diaries. Observed versus monitored duration of brace wear found the HOBO (temperature sensitive) to be the most valid compliance monitor. The HOBO had the lowest average of difference and variance of difference scores. The correlation between the recorded daily entries and monitored brace wear time was also highest for the HOBO in analysis of dependent and independent scores. Bland-Altman plots showed that the pressure sensitive monitor underestimated wear time whereas the temperature monitors overestimated wear time. Compliance to prescribed wearing schedule has been a barrier to studying TLSO efficacy. All 3 monitors were found to measure TLSO compliance, but the 2 temperature monitors were more in agreement with the daily diaries. Based on its functional advantages compared with the HOBO, the StowAway TidbiT will be used to further investigate the long-term compliance of TLSO bracing in children with SCI.

  2. Survey of LWR environmental control technology performance and cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeb, C.M.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Lewallen, M.A.

    1980-03-01

    This study attempts to establish a ranking for species that are routinely released to the environment for a projected nuclear power growth scenario. Unlike comparisons made to existing standards, which are subject to frequent revision, the ranking of releases can be used to form a more logical basis for identifying the areas where further development of control technology could be required. This report describes projections of releases for several fuel cycle scenarios, identifies areas where alternative control technologies may be implemented, and discusses the available alternative control technologies. The release factors were used in a computer code system called ENFORM, which calculates the annual release of any species from any part of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle given a projection of installed nuclear generation capacity. This survey of fuel cycle releases was performed for three reprocessing scenarios (stowaway, reprocessing without recycle of Pu and reprocessing with full recycle of U and Pu) for a 100-year period beginning in 1977. The radioactivity releases were ranked on the basis of a relative ranking factor. The relative ranking factor is based on the 100-year summation of the 50-year population dose commitment from an annual release of radioactive effluents. The nonradioactive releases were ranked on the basis of dilution factor. The twenty highest ranking radioactive releases were identified and each of these was analyzed in terms of the basis for calculating the release and a description of the currently employed control method. Alternative control technology is then discussed, along with the available capital and operating cost figures for alternative control methods

  3. Forensics, radiology, society. X-rays. Tool and document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Beatrice; Vogel, Hermann [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Forensic Medicine

    2014-07-01

    During the last years, the individual specialities of forensic medicine and diagnostic imaging have increasingly cooperated to create the interdisciplinary entity of forensic radiology. The book demonstrates the potential of this speciality: It has become evident that the combination of diagnostic imaging and forensic medicine solves more cases of death of unknown cause than each alone, and that a radiograph can be read like a document describing forces of modern time and its effects on current society. The posters of 6 exhibitions demonstrate the actual cause of death and its preceding violence. They aim at the medical as well as the interested lay-public: Causes of natural and of violent death become visible. For instance, stab- and gunshot wounds into a person's rear are contradictory of self-defence. Stab wounds with penetration of ribs indicate great force and, therefore, intentional homicide. The same is valid for multiple stabs, stabs through silicon prosthesis of a mammoplasty, and stabs into the breast cage of a defenceless toddler. X-rays of the living can indicate preceding torture. X-rays are part of the security technology employed at airports and countries' borders. They help to detect drugs, explosives, and human stow-aways. The x-ray examination of the deceased visualises success and failure of the preceding therapy. After reanimation, the position of a tracheal tube, the effects of a vascular puncture, and potential fractures of the breast cage can be evaluated. After cardiac and aortic interventions, the procedure of choice and its effects can be seen. Concerning general or intensive care, diagnostic imaging shows the position of urinary catheters, gastric tubes and vascular catheters. Prenatal diagnostic imaging can determine the sex of the foetus and possible malformations; and in peri- and postnatal death, it may show the effects of iatrogenic actions, and later on, of child-abuse.

  4. Using ionising radiation against terrorism and contrabandage determination of the occurring dose values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hupe, O.; Ankerhold, U.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Presently the combat against terrorism and contrabandage is gaining in importance. This leads to a growing need for human inspections for weapons or chemical substances like drugs or explosives at e.g. airports and federal buildings. Up to now, this has been done mainly by pat search or the use of metal detectors. But the installed metal detection systems can have a high rate of false alerts, caused e.g. by belt buckles, leading to a high rate of time consuming manual follow-up checks. Also, it is not possible to detect chemical substances or modern plastic weapons. Therefore, a lot of efforts have been made to develop reliable technologies for passenger and cargo controls. Up to now, the demands placed on control systems for the use in routine are fulfilled only by X-ray screening systems. X-ray scanners have been used successfully for several years for personnel controls (checks) at diamond mines and prisons or as cargo scanner. So far, however, these systems have not been used frequently for human inspections, e.g. at airports. In general, two aspects must be considered wit h regard to the use of X-ray personnel scanners: the privacy aspect, because the body shape is seen, and the radiation protection aspect. For radiation protection purposes, and to observe the prescribed dose limits, it is extremely important to know the dose a person gets knowingly when passing a personnel scanner or, as a stowaway, a cargo scanner. Within the scope of a research project measurements were performed on different types of personnel and cargo scanners, using the transmission and backscattering method. All scanners investigated work with a high dose rate and use a short irradiation time. Because of this technique, reliable values of the personal and ambient dose equivalent, H p (10) and H * (10), could be determined only with a specially developed measuring system (presented in a poster at this conference). The scanner systems and dose values