WorldWideScience

Sample records for stoves

  1. Performance evaluation of kerosene stoves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malathy, D; Murugesan, V; Shanmugam, K; Swaminathan, K R

    1984-07-01

    This article compares the eight types of stoves available in the market in Coimbatore area. The authors have discussed about the design parameters which affect the fuel efficiencies of the kerosene stoves.

  2. Biomass stoves in dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo

    and analyzed in this session. Experimental results regarding the performance of biomass combustion stoves and the effects of real-life practices in terms of thermal efficiency, particulate and gaseous emissions will be addressed. This research is based on the development of a new testing approach that combines...... laboratory and field measurements established in the context of the implications of the upcoming eco-design directive. The communication will cover technical aspects concerning the operating performance of different types of biomass stoves and building envelopes, in order to map the ongoing opportunities...

  3. Wood-burning stoves worldwide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo

    global environmental health risk, since these sources are important contributors to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the ambient air that increase climate and health risks. This thesis explores the social-technical dimensions of both the use of wood-burning stoves (WBSs) and transition to the use......More than any time in our history, the wood-burning stove continues to be the most popular technology used for cooking and heating worldwide. According to the World Health Organization and recent scientific studies, the inefficient use of solid-fuels in traditional stoves constitutes the major...... systems, improved efficient retrofits and advanced stove innovations. In chapter 3, four popular wood-burning practices found in five countries were singled-out to be examined closely in four case studies: “cooking in Brazil”, “cooking and heating in Peru”, “heating in Portugal” and “recreational heat...

  4. Improved biomass Injera stove- Mirte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, M.; Kenna, J.

    1994-01-01

    The status report of 1994 - 1995 shows as the need to design an improved biomass stove for Injera was recognized. The marketing began in mid-1994 with a Mirte which showed even higher efficiencies in laboratory, using 50 percent less woody biomass than the open fire. By early 1994 several hundreds Mirte stoves had been sold in Addis Ababa at non-subsidized prices. The Mirte is currently produced on a large-scale by building materials companies. 3 figs. 1 tab

  5. Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves and Improved Stove Emission Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HATFIELD, MICHAEL; Still, Dean

    2013-04-15

    In developing countries, there is an urgent need for access to safe, efficient, and more affordable cooking technologies. Nearly 2.5 billion people currently use an open fire or traditional cookstove to prepare their meals, and recent models predict that use of biomass for cooking will continue to be the dominant energy use in rural, resource-poor households through 2030. For these families, cooking poses serious risks to health, safety, and income. An alarming 4 million people, primarily women and children, die prematurely each year from indoor and outdoor exposure to the harmful emissions released by solid fuel combustion. Use of traditional stoves can also have a significant impact on deforestation and climate change. This dire situation creates a critical need for cookstoves that significantly and verifiably reduce fuel use and emissions in order to reach protective levels for human health and the environment. Additionally, advances in the scientific equipment needed to measure and monitor stove fuel use and emissions have not kept pace with the significant need within the industry. While several testing centers in the developed world may have hundred thousand-dollar emissions testing systems, organizations in the field have had little more than a thermometer, a scale, and subjective observations to quantify the performance of stove designs. There is an urgent need for easy-to-use, inexpensive, accurate, and robust stove testing equipment for use by laboratory and field researchers around the world. ASAT and their research partner, Aprovecho Research Center (ARC), have over thirty years of experience addressing these two needs, improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment, with expertise spanning the full spectrum of development from conceptual design to product manufacturing and dissemination. This includes: 1) research, design, and verification of clean biomass cookstove technology and emissions monitoring equipment; 2) mass production of quality

  6. ITDG stoves project - the story so far

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, S

    1981-12-01

    The ITDG stoves project was initiated in 1978 and funded by ODA in 1979 to assist overseas organizations in the design, testing and development of wood-burning stoves, as a contribution to the deforestation problem. Collaboration has been established with three organizations in Indonesia, Sri Lanka and India who have the resources to undertake testing, design and dissemination of stoves. The strategy and performance of the stove project to date is evaluated.

  7. Household energy isn't all stoves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clancy, Joy S.

    1998-01-01

    When people talk about 'household energy', most people automatically think of stoves. A lot of attention has been paid to improving stoves to make them more energy efficient and to reduce their pollution. This is one side of the 'stoves' approach, whilst others look at the 'supply' side of the

  8. Diffusion of improved biomass stoves in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daxiong Qiu; Shuhua Gu; Catania, P.; Kun Huang

    1996-01-01

    The large-scale utilization of inefficient biofuel stoves for cooking and heating in the rural areas of China can cause ecological and environmental problems; thus, in 1982, the Chinese government encouraged the diffusion of improved biomass stoves. From 1982 to 1994, these improved biomass stoves have been used by 144 million households or the equivalent of 90% of all improved stoves installed globally; 62% of the Chinese market has been penetrated. This paper presents the fundamental features of China's diffusion programme of improved biomass stoves, analyses of the future domestic market, and defines some of the lessons learned from the diffusion programme which may be applicable in other emerging nations. (Author)

  9. Strong air pollution from old wood stoves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    According to this article, wood-firing is the major source of suspended dust in Norway. Old stoves emit about six times as much as new stoves. Only seven percent of the wood-firing takes place in modern, clean-burning stoves. In Oslo, where replacement of old stoves has been publicly supported, this fraction is even less. The emission of carbon dioxide from burning wood does not count as climate gas emission since the amount of CO 2 released from a burning tree equals the amount that was fixed in the growing tree, and it would have been released anyhow by the decaying tree if not burned

  10. Perceptions of the health effects of stoves in Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Joanna K; Emmel, Nick D; Manaseki, Semira; Chambers, Jacky

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the views of stove users in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia on how stoves affect their health. In this paper focus groups were conducted with improved stove users; traditional stove users; and a mix of traditional and improved stove users. Individual interviews were also held with various types of stove users. A translator moderated all discussions with a questioning route. All discussions were fully transcribed and translated. The transcripts were analysed by identifying common themes in responses to form an emerging theory. The findings in the paper are that all stove users recognised respiratory symptoms caused by stove smoke and other health effects such as warmth, dirt and workload, which they perceived to be important. Stove users had a lack of knowledge about the diseases caused by the smoke. Public health was a key driver for the improved stove project, yet has been neglected in improved stove marketing. The study used in this paper was limited by the language barrier. Some of the meanings of participants' responses may have been lost in translation. This paper has highlighted the importance of the health effects of stove smoke to stove users. Uptake of the improved stoves has been low. Public health should be included in marketing strategies for improved stoves to increase their uptake. The paper shows that acute respiratory infections are a major cause of mortality world-wide. Indoor air pollution from burning biomass fuels in household stoves causes a significant proportion of respiratory infections. No qualitative research has been published exploring stove users' views on the health effects of stoves. This paper provides an insight into stove users' perceptions for those interested in people-centred approaches to tackling international health issues.

  11. Bringing Stoves to the People: An Assessment of Impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, S.; Prasad, K.K; Van der Zaan, H.B

    1990-01-01

    The absence of reliable and in-depth information on the impact of improved cook-stove has required stove project managers, governments and donors to rely on unverified and anecdotal data for designing and implementing stove programmes. This survey was designed to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of world-wide stove activities. The report was a compilation of seven stove surveys carried out from Burkina Faso, Guatemala, India, Indonesia, Kenya and Niger. The report has indicated the benefits of using improved cook stoves that includes, conserving energy, reduction of indoor air pollution, improves household health, foster greater gender equality and stimulation of small-scale enterprise development

  12. Ceramic stove eases strain on African forests | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-28

    Oct 28, 2010 ... IDRC began supporting research that led to the marketing of the ceramic Jiko stove in the ... IDRC Communications ... Informal sector workers producing the traditional stoves were sent designs and convinced to switch to this ...

  13. Smoke emissions from a catalytic wood stove

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowburn, D.A.; Stephens, N.P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The work reported here was concerned with testing a catalytic wood burning stove (roomheater) following the most applicable UK procedures. The identical stove has also been tested in several other nations to their individual procedures. The results will be submitted to the International Energy Agency (IEA) such that appropriate comparisons can be made. The results comprised: burning rate; an indicative appliance efficiency; heat output; carbon dioxide emissions; carbon monoxide emissions; and smoke emissions. These results were determined with the appliance at three nominal burning rates (high, medium and low). Comparing the results with those obtained in other countries indicates good agreement except when the appliance was operated at low burning rates, under which conditions the UK results indicate significantly worse smoke emissions than those measured by other researchers. (author)

  14. Fuelwood and stoves: lessons from Zimbabwe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, J

    1983-03-01

    Laboratory tests on traditional open fires as methods of cooking give values of thermal efficiency varying from 12-30%. These are significantly higher than values which are widely quoted in the literature. The results of a research visit to Zimbabwe indicated that in three villages fuel efficiency did not appear to be the main determinant of choice of cooking method: villagers had changed from their traditional mode of cooking to stoves which they perceived to consume substantially more fuel. These stoves enable meals to be prepared more quickly which the women found useful during the busy months. The increased labour costs could be borne because the fuel was gathered during the slack season.

  15. In-home performance of residential cordwood stoves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houck, J.E.; Barnett, S.G.; Roholt, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    The air quality impacts of residential cordwood stoves have been of concern to regulators, energy planners, and members of the woodstove industry. In addition, the reliability of laboratory certification emission values in predicting 'real world' emissions has been questioned. In response to these concerns, particulate emissions from residential cordwood stoves under actual in-home use have been measured for 5 heating seasons as part of 12 separate studies in Oregon, New York, Vermont, and the Yukon Territory. Monitoring was conducted using an automated emission sampler (AES) system. The system has been deployed in nearly 100 individual homes. Typically, emissions from several 1-week-long integrated sampling periods over the course of the heating season were measured with the AES system at each home. Particulate emission rates in grams of particles per hour of stove operation, grams of particles per kilogram of dry wood burned, and grams of particles per million Joules were calculated. Ancillary data provided by the studies included wood burn rates, homeowner wood loading patterns, wood moisture content and species, hours of operation of auxiliary heating appliances in the study homes, room ambient, flue gas, catalyst, and pre-catalyst temperatures, and hours of catalyst operation. Conventional stoves, high-technology non-catalytic stoves, catalytic stoves, and stoves equipped with retrofit catalytic devices have been studied. In addition to the 12 cordwood stove studies, the AES system has been used in 2 pellet stove studies and 1 fireplace study

  16. Performance evaluation of a powered charcoal stove using different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A powered stove was designed to effectively utilized biomass, quickly start and maintain fire and reduce cooking time. The stove consists of a blower with hand winder and a fuel carrier. Performance evaluation carried out show that boiling time decreased with increased volumetric air flow rate for all the biomass used.

  17. Fuel efficient stoves for the poorest two billion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Ashok

    2012-03-01

    About 2 billion people cook their daily meals on generally inefficient, polluting, biomass cookstoves. The fuels include twigs and leaves, agricultural waste, animal dung, firewood, and charcoal. Exposure to resulting smoke leads to acute respiratory illness, and cancers, particularly among women cooks, and their infant children near them. Resulting annual mortality estimate is almost 2 million deaths, higher than that from malaria or tuberculosis. There is a large diversity of cooking methods (baking, boiling, long simmers, brazing and roasting), and a diversity of pot shapes and sizes in which the cooking is undertaken. Fuel-efficiency and emissions depend on the tending of the fire (and thermal power), type of fuel, stove characteristics, and fit of the pot to the stove. Thus, no one perfect fuel-efficient low-emitting stove can suit all users. Affordability imposes a further severe constraint on the stove design. For various economic strata within the users, a variety of stove designs may be appropriate and affordable. In some regions, biomass is harvested non-renewably for cooking fuel. There is also increasing evidence that black carbon emitted from stoves is a significant contributor to atmospheric forcing. Thus improved biomass stoves can also help mitigate global climate change. The speaker will describe specific work undertaken to design, develop, test, and disseminate affordable fuel-efficient stoves for internally displaced persons (IDPs) of Darfur, Sudan, where the IDPs face hardship, humiliation, hunger, and risk of sexual assault owing to their dependence on local biomass for cooking their meals.

  18. Scaling housing interventions for wood-burning stoves worldwide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo; Jensen, Ole Michael; da Cruz Tarelho, Luís António

    2013-01-01

    The wood-burning stove is the most popular energy technology in the world since about 3 billion people rely on it for both domestic cooking and heating purposes. It is estimated that in 2030 more than 200 million people will be affected by this abundant energy source. Large-scale clean stove prog...

  19. Improvement Design of an Existing Atomized Kerosene Stove for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The existing atomized kerosene stove being used in some households in Nigeria does not give room for primary air fuel mixture but secondary one before combustion. This in turn leads to higher specific fuel consumption and ultimately lower thermal efficiency (resulting from low combustion efficiency) of the stove. In order ...

  20. Emission of Dioxins from Danish Wood-Stoves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikelsøe, J.; Madsen, Henrik; Hansen, K.

    1994-01-01

    The main purpose of the investigation was to estimate the annual dioxin emission from Danish wood-stoves. 4 stoves of different designs and 3 types of fuel were tested in 2 operating conditions. Sampling was carried out in a dilution tunnel, making reproducible sampling possible. The dioxin...

  1. The emissions from a space-heating biomass stove

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyuncu, T.; Pinar, Y.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the flue gas emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO X ), sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) and soot from an improved space-heating biomass stove and thermal efficiency of the stove have been investigated. Various biomass fuels such as firewood, wood shavings, hazelnut shell, walnut shell, peanut shell, seed shell of apricot (sweet and hot seed type), kernel removed corncob, wheat stalk litter (for cattle and sheep pen), cornhusk and maize stalk litter (for cattle pen) and charcoal were burned in the same space-heating biomass stove. Flue gas emissions were recorded during the combustion period at intervals of 5min. It was seen from the results that the flue gas emissions have different values depending on the characteristics of biomass fuels. Charcoal is the most appropriate biomass fuel for use in the space-heating biomass stoves because its combustion emits less smoke and the thermal efficiency of the stove is approximately 46%. (author)

  2. Poverty alleviation aspects of successful improved household stoves programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Programmes to improve household wood and charcoal stove efficiencies have been launched throughout the developing world over the past 20 years. Their main driver has been to reduce environmental degradation resulting from the removal of trees for charcoal and fuel wood production. In addition, health benefits arise from the reduction or removal of smoke in people's homes. Unfortunately, many programmes have failed to establish sustainable improved stove production - primarily through lack of sufficient attention to consumer tastes and market dynamics. This project, carried out in Kenya, Ethiopia and Uganda, has identified key success factors for sustainable stove production and supply by determining the poverty impacts of successful, commercially-based, improved household biomass stove programmes on producers, consumers and others associated with the household fuel and stove supply and end-use business. (author)

  3. Development and Performance Evaluation of Charcoal-Fired Cooking Stoves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndirika, V. I. O.

    2002-01-01

    Three different sizes of cooking stoves which utilizes charcoal as source of fuel with fuel capacities 15.7 kg, 10.6 kg and 3.5 kg for the large, medium and small stoves respectively were designed and fabricated for domestic cooking of food by the rural communities. The stoves were evaluated for performance in terms of fuel efficiency, fuel consumption rate, cooking efficiency and boiling time during testing operation with water. From the result it was revealed that the rate of fuel consumption for the large, medium and small cooking stove were 7.2 kg/h, 5.9 kg/h and 2.3 kg/h respectively, and their fuel efficiencies were 88%, 86% and 82% respectively. Also the cooking efficiencies of these stoves were 94%, 83% and 72% respectively. A comparative evaluation of the cooking efficiencies, fuel efficiencies, fuel consumption rate and cooking time between the three types of stoves and the traditional three stone open fire system, reveals that the cooking efficiencies and fuel efficiencies obtained were greater than the values obtained with the traditional three stone open fire system. But the values of the fuel consumption rate and boiling time obtained for the three stoves were lower than the values obtained with the traditional system. And the difference between their means was statistically significant at 5 % level of significance

  4. Catalytic combustion in gas stoves - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, Anna-Karin [CATATOR AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    Several independent studies show that gas stoves to some degree contribute to the indoor emissions of NO{sub x} especially in situations were the ventilation flow is poor. The peak-NO{sub x} concentrations can reach several hundred ppb but the integral concentration seldom exceeds about 20 - 50 ppb, which corresponds to an indoor-outdoor ratio of about 1 - 2.5. Epidemiological studies indicate increasing problems with respiratory symptoms in sensitive people at concentrations as low as 15 ppb of NO{sub 2}. Consequently, the NO{sub x}-concentration in homes where gas stoves are used is high enough to cause health effects. However, in situations where the ventilation flow is high (utilisation of ventilation hoods) the NO{sub x}-emissions are not likely to cause any health problems. This study has been aimed at investigating the possibilities to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions from gas stoves by replacing the conventional flame combustion with catalytic combustion. The investigation is requested by Swedish Gas Center, and is a following-up work of an earlier conducted feasibility study presented in April-2002. The present investigation reports on the possibility to use cheap and simple retro-fit catalytic design suggestions for traditional gas stoves. Experiments have been conducted with both natural and town gas, and parameters such as emissions of NO{sub x}, CO and unburned fuel gas and thermal efficiency, etc, have been examined and are discussed. The results show that it is possible to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions up to 80% by a simple retro-fit installation, without decreasing the thermal efficiency of the cooking plate. The measured source strengths correspond to indoor NO{sub x} concentrations that are below or equal to the average outdoor concentration, implying that no additional detrimental health effects are probable. The drawback of the suggested installations is that the concentration of CO and in some cases also CH{sub 4} are increased in the flue gases

  5. Transition to an intelligent use of cleaner biomass stoves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo; Jensen, Ole Michael; Vicent, Estela D.

    2016-01-01

    are relevant issues to save energy and avoid greenhouse gas (CO2e) emissions. This work compares the operating performance of 3 types of biomass stoves used in Europe in their interaction with dwellings. Field studies were conducted in 24 houses in Portugal and Denmark to analyse wood-burning behaviours......In Europe, inappropriate user behaviours in the operation of wood-burning stoves (WBSs) results in substantial energy losses where fireplaces and conventional stoves are major contributors to undue emissions of health damaging fine particulate matter (PM2.5). The design and adoption of cleaner WBSs...

  6. Regulation of air pollution from wood-burning stoves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Thomas Bue; Brandt, Jørgen; Hansen, Lars Gårn

    Air pollution is a major global challenge. Emissions from residential wood-burning stoves make a surprisingly large contribution to total air pollution related health costs. In Denmark, emissions from wood-burning stoves are calculated to cause almost 400 premature deaths each year within Denmark...... and additionally about 300 premature deaths in other parts of Europe. In this article, we present an integrated assessment of the net social benefit of different schemes for regulating wood-burning stoves including bans and taxes. The assessment uses high resolution air pollution emission inventory...

  7. Efficiency tests on the pyrolysis gasifier stove Peko Pe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Sieverts

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents results from water boiling tests on the pyrolysis gasifier stove Peko Pe, which has been developed by the Norwegian Paal Wendelbo. The stove efficiency determined vary between 21 and 29% when burning dry Danish woodchips (10% moisture) with an estimated caloric value of 16 MJ...... the water content in the grass. In Adjumani refugee camp it was furthermore found that the stove was able to provide sufficient energy from solid combustion, after the pyrolysis was stopped, to boil water for additional 25-30 minutes with lid. This effect was not seen in the tests on woodchips in Denmark...

  8. Wood-burning stoves in low-carbon dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo; Jensen, Ole Michael; Afshari, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    The European climate change strategy intends to encourage the erection of low-carbon buildings and the upgrading of existing buildings to low-carbon level. At the same time, it is an EU vision to maximise the use of renewable energy resources. In this strategy, small-scale wood......-burning is an overlooked source for heating. A wood-burning stove is considered low-carbon technology since its fuel is based on local residual biomass. A field study investigating how modern wood-burning stoves operated in modern single-family houses showed that intermittent heat supply occasionally conflicted...... combustion technology and automatics, controlling the interplay between stove and house, can make wood-burning stoves suitable for low-carbon dwellings and meet the remaining heat demand during the coldest period. It was further concluded that new guidelines need to be elaborated about how to install...

  9. Cord Wood Testing in a Non-Catalytic Wood Stove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trojanowski, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wei, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-06-30

    EPA Method 28 and the current wood stove regulations have been in-place since 1988. Recently, EPA proposed an update to the existing NSPS for wood stove regulations which includes a plan to transition from the current crib wood fuel to cord wood fuel for certification testing. Cord wood is seen as generally more representative of field conditions while the crib wood is seen as more repeatable. In any change of certification test fuel, there are questions about the impact on measured results and the correlation between tests with the two different fuels. The purpose of the work reported here is to provide data on the performance of a noncatalytic stove with cord wood. The stove selected has previously been certified with crib wood which provides a basis for comparison with cord wood. Overall, particulate emissions were found to be considerably higher with cord wood.

  10. Survey of usage patterns for domestic stoves/fireplaces. Prestudy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, David; Joeborn, Inger; Sjoedin, Aake; Munkhammar, Inger; Gustavsson, Lennart

    2005-02-01

    We have investigated the use of domestic wood burning for wood stoves and open fireplaces. The results from a closer examination of existing national energy statistics for residential heating has enabled a division of the average consumption of firewood for each house by the category 'fireplace for open fire' and 'tiled stove/heating stove/fireplace for wood'. The estimation of emissions can therefore be improved by differentiating emission factors for different wood stoves and open fireplaces. Today, only one emission factor is used. An insight into general firing procedures, wood storage routines etc. was investigated using a questionnaire for the Teleborg area of the city Vaexjoe. The results of this study provide a foundation for further work, which will subsequently enable improvements for emission inventories on small-scale biomass combustion from household appliances

  11. Improved stoves in Southern Africa: a solution for all seasons

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mapako, MC

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available to avoid using wood altogether. The requirements of a cooking fuel vary seasonally in any given household, and across different climatic zones. The ability of improved stoves to meet these requirements varies considerably across these different zones...

  12. WOOD STOVE EMISSIONS: PARTICLE SIZE AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes wood stove particle size and chemical composition data gathered to date. [NOTE: In 1995, EPA estimated that residential wood combustion (RWC), including fireplaces, accounted for a significant fraction of national particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter...

  13. performance eval performance evaluation of a biomass stove using

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    2015-07-03

    Jul 3, 2015 ... stoves have come in various sizes and styles which require biomass ... impacts associated solid wood based fuel is reduced through .... The LEMS model is an ideal test for .... increased firepower, the curve returns to a fairly.

  14. Improved stoves in India: A study of sustainable business models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrimali, Gireesh; Slaski, Xander; Thurber, Mark C.; Zerriffi, Hisham

    2011-01-01

    Burning of biomass for cooking is associated with health problems and climate change impacts. Many previous efforts to disseminate improved stoves – primarily by governments and NGOs – have not been successful. Based on interviews with 12 organizations selling improved biomass stoves, we assess the results to date and future prospects of commercial stove operations in India. Specifically, we consider how the ability of these businesses to achieve scale and become self-sustaining has been influenced by six elements of their respective business models: design, customers targeted, financing, marketing, channel strategy, and organizational characteristics. The two companies with the most stoves in the field shared in common generous enterprise financing, a sophisticated approach to developing a sales channel, and many person-years of management experience in marketing and operations. And yet the financial sustainability of improved stove sales to households remains far from assured. The only company in our sample with demonstrated profitability is a family-owned business selling to commercial rather than household customers. The stove sales leader is itself now turning to the commercial segment to maintain flagging cash flow, casting doubt on the likelihood of large positive impacts on health from sales to households in the near term. - Highlights: ► Business models to sell improved stoves can be viable in India. ► Commercial stove efforts may not be able to deliver all the benefits hoped for. ► The government could play a useful role if policies are targeted and well thought-out. ► Develops models for that hard-to-define entity mixing business and charity.

  15. Heat transfer and performance analysis of thermoelectric stoves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najjar, Yousef S.H.; Kseibi, Musaab M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Design and testing of a thermo electric stove. • Three biofuels namely: wood, peat and manure are used. • Heat transfer analysis is detailed. • Resulting thermoelectric energy for vital purposes in remote poor regions. • Evaluation of performance of the stove subcomponents. - Abstract: Access to electricity is one of the important challenges for remote poor regions of the world. Adding TEG (thermoelectric generators) to stoves can provide electricity for the basic benefits such as: operating radio, light, phones, medical instruments and other small electronic devices. Heat transfer analysis of a multi-purpose stove coupled with 12 TEG modules is presented. This analysis comprises a well aerodynamically designed combustor, finned TEG base plate, cooker and water heater beside the outer surface for space heating. Heat transfer analysis was also carried out for all the subcomponents of the stove, and performance predicted against the experimental results. It was found that the maximum power obtained is about 7.88 W using wood, manure or peat with an average overall efficiency of the stove about 60%.

  16. Guidelines for automated control systems for stoves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illerup, Jytte Boll; Mandl, Christoph; Obernberger, Ingwald

    ERA-NET Bioenergy is a network of national research and development programmes focusing on bioenergy which includes 14 funding organisations from 10 European countries: Austria, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, The Netherlands, Poland, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Its mission is to e...... manufacturers concerning the optimisation of their products and the development and design of new products with its recommendations which have been worked out based on scientific investigations as well as comprehensive test runs....... units or measures to stabilise the draft or to reduce standing losses). Objectives related to the implementation and evaluation of the different measures -Test of the most promising concepts by performing test runs with prototypes. -Development of design guidelines for stove manufacturers based...... by ERA-NET Bioenergy under 7th Joint Call for Research and Development of the ERA-NET Bioenergy from 2013. Today small-scale biomass combustion is one of the most relevant bioenergy applications. Driven by EU-wide and national measures to promote the utilisation of biomass for energy production...

  17. Experimental and computational studies on a gasifier based stove

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varunkumar, S.; Rajan, N.K.S.; Mukunda, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A simple method to calculate the fraction of HHC was devised. ► η g for stove is same as that of a downdraft gasifier. ► Gas from stove contains 5.5% of CH 4 equivalent of HHC. ► Effect of vessel size on utilization efficiency brought out clearly. ► Contribution of radiative heat transfer from char bed to efficiency is 6%. - Abstract: The work reported here is concerned with a detailed thermochemical evaluation of the flaming mode behaviour of a gasifier based stove. Determination of the gas composition over the fuel bed, surface and gas temperatures in the gasification process constitute principal experimental features. A simple atomic balance for the gasification reaction combined with the gas composition from the experiments is used to determine the CH 4 equivalent of higher hydrocarbons and the gasification efficiency (η g ). The components of utilization efficiency, namely, gasification–combustion and heat transfer are explored. Reactive flow computational studies using the measured gas composition over the fuel bed are used to simulate the thermochemical flow field and heat transfer to the vessel; hither-to-ignored vessel size effects in the extraction of heat from the stove are established clearly. The overall flaming mode efficiency of the stove is 50–54%; the convective and radiative components of heat transfer are established to be 45–47 and 5–7% respectively. The efficiency estimates from reacting computational fluid dynamics (RCFD) compare well with experiments.

  18. A quantitative performance assessment of improved cooking stoves and traditional three-stone-fire stoves using a two-pot test design in Chamwino, Dodoma, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, J.; Uckert, G.; Graef, F.; Hoffmann, H.; Kimaro, A. A.; Sererya, O.; Sieber, S.

    2018-02-01

    In Tanzania, a majority of rural residents cook using firewood-based three-stone-fire stoves. In this study, quantitative performance differences between technologically advanced improved cooking stoves and three-stone-fire stoves are analysed. We test the performance of improved cooking stoves and three-stone-fire stoves using local cooks, foods, and fuels, in the semi-arid region of Dodoma in Tanzania. We used the cooking protocol of the Controlled Cooking Test following a two-pot test design. The findings of the study suggest that improved cooking stoves use less firewood and less time than three-stone-fire stoves to conduct a predefined cooking task. In total, 40 households were assessed and ask to complete two different cooking tasks: (1) a fast cooking meal (rice and vegetables) and (2) a slow cooking meal (beans and rice). For cooking task 1, the results show a significant reduction in firewood consumption of 37.1% by improved cooking stoves compared to traditional three-stone-fire stoves; for cooking task 2 a reduction of 15.6% is found. In addition, it was found that the time needed to conduct cooking tasks 1 and 2 was significantly reduced by 26.8% and 22.8% respectively, when improved cooking stoves were used instead of three-stone-fire-stoves. We observed that the villagers altered the initial improved cooking stove design, resulting in the so-called modified improved cooking stove. In an additional Controlled Cooking Test, we conducted cooking task 3: a very fast cooking meal (maize flour and vegetables) within 32 households. Significant changes between the initial and modified improved cooking stoves regarding firewood and time consumption were not detected. However, analyses show that both firewood and time consumption during cooking was reduced when large amounts (for 6-7 household members) of food were prepared instead of small amounts (for 2-3 household members).

  19. Energy performance of Portuguese and Danish wood-burning stoves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, Ricardo; Jensen, Ole Michael; Tarelho, Luis A. C.

    2011-01-01

    In Europe, considerable amounts of renewable energy resources are used for residential heating with wood-burning stoves, which can cause considerable energy losses and environmental impacts. A better understanding of its operating characteristics will permit to improve the buildings energy...... carried out through the measurement of the main operating parameters: flue gas temperature and composition, combustion air flow rate, and fuel consumption rate. The results showed that the appliances emitted energy intermittently, with a mean heat flow rate into the indoors of 5 kWth, representing mean...... efficiency and indoor climate, and to reduce the emission of air pollutants to the environment. This study aimed to analyze the operating conditions of a Portuguese made stove and compare it with the most efficient Danish made stoves tested at the Technological Institute. The combustion experiments were...

  20. Mapping the performance of wood-burning stoves by installations worldwide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo; Jensen, Ole Michael; Tarelho, Luis A. C.

    2016-01-01

    environmental health risk. Research stressed the need to increase the performance of conventional interplays between users, stoves and buildings. This scientific review aims to characterize the performance and environmental effects of 9 wood-burning stove categories by installations worldwide...

  1. STUDI EMISI TUNGKU MASAK RUMAH TANGGA (Study for Emission Characteristic of Household Stoves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Haryanto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to study emission characteristic of household stoves. Five stoves were tested, namely clay pot biomass stove, brick biomass stove, kerosene stove, coal stove, and LPG stove.  Emission parameters to be measured were CO, NO2, SO2, and particulates. Gas emission was measured using gas analyzer Wolfsense TG 501, while particulate was determined based on Indonesian National Standard (SNI: 19-7117.12-2005. Results showed that LPG stove emitted no CO indicating that complete burning existed. Other stoves emitted CO with kerosene stove exhibited the highest CO emission of 1074 μg/m3. Biomass pot stoves produced SO2 (722 μg/m3 which is lower than LPG stove (1488 μg/m3 and kerosene stove (1055 μg/m3, but higher than coal stove (290 μg/m3. On the other side, biomass pot stoves produced more NO2 (99 μg/m3 with pot stove as compared to kerosene stove (25 μg/m3. Particulate emission increased based on the fuels used with an order from the lowest was LPG stove, kerosene stove, coal stove, and biomass stove. Key words: emission, stove, biomass, fossil fuels   ABSTRAK Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengkaji karakteristik emisi beberapa tungku atau kompor dapur rumah tangga. Penelitian dilakukan dengan menggunakan lima jenis tungku atau kompor, yaitu tungku biomassa pot tebal, tungku biomassa bata, kompor minyak tanah, kompor batubara, dan kompor LPG. Parameter emisi yang diukur meliputi CO, NO2, SO2 dan partikel. Emisi gas diukur menggunakan gas analyser Wolfsense TG 501, sedangkan emisi partikel debu ditentukan berdasarkan standar SNI 19-7117.12-2005. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kompor LPG tidak menghasilkan emisi CO. Kompor minyak tanah menghasilkan emisi CO paling tinggi yaitu (1074 μg/m3. Kompor LPG menghasilkan emisi SO2 paling banyak (1488 μg/m3, diikuti kompor minyak tanah (1055 μg/m3, tungku kayu pot (722 μg/m3, dan kompor batubara (290 μg/m3. Di pihak lain, tungku biomassa pot tebal

  2. Clean Cook Stove Technology for Artisanal Palm Oil Clarification and Biochar Production in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorvlo, Selorm Y.; Addo, Ahmad; Abenney-Mickson, Stephen

    the palm fruits) and simultaneously produce heat and biochar. The adopted design procedure was iterative and eight preliminary tests were conducted; each an improvement of the previous stove tested. The best stove configuration was adopted for the design calculations and the final stove fabricated...... with a biochar yield of 5%. A maximum CO emission of 5 ppm was measured. The study showed that the palm oil clarification process with the designed cook stove provided a smokeless work environment, heat and biochar....

  3. Burns and fires in South Africa's informal settlements: Have approved kerosene stoves improved safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimemia, David; van Niekerk, Ashley; Govender, Rajen; Seedat, Mohamed

    2018-06-01

    This study is a follow-on to an intervention project that implemented South African Bureau of Standards approved kerosene stoves and safety education in 150 households of a Johannesburg informal settlement. An investigation conducted 12 months later established that 43 stoves had operational defects, yet 23 households continued using the faulty appliances. This study focuses on (1) the psychological and behavioural factors associated with continued use of faulty stoves by the 23 households, and (2), the specific technical failures of these stoves. The study involved one-on-one recall interviews with the households using defective stoves (N=21) and laboratory-based stove tests for seven of the affected appliances. The results indicate that the stoves had defects in critical safety features such as flame control and the self-extinguishing mechanism. Four stove malfunctions of minor burn affect were reported in the study. Continued use of the damaged stoves was significantly associated with the time from receipt of the stove to detection of first failure: stoves that failed later on were more significantly likely to remain in use as compared to those that failed sooner. The findings point to the need for strengthening enforcement of appliance standards, public education on kerosene stove use, and structural change for the energy-poor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. Development and optimization of a stove-powered thermoelectric generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastbergen, Dan

    Almost a third of the world's population still lacks access to electricity. Most of these people use biomass stoves for cooking which produce significant amounts of wasted thermal energy, but no electricity. Less than 1% of this energy in the form of electricity would be adequate for basic tasks such as lighting and communications. However, an affordable and reliable means of accomplishing this is currently nonexistent. The goal of this work is to develop a thermoelectric generator to convert a small amount of wasted heat into electricity. Although this concept has been around for decades, previous attempts have failed due to insufficient analysis of the system as a whole, leading to ineffective and costly designs. In this work, a complete design process is undertaken including concept generation, prototype testing, field testing, and redesign/optimization. Detailed component models are constructed and integrated to create a full system model. The model encompasses the stove operation, thermoelectric module, heat sinks, charging system and battery. A 3000 cycle endurance test was also conducted to evaluate the effects of operating temperature, module quality, and thermal interface quality on the generator's reliability, lifetime and cost effectiveness. The results from this testing are integrated into the system model to determine the lowest system cost in $/Watt over a five year period. Through this work the concept of a stove-based thermoelectric generator is shown to be technologically and economically feasible. In addition, a methodology is developed for optimizing the system for specific regional stove usage habits.

  5. Performance Evaluation of a Biomass Stove Using Particulate Matter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Researchers have proved that smoke and other emissions resulting from fuel wood in traditional stoves have led to increase in health hazards which include acute ... High thermal efficiency translates to less exposure to PM and CO emission which reduces significantly, risk to health accruing to the use of briquette and fuel ...

  6. Emission of dioxins from fireplaces and wood-burning stoves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, K.J.; Vikelsoee, J.; Madsen, H.

    1994-01-01

    In 1988 the Environmental Report No. 149 was published. The result of this investigation was that exceptionally large quantities of dioxin were emitted from burning of clean wood in fireplaces and wood-burning stoves. The conclusion was, however, that it was a preliminary investigation subject to great uncertainties. So it was recommended to make further investigations. The project was continued in 1990, and the present report is the result of this investigation. The fuels applied were logged and treated as an integral part of the test in order to take precautions against contamination. A new test arrangement with a dilution channel was developed in order to be able to take samples. The dilution channel made it possible to take out representative samples for the entire combustion process. Four wood-burning stoves were chosen for the experiments. Two stoves representing those sold from 1960 till 1990. One new stove approved according to DS 887 and finally a prototype stove. The dioxin analysis method was developed so that it could better handle the presence of tar in the samples taken. Danmarks Miljoe Undersoegelse (DMU) - The Danish Environmental Investigations - carried out a great work of development and documentation in this field. Before the main experiment a validation of the sampling and the analysis method was made. The conclusion was that the sampling and analysis method was satisfactory and that a continuity from Environmental Project no. 149 was ensured. During the execution of the present project a probable explanation of the high dioxin emission has been found which were reported in Environmental Project No. 149. The reason is in all probability contamination from burning of pressure-creosoted wood with burning of clean wood. The present report contains a number of appendices showing results from single experiments, references and a number of references to supplementary reports which were elaborated during the progress of the work. (EG)

  7. Proper indoor climate by the adoption of advanced wood burning stoves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo; Jensen, Ole Michael; Skreiberg, Oeyvind

    2014-01-01

    The indoor emission of (ultra)fine particles and overheating from wood-burning stoves are crucial problems in modern houses when wood is used for heating. The main cause for indoor particle emission is the interaction between user and stove when lighting and refilling the stove. The main causes...... for overheating are a high thermal insulation level of the house and high (peak) wattage of the stove. This research aims to understand how low wattage stoves with a computer added device and water jacket will perform on the indoor air quality as proper heating appliances for low energy houses. Two field studies...... were designed to compare the influence of the auto-pilot device and water jacket on the indoor climate. The first experiments were conducted in 8 renovated detached houses using certified stoves while the following experiments were conducted in 4 low energy houses using modern and advanced stoves...

  8. Chimney stoves modestly improved indoor air quality measurements compared with traditional open fire stoves: results from a small-scale intervention study in rural Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartinger, S M; Commodore, A A; Hattendorf, J; Lanata, C F; Gil, A I; Verastegui, H; Aguilar-Villalobos, M; Mäusezahl, D; Naeher, L P

    2013-08-01

    Nearly half of the world's population depends on biomass fuels to meet domestic energy needs, producing high levels of pollutants responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality. We compare carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM2.5) exposures and kitchen concentrations in households with study-promoted intervention (OPTIMA-improved stoves and control stoves) in San Marcos Province, Cajamarca Region, Peru. We determined 48-h indoor air concentration levels of CO and PM2.5 in 93 kitchen environments and personal exposure, after OPTIMA-improved stoves had been installed for an average of 7 months. PM2.5 and CO measurements did not differ significantly between OPTIMA-improved stoves and control stoves. Although not statistically significant, a post hoc stratification of OPTIMA-improved stoves by level of performance revealed mean PM2.5 and CO levels of fully functional OPTIMA-improved stoves were 28% lower (n = 20, PM2.5, 136 μg/m(3) 95% CI 54-217) and 45% lower (n = 25, CO, 3.2 ppm, 95% CI 1.5-4.9) in the kitchen environment compared with the control stoves (n = 34, PM2.5, 189 μg/m(3), 95% CI 116-261; n = 44, CO, 5.8 ppm, 95% CI 3.3-8.2). Likewise, although not statistically significant, personal exposures for OPTIMA-improved stoves were 43% and 17% lower for PM2.5 (n = 23) and CO (n = 25), respectively. Stove maintenance and functionality level are factors worthy of consideration for future evaluations of stove interventions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. In-home performance of pellet stoves in Medford and Klamath Falls, Oregon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, S.G.; Houck, J.E.; Roholt, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    Pollutant emissions, thermal efficiencies, and heat outputs of pellet stoves operating in homes located in Klamath Falls and Medford, Oregon were documented. Six stoves representing two commercially available, certified models were studied during the 1989-1990 heating season. Three models exempt from certification (a total of six stoves) were studied during the 1990-1991 heating season. An automated emission sampler (AES) system was used to conduct long-term, in-home monitoring of the stoves. The results of the studies have permitted an evaluation of the environmental and energy performance characteristics of the stoves. For the certified stoves, the average overall particulate emissions were 1.05 grams per hour (g/hr), which is about 75% lower than the best-performing cordwood stoves. The in-home particulate emission values were close to their laboratory certification values. Preliminary results for the exempt stoves produced an average particulate emission value of 2.02 g/hr. Also, for the certified stoves, altitude appeared to have little or no effect on particulate emissions and there appeared to be no differences in particulate emission rates between the two models studied. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and carbon monoxide emissions were low. The carbon monoxide emission rates averaged 14 g/hr, the average net thermal efficiency of the stoves was 68%, and the average heat output was 8,747 Btu per hour. Similar data are currently being evaluated for the exempt stoves. Emission and energy performance data obtained for the pellet stoves assessed in this study demonstrated that pellet stoves offer a viable residential biomass-fueled heating option

  10. The house, the tile stove and the climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atzbach, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The tile stove was invented in the North Alpine area between the 8th and 10th century. Apart from convection air heating and clay cupola ovens, this system provided the only possibility for a smoke-free heated living room. The innovation of the tile stove heating system itself did not reach...... the Southern Scandinavian region until the 12th century. In the Upper German speaking area, this heating system had been connected to a characteristic ground plan since the 14th century. This so-called ninefold ground plan consisted of the "stube" and the adjacent kitchen, a central corridor and unheated...... chambers in three bays and two or three aisles. It probably originated from the "appartement" in a noble context, but "trickled down" to urban and rural housing. In contrast to the quick spread of the heating system, this ground plan was only gradually adopted in the Lower Mountain Range, Northern Germany...

  11. EMISSIONS CHARACTERISTICS OF A RESIDENTIAL PELLET BOILER AND A STOVE

    OpenAIRE

    Win, Kaung Myat; Persson, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    Gaseous and particulate emissions from a residential pellet boiler and a stove are measured at a realistic 6-day operation sequence and during steady state operation. The aim is to characterize the emissions during each phase in order to identify when the major part of the emissions occur to enable actions for emission reduction where the savings can be highest. The characterized emissions comprised carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NO), total organic carbon (TOC) and particulate matter (...

  12. Impact of fuel quality and burner capacity on the performance of wood pellet stove

    OpenAIRE

    Petrović-Bećirović Sanja B.; Manić Nebojša G.; Stojiljković Dragoslava D.

    2015-01-01

    Pellet stoves may play an important role in Serbia in the future when fossil fuel fired conventional heating appliances are replaced by more efficient and environmentally friendly devices. Experimental investigation was conducted in order to examine the influence of wood pellet quality, as well as burner capacity (6, 8 and 10 kW), used in the same stove configuration, on the performance of pellet stove with declared nameplate capacity of 8 kW. The results o...

  13. Linking biomass fuel consumption and improve cooking stove: A study from Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohel, Md. Shawkat Islam; Rana, Md. Parvez; Akhter, Sayma

    2010-09-15

    The study determines the biomass fuel consumption pattern and environmental consequences of biomass fuel usage in the traditional and improve cooking stove. The introduction of improved cooking stove minimizes people's forest dependence by reducing the amount of fuelwood required to meet their household needs. Firewood was the most frequently used biomass fuel. It has been figured out that the incomplete combustion of biomass in the traditional cooking stove poses severe epidemiological consequences to human health and contributes to global warming. While improve cooking stove help to reduce such consequences.

  14. Inhalation exposure and risk of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) among the rural population adopting wood gasifier stoves compared to different fuel-stove users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nan; Chen, Yuanchen; Du, Wei; Shen, Guofeng; Zhu, Xi; Huang, Tianbo; Wang, Xilong; Cheng, Hefa; Liu, Junfeng; Xue, Chunyu; Liu, Guangqing; Zeng, Eddy Y.; Xing, Baoshan; Tao, Shu

    2016-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatica hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of compounds with carcinogenic potentials and residential solid fuel combustion is one major source of PAHs in most developing countries. Replacement of traditional stoves with improved ones is believed to be a practical approach to reduce pollutant emissions, however, field assessments on the performance and consequent impacts on air quality and human health after adopting improved stoves are rare. The study is the first time to quantify inhalation exposure to PAHs among the residents who adopted wood gasifier stoves. The results were compared to those still burning coals in the region and compared to exposure levels for different fuel/stove users in literature. The results showed that the PAHs exposure levels for the wood gasifier stove users were significantly lower than the values for those using traditional wood stoves reported in literature, and the daily exposure concentrations of BaPeq (Benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentration) can be reduced by 48%-91% if traditional wood stoves were replaced by wood gasifier stoves. The corresponding Incremental Lifetime Cancer Risk (ILCR) decreased approximately four times from 1.94 × 10-4 to 5.17 × 10-5. The average concentration of the total 26 PAHs for the wood users was 1091 ± 722 ng/m3, which was comparable to 1060 ± 927 ng/m3 for those using anthracite coals, but the composition profiles were considerably different. The average BaPeq were 116 and 25.8 ng/m3 for the wood and coal users, respectively, and the corresponding ILCR of the anthracite coal users was 1.69 × 10-5, which was nearly one third of those using the wood gasifier stoves. The wood users exposed to not only high levels of high molecular weight PAHs, but relatively high fractions of particulate phase PAHs in small particles compared to the coal users, resulting in high exposure risks.

  15. Impact of fuel quality and burner capacity on the performance of wood pellet stove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović-Bećirović Sanja B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pellet stoves may play an important role in Serbia in the future when fossil fuel fired conventional heating appliances are replaced by more efficient and environmentally friendly devices. Experimental investigation was conducted in order to examine the influence of wood pellet quality, as well as burner capacity (6, 8 and 10 kW, used in the same stove configuration, on the performance of pellet stove with declared nameplate capacity of 8 kW. The results obtained showed that in case of nominal load and combustion of pellets recommended by the stove manufacturer, stove efficiency of 80.03% was achieved. The use of lower quality pellet caused additional 1.13 kW reduction in heat output in case of nominal load and 0.63 kW in case of reduced load. This was attributed to less favourable properties and lower bulk and particle density of lower quality pellet. The use of different burner capacity has shown to have little effect on heat output and efficiency of the stove when pre-set values in the control system of the stove were not altered. It is concluded that replacement of the burner only is not sufficient to increase/decrease the declared capacity of the same stove configuration, meaning that additional measures are necessary. These measures include a new set up of the stove control system, which needs to be properly adjusted for each alteration in stove configuration. Without the adjustment mentioned, declared capacity of the stove cannot be altered, while its CO emission shall be considerably increased.

  16. Competing for development : a case study of fuel-efficient stoves for Darfur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelnour, S.; Branzei, O.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discussed the Darfur Stoves Project. The project was designed to provide local support to non-government organizations (NGOs) to set up production facilities capable of producing 100 stoves per day. The Berkeley-Darfur stove design was based on a survey conducted in Darfur of cooking methods, tools, household fuels, and food requirements. The stove was designed to perform well in windy conditions. A pilot production facility was conducted to ensure that the stoves were easily built and assembled using simple hand tools. The stoves save the average family $250 per year in fuel wood and labour costs. The project is now examining methods of setting up multiple full-scale assembly shops to ensure that 300,000 stoves are built and distributed to households and displaced communities in the Darfur region. The need to save fuel wood has grown since the onset of armed conflict in the region. The combined concerns of deforestation, starvation, and violence against women as they searched for fuel wood has become a central concern in the region. The stove design is one of several designs currently being adopted by development agencies in the region. 32 refs., 11 figs

  17. Competing for development : a case study of fuel-efficient stoves for Darfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelnour, S.; Branzei, O. [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Richard Ivey School of Business

    2008-07-01

    This paper discussed the Darfur Stoves Project. The project was designed to provide local support to non-government organizations (NGOs) to set up production facilities capable of producing 100 stoves per day. The Berkeley-Darfur stove design was based on a survey conducted in Darfur of cooking methods, tools, household fuels, and food requirements. The stove was designed to perform well in windy conditions. A pilot production facility was conducted to ensure that the stoves were easily built and assembled using simple hand tools. The stoves save the average family $250 per year in fuel wood and labour costs. The project is now examining methods of setting up multiple full-scale assembly shops to ensure that 300,000 stoves are built and distributed to households and displaced communities in the Darfur region. The need to save fuel wood has grown since the onset of armed conflict in the region. The combined concerns of deforestation, starvation, and violence against women as they searched for fuel wood has become a central concern in the region. The stove design is one of several designs currently being adopted by development agencies in the region. 32 refs., 11 figs.

  18. Biomass conservation potential of pottery/ceramic lined Mamta Stove: An improved stove promoted under National Programme on Improved Cookstoves in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, R.; Yadla, V.L. [M.S. Univ. of Baroda, Vadodara (India). Home Management Dept.

    1995-10-01

    To combat biomass scarcity and ensure a cleaner cooking environment with less drudgery, among other things, a variety of improved stoves are promoted under National Programme on Improved Cookstoves (NPIC). Mamta Stove (MS) is one among such improved stoves. An indepth study was undertaken covering a sample of twenty-five rural families with the primary objective of assessing fuel saving potential of MS under field conditions through Kitchen Performance Test (KPT). Conventional stove (CS) used in almost all the families was shielded horse-shoe shaped stove with a negligible proportion using three stone open fire. Nearly 88% depended only on zero private cost fuels. The mean number of persons for whom the stoves were used on the days of field measurements in case of CS and MS were 5.6 and 5.7 respectively with an SD of 1.16 and standard adult equivalent (SAE) was approximately 4. Cooking pots included a concave roasting pan, a deep frying pan and flat bottomed pots. The mean daily fuel consumption on CS and MS were estimated to be 4.88 kg and 3.75 kg respective, thereby, resulting in fuel saving to the tune of 24% on MS. The paper discusses at length the design features of CS and MS, meal pattern, cooking habits, need for user training, consumerism in the area of cooking and stove technology, economics of switching over to MS and policy implications of commercialization of hitherto subsidized stove program. Further, salient characteristics of high and low cooking fuel consumers on MS are presented to bring to limelight their profile.

  19. On the possibilities of reduction in emission caused by home tile stoves in Cracow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szewczyk, W. [Academy of Mining and Metallurgy, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The coal-fired tile stoves are still very popular in Poland. The estimated total number of such home stoves operated in Cracow reaches ca. 100 000. Operation of these stoves during the heating season belongs to the most significant sources of air pollution. Type and scale of emission of the most important pollutants, caused by coal combustion in home stoves in Cracow has been determined basing upon the investigations carried out at the laboratory of the Department of Power Engineering Machines and Devices, Academy of Mining and Metallurgy, Cracow, Poland within the American-Polish Program of Elimination of Low Emission Sources in Cracow. Further experiments included in this Program allowed to estimate the attainable efficiency of home tile stoves and possible reduction in pollutant emission resulting from their operation. A short discussion of these data and capacities is presented in this lecture.

  20. Impact of operating wood-burning stoves on indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Alireza; Jensen, Ole Michael; Bergsøe, Niels Christian

    2011-01-01

    A field study on the impact of operating and reloading wood-burning stoves on the indoor air quality was carried out during two consecutive winters. In contrast to the majority of recent studies, which focussed on the ambient air quality and the penetration of particles to the indoor air......, this study aims to understand to what extent the operation of a stove contributes to the generation of concentration of ultrafine particles in the indoor air. Therefore, different stoves were ignited in one session by the owner of the stove and in a subsequent session by an expert on wood-burning stoves....... The study was conducted in seven typical Danish detached houses without other indoor activities taking place. In each house the average air change rate during one week was measured (using passive tracer gas technique) and the indoor and outdoor temperature and relative humidity were recorded continuously...

  1. Improved cook stove adoption and impact assessment: A proposed methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troncoso, Karin; Armendáriz, Cynthia; Alatorre, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Until now, the success of improved cook stoves (ICS) implementation programs has usually been measured by the number of ICS distributed. Some important research has been conducted to try to determine the effects of the use of an ICS in the user′s health, but these studies are expensive and time consuming. Moreover, no evaluations show the impact of the technology in the user′s lives. This study seeks to contribute to fill this gap. Scope: By applying cluster analysis techniques to survey data, the most relevant variables that explain adoption and impact were identified. Using these variables, two qualitative indexes are proposed: The adoption index considers the use of the new technology, the level of satisfaction, and the conditions of the stove. The impact index considers the changes in cooking practices and life quality brought about by the ICS. Both indexes are then applied to two implementation programs. The indexes show the differences between the program results and the user′s perceptions of each technology. Conclusions: The proposed indexes can be used to measure the success of an ICS implementation program in terms of the benefits perceived by the users of these technologies. -- Highlights: •Two qualitative indexes are proposed to measure the benefits perceived by ICS users. •Two implementation programs were assessed. •The approach enables determining the impact of ICS programs at a fraction of the cost. •It enables comparing the results of different implementation programs

  2. Stoves or sugar? Willingness to adopt improved cookstoves in Malawi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagger, Pamela; Jumbe, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Malawi has set a target of adoption of two million improved cookstoves (ICS) by 2020. Meeting this objective requires knowledge about determinants of adoption, particularly in rural areas where the cost of traditional cooking technologies and fuels are non-monetary, and where people have limited capacity to purchase an ICS. We conducted a discrete choice experiment with 383 households in rural Malawi asking them if they would chose a locally made ICS or a package of sugar and salt of roughly equal value. Six months later, we assessed adoption and stove use patterns. Sixty-six percent of households chose the ICS. We find that having a larger share of crop residues in household fuel supply, awareness of the environmental impacts of woodfuel reliance, time the primary cook devotes to collecting fuelwood, and peer effects at the village-level increase the odds of choosing the ICS. Having a large labor supply for fuelwood collection and experience with a non-traditional cooking technology decreased the odds of choosing the ICS. In a rapid assessment six months after stoves were distributed, we found 80% of households were still using the ICS, but not exclusively. Our findings suggest considerable potential for wide-scale adoption of low cost ICS in Malawi. - Highlights: •There is demand for locally produced improved cookstoves in rural Malawi. •Environmental awareness, labor availability, and peer effects influence adoption. •Sustained and exclusive use of improved cookstoves requires training and follow-up.

  3. Performance Evaluation of Waste Heat Recovery in a Charcoal Stove using a Thermo-Electric Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnamdi Judges Ajah

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Charcoal stoves have widespread use among the poorer households and outdoor food vendors in Nigeria. In order to improve the efficiency of charcoal stoves, various researches have tried integrating a thermoelectric module in the charcoal stove. The researches, however did not exploit the performance of the thermoelectric modules at different ambient temperatures. To evaluate the performance of thermoelectric integrated charcoal stoves in the sub-Saharan Africa, a self-powered, forced air induced thermoelectric charcoal stove experiment was carried out at five different ambient temperatures of 36ºC, 33ºC, 32ºC, 30ºC and 29ºC and an average fuel hotbed temperature of 1023.75ºC. The thermoelectric charcoal stove generated a maximum voltage of 5.25V at an ambient temperature of 29ºC. The least maximum voltage was generated at the highest ambient temperature of 36ºC. It was observed that the maximum voltage increased with decreasing ambient temperature, this could be attributed to the ambient air being used to cool the thermoelectric generator. Therefore, it could be said that the performance of a forced draft thermoelectric charcoal stove increases with decrease in ambient temperature.

  4. Quantitative Guidance for Stove Usage and Performance to Achieve Health and Environmental Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael A; Chiang, Ranyee A

    2015-08-01

    Displacing the use of polluting and inefficient cookstoves in developing countries is necessary to achieve the potential health and environmental benefits sought through clean cooking solutions. Yet little quantitative context has been provided on how much displacement of traditional technologies is needed to achieve targets for household air pollutant concentrations or fuel savings. This paper provides instructive guidance on the usage of cooking technologies required to achieve health and environmental improvements. We evaluated different scenarios of displacement of traditional stoves with use of higher performing technologies. The air quality and fuel consumption impacts were estimated for these scenarios using a single-zone box model of indoor air quality and ratios of thermal efficiency. Stove performance and usage should be considered together, as lower performing stoves can result in similar or greater benefits than a higher performing stove if the lower performing stove has considerably higher displacement of the baseline stove. Based on the indoor air quality model, there are multiple performance-usage scenarios for achieving modest indoor air quality improvements. To meet World Health Organization guidance levels, however, three-stone fire and basic charcoal stove usage must be nearly eliminated to achieve the particulate matter target (< 1-3 hr/week), and substantially limited to meet the carbon monoxide guideline (< 7-9 hr/week). Moderate health gains may be achieved with various performance-usage scenarios. The greatest benefits are estimated to be achieved by near-complete displacement of traditional stoves with clean technologies, emphasizing the need to shift in the long term to near exclusive use of clean fuels and stoves. The performance-usage scenarios are also provided as a tool to guide technology selection and prioritize behavior change opportunities to maximize impact.

  5. Wood Stove Pollution in the Developed World: A Case to Raise Awareness Among Pediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokoff, Lisa B; Koutrakis, Petros; Garshick, Eric; Karagas, Margaret R; Oken, Emily; Gold, Diane R; Fleisch, Abby F

    2017-06-01

    Use of wood for residential heating is regaining popularity in developed countries. Currently, over 11 million US homes are heated with a wood stove. Although wood stoves reduce heating costs, wood smoke may adversely impact child health through the emission of gaseous and particulate air pollutants. Our purpose is to raise awareness of this environmental health issue among pediatricians. To summarize the state of the science, we performed a narrative review of articles published in PubMed and Web of Science. We identified 36 studies in developed countries that reported associations of household wood stove use and/or community wood smoke exposure with pediatric health outcomes. Studies primarily investigated respiratory outcomes, with no evaluation of cardiometabolic or neurocognitive health. Studies found community wood smoke exposure to be consistently associated with adverse pediatric respiratory health. Household wood stove use was less consistently associated with respiratory outcomes. However, studies of household wood stoves always relied on participant self-report of wood stove use, while studies of community wood smoke generally assessed air pollution exposure directly and more precisely in larger study populations. In most studies, important potential confounders, such as markers of socioeconomic status, were unaccounted for and may have biased results. We conclude that studies with improved exposure assessment, that measure and account for confounding, and that consider non-respiratory outcomes are needed. While awaiting additional data, pediatricians can refer patients to precautionary measures recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to mitigate exposure. These include replacing old appliances with EPA-certified stoves, properly maintaining the stove, and using only dry, well-seasoned wood. In addition, several studies have shown mechanical air filters to effectively reduce wood stove pollution exposure in affected homes and

  6. [Design of coal stove, construction, assembly and test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitrus, K.D.; Dauda, S.

    2004-01-01

    Some years back, after the discovery of Petroleum, Kerosene as one of the fraction of the distillation of Petroleum came into use as cooking fuel and a reduction in pressure was seen on wood and vegetation. Along this line, by the improvement of sciences and technology gas cooker and electric cooker were developed; but epileptic supply of electricity, gas and government policy on deforestation showed that continuous dependence on wood, electricity, gas and kerosene as the only sources of cooking fuel is not going to solve Nigeria domestic cooking problem. To solve this, coal as a source of heat energy could be used as a cooking fuel. However, this paper reports the design of coal stove, construction, assembly and test. The test result showed that using coal (anthracite) as the fuel on a pot of 200g containing 800g of water at room temperature could boil the water in 20 minutes

  7. Particle Morphology From Wood-Burning Cook Stoves Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, O.; Carabali, G.; Castro, T.; Torres, R.; Ruiz, L. G.; Molina, L. T.; Saavedra, I.

    2013-12-01

    Emissions from three wood-burning cook stoves were sampled to collect particles. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) copper grids were placed on the last two stages of an 8-stage MOUDI cascade impactor (d50= 0.32, and 0.18 μm). Samples were obtained on two heating stages of cooking, the first is a quick heating process to boil 1 liter of water, and the second is to keep the water at 90 C. Absorption coefficient, scattering coefficients, and particles concentration (0.01 - 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter) were measured simultaneously using an absorption photometer (operated at 550 nm), a portable integrating nephelometer (at 530 nm), and a condensation particle counter connected to a chamber to dilute the wood stoves emissions. Transmission electron micrographic images of soot particles were acquired at different magnifications using a High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) JEOL HRTEM 4000EX operating at 200 kV, equipped with a GATAN digital micrograph system for image acquisition. The morphology of soot particles was analyzed calculating the border-based fractal dimension (Df). Particles sampled on the first heating stage exhibit complex shapes with high values of Df, which are present as aggregates formed by carbon ceno-spheres. The presence of high numbers of carbon ceno-spheres can be attributed to pyrolysis, thermal degradation, and others processes prior to combustion. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to determine the elemental composition of particles. EDS analysis in particles with d50= 0.18 μm showed a higher content of carbonaceous material and relevant amounts of Si, S and K.

  8. CO and NO emissions from pellet stoves: an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrocelli, D.; Lezzi, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    This work presents a report on an experimental investigation on pellet stoves aimed to fully understand which parameters influence CO and NO emissions and how it is possible to find and choose the optimal point of working. Tests are performed on three pellet stoves varying heating power, combustion chamber size and burner pot geometry. After a brief review on the factors which influence the production of these pollutants, we present and discuss the results of experimental tests aimed to ascertain how the geometry of the combustion chamber and the distribution of primary and secondary air, can modify the quantity of CO and NO in the flue gas. Experimental tests show that production of CO is strongly affected by the excess air and by its distribution: in particular, it is critical an effective control of air distribution. In these devices a low-level of CO emissions does require a proper setup to operate in the optimal range of excess air that minimizes CO production. In order to simplify the optimization process, we propose the use of instantaneous data of CO and O2 concentration, instead of average values, because they allow a quick identification of the optimal point. It is shown that the optimal range of operation can be enlarged as a consequence of proper burner pot design. Finally, it is shown that NO emissions are not a critical issue, since they are well below threshold enforced by law, are not influenced by the distribution of air in the combustion chamber, and their behavior as a function of air excess is the same for all the geometries investigated here.

  9. CO and NO emissions from pellet stoves: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrocelli, D; Lezzi, A M

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a report on an experimental investigation on pellet stoves aimed to fully understand which parameters influence CO and NO emissions and how it is possible to find and choose the optimal point of working. Tests are performed on three pellet stoves varying heating power, combustion chamber size and burner pot geometry. After a brief review on the factors which influence the production of these pollutants, we present and discuss the results of experimental tests aimed to ascertain how the geometry of the combustion chamber and the distribution of primary and secondary air, can modify the quantity of CO and NO in the flue gas. Experimental tests show that production of CO is strongly affected by the excess air and by its distribution: in particular, it is critical an effective control of air distribution. In these devices a low-level of CO emissions does require a proper setup to operate in the optimal range of excess air that minimizes CO production. In order to simplify the optimization process, we propose the use of instantaneous data of CO and O2 concentration, instead of average values, because they allow a quick identification of the optimal point. It is shown that the optimal range of operation can be enlarged as a consequence of proper burner pot design. Finally, it is shown that NO emissions are not a critical issue, since they are well below threshold enforced by law, are not influenced by the distribution of air in the combustion chamber, and their behavior as a function of air excess is the same for all the geometries investigated here.

  10. SITUATIONAL CONTROL OF HOT BLAST STOVES GROUP BASED ON DECISION TREE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Kobysh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper was developed the control system of group of hot blast stoves, which operates on the basis of the packing heating control subsystem and subsystem of forecasting of modes duration in the hot blast stoves APCS of iron smelting in a blast furnace. With the use of multi-criteria optimization methods, implemented the adjustment of control system conduct, which takes into account the current production situation that has arisen in the course of the heating packing of each hot blast stove group. Developed a situation recognition algorithm and the choice of scenarios of control based on a decision tree.

  11. Policy trade-offs between climate mitigation and clean cook-stove access in South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Colin; Pachauri, Shonali; Rao, Narasimha D.; McCollum, David; Rogelj, Joeri; Riahi, Keywan

    2016-01-01

    Household air pollution from traditional cook stoves presents a greater health hazard than any other environmental factor. Despite government efforts to support clean-burning cooking fuels, over 700 million people in South Asia could still rely on traditional stoves in 2030. This number could rise if climate change mitigation efforts increase energy costs. Here we quantify the costs of support policies to make clean cooking affordable to all South Asians under four increasingly stringent climate policy scenarios. Our most stringent mitigation scenario increases clean fuel costs 38% in 2030 relative to the baseline, keeping 21% more South Asians on traditional stoves or increasing the minimum support policy cost to achieve universal clean cooking by up to 44%. The extent of this increase depends on how policymakers allocate subsidies between clean fuels and stoves. These additional costs are within the range of financial transfers to South Asia estimated in efforts-sharing scenarios of international climate agreements.

  12. Validation of numerical model for cook stove using Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes based solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Moinul; Hasan, Md. Abdullah Al; Rahman, Md. Mominur; Rahaman, Md. Mashiur

    2017-12-01

    Biomass fired cook stoves, for many years, have been the main cooking appliance for the rural people of developing countries. Several researches have been carried out to the find efficient stoves. In the present study, numerical model of an improved household cook stove is developed to analyze the heat transfer and flow behavior of gas during operation. The numerical model is validated with the experimental results. Computation of the numerical model is executed the using non-premixed combustion model. Reynold's averaged Navier-Stokes (RaNS) equation along with the κ - ɛ model governed the turbulent flow associated within the computed domain. The computational results are in well agreement with the experiment. Developed numerical model can be used to predict the effect of different biomasses on the efficiency of the cook stove.

  13. Integration of Thermoelectric Generators and Wood Stove to Produce Heat, Hot Water, and Electrical Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goudarzi, A.M.; Mazandarani, P.; Panahi, R.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional fire stoves are characterized by low efficiency. In this experimental study, the combustion chamber of the stove is developed by two devices. An electric fan can increase the air to fuel ratio in order to increase the system’s efficiency and to decrease the air pollution by providing....... The presented prototype is designed to fulfill the basic needs of domestic electricity, hot water and the essential heat for warming the room and cooking....

  14. Policy trade-offs between climate mitigation and clean cook-stove access in South Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, C.; Pachauri, S.; Rao, N.; McCollum, D.; Rogelj, J.; Riahi, K.

    2016-01-01

    Household air pollution from traditional cook stoves presents a greater health hazard than any other environmental factor. Despite government efforts to support clean-burning cooking fuels, over 700 million people in South Asia could still rely on traditional stoves in 2030. This number could rise if climate change mitigation efforts increase energy costs. Here we quantify the costs of support policies to make clean cooking affordable to all South Asians under four increasingly stringent c...

  15. Optimization of Operating Conditions of a Household Up-draft Biomass Gasification Stove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanghui Deng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out with a household up-draft biomass gasification stove to investigate effects of the air distribution method on the performance of the stove. The temperature distribution along the gasifier, the producer gas composition, the stove power, and the thermal efficiency were investigated. Results showed that in the temperature distribution along the gasifier height, the highest temperature was at the bottom oxidation layer of the gasifier, in the range of 950 to 1050 °C. With increasing air quantity through the burner, the time required to boil the water first decreased and then increased, whereas the stove power and thermal efficiency increased and then decreased. The best stove performance was obtained at an optimum air distribution ratio of 0.333 between burner and gasifier air (0.794×10-3 m3/s·kg. When the burner air increased, the flame length above the burner was remarkably reduced and the flame color gradually changed from yellow-red to blue. At the optimum air distribution ratio of 0.333, the flame was blue and stable. The present study provides references for developing a more efficient biomass gasification stove.

  16. Biogas cook stoves for healthy and sustainable diets? A case study in Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Lee Anderman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alternative cook stoves that replace solid fuels with cleaner energy sources, such as biogas, are gaining popularity in low-income settings across Asia, Africa and South America. Published research on these technologies focuses on their potential to reduce indoor air pollution and improve respiratory health. Effects on other cooking related aspects, such as diets and women’s time management, are less understood. In this study in southern India, we investigate if using biogas cook stoves alters household diets and women’s time management. We compare treatment households who are supplied with a biogas cook stove with comparison households who do not have access to these stoves, while controlling for several socio-economic factors. We find that diets of treatment households are more diverse than diets of comparison households. In addition, women from treatment households spend on average 40 minutes less cooking and 70 minutes less collecting firewood per day than women in comparison households. This study illustrates that alongside known benefits for respiratory health, using alternative cook stoves may benefit household diets and free up women’s time. To inform development investments and ensure these co-benefits, we argue that multiple dimensions of sustainability should be considered in evaluating the impact of alternative cook stoves.

  17. Biogas Stoves Reduce Firewood Use, Household Air Pollution, and Hospital Visits in Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jessica J; Hollingsworth, John W; Chartier, Ryan T; Cooper, Ellen M; Foster, William Michael; Gomes, Genna L; Kussin, Peter S; MacInnis, John J; Padhi, Bijaya K; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Rodes, Charles E; Ryde, Ian T; Singha, Ashok K; Stapleton, Heather M; Thornburg, Jonathan; Young, Cora J; Meyer, Joel N; Pattanayak, Subhrendu K

    2017-01-03

    Traditional cooking using biomass is associated with ill health, local environmental degradation, and regional climate change. Clean stoves (liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), biogas, and electric) are heralded as a solution, but few studies have demonstrated their environmental health benefits in field settings. We analyzed the impact of mainly biogas (as well as electric and LPG) stove use on social, environmental, and health outcomes in two districts in Odisha, India, where the Indian government has promoted household biogas. We established a cross-sectional observational cohort of 105 households that use either traditional mud stoves or improved cookstoves (ICS). Our multidisciplinary team conducted surveys, environmental air sampling, fuel weighing, and health measurements. We examined associations between traditional or improved stove use and primary outcomes, stratifying households by proximity to major industrial plants. ICS use was associated with 91% reduced use of firewood (p biogas stoves in a context in which traditional stove use persists, although pollution levels in ICS households still remained above WHO guidelines.

  18. Stove checking behaviour in people with OCD vs. anxious controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucarelli, Bianca; Purdon, Christine

    2016-12-01

    A growing body of research suggests that the repetition of an action degrades memory for that action, as well as confidence that is has been done correctly. This has important implications for understanding the compulsive repetition of actions characteristic of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). At this time, though, much of the research has been conducted on analogue or nonclinical OCD samples in comparison to healthy controls and often using virtual, as opposed to actual, threat stimuli. Furthermore, although it has been argued that people with OCD are overly attentive to threat stimuli, the research on actual attention to threat is scant. People with a principal diagnosis of OCD (n = 30) and people with a clinically significant diagnosis of an anxiety disorder, but no OCD (n = 18) completed measures of memory confidence and responsibility and then underwent a stove-checking task in a functioning kitchen while wearing a portable eye tracking device. Pre- and post-task ratings of harm and responsibility were taken, along with post-task ratings of memory and certainty. People with OCD did not exhibit poorer memory confidence than the anxious control (AC) group, but did report greater trait and state responsibility for harm. The OCD group checked longer than did the AC group and check duration predicted post-task ratings of harm, but to the same extent in both groups. People with OCD attended to threat items less than did the AC group. Greater visual attention to the stove during the checking period was associated with greater post-task ratings of responsibility and harm and with less certainty in and memory for the check - but only for the AC group. The sample size was modest, women were over-represented and problems with the eye tracking device reduced the amount of reliable data available for analysis. Compulsions are complex actions that are mediated by many trait, state and contextual factors. People with OCD may be able to circumvent self

  19. Experimentation on bio-kerosene stove using organic additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshini, M.; Shetty, Divakar

    2017-07-01

    One of the basic worthy item used in most of the villages even now a day's also is the kerosene stove. But in the current scenario, the petroleum products are been replenished. So an alternate fuel should be found in order delve. This work is to check the contingency of blending pongamia oil and kerosene in which is used as an additive. Pongamia is one of the forest based fast growing evergreen tree which is capable of yielding 9 - 90 kg seeds from which 25% of oil can be extracted. Distilled cow urine is to be used so that the fuel can be stored for longer time and is odorless. Blends of 10% to 70% neat pongamia oil - kerosene(KEP) and pongamia oil - kerosene with additive(KEPWA) are prepared. The properties such as flash point, fire point and viscosity are determined. The blends are been compared by doing emission test. The blends with additive showed better properties and reducing in emission characteristics compared to neat blends. It is also observed that emission of CO is decreasing with increasing blends.

  20. Gasification Performance of a Top-Lit Updraft Cook Stove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Mehta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an experimental study of a top-lit updraft cook stove with a focus on gasification. The reactor is operated with primary air only. The performance is studied for a variation in the primary airflow, as well as reactor geometry. Temperature in the reactor, air flow rate, fuel consumption rate, and producer gas composition were measured. From the measurements the superficial velocity, pyrolysis front velocity, peak bed temperature, air fuel ratio, heating value of the producer gas, and gasification rate were calculated. The results show that the producer gas energy content was maximized at a superficial velocity of 9 cm/s. The percent char remaining at the end of gasification decreased with increasing combustion chamber diameter. For a fixed superficial velocity, the gasification rate and producer gas energy content were found to scale linearly with diameter. The energy content of the producer gas was maximized at an air fuel (AF ratio of 1.8 regardless of the diameter.

  1. Fuelwood savings and carbon emission reductions by the use of improved cooking stoves in an Afromontane forest, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Dresen, E.; DeVries, B.R.; Herold, M.; Verchot, L.; Müller, R.

    2014-01-01

    In many Sub-Saharan African countries, fuelwood collection is among the most important drivers of deforestation and particularly forest degradation. In a detailed field study in the Kafa region of southern Ethiopia, we assessed the potential of efficient cooking stoves to mitigate the negative impacts of fuelwood harvesting on forests. Eleven thousand improved cooking stoves (ICS), specifically designed for baking Ethiopia’s staple food injera , referred to locally as “ Mirt ” stoves, have be...

  2. Experimental and numerical investigations of heat transfer and thermal efficiency of an infrared gas stove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenlerdchanya, A.; Rattanadecho, P.; Keangin, P.

    2018-01-01

    An infrared gas stove is a low-pressure gas stove type and it has higher thermal efficiency than the other domestic cooking stoves. This study considers the computationally determine water and air temperature distributions, water and air velocity distributions and thermal efficiency of the infrared gas stove. The goal of this work is to investigate the effect of various pot diameters i.e. 220 mm, 240 mm and 260 mm on the water and air temperature distributions, water and air velocity distributions and thermal efficiency of the infrared gas stove. The time-dependent heat transfer equation involving diffusion and convection coupled with the time-dependent fluid dynamic equation is implemented and is solved by using the finite element method (FEM). The computer simulation study is validated with an experimental study, which is use standard experiment by LPG test for low-pressure gas stove in households (TIS No. 2312-2549). The findings revealed that the water and air temperature distributions increase with greater heating time, which varies with the three different pot diameters (220 mm, 240 mm and 260 mm). Similarly, the greater heating time, the water and air velocity distributions increase that vary by pot diameters (220, 240 and 260 mm). The maximum water temperature in the case of pot diameter of 220 mm is higher than the maximum water velocity in the case of pot diameters of 240 mm and 260 mm, respectively. However, the maximum air temperature in the case of pot diameter of 260 mm is higher than the maximum water velocity in the case of pot diameters of 240 mm and 220 mm, respectively. The obtained results may provide a basis for improving the energy efficiency of infrared gas stoves and other equipment, including helping to reduce energy consumption.

  3. Electrical performance analysis and economic evaluation of combined biomass cook stove thermoelectric (BITE) generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertsatitthanakorn, C

    2007-05-01

    The use of biomass cook stoves is widespread in the domestic sector of developing countries, but the stoves are not efficient. To advance the versatility of the cook stove, we investigated the feasibility of adding a commercial thermoelectric (TE) module made of bismuth-telluride based materials to the stove's side wall, thereby creating a thermoelectric generator system that utilizes a proportion of the stove's waste heat. The system, a biomass cook stove thermoelectric generator (BITE), consists of a commercial TE module (Taihuaxing model TEP1-1264-3.4), a metal sheet wall which acts as one side of the stove's structure and serves as the hot side of the TE module, and a rectangular fin heat sink at the cold side of the TE module. An experimental set-up was built to evaluate the conversion efficiency at various temperature ranges. The experimental set-up revealed that the electrical power output and the conversion efficiency depended on the temperature difference between the cold and hot sides of the TE module. At a temperature difference of approximately 150 degrees C, the unit achieved a power output of 2.4W. The conversion efficiency of 3.2% was enough to drive a low power incandescent light bulb or a small portable radio. A theoretical model approximated the power output at low temperature ranges. An economic analysis indicated that the payback period tends to be very short when compared with the cost of the same power supplied by batteries. Therefore, the generator design formulated here could be used in the domestic sector. The system is not intended to compete with primary power sources but serves adequately as an emergency or backup source of power.

  4. Policy implications for improved cook stove programs—A case study of the importance of village fuel use variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlne, Niklas; Ahlgren, Erik O.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the long history of cook stove programs, very few have been successful, often only in areas where biomass is purchased or there is a biomass shortage. Several studies have described how rural households generally rely on several different fuels; which fuels are used may depend on various household characteristics such as location and income. This article explores possible consequences of variations in fuel usage for improved cook stove programs and how this may vary between different areas. Reductions of CO 2 equivalent emissions and monetary savings are calculated for hypothetical cook stove deployment using data from a rural energy survey in the Vĩnh Phúc province of northern Vietnam. The results indicate that the areas may respond differently to the various stove options, both in terms of economy and emission reductions. Furthermore, there are large differences in emission reduction calculations when only Kyoto-gases are included and when non-Kyoto greenhouse agents are added. Assumptions regarding household behavior and stove efficiencies have large impacts on the results, indicating a need for further research on how improved cook stoves may influence households’ fuel choices. - Highlights: • Household data from six different villages were used to calculate potential benefits from an improved stove program. • The possible monetary savings and reductions in CO 2 equivalent emissions were calculated. • The results show benefits as non-linear functions of stove improvements. • The results show large variations among villages in the functions mapping stove improvements to benefits

  5. Black carbon cookstove emissions: A field assessment of 19 stove/fuel combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Charity; Delapena, Samantha; Prasad, Rajendra; L'Orange, Christian; Alexander, Donee; Johnson, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from household cookstoves consuming solid fuel produce approximately 25 percent of total anthropogenic BC emissions. The short atmospheric lifetime of BC means that reducing BC emissions would result in a faster climate response than mitigating CO2 and other long-lived greenhouse gases. This study presents the results of optical BC measurements of two new cookstove emissions field assessments and 17 archived cookstove datasets. BC was determined from attenuation of 880 nm light, which is strongly absorbed by BC, and linearly related between 1 and 125 attenuation units. A relationship was experimentally determined correlating BC mass deposition on quartz filters determined via thermal optical analysis (TOA) and on PTFE and quartz filters using transmissometry, yielding an attenuation cross-section (σATN) for both filter media types. σATN relates TOA measurements to optical measurements on PTFE and quartz (σATN(PTFE) = 13.7 cm-2 μg, R2 = 0.87, σATN(Quartz) = 15.6 cm-2 μg, R2 = 0.87). These filter-specific σATN, optical measurements of archived filters were used to determine BC emission factors and the fraction of particulate matter (PM) in the form of black carbon (BC/PM). The 19 stoves measured fell into five stove classes; simple wood, rocket, advanced biomass, simple charcoal, and advanced charcoal. Advanced biomass stoves include forced- and natural-draft gasifiers which use wood or biomass pellets as fuel. Of these classes, the simple wood and rocket stoves demonstrated the highest median BC emission factors, ranging from 0.051 to 0.14 g MJ-1. The lowest BC emission factors were seen in charcoal stoves, which corresponds to the generally low PM emission factors observed during charcoal combustion, ranging from 0.0084 to 0.014 g MJ-1. The advanced biomass stoves generally showed an improvement in BC emissions factors compared to simple wood and rocket stoves, ranging from 0.0031 to 0.071 g MJ-1. BC/PM ratios were highest for the

  6. 'Oorja' in India: Assessing a large-scale commercial distribution of advanced biomass stoves to households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Mark C; Phadke, Himani; Nagavarapu, Sriniketh; Shrimali, Gireesh; Zerriffi, Hisham

    2014-04-01

    Replacing traditional stoves with advanced alternatives that burn more cleanly has the potential to ameliorate major health problems associated with indoor air pollution in developing countries. With a few exceptions, large government and charitable programs to distribute advanced stoves have not had the desired impact. Commercially-based distributions that seek cost recovery and even profits might plausibly do better, both because they encourage distributors to supply and promote products that people want and because they are based around properly-incentivized supply chains that could more be scalable, sustainable, and replicable. The sale in India of over 400,000 "Oorja" stoves to households from 2006 onwards represents the largest commercially-based distribution of a gasification-type advanced biomass stove. BP's Emerging Consumer Markets (ECM) division and then successor company First Energy sold this stove and the pelletized biomass fuel on which it operates. We assess the success of this effort and the role its commercial aspect played in outcomes using a survey of 998 households in areas of Maharashtra and Karnataka where the stove was sold as well as detailed interviews with BP and First Energy staff. Statistical models based on this data indicate that Oorja purchase rates were significantly influenced by the intensity of Oorja marketing in a region as well as by pre-existing stove mix among households. The highest rate of adoption came from LPG-using households for which Oorja's pelletized biomass fuel reduced costs. Smoke- and health-related messages from Oorja marketing did not significantly influence the purchase decision, although they did appear to affect household perceptions about smoke. By the time of our survey, only 9% of households that purchased Oorja were still using the stove, the result in large part of difficulties First Energy encountered in developing a viable supply chain around low-cost procurement of "agricultural waste" to make

  7. Thermoelectricity - A Promising Complementarity with Efficient Stoves in Off-grid-areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Favarel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermoelectric modules produce electricity from heat flow. In areas without electricity, biomass is generally burnt in open fires or rudimentary stoves in order to generate heat, to cook and to produce domestic hot water. Combustion quality in these devices is very low and needs a large amount of wood extracted from surrounding forests. “Planète Bois” develops highly efficient clean multifunction stoves based on double chamber combustion.  As an exhaust fan is necessary to adjust the primary and secondary air flows for optimal combustion, these stoves cannot currently be used without electricity. Thermoelectric modules incorporated in a heat exchanger between the flue and the hot water tank can supply the exhaust fan and also produce some electricity for other basic purposes. Our paper presents tests that were done on one of these stoves to size the thermoelectric generator and thus the produced electricity. These preliminary tests are used to identify an outlook for the successful implementation of these stoves.

  8. Methodology for identifying parameters for the TRNSYS model Type 210 - wood pellet stoves and boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Tomas; Fiedler, Frank; Nordlander, Svante

    2006-05-15

    This report describes a method how to perform measurements on boilers and stoves and how to identify parameters from the measurements for the boiler/stove-model TRNSYS Type 210. The model can be used for detailed annual system simulations using TRNSYS. Experience from measurements on three different pellet stoves and four boilers were used to develop this methodology. Recommendations for the set up of measurements are given and the required combustion theory for the data evaluation and data preparation are given. The data evaluation showed that the uncertainties are quite large for the measured flue gas flow rate and for boilers and stoves with high fraction of energy going to the water jacket also the calculated heat rate to the room may have large uncertainties. A methodology for the parameter identification process and identified parameters for two different stoves and three boilers are given. Finally the identified models are compared with measured data showing that the model generally agreed well with measured data during both stationary and dynamic conditions.

  9. Are Korean Households Willing to Pay a Premium for Induction Cooktops over Gas Stoves?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Jin Kim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Korean households generally prefer to use induction cooktops rather than gas stoves because of their greater convenience and safety features. This paper tries to investigate whether Korean households are willing to pay a premium for replacing their gas stoves, which are currently common in Korea, with induction cooktops, from the perspective of convenience and safety. To this end, a contingent valuation technique was applied to assess the additional willingness to pay (WTP a premium for using an induction cooktop rather than a gas stove. A nationwide survey of 1000 households was carried out. The results indicate that the mean additional WTP for using an induction cooktop rather than a gas stove is KRW 207 (USD 0.19 per cubic meter of residential gas. This value can be interpreted as the convenience and safety benefits to the consumer of using an induction cooktop rather than a gas stove, or residential electricity rather than residential gas for cooking. It amounts to approximately 26.7% of the average 2015 price of residential gas, which was KRW 775 (USD 0.70 per cubic meter. If the gap between the price for residential electricity and the price for residential gas is less than the WTP value, households will increase their demand for residential electricity for cooking.

  10. Numerical investigation of the flow inside the combustion chamber of a plant oil stove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritz, B.; Werler, M.; Wirbser, H.; Gabi, M.

    2013-10-01

    Recently a low cost cooking device for developing and emerging countries was developed at KIT in cooperation with the company Bosch und Siemens Hausgeräte GmbH. After constructing an innovative basic design further development was required. Numerical investigations were conducted in order to investigate the flow inside the combustion chamber of the stove under variation of different geometrical parameters. Beyond the performance improvement a further reason of the investigations was to rate the effects of manufacturing tolerance problems. In this paper the numerical investigation of a plant oil stove by means of RANS simulation will be presented. In order to reduce the computational costs different model reduction steps were necessary. The simulation results of the basic configuration compare very well with experimental measurements and problematic behaviors of the actual stove design could be explained by the investigation.

  11. Energy and emissions characterization of an eco-efficient biomass cook stove at different altitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Bayer, Juan F.; Graciano-Bustamante, Diana S.; Gómez-Betancur, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Around 2.5 billion people depend on wood as their main fuel for heating and cooking.In this work is studied the effect of altitude (678 and 1976 meters above sea level) on energy performance and emissions of an improved wood stove under standardized cooking tests. The experiments were carried out under the Water Boiling (WBT) and Controlled Cooking (CCT) Tests. The efficiency decreased about 24 % with increasing altitude in WBT, and specific fuel consumption increased 27.3 % due to the air density changes. Regarding the controlled cooking test, the specific fuel consumption and specific emissions increased by 15.3 % and 16 %, respectively. It is highlighted that altitude significantly affects the 'Plancha' wood stove behavior. Specific emissions increased at higher altitudes, so it is necessary to redesign wood stoves according to their geographical location in order to optimize the cooking process. (author)

  12. Gases emissions and excess air measurements for performance analysis of a wood stove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmo, Felipe Alfaia do; Canto, Sergio Aruana Elarrat; Nogueira, Manoel Fernandes Martins; Maneschy, Carlos Edilson de Almeida; Santos, Tiago da Silva; Gazel, Hussein Felix [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Campus Universitario Jose da Silveira Netto], E-mails: aruana@ufpa.br, mfmn@ufpa.br, cemaneschy@ufpa.br

    2010-07-01

    Millions of people in Africa, Central and South America and Asia rely on rudimentary and inefficient wood stove that causes respiratory diseases and demand for large quantity of biomass from native forest. The international agents as World Bank, UNESCO and International Energy Agency has pointed out the relevancy of wood stove. Research on this subject has been done by Shell Foundation and Aprovecho Research Center that indicates Rocket Stove technology as the most promising and able to provide efficiency together with low cost. This work presents performance results obtained from one wood rocket stove manufactured by a Brazilian company named Ecofogao. The stove performance was measured characterizing the amount of energy supplied to the stove in the biomass and characterizing the eluding gases. The incoming energy was quantified through the high heating value for the Jabot (using a bomb calorimeter) plus the Ultimate Analysis (content of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen), Proximate Analysis (content of moisture, fixed carbon, volatiles and ash) and the mass flow rate of biomass feed to the stoven. The leaving energy in the exhaustion gases was quantified measuring its temperature and composition immediately at the exit of the stoven what is the inlet of chimney. The results show the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and CO in the concentration ranges of (0.9% to 6.30%), (14.30% to 19.90%) and (0.17% to 2.50%) respectively. The excess air is in the range (3.33 to 23.33) based on carbon dioxide measurements in the eluted gases. These results provided information to promote also further improvements on the stoven design. (author)

  13. Induction stoves as an option for clean cooking in rural India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Manjushree; Prasad, Rakesh; Rehman, Ibrahim H; Gill, Bigsna

    2016-01-01

    As part of a programme on ‘access to clean cooking alternatives in rural India’, induction stoves were introduced in nearly 4000 rural households in Himachal Pradesh, one of the few highly electrified states in India. Analysis of primary usage information from 1000 rural households revealed that electricity majorly replaced Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG), generally used as a secondary cooking fuel, but did not influence a similar shift from traditional mud stoves as the primary cooking technology. Likewise, the shift from firewood to electricity as a primary cooking fuel was observed in only 5% of the households studied. Country level analysis indicates that rural households falling in lower monthly per capita expenditure (MPCE) classes have lesser access to electricity and clean cooking options than those falling in higher MPCE classes. Again, only three states in India with high levels of rural household electrification report consumption statuses more than 82 kWh per month (the estimated mean for electricity consumption by induction stoves). Overall, the results of the study indicate that induction stoves will have limited potential in reducing the consumption of firewood and LPG if included in energy access programmes, that too only in regions where high levels of electrification exist. - Highlights: • Primary survey of induction stove users was conducted in 1000 rural households. • In 84% households, electricity replaced LPG as the secondary cooking fuel. • In only 5% households, electricity replaced firewood as the primary cooking fuel. • Electricity as a cooking fuel for rural India still needs massive investments. • Currently, induction stoves are only able to reduce consumption of firewood and LPG.

  14. FASHION THE KITCHEN: CAST IRON STOVES THE PROVINCE OF QUEBEC, 1900-1914

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Baillargeon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of aesthetics in the marketing strategies of Quebec’s foundries and retailers at the beginning of the 20th century is not well known. This qualitative analysis of published cast iron stove advertisements suggests that the use of aesthetics to market stoves was far more elaborate than the simple alignment with trendy or classic style categories. In fact, aesthetics were the cornerstone of advertising activities aimed at developing and capitalizing on various market segments at a time of burgeoning consumerism.

  15. Test of pyrolysis gasifier stoves in two institutional kitchens in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendelbo, Pall; Nielsen, Per Sieverts

    1998-01-01

    : The main purpose of the paper is to evaluate tests of institutional kitchens carried out at schools in Uganda 1997. The results of the tests for the institutional kitchen with pyrolysis gasifier stoves are compared with the fuel use in traditional kitchens with three-stone stoves. The project......, respectively. The cooking place was build up with a rotating plate on which tree gasifier units were placed. In this way it was possible to change on of the gasifier units when necessary. The pot was then mounted on a tripod app. 10 cm above the gasifier units. The results of the tests show that the improved...

  16. Intelligent Heat System – high energy efficient wood stoves with low emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illerup, Jytte Boll; Nickelsen, Joachim; Hansen, Brian Brun

    2016-01-01

    This development and demonstration project conducted by HWAM A/S and DTU Chemical Engineering has contributed to the development of an automatically controlled wood stove (HWAM IHS), which is on the market today. The new digital control system ensures optimal combustion conditions by keeping...... compared to traditional manually controlled stoves. The tests also showed that in many cases it is impossible to visually tell if non-optimal combustion occurs. Also, in practice it is impossible to manually control the combustion air as fast and optimally as the automatically controlled air inlet valves...

  17. Impact of cleaner fuel use and improved stoves on acute respiratory infections: evidence from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Prabhat; Sharma, Anurag; Mahal, Ajay

    2017-11-01

    The use of cleaner fuel and improved stoves has been promoted as a means to lower harmful emissions from solid fuels. However, little is known about how exclusive use of cleaner fuels, mixed fuel use and improved stoves influences children's health. We compared the impact of using liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) exclusively with mixed fuel use (LPG plus polluting fuels) and with exclusive use of polluting fuels on acute respiratory infections (ARI) among 16 157 children 0-4 years of age from households in the 2012 Indian Human Development Survey. Inverse probability weighting (IPW) procedures for multiple treatments were used for this evaluation. Children from households using LPG had a 5.0% lower probability of reporting ARI relative to exclusive users of polluting fuels, with larger effects (10.7%) in rural households. The probability of ARI in households using improved stoves and mixed fuel use was also lower in rural households, by 2.9% and 2.8%, respectively. The magnitude of effect varied across population subgroups, with the highest effects for children living in households living in kachha (low quality material) houses households identified as poor. Use of LPG and improved stoves lowered the probability of ARI among children younger than 5 years. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Development of thermoacoustic engine operating by waste heat from cooking stove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B. M.; Abakr, Y. A.; Riley, P. H.; Hann, D. B.

    2012-06-01

    There are about 1.5 billion people worldwide use biomass as their primary form of energy in household cooking[1]. They do not have access to electricity, and are too remote to benefit from grid electrical supply. In many rural communities, stoves are made without technical advancements, mostly using open fires cooking stoves which have been proven to be extremely low efficiency, and about 93% of the energy generated is lost during cooking. The cooking is done inside a dwelling and creates significant health hazard to the family members and pollution to environment. SCORE (www.score.uk.com) is an international collaboration research project to design and build a low-cost, high efficiency woodstove that uses about half amount of the wood of an open wood fire, and uses the waste heat of the stove to power a thermoacoustic engine (TAE) to produce electricity for applications such as LED lighting, charging mobile phones or charging a 12V battery. This paper reviews on the development of two types of the thermoacoustic engine powered by waste heat from cooking stove which is either using Propane gas or burning of wood as a cooking energy to produce an acceptable amount of electricity for the use of rural communities.

  19. Impacts of two improved wood-burning stoves on the indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo; Jensen, Ole Michael; Tarelho, Luis A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Large amounts of forest wood is still being used in rural housing in low and mid-income countries in South America - 36% in Peru and 6% in Brazil - generating hazardous wood smoke. Interviews were conducted to the users of improved stoves in 20 rural households. In Peru, the field study was carri...

  20. GREENHOUSE GASES FROM BIOMASS AND FOSSIL FUEL STOVES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: A MANILA PILOT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samples were taken of the combustion gases released by household cookstoves in Manila, Philippines. In a total of 24 samples, 14 cookstoves were tested. These were fueled by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), kerosene (three kinds of stoves), charcoal, and wood. Ambient samples were ...

  1. Beer, wood, and welfare - The impact of improved stove use among dolo-beer breweries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Grimm (Michael); J. Peters (Jörg)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractLocal beer breweries in Burkina Faso absorb a considerable amount of urban woodfuel demand. We assess the woodfuel savings caused by the adoption of improved brewing stoves by these micro-breweries and estimate the implied welfare effects through the woodfuel market on private households

  2. Coal use, stove improvement, and adult pneumonia mortality in Xuanwei, China: a retrospective cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, M.; Chapman, R.S.; Vermeulen, R.C.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Tian, L.; Zheng, T.; Chen, B.E.; Engels, E.A.; He, X.; Blair, A.; Lan, Q.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Xuanwei County, China, unvented indoor coal burning is strongly associated with increased risk of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the impact of coal burning and stove improvement on risk of pneumonia is not clear. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective

  3. Changes of indoor climate by the adoption of retrofitted wood-burning stoves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo; Jensen, Ole Michael; Tarelho, Luis A. C.

    2014-01-01

    More than 3 billion people in the world rely on local solid-fuels for domestic cooking and heating through inefficient combustion, causing indoor air pollution and overheating worldwide. Technological regimes were categorized in 18 popular stove models to describe how residential wood combustion ...

  4. Deployment of coal briquettes and improved stoves: possibly an option for both environment and climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guorui Zhi; Conghu Peng; Yingjun Chen; Dongyan Liu; Guoying Sheng; Jiamo Fu [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Chemistry

    2009-08-15

    The use of coal briquettes and improved stoves by Chinese households has been encouraged by the government as a means of reducing air pollution and health impacts. In this study we have shown that these two improvements also relate to climate change. Our experimental measurements indicate that, if all coal were burned as briquettes in improved stoves, particulate matter (PM), organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) could be annually reduced by 63 {+-} 12%, 61 {+-} 10%, and 98 {+-} 1.7%, respectively. Also, the ratio of BC to OC (BC/OC) could be reduced by about 97%, from 0.49 to 0.016, which would make the primary emissions of household coal combustion more optically scattering. Therefore, it is suggested that the government consider the possibility of: (i) phasing out direct burning of bituminous raw-coal-chunks in households; (ii) phasing out simple stoves in households; and, (iii) financially supporting the research, production, and popularization of improved stoves and efficient coal briquettes. These actions may have considerable environmental benefits by reducing emissions and mitigating some of the impacts of household coal burning on the climate. International cooperation is required both technologically and financially to accelerate the emission reduction in the world. 50 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Intelligent Heat System - High-Energy Efficient Wood Stoves with Low Emissions. Field Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illerup, Jytte Boll; Nickelsen, Joachim; Hansen, Brian Brun

    2014-01-01

    Wood stoves have the potential of providing CO2-neutral energy without transmission loss—but with the significant drawbacks of high emissions of pollutants and particulate matter at low altitude close to private homes, and with an uneven heat release profile which produces non-optimal heating...

  6. Personal exposures of preschool children to carbon monoxide: roles of ambient air quality and gas stoves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, S.; Reponen, A.; Mukala, K.; Pasanen, P.; Tuomisto, J.; Jantunen, M.J. (National Public Health Institute, Kuopio (Finland). Division of Environmental Health)

    1994-12-01

    Personal 1 h mean CO exposures of preschool children in two day care centers (Toolo and Vallila) in Helsinki were measured with continuously recording personal exposure monitors. In Vallila, the median CO exposure of children from homes with gas stoves was 2.0 mgm[sup -3], and with electric stoves, 0.9 mgm[sup -3]. In Tooloo, the corresponding values were 1.9 and 1.0 mgm[sup -3], respectively. The national ambient air quality guidelines for CO in Finland were exceeded in a few percent of the exposure measurements. The results were compared to fixed-site ambient air monitoring data and related to the presence of town-gas fired stoves in the children's homes. The results show that fixed-site ambient air monitors are of little value in predicting personal exposures of children or even their relative differences between areas. They also show that town-gas fired stoves may have a profound effect on the CO exposures of the children. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Seasonal fuel consumption, stoves, and end-uses in rural households of the far-western development region of Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Nicholas L.; Upadhyay, Basudev; Maharjan, Shovana; Jagoe, Kirstie; Weyant, Cheryl L.; Thompson, Ryan; Uprety, Sital; Johnson, Michael A.; Bond, Tami C.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding how fuels and stoves are used to meet a diversity of household needs is an important step in addressing the factors leading to continued reliance on polluting devices, and thereby improving household energy programs. In Nepal and many other countries dependent on solid fuel, efforts to mitigate the impacts of residential solid fuel use have emphasized cooking while focusing less on other solid fuel dependent end-uses. We employed a four-season fuel assessment in a cohort of 110 households residing in two elevation regions of the Far-Western Development Region (Province 7) of Nepal. Household interviews and direct fuel weights were used to assess seasonality in fuel consumption and its association with stoves that met cooking and non-cooking needs. Per-capita fuel consumption in winter was twice that of other measured seasons, on average. This winter increase was attributed to greater prevalence of use and fuel consumption by supplemental stoves, not the main cooking stove. End-use profiles showed that fuel was used in supplemental stoves to meet the majority of non-meal needs in the home, notably water heating and preparation of animal food. This emphasis on fuels, stoves, and the satisfaction of energy needs—rather than just stoves or fuels—leads to a better understanding of the factors leading to device and fuel choice within households.

  8. Using exhaled carbon monoxide and carboxyhemoglobin to evaluate the effectiveness of a chimney stove model in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppler, Adam R; Fitzgerald, Christopher; Dorner, Stephen C; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Rathbun, Stephen L; Adetona, Olorunfemi; Naeher, Luke P

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of biological indicators of physiological change may be useful in evaluating the effectiveness of stove models, which are intended to reduce indoor smoke exposure and potential health effects. We examined changes in exhaled carbon monoxide (CO), percentage carboxy-hemoglobin, and total hemoglobin in response to the installation of a chimney stove model by the Juntos National Program in Huayatan, Peru in 2008. Biomarkers were measured in a convenience sample comprising 35 women who met requirements for participation, and were measured before and three weeks after installation of a chimney stove. The relationships between exposure to indoor smoke and biomarker measurements were also analyzed using simple linear regression models. Exhaled CO reduced from 6.71 ppm (95% CI 5.84-7.71) to 3.14 ppm (95% CI 2.77-3.66) three weeks after stove installation (P < 0.001) while % COHb reduced from 1.76% (95% CI 1.62-1.91) to 1.18% (95% CI 1.12-1.25; P < 0.001). Changes in exhaled CO and % COHb from pre- to post-chimney stove installation were not correlated with corresponding changes in exposure to CO and PM2.5 even though the exposures also reduced after stove installation. Exhaled CO and % COHb both showed improvement with reduction in concentration after the installation of the chimney cook stoves, indicating a positive physiological response subsequent to the intervention.

  9. Adoption of Clean Cookstoves after Improved Solid Fuel Stove Programme Exposure: A Cross-Sectional Study in Three Peruvian Andean Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jennyfer; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Verastegui, Hector; Hartinger, Stella M

    2017-07-08

    This study examined measures of clean cookstove adoption after improved solid fuel stove programmes in three geographically and culturally diverse rural Andean settings and explored factors associated with these measures. A questionnaire was administered to 1200 households on stove use and cooking behaviours including previously defined factors associated with clean cookstove adoption. Logistic multivariable regressions with 16 pre-specified explanatory variables were performed for three outcomes; (1) daily improved solid fuel stove use, (2) use of liquefied petroleum gas stove and (3) traditional stove displacement. Eighty-seven percent of households reported daily improved solid fuel stove use, 51% liquefied petroleum gas stove use and 66% no longer used the traditional cookstove. Variables associated with one or more of the three outcomes are: education, age and civil status of the reporting female, household wealth and size, region, encounters of problems with the improved solid fuel stove, knowledge of somebody able to build an improved solid fuel stove, whether stove parts are obtainable in the community, and subsidy schemes. We conclude that to be successful, improved solid fuel stove programmes need to consider (1) existing household characteristics, (2) the household's need for ready access to maintenance and repair, and (3) improved knowledge at the community level.

  10. Adoption and use of a semi-gasifier cooking and water heating stove and fuel intervention in the Tibetan Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S.; Carter, E.; Shan, M.; Ni, K.; Niu, H.; Tseng, J. T. W.; Pattanayak, S. K.; Jeuland, M.; Schauer, J. J.; Ezzati, M.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Yang, X.; Baumgartner, J.

    2017-07-01

    Improved cookstoves and fuels, such as advanced gasifier stoves, carry the promise of improving health outcomes, preserving local environments, and reducing climate-forcing air pollutants. However, low adoption and use of these stoves in many settings has limited their benefits. We aimed to improve the understanding of improved stove use by describing the patterns and predictors of adoption of a semi-gasifier stove and processed biomass fuel intervention in southwestern China. Of 113 intervention homes interviewed, 79% of homes tried the stove, and the majority of these (92%) continued using it 5-10 months later. One to five months after intervention, the average proportion of days that the semi-gasifier stove was in use was modest (40.4% [95% CI 34.3-46.6]), and further declined over 13 months. Homes that received the stove in the first batch used it more frequently (67.2% [95% CI 42.1-92.3] days in use) than homes that received it in the second batch (29.3% [95% CI 13.8-44.5] days in use), likely because of stove quality and user training. Household stove use was positively associated with reported cooking needs and negatively associated with age of the main cook, household socioeconomic status, and the availability of substitute cleaner-burning stoves. Our results show that even a carefully engineered, multi-purpose semi-gasifier stove and fuel intervention contributed modestly to overall household energy use in rural China.

  11. Improved stoves and wood benches: one alternative energy self-sufficiency at the farm level for dependents of the oak forests of the Eastern Cordillera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristizabal Hernandez, Javier Dario

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve thermal efficiency of typical cook stoves used in rural area of Encino, Santander, three improved cook stoves prototypes were built, by means of a modification carried out at combustion chamber. The improved cook stoves were tested by using Controlled Cooking Test (CCT) and compared against a typical cook stove. Scores displayed a mean performance of 14.66% among improved cook stoves and typical cook stove, which implies a saving in fuelwood consume of 0.86 ton/year. Likewise, farm fuelwood lots design is proposed by comparing four tree species used for cooking purposes in that place. Finally, impact in terms of avoided deforestation and carbon dioxide emissions is assessed, under a focus that it could integrate both improved cook stoves and farm fuel wood lots.

  12. Cooking and baking with the sun. Development potential of solar stoves. Kochen und Backen mit Sonne. Entwicklungsmoeglichkeiten von Solaroefen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelle, E.; Kienzle, P.; Oehler, U.

    1991-04-01

    Throughout the last years efforts were made to use solar energy for cooking and baking. Especially in the sunblessed development countries this could contribute to saving fossile energies and ressources. U. Oehler is one of those who developed solar stoves which have proved to work well both in our climate and in tropical areas. A simple theoretic model tires to describe the temperature behaviour of such a stove. By way of comparison the stove was also subjected to experiments. The potential of development and practical application is described. (orig.).

  13. Intelligent Heat System - High-Energy Efficient Wood Stoves with Low Emissions. Emissions of Gases and Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illerup, Jytte Boll; Hansen, Brian Brun; Lin, Weigang

    2015-01-01

    performance has been verified by field tests in private homes. The main components of an Autopilot IHS wood stove are: a modern wood stove with three separate combustion air inlets, and a control system composing of measuring devices for vital process parameters and a system of controlling valves to regulate...... combustion charges and phases. The experiments showed that the digital control of the combustion process ensures constant and optimal temperatures and overall oxygen concentrations in the combustion chamber resulting in low PM and CO emissions.......A collaboration project between the CHEC research Centre, at DTU Chemical Engineering, and the stove manufacturing company HWAM A/S has been established during the last years and has led to development and marketing of wood stoves (Autopilot IHS) equipped with a digital control system. The improved...

  14. Absorption cycle commercial refrigerator using wood burning cook stove; Geladeira de absorcao acionada por fogao a lenha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Jose Tomaz Vieira; Martins, Gilberto [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Energia

    1991-12-31

    The current utilization of wood burning cook stoves in Brazil and the socio-economical profile of their users were surveyed. A traditional heavy-mass wood-burning cook stove was studied as a thermal equipment. Simple changes in the geometry of the combustion chamber were suggested to improve the cooking efficiency. A closed two-phase thermosyphon using water as working fluid was designed, built and connected between the combustion chamber of the cook stove and a depressurized absorption refrigeration system to determine the heat flux and the temperature level. A commercial refrigerator unit, using the absorption cycle, was coupled with the wood stove through the thermosyphon. The overall results of the coupling point to successful country-side applications. (author) 12 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Air pollution and inhalation exposure to particulate matter of different sizes in rural households using improved stoves in central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weijian; Shen, Guofeng; Chen, Yuanchen; Shen, Huizhong; Huang, Ye; Li, Tongchao; Wang, Yilong; Fu, Xiaofang; Tao, Shu; Liu, Wenxin; Huang-Fu, Yibo; Zhang, Weihao; Xue, Chunyu; Liu, Guangqing; Wu, Fuyong; Wong, Minghung

    2018-01-01

    Household air pollution is considered to be among the top environmental risks in China. To examine the performance of improved stoves for reduction of indoor particulate matter (PM) emission and exposure in rural households, individual inhalation exposure to size-resolved PM was investigated using personal portable samplers carried by residents using wood gasifier stoves or improved coal stoves in a rural county in Central China. Concentrations of PM with different sizes in stationary indoor and outdoor air were also monitored at paired sites. The stationary concentrations of size-resolved PM in indoor air were greater than those in outdoor air, especially finer particles PM 0.25 . The daily averaged exposure concentrations of PM 0.25 , PM 1.0 , PM 2.5 and total suspended particle for all the surveyed residents were 74.4±41.1, 159.3±74.3, 176.7±78.1 and 217.9±78.1μg/m 3 , respectively. Even using the improved stoves, the individual exposure to indoor PM far exceeded the air quality guideline by WHO at 25μg/m 3 . Submicron particles PM 1.0 were the dominant PM fraction for personal exposure and indoor and outdoor air. Personal exposure exhibited a closer correlation with indoor PM concentrations than that for outdoor concentrations. Both inhalation exposure and indoor air PM concentrations in the rural households with gasifier firewood stoves were evidently lower than the reported results using traditional firewood stoves. However, local governments in the studied rural areas should exercise caution when widely and hastily promoting gasifier firewood stoves in place of improved coal stoves, due to the higher PM levels in indoor and outdoor air and personal inhaled exposure. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Diffusion of rural innovations: some analytical issues and the case of wood-burning stoves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, B

    1983-04-01

    The literature on the diffusion of rural innovations in Third World countries reveals a spectrum of approaches to the diffusion process. It is argued here that the effectiveness of a particular approach in the diffusion of particular innovations would depend on the technical, the economic, and the social characteristics of the innovations. A typology of innovations in terms of these characteristics has been drawn up. This provides the analytical framework within which the instance of wood-burning stoves is concerned. A priori, the characteristics of this innovation are seen to be such as to necessitate the close involvement of the users approach to diffusion. Available evidence relating to actual experience with promoting woodburning stoves is seen to bear this out. 62 references.

  17. Personal exposures of preschool children to carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide. The role of gas stoves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, S.; Jantunen, M.J.; Mukala, K.; Tuomisto, J. [National Public Health Institute, Kuopio (Finland). Div. of Environmental Health; Pasanen, P. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland)

    1993-12-31

    Personal 1-h mean CO exposures of preschool children in two day care centers of Helsinki were measured with continuously recording personal exposure monitors, and their personal 1-wk NO{sub 2} exposures with Palmes tubes. The results were compared to fixed site ambient air monitoring results and related to the presence of high CO, low heat value town gas fired stoves in the homes of the children. Results show that fixed site ambient air monitors are of little value in predicting personal exposures of children or even their relative differences between areas, and also that town gas fired stoves have a profound effect on the CO exposures, and little or no effect on the NO{sub 2} exposures of the children. (author)

  18. Fuelwood Savings and Carbon Emission Reductions by the Use of Improved Cooking Stoves in an Afromontane Forest, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Dresen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In many Sub-Saharan African countries, fuelwood collection is among the most important drivers of deforestation and particularly forest degradation. In a detailed field study in the Kafa region of southern Ethiopia, we assessed the potential of efficient cooking stoves to mitigate the negative impacts of fuelwood harvesting on forests. Eleven thousand improved cooking stoves (ICS, specifically designed for baking Ethiopia’s staple food injera, referred to locally as “Mirt” stoves, have been distributed here. We found a high acceptance rate of the stove. One hundred forty interviews, including users and non-users of the ICS, revealed fuelwood savings of nearly 40% in injera preparation compared to the traditional three-stone fire, leading to a total annual savings of 1.28 tons of fuelwood per household. Considering the approximated share of fuelwood from unsustainable sources, these savings translate to 11,800 tons of CO2 saved for 11,156 disseminated ICS, corresponding to the amount of carbon stored in over 30 ha of local forest. We further found that stove efficiency increased with longer injera baking sessions, which shows a way of optimizing fuelwood savings by adapted usage of ICS. Our study confirms that efficient cooking stoves, if well adapted to the local cooking habits, can make a significant contribution to the conservation of forests and the avoidance of carbon emission from forest clearing and degradation.

  19. Improved earthen stoves in coastal areas in Bangladesh: Economic, ecological and socio-cultural evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazmul Alam, S.M.; Chowdhury, Sakila Jahan [Department of Social Sciences and Asian Languages, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987 Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

    2010-12-15

    The study evaluated the economic, ecological and socio-cultural achievements of improved earthen stoves that were provided to the beneficiaries under a project to improve decreasing biomass energy utilization. A questionnaire was developed and a random sampling method was employed for selecting the samples from the population. The region has undergone a significant change with the development of shrimp aquaculture in brackish water on former paddy field. As a result the households have become dependent on the wood resources of the Sundarban (77% as their first choice of daily fuel). The fuel collection rate from the Sundarban has increased by 30% since the change to aquaculture, while the use of agricultural residues has declined by a similar amount. The introduction of the improved stove with two cook stations and a chimney resulted in a reduction of fuel use (as wood) to 540 g caput{sup -1} d{sup -1}, from the previous usage of 810 g caput{sup -1} d{sup -1} using the traditional stove. Households saved 1.5 kg d{sup -1} of fuel (one third), and reduced the cooking time by 45 min d{sup -1} (about 20%). While 85% of men and 65% of women were the major fuel collectors, the improved stove resulted in a small increase (14 taka) in the women's contribution to family income as well as a monthly saving on fuel cost of 45 taka. Respondents utilized saved time and money for household means and other economic activities. (author)

  20. The development of a thermoelectric power generator dedicated to stove-fireplaces with heat accumulation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sornek, Krzysztof; Filipowicz, Mariusz; Rzepka, Kamila

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Application of thermoelectric generators in the stove-fireplace with accumulation. • Construction of the thermoelectric generator is limited by the heat accumulation. • Variants of the heat exchanger’s construction are discussed. • The control method is related on velocity of flue gas and water cooling. • The power limit of 30 W for self-sufficient operation is sufficient. - Abstract: A significant part of the world’s population (about 40%) cooks their meals and provides heating for their homes using wood-burning heating devices. Due to the relatively low cost of fuel and their aesthetic design, solid fuel stoves capable of heat accumulation are convenient and common. The use of dedicated small-scale power generators provides also additional benefits. This paper presents the results of a study conducted to verify the possibility of generating power using stove-fireplaces with heat accumulation systems. In such units, the temperature of the flue gas should be kept at a certain level for the purposes of storing heat, which results from certain limitations of the thermoelectric generators. To verify the possibility of applying thermoelectric modules in such heating devices, a dedicated system with thermoelectric generators was selected from among various microcogeneration systems and implemented. Three types of heat exchangers were studied and the most efficient unit was selected for further testing. Two types of generators, with maximum operating temperatures of 320 and 175 °C, were compared. Subsequently, the characteristics of the latter were determined. The conducted tests allowed to determine the performance and the total efficiency of the generators that were used. It has been demonstrated that the maximum power of the generator would not exceed ca. 30 W e and that there is no economic justification for such a device. However, providing a self-powered and self-sufficient operation of stove-fireplaces with heat accumulation systems

  1. Integration of Thermoelectric Generators and Wood Stove to Produce Heat, Hot Water, and Electrical Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, A. M.; Mazandarani, P.; Panahi, R.; Behsaz, H.; Rezania, A.; Rosendahl, L. A.

    2013-07-01

    Traditional fire stoves are characterized by low efficiency. In this experimental study, the combustion chamber of the stove is augmented by two devices. An electric fan can increase the air-to-fuel ratio in order to increase the system's efficiency and decrease air pollution by providing complete combustion of wood. In addition, thermoelectric generators (TEGs) produce power that can be used to satisfy all basic needs. In this study, a water-based cooling system is designed to increase the efficiency of the TEGs and also produce hot water for residential use. Through a range of tests, an average of 7.9 W was achieved by a commercial TEG with substrate area of 56 mm × 56 mm, which can produce 14.7 W output power at the maximum matched load. The total power generated by the stove is 166 W. Also, in this study a reasonable ratio of fuel to time is described for residential use. The presented prototype is designed to fulfill the basic needs of domestic electricity, hot water, and essential heat for warming the room and cooking.

  2. Thermal distillation system utilizing biomass energy burned in stove by means of heat pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tanaka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A thermal distillation system utilizing a part of the thermal energy of biomass burned in a stove during cooking is proposed. The thermal energy is transported from the stove to the distiller by means of a heat pipe. The distiller is a vertical multiple-effect diffusion distiller, in which a number of parallel partitions in contact with saline-soaked wicks are set vertically with narrow gaps of air. A pilot experimental apparatus was constructed and tested with a single-effect and multiple-effect distillers to investigate primarily whether a heat pipe can transport thermal energy adequately from the stove to the distiller. It was found that the temperatures of the heated plate and the first partition of the distiller reached to about 100 °C and 90 °C, respectively, at steady state, showing that the heat pipe works sufficiently. The distilled water obtained was about 0.75 and 1.35 kg during the first 2 h of burning from a single-effect and multiple-effect distillers, respectively.

  3. Pilot study to reduce emissions, improve health, and offset BC emissions through the distribution of improved cook stoves in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banmali Pradhan, B.; Panday, A. K.; Surapipith, V.

    2013-12-01

    In most developing countries, wood and other biomass fuels are still the primary source of energy for the majority of the people, particularly the poor. It is estimated that cook stoves account for approximately 20% of global black carbon emissions. In Nepal 87% of energy is supplied from traditional biomass and 75% of households still depend on biomass as a cooking fuel. The substitution of traditional cook stoves with improved cook stoves provides an important way to reduce black carbon emissions. In 2013 the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) has commenced a pilot study that both examines ways to effectively disseminate improved cookstoves across remote rural mountain regions, and also quantifies the resulting changes in emissions, air quality and health. The selected study area is in Bajrabarahi Village in Makawanpur district, to the southwest of Kathmandu. The study area consists of around 1600 households, which are divided into control groups and groups where the cook stove intervention is taking place. The study complements the ';Clean Cooking energy solution for all by 2017' announced by the Government of Nepal recently, and will provide insights to the government on ways to effectively reduce black carbon emissions from cook stoves. To make the study robust and sustainable, local women's group and a local medical institution are involved in the project right from the conceptualization stage. The study region has been chosen in part because the medical school Patan Academy of Health Sciences (PAHS) has already started a long term health assessment in the region, and has built up considerable local contacts. The local women's group is working on the modality of cook stove distribution through micro credit programmes in the village. We will distribute the best available manufactured, fan-assisted cook stoves that are expected to reduce BC emissions the most. Health assessments, emissions estimates, as well as measurements of

  4. PENGEMBANGAN TUNGKU BRIKET BATUBARA SKALA RUMAH TANGGA Improvement of a Coal Briquette Stove for Household Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamrin Tamrin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Improving of a coal briquette stove is required in the context of energy diversification for strengthening national energy security. The policy of kerosene conversion to LPG is a short term policy and needs other source of energy alternative.  In idealized sense, all potentials should be used for household cooking, not always depending on a particular energy source. Purpose of this research was to improve a household coal briquette stove to increase stove efficiency and ease in ceasing the ember. Design criteria of the coal briquette stove were based on heat transfer from the burning coal to the heated object, ease in ceasing the ember, and facilitating the exhausting smoke from the kitchen room. Performance test to the designed stove was conducted on analyses of temperature at the bottom of a pan versus time during the firing, heat efficiency, and the time of ceasing ember. The results showed that the cooking temperature (>180 oC was reached after 35-65 minutes. The cooking temperature lasted for 4 hours, heat efficiency of 25.5 % was about optimum, and the time of ember ceasing was 19-33 minutes. ABSTRAK Pengembangan tungku briket batubara sangat diperlukan dalam diversifikasi pemakaian energi bahan bakar agar ketahanan energi nasional  menjadi kuat.  Kebijakan pengalihan bahan bakar minyak tanah ke elpiji merupakan ke- bijakan jangka pendek dan perlu energi alternatif lainnya  Idealnya  semua potensi yang ada dapat digunakan untuk memasak, tidak harus bergantung pada energi tertentu.  Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengembangkan tungku briket batubara skala rumah tangga untuk meningkatkan efiseinsi dan memudahkan pematian bara api. Tungku briket batubara dibuat didasarkan pada sistem pindah panas dari bara briket ke objek yang dipanaskan, memudahkan pe- matian bara api briket batubara dan menyalurkan asap dari ruang pembakaran keluar dari ruang dapur. Pengujian dilakukan untuk mengetahui perubahan suhu dasar panci selama pembakaran

  5. Implications of changes in household stoves and fuel use in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Rufus D.; Smith, Kirk R.; Zhang Junfeng; Ma Yuqing

    2004-01-01

    In recent decades China has pursued a number of national energy policies as integral components of its 5-year development plans including the unprecedented dissemination of several generations of fuel saving stoves in the majority of its rural populations. These programs, although designed for conservation of fuel wood resources and using deceptively simple technologies, have much wider impacts on both a national and a global level through their impacts on health and emission of pollutants that have warming consequences for the atmosphere. In the current manuscript we examine these implications using emissions data collected as part of a comprehensive evaluation of 28 typical stove/fuel technologies in common use. We illustrate that relative benefits of biomass and fossil fuels, and subsequently policies regarding promotion of different fuel types, are dependent on which products of incomplete combustion are considered. If one only considers gases included within the Kyoto protocol, the burning of renewably harvested biomass appears to have an advantage over kerosene or LPG as a large component of PIC emissions from inefficient biomass stoves are not included in the calculation. If, however, one considers a more comprehensive list of compounds that have direct or indirect effects on global warming, at best the burning of fuel wood when 100% renewably harvested has a similar GWC to these better quality fuels, and, under conditions experienced in many rural areas of the world, often considerably worse. Comprehensive evaluation would require all major radiative forcing agents to be considered, even though that presents considerable difficulties considering reported uncertainties of some global warming potentials. The stove types in this study demonstrated a wide range of emission factors. This offers an effective mechanism for achieving short-term reduction in emissions of health damaging pollutants, and also accomplishes the longer-term goal of reducing of greenhouse

  6. Design, empirical modelling and analysis of a waste-heat recovery system coupled to a traditional cooking stove

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakdanuphab, Rachsak; Sakulkalavek, Aparporn

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • WHR system was implemented to utilise the waste heat from a stove. • The empirical modelling by RSM can be used to predict the generated TEG power. • The total conversion efficiency of the WHR system was more than 80%. • The stove efficiency decreased less than 5% when the WHR system was attached. - Abstract: In this work, a waste-heat recovery (WHR) system was designed and implemented to utilise the waste heat from a cooking stove. The WHR system was designed to preserve maximum thermal energy efficiency, use passive cooling, and produce a system that did not alter the body of the cooking stove. The thermal energy from the cooking stove was converted into electrical energy by a thermoelectric generator (TEG) and used in a waste-heat hot water boiler. The cold side of the TEG was cooled by heat pipes immersed in a water box that offers a high heat transfer rate. The heated water can be used for domestic purposes. Dependent variables were the heater temperature and the volume of water. The heater temperature was varied between 130 and 271 °C, and 4.2–9.5 L of water was investigated. At equilibrium, response surface methodology based on a central composite design was used to empirically model the influence of the heater temperature and the volume of water on the electrical power generation and the hot water temperature. Experimental results of the system efficiency showed that the heater temperature was more influential than was the volume of water. The total efficiency of the WHR system was more than 80%. Thermal contact resistance was analysed to improve the WHR system performance. Finally, the thermal efficiency of a cooking stove, both with and without the WHR system, was measured. Results showed that the thermal efficiency of the cooking stove decreased by less than 5% when the WHR system was attached.

  7. ‘Oorja’ in India: Assessing a large-scale commercial distribution of advanced biomass stoves to households

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Mark C.; Phadke, Himani; Nagavarapu, Sriniketh; Shrimali, Gireesh; Zerriffi, Hisham

    2015-01-01

    Replacing traditional stoves with advanced alternatives that burn more cleanly has the potential to ameliorate major health problems associated with indoor air pollution in developing countries. With a few exceptions, large government and charitable programs to distribute advanced stoves have not had the desired impact. Commercially-based distributions that seek cost recovery and even profits might plausibly do better, both because they encourage distributors to supply and promote products that people want and because they are based around properly-incentivized supply chains that could more be scalable, sustainable, and replicable. The sale in India of over 400,000 “Oorja” stoves to households from 2006 onwards represents the largest commercially-based distribution of a gasification-type advanced biomass stove. BP's Emerging Consumer Markets (ECM) division and then successor company First Energy sold this stove and the pelletized biomass fuel on which it operates. We assess the success of this effort and the role its commercial aspect played in outcomes using a survey of 998 households in areas of Maharashtra and Karnataka where the stove was sold as well as detailed interviews with BP and First Energy staff. Statistical models based on this data indicate that Oorja purchase rates were significantly influenced by the intensity of Oorja marketing in a region as well as by pre-existing stove mix among households. The highest rate of adoption came from LPG-using households for which Oorja's pelletized biomass fuel reduced costs. Smoke- and health-related messages from Oorja marketing did not significantly influence the purchase decision, although they did appear to affect household perceptions about smoke. By the time of our survey, only 9% of households that purchased Oorja were still using the stove, the result in large part of difficulties First Energy encountered in developing a viable supply chain around low-cost procurement of “agricultural waste” to

  8. Wood fuel use in the traditional cooking stoves in the rural floodplain areas of Bangladesh: A socio-environmental perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, Md. Danesh [Department of Forest Science, Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea)]|[Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh); Al Rashid, Harun [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh); Shin, Man Yong [Department of Forest Science, Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-01-15

    A study was conducted, using a multistage simple random sampling design, to determine the structural characteristics of the traditional cooking stoves, amount of wood fuel consumed in the rural floodplain areas in Bangladesh, and also to figure out the socio-economic and environmental consequences of wood fuel usage in the traditional cooking stove. The study showed that family size, income, amount cooked and burning hours significantly affected the amount of wood fuel used per family per year. Taking into account different family sizes, the study observed that 4.24 tonne fuelwood were consumed per family per year. The study showed that 42% of families used only biomass fuel, 5% used liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and 53% used kerosene along with biomass fuels. The main source of biomass fuel was homestead forests (40%). It has been figured out that the incomplete combustion of biomass in the traditional cooking stove poses severe epidemiological consequences to human health and contributes to global warming. The study also showed that 83% of the respondents would prefer improved cooking stoves over traditional cooking stoves. (author)

  9. Wood fuel use in the traditional cooking stoves in the rural floodplain areas of Bangladesh: A socio-environmental perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, Md. Danesh; Al Rashid, Harun; Shin, Man Yong

    2009-01-01

    A study was conducted, using a multistage simple random sampling design, to determine the structural characteristics of the traditional cooking stoves, amount of wood fuel consumed in the rural floodplain areas in Bangladesh, and also to figure out the socio-economic and environmental consequences of wood fuel usage in the traditional cooking stove. The study showed that family size, income, amount cooked and burning hours significantly affected the amount of wood fuel used per family per year. Taking into account different family sizes, the study observed that 4.24 tonne fuelwood were consumed per family per year. The study showed that 42% of families used only biomass fuel, 5% used liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and 53% used kerosene along with biomass fuels. The main source of biomass fuel was homestead forests (40%). It has been figured out that the incomplete combustion of biomass in the traditional cooking stove poses severe epidemiological consequences to human health and contributes to global warming. The study also showed that 83% of the respondents would prefer improved cooking stoves over traditional cooking stoves. (author)

  10. Designing a behavioral intervention using the COM-B model and the theoretical domains framework to promote gas stove use in rural Guatemala: a formative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lisa M; Diaz-Artiga, Anaité; Weinstein, John R; Handley, Margaret A

    2018-02-14

    Three billion people use solid cooking fuels, and 4 million people die from household air pollution annually. Shifting households to clean fuels, like liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), may protect health only if stoves are consistently used. Few studies have used an implementation science framework to systematically assess "de-implementation" of traditional stoves, and none have done so with pregnant women who are more likely to adopt new behaviors. We evaluated an introduced LPG stove coupled with a phased behavioral intervention to encourage exclusive gas stove use among pregnant women in rural Guatemala. We enrolled 50 women at < 20 weeks gestation in this prospective cohort study. All women received a free 3-burner LPG stove and ten tank refills. We conducted formative research using COM-B Model and Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF). This included thematic analysis of focus group findings and classes delivered to 25 pregnant women (Phase 1). In Phase 2, we complemented classes with a home-based tailored behavioral intervention with a different group of 25 pregnant women. We mapped 35 TDF constructs onto survey questions. To evaluate stove use, we placed temperature sensors on wood and gas stoves and estimated fraction of stove use three times during pregnancy and twice during the first month after infant birth. Class attendance rates were above 92%. We discussed feasible ways to reduce HAP exposure, proper stove use, maintenance and safety. We addressed food preferences, ease of cooking and time savings through cooking demonstrations. In Phase 2, the COM-B framework revealed that other household members needed to be involved if the gas stove was to be consistently used. Social identity and empowerment were key in decisions about stove repairs and LPG tank refills. The seven intervention functions included training, education, persuasion, incentivization, modelling, enablement and environmental restructuring. Wood stove use dropped upon introduction of the

  11. Farmer innovation driven by needs and understanding: building the capacities of farmer groups for improved cooking stove construction and continued adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uckert, G.; Hafner, J.; Graef, F.; Hoffmann, H.; Kimaro, A.; Sererya, O.; Sieber, S.

    2017-12-01

    Enhancing food security is one of the main goals of subsistence farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa. This study investigates the implementation of improved loam-made cooking stoves and its contribution to coping and livelihood strategies. Controlled combustion, air as well as smoke flue, and heat insulation facilitate the more efficient fuel consumption of improved cooking stoves compared to traditional stoves—namely three stone fires. Although the majority of small-scale farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa rely on the free public good of firewood, the increasing time needed for collecting firewood implies high opportunity costs for productive members of the family. The primary outcomes for users of improved stoves are reduced fuel consumption, greater safety, saved time, and reduced smoke in the kitchen. The paper illustrates part of the output, outcome, and impact of a participatory action research approach for implementing improved cooking stoves. Special emphasis was put on enabling the villagers to construct their stoves without external support, hence having locally manufactured stoves made of mud, bricks, and dried grass. The impact pathway of improved cooking stoves followed the training-of-trainers concept, where members of the initially established farmer groups were trained to construct stoves on their own. Special focus was given to knowledge exchange and knowledge transfer in order to increase firewood efficiency and overall satisfaction of users of improved cook stoves. Encouraging the members to further adapt the stoves enabled them to scale-up the construction of improved cooked stoves into a business model and increase dissemination while creating income. Although many important benefits, like time and knowledge gain, were identified by the farmers after adoption of the new technology, we found adoption rates differed significantly between regions.

  12. Behavioral Attitudes and Preferences in Cooking Practices with Traditional Open-Fire Stoves in Peru, Nepal, and Kenya: Implications for Improved Cookstove Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn L. Rhodes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Global efforts are underway to develop and promote improved cookstoves which may reduce the negative health and environmental effects of burning solid fuels on health and the environment. Behavioral studies have considered cookstove user practices, needs and preferences in the design and implementation of cookstove projects; however, these studies have not examined the implications of the traditional stove use and design across multiple resource-poor settings in the implementation and promotion of improved cookstove projects that utilize a single, standardized stove design. We conducted in-depth interviews and direct observations of meal preparation and traditional, open-fire stove use of 137 women aged 20–49 years in Kenya, Peru and Nepal prior in the four-month period preceding installation of an improved cookstove as part of a field intervention trial. Despite general similarities in cooking practices across sites, we identified locally distinct practices and norms regarding traditional stove use and desired stove improvements. Traditional stoves are designed to accommodate specific cooking styles, types of fuel, and available resources for maintenance and renovation. The tailored stoves allow users to cook and repair their stoves easily. Women in each setting expressed their desire for a new stove, but they articulated distinct specific alterations that would meet their needs and preferences. Improved cookstove designs need to consider the diversity of values and needs held by potential users, presenting a significant challenge in identifying a “one size fits all” improved cookstove design. Our data show that a single stove design for use with locally available biomass fuels will not meet the cooking demands and resources available across the three sites. Moreover, locally produced or adapted improved cookstoves may be needed to meet the cooking needs of diverse populations while addressing health and environmental concerns of

  13. Behavioral Attitudes and Preferences in Cooking Practices with Traditional Open-Fire Stoves in Peru, Nepal, and Kenya: Implications for Improved Cookstove Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Evelyn L.; Dreibelbis, Robert; Klasen, Elizabeth; Naithani, Neha; Baliddawa, Joyce; Menya, Diana; Khatry, Subarna; Levy, Stephanie; Tielsch, James M.; Miranda, J. Jaime; Kennedy, Caitlin; Checkley, William

    2014-01-01

    Global efforts are underway to develop and promote improved cookstoves which may reduce the negative health and environmental effects of burning solid fuels on health and the environment. Behavioral studies have considered cookstove user practices, needs and preferences in the design and implementation of cookstove projects; however, these studies have not examined the implications of the traditional stove use and design across multiple resource-poor settings in the implementation and promotion of improved cookstove projects that utilize a single, standardized stove design. We conducted in-depth interviews and direct observations of meal preparation and traditional, open-fire stove use of 137 women aged 20–49 years in Kenya, Peru and Nepal prior in the four-month period preceding installation of an improved cookstove as part of a field intervention trial. Despite general similarities in cooking practices across sites, we identified locally distinct practices and norms regarding traditional stove use and desired stove improvements. Traditional stoves are designed to accommodate specific cooking styles, types of fuel, and available resources for maintenance and renovation. The tailored stoves allow users to cook and repair their stoves easily. Women in each setting expressed their desire for a new stove, but they articulated distinct specific alterations that would meet their needs and preferences. Improved cookstove designs need to consider the diversity of values and needs held by potential users, presenting a significant challenge in identifying a “one size fits all” improved cookstove design. Our data show that a single stove design for use with locally available biomass fuels will not meet the cooking demands and resources available across the three sites. Moreover, locally produced or adapted improved cookstoves may be needed to meet the cooking needs of diverse populations while addressing health and environmental concerns of traditional stoves. PMID

  14. Electricity savings with pellet stoves and solar heating in electrically heated houses; Elbesparing med pelletkaminer och solvaerme i direktelvaermda smaahus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Tomas [Hoegskolan Dalarna, Borlaenge (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how electrically heated houses can be converted to using wood pellet and solar heating. There are a large number of wood pellet stoves on the market. Many stoves have a water jacket, which gives an opportunity to distribute the heat to domestic hot water and a radiator heating system. Three typical Swedish houses with electric resistance heating have been studied. Fourteen different system concepts using wood pellet stoves and solar heating systems have been evaluated. The systems and the houses have been simulated in detail using TRNSYS. The houses have been divided in up to 10 different zones and heat transfer by air circulation through doorways and open doors have been simulated. The pellet stoves were simulated using a recently developed TRNSYS component, which models the start- and stop phases, emissions and the dynamic behaviour of the stoves. The model also calculates the CO-emissions. Simulations were made with one stove without a water jacket and two stoves with different fractions of the generated heat distributed in the water circuit. Simulations show that the electricity savings using a pellet stove are greatly affected by the house plan, the system choice, if the internal doors are open or closed and the desired level of comfort. Installing a stove with a water-jacket connected to a radiator system and a hot water storage has the advantage that heat can be transferred to domestic hot water and be distributed to other rooms. Such systems lead to greater electricity savings, especially in houses having a traditional layout. It was found that not all rooms needed radiators and that it was more effective in most cases to use a stove with a higher fraction of the heat distributed by the water circuit. The economic investigation shows that installing a wood pellet stove without a water jacket gives the lowest total energy- and capital costs in the house with an open plan (for today's energy prices and the

  15. Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Commercial Portable Air Purifier in Homes with Wood Burning Stoves: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie F. Hart

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wood burning for residential heating is prevalent in the Rocky Mountain regions of the United States. Studies have shown that wood stoves can be a significant source of PM2.5 within homes. In this study, the effectiveness of an electrostatic filter portable air purifier was evaluated (1 in a home where a wood stove was the sole heat source and (2 in a home where a wood stove was used as a supplemental heat source. Particle count concentrations in six particle sizes and particle mass concentrations in two particle sizes were measured for ten 12-hour purifier on and ten purifier off trials in each home. Particle count concentrations were reduced by 61–85 percent. Similar reductions were observed in particle mass concentrations. These findings, although limited to one season, suggest that a portable air purifier may effectively reduce indoor particulate matter concentrations associated with wood combustion during home heating.

  16. Perceptions of Improved Biomass and Liquefied Petroleum Gas Stoves in Puno, Peru: Implications for Promoting Sustained and Exclusive Adoption of Clean Cooking Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Hollada

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Many households in low- and middle-income countries cook with inefficient biomass-burning stoves, which cause high levels of household air pollution and threaten long-term health. Although clean stoves and fuels are available, uptake and consistent use has been low. Using observations and in-depth interviews, we assessed the attitudes, preferences, and beliefs about traditional versus liquefied petroleum gas (LPG stoves in rural Puno, Peru. A total of 31 in-depth interviews were conducted with primary cooks and their families, health workers, community leaders, and improved stove contractors. Six in-home observations of meal preparation were also conducted. Six major barriers to consistent use of clean stoves were identified: (1 perceived differences in food taste and nutrition by stove type; (2 cooking niches filled by different stoves; (3 social norms related to cooking practices; (4 safety concerns; (5 comparative costs of using different stoves; and (6 lack of awareness and concern about long-term health risks. These findings suggest that to successfully reduce household air pollution, clean cooking programs and policies must consider the many factors influencing adoption beyond health, such as cost, taste, fears, and cultural traditions. These factors could be incorporated into community-based and national efforts to scale-up sustained and exclusive adoption of clean cooking.

  17. Primary emissions and secondary aerosol production potential from woodstoves for residential heating: Influence of the stove technology and combustion efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Amelie; Stefenelli, Giulia; Bruns, Emily A.; Pieber, Simone M.; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Slowik, Jay G.; Prévôt, André S. H.; Wortham, Henri; El Haddad, Imad; Marchand, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    To reduce the influence of biomass burning on air quality, consumers are encouraged to replace their old woodstove with new and cleaner appliances. While their primary emissions have been extensively investigated, the impact of atmospheric aging on these emissions, including secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, remains unknown. Here, using an atmospheric smog chamber, we aim at understanding the chemical nature and quantify the emission factors of the primary organic aerosols (POA) from three types of appliances for residential heating, and to assess the influence of aging thereon. Two, old and modern, logwood stoves and one pellet burner were operated under typical conditions. Emissions from an entire burning cycle (past the start-up operation) were injected, including the smoldering and flaming phases, resulting in highly variable emission factors. The stoves emitted a significant fraction of POA (up to 80%) and black carbon. After ageing, the total mass concentration of organic aerosol (OA) increased on average by a factor of 5. For the pellet stove, flaming conditions were maintained throughout the combustion. The aerosol was dominated by black carbon (over 90% of the primary emission) and amounted to the same quantity of primary aerosol emitted by the old logwood stove. However, after ageing, the OA mass was increased by a factor of 1.7 only, thus rendering OA emissions by the pellet stove almost negligible compared to the other two stoves tested. Therefore, the pellet stove was the most reliable and least polluting appliance out of the three stoves tested. The spectral signatures of the POA and aged emissions by a High Resolution - Time of Flight - Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Electron Ionization (EI) at 70 eV) were also investigated. The m/z 44 (CO2+) and high molecular weight fragments (m/z 115 (C9H7+), 137 (C8H9O2+), 167 (C9H11O3+) and 181 (C9H9O4+, C14H13+)) correlate with the modified combustion efficiency (MCE) allowing us to discriminate further

  18. A laboratory comparison of the global warming impact of five major types of biomass cooking stoves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacCarty, N.; Ogle, D.; Still, D.; Bond, T.; Roden, C. [Aprovecho Research Center, Creswell, OR (United States)

    2008-06-15

    With over 2 billion of the world's population living in families using biomass to cook every day, the possibility of improved stoves helping to mitigate climate change is generating increasing attention. With their emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, and black carbon, among other substances, is there a cleaner, practical option to provide to the families that will need to continue to use biomass for cooking? This study served to help quantify the relative emissions from five common types of biomass combustion in order to investigate if there are cleaner options. The laboratory results showed that for situations of sustainable harvesting where CO{sub 2} emissions are considered neutral, some improved stoves with rocket-type combustion or fan assistance can reduce overall warming impact from the products of incomplete combustion (PICs) by as much as 50-95%. In non-sustainable situations where fuel and CO{sub 2} savings are of greater importance, three types of improved combustion methods were shown to potentially reduce warming by 40-60%. Charcoal-burning may emit less CO{sub 2} than traditional wood-burning, but the PIC emissions are significantly greater.

  19. Chemical characterization of biomass burning deposits from cooking stoves in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salam, Abdus; Hasan, Mahmodul; Begum, Bilkis A.; Begum, Monira; Biswas, Swapan K.

    2013-01-01

    Biomass burning smoke deposits were characterized from cooking stoves in Brahmondi, Narsingdi, Bangladesh. Arjun, bamboo, coconut, madhabilata, mahogany, mango, rice husk coil, plum and mixed dried leaves were used as biomasses. Smoke deposits were collected from the ceiling (above the stove) of the kitchen on aluminum foil. Deposits samples were analyzed with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy for trace elements determination. UV–visible spectrophotometer was used for ions analysis. The surface morphology of the smoke deposits was studied with scanning electron microscope (SEM). Elevated concentrations of the trace elements were observed, especially for toxic metals (Pb, Co, Cu). The highest concentration of lead was observed in rice husk coil among the determined biomasses followed by mahogany and arjun, whereas the lowest concentration was observed in bamboo. Potassium has the highest concentration among the determined trace elements followed by calcium, iron and titanium. Trace elements such as potassium, calcium, iron showed significant variation among different biomass burning smoke deposits. The average concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, and phosphate were 38.0, 0.60, 0.73 mg kg −1 , respectively. The surface morphology was almost similar for these biomass burning deposit samples. The Southeast Asian biomass burning smoke deposits had distinct behavior from European and USA wood fuels combustion. -- Highlights: •Elevated concentrations of trace elements were observed in biomass burning deposits. •Very high concentration of lead was observed in biomasses burring deposits •Elevated toxic trace elements concentrations in kitchens need further surveillance

  20. The role of donor organisations in promoting energy efficient cook stoves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kees, Marlis; Feldmann, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on cooking energy and the role of donor organisations in the introduction and dissemination of improved stoves. After presenting some basic facts on cooking energy, the article discusses the cooking energy–poverty nexus and possible reasons for the often neglect of this topic in the context of development cooperation. Clean and efficient technologies for cooking are presented and a short introduction to different dissemination approaches shows the changes that occurred in the last years. The importance of public sector investments to increase the supply and use of clean cooking energy technologies in developing countries is analysed and underlined by GTZ’s experiences in this field. The case study of Uganda finally demonstrates how cooking energy interventions work in the field and points out that investment pays off. - Highlights: ► Cooking energy is a neglected topic in the context of development cooperation. ► Political frameworks do not reflect social and economic relevance of biomass energy. ► Scaling up the dissemination of cookstoves requires public sector investment. ► Investments in efficient and clean stoves pay-off.

  1. Beer, Wood, and Welfare--The Impact of Improved Stove Use Among Dolo-Beer Breweries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Grimm

    Full Text Available Local beer breweries in Burkina Faso absorb a considerable amount of urban woodfuel demand. We assess the woodfuel savings caused by the adoption of improved brewing stoves by these micro-breweries and estimate the implied welfare effects through the woodfuel market on private households as well as the environmental effect. We find substantial wood savings among the breweries, 36% to 38% if they fully switch to an improved stove. In absolute amounts, they save about 0.176 kg of fuelwood per litre of dolo brewed. These savings imply huge reductions in CO2-emissions and reduce the overall demand for woodfuel, which is predominantly used by the poorer strata for cooking purposes. We provide estimates for the price decrease that might result from this and show that the urban poor are likely to benefit. Thus, the intervention under study is an example for a green growth intervention with pro-poor welfare gains--something green growth strategies should look for.

  2. Emissions and efficiency of a domestic gas stove burning natural gases with various compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yungchang Ko; Tahui Lin

    2003-01-01

    The heating value of a fuel, which depends on its composition, strongly affects burner performance. Using the same gas stove to burn natural gas with various heating values is inappropriate and hazardous due to the possible occurrence of incomplete combustion (i.e. a great increase of CO emissions and/or soot formation), liftoff, flashback and inadequate heat input. In this study, we aim to assess the effects of changes in gas composition on burner performance and propose suitable design or operational factors of domestic gas stoves burning natural gas with various heating values. A single gas burner, originally designed for burning natural gas with low heating value, is adopted to investigate the effects of variations in gas composition on the burner performance. The influence of five significant parameters, including gas composition, primary aeration, gas flow rate (heat input), gas supply pressure, and loading height, on the thermal efficiency and CO emissions were reported and discussed. Using natural gas with high heating value instead of natural gas with low heating value results in a decrease in thermal efficiency (due to higher thermal input) and an increase in CO emission (caused by incomplete combustion). These problems can be significantly improved by decreasing the gas pressure to a suitable value, by enlarging the primary aeration to a favorable level, by selecting a proper thermal input, or by adjusting the optimized heating height. (Author)

  3. Coal use, stove improvement, and adult pneumonia mortality in Xuanwei, China: a retrospective cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, M.; Chapman, R.S.; Vermeulen, R.; Tian, L.W.; Zheng, T.Z.; Chen, B.E.; Engels, E.A.; He, X.Z.; Blair, A.; Lan, Q. [NCI, Bethesda, MD (USA)

    2009-02-15

    In Xuanwei County, China, unvented indoor coal burning is strongly associated with increased risk of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the impact of coal burning and stove improvement on risk of pneumonia is not clear. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among all farmers born 1917 through 1951 and living in Xuanwei as of 1 January 1976. The analysis included a total of 42,422 cohort members. Follow-up identified all deaths in the cohort from 1976 through 1996. Ages at entry into and at exit from follow-up ranged from 24 to 59 years and from 25 to 80 years, respectively. The record search detected 225 deaths from pneumonia, and 32,332 (76%) were alive as of 31 December 1996. We constructed multivariable Cox models (time variable = age) to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Use of coal, especially smokeless coal, was positively associated with pneumonia mortality. Annual tonnage and lifetime duration of smoky and smokeless coal use were positively associated with pneumonia mortality. Stove improvement was associated with a 50% reduction in pneumonia deaths (smoky coal users: HR, 0.521; 95% CI, 0.340-0.798; smokeless coal users: HR, 0.449; 95% CI, 0.215-0.937). Our analysis is the first to suggest that indoor air pollution from unvented coal burning is an important risk factor for pneumonia death in adults and that improving ventilation by installing a chimney is an effective measure to decrease it.

  4. Residential space heating with wood burning stoves. Energy efficiency and indoor climate; Boligopvarmning ved braendefyring. Energieffektivitet og indeklima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Ole Michael; Afshari, A.; Bergsoee, N.C.; Carvalho, R. [Miljoestyrelsen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Aalborg Univ.. Statens Byggeforskningsinstitut, Aalborg (Denmark))

    2012-11-01

    Two issues turn up concerning how to use wood-burning stoves in modern homes. The first is whether wood-burning stoves in future may still act as a genuine heat source, given that new and refurbished single-family houses retain the heat much better than older ones and therefore need less and less energy for space heating. The second issue is whether it will still be possible to use wood-burning stoves in modern houses where the air exchange is controlled by mechanical ventilation or possibly heat recovery. It is a question whether firing techniques can be developed that will work in airtight houses with mechanical ventilation and negative pressure, so that harmful particle emissions can be avoided. To illustrate the first issue, a field study was designed to look carefully at seven modern wood-burning stoves that were set up in six new houses and one older house and investigated, both in terms of firing and heat release. As a background for this part of the study, a heat balance calculation was made for each house. The question is, whether wood-burning stoves will also in the future have a role to play as a heating source. Modern houses grow ever tighter and only need to be supplied with a small quantity of heat. The new Danish Buildings Requirement, 2010 has resulted in a further reduction of 25 % of the energy demand, including the energy supply for heating. However, the new requirements imply that the heating season eventually become so short that a traditional central heating installation becomes superfluous. This means that by using the small amounts of wood cut in gardens and hedgerows of the neighbourhood, a wood-burning stove will, in principle, cover the heating demand. Therefore, the question is rather whether a wood-burning stove is manufactured that can successfully be adapted to new houses. As a consequence of this development, future stoves must be further scaled down in order to meet the heating demand of a modern low-energy house and the stoves must

  5. Fuelwood savings and carbon emission reductions by the use of improved cooking stoves in an Afromontane forest, Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dresen, E.; DeVries, B.R.; Herold, M.; Verchot, L.; Müller, R.

    2014-01-01

    In many Sub-Saharan African countries, fuelwood collection is among the most important drivers of deforestation and particularly forest degradation. In a detailed field study in the Kafa region of southern Ethiopia, we assessed the potential of efficient cooking stoves to mitigate the negative

  6. Does pan diameter influence carbon monoxide levels during heating of water to boiling point with a camping stove?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh-Smith, Simon; Stevenson, Richard; Watt, Martin; Watt, Ian; McFadyen, Angus; Grant, Stan

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether pan diameter influences carbon monoxide (CO) concentration during heating of water to boiling point with a camping stove. The hypothesis was that increasing pan diameter increases CO concentration because of greater flame dispersal and a larger flame. This was a randomized, prospective study. A Coleman Dual Fuel 533 stove was used to heat pans of water to boiling point, with CO concentration monitored every 30 seconds for 5 minutes. The stove was inside a partially ventilated 200-L cardboard box model that was inside an environmental chamber at -6 degrees C. Water temperature, water volume, and flame characteristics were all standardized. Ten trials were performed for each of 2 pan diameters (base diameters of 165 mm [small] and 220 mm [large]). There was a significant difference (P = .002) between the pans for CO levels at each measurement interval from 60 seconds onward. These differences were markedly larger after 90 seconds, with a mean difference of 185 ppm (95% CI 115, 276 ppm) for all the results from 120 seconds onwards. This study has shown that there is significantly higher CO production with a large-diameter pan compared with a small-diameter pan. These findings were evident by using a camping stove to heat water to boiling point when a maximum blue flame was present throughout. Thus, in enclosed environments it is recommended that small-diameter pans be used in an attempt to prevent high CO levels.

  7. Indoor Wood-Burning Stove and Fireplace Use and Breast Cancer in a Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Alexandra J; Sandler, Dale P

    2017-07-18

    Indoor burning of fuel for heating or cooking releases carcinogens. Little is known about the impact of indoor air pollution from wood-burning stoves or fireplaces on breast cancer risk. In a large prospective cohort study, we evaluated the risk of breast cancer in relation to indoor heating and cooking practices. Sister Study participants ( n =50,884) were recruited from 2003–2009. Breast cancer–free women in the United States or Puerto Rico, 35–74 y old, with a sister with breast cancer were eligible. Participants completed questionnaires on indoor heating and cooking practices for both their enrollment and their longest adult residence. Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the association between indoor heating/cooking and breast cancer. A total of 2,416 breast cancer cases were diagnosed during follow-up (mean=6.4 y). Having an indoor wood-burning stove/fireplace in the longest adult residence was associated with a higher breast cancer risk [HR=1.11 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.22)]; the risk increased with average frequency of use [≥once/week, HR=1.17 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.34)] (p for trend=0.01). An elevated HR was seen for women burning wood [HR=1.09 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.21)] or natural gas/propane [HR=1.15 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.32)]. No association was observed for burning artificial fire-logs [HR=0.98 (95% CI: 0.85, 1.12)] except among women from western states [HR=1.36 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.81)]. In this prospective study, using an indoor wood-burning stove/fireplace in the longest adult residence at least once a week and burning either wood or natural gas/propane was associated with a modestly higher risk of breast cancer. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP827.

  8. Slow heat release - solid fuel stove with acetat-trihydrate heat storage sodium; Slow heat release - Braendeovn med salthydratvarmelager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielke, U.; Bjerrum, M.; Noergaard, T. (Teknologisk Institut, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2012-07-01

    Of the 700,000 solid fuel stoves in Denmark, 600,000 are installed in permanent residences, and 100,000 are installed in summer cottages. Recent examinations have shown that in the heating season, these stoves contribute with a not negligible share of air pollution in the cities. The reason is often inexpedient firing and an inappropriate performance of the stove. In many cases the thermal output of the stove exceeds the heating demand of a modern residence; and the user typically reduces the stove's combustion air supply with the purpose of lowering the temperature of the accommodation space. The result is a sooting combustion followed by undesired and environmentally damaging emissions. In worst case the user fires throughout the night reducing the air to an absolutely minimum. In these situations the fuel smoulders all night, and the stove emits large amounts of undesirable and unhealthy emissions. By constructing the stove with a heat storage that can accumulate the heat from the stove and emit the heat later (when not firing), the problem with the unhealthy ''night firings'' should be eliminated. The project started with a pre-examination regarding suitable materials for a heat storage and a literature study of the subject. By using an OGC material, in this case sodiumacetat-trihydrat, the weight of the stove, in spite of the heat storage, could be held within reasonable frames, since 130 kg PCM can contain the same heat amount as 1,200 kg stone. The great challenge was to compensate for PCM's poor heat conductivities, to distribute the heat in the whole heat storage, making it melt regularly without generating local boiling. This problem was solved by construction measures. The system with sodiumacetat-trihydrat, which melts by 58 deg. C, came to function satisfactorily. 14 hours after the last firing, the temperature of the heat storage was 30 deg. C. The tests with PCM were followed by an extensive emission measuring program

  9. Measurement and modeling of indoor air pollution in rural households with multiple stove interventions in Yunnan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Zohir; Campanella, Luke; Gray, Christen; Al Masud, Abdullah; Marter-Kenyon, Jessica; Pennise, David; Charron, Dana; Zuzhang, Xia

    2013-03-01

    In the developing world, indoor air pollution (IAP) created from solid fuel used in traditional biomass cook stoves is a leading contributor of poor respiratory health, global burden of disease, and greenhouse pollutant emissions. In the present study, we piloted an experimental cross-sectional monitoring and evaluation design with 30 households in rural Lijiang and Deqin counties in northwest Yunnan province, China. This approach offers the ability to examine the effectiveness of improved cook stove (ICS) programs with a much smaller sample size than the typical population based pre- and post-intervention study that requires a large sample representative of the population. Continuous PM2.5 was measured with the UCB (currently known as UCB-PATS) and the TSI DustTrak and continuous CO was measured with the HOBO CO logger. Using the traditional method of cooking and heating, mean 24-h PM2.5 and CO concentrations in the kitchen were measured in the range of 0.15-0.71 mg m-3 for PM2.5 and 3.0-11 ppm for CO. These concentrations were compared to using a combination of improved stoves in the kitchen where PM2.5 and CO concentrations were measured in the range of 0.08-0.18 mg m-3 for PM2.5 and 0.7-5.5 ppm for CO. These concentrations yielded statistically significant reduction in IAP when replacing the traditional fireplace or traditional stove with an improved stove combination. Finally, we show a strong correlation between CO and PM2.5 (R2 = 0.72-0.76). The combination of this experimental design along with the monitoring and evaluation protocol presented here may provide a robust framework to rapidly assess the effectiveness of ICS interventions in progress.

  10. Particulate Matter 2.5 Exposure and Self-Reported Use of Wood Stoves and Other Indoor Combustion Sources in Urban Nonsmoking Homes in Norway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annah B Wyss

    Full Text Available Few studies have examined particulate matter (PM exposure from self-reported use of wood stoves and other indoor combustion sources in urban settings in developed countries. We measured concentrations of indoor PM < 2.5 microns (PM2.5 for one week with the MicroPEM™ nephelometer in 36 households in the greater Oslo, Norway metropolitan area. We examined indoor PM2.5 levels in relation to use of wood stoves and other combustion sources during a 7 day monitoring period using mixed effects linear models with adjustment for ambient PM2.5 levels. Mean hourly indoor PM2.5 concentrations were higher (p = 0.04 for the 14 homes with wood stove use (15.6 μg/m3 than for the 22 homes without (12.6 μg/m3. Moreover, mean hourly PM2.5 was higher (p = 0.001 for use of wood stoves made before 1997 (6 homes, 20.2 μg/m3, when wood stove emission limits were instituted in Norway, compared to newer wood stoves (8 homes, 11.9 μg/m3 which had mean hourly values similar to control homes. Increased PM2.5 levels during diary-reported burning of candles was detected independently of concomitant wood stove use. These results suggest that self-reported use of wood stoves, particularly older stoves, and other combustion sources, such as candles, are associated with indoor PM2.5 measurements in an urban population from a high income country.

  11. Guided synthesis of accumulative solutions for the conceptual design of an efficient stove working with biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Álvarez Cabrales, Alexis; Gaskins Espinosa, Benjamín Gabriel; Pérez Rodríguez, Roberto; Simeón Monet, Rolando Esteban

    2014-01-01

    The conceptual design is closely related to a product functional structure and the search of solution principles for its definition. This work exposes an accumulative method for the traceability of the functional structure that implements the guided conceptual synthesis of solutions in the preliminary analysis of this designing process stage. The method constitutes a contribution to Pahls and Beitzs classic design model. In it, the functional information system is manipulated, providing the designer with a help so that he can examine the different solutions that are obtained, giving him the possibility of selecting the most convenient one. The guided analysis of the accumulative solutions synthesis is illustrated by means of the conceptual design of an efficient stove working with biomass. (author)

  12. Available exhaust gas power in different configurations in a pellet stove plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granada, E.; Patino, D.; Collazo, J.; Moran, J.C.; Porteiro, J. [Vigo University, E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende, s/n, 36200 Vigo (Spain)

    2009-12-15

    With a view to finding the best configuration for a small cogeneration system based on the pellet combustion process, exergetic analysis was applied to a small pellet stove. The evaluation focuses on fume exergetic content for power generation purposes. Preheated air, secondary air, fume recirculation and basis configurations were studied. Global exergetic calculation was developed at these configurations based on experimental correlations of energy and emissions. The influences of the pellet feeding rate, excess air, secondary air and fume recirculation were studied. The results for multiple configurations are discussed and the best one is presented. Results show that CO emissions have a major influence on fume exergetic content, although if emissions diminish only a slight thermomechanical exergetic efficiency increase is expected. (author)

  13. Influence of the operating modes of wood-fired stoves on particle emissions; Einfluss der Betriebsweise auf die Partikelemissionen von Holzoefen. Projektzusatz 1+2 zum Projekt Wirkung von Verbrennungspartikeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klippel, N.; Nussbaumer, T.

    2007-03-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) examines the influence of the operating characteristics of wood-fired stoves on their particle emissions. Four types of stove are compared: A metal stove with small combustion chamber and a low mass of ceramic lining, a stove with a large combustion chamber and heavier ceramic lining, a newly designed stove with two-stage combustion using gasification and gas oxidation in a separate combustion chamber using secondary air and a modern pellet-fired stove operated with wood and straw pellets. The report describes the measurement programme and presents the results obtained using gravimetric measurements. The spectrum of particle emissions measured for the four types of stove are presented and discussed. The correlation of carbon monoxide and fine-dust emissions is examined. The results of biological tests and the chemical analysis of the dust are discussed.

  14. Emission factors from biomass burning in three types of appliances: fireplace, woodstove and pellet stove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Márcio; Vicente, Estela; Calvo, Ana; Nunes, Teresa; Tarelho, Luis; Alves, Célia

    2014-05-01

    In the last years, the importance of biomass fuels has increased mainly for two reasons. One of them is the effort to control the emissions of greenhouse gases, and on the other hand, the increasing costs associated with fossil fuels. Besides that, biomass burning is now recognised as one of the major sources contributing to high concentrations of particulate matter, especially during winter time. Southern European countries have a lack of information regarding emission profiles from biomass burning. Because of that, in most source apportionment studies, the information used comes from northern and alpine countries, whose combustion appliances, fuels and habits are different from those in Mediterranean countries. Due to this lack of information, series of tests using different types of equipment, as well as fuels, were carried out in order to obtain emission profiles and emission factors that correspond to the reality in southern European countries. Tests involved three types of biomass appliances used in Portugal, a fireplace, a woodstove and a modern pellet stove. Emission factors (mg.kg-1 fuel, dry basis) for CO, THC and PM10 were obtained. CO emission factors ranged from 38, for pine on the woodstove, to 84 for eucalyptus in the fireplace. THC emissions were between 4 and 24, for pine in the woodstove and eucalyptus in the fireplace, respectively. PM10 emission factors were in the range from 3.99, for pine in the woodstove, to 17.3 for eucalyptus in the fireplace. On average, the emission factors obtained for the fireplace are 1.5 (CO) to 4 (THC) times higher than those of the woodstove. The fireplace has emission factors for CO, THC and PM10 10, 35 and 32 times, respectively, higher than the pellet stove.

  15. Enablers and Barriers to Large-Scale Uptake of Improved Solid Fuel Stoves: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzzolo, Elisa; Stanistreet, Debbi; Pope, Daniel; Bruce, Nigel G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Globally, 2.8 billion people rely on household solid fuels. Reducing the resulting adverse health, environmental, and development consequences will involve transitioning through a mix of clean fuels and improved solid fuel stoves (IS) of demonstrable effectiveness. To date, achieving uptake of IS has presented significant challenges. Objectives: We performed a systematic review of factors that enable or limit large-scale uptake of IS in low- and middle-income countries. Methods: We conducted systematic searches through multidisciplinary databases, specialist websites, and consulting experts. The review drew on qualitative, quantitative, and case studies and used standardized methods for screening, data extraction, critical appraisal, and synthesis. We summarized our findings as “factors” relating to one of seven domains—fuel and technology characteristics; household and setting characteristics; knowledge and perceptions; finance, tax, and subsidy aspects; market development; regulation, legislation, and standards; programmatic and policy mechanisms—and also recorded issues that impacted equity. Results: We identified 31 factors influencing uptake from 57 studies conducted in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. All domains matter. Although factors such as offering technologies that meet household needs and save fuel, user training and support, effective financing, and facilitative government action appear to be critical, none guarantee success: All factors can be influential, depending on context. The nature of available evidence did not permit further prioritization. Conclusions: Achieving adoption and sustained use of IS at a large scale requires that all factors, spanning household/community and program/societal levels, be assessed and supported by policy. We propose a planning tool that would aid this process and suggest further research to incorporate an evaluation of effectiveness. Citation: Rehfuess EA, Puzzolo E, Stanistreet D, Pope D, Bruce

  16. Quality of charcoal produced using micro gasification and how the new cook stove works in rural Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njenga, Mary; Mahmoud, Yahia; Mendum, Ruth; Iiyama, Muyiki; Jamnadass, Ramni; Roing de Nowina, Kristina; Sundberg, Cecilia

    2016-09-01

    Wood based energy is the main source of cooking and heating fuel in Sub-Saharan Africa. Its use rises as the population increases. Inefficient cook stoves result in fuel wastage and health issues associated with smoke in the kitchen. As users are poor women, they tend not to be consulted on cook stove development, hence the need for participatory development of efficient woodfuel cooking systems. This paper presents the findings of a study carried out in Embu, Kenya to assess energy use efficiency and concentrations of carbon monoxide and fine particulate matter from charcoal produced using gasifier cook stoves, compared to conventional wood charcoal. Charcoal made from Grevillea robusta prunings, Zea mays cob (maize cob) and Cocos nucifera (coconut shells) had calorific values of 26.5 kJ g-1, 28.7 kJ g-1 and 31.7 kJ g-1 respectively, which are comparable to conventional wood charcoal with calorific values of 33.1 kJ g-1. Cooking with firewood in a gasifier cook stove and use of the resultant charcoal as by-product to cook another meal in a conventional charcoal stove saved 41% of the amount of fuel compared to cooking with firewood in the traditional three stone open fire. Cooking with firewood based on G. robusta prunings in the traditional open fire resulted in a concentration of fine particulate matter of 2600 μg m-3, which is more than 100 times greater than from cooking with charcoal made from G. robusta prunings in a gasifier. Thirty five percent of households used the gasifier for cooking dinner and lunch, and cooks preferred using it for food that took a short time to prepare. Although the gasifier cook stove is energy and emission efficient there is a need for it to be developed further to better suit local cooking preferences. The energy transition in Africa will have to include cleaner and more sustainable wood based cooking systems.

  17. Fuel Efficient Stoves for Darfur Camps of Internally DisplacedPersons - Report of Field Trip to North and South Darfur, Nov. 16 -Dec.17, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Gadgil, Ashok; Jacobs, Mark; Lee, Yoo-Mi

    2006-02-01

    Approximately 2.2 million internally displaced persons (''IDPs'') in Darfur are living in dense camps scattered in arid areas with low fuelwood productivity. Unsustainable harvesting of fuelwood by the IDPs has created ever increasing zones of denudation, that now (in November 2005) have reached several kilometers from the camp boundaries. Leaving the safety of the camps to fetch fuelwood from farther and farther away imposes great risk and hardship on the IDP women. Three different metal fuel efficient stove (''FES'') designs were tested in Darfur IDP camps for their suitability to substantially reduce the fuelwood needs of IDPs. The mud-and-dung ''ITDG'' stoves being promoted under the current FES program were also examined and tested. A modified design of the ITDG mud-and-dung stove, ''Avi'', was developed, built and tested. Systematic informal surveys of IDP households were undertaken in North and South Darfur to understand the household parameters related to family size, food, fuel, cooking habits, cooking pots, expenditure on fuel, and preferences related to alternative ways to spend time/money if fuel could be saved. Surveys found that a significant fraction of families are missing meals for lack of fuel (50% in South Darfur, and 90% in the North Darfur camps visited by the mission). About 60% of women in South Darfur, and about 90% of women in North Darfur camps purchase fuelwood. Selling some of the food rations to purchase fuel to cook meals was significant (40%) in South Darfur and has become common (80%) in North Darfur. The LBNL mission found that two of the metal stoves and the mud-and-dung Avi can significantly reduce fuelwood consumption using the same fuel, pot, cooking methods, and food ingredients used by Darfur IDPs. The most suitable design for Darfur conditions would be a modified ''Tara'' stove. With training of the cooks in tending the fire

  18. Mitigation of Short-Lived Climate Pollutants from Residential Coal Heating and Combined Heating/Cooking Stoves: Impacts on the Cryosphere, Policy Options, and Co-benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafe, Z.; Anenberg, S.; Klimont, Z.; Kupiainen, K.; Lewis, J.; Metcalfe, J.; Pearson, P.

    2017-12-01

    Residential solid fuel combustion for cooking, heating, and other energy services contributes to indoor and outdoor air pollution, and creates impacts on the cryosphere. Solid fuel use often occurs in colder climates and at higher elevations, where a wide range of combustion emissions can reduce reflectivity of the snow- and ice-covered surfaces, causing climatic warming. Reducing short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs), such as black carbon (BC), could have substantial climate and health co-benefits, especially in areas where emissions influence the cryosphere. A review of existing literature and emissions estimates, conducted as part of the Warsaw Summit on BC and Other Emissions from Residential Coal Heating Stoves and Combined Cooking/Heating Stoves, found little nationally-representative data on the fuels and technologies used for heating and combined cooking/heating. The GAINS model estimates that 24 million tonnes of coal equivalent were combusted by households for space heating globally in 2010, releasing 190 kilotons (kt) BC. Emissions from combined cooking/heating are virtually unknown. Policy instruments could mitigate cryosphere-relevant emissions of SLCPs from residential heating or cooking. These include indoor air quality guidelines, stove emission limits, bans on the use of specific fuels, regulatory codes that stipulate when burning can occur, stove changeout programs, and voluntary public education campaigns. These measures are being implemented in countries such as Chile (fuelwood moisture reduction campaign, energy efficiency, heating system improvements), Mongolia (stove renovation, fuel switching), Peru (improved stove programs), Poland (district heating, local fuel bans), United States (stove emission regulation) and throughout the European Community (Ecodesign Directive). Few, if any, of these regulations are likely to reduce emissions from combined cooking/heating. This research team found no global platform to create and share model

  19. Community effectiveness of stove and health education interventions for reducing exposure to indoor air pollution from solid fuels in four Chinese provinces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zheng; Jin Yinlong; Liu Fan; Cheng Yibin; Liu Jiang; Kang Jiaqi; He Gongli; Tang Ning; Chen Xun; Baris, Enis; Ezzati, Majid

    2006-01-01

    Indoor air pollution (IAP) from biomass and coal is a leading cause of mortality and disease burden in the developing world. There is limited evidence of the community effectiveness of interventions for reducing IAP exposure. We conducted a community-based intervention study of stove and health education interventions in four low-income Chinese provinces: Gansu, Guizhou, Inner Mongolia, and Shaanxi. Separate townships in one county in each province were assigned to stove plus behavioral interventions, behavioral interventions alone, and control. Data on household fuel and stove use, and on concentrations of respirable particles (RPM), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), were collected in peak and late heating seasons before and after interventions. The effectiveness of interventions was evaluated using difference-in-difference analysis. Pollutant concentrations were also measured in controlled tests, in which stoves were operated by expert users. In controlled tests, there was consistent and substantial reduction in concentrations of RPM (>88%) and CO (>66%); in the two coal-using provinces, SO 2 concentrations declined more in Shaanxi than in Guizhou. In community implementation, combined stove and behavioral interventions reduced the concentrations of pollutants in rooms where heating was the main purpose of stove use in the peak heating season, with smaller, non-significant, reduction in late heating season. Gansu was the only province where combined stove and behavioral interventions led to pollution reduction where cooking was the primary purpose of stove use. Compared to the control group, no significant IAP reductions were seen in groups with health education alone

  20. Differential effects of smoking on lung cancer mortality before and after household stove improvement in Xuanwei, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.M.; Chapman, R.S.; Shen, M.; Lubin, J.H.; Silverman, D.T.; He, X.; Hosgood, H.D.; Chen, B.E.; Rajaraman, P.; Caporaso, N.E.; Fraumeni, J.F.; Blair, A.; Lan, Q. [NCI, Bethesda, MD (USA)

    2010-08-24

    In Xuanwei County, Yunnan Province, China, lung cancer mortality rates in both males and females are among the highest in China. We evaluated differential effects of smoking on lung cancer mortality before and after household stove improvement with chimney to reduce exposure to smoky coal emissions in the unique cohort in Xuanwei, China. Effects of independent variables on lung cancer mortality were measured as hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals using a multivariable Cox regression model that included separate time-dependent variables for smoking duration (years) before and after stove improvement. We found that the effect of smoking on lung cancer risk becomes considerably stronger after chimney installation and consequent reduction of indoor coal smoke exposure.

  1. Comparison of carbon monoxide poisonings originated from coal stove and natural gas and the evaluation of Neutrophil/Lymphocyte ratio

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    Yahya Kemal Günaydın

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study is to present the epidemiologic, clinical, laboratory and prognosis differences between the coal stove origin poisoning and natural gas leakages. We also aimed to investigate relationship between the severity of clinical picture, prognosis, complications develop in CO poisoning with neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR at the initial admission. Methods: All the acute carbon monoxide cases who applied to Ankara Training and Research Hospital Emergency Medicine Clinic between October 2009 and April 2010 were included to this prospective study. CO poisoning diagnosis was made by the history of CO poisoning with carboxyl hemoglobin (COHb concentration is over 10%. 100 patients were included to our study. Results: Of the patients, 55(55% were poisoned from the coal-stove and 45(45% from natural gas leakage. The mean COHb level of the natural gas group was significantly high (p=0.01. The mean value of GCS of the natural gas group was significantly lower (p=0.018. The number of patients with indication for HBO therapy were 17 and 6 in the natural gas group and coal-stove group, respectively, being significantly higher in the natural gas group(p=0.001. There was no statistically significant relationship between the value of NLR and values of COHb, troponin, and GCS (p=0.872, p=0.470, and p=0.896, respectively. Conclusions: Carbon monoxide poisoning from natural gas leakage is more toxic than that from the coal-stove. There is no relationship between NLR at the time of presentation and the severity of clinical findings, prognosis and complications.

  2. Factors Influencing Household Uptake of Improved Solid Fuel Stoves in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Qualitative Systematic Review

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    Stanistreet Debbi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Household burning of solid fuels in traditional stoves is detrimental to health, the environment and development. A range of improved solid fuel stoves (IS are available but little is known about successful approaches to dissemination. This qualitative systematic review aimed to identify factors that influence household uptake of IS in low- and middle-income countries. Extensive searches were carried out and studies were screened and extracted using established systematic review methods. Fourteen qualitative studies from Asia, Africa and Latin-America met the inclusion criteria. Thematic synthesis was used to synthesise data and findings are presented under seven framework domains. Findings relate to user and stakeholder perceptions and highlight the importance of cost, good stove design, fuel and time savings, health benefits, being able to cook traditional dishes and cleanliness in relation to uptake. Creating demand, appropriate approaches to business, and community involvement, are also discussed. Achieving and sustaining uptake is complex and requires consideration of a broad range of factors, which operate at household, community, regional and national levels. Initiatives aimed at IS scale up should include quantitative evaluations of effectiveness, supplemented with qualitative studies to assess factors affecting uptake, with an equity focus.

  3. How do People in Rural India Perceive Improved Stoves and Clean Fuel? Evidence from Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand

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    Vasundhara Bhojvaid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improved cook stoves (ICS have been widely touted for their potential to deliver the triple benefits of improved household health and time savings, reduced deforestation and local environmental degradation, and reduced emissions of black carbon, a significant short-term contributor to global climate change. Yet diffusion of ICS technologies among potential users in many low-income settings, including India, remains slow, despite decades of promotion. This paper explores the variation in perceptions of and preferences for ICS in Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand, as revealed through a series of semi-structured focus groups and interviews from 11 rural villages or hamlets. We find cautious interest in new ICS technologies, and observe that preferences for ICS are positively related to perceptions of health and time savings. Other respondent and community characteristics, e.g., gender, education, prior experience with clean stoves and institutions promoting similar technologies, and social norms as perceived through the actions of neighbours, also appear important. Though they cannot be considered representative, our results suggest that efforts to increase adoption and use of ICS in rural India will likely require a combination of supply-chain improvements and carefully designed social marketing and promotion campaigns, and possibly incentives, to reduce the up-front cost of stoves.

  4. A study of selected aspects of the operation of thermoelectric generator incorporated in a biomass-fired stove

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    Sornek Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High demands in the field of energy efficiency and clean combustion make it necessary to looking for the new developments in the field of stoves, fireplaces and stove-fireplaces with accumulation. An interesting idea is to use the thermoelectric modules, which receive a heat from flue gas and convert it to the electricity. Electricity generated in this way may be used to power combustion optimizers and other components. This paper shows results of studied carried out to determine the possibility of combined heat and power generation using the stove-fireplace with accumulation. Thermoelectric generator with maximum hot side temperature at a level of 150°C was placed on the surface of the exchanger. Cooling down was realized using the dedicated water exchanger as well as the heat sink without and with an air fan. The experimental results allowed to define the effect of the different cooling systems on the output TEG voltage. Moreover, dependence of the current-voltage characteristics and generated power from the temperature was obtained.

  5. Influence of phosphorus content of coconut oil on deposit and performance of plant oil pressure stoves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzeisen, M.; Mueller, J. [Institut fuer Agrartechnik, Universitaet Hohenheim (440e), Garbenstrasse 9, D-70593 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Influence of phosphorus lipids on formation of deposits and performance of plant oil pressure stoves was investigated. Refined coconut oil with an original phosphorous content of 5.9 mg/kg was used as base for fuel blends by adding lecithin to adjust increased phosphorous concentrations of 32.2, 51.6 and 63.0 mg/kg. The fuel blends were analysed for acid value, iodine value, total contamination, ash content and Conradson carbon residue according to standard methods. In burning trials, the specific fuel consumption, the required frequency of nozzle cleaning and the amount of deposits in the vaporizer were measured. Results showed an exponential increase of deposits in the vaporizer when phosphorous content was increased: deposits amounted to 0.12 g/kg of consumed fuel for unblended coconut oil and 0.92 g/kg for the blend with the highest phosphorous content. Furthermore, increased phosphorous content caused higher fuel consumption of 0.375 kg/h compared to 0.316 kg/h for the control. (author)

  6. Lessons from a pilot program to induce stove replacements in Chile: design, implementation and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Walter; Chávez, Carlos; Salgado, Hugo; Vásquez, Felipe

    2017-11-01

    We present the design, implementation, and evaluation of a subsidy program to introduce cleaner and more efficient household wood combustion technologies. The program was conducted in the city of Temuco, one of the most polluted cities in southern Chile, as a pilot study to design a new national stove replacement initiative for pollution control. In this city, around 90% of the total emissions of suspended particulate matter is caused by households burning wood. We created a simulated market in which households could choose among different combustion technologies with an assigned subsidy. The subsidy was a relevant factor in the decision to participate, and the inability to secure credit was a significant constraint for the participation of low-income households. Due to several practical difficulties and challenges associated with the implementation of large-scale programs that encourage technological innovation at the household level, it is strongly advisable to start with a small-scale pilot that can provide useful insights into the final design of a fuller, larger-scale program.

  7. How the user can influence particulate emissions from residential wood and pellet stoves: Emission factors for different fuels and burning conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fachinger, Friederike; Drewnick, Frank; Gieré, Reto; Borrmann, Stephan

    2017-06-01

    For a common household wood stove and a pellet stove we investigated the dependence of emission factors for various gaseous and particulate pollutants on burning phase, burning condition, and fuel. Ideal and non-ideal burning conditions (dried wood, under- and overload, small logs, logs with bark, excess air) were used. We tested 11 hardwood species (apple, ash, bangkirai, birch, beech, cherry, hickory, oak, olive, plum, sugar maple), 4 softwood species (Douglas fir, pine, spruce, spruce/fir), treated softwood, beech and oak wood briquettes, paper briquettes, brown coal, wood chips, and herbaceous species (miscanthus, Chinese silver grass) as fuel. Particle composition (black carbon, non-refractory, and some semi-refractory species) was measured continuously. Repeatability was shown to be better for the pellet stove than for the wood stove. It was shown that the user has a strong influence on wood stove emission behavior both by selection of the fuel and of the burning conditions: Combustion efficiency was found to be low at both very low and very high burn rates, and influenced particle properties such as particle number, mass, and organic content in a complex way. No marked differences were found for the emissions from different wood species. For non-woody fuels, much higher emission factors could be observed (up to five-fold increase). Strongest enhancement of emission factors was found for burning of small or dried logs (up to six-fold), and usage of excess air (two- to three-fold). Real world pellet stove emissions can be expected to be much closer to laboratory-derived emission factors than wood stove emissions, due to lower dependence on user operation.

  8. Effects of a liquefied petroleum gas stove intervention on pollutant exposure and adult cardiopulmonary outcomes (CHAP): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandiño-Del-Rio, Magdalena; Goodman, Dina; Kephart, Josiah L; Miele, Catherine H; Williams, Kendra N; Moazzami, Mitra; Fung, Elizabeth C; Koehler, Kirsten; Davila-Roman, Victor G; Lee, Kathryn A; Nangia, Saachi; Harvey, Steven A; Steenland, Kyle; Gonzales, Gustavo F; Checkley, William

    2017-11-03

    Biomass fuel smoke is a leading risk factor for the burden of disease worldwide. International campaigns are promoting the widespread adoption of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) in resource-limited settings. However, it is unclear if the introduction and use of LPG stoves, in settings where biomass fuels are used daily, reduces pollution concentration exposure, improves health outcomes, or how cultural and social barriers influence the exclusive adoption of LPG stoves. We will conduct a randomized controlled, field intervention trial of LPG stoves and fuel distribution in rural Puno, Peru, in which we will enroll 180 female participants aged 25-64 years and follow them for 2 years. After enrollment, we will collect information on sociodemographic characteristics, household characteristics, and cooking practices. During the first year of the study, LPG stoves and fuel tanks will be delivered to the homes of 90 intervention participants. During the second year, participants in the intervention arm will keep their LPG stoves, but the gas supply will stop. Control participants will receive LPG stoves and vouchers to obtain free fuel from distributors at the beginning of the second year, but gas will not be delivered. Starting at baseline, we will collect longitudinal measurements of respiratory symptoms, pulmonary function, blood pressure, endothelial function, carotid artery intima-media thickness, 24-h dietary recalls, exhaled carbon monoxide, quality-of-life indicators, and stove-use behaviors. Environmental exposure assessments will occur six times over the 2-year follow-up period, consisting of 48-h personal exposure and kitchen concentration measurements of fine particulate matter and carbon monoxide, and 48-h kitchen concentrations of nitrogen dioxide for a subset of 100 participants. Findings from this study will allow us to better understand behavioral patterns, environmental exposures, and cardiovascular and pulmonary outcomes resulting from the adoption of

  9. Emission of Metals from Pelletized and Uncompressed Biomass Fuels Combustion in Rural Household Stoves in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Tong, Yindong; Wang, Huanhuan; Chen, Long; Ou, Langbo; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Guohua; Zhu, Yan

    2014-07-01

    Effort of reducing CO2 emissions in developing countries may require an increasing utilization of biomass fuels. Biomass pellets seem well-suited for residential biomass markets. However, there is limited quantitative information on pollutant emissions from biomass pellets burning, especially those measured in real applications. In this study, biomass pellets and raw biomass fuels were burned in a pellet burner and a conventional stove respectively, in rural households, and metal emissions were determined. Results showed that the emission factors (EFs) ranged 3.20-5.57 (Pb), 5.20-7.58 (Cu), 0.11-0.23 (Cd), 12.67-39.00 (As), 0.59-1.31 mg/kg (Ni) for pellets, and 0.73-1.34 (Pb), 0.92-4.48 (Cu), 0.08-0.14 (Cd), 7.29-13.22 (As), 0.28-0.62 (Ni) mg/kg for raw biomass. For unit energy delivered to cooking vessels, the EFs ranged 0.42-0.77 (Pb), 0.79-1.16 (Cu), 0.01-0.03 (Cd), 1.93-5.09 (As), 0.08-0.19 mg/MJ (Ni) for pellets, and 0.30-0.56 (Pb), 0.41-1.86 (Cu), 0.04-0.06 (Cd), 3.25-5.49 (As), 0.12-0.26 (Ni) mg/MJ for raw biomass. This study found that moisture, volatile matter and modified combustion efficiency were the important factors affecting metal emissions. Comparisons of the mass-based and task-based EFs found that biomass pellets produced higher metal emissions than the same amount of raw biomass. However, metal emissions from pellets were not higher in terms of unit energy delivered.

  10. Sustainable energy development strategies in the rural Thailand: The case of the improved cooking stove and the small biogas digester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limmeechokchai, Bundit [Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology, Thammasat University, P.O. Box 22 Thammasat Rangsit Post Office, Pathumthani 12121 (Thailand); Chawana, Saichit [The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2007-06-15

    This paper presents the strategies to overcome barriers to the adoption of improved cooking stove (ICS) and small biogas digester (SBD) technologies in Thailand. Firstly, to obtain the appropriate strategies to implement the ICS and the SBD, a pattern of energy consumption in the residential sector is investigated. Then the potential of reduction of energy consumption and corresponding emissions by the ICS and the SBD is assessed. The identification and ranking of barriers to the adoption of the ICS and the SBD technologies are also investigated. In this study the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) model is used to assess the energy consumption and the corresponding emissions reduction. Then, the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) model is used to identify and rank the barriers. Results from the LEAP model show that the cumulative total energy consumption and corresponding emissions reductions during the period 2002-2030 by the ICS are 27,887.7 ktoe and 10,041.0 thousand tonnes of CO{sub 2} equivalent, respectively. An average emissions reduction cost per tonne of CO{sub 2} equivalent per year is US$ 0.95 for a fuel wood cooking stove and US$ 0.35 for a charcoal cooking stove. Regarding the SBD, the cumulative total liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) consumption reduction and CO{sub 2} mitigation are 5780.9ktoe and 1548.8 thousand tonnes of CO{sub 2} equivalent during the period 2002-2030, respectively. Results from AHP analysis of ranking of barriers show that the three most important barriers in the adoption of the ICS are (i) high investment cost, (ii) lack of information, and (iii) lack of financial sources. For the SBD, the three most important barriers are (i) high investment cost, (ii) lack of financial sources, and (iii) lack of experts and skilled manpower. The sustainable energy triangle strategy (SETS) is implemented to overcome barriers in the adoption of the ICS. Results show that the traditional cooking stoves are successfully replaced

  11. Biomonitoring Human Exposure to Household Air Pollution and Association with Self-reported Health Symptoms – A Stove Intervention Study in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Commodore, Adwoa; Hartinger, Stella; Lewin, Michael; Sjödin, Andreas; Pittman, Erin; Trinidad, Debra; Hubbard, Kendra; Lanata, Claudio F.; Gil, Ana I.; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Naeher, Luke P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Household air pollution (HAP) from indoor biomass stoves contains harmful pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and is a leading risk factor for global disease burden. We used biomonitoring to assess HAP exposure and association with self-reported symptoms in 334 non-smoking Peruvian women to evaluate the efficacy of a stove intervention program. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study within the framework of a community randomized control trial. Using urinary PAH metabolites (OH-PAHs) as the exposure biomarkers, we investigated whether the intervention group (n = 155, with new chimney-equipped stoves) were less exposed to HAP compared to the control group (n = 179, with mostly open-fire stoves). We also estimated associations between the exposure biomarkers, risk factors, and self-reported health symptoms, such as recent eye conditions, respiratory conditions, and headache. Results We observed reduced headache and ocular symptoms in the intervention group than the control group. Urinary 2-naphthol, a suggested biomarker for inhalation PAH exposure, was significantly lower in the intervention group (GM with 95% CI: 13.4 [12.3, 14.6] μg/g creatinine) compared to control group (16.5 [15.0, 18.0] μg/g creatinine). Stove type and/or 2-naphthol was associated with a number of self-reported symptoms, such as red eye (adjusted OR with 95% CI: 3.80 [1.32, 10.9]) in the past 48 h. Conclusions Even with the improved stoves, the biomarker concentrations in this study far exceeded those of the general populations and were higher than a no-observed-genotoxic-effect-level, indicating high exposure and a potential for increased cancer risk in the population. PMID:27680405

  12. Prevalence of Acute Respiratory Infections in Women and Children in Western Sierra Leone due to Smoke from Wood and Charcoal Stoves

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    Eldred Tunde Taylor

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Combustion of biomass fuels (wood and charcoal for cooking releases smoke that contains health damaging pollutants. Women and children are the most affected. Exposure to biomass smoke is associated with acute respiratory infections (ARI. This study investigated the prevalence of ARI potentially caused by smoke from wood and charcoal stoves in Western Sierra Leone, as these two fuels are the predominant fuel types used for cooking. A cross sectional study was conducted for 520 women age 15–45 years; and 520 children under 5 years of age in homes that burn wood and charcoal. A questionnaire assessing demographic, household and exposure characteristics and ARI was administered to every woman who further gave information for the child. Suspended particulate matter (SPM was continuously monitored in fifteen homes. ARI prevalence revealed 32% and 24% for women, 64% and 44% for children in homes with wood and charcoal stoves, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounders for each group, the odds ratio of having suffered from ARI was similar for women, but remained large for children in homes with wood stoves relative to charcoal stoves (OR = 1.14, 95%CI: 0.71–1.82 and (OR = 2.03, 95%CI: 1.31–3.13, respectively. ARI prevalence was higher for children in homes with wood stoves compared with homes with charcoal stoves, but ARI prevalence for both types of fuels is higher compared with reported prevalence elsewhere. To achieve a reduction in ARI would require switching from wood and charcoal to cleaner fuels.

  13. Additional income with open chimneys and stove. Nostalgia, romanticism and thermal comfort; Zusatzgeschaeft mit Oefen und Kaminen. Nostalgisch-romantische Gefuehle und behagliche Waerme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, G. [Buderus Heiztechnik GmbH, Wetzlar (Germany)

    2004-01-01

    Stoves and open fireplaces are coming into fashion again with the trend towards nostalgia and design awareness. Further, wood-fuelled chimneys and stoves are viewed as romantic, and they also provide high thermal comfort. Heating systems experts can get additional income from this trend. (orig.) [German] Kamine und Oefen sind bei vielen Hausbesitzern und Bauherrn wieder in Mode. Dieser Trend ist zum einen Teil eines gestiegenen Nostalgie- und Designbewusstseins. Zum anderen gelten vor allem holzbefeuerte Kamine und Oefen als romantisch und ihre Waerme aufgrund des hohen Strahlungsanteils als behaglich. Fuer den aktiven Heizungsfachhandwerker laesst sich aus dieser Modestroemung ein lukratives Zusatzgeschaeft ableiten. (orig.)

  14. Emission of PCDD/F, PCB, and HCB from combustion of firewood and pellets in residential stoves and boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Björn; Naslund, Morgan; Marklund, Stellan

    2006-08-15

    To assess potential emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) from residential combustion of biofuels, experiments were performed in which various types of pellets and firewood were combusted in four types of stoves and boilers, with both full and reduced rates of air supply. Intermittent combustion of wood pellets resulted in emissions of 11 ng-(WHO-TEQ)/kg combusted fuel (dry weight). A modern, environmentally certified boiler yielded somewhat lower emissions of PCCD/F and PCB than a wood stove. Both gave <0.1 ng(WHO-TEQ)/m3n (1.3-6.5 ng(WHO-TEQ)/kg) and considerably lower emissions than an old boiler (7.0-13 ng(WHO-TEQ)/kg). No positive effect on emissions could be observed in full air combustion (simulating the use of a heat storage tank) compared to combustion with reduced air. Two of the wood combustion experiments included paper and plastic waste fuels. Chlorine-containing plastic waste gave rise to high emissions: ca. 310 ng(WHO-TEQ)/ kg over the whole combustion cycle. The homologue profiles of PCDD/Fs show characteristic differences between ashes and flue gas from combustions with different levels of air supply. These differences do not, however, seem to have any correlation to the relative amount of toxic congeners.

  15. Dioxin emissions from coal combustion in domestic stove: Formation in the chimney and coal chlorine content influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paradiz Bostjan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion experiments conducted in domestic stove burning hard coal demonstrated a predominant influence of the coal chlorine content on the PCDD/F emissions, together with a pronounced effect of the flue gas temperature. PCDD/F concentrations of over 100 ng TEQ/m3, three orders of magnitude higher than in a modern waste incinerator, were measured in the flue gases of a domestic stove when combusting high chlorine coal (0.31 %. The PCDD/F concentrations in the flue gases dropped below 0,5 ng TEQ/m3, when low chlorine coal (0.07 % was used. When low chlorine coal was impregnated with NaCl to obtain 0.38 % chlorine content, the emission of the PCDD/Fs increased by two orders of magnitude. Pronounced nonlinearity of the PCDD/F concentrations related to chlorine content in the coal was observed. The combustion of the high chlorine coal yielded PCDD/F concentrations in flue gases one order of magnitude lower in a fan cooled chimney when compared to an insulated one, thus indicating formation in the chimney. The influence of flue gas temperature on the PCDD/F emissions was less pronounced when burning low chlorine coal. The predominant pathway of the PCDD/F emissions is via flue gases, 99 % of the TEQ in the case of the high chlorine coal for insulated chimney.

  16. Assessing the impact of water filters and improved cook stoves on drinking water quality and household air pollution: a randomised controlled trial in Rwanda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghislaine Rosa

    Full Text Available Diarrhoea and respiratory infections remain the biggest killers of children under 5 years in developing countries. We conducted a 5-month household randomised controlled trial among 566 households in rural Rwanda to assess uptake, compliance and impact on environmental exposures of a combined intervention delivering high-performance water filters and improved stoves for free. Compliance was measured monthly by self-report and spot-check observations. Semi-continuous 24-h PM2.5 monitoring of the cooking area was conducted in a random subsample of 121 households to assess household air pollution, while samples of drinking water from all households were collected monthly to assess the levels of thermotolerant coliforms. Adoption was generally high, with most householders reporting the filters as their primary source of drinking water and the intervention stoves as their primary cooking stove. However, some householders continued to drink untreated water and most continued to cook on traditional stoves. The intervention was associated with a 97.5% reduction in mean faecal indicator bacteria (Williams means 0.5 vs. 20.2 TTC/100 mL, p<0.001 and a median reduction of 48% of 24-h PM2.5 concentrations in the cooking area (p = 0.005. Further studies to increase compliance should be undertaken to better inform large-scale interventions.Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01882777; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=NCT01882777&Search=Search.

  17. Assessing the impact of water filters and improved cook stoves on drinking water quality and household air pollution: a randomised controlled trial in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ghislaine; Majorin, Fiona; Boisson, Sophie; Barstow, Christina; Johnson, Michael; Kirby, Miles; Ngabo, Fidele; Thomas, Evan; Clasen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhoea and respiratory infections remain the biggest killers of children under 5 years in developing countries. We conducted a 5-month household randomised controlled trial among 566 households in rural Rwanda to assess uptake, compliance and impact on environmental exposures of a combined intervention delivering high-performance water filters and improved stoves for free. Compliance was measured monthly by self-report and spot-check observations. Semi-continuous 24-h PM2.5 monitoring of the cooking area was conducted in a random subsample of 121 households to assess household air pollution, while samples of drinking water from all households were collected monthly to assess the levels of thermotolerant coliforms. Adoption was generally high, with most householders reporting the filters as their primary source of drinking water and the intervention stoves as their primary cooking stove. However, some householders continued to drink untreated water and most continued to cook on traditional stoves. The intervention was associated with a 97.5% reduction in mean faecal indicator bacteria (Williams means 0.5 vs. 20.2 TTC/100 mL, pcooking area (p = 0.005). Further studies to increase compliance should be undertaken to better inform large-scale interventions. Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01882777; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=NCT01882777&Search=Search.

  18. 76 FR 2708 - Porcelain-on-Steel Cooking Ware From Taiwan; Top-of-the-Stove Stainless Steel Cooking Ware From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    .... 701- TA-267 and 731-TA-304 (Third Review)] Porcelain-on-Steel Cooking Ware From Taiwan; Top-of-the-Stove Stainless Steel Cooking Ware From Korea AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission...-steel cooking ware from Taiwan and the antidumping and countervailing duty orders on imports of top-of...

  19. 75 FR 62144 - Porcelain-on-Steel Cooking Ware From China and Taiwan; Top-of-the-Stove Stainless Steel Cooking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ...); (Investigation Nos. 701-TA-267 and 731-TA-304 (Third Review))] Porcelain-on-Steel Cooking Ware From China and Taiwan; Top-of- the-Stove Stainless Steel Cooking Ware From Korea AGENCY: United States International... porcelain-on-steel cooking ware from China and Taiwan and the antidumping and countervailing duty orders on...

  20. Impact of the Improved Patsari Biomass Stove on Urinary Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Biomarkers and Carbon Monoxide Exposures in Rural Mexican Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riojas-Rodriguez, Horacio; Schilmann, Astrid; Marron-Mares, Adriana Teresa; Masera, Omar; Li, Zheng; Romanoff, Lovisa; Sjödin, Andreas; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Needham, Larry L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cooking with biomass fuels on open fires results in exposure to health-damaging pollutants such as carbon monoxide (CO), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and particulate matter. Objective: We compared CO exposures and urinary PAH biomarkers pre- and postintervention with an improved biomass stove, the Patsari stove. Methods: In a subsample of 63 women participating in a randomized controlled trial in central Mexico, we measured personal CO exposure for 8 hr during the day using continuous monitors and passive samplers. In addition, first-morning urine samples obtained the next day were analyzed for monohydroxylated PAH metabolites by gas chromatography/isotope dilution/high-resolution mass spectrometry. Exposure data were collected during the use of an open fire (preintervention) and after installation of the improved stove (postintervention) for 47 women, enabling paired comparisons. Results: Median pre- and postintervention values were 4 and 1 ppm for continuous personal CO and 3 and 1 ppm for passive sampler CO, respectively. Postintervention measurements indicated an average reduction of 42% for hydroxylated metabolites of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, and pyrene on a whole-weight concentration basis (micrograms per liter of urine), and a 34% reduction on a creatinine-adjusted basis (micrograms per gram of creatinine). Pre- and postintervention geometric mean values for 1-hydroxypyrene were 3.2 and 2.0 μg/g creatinine, respectively. Conclusion: Use of the Patsari stove significantly reduced CO and PAH exposures in women. However, levels of many PAH biomarkers remained higher than those reported among smokers. PMID:21622083

  1. Poaia [Psychotria ipecacuanha (Brot. Stoves]: aspectos da memória cultural dos poaieiros de Cáceres - Mato Grosso, Brasil Ipecac [Psychotria ipecacuanha (Brot. Stoves]: aspects of cultural memory of "poaieiros" in Cáceres - Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Teixeira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O Brasil está entre os principais exportadores de poaia [Psychotria ipecacuanha (Brot. Stoves] seguido do Panamá e Costa Rica. A poaia brasileira apresenta alto valor farmacológico das raízes devido aos teores de emetina e cefalina. Este trabalho teve como objetivo descrever como as famílias de poaieiros mantém a memória cultural sobre a Psychotria ipecacuanha (Brot. Stoves. As informações foram coletadas no município de Cáceres, Mato Grosso, através de entrevista estruturada e observação participante com 20 homens e 10 mulheres, de faixa etária de 45 a 86 anos. Foram citadas as formas de utilização na alimentação para animais, inseticida, carrapaticida, emético, contra diarréias, para alívio de dor de cabeça, contra malária, bronquite e dor no estômago. A raiz é a parte mais usada e a forma de preparo é tintura ou misturada ao fumo, ao vinho ou à cachaça. Poucos entrevistados passaram aos filhos o conhecimento sobre a P. ipecacuanha. A memória cultural sobre a P. ipecacuanha deve-se a vivência, extração e comercialização da planta, e por ouvir as conversas dos pais com amigos. A perda de conhecimento associado a poaia é causada pelo êxodo rural, destruição do habitat com o desmatamento e ocupação agrícola. A extinção da espécie na região contribui para a erosão cultural.Brazil is among the leading exporters of ipecac [Psychotria ipecacuanha (Brot. Stoves], followed by Panama and Costa Rica. The roots of Brazilian ipecac have high pharmacological value due to their levels of emetine and cephalin. This study aimed to describe how families of "poaieiros" maintain the cultural memory of Psychotria ipecacuanha (Brot. Stoves. Information was collected in the city of Cáceres, Mato Grosso State, Brazil, through structured interviews and participating observation involving 20 men and 10 women aged from 45 to 86 years. The cited forms of use were in animal nutrition, as insecticide, acaricide, emetic

  2. Laboratory Measurements of Biomass Cook-stove Emissions Aged in an Oxidation Flow Reactor: Influence of Combustion and Aging Conditions on Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshop, A. P.; Reece, S. M.; Sinha, A.; Wathore, R.

    2016-12-01

    Combustion in rudimentary and improved cook-stoves used by billions in developing countries can be a regionally dominant contributor to black carbon (BC), primary organic aerosols (POA) and precursors for secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Recent studies suggest that SOA formed during photo-oxidation of primary emissions from biomass burning may make important contribution to its atmospheric impacts. However, the extent to which stove type and operating conditions affect the amount, composition and characteristics of SOA formed from the aging of cookstoves emissions is still largely undetermined. Here we present results from experiments with a field portable oxidation flow reactor (F-OFR) designed to assess aging of cook-stove emissions in both laboratory and field settings. Laboratory tests results are used to compare the quantity and properties of fresh and aged emissions from a traditional open fire and twp alternative stove designs operated on the standard and alternate testing protocols. Diluted cookstove emissions were exposed to a range of oxidant concentrations in the F-OFR. Primary emissions were aged both on-line, to study the influence of combustion variability, and sampled from batched emissions in a smog chamber to examine different aging conditions. Data from real-time particle- and gas-phase instruments and integrated filter samples were collected up and down stream of the OFR. The properties of primary emissions vary strongly with stove type and combustion conditions (e.g. smoldering versus flaming). Experiments aging diluted biomass emissions from distinct phases of stove operation (smoldering and flaming) showed peak SOA production for both phases occurred between 3 and 6 equivalent days of aging with slightly greater production observed in flaming phase emissions. Changing combustion conditions had a stronger influence than aging on POA+SOA `emission factors'. Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor data show a substantial evolution of aerosol

  3. Wood burning stoves and small boilers - particle emissions and reduction initiatives; Braendeovne og smae kedler - partikelemissioner og reduktionstiltag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illerup, J B; Capral Henriksen, T; Lundhede, T [Danmarks Miljoeundersoegelser, Aarhus Universitet, Aarhus (Denmark); Breugel, C van; Zoellner Jensen, N [Miljoestyrelsen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2007-06-15

    Pollution from burning wood in private households, and the environmental and health consequences of this is determined in practice by a complicated interaction between a number of factors, including firing habits, fuel, type of stove/boiler, chimney and location of the chimney in relation to the surroundings. This report maps out the technologies used today for burning wood in private households, how these technologies contribute to particle emissions and which technologies may potentially reduce emissions of particles from burning wood in households in Denmark. Moreover, the possible emissions reductions and the financial costs incurred by consumers from different initiatives have been estimated. This report does not deal with possible initiatives for improvement of firing habits, fuel quality and chimneys. (au)

  4. THE TILES FROM THE STOVES OF K. ROZUMOVSKYI’S PALACE AND PARK ENSEMBLE IN BATURYN HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL PRESERVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. А. Герасько

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The theme of this article is the research of the artistic design of the heating system of K. Rozumovskyi’s palace in Baturyn. The object of the research of this theme is thorough study of the production and application of Baturyn tiles in the heating system of the last Ukrainian hetman’s palace. The method of the research of this theme is study of the written sources: the archival documents, the reports of the archaeological expeditions, popular scientific literature, the periodical press and study of the explored material (tiles, made the visual comparative analysis, visiting the museums of local lore. The results of the research can be used in the study of the tiles production and their application in the artistic design of the stove system heating in the 2nd half of the ХVІІІ –beginning ХІХ cent.Purchase on Elibrary.ru > Buy now

  5. Chemical characterisation of PM10 emissions from combustion in a closed stove of common woods grown in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, C.; Alves, C.; Pio, C.; Rzaca, M.; Schmidl, C.; Puxbaum, H.

    2009-04-01

    A series of source tests were conducted to determine the wood elemental composition, combustion gases and the chemical constitution of PM10 emissions from the closed stove combustion of four species of woods grown in Portugal: Eucalyptus globulos, Pinus pinaster, Quercus suber and Acacia longifolia. The burning tests were made in a closed stove with a dilution source sampler. To ascertain the combustion phase and conditions, continuous emission monitors measured O2, CO2, CO, NO, hydrocarbons, temperature and pressure, during each burning cycle. Woodsmoke samples have been collected and analysed to estimate the contribution of plant debris and biomass smoke to atmospheric aerosols. At this stage of work, cellulose, anhydrosugars and humic-like substances (HULIS) have been measured. Cellulose was determined photometrically after its conversion to D-Glucose. The determination of levoglucosan and other anhydrosugars, including mannosan and galactosan, was carried out by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. HULIS determination was made with a total organic carbon analyser and an infrared non dispersive detector, after the isolation of substances. Cellulose was present in PM10 at mass fractions (w/w) of 0.13%, 0.13%, 0.05% and 0.08% for Eucalyptus globulos, Pinus pinaster, Quercus suber and Acacia longifolia, respectively. Levoglucosan was the major anhydrosugar present in the samples, representing mass fractions of 14.71%, 3.80%, 6.78% and 1.91%, concerning the above mentioned wood species, respectively. The levoglucosan-to-mannosan ratio, usually used to evaluate the proportion of hardwood or softwood smoke in PM10, gave average values of 34.9 (Eucalyptus globulos), 3.40 (Pinus pinaster), 24.8 (Quercus suber) and 10.4 (Acacia longifolia). HULIS were present at mass fractions of 2.35%, 2.99%, 1.52% and 1.72% for the four wood species listed in the same order as before.

  6. Effects of wood smoke particles from wood-burning stoves on the respiratory health of atopic humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riddervold Ingunn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing evidence that particulate air pollution derived from wood stoves causes acute inflammation in the respiratory system, increases the incidence of asthma and other allergic diseases, and increases respiratory morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to evaluate acute respiratory effects from short-term wood smoke exposure in humans. Twenty non-smoking atopic volunteers with normal lung function and without bronchial responsiveness were monitored during three different experimental exposure sessions, aiming at particle concentrations of about 200 μg/m3, 400 μg/m3, and clean air as control exposure. A balanced cross-over design was used and participants were randomly allocated to exposure orders. Particles were generated in a wood-burning facility and added to a full-scale climate chamber where the participants were exposed for 3 hours under controlled environmental conditions. Health effects were evaluated in relation to: peak expiratory flow (PEF, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1, and forced vital capacity (FVC. Furthermore, the effects were assessed in relation to changes in nasal patency and from markers of airway inflammation: fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO, exhaled breath condensate (EBC and nasal lavage (NAL samples were collected before, and at various intervals after exposure. Results No statistically significant effect of wood smoke exposure was found for lung function, for FENO, for NAL or for the nasal patency. Limited signs of airway inflammation were found in EBC. Conclusion In conclusion, short term exposure with wood smoke at a concentration normally found in a residential area with a high density of burning wood stoves causes only mild inflammatory response.

  7. Oxygen and coke oven gas (COG) consumption optimization at hot stove of Usiminas blast furnace 3; Otimizacao do consumo de oxigenio e GCO nos regeneradores do alto forno 3 da Usiminas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervino, Marco Antonio; Bastos, Moises Hofer [Usiminas, Ipatinga, MG (Brazil)

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents the model developed for determination of the correlation between oxygen and coke oven gas (COG) consumption in the hot stove at Usiminas blast furnace 3, the applicability and results obtained. (author)

  8. Fiscal 1999 report on result of the model project for waste heat recovery in hot blast stove; 1999 nendo netsufuro hainetsu kaishu model jigyo seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    For the purpose of curtailing energy consumption of the steel industry, a heavy energy consuming industry in China, a model project was carried out for waste heat recovery in a hot blast stove, with the fiscal 1999 results reported. In the process of this project, a heat exchanger for recovering heat is installed in the exhaust gas flue of a hot blast stove in ironworks, with sensible heat recovered through a heating medium. The heat exchanger for recovering heat and the preheating heat exchanger, which was installed in the main pipe for blast furnace gas and for combustion air, were connected by pressure piping, with the blast furnace gas and the combustion air preheated. In addition, a heating medium circulating pump for transporting the heating medium is installed, as are an expansion tank for absorbing expansion/contraction due to change in temperature, a heating medium storage tank for accepting the entire heating medium in the system for the maintenance of the equipment, and heating medium feeding pump, for example. This year, on the basis of the 'Agreement Annex', basic designs and detailed designs were performed for each equipment in the waste heat recovering equipment for the hot blast stove. Further, procurement and manufacturing were implemented for various component parts and devices of the waste heat recovering equipment. (NEDO)

  9. Performance of a domestic cooking wick stove using fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) from oil plants in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagutu, Agatha W.; Chhabra, Sumesh C.; Lang' at-Thoruwa, Caroline C. [Department of Chemistry, Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844-0100, Nairobi (Kenya); Thoruwa, Thomas F.N. [Department of Energy Engineering, Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844, Nairobi (Kenya); Mahunnah, R.L.A. [University of Dar-es Salaam, Muhimbili College of Medicine, P.O. Box 53486, Dar-es Salaam (Tanzania)

    2010-08-15

    With depletion of solid biomass fuels and their rising costs in recent years, there has been a shift towards using kerosene and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) for domestic cooking in Kenya. However, the use of kerosene is associated with health and safety problems. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a clean, safe and sustainable liquid bio-fuel. Plant oil derivatives fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) present such a promising solution. This paper presents the performance of a wick stove using FAME fuels derived from oil plants: Jatropha curcus L. (Physic nut), Croton megalocarpus Hutch, Calodendrum capense (L.f.) Thunb., Cocos nucifera L. (coconut), soyabeans and sunflower. The FAME performance tests were based on the standard water-boiling tests (WBT) and compared with kerosene. Unlike kerosene all FAME fuels burned with odorless and non-pungent smell generating an average firepower of 1095 W with specific fuel consumption of 44.6 g L{sup -1} (55% higher than kerosene). The flash points of the FAME fuels obtained were typically much higher (2.3-3.3 times) than kerosene implying that they are much safer to use than kerosene. From the results obtained, it was concluded that the FAME fuels have potential to provide safe and sustainable cooking liquid fuel in developing countries. (author)

  10. Performance of a domestic cooking wick stove using fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) from oil plants in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagutu, Agatha W.; Thoruwa, Thomas F.N.; Chhabra, Sumesh C.; Lang'at-Thoruwa, Caroline C.; Mahunnah, R.L.A.

    2010-01-01

    With depletion of solid biomass fuels and their rising costs in recent years, there has been a shift towards using kerosene and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) for domestic cooking in Kenya. However, the use of kerosene is associated with health and safety problems. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a clean, safe and sustainable liquid bio-fuel. Plant oil derivatives fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) present such a promising solution. This paper presents the performance of a wick stove using FAME fuels derived from oil plants: Jatropha curcus L. (Physic nut), Croton megalocarpus Hutch, Calodendrum capense (L.f.) Thunb., Cocos nucifera L. (coconut), soyabeans and sunflower. The FAME performance tests were based on the standard water-boiling tests (WBT) and compared with kerosene. Unlike kerosene all FAME fuels burned with odorless and non-pungent smell generating an average firepower of 1095 W with specific fuel consumption of 44.6 g L -1 (55% higher than kerosene). The flash points of the FAME fuels obtained were typically much higher (2.3-3.3 times) than kerosene implying that they are much safer to use than kerosene. From the results obtained, it was concluded that the FAME fuels have potential to provide safe and sustainable cooking liquid fuel in developing countries.

  11. Factors affecting perception of beneficiaries of National Programme on Improved Cookstoves regarding cost-benefit of adoption of Mamta Stove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, R.; Yadla, V.L. [M.S. Univ. of Baroda, Vadodara (India). Home Management Dept.

    1995-10-01

    Perceived levels of cost-benefit of adoption of Mamta Stove (MS) was investigated on a sample of 390 beneficiaries of National Programme on Improved Cookstoves (NPIC) drawn through multistage random sampling technique from 3 villages in Gujarat State, viz., Kanjari, Vadadla, and Sindhrot. A standardized cost-benefit scale that exhibited a reliability coefficient of 0.92 was used in the study. The main cooks revealed a mean age of 36 years. Regarding perception on available sources of cooking fuel and accessibility to those, a wide disparity was observed, not only with reference to commercial sources and fuel forms but also with reference to free fuels gathered from forest land and waste land. MSs were installed in rural kitchens with the active involvement of about 50% of the main cooks. Majority of the cooks in Sindhrot village attended user education camps. The mean perceived cost-benefit ratio (PCBR) was computed to be 0.14. However, PCBR of the cooks from Sindhrot village was 0.51 while those of Vadadla and Kanjari were 0.09 and {minus}0.19 respectively. The correlation coefficient computed between PCBR and selected variables revealed that there existed a significant positive correlation between PCBR of the cook and their participation in NPIC and quality of installation of MS. The observation of the highest PCBR in Sindhrot village, a model smokeless village developed by TBU Baroda, could be attributed to the implementation of NPIC in a systematic manner adopting participatory model. The paper discusses at length the implications of the study and outlines the strategies for achieving widespread adoption of MS by beneficiaries of NPIC.

  12. Discontinuous and Continuous Indoor Air Quality Monitoring in Homes with Fireplaces or Wood Stoves as Heating System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gennaro, Gianluigi; Dambruoso, Paolo Rosario; Di Gilio, Alessia; Di Palma, Valerio; Marzocca, Annalisa; Tutino, Maria

    2015-12-24

    Around 50% of the world's population, particularly in developing countries, uses biomass as one of the most common fuels. Biomass combustion releases a considerable amount of various incomplete combustion products, including particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The paper presents the results of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) measurements in six houses equipped with wood burning stoves or fireplaces as heating systems. The houses were monitored for 48-h periods in order to collect PM10 samples and measure PAH concentrations. The average, the maximum and the lowest values of the 12-h PM10 concentration were 68.6 μg/m³, 350.7 μg/m³ and 16.8 μg/m³ respectively. The average benzo[a]pyrene 12-h concentration was 9.4 ng/m³, while the maximum and the minimum values were 24.0 ng/m³ and 1.5 ng/m³, respectively. Continuous monitoring of PM10, PAHs, Ultra Fine Particle (UFP) and Total Volatile Organic Compounds (TVOC) was performed in order to study the progress of pollution phenomena due to biomass burning, their trends and contributions to IAQ. The results show a great heterogeneity of impacts on IAQ in terms of magnitude and behavior of the considered pollutants' concentrations. This variability is determined by not only different combustion technologies or biomass quality, but overall by different ignition mode, feeding and flame management, which can also be different for the same house. Moreover, room dimensions and ventilation were significant factors for pollution dispersion. The increase of PM10, UFP and PAH concentrations, during lighting, was always detected and relevant. Continuous monitoring allowed singling out contributions of other domestic sources of considered pollutants such as cooking and cigarettes. Cooking contribution produced an impact on IAQ in same cases higher than that of the biomass heating system.

  13. Discontinuous and Continuous Indoor Air Quality Monitoring in Homes with Fireplaces or Wood Stoves as Heating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi de Gennaro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Around 50% of the world’s population, particularly in developing countries, uses biomass as one of the most common fuels. Biomass combustion releases a considerable amount of various incomplete combustion products, including particulate matter (PM and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. The paper presents the results of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ measurements in six houses equipped with wood burning stoves or fireplaces as heating systems. The houses were monitored for 48-h periods in order to collect PM10 samples and measure PAH concentrations. The average, the maximum and the lowest values of the 12-h PM10 concentration were 68.6 μg/m3, 350.7 μg/m3 and 16.8 μg/m3 respectively. The average benzo[a]pyrene 12-h concentration was 9.4 ng/m3, while the maximum and the minimum values were 24.0 ng/m3 and 1.5 ng/m3, respectively. Continuous monitoring of PM10, PAHs, Ultra Fine Particle (UFP and Total Volatile Organic Compounds (TVOC was performed in order to study the progress of pollution phenomena due to biomass burning, their trends and contributions to IAQ. The results show a great heterogeneity of impacts on IAQ in terms of magnitude and behavior of the considered pollutants’ concentrations. This variability is determined by not only different combustion technologies or biomass quality, but overall by different ignition mode, feeding and flame management, which can also be different for the same house. Moreover, room dimensions and ventilation were significant factors for pollution dispersion. The increase of PM10, UFP and PAH concentrations, during lighting, was always detected and relevant. Continuous monitoring allowed singling out contributions of other domestic sources of considered pollutants such as cooking and cigarettes. Cooking contribution produced an impact on IAQ in same cases higher than that of the biomass heating system.

  14. Comparison of carbon monoxide levels during heating of ice and water to boiling point with a camping stove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh-Smith, Simon; Watt, Ian; McFadyen, Angus; Grant, Stan

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether using a camping stove to bring a pan of ice to boiling point produces higher carbon monoxide (CO) concentration than would bringing a pan of water to boiling point. The hypothesis was that ice would cause greater CO concentration because of its greater flame-cooling effect and, consequently, more incomplete combustion. This was a randomized, prospective observational study. After an initial pilot study, CO concentration was monitored during 10 trials for each of ice and water. A partially ventilated 200-L cardboard box model was developed and then used inside a chamber at -6 degrees C. Ice temperature and volume, water temperature and volume, pan size, and flame characteristics were all standardized. Temperature of the heated medium was monitored to determine time to boiling point. Carbon monoxide concentration was monitored every 30 seconds for the first 3 minutes, then every minute until the end of each 10-minute trial. There was no significant difference (P > .05) in CO production levels between ice and water. Each achieved a similar mean plateau level of approximately 400 ppm CO concentration with a similar rate of rise. However, significantly higher (P = .014) CO concentration occurred at 4 and 5 minutes when the flame underwent a yellow flare; this occurred only on 3 occasions when ice was the medium. There were no significant differences for CO production between bringing a pan of ice or water to boiling point. In a small number of ice trials, the presence of a yellow flame resulted in high CO concentration. Yellow flares might occur more often with ice or snow melting, but this has not been proven.

  15. Status and Benefits of Renewable Energy Technologies in the Rural Areas of Ethiopia: A Case Study on Improved Cooking Stoves and Biogas Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yitayal Addis Alemayehu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The majority of Ethiopia’s people (85% reside in rural areas, deriving their livelihood from agriculture. Ethiopia’s energy system is characterized mainly by biomass fuel supply, with households being the greatest energy consumers. The household sector takes up nearly 94 % of the total energy supplies. Access to energy resources and technologies in rural Ethiopia is highly constrained which makes the energy supply and consumption pattern of the country to show many elements of un-sustainability. The concern on cooking practices, household economics, health, forest and agricultural resource management, and global greenhouse gas emissions has emerged as a transformative opportunity to improve individual lives, livelihoods, and the global environment. More decentralized renewable energy projects could play an important role in mitigating traditional biomass fuel use. Improved cooking stove (ICS dissemination projects have been launched involving the private sector in the production and commercialization of the stoves. In doing so, about 3.7 million ICSs have been disseminated in the country so far which benefited stove users, producers and the total environment as about 30 million hectare of forest per year can be conserved. Conversion of animal waste to biogas energy to replace traditional fuel and use of the slurry as a fertilizer is the other current focus of the government of Ethiopia and installed more than 860 biogas digesters. The benefits obtained from these technologies are considerable and promising. However, the programs are not that much benefited the rural households where it had been intended to address. So, due attention should be given for those of the rural households in order to address the fuel wood crisis, environmental degradation and their health condition.

  16. Indoor air pollution exposure from use of indoor stoves and fireplaces in association with breast cancer: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Alexandra J; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Stellman, Steven D; Beyea, Jan; Steck, Susan E; Mordukhovich, Irina; McCarty, Kathleen M; Ahn, Jiyoung; Rossner, Pavel; Santella, Regina M; Gammon, Marilie D

    2014-12-12

    Previous studies suggest that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may adversely affect breast cancer risk. Indoor air pollution from use of indoor stoves and/or fireplaces is an important source of ambient PAH exposure. However, the association between indoor stove/fireplace use and breast cancer risk is unknown. We hypothesized that indoor stove/fireplace use in a Long Island, New York study population would be positively associated with breast cancer and differ by material burned, and the duration and timing of exposure. We also hypothesized that the association would vary by breast cancer subtype defined by p53 mutation status, and interact with glutathione S-transferases GSTM1, T1, A1 and P1 polymorphisms. Population-based, case-control resources (1,508 cases/1,556 controls) were used to conduct unconditional logistic regression to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Breast cancer risk was increased among women reporting ever burning synthetic logs (which may also contain wood) in their homes (OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.11, 1.84), but not for ever burning wood alone (OR = 0.93, 95% CI 0.77, 1.12). For synthetic log use, longer duration >7 years, older age at exposure (>20 years; OR = 1.65, 95% CI 1.02, 2.67) and 2 or more variants in GSTM1, T1, A1 or P1 (OR = 1.71, 95% CI 1.09, 2.69) were associated with increased risk. Burning wood or synthetic logs are both indoor PAH exposure sources; however, positive associations were only observed for burning synthetic logs, which was stronger for longer exposures, adult exposures, and those with multiple GST variant genotypes. Therefore, our results should be interpreted with care and require replication.

  17. Energy and emissions characterization of an eco-efficient biomass cook stove at different altitudes; Caracterización energética y emisiones de una estufa de cocción ecoeficiente con biomasa a diferentes altitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-Bayer, Juan F.; Graciano-Bustamante, Diana S.; Gómez-Betancur, José A. [Universidad de Antioquia. Grupo de manejo eficiente de la energía. Medellín (Colombia)

    2013-07-01

    Around 2.5 billion people depend on wood as their main fuel for heating and cooking.In this work is studied the effect of altitude (678 and 1976 meters above sea level) on energy performance and emissions of an improved wood stove under standardized cooking tests. The experiments were carried out under the Water Boiling (WBT) and Controlled Cooking (CCT) Tests. The efficiency decreased about 24 % with increasing altitude in WBT, and specific fuel consumption increased 27.3 % due to the air density changes. Regarding the controlled cooking test, the specific fuel consumption and specific emissions increased by 15.3 % and 16 %, respectively. It is highlighted that altitude significantly affects the 'Plancha' wood stove behavior. Specific emissions increased at higher altitudes, so it is necessary to redesign wood stoves according to their geographical location in order to optimize the cooking process. (author)

  18. Development of mathematical model and optimal control system of internal temperatures of hot-blast stove process in staggered parallel operation; Netsufuro sushiki model to parallel sofu ni okeru ronai ondo saiteki seigyo system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matoba, Y. [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Otsuka, K.

    1998-07-01

    A mathematical model and an optimal control system of hot-blast stove process are described. A precise mathematical simulation model of the hot-blast stove was developed and the accuracy of the model has been confirmed. An optimal control system of the thermal conditions of the hot-blast stoves in staggered parallel operation was also developed. By the use of the multivariable optimal regulator and the feedforward compensations for the change of the aimed blast temperature and blast volume, the system is able to control the hot blast temperature and the brick temperature efficiently. The system has been applied to Kashima works. The variations of the blast temperature and the silica brick temperature have been decreased. The ultimate low heat level operations have been realized and the thermal efficiency furthermore has been raised by about 1%. 8 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Solar stove as a mechanism of appropriate energy by the low-income population in Sergipe, Brazil; Fogao solar como mecanismo de apropriacao de energia pela populacao de baixa renda em Sergipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brazil, Osiris Ashton Vital; Silva, Maria Susana [Sergipe Parque Tecnologico (SERGIPETEC), Aracaju, SE (Brazil); Araujo, Paulo Mario Machado de; Doria, Mary Barreto; Claudia Andrade, Leao Ana [Instituto de Tecnologia e Pesquisa (LEM/ITP), Aracaju, Sergipe (Brazil). Lab. de Energia e Materiais; Teixeira, Olivio [Universidade Federal do Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work presents the experience from the realization of social workshops technology of construction and use of the solar stove box type in Sergipe State. The workshops were realized in 2007 and in the beginning from 2008 like mechanisms to appropriate the low income family to the use of the solar energy. The workshops accompanying enables to analyze the dynamic and propose betterments in the construction process of the innovation. The incentive to the solar stove use is justified by the fact of low income population frequently use logs like energetic for cook. The reached results in the workshops made possible the discussion of the mechanism from appropriation of the solar stove by the population in the government State action optic. (author)

  20. Replacement of coal-fuelled stoves by modern room heating systems in multistorey dwellings; Abloesung der Kohle-Einzelofenheizung durch moderne Raumheizungssysteme in Mehrgeschossbauten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, K. [Institut fuer Energetik und Umwelt gGmbH, Leipzig (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    In eastern Germany, approximately one million residential units in multi-storey apartment buildings are still heated with coal-fired stoves. Not all building societies or private house-owners can afford to substitute modern heating systems for individual coal stoves within the foreseeable future. Problems encountered when modernizing heating systems are described. A way of pre-financing modernization is by loans given by the tenants to the building society. The paper deals with individual aspects, such as contract conditions, organization and experience with this model, as well as its advantages for the landlord and tenant. (MSK) [Deutsch] In Ostdeutschland werden noch rund 1 Million Wohnungen in mehrgeschossigen Wohnhaeuern mit Kohle geheizt. Nicht alle Wohnungsgenossenschaften oder privaten Hauseigentuemer sind finanziell in der Lage in absehbarer Zeit die Kohle-Einzelheizung durch moderne Heizungssysteme abzuloesen. Im Folgenden werden die Probleme bei der Heizungsmodernisierung beschrieben. Der Weg Heizungsmodernisierung durch Mieterdarlehen wird in einzelnen Punkten wie Finanzierung durch Mieterdarlehen, deren Organisation und Erfahrungen mit diesem Modell sowie die Vorteile fuer Vermieter und Mieter dargelegt.

  1. Morphology and Chemical Composition of soot particles emitted by Wood-burning Cook-Stoves: a HRTEM, XPS and Elastic backscattering Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabali-Sandoval, G. A., Sr.; Castro, T.; Peralta, O.; De la Cruz, W.; Días, J.; Amelines, O.; Rivera-Hernández, M.; Varela, A.; Muñoz-Muñoz, F.; Policroniades, R.; Murillo, G.; Moreno, E.

    2014-12-01

    The morphology, microstructure and the chemical composition on surface of soot particles were studied by using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and elastic backscattering spectrometry. In order to obtain freshly soot particles emitted by home-made wood-burning cook stoves, copper grids for Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) were placed on the last two of an 8-stages MOUDI cascade impactor. The analysis of HRTEM micrographs revealed the nanostructure and the particle size of soot particles. The XPS survey spectra show a large carbon peak around 285 eV and the oxygen signal at 533 eV. Some differences observed in the carbon/oxygen (C/O) ratio of the particles probably depend on the combustion process efficiency of each cook-stove analyzed. The C-1s XPS spectra show an asymmetric broad peak and other with low intensity that corresponds to sp2 and sp3hybridization, which were fitted with a convolution using Gaussian functions. Elastic backscattering technique allows a chemical elemental analysis of samples and confirms the presence of C, O and Si observed by XPS. Additionally, the morphological properties of soot aggregates were analyzed calculating the border-based fractal dimension (Df). Particles exhibit complex shapes with high values of Df. Also, real-time absorption (σabs) and scattering (σsct) coefficients of fine (with aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 µm) soot particles were measured. The trend in σabs and σsct indicate that the cooking process has two important combustion stages which varied in its flaming strength, being vigorous in the first stage and soft in the second one.

  2. Indoor air pollution by emissions of fossil fuel single stoves: possibly a hitherto underrated risk factor in the development of carcinomas in the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, A; Senneweld, E; Maier, H

    1995-02-01

    We have carried out three case-control studies on the relative risk of head and neck cancer in association with indoor air pollution. The studies performed at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology of the University of Heidelberg comprised 369 male patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx and 1476 healthy control subjects matched for sex, age, and residential area. The OR of laryngeal cancer related to daily exposure to fossil fuels due to stove-heating with oil, coal, gas, and wood for longer than 40 years was 2.5 (CI = 1.51 to 4.05). After adjustment for tobacco and alcohol, the OR declined slightly to 2.0 (CI = 1.10 to 3.46) but still was significant. Elevated ORs were also found for daily presence in a kitchen with an oil, coal, or wood oven for longer than 40 years (OR = 1.7, CI = 1.01 to 2.71; after tobacco and alcohol adjustment, OR = 1.4, CI = 0.76 to 2.41). The OR of pharyngeal cancer related to daily exposure to fossil fuels due to stove-heating with oil, coal, gas, and wood for longer than 40 years was 3.6 (CI = 2.04 to 6.41). After adjustment for tobacco and alcohol the OR declined slightly to 3.3 (CI = 1.43 to 7.55) but still was significant. Elevated ORs were also found for daily presence in a kitchen with an oil, coal, or wood oven for longer than 40 years (OR = 1.6, CI = 0.89 to 2.77; after tobacco and alcohol adjustment, OR = 2.5, CI = 1.03 to 6.30).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. The use of wood burning cook stove in rural areas of Piaui-Brazil: a case study; O uso do fogao a lenha no semi-arido piauiense: um estudo de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Albemerc Moura de; Martins, Gilberto; Trigoso, Federico B. Morante [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Sociais Aplicadas

    2008-07-01

    The use of wood burning cook stoves is an ancient practice, still used nowadays, mainly in the rural areas of the developing countries. Despite its widespread use by millions of people around of the world, little attention has being paid to its study. In Piaui this reality is not different, since thousands of locals use this equipment as their main instrument for the preparation of their meals. The present article has the objective to study the use of wood stove in rural areas of Piaui. A questionnaire has been applied to ten homes in two villages, which permitted to obtain the main characteristics of the equipment used as well as the habits and wood consumption patterns. (author)

  4. Reviews Equipment: BioLite Camp Stove Game: Burnout Paradise Equipment: 850 Universal interface and Capstone software Equipment: xllogger Book: Science Magic Tricks and Puzzles Equipment: Spinthariscope Equipment: DC Power Supply HY5002 Web Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    WE RECOMMEND BioLite CampStove Robust and multifaceted stove illuminates physics concepts 850 Universal interface and Capstone software Powerful data-acquisition system offers many options for student experiments and demonstrations xllogger Obtaining results is far from an uphill struggle with this easy-to-use datalogger Science Magic Tricks and Puzzles Small but perfectly formed and inexpensive book packed with 'magic-of-science' demonstrations Spinthariscope Kit for older students to have the memorable experience of 'seeing' radioactivity WORTH A LOOK DC Power Supply HY5002 Solid and effective, but noisy and lacks portability HANDLE WITH CARE Burnout Paradise Car computer game may be quick off the mark, but goes nowhere fast when it comes to lab use WEB WATCH 'Live' tube map and free apps would be a useful addition to school physics, but maths-questions website of no more use than a textbook

  5. Investigation of time-resolved atmospheric conditions and indoor/outdoor particulate matter concentrations in homes with gas and biomass cook stoves in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Heather A; Pardyjak, Eric R

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports findings from a case study designed to investigate indoor and outdoor air quality in homes near the United States-Mexico border During the field study, size-resolved continuous particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured in six homes, while outdoor PM was simultaneously monitored at the same location in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, during March 14-30, 2009. The purpose of the experiment was to compare PM in homes using different fuels for cooking, gas versus biomass, and to obtain a spatial distribution of outdoor PM in a region where local sources vary significantly (e.g., highway, border crossing, unpaved roads, industry). Continuous PM data were collected every 6 seconds using a valve switching system to sample indoor and outdoor air at each home location. This paper presents the indoor PM data from each home, including the relationship between indoor and outdoor PM. The meteorological conditions associated with elevated ambient PM events in the region are also discussed. Results indicate that indoor air pollution has a strong dependence on cooking fuel, with gas stoves having hourly averaged median PM3 concentrations in the range of 134 to 157 microg m(-3) and biomass stoves 163 to 504 microg m(-1). Outdoor PM also indicates a large spatial heterogeneity due to the presence of microscale sources and meteorological influences (median PM3: 130 to 770 microg m(-3)). The former is evident in the median and range of daytime PM values (median PM3: 250 microg m(-3), maximum: 9411 microg m(-3)), while the meteorological influences appear to be dominant during nighttime periods (median PM3: 251 microg m(-3), maximum: 10,846 microg m(-3)). The atmospheric stability is quantified for three nighttime temperature inversion episodes, which were associated with an order of magnitude increase in PM10 at the regulatory monitor in Nogales, AZ (maximum increase: 12 to 474 microg m(-3)). Implications: Regulatory air quality standards are based on outdoor

  6. Heat radiation approach for harnessing heat of the cook stove to generate electricity for lighting system and charging of mobile phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Rodrigo C., Jr.; Manansala, Chad Deo G.

    2018-01-01

    This study is based on the potential of thermoelectric coupling such as the thermoelectric cooler module. A thermoelectric cooler converts the heat coming from the cook stove into electricity and store in a battery. A dc-dc boost converter will be used to produce enough voltage to light a minimum house dwelling or charge phone battery. This device will be helpful to those that faces a problem on electricity especially in the isolated areas. The study aims (1) to harness heat from the cook stove up to 110 °C (2) To automatically cool-off the system to protect the thermoelectric cooler from damage due to excessive heat using an electronic solenoid; (3) To store energy harnessed in the battery; (4) To amplify the output voltages of the battery using DC to DC boost converter for lighting system and charging of mobile phone battery. From various tests conducted, it can fully charge a mobile phone in 3 hours observing the unit’s battery voltage drop from 4.06V to 3.98V. In the testing it used different orientation of steel rod by conduction to transfer heat and by radiation through tubular steel with its different dimensions. Most recent testing proved that the 2x2x9 tubular steel by radiation had the best result. The temperature reached more than a hundred degree Celsius that met the objective. The test resulted of boosting the voltage of the battery output from 3.7V to 4.96V on the average. The boosted voltage decrease as the system’s cool-off mechanism operated when the temperature reached above 110 degree Celsius decreasing output voltage to 0.8V resulting the boosted voltage to drop to zero. Therefore, the proponents concluded that heat waste can be converted to electrical energy by harnessing heat through radiation, with the help of TEC that generates voltage for lighting and can be boosted to be used for mobile charging. Furthermore, the study proved that the excess heat can damaged the TEC which was prevented by using of cooling-off mechanism, making it more

  7. Multi-methodological characterisation of Costa Rican biochars from small-scale retort and top-lit updraft stoves and inter-methodological comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeri Kaal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We applied common (pH, elemental analysis, thermogravimetry and less-common (infrared spectroscopy, GACS adsorption test, pyrolysis-GC-MS, hydrogen pyrolysis analytical procedures to a set of biochars from Costa Rica (bamboo stalk, cacao chaff, sawmill scrap, coconut husk and orchard prunings feedstocks. The biochars were produced by high temperature combustion in a top-lit updraft stove (TLUD and low temperature anaerobic charring in a retort (RET, the latter of which was heated by the gas that evolved from the TLUD. The RET biochars exhibit a smaller adsorption capacity, higher molecular diversity and larger proportion of thermolabile materials, because of the lower degree of thermochemical alteration (DTA and therefore limited formation of the microporous polycondensed aromatic matrix typical of the TLUD biochars. Multivariate statistics showed that DTA, not feedstock composition, controls biochar organic chemistry. The TLUD biochars might be better candidates for soil amendment because of their adsorption capacities and will probably exert a more prolonged effect because of their chemical stability. The cross-comparison of the methods showed the complementarity of especially elemental analysis, GACS, thermogravimetry, hypy and pyrolysis-GC-MS.

  8. Caracterización energética y emisiones de una estufa de cocción ecoeficiente con biomasa a diferentes altitudes//Energy and emissions characterization of an eco‐efficient biomass cook stove at different altitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Pérez-Bayer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerca de 2500 millones de personas dependen de la leña como su principal combustible para calefacción y cocción.En este trabajo se estudia el efecto de la altitud (678 y 1976 metros sobre el nivel del mar, msnm en el desempeño energético y las emisiones de una estufa de cocción eco-eficiente con biomasa.Los experimentos se llevaron a cabo bajo las pruebas de ebullición de agua y cocción controlada. El rendimiento disminuyó 24% al aumentar la altitud en la prueba de ebullición, y el consumo específico de combustible aumentó 27,3% debido a los cambios en la densidad del aire. En la prueba de cocción controlada, el consumo específico de combustible y las emisiones específicas aumentaron 15,3% y 16%, respectivamente. La altitud afectó significativamente el desempeño de la estufa tipo "Plancha", por lo que es necesario el rediseño de las estufas de acuerdo a su ubicación geográfica con el fin de optimizar el proceso de cocción.Palabras claves: estufa de cocción eco-eficiente, biomasa, combustión, altitud, energía y emisiones, pruebas de desempeño WBT–CCT.______________________________________________________________________________AbstractAround 2.5 billion people depend on wood as their main fuel for heating and cooking.In this work is studied the effect of altitude (678 and 1976 meters above sea level on energy performance and emissions of an improved wood stove under standardized cooking tests. The experiments were carried out under the Water Boiling (WBTand Controlled Cooking (CCT Tests. The efficiency decreased about 24% with increasing altitude in WBT, and specific fuel consumption increased 27.3% due to the air density changes. Regarding the controlled cooking test, the specific fuel consumption and specific emissions increased by 15.3% and 16 %, respectively. It is highlighted that altitude significantly affects the “Plancha” wood stove behavior. Specific emissions increased at higher altitudes, so it is

  9. Seasonal variation in outdoor, indoor, and personal air pollution exposures of women using wood stoves in the Tibetan Plateau: Baseline assessment for an energy intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Kun; Carter, Ellison; Schauer, James J; Ezzati, Majid; Zhang, Yuanxun; Niu, Hongjiang; Lai, Alexandra M; Shan, Ming; Wang, Yuqin; Yang, Xudong; Baumgartner, Jill

    2016-09-01

    Cooking and heating with coal and biomass is the main source of household air pollution in China and a leading contributor to disease burden. As part of a baseline assessment for a household energy intervention program, we enrolled 205 adult women cooking with biomass fuels in Sichuan, China and measured their 48-h personal exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and carbon monoxide (CO) in winter and summer. We also measured the indoor 48-h PM2.5 concentrations in their homes and conducted outdoor PM2.5 measurements during 101 (74) days in summer (winter). Indoor concentrations of CO and nitrogen oxides (NO, NO2) were measured over 48-h in a subset of ~80 homes. Women's geometric mean 48-h exposure to PM2.5 was 80μg/m(3) (95% CI: 74, 87) in summer and twice as high in winter (169μg/m(3) (95% CI: 150, 190), with similar seasonal trends for indoor PM2.5 concentrations (winter: 252μg/m(3); 95% CI: 215, 295; summer: 101μg/m(3); 95% CI: 91, 112). We found a moderately strong relationship between indoor PM2.5 and CO (r=0.60, 95% CI: 0.46, 0.72), and a weak correlation between personal PM2.5 and CO (r=0.41, 95% CI: -0.02, 0.71). NO2/NO ratios were higher in summer (range: 0.01 to 0.68) than in winter (range: 0 to 0.11), suggesting outdoor formation of NO2 via reaction of NO with ozone is a more important source of NO2 than biomass combustion indoors. The predictors of women's personal exposure to PM2.5 differed by season. In winter, our results show that primary heating with a low-polluting fuel (i.e., electric stove or wood-charcoal) and more frequent kitchen ventilation could reduce personal PM2.5 exposures. In summer, primary use of a gaseous fuel or electricity for cooking and reducing exposure to outdoor PM2.5 would likely have the greatest impacts on personal PM2.5 exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Study design of a cluster-randomized controlled trial to evaluate a large-scale distribution of cook stoves and water filters in Western Province, Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Corey L; Kirby, Miles A; Zambrano, Laura D; Rosa, Ghislane; Barstow, Christina K; Thomas, Evan A; Clasen, Thomas F

    2016-12-15

    In Rwanda, pneumonia and diarrhea are the first and second leading causes of death, respectively, among children under five. Household air pollution (HAP) resultant from cooking indoors with biomass fuels on traditional stoves is a significant risk factor for pneumonia, while consumption of contaminated drinking water is a primary cause of diarrheal disease. To date, there have been no large-scale effectiveness trials of programmatic efforts to provide either improved cookstoves or household water filters at scale in a low-income country. In this paper we describe the design of a cluster-randomized trial to evaluate the impact of a national-level program to distribute and promote the use of improved cookstoves and advanced water filters to the poorest quarter of households in Rwanda. We randomly allocated 72 sectors (administratively defined units) in Western Province to the intervention, with the remaining 24 sectors in the province serving as controls. In the intervention sectors, roughly 100,000 households received improved cookstoves and household water filters through a government-sponsored program targeting the poorest quarter of households nationally. The primary outcome measures are the incidence of acute respiratory infection (ARI) and diarrhea among children under five years of age. Over a one-year surveillance period, all cases of acute respiratory infection (ARI) and diarrhea identified by health workers in the study area will be extracted from records maintained at health facilities and by community health workers (CHW). In addition, we are conducting intensive, longitudinal data collection among a random sample of households in the study area for in-depth assessment of coverage, use, environmental exposures, and additional health measures. Although previous research has examined the impact of providing household water treatment and improved cookstoves on child health, there have been no studies of national-level programs to deliver these interventions

  11. Research report of fiscal 1997. Research on the projects on Activities Implemented Jointly Japan Program (feasibility research on energy saving by improving heat management for hot blast stoves and heating furnaces); 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho. `Kyodo jisshi katsudo Japan Program` ni kakawaru project chosa (neppuro, kanetsuro no netsukanri kaizen ni yoru sho energy kanosei chosa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Research was made on joint implementation (JI) for preventing global climate changes in China. Since such the stove and furnace consume a large amount of energy, their improvement and energy saving are important for integrated iron plants. Maanshan iron plant was selected for the research. All the furnaces were manually operated without combustion control systems, and oxygen meters for exhaust gas frequently troubled. As measures for the stoves, operation at a proper air fuel ratio, improvement of over heat storage combustion, and dust cleaning for waste heat recovery gas heaters were proposed. For the furnaces, a proper oxygen content at the end of furnaces (reduction of invasion air) was proposed to improve exhaust gas loss up to that in Japan. For this target, reinforced instrument management and standardized combustion control are essential. JI of software improvement for operation and management can reduce annual greenhouse effect gas emission to 45,900t and 6,300t in carbon equivalent for the stove and furnace, respectively. CO2 reduction is also estimated to be 1,173,000t and 205,000t in China of 107,570,000t in raw steel production, respectively. 28 figs., 32 tabs.

  12. A community randomised controlled trial evaluating a home-based environmental intervention package of improved stoves, solar water disinfection and kitchen sinks in rural Peru: rationale, trial design and baseline findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartinger, S M; Lanata, C F; Hattendorf, J; Gil, A I; Verastegui, H; Ochoa, T; Mäusezahl, D

    2011-11-01

    Pneumonia and diarrhoea are leading causes of death in children. There is a need to develop effective interventions. We present the design and baseline findings of a community-randomised controlled trial in rural Peru to evaluate the health impact of an Integrated Home-based Intervention Package in children aged 6 to 35 months. We randomised 51 communities. The intervention was developed through a community-participatory approach prior to the trial. They comprised the construction of improved stoves and kitchen sinks, the promotion of hand washing, and solar drinking water disinfection (SODIS). To reduce the potential impact of non-blinding bias, a psychomotor stimulation intervention was implemented in the control arm. The baseline survey included anthropometric and socio-economic characteristics. In a sub-sample we determined the level of faecal contamination of drinking water, hands and kitchen utensils and the prevalence of diarrhoegenic Escherichia coli in stool specimen. We enrolled 534 children. At baseline all households used open fires and 77% had access to piped water supplies. E. coli was found in drinking water in 68% and 64% of the intervention and control households. Diarrhoegenic E. coli strains were isolated from 45/139 stool samples. The proportion of stunted children was 54%. Randomization resulted in comparable study arms. Recently, several critical reviews raised major concerns on the reliability of open health intervention trials, because of uncertain sustainability and non-blinding bias. In this regard, the presented trial featuring objective outcome measures, a simultaneous intervention in the control communities and a 12-month follow up period will provide valuable evidence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fuel efficient stoves for the Third World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, P [Intermediate Technology Group Ltd., Rugby (GB)

    1990-12-01

    In developing countries particularly in rural areas, the majority of households depend on biomass fuels such as wood, charcoal, or animal dung for their cooking and heating needs. Formerly free, these materials are acquiring a monetary value and improved combustion efficiency leads to better utilisation as well as reduced pollution. This article describes the latest development in this field. (author).

  14. STOVE: Seed treatments for organic vegetable production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, A.; Jahn, M.; Kromphardt, C.; Krauthausen, H.J.; Roberts, S.J.; Wright, S.A.I.; Amein, T.; Forsberg, G.; Tinivella, F.; Gullino, M.L.; Wikström, M.; Wolf, van der J.M.; Groot, S.P.C.; Werner, S.; Koch, E.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the EU-financed research project „STOVE“ (Seed Treatments for Organic Vegetable Production) is to evaluate different methods potentially suited for seed treatment of vegetables in organic farming regarding their efficacy, to optimise these methods, and where feasible to combine them with

  15. FY 2000 Study report. Feasibility study on model project for effective utilization of sensible heat of off gas from hot stoves at blast furnaces in India; 2000 nendo Indo ni okeru koro netsufuro hai gas kennetsu yuko riyo model jigyo jisshi kanosei chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The feasibility study was conducted on a model project in India for the energy saving effect and reduction of the greenhouse gas emissions by introducing blast furnace hot stove waste heat recovery systems in steelworks. The blast furnaces studied are Blast Furnace G at Jamshedpur Steelworks of TISCO, the largest private steel maker in India, and No.7 Blast Furnace at Bhilai Steelworks of state-operated Steel Authority of India Ltd. (SAIL). The study results indicate that the annual energy-saving effects of 8,255 and 8,190 tons as heavy oil, and annual CO2 emission reduction of 25,543 and 25,342 tons are expected in the TISCO and SAIL blast furnaces, respectively, in the case of increasing blast temperature and reducing blast furnace fuel coke (increased iron production possible). The model project is applicable to both blast furnaces. There are a total of 46 blast furnaces in India in which the heat recovery systems can be introduced. The nation-wide annual energy saving and CO2 abatement would reach 126,202 tons as heavy oil and 390,501 tons, when all of these blast furnaces could be provided with the heat recovery systems. (NEDO)

  16. A profile of biomass stove use in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elledge, Myles F; Phillips, Michael J; Thornburg, Vanessa E; Everett, Kibri H; Nandasena, Sumal

    2012-04-01

    A large body of evidence has confirmed that the indoor air pollution (IAP) from biomass fuel use is a major cause of premature deaths, and acute and chronic diseases. Over 78% of Sri Lankans use biomass fuel for cooking, the major source of IAP in developing countries. We conducted a review of the available literature and data sources to profile biomass fuel use in Sri Lanka. We also produced two maps (population density and biomass use; and cooking fuel sources by district) to illustrate the problem in a geographical context. The biomass use in Sri Lanka is limited to wood while coal, charcoal, and cow dung are not used. Government data sources indicate poor residents in rural areas are more likely to use biomass fuel. Respiratory diseases, which may have been caused by cooking emissions, are one of the leading causes of hospitalizations and death. The World Health Organization estimated that the number of deaths attributable to IAP in Sri Lanka in 2004 was 4300. Small scale studies have been conducted in-country in an attempt to associate biomass fuel use with cataracts, low birth weight, respiratory diseases and lung cancer. However, the IAP issue has not been broadly researched and is not prominent in Sri Lankan public health policies and programs to date. Our profile of Sri Lanka calls for further analytical studies and new innovative initiatives to inform public health policy, advocacy and program interventions to address the IAP problem of Sri Lanka.

  17. Improved stove programs need robust methods to estimate carbon offsets

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Michael; Edwards, Rufus; Masera, Omar

    2010-01-01

    Current standard methods result in significant discrepancies in carbon offset accounting compared to approaches based on representative community based subsamples, which provide more realistic assessments at reasonable cost. Perhaps more critically, neither of the currently approved methods incorporates uncertainties inherent in estimates of emission factors or non-renewable fuel usage (fNRB). Since emission factors and fNRB contribute 25% and 47%, respectively, to the overall uncertainty in ...

  18. Test Report - StoveTeam International, Ecocina Stove with Wood Fuel - Air Pollutant Emissions and Fuel Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test results were obtained in accordance with ISO (International Organization for Standardization) IWA (International Workshop Agreement) 11:2012 that was unanimously affirmed by more than 90 stakeholders at the ISO International Workshop on Cookstoves on February 28-29, 2012 in ...

  19. Test Report - In Stove 60-Liter Institutional Stove with Wood Fuel - Air Pollutant Emissions and Fuel Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test results were obtained in accordance with ISO (International Organization for Standardization) IWA (International Workshop Agreement) 11:2012 that was unanimously affirmed by more than 90 stakeholders at the ISO International Workshop on Cookstoves on February 28-29, 2012 in ...

  20. From Stove-pipe to Network Centric Leveraging Technology to Present a Unified View

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abuhantash, Medhat A; Shoultz, Matthew V

    2004-01-01

    .... The paper will also demonstrate how the application of current technology can be leveraged to present a unified view of data from disparate data sources, and how our organization is leveraging...

  1. Granny's stove: So yesterday; Omas Ofen war gestern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilgers, Claudia

    2010-10-08

    Heating with wood means that wood must be chopped, stacked, stored, dried, and the wood furnace fed by hand. In spite of this, about one third of all wood-heating builder-owners decide to instal a wood gasifier boiler. SONNE WIND and WAeRME presents information and data on boilers up to 50 kW from 20 manufacturers. (orig.)

  2. Solid-fuel cook stoves: Fuel efficiency and emissions testing--Austin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 1.6 million people prematurely die each year due to exposure to air pollutants from burning solid fuels for residential cooking and heating (WHO, 2010). Residential solid-fuel use accounts for approximately 25 percent of ...

  3. Practical and money-saving use of the sawdust stove in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download link ...

  4. Autonomy and Proximity in Household Heating Practices: the Case of Wood-Burning Stoves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Kjerulf

    2008-01-01

    alter infrastructural conditions in order to pursue personal strategies for domestic heating and comfort, personal strategies that may have their root in economic considerations or may regard the construction of homeliness and sensuous pleasure - referring in turn to broader socio-cultural values...

  5. Raekoja kunagised kahhelahjud = Old Stoves in Tallinn Town Hall / Lea Sillart

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sillart, Lea

    2004-01-01

    Tallinna Raekojas olnud kahhelahjudest ja kahlileidudest. Andreas Belau töökoja baroksetest sinivalgetest ahjukahlitest aastast 1745. Kodanikesaali vestibüülis olnud neogooti stiilis malmahju (19. saj. lõpp) eksponeeritakse pööningul

  6. Insulated Solar Electric Cooking – Tomorrow's healthy affordable stoves?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Watkins

    Full Text Available We present a cooking technology consisting of a solar panel directly connected to an electric heater inside of a well-insulated chamber. Assuming continued decrease in solar panel prices, we anticipate that in a few decades Solar Electric Cooking (SEC technologies will be the most common cooking technology for the poor. Appropriate use of insulation reduces the power demand making low-power Insulated Solar Electric Cooking (ISEC systems already cost competitive. We present a $100 prototype and preliminary results of two implementations in Uganda.

  7. Did I turn off the stove? Good inhibitory control can protect from influences of repeated checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linkovski, O.; Kalanthroff, E.; Henik, A.; Anholt, G.E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder characterized by compulsions aimed at reducing anxiety associated with intrusive cognitions. However, compulsive behaviors such as repeated checking were found to increase rather than decrease uncertainty related

  8. Autonomy and proximity in household heating practices - the case of wood burning stoves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Kjerulf

    Afbrænding af træ i brændeovne og brændefyr er blevet væsentligt mere udbredt i Danmark siden midten af 1990'erne; en udvikling der medfører øget partikelforurening i boligområder med villaer og rækkehuse. Brugen af brændeovne bliver, på basis af et sociologisk studie af fænomenet, forstået i for...

  9. Volatile organic compounds in emissions from brown-coal-fired residential stoves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engewald, W.; Knobloch, T.; Efer, J.

    1993-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds were determined in stack-gas emissions from the residential burning of brown-coal briquets using adsorptive enrichment on hydrophobic adsorbents, thermal desorption and capillary-gas chromatographic analysis. 152 compounds were identified and quantified. Quantitative emission factors of the identified individual compounds were determined in relation to the amount of the fuel used. These factors permit assessment of the pollution of the city of Leipzig with volatile organic compounds resulting from the burning of indigenous lignite. (orig.) [de

  10. Influence of quality coal combustion and domestic stoves outbreaks steam generators and the environmental pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Petrilean, Dan Codrut

    2008-01-01

    It was drawn balance a steam generator. We determined the pollutant emissions from coal combustion in the furnace Jiu Valley steam generator with an output of 150 MW. As an example of the steam generator was considered the type BabkoK Hitachi with turbine Turbao + Atom, in cogeneration.

  11. Test Report, BioLite Home Stove with Wood Fuel, Air Pollutant Emissions and Fuel Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test results were obtained in accordance with ISO (International Organization for Standardization) IWA (International Workshop Agreement) 11:2012 that was unanimously affirmed by more than 90 stakeholders at the ISO International Workshop on Cookstoves on February 28-29, 2012 in ...

  12. Reducing particulate matter in the operation of firewood burning stoves taking into account the toxicological relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, Volker Alfred

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing humanity is climate change. Correspondingly, inter alia, the German government has set a target by 2020, to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases to the 1990 level by 20%. For this purpose can and should an increased energetic use of biomass contribute. End of 2007, the bioenergy had a share of around three quarters of the renewable primary energy input. Of which more than 45% were used for the heat supply. A total of more than 90% of renewable heat have been provided from biomass. From the provided amount of heat come over 80% from the combustion of solid biofuels - so far almost exclusively wood products - in small and medium wood-fuelled combustion systems. To reduce carbon dioxide emissions the federal government is accelerating a further expansion of energetic use of biomass in the heating sector. This expansion of thermal use of biomass, however, for reasons of pollution control, should not rise simultaneously with the emissions of air pollutants such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides or particulate matter. [de

  13. Combining interventions: improved chimney stoves, kitchen sinks and solar disinfection of drinking water and kitchen clothes to improve home hygiene in rural Peru L’association d’interventions - améliorer les cuisinières à bois, mettre en place des éviers, désinfecter l’eau domestique et le linge de cuisine par le solaire – permet d’améliorer l’hygiène dans les foyers ruraux du Pérou Intervenciones combinadas: mejorar las cocinas a leña, instalar fregaderos y desinfectar el agua para beber y los paños de cocina con energía solar para mejorar la higiene en hogares rurales en Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. Gil

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Home based interventions are advocated in rural areas against a variety of diseases. The combination of different interventions might have synergistic effects in terms of health improvement and cost effectiveness. However, it is crucial to ensure cultural acceptance. The aim of the study was to develop an effective and culturally accepted home-based intervention package to reduce diarrhoea and lower respiratory illnesses in children. In two rural Peruvian communities we evaluated the performance and acceptance of cooking devices, household water treatments (HWT and home- hygiene interventions, with qualitative and quantitative methods. New ventilated stove designs reduced wood consumption by 16%. The majority of participants selected solar water disinfection as HWT in a blind tasting. In-depth interviews on hygiene improvement further revealed a high demand for kitchen sinks. After one year of installation the improved chimney stoves and kitchen sinks were all in use.  The intervention package was successfully adapted to local customs, kitchen-, home- and hygiene management. High user satisfaction was primarily driven by convenience gains due to the technical improvements and only secondarily by perceived health benefits.Les interventions à domicile sont recommandées dans les zones rurales pour éviter diverses maladies. L’association de différentes interventions entraîne une synergie en termes d’amélioration de la santé et de rapport coût-efficacité. Il est cependant crucial d’obtenir l’adhésion de la population. Le but de l’étude était d'élaborer un programme d’interventions à domicile, efficaces et acceptées par la population, visant à réduire la diarrhée et les affections des voies respiratoires basses chez l’enfant. Nous avons évalué, dans deux communautés rurales du Pérou, l’efficacité et l’acceptation d’appareils de cuisson, des traitements de l’eau domestique (HWT et d’interventions d

  14. Norwegian households' perception of wood pellet stove compared to air-to-air heat pump and electric heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sopha, Bertha Maya; Kloeckner, Christian A.; Skjevrak, Geir; Hertwich, Edgar G.

    2010-01-01

    In 2003, the high dependency on electric heating combined with the high electricity price prompted a significant number of Norwegian households to consider alternative heating systems. The government introduced economic support for wood pellet heating and heat pumps. In contrast to the fast growing heat pump market, this financial support has not resulted in a widespread adoption of wood pellet heating. This paper studies factors that influence the choice of heating system based on Norwegian households' perceptions. Electric heating, heat pump and wood pellet heating were compared, with a special focus on wood pellet heating. This study was conducted as a questionnaire survey on two independent samples. The first sample consisted of 188 randomly chosen Norwegian households, mainly using electric heating; the second sample consisted of 461 households using wood pellet heating. Our results show that socio-demographic factors, communication among households, the perceived importance of heating system attributes, and the applied decision strategy all influence the Norwegian homeowners. The significance of these factors differs between the two samples and the preferred type of anticipated future heating system. Strategies for possible interventions and policy initiatives are discussed.

  15. Modelling of a solar stove: small scale concentrating system with heat storage: potential for cooking in rural areas, Zimbabwe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikukwa, Actor

    2007-10-15

    The central objective of the present research is to serve as an in-depth technical introduction to small-scale concentrating systems tailored for application especially in rural areas in Africa located outside the national electricity grids. For example, MSc and doctoral-students recently matriculated on NUFU-sponsorship at some universities in Africa (i.e Mozambique, Uganda, Tanzania, South Africa and Ethiopia) for research in solar-concentrator technologies will find most of the material in this work quite useful. Chapter 1 discusses the premise on which this research is based. It essentially highlights the gravity of the energy crisis as experienced by the impoverished masses living in most parts of Africa. The situation in Zimbabwe was discussed in detail (for case-studies1) because it is a suitable example added to the convenience of being the country of the author's origin. The second chapter is thus a detailed study on the solar energy resource situation in Zimbabwe. It describes the availability and patterns of solar energy based on the existing solar radiation data obtained from meteorological stations scattered throughout the country. These results were necessary for assessing the potential of the proposed system in Zimbabwe, and can also be extended for use in other solar energy projects. Chapter 3 focuses on the collection of solar radiation using parabolic concentrators. Major determinants that include errors and optical sensitivity of parabolic solar collectors, the correlation between receiver configuration and the parabolic collector are expounded. Arguments for and the main principle on how-to incorporate a mechanical solar tracking device are also laid-out in this part of the thesis. A very critical component of the concentrating system: the volumetric fibrous receiver, is described in the 4th chapter. Here, the theory on which one of the major computer programmes developed in this research, is given an in-depth treatment. The gist of this programme is to simulate the heat transfer mechanisms taking place within the fibrous receiver during operation. The predicted results are then presented and discussed in detail. The transportation of the hot air from the receiver, the ceding of its sensible energy to rockbed thermal storage and insulation are deliberated in chapter 5. Another major computer programme that models these processes is written, in which case, results for different inputs are discussed and compared. The need to devise an airpump capable of adjusting the mass flow rate in order to sustain a constant inlet air temperature to the storage is highlighted. Chapter 6 describes the design of the hotplates and their incorporation to the storage unit. The premise on which the third major computer model in this work is discussed in detail. This simulation programme attempts to model a cooking process, in which case, the thermal storage is simultaneously discharged. The results are presented and an overview of the merits of a successful system are briefly discussed. Finally, major conclusions, recommendations and areas for further study are given(Author). refs., figs., tabs

  16. Test Report - CleanCook Model A1 Stove with Alcohol Fuel - Air Pollutant Emissions and Fuel Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test results were obtained in accordance with ISO (International Organization for Standardization) IWA (International Workshop Agreement) 11:2012 that was unanimously affirmed by more than 90 stakeholders at the ISO International Workshop on Cookstoves on February 28-29, 2012 in ...

  17. Modelling of a solar stove: small scale concentrating system with heat storage: potential for cooking in rural areas, Zimbabwe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikukwa, Actor

    2007-10-15

    The central objective of the present research is to serve as an in-depth technical introduction to small-scale concentrating systems tailored for application especially in rural areas in Africa located outside the national electricity grids. For example, MSc and doctoral-students recently matriculated on NUFU-sponsorship at some universities in Africa (i.e Mozambique, Uganda, Tanzania, South Africa and Ethiopia) for research in solar-concentrator technologies will find most of the material in this work quite useful. Chapter 1 discusses the premise on which this research is based. It essentially highlights the gravity of the energy crisis as experienced by the impoverished masses living in most parts of Africa. The situation in Zimbabwe was discussed in detail (for case-studies1) because it is a suitable example added to the convenience of being the country of the author's origin. The second chapter is thus a detailed study on the solar energy resource situation in Zimbabwe. It describes the availability and patterns of solar energy based on the existing solar radiation data obtained from meteorological stations scattered throughout the country. These results were necessary for assessing the potential of the proposed system in Zimbabwe, and can also be extended for use in other solar energy projects. Chapter 3 focuses on the collection of solar radiation using parabolic concentrators. Major determinants that include errors and optical sensitivity of parabolic solar collectors, the correlation between receiver configuration and the parabolic collector are expounded. Arguments for and the main principle on how-to incorporate a mechanical solar tracking device are also laid-out in this part of the thesis. A very critical component of the concentrating system: the volumetric fibrous receiver, is described in the 4th chapter. Here, the theory on which one of the major computer programmes developed in this research, is given an in-depth treatment. The gist of this programme is to simulate the heat transfer mechanisms taking place within the fibrous receiver during operation. The predicted results are then presented and discussed in detail. The transportation of the hot air from the receiver, the ceding of its sensible energy to rockbed thermal storage and insulation are deliberated in chapter 5. Another major computer programme that models these processes is written, in which case, results for different inputs are discussed and compared. The need to devise an airpump capable of adjusting the mass flow rate in order to sustain a constant inlet air temperature to the storage is highlighted. Chapter 6 describes the design of the hotplates and their incorporation to the storage unit. The premise on which the third major computer model in this work is discussed in detail. This simulation programme attempts to model a cooking process, in which case, the thermal storage is simultaneously discharged. The results are presented and an overview of the merits of a successful system are briefly discussed. Finally, major conclusions, recommendations and areas for further study are given(Author). refs., figs., tabs

  18. Test Report, BioLite HomeStove with Wood Fuel, Air Pollutant Emissions and Fuel Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test results were obtained in accordance with ISO (International Organization for Standardization) IWA (International Workshop Agreement) 11:2012 that was unanimously affirmed by more than 90 stakeholders at the ISO International Workshop on Cookstoves on February 28-29, 2012 in ...

  19. performance evaluation of some locally fabricated cookstoves in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The metal shield stove had the fastest time to boil 2kg of water at 12 fastest time to boil ... Keywords: Cookstoves, cookstove performance, water boiling test, wood stove, charcoal stove. 1. INTRODUCTION ..... Michoacan, Mexico. Renewable ...

  20. Using stated preference methods to design cost-effective subsidy programs to induce technology adoption: an application to a stove program in southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Walter; Salgado, Hugo; Vásquez, Felipe; Chávez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    We study the design of an economic incentive based program - a subsidy - to induce adoption of more efficient technology in a pollution reduction program in southern Chile. Stated preferences methods, contingent valuation (CV), and choice experiment (CE) are used to estimate the probability of adoption and the willingness to share the cost of a new technology by a household. The cost-effectiveness property of different subsidy schemes is explored numerically for different regulatory objectives. Our results suggest that households are willing to participate in voluntary programs and to contribute by paying a share of the cost of adopting more efficient technologies. We find that attributes of the existing and the new technology, beyond the price, are relevant determinant factors of the participation decision and payment. Limited access to credit markets for low income families can be a major barrier for an effective implementation of these types of programs. Variations in the design of the subsidy and on the regulator's objective and constraints can have significant impact on the level and the cost of reduction of aggregate emissions achieved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Remember when science was fun? Encountering 'nuclear fallout in your wood stove' and other mysteries at the Northwestern New Mexico regional and state science and engineering fairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hylko, J.M.; Miller, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Rio Grande Chapter of the Health Physics Society is a proud supporter of the Northwestern New Mexico Regional and State Science and Engineering Fairs. In this role, the chapter provides judges and furnishes monetary awards to recognize those students, between grades 6-12, and their teachers whose projects include the utilization or investigation of ionizing (e.g., gamma) or non-ionizing (e.g., UV exposure, microwaves) radiation. The chapter promotes public information and education about health physics by sending every award winner and sponsoring teacher a copy of career opportunities in health physics, including information about degree programs and scholarships. Also, the chapter provides a 1-year free subscription to the Rio Grande Chapter Newsletter, and publishes the names of the award winners, the titles of their projects, the names of their teachers, and the names of their schools. Furthermore, chapter members are encouraged to assist contestants and award winners by providing mentoring opportunities, and educational resources such as textbooks. This paper reviews the Rio Grande Chapter Science and Engineering Fair Program with respect to judging categories and criteria, project titles, what the chapter has learned from the students, and an overview of the 1995 Regional, State, and International Science and Engineering Fair Programme. (author)

  2. Indoor air pollution exposure from use of indoor stoves and fireplaces in association with breast cancer: a case-control study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    White, A. J.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Stellman, S. D.; Beyea, J.; Steck, S. E.; Mordukhovich, I.; McCarty, K. M.; Ahn, J.; Rössner ml., Pavel; Santella, R. M.; Gammon, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, Dec 12 (2014), s. 108 ISSN 1476-069X Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * GST * cancer Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 3.372, year: 2014

  3. The late medieval vessel stove tiles in the topographical context of Klaipėda / Raimonda Nabažaitė

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nabažaitė, Raimonda

    2014-01-01

    Käsitlus toetub Klaipėda Väike-Leedu ajaloomuuseumi kogudes säilitatavatele esemetele. Artikli eesmärgiks on tuvastada kuidas on toimunud Klaipėda ahjupottide areng kesk- ja uusajal. Ahjude kasutus Klaipėdas vastab kahlite üldarengule mujal Euroopas

  4. Impact of primary and secondary air supply intensity in stove on emissions of size-segregated particulate matter and carbonaceous aerosols from apple tree wood burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Shen, Zhenxing; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Qian; Lei, Yali; Cao, Junji; Huang, Yu; Liu, Suixin; Zheng, Chunli; Xu, Hongmei; Liu, Hongxia; Pan, Hua; Liu, Pingping; Zhang, Renjian

    2018-04-01

    In order to assess emission factors (EF) more accurately from household biomass burning, a series of laboratory-controlled apple tree wood burning tests were conducted to measure the EFs of size-segregated particulate matter (PM) and carbonaceous aerosols. The controlled burning experiments were conducted with designed primary air (PA) and secondary air (SA) supply intensity. An optimum value of 7 m3·h- 1 was found for SA, resulting the highest modified combustion efficiency (92.4 ± 2.5%) as well as the lowest EFs of PM2.5 (0.13 ± 0.01 g·MJ- 1), OC (0.04 ± 0.03 g·MJ- 1) and EC (0.03 ± 0.01 g·MJ- 1). SA values of 7 and 10 m3·h- 1 resulted the lowest EFs for all the different PM sizes. In a test with PA of 6 m3·h- 1 and SA of 7 m3·h- 1, very low EFs were observed for OC1 (8.2%), OC2 (11.2%) and especially OP (Pyrolyzed OC) (0%, not detected), indicating nearly complete combustion under this air supply condition. Besides SA, higher PA was proved to have positive effects on PM and carbonaceous fraction emission reduction. For example, with a fixed SA of 1.5 m3·h- 1, EFs of PM2.5 decreased from 0.64 to 0.27 g·MJ- 1 when PA increased from 6 to 15 m3·h- 1 (P < 0.05). Similar reductions were also observed in EFs of OC, EC and size segregated PM.

  5. Status of bio energy based on forest material - from the stub to the stove door; Status for bioenergi basert paa skogsvirke - fra stubben til ovnsdoera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lileng, Joern K.; Gjoelsjoe, Simen

    1999-07-01

    It is not well documented in Norway who possesses the competence and who is the user of forest material as bio fuel. Forest material is forest chips, secondary products from forestry, and firewood. The project reported was a literature study that throws light on the problem by referring to central persons and institutions in this field. The report also is a general introduction to bio energy based on forest material. The principle sections deal with (1) Climate policy, (2) Energy carriers based on forest material, (3) Systems for selection and treatment of bio fuel, (4) Methods for calculation of the supply of biomass in the forest, (5) Returning ash to the forest, (6) Transport, (7) Storage, (8) Assessment of bio energy, (9) Abstract of relevant Norwegian reports, (10) Bio energy projects and bio energy actors in Norway and (11) Proposed research projects and research work on forest material as fuel.

  6. Source profiles and contributions of biofuel combustion for PM2.5, PM10 and their compositions, in a city influenced by biofuel stoves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ying-Ze; Chen, Jia-Bao; Zhang, Lin-Lin; Du, Xin; Wei, Jin-Jin; Fan, Hui; Xu, Jiao; Wang, Hai-Ting; Guan, Liao; Shi, Guo-Liang; Feng, Yin-Chang

    2017-12-01

    Source and ambient samples were collected in a city in China that uses considerable biofuel, to assess influence of biofuel combustion and other sources on particulate matter (PM). Profiles and size distribution of biofuel combustion were investigated. Higher levels in source profiles, a significant increase in heavy-biomass ambient and stronger correlations of K + , Cl - , OC and EC suggest that they can be tracers of biofuel combustion. And char-EC/soot-EC (8.5 for PM 2.5 and 15.8 for PM 10 of source samples) can also be used to distinguish it. In source samples, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were approximately 28.0%-68.8% (PM 2.5 ) and 27.2%-43.8% (PM 10 ) of OC. For size distribution, biofuel combustion mainly produces smaller particles. OC1, OC2, EC1 and EC2 abundances showed two peaks with one below 1 μm and one above 2 μm. An advanced three-way factory analysis model was applied to quantify source contributions to ambient PM 2.5 and PM 10 . Higher contributions of coal combustion, vehicular emission, nitrate and biofuel combustion occurred during the heavy-biomass period, and higher contributions of sulfate and crustal dust were observed during the light-biomass period. Mass and percentage contributions of biofuel combustion were significantly higher in heavy-biomass period. The biofuel combustion attributed above 45% of K + and Cl - , above 30% of EC and about 20% of OC. In addition, through analysis of source profiles and contributions, they were consistently evident that biofuel combustion and crustal dust contributed more to cation than to anion, while sulfate & SOC and nitrate showed stronger influence on anion than on cation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reducing particulate matter in the operation of firewood burning stoves taking into account the toxicological relevance; Feinstaubminderung im Betrieb von Scheitholzkaminoefen unter Beruecksichtigung der toxikologischen Relevanz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, Volker Alfred

    2010-12-02

    One of the greatest challenges facing humanity is climate change. Correspondingly, inter alia, the German government has set a target by 2020, to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases to the 1990 level by 20%. For this purpose can and should an increased energetic use of biomass contribute. End of 2007, the bioenergy had a share of around three quarters of the renewable primary energy input. Of which more than 45% were used for the heat supply. A total of more than 90% of renewable heat have been provided from biomass. From the provided amount of heat come over 80% from the combustion of solid biofuels - so far almost exclusively wood products - in small and medium wood-fuelled combustion systems. To reduce carbon dioxide emissions the federal government is accelerating a further expansion of energetic use of biomass in the heating sector. This expansion of thermal use of biomass, however, for reasons of pollution control, should not rise simultaneously with the emissions of air pollutants such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides or particulate matter. [German] Eine der groessten Herausforderungen fuer die Menschheit ist der Klimawandel. Entsprechend hat sich u.a. die deutsche Bundesregierung das Ziel gesetzt bis 2020 die Emissionen an Treibhausgasen im Vergleich zum Stand 1990 um 20 % zu mindern. Hierzu kann und soll eine verstaerkte energetische Nutzung der Biomasse beitragen. Ende 2007 hatte die Bioenergie einen Anteil von rund drei Viertel am erneuerbaren Primaerenergieeinsatz. Davon wurden mehr als 45 % fuer die Waermebereitstellung genutzt. Insgesamt wurden mehr als 90 % der erneuerbaren Waerme aus Biomasse bereitgestellt. Von der bereitgestellten Waermemenge kommen ueber 80 % aus der Verbrennung von festen Biobrennstoffen - bisher fast ausschliesslich Holzprodukte - in kleinen und mittleren Holzfeuerungsanlagen. Zur Verminderung der Kohlenstoffdioxidemissionen wird von Seiten des Bundes ein weiterer Ausbau der energetischen Biomassenutzung im Waermebereich forciert. Bei diesem Ausbau der thermischen Biomassenutzung duerfen aber aus Gruenden des Immissionsschutzes nicht gleichzeitig die Emissionen an Luftschadstoffen wie z. B. Kohlenstoffmonoxid, Stickstoffoxide oder Feinstaub ansteigen.

  8. Implications of Different Household Cooking Energy on Indoor Air ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Energy is a basic necessity of life for meeting domestic, social and industrial needs of man. ... The cooking methods sampled were firewood stove, kerosene stove, charcoal stove, electricity stove and gas cooker. ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  9. The Household Cooking Sector in Nigeria: Environmental and Economic Sustainability Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Gujba, Haruna; Mulugetta, Yacob; Azapagic, Adisa

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies life cycle environmental impacts and costs of the household cooking sector in Nigeria from 2003 to 2030. Five scenarios are considered: business as usual, dominated by fuel wood stoves; low penetration of improved fuel wood and solar stoves, as planned by the government; high penetration of these stoves; increased use of fossil fuel stoves; and increased use of electric stoves. If business as usual (BAU) continues, the environmental impacts would increase by up to four time...

  10. Handbook for Residents of Military Family Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    6. CLEAN STOVE, OVEN, BROILER AND HOOD. FOR UNITS WITH FREE STANDING STOVES, MOVE STOVE AND CLEAN UNDERNEATH AND BEHIND IT. 7. DEFROST AND CLEAN...OUARTERS CLEARANCE REOUIREMENTS 1 Stove, inside and out, especially burners, ports, oven, and broiler cleaned. Ensure all burners operate normally. 2. Stove...expected to maintain your system. f. RAKING. Grounds will be raked as often as necessary to keep the area free of leaves, litter , etc. Raked leaves

  11. Home interventions are effective at decreasing indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Paulin, L. M.; Diette, G. B.; Scott, M.; McCormack, M. C.; Matsui, E. C.; Curtin-Brosnan, J.; Williams, D. L.; Kidd-Taylor, A.; Shea, M.; Breysse, P. N.; Hansel, N. N.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a by-product of combustion produced by indoor gas appliances such as cooking stoves, is associated with respiratory symptoms in those with obstructive airways disease. We conducted a three-armed randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of interventions aimed at reducing indoor NO2 concentrations in homes with unvented gas stoves: (i) replacement of existing gas stove with electric stove; (ii) installation of ventilation hood over existing gas stove; and (iii) placemen...

  12. Breads, loaves and portable stoves. Two ceramic forms intended for the baking of bread in Al-Andalus: the stove (tannur and the dish (tabag | Panes, hogazas y fogones portátiles. Dos formas cerámicas destinadas a la cocción del pan en Al-Andalus: el hornillo (tannur y el plato (tabag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Gutiérrez Lloret

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available With this work we want to identify several pottery's series found in rural archaeological sequences of the Middle Ages beginning from the Eastern part of the Iberian Peninsula with two portable methode for bread-baking —the portable furnace or tannur and the baking-plate or tabaq— cited in the literary Arabian sources, contrasting with similar objects quoted by Latin and visigothics sources. This study includes also their origin and perdurance but, whereas these baking-plate appear in the Late Roman baking technology, the portable furnace was, apparently, introduced in al-Andalus with the Islamic conquest. | En este trabajo pretendemos identificar diversos repertorios cerámicos aparecidos en contextos arqueológicos altomedievales rurales del levante peninsular, con dos sistemas portátiles de coción del pan —el hornillo o tannur y el plato o tabaq— mencionados en las fuentes literarias árabes, relacionándolos, en algunos casos, con objetos similares mencionados en las fuentes latinas y visigodas. Estudiamos también sus orígenes y perduraciones, pero mientras que el plato figura en las tradiciones tardorromanas de panificación, el hornillo, de tradición semita, parece ser introducido en al-Andalus con la conquista islámica.

  13. PENTINGNYA KARAKTERISTIK TUNGKU UNTUK MENCIPTAKAN BEBAN, HARGA JUAL, DAN PROFITABILITAS PATUNG BARONG BERMEDIA KERAMIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Normal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the influence of stove characteristics to production cost price, saleprice, and profitability. The research results showed that the stove characteristics influenced the productioncost price of barong statue. The production cost price of barong statue by small stove was Rp 93.495,95 eachunit, by medium stove was Rp 91.423,81 each unit, and by big stove was Rp 89.040,23 each unit. The costprice of production of barong statue decreased 2,21 % for medium stove, and 4,76% for big stove. From thefinancial management side, the good management of financial resources in manufacturing barong statue couldcreate more accurate the production cost price; the stove characteristics influenced cost price of barong statue.The sale price of barong statue by small size stove was Rp 121.539,54 each unit, by medium stove was Rp118.850,95 each unit, and by the big stove was Rp 115.752,30 each unit. The sale price of barong statuedecreased 2,21% for medium stove, and 4,76% for big stove. The determination of cost price exactly couldcreate financial structure well because cost price is an element of sales; and the stove characteristics influencedthe profitability of barong statue. The profitability of barong statue by small stove was 11,54%, by mediumstove was 11,54%, and by big stove was 11,54%. The profitability of barong statue did not differ from thesmall, medium and big stove. The management of fire stove and productive assets effectively could increaseprofitability as part of financial management for short term, middle term, and long term.

  14. Household air pollution and childhood pneumonia in South Sudan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    clean/improved cook stoves such as the Uga Cooking Stove (locally made in Uganda, using charcoal) is critical to .... household ventilation or behavior change may reduce levels of HAP or ... Health, Environmental and Social Determinants of.

  15. 76 FR 43346 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... production limits and restrictions while seeking permits to install and operate additional equipment to... pre-1988 wood stoves with cleaner burning parts and/or stoves. The Department of Justice will receive...

  16. A user-centered, iterative engineering approach for advanced biomass cookstove design and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Ming; Carter, Ellison; Baumgartner, Jill; Deng, Mengsi; Clark, Sierra; Schauer, James J.; Ezzati, Majid; Li, Jiarong; Fu, Yu; Yang, Xudong

    2017-09-01

    Unclean combustion of solid fuel for cooking and other household energy needs leads to severe household air pollution and adverse health impacts in adults and children. Replacing traditional solid fuel stoves with high efficiency, low-polluting semi-gasifier stoves can potentially contribute to addressing this global problem. The success of semi-gasifier cookstove implementation initiatives depends not only on the technical performance and safety of the stove, but also the compatibility of the stove design with local cooking practices, the needs and preferences of stove users, and community economic structures. Many past stove design initiatives have failed to address one or more of these dimensions during the design process, resulting in failure of stoves to achieve long-term, exclusive use and market penetration. This study presents a user-centered, iterative engineering design approach to developing a semi-gasifier biomass cookstove for rural Chinese homes. Our approach places equal emphasis on stove performance and meeting the preferences of individuals most likely to adopt the clean stove technology. Five stove prototypes were iteratively developed following energy market and policy evaluation, laboratory and field evaluations of stove performance and user experience, and direct interactions with stove users. The most current stove prototype achieved high performance in the field on thermal efficiency (ISO Tier 3) and pollutant emissions (ISO Tier 4), and was received favorably by rural households in the Sichuan province of Southwest China. Among household cooks receiving the final prototype of the intervention stove, 88% reported lighting and using it at least once. At five months post-intervention, the semi-gasifier stoves were used at least once on an average of 68% [95% CI: 43, 93] of days. Our proposed design strategy can be applied to other stove development initiatives in China and other countries.

  17. Wood burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmann, H

    1955-01-01

    Discussed are the use of wood as a fuel, the technique of wood combustion and the operation of wood-burning stoves for cooking and heating. In addition, there is a section which reviews the use of wood stoves in various countries and lists manufacturers of stoves, central heating furnaces and in some cases sawdust burners.

  18. Results of Laboratory Testing of 15 Cookstove Designs in Accordance with the ISO/IWA Tiers of Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Dean; Bentson, Samuel; Li, Haixi

    2015-03-01

    The widespread adoption and sustained use of modern cookstoves has the potential to reduce harmful effects to climate, health, and the well-being of approximately one-third of the world's population that currently rely on biomass fuel for cooking and heating. In an effort to understand and develop cleaner burning and more efficient cookstoves, 15 stove design and fuel/loading combinations were evaluated in the laboratory using the International Workshop Agreement's five-tiered (0-4) rating system for fuel use and emissions. The designs evaluated include rocket-type combustion chamber models including reduced firepower, sunken pots, and chimneys (three stoves); gasifier-type combustion chambers using prepared fuels in the form of wood pellets (four stoves); forced draft stoves with a small electric fan (five stoves); and a single insulated charcoal stove with preheated secondary air. It was found that a charcoal burning stove was the only stove to meet all the Tier 4 levels of performance. Achieving over 40% thermal efficiency at high power was made possible by reducing firepower and gaps around the pot, although batch-fed stoves generally do not "turn down" for optimal low power performance. While all stoves met Tier 4 for carbon monoxide, only stoves equipped with electrical fans reduced respirable particulate matter to Tier 4 levels. Finally, stoves with chimneys and integrated pots were fuel efficient and virtually eliminated indoor emissions. It is hoped that these design techniques will be useful in further development and evolution of high-performance cookstove designs.

  19. Black clay. Domestic stove based on counter current combustion, a principle used during the Iron Age and utilized in a baking oven from the Middle Ages; Sortemuld; Braendovn med modstroemsforbraending et princip fra jernalderen anvendt i bageovne fra middelalderen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, E.

    1994-01-01

    Sortemuld (Black clay) ovens, based on the counter-current combustion principle, were used during the Iron Age and throughout the following centuries. It is claimed that the use of this technique results in the wood fuel being burnt so quickly that the oven temperature remains so high and for such a long time that the heat will be retained in the walls of such clay ovens. Prototype ovens were constructed, based on this principle, and various types of wood fuel were burnt in them. About 20 - 40 kg of fuel was combusted with each firing which lasted from 2-4 hours, answering to 20 - 40 kW/hrs. The carbon dioxide content reached 0.1% at times. The designs and construction of the prototypes ovens are described in detail and their performance documented. The text is illustrated with diagrams and the results of the performance testing are given in detail. (AB)

  20. The Household Cooking Sector in Nigeria: Environmental and Economic Sustainability Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruna Gujba

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies life cycle environmental impacts and costs of the household cooking sector in Nigeria from 2003 to 2030. Five scenarios are considered: business as usual, dominated by fuel wood stoves; low penetration of improved fuel wood and solar stoves, as planned by the government; high penetration of these stoves; increased use of fossil fuel stoves; and increased use of electric stoves. If business as usual (BAU continues, the environmental impacts would increase by up to four times and costs by up to five times, mainly because of high fuel wood consumption. Implementing the government’s plan to introduce improved fuel wood and solar stoves would yield no environmental advantages, as the proposed number of stoves is too low. A higher number of the advanced stoves would lead to significant improvements in some impacts but would worsen others so that some trade-offs are needed. From the economic perspective, the scenario with a high use of advanced stoves has the lowest total costs but its capital costs are three times higher than for BAU. The government should prioritise the introduction of advanced stoves to reduce health impact from indoor pollution and reduce pressures on biomass resources; however, this may require subsidies. Fossil fuel and electric stoves would also help to preserve biomass and reduce health impacts from indoor pollution but would lead to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions and depletion of fossil resources.

  1. Does peer use influence adoption of efficient cookstoves? Evidence from a randomized controlled trial in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltramo, Theresa; Blalock, Garrick; Levine, David I; Simons, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the effect of peer usage on consumer demand for efficient cookstoves with a randomized controlled trial in rural Uganda. The authors tested whether the neighbors of buyers who ordered and received a stove are more likely to purchase an efficient cookstove than the neighbors of buyers who ordered but have not yet received a stove. The authors found that neighbors of buyers who have experience with the stove are not detectably more likely to purchase a stove than neighbors of buyers who have not yet received their stove. The authors found evidence of peer effects in opinions about efficient cookstoves. Knowing that a prominent member of the community has the efficient stove predicts 17-22 percentage points higher odds of strongly favoring the stove. However, this more favorable opinion seemingly has no effect on purchase decisions.

  2. Cookstove handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Firewood has become a matter of serious concern due to dwindling forest resources coupled with excessive consumption resulting from wasteful and inefficient methods of cooking. Efforts are now being made by various researchers to design more efficient and less expensive cooking stoves. This handbook is a compendium of more than 40 different types of solid-fuel cooking stoves which can be manufactured using locally available materials and skills. The evolution of cooking stoves from open-fire cooking arrangements is described. One chapter is devoted to cooking-stove design considerations, including performance, combustion, oxygen requirements, surrounding air effects, near-by solid-surface effects, the excess-air concept, heat transfer, geometrical efficiency and stove components. The bulk of the document introduces traditionally used and improved cooking-stove designs for wood and charcoal burning in detail providing information on fuels, stove materials, and advantages and disadvantages. A description of 14 different laboratory investigations on efficiency aspects of cooking stoves is presented. Annexes are devoted to the composition and properties of wood, a summary of characteristics of the stoves described in the text, the efficiencies of commonly used cooking stoves with different fuels and a glossary. 82 references.

  3. Health and climate benefits of cookstove replacement options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieshop, Andrew P.; Marshall, Julian D.; Kandlikar, Milind

    2011-01-01

    The health and climate impacts of available household cooking options in developing countries vary sharply. Here, we analyze and compare these impacts (health; climate) and the potential co-benefits from the use of fuel and stove combinations. Our results indicate that health and climate impacts span 2 orders of magnitude among the technologies considered. Indoor air pollution is heavily impacted by combustion performance and ventilation; climate impacts are influenced by combustion performance and fuel properties including biomass renewability. Emission components not included in current carbon trading schemes, such as black carbon particles and carbon monoxide, can contribute a large proportion of the total climate impact. Multiple ‘improved’ stove options analyzed in this paper yield roughly equivalent climate benefits but have different impacts on indoor air pollution. Improvements to biomass stoves can improve indoor air quality, which nonetheless remains significantly higher than for stoves that use liquid or gaseous hydrocarbons. LPG- and kerosene-fueled stoves have unrivaled air quality benefits and their climate impacts are also lower than all but the cleanest stoves using renewable biomass. - Research highlights: ► Cookstoves in developing countries have impacts on users' health and the climate. ► A framework to estimate these impacts from different stove types was developed.► Much of stoves' climate impacts are from emissions excluded from climate treaties.► Improved stoves rank differently in their climate and health impacts.► Stoves using modern fuels like LPG provide unrivaled exposure and climate benefits.

  4. Final Technical Report: Thermoelectric-Enhanced Cookstove Add-on (TECA) for Clean Biomass Cookstoves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokes, David [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2015-09-29

    This program seeks to demonstrate a solution to enhance existing biomass cookstove performance through the use of RTI’s Thermoelectric Enhanced Cookstove Add-on (TECA) device. The self-powered TECA device captures a portion of heat from the stove and converts it to electricity through a thermoelectric (TE) device to power a blower. Colorado State University and Envirofit International are partners to support the air injection design and commercialization to enhance combustion in the stove and reduce emissions. Relevance: By demonstrating a proof of concept of the approach with the Envirofit M-5000 stove and TECA device, we hope to apply this technology to existing stoves that are already in use and reduce emissions for stoves that have already found user acceptance to provide a true health benefit. Challenges: The technical challenges include achieving Tier 4 emissions from a biomass stove and for such a stove to operate reliably in the harsh field environment. Additional challenges include the fact that it is difficult to develop a cost effective solution and insure adoption and proper use in the field. Outcomes: In this program we have demonstrated PM emissions at 82 mg/MJd, a 70% reduction as compared to baseline stove operation. We have also developed a stove optimization approach that reduces the number of costly experiments. We have evaluated component-level reliability and will be testing the stove prototype in the field for performance and reliability.

  5. Deployment of commercial energy efficiency cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    This research concerned the promotion of energy-efficient wood stoves in commercial and institutional kitchens in Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda through technology transfer and training of local commercial stove producers. The key objective of the project was to introduce proven designs of energy-efficient wood stoves to producers in the target countries and train them in the manufacture and marketing of these stoves. The improved designs save 50% of the fuel used by the traditional stoves - a major saving where 10-15% of the kitchen budget is spent on fuel. They also remove smoke more effectively, protect cooks from heat and burns, and are easier to keep clean. The project went well although results have varied from one country to the other. In conclusion, the technology transfer of commercial stove designs can take place between neighbouring countries by a process of training, study visits, prototype development, market surveys and producer support.(author)

  6. Technical Guide for conservation of wood fuel: Experiences from Sahel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorez, J.P.

    1992-03-01

    The guide gives technical information in design of energy efficient cooking stoves for the wood depleted countries in sub-saharan Africa. Knowledge and experiences of the Sahel region have been used to design the stoves discussed. As an introduction, the causes and consequences of the wood fuel crises are reviewed. The main models of improved stoves that are spread in Sahel are then described, together with data on performance and design considerations. Strategies for distribution of the improved stoves are analyzed, and ways to follow-up and evaluate their use are suggested. Results of campaigns to distribute the stoves in West African countries are given and methods to improve the distribution are proposed, in particular to promote the ceramic stoves. Finally, complementary wood fuel conservation campaigns are suggested for activities other than household cooking. 22 refs, 14 figs, 5 tabs and photos

  7. Pengembangan Tungku Gasifikasi Arang Biomassa Tipe Natural Draft Gasification Berdasarkan Analisis Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlanda Augupta Pane

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A biomass stove based on natural draft gasification (NDG has been developed in a previous study (Nelwa, et al. 2013 by using simulation based on heat transfer and equilibrium modeling. In this study, a CFD simulation was performed in order to analyze the effect of chimney height, and inlet hole diameter of the stove to the performance of the stove. The results of simulation showed that power produced by stove was between 1863.9 J/s until 2585.7 J/s, and its gasification efficiency was 67.11%. The results of simulation also showed that charcoal gasification produces combustible gases (CO, CH4, and H2 at the bottom and the center of stove, and then they were oxidized by secondary air at the top of stove. This oxidation reaction produces sufficient heat energy which can be used for cooking process.

  8. Field performance of wood-burning and coal-burning appliances in Crested Butte during the 1989-90 heating season. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaasma, D.R.; Champion, M.R.; Gundappa, M.

    1991-10-01

    The field performance of woodburning and coalburning appliances in and around Crested Butte, CO, has been evaluated. Measurements included particulate matter (PM), carbon monoxide (CO), and weekly average burn rates. Woodburning appliances included conventional airtight stoves, EPA-certified catalytic stoves, and EPA-certified noncatalytic stoves. Compared to the emissions measured from conventional stoves, the certified stoves reduced PM emission factors (g/kg) by 53% and CO emission factors by 49%. Coalburning appliances included a commercial scale boiler, a residential stoker, and hand-fired coalstove. The coalburning appliances were compared to conventional woodstoves on a grams of pollutant per joule of heat output basis. The automatically stoked coal appliances reduced PM and CO emissions by roughly 84% and 85%, respectively. The hand-fired stove was cleaner than expected, reducing PM by 55% and CO by 27%

  9. Emission reduction potentials of improved cookstoves and their issues in adoption: An Indian outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Monikankana; Dasappa, S

    2017-12-15

    Biomass as a fuel for cooking is a common practice in rural India, and about 700 million people use traditional stoves to meet their energy demand. However, the thermal and the combustion efficiencies of these stoves are very low, leading to an inefficient use of biomass, and also, resulting in significant indoor air pollution. Research development has however led to the development of some improved stoves viz., natural draft and forced draft for both domestic as well as large scale cooking applications and government is trying to promote them. Forced draft stoves using processed biomass fuels (pellets) have received more prominence due to their superior performance, however, higher initial cost and limited fuel distribution networks have remained the key challenges. Improved natural draft stoves too have gained attention for being relatively inexpensive, and they are more likely to hit the rural households. In this paper, we have examined the environmental benefits obtained by the use of improved stoves for two important scenarios: traditional stoves are replaced by (i)improved natural draft stoves and, (ii) by improved natural draft as well as forced draft stoves. In the best case scenario (case ii), i.e., by shifting 111 million households who currently use wood to the forced draft stoves, and another 45 million households who are dependent on dung cake and agro residues to the improved natural draft stoves, the emission reduction that can be achieved are as follows: particulate matter (PM) 875 kT, black carbon (BC) 229 kT, organic carbon (OC) 525 kT, methane (CH 4 )1178 kT and non methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) of 564 kT. With the promotion of only natural draft improved stoves, the total reductions would be ∼12% lower than the combinational promotion. The CO 2 equivalent reduction is estimated to be ∼70-80 MT per year. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Home interventions are effective at decreasing indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, L M; Diette, G B; Scott, M; McCormack, M C; Matsui, E C; Curtin-Brosnan, J; Williams, D L; Kidd-Taylor, A; Shea, M; Breysse, P N; Hansel, N N

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2 ), a by-product of combustion produced by indoor gas appliances such as cooking stoves, is associated with respiratory symptoms in those with obstructive airways disease. We conducted a three-armed randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of interventions aimed at reducing indoor NO2 concentrations in homes with unvented gas stoves: (i) replacement of existing gas stove with electric stove; (ii) installation of ventilation hood over existing gas stove; and (iii) placement of air purifiers with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and carbon filters. Home inspection and NO2 monitoring were conducted at 1 week pre-intervention and at 1 week and 3 months post-intervention. Stove replacement resulted in a 51% and 42% decrease in median NO2 concentration at 3 months of follow-up in the kitchen and bedroom, respectively (P = 0.01, P = 0.01); air purifier placement resulted in an immediate decrease in median NO2 concentration in the kitchen (27%, P kitchen (20%, P = 0.05). NO2 concentrations in the kitchen and bedroom did not significantly change following ventilation hood installation. Replacing unvented gas stoves with electric stoves or placement of air purifiers with HEPA and carbon filters can decrease indoor NO2 concentrations in urban homes. Several combustion sources unique to the residential indoor environment, including gas stoves, produce nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and higher NO2 concentrations, are associated with worse respiratory morbidity in people with obstructive lung disease. A handful of studies have modified the indoor environment by replacing unvented gas heaters; this study, to our knowledge, is the first randomized study to target unvented gas stoves. The results of this study show that simple home interventions, including replacement of an unvented gas stove with an electric stove or placement of HEPA air purifiers with carbon filters, can significantly decrease indoor NO2 concentrations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A

  11. Characterizing Particulate Matter Exfiltration Estimates for Alternative Cookstoves in a Village-Like Household in Rural Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneja, Sutyajeet I.; Tielsch, James M.; Khatry, Subarna K.; Zaitchik, Benjamin; Curriero, Frank C.; Breysse, Patrick N.

    2017-11-01

    Alternative stoves are an intervention option to reduce household air pollution. The amount of air pollution exiting homes when alternative stoves are utilized is not known. In this paper, particulate matter exfiltration estimates are presented for four types of alternative stoves within a village-like home, which was built to reflect the use of local materials and common size, in rural Nepal. Four alternative stoves with chimneys were examined, which included an alternative mud brick stove, original Envirofit G3355 model, manufacture altered Envirofit G3355, and locally altered Envirofit G3355. Multiple linear regression was utilized to determine estimates of PM2.5 exfiltration. Overall exfiltration fraction average (converted to a percent) for the four stoves were: alternative mud brick stove with chimney 56%, original Envirofit G3355 model with chimney 87%, manufacture altered Envirofit G3355 model with chimney 69%, and locally altered Envirofit G3355 model with chimney 69%. Alternative cookstoves resulted in higher overall average exfiltration due to direct and indirect ventilation relative to traditional, mud-based stoves. This contrast emphasizes the need for an improved understanding of the climate and health implications that are believed to come from implementing alternative stoves on a large scale and the resultant shift of exposure burden from indoors to outdoors.

  12. THE FORM OF THE COOKING VESSEL AND THE ENERGETIC EFFICIENCY OF COOKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAUL KRÄMER

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper examines the contribution of the form of the cooking vessel to the heat transfer efficiency of the stove/pot system. A rounded (convex pot bottom increases the surface available for heat transfer and, hence, heat transfer efficiency. We suggest that combustion-efficient stoves combined with rounded-bottom vessels compare favourably to the same stoves in combination with flat-bottom stoves. Clay pots with a rounded bottom correspond to African traditions. Nowadays metal pots with rounded bottoms are locally produced in some areas. Implications of pot forms for the outcome of Water Boiling Tests are also discussed.

  13. Abatement of emissions from small-scale combustion of biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowburn, D.A.; Holtham, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarises the findings of a study examining the feasibility of designing a free-standing stove for heating a room using a downburning combustion system with air introduced above the bed of the fire to minimise the deposition of tar on the glass door of the stove. Details of the construction and operation of the appliance and the testing methods are given. Emission measurements, modeling, and work on pre-production of the prototype and production model stoves are reported. A paper on the development of low smoke stoves for domestic wood use is presented in an appendix. (UK)

  14. Modeling of pancake frying with non-uniform heating source applied to domestic cookers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz-Serrano, F.; Sagues, C.; Feyissa, Aberham Hailu

    2016-01-01

    The design of domestic cooking stoves is usually optimized by performing time-consuming cooking experiments, often using frying of pancakes as a standard. Simulation of cooking processes may reduce the number of experiments used in the development of the cooking stoves, saving time and resources....

  15. The Use Of Sawdust As An Alternative Source Of Energy For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the reports on the utilization of sawdust stove as a way of ameliorating the effect of perennial fuel crisis in Nigeria on domestic cooking and a means of reducing deforestation and subsequent desertification. The performance of the sawdust stove, in terms of cooking duration and specific fuel consumption ...

  16. Migranten im frühneuzeitlichen Skandinavien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atzbach, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the possibility how to identify Dutch, German and Scottish migrants in Aalborg, Elsinore and Nyä Lödöse on the basis of stove tiles......This paper discusses the possibility how to identify Dutch, German and Scottish migrants in Aalborg, Elsinore and Nyä Lödöse on the basis of stove tiles...

  17. K hospodaření a kultuře bydlení na středočeském statku v raném novověku: příklad z Trněného Újezdu (okr. Kladno)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šulc, J.; Kypta, J.; Ježek, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 4 (2009), s. 697-714 ISSN 0323-1267 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80020508 Keywords : Central Bohemia * Late Middle Ages * Early Modern period * village * social structure * stove tiles * stoves Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  18. Asante et al., Afr. J. Infect. Dis. (2016) 10(2): 102 – 110 DOI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    There is the need to initiate interventions that use improved cook stoves and to test the health .... Cigarettes smoking in the last month. Yes ..... potential impact of using improved cook-stoves on other infant health outcomes such as ... Amegah, A.K., Damptey, O.K., Sarpong, G.A., Duah, E., Vervoorn, D.J., Jaakkola, J.J., 2013.

  19. Search Results | Page 13 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 121 - 130 of 132 ... Ceramic stove eases strain on African forests. A cooking stove that has become popular in Kenya and neighbouring countries has taken pressure off Africa's threatened forests by reducing the demand for wood and charcoal. Research in Action.

  20. Search Results | Page 72 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 711 - 720 of 1119 ... Ceramic stove eases strain on African forests. A cooking stove that has become popular in Kenya and neighbouring countries has taken pressure off Africa's threatened forests by reducing the demand for wood and charcoal. Research in Action. LIVESTOCK Food security Immunization Gender ...

  1. Search Results | Page 765 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 7641 - 7650 of 8532 ... Ceramic stove eases strain on African forests. A cooking stove that has become popular in Kenya and neighbouring countries has taken pressure off Africa's threatened forests by reducing the demand for wood and charcoal. Research in Action. Crops Farming Systems Food security ...

  2. Combustion performance of cellulosic biomass in a gasifier-based cookstove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Shaharin A.; Romli, Raffisyazana

    2012-06-01

    Depletion in fossil fuel and increase in the world population may change the trend in future kitchens in households. Cooking with LPG fuel may one day become impossible and households would have to consider alternatives such as electric stoves. One other solution to this problem is through the use of biomass cook stoves. However, traditional cook stoves, predominantly used in the households, are not efficient and its utilizations for domestic cooking have been a major contributor to the ill effects related in respiratory and other health problem. Improved cook stoves programs implemented in the developing world attempt to address these problems. Biomass gasification appears to have significant potential in Asia for domestic cooking applications. Gasifier-based cook stoves are fuel efficient in comparison to traditional cook stove. The objective of this paper is to study the performance of various type of cellulosic biomass in a gasifier-based cook stove. The biomass considered in this study are oil palm fronds, dried leaves, wood sticks, coconut shells, bagasse, charcoal, and saw dust. The samples are analyzed in order to study their chemical properties. The thermochemical properties of the biomass were characterized. The performance of the each of the samples is studied by observing the time taken to boil water. It is found that oil palm fronds are the best type of biomass for the gasifer cook stove. It is also concluded that the higher the carbon content and the calorific value in a biomass, the lesser the time taken to boil the water.

  3. Kenya | Page 94 | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC began supporting research that led to the marketing of the ceramic Jiko stove in the mid-1980s, amid growing concern about deforestation and desertification. Today, surveys show that 80% of households in urban Nairobi and Mombasa use the domestic version of the stove, reducing their fuel consumption by up to ...

  4. Comparative study of the thermal performance and emission levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... internal fining with refractory material. The stove was charged with jive (5) selected wood species and a number of parameters, such as temperature projile amI flue gas composition were measured. Experimental evidence points to an improvement in the length amI peak temperatures of combustion on the modified stove ...

  5. Search Results | Page 833 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 8321 - 8330 of 8491 ... Ceramic stove eases strain on African forests. A cooking stove that has become popular in Kenya and neighbouring countries has taken pressure off Africa's threatened forests by reducing the demand for wood and charcoal. Research in Action. FOREST RESOURCES Water ...

  6. Tanzanie | Page 44 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A cooking stove that has become popular in Kenya and neighbouring countries has taken pressure off Africa's threatened forests by reducing the demand for wood and charcoal. IDRC began supporting research that led to the marketing of the ceramic Jiko stove in the mid-1980s, amid growing concern about deforestation ...

  7. Tanzanie | Page 36 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A cooking stove that has become popular in Kenya and neighbouring countries has taken pressure off Africa's threatened forests by reducing the demand for wood and charcoal. IDRC began supporting research that led to the marketing of the ceramic Jiko stove in the mid-1980s, amid growing concern about deforestation ...

  8. Tanzania | Page 39 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A cooking stove that has become popular in Kenya and neighbouring countries has taken pressure off Africa's threatened forests by reducing the demand for wood and charcoal. IDRC began supporting research that led to the marketing of the ceramic Jiko stove in the mid-1980s, amid growing concern about deforestation ...

  9. Tanzania | Page 44 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A cooking stove that has become popular in Kenya and neighbouring countries has taken pressure off Africa's threatened forests by reducing the demand for wood and charcoal. IDRC began supporting research that led to the marketing of the ceramic Jiko stove in the mid-1980s, amid growing concern about deforestation ...

  10. An analysis of combustion from a top-lit up-draft (TLUD cookstove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Birzer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that three billion people worldwide cook with traditional stoves. These stoves generaly consist of three stones and an open fire, and produce harmful emissions that are known to cause fatal illnesses. Traditional stoves claim the lives of 1.6 million people every year and cause the death of more children under the age of five than any other single cause. In addition, widespread land degradation and deforestation have resulted from inefficient fuel consumption of traditional stoves. This paper presents some results from an extensive investigation into design and experimental evalation of top-lit up-draft (TLUD microgasifier cookstoves aimed at addressing problems associated with traditional cooking approaches. Results indicate that geometric variations of the stove and fuel size influence burn rates and emissions production, and must therefore be considered for any design and implementation.

  11. Cookstove options for safety and health: Comparative analysis of technological and usability attributes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimemia, David; Van Niekerk, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    Energy use in low-income households in South Africa is considerably more hazardous than in middle to high-income households. Poverty is a key underlying factor. However, poor quality domestic energy technologies, including stoves, heaters and light sources contribute to this vulnerability. The problem is compounded by behavioural and environmental factors. Since cooking is a key energy-using chore, access to efficient, safe and versatile stoves portend safety improvements. This paper reports on a comparative analysis of eleven technological and usability attributes (CO emissions, firepower, efficiency, fuel toxicity, fuel cost, stove price, controllability, durability, availability, temperature of touchable-parts, and mechanical stability) of commercially available stoves that utilise four energy sources (kerosene, methanol, ethanol gel, and LPG). The ensuing discussion serves as a guide to enable the selection of the best-fit stove-fuel combination for low-income households. The findings indicate that LPG stoves have comparatively better overall rankings for cleanliness, firepower, safety, and durability. This analysis highlights that no combustion technology is risk-proof and there remains a burden on users to exercise diligence. We recommend that South Africa adopts an affirmative policy and strategic actions that discourage the use of kerosene as a household combustion fuel, and promotes the adoption of LPG as a safer and practical alternative. - Highlights: • Inefficient fuel combustion stoves raise risk profile in energy-poor households. • This study uses quantitative methods to compare the attributes of four stove types. • LPG stoves have comparatively better ranking for emissions, safety, and durability. • Transformative policies and strategies are required to promote safe, clean stoves.

  12. Assessment of environmental impact caused by the use of traditional stoves in the Vilacota-Maure area of regional conservation in the Tacna region; Evaluación de impacto ambiental producido por el uso de cocinas tradicionales en el área de conservación regional Vilacota-Maure de la región Tacna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Alfredo Torres Muro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Seventy percent of the population of rural, inter-Andean basins and high Andes in Peru use biomass for heating, cooking and other crafts and customs.It is necessary to have data on extraction, consumption of biomass and the impacts that they may be causing, to plan for its sustainable production and use. This work is the product of several years of research; the geographical, climatic and cultural conditions of the study area prevent carrying out an extendedstay for the collection of information from primary sources; however,the estimate of fuel wood consumption and the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of environmental impacts in this area contribute to fill the information void. The results obtained allow us to conclude that using firewood in the study area is causing negative environmental impacts of local and globalconsequences. Regional and local authorities should plan, in the short-term,on a program with clean and renewable technologies tosolve this problem.

  13. Efficiency and emissions of coal combustion in two unvented cookstoves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaoma, J.; Kasali, G.B.; Ellegaard, A.

    1994-01-01

    An improved chamber method was employed in the evaluation of the energy conversion and emission characteristics of coal in two unvented cookstoves known as the clay stove and the Maamba stove. Burn rate and stove efficiency were determined together with mission factors for carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO) and respirable suspended particulates (RSP). Compared to Maamba stove, the clay stove exhibited a lower burn rate but higher efficiency. The clay stove recorded mean CO, SO 2 , NO 2 , NO and RSP emission factors of 200, 47, 10, 0.4 and 2.4 g/kg, respectively. The Maamba stove emission factors for the same pollutants were 170, 36, n.d., 1.2 and 8.0 g/kg, respectively. The emissions and concentrations of carbon monoxide were less than those previously found with charcoal use, but still exceeded air pollution guidelines by orders of magnitude. Thus the use of coal would not constitute any appreciable improvement over the present charcoal use. Sulphur dioxide emissions and concentrations are quite high, and would constitute a new pollutant in residential areas of Zambia. Particulate emissions and concentrations from coal are higher than from charcoal. In view of specific health risks associated with particulates from coal smoke the domestic use of raw coal is not recommended. 16 refs, 8 figs, 20 tabs

  14. Understanding consumer preference and willingness to pay for improved cookstoves in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Julia; Derby, Elisa; Dutta, Karabi

    2015-01-01

    The USAID/WASHplus project conducted a comprehensive assessment to understand consumer needs and preferences as they relate to increasing the uptake and consistent, exclusive, and correct use of improved cookstoves (ICSs) in Bangladesh. The assessment included household ICS trials, fuel and stove use monitoring, and consumers' perceived value of and willingness to pay for ICSs. Results showed that cooks appreciated and liked the ICS, but that no models met consumer needs sufficiently to replace traditional stoves. Initially, many preferred ICSs over traditional stoves, but this preference decreased over the 3-week trial period. Complaints and suggestions for improvement fell into two general categories: those that can be addressed through fairly simple modifications to the stove design, and those more appropriately addressed through point-of-purchase consumer education and follow-up from service agents or health outreach workers. Most households using the ICS realized fuel use reductions, although these were lower than expected, partly because of continued parallel traditional stove use. When given the option to purchase the stoves at market value, only one of 105 households did so; however, a separate assessment showed that 80% of participants (12 of 15 households) preferred to keep the stove rather than receive a cash buyout at market value. This indicates that users value the ICS when acquisition barriers are removed and highlights the need for better financing options.

  15. Women targeted and women negated. An aspect of the environmental movement in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, M

    1996-05-01

    There are many ways to solve environmental problems. In this article the issue of energy consumption in Bangladesh and the rapid introduction of improved stove projects illustrates the importance of involving women in decision making that directly involves their lives. 82% of total energy consumption is based on traditional, renewable resources such as firewood, agricultural residues, tree residues, and dung. It is argued that resource depletion is related to population growth, the introduction of high yield seeds and related agricultural practices, and the lack of a sound basis for social and natural forestry. Improved stoves were introduced in order to reduce the depletion of resources. It was assumed that women would understand the value of preserving national natural resources and that energy resources for cooking were becoming scarce. The improved technology had the advantage of saving energy and saving women's time and effort in biomass and fuelwood collection. What was not considered in the decision was the design of the stove which was not adaptable to traditional cooking tools and pots and was more time consuming. The new stoves produced ash too quickly that needed to be removed before the combustion process was obstructed. The stove required straight straw or fuelwood, when available supplies were irregularly shaped. The ash residues could not be recycled, whereas potash could be used as fertilizer. Stoves required the use of a trained and sophisticated user. Stoves were expensive commodities. Women's time was obstructed because the stove needed tending and the usual chores could not be performed while food was cooking. The women in several projects rejected the stoves based on technological, cultural, and economic factors. It is argued that the environmental movement in Bangladesh conceptualized the environmental problem in economic terms but solved the problem technologically. The failure was in imposing new technology on women and in an inappropriate

  16. A health intervention or a kitchen appliance? Household costs and benefits of a cleaner burning biomass-fuelled cookstove in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundale, Katie; Thomas, Ranjeeta; Malava, Jullita Kenala; Havens, Deborah; Mortimer, Kevin; Conteh, Lesong

    2017-06-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of mortality for children under five years in sub-Saharan Africa. Household air pollution has been found to increase risk of pneumonia, especially due to exposure from dirty burning biomass fuels. It has been suggested that advanced stoves, which burn fuel more efficiently and reduce smoke emissions, may help to reduce household air pollution in poor, rural settings. This qualitative study aims to provide an insight into the household costs and perceived benefits from use of the stove in Malawi. It was conducted alongside The Cooking and Pneumonia Study (CAPS), the largest village cluster-level randomised controlled trial of an advanced combustion cookstove intervention to prevent pneumonia in children under five to date. In 2015, using 100 semi-structured interviews this study assessed household time use and perceptions of the stove from both control and intervention participants taking part in the CAPS trial in Chilumba. Household direct and indirect costs associated with the intervention were calculated. Users overwhelming liked using the stove. The main reported benefits were reduced cooking times and reduced fuel consumption. In most interviews, the health benefits were not initially identified as advantages of the stove, although when prompted, respondents stated that reduced smoke emissions contributed to a reduction in respiratory symptoms. The cost of the stove was much higher than most respondents said they would be willing to pay. The stoves were not primarily seen as health products. Perceptions of limited impact on health was subsequently supported by the CAPS trial data which showed no significant effect on pneumonia. While the findings are encouraging from the perspective of acceptability, without innovative financing mechanisms, general uptake and sustained use of the stove may not be possible in this setting. The findings also raise the question of whether the stoves should be marketed and championed as 'health

  17. Technology Innovations to Improve Biomass Cookstoves to Meet Tier 4 Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Still, Dean K [Aprovecho Research Center, Cottage Grove, OR (United States); Hatfield, Micheal S [Aprovecho Research Center, Cottage Grove, OR (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Technology Innovations to Improve Biomass Cookstoves to Meet Tier 4 Standards. Protecting public health has become a major motivation for investigating how improved cook stoves might function as a viable intervention. Currently, the great majority of cookstoves for sale in the developing world were not designed for this purpose but instead success was based on criteria such as reduced fuel use, affordability, and ease of use. With DOE funding Aprovecho Research Center spent three years creating stoves using an iterative development and modeling approach resulting in four stoves that in lab tests met the World Health Organization (2014) intermediate rate vented targets for PM2.5 and for CO.

  18. Barbecue Basics: Tips to Prevent Foodborne Illness

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heat makes the basics of food safety especially important. “Fortunately, there are a lot of steps consumers ... the microwave, oven or stove to reduce grilling time, do so immediately before the food goes on ...

  19. Abstract Résumé

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    project that used the World Wide Web to assess the health needs of secondary school students, and tested the web's ..... running water, indoor bathroom, refrigerator, gas or electric stove, metal or wooden bed, sofa, bicycle, car (motor vehicle),.

  20. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... found in fumes produced any time you burn fuel in cars or trucks, small engines, stoves, lanterns, ... prevent CO poisoning in my home? Install a battery-operated or battery back-up CO detector in ...

  1. At Home with MS: Adapting Your Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for unstable partially opened doors. n If you purchase a new stove, choose one with controls at ... information provided is based on professional advice, published experience, and expert opinion, but does not constitute medical ...

  2. Internet of things: emerging and future scenarios from an information security perspective

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlamini, MT

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available of stoves can bring down a power grid, future life threatening health systems and how a distributed denial of service can be used to beat competition and increase revenues of Telcos....

  3. Zbytky novověkých kachlů z tvrze Tiché u Kaplice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Durdík, Tomáš; Pavlík, Č.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2016, č. 13 (2016), s. 281-289 ISSN 1211-6831 Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : Tichá Stronghold * stove tiles * Modern period Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  4. Household fuel consumption and resource use in rural-urban Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebreegziabher, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords: biofuels; land degradation; technology adoption; fuel-savings efficiency; stove R&D; household and community tree investments; fuelwood availability; animal dung; biogas; urban fuel demand; rural hinterlands; northern Ethiopia. Fuel scarcity and land degradation are intertwined

  5. Kočka ze Záběhlic. Kachel s motivem svaté Kateřiny Alexandrijské stojící na císaři Maxentiovi (Maximinovi) z Prahy-Záběhlic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ernée, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2011), s. 603-607 ISSN 1214-3553 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80020508 Keywords : stove tiles * Late Middle Ages * St. Catharina of Alexandria Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  6. ENERGY CHARACTERISTICS OF ETHANOL CHARACTERISTICS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    CHARACTERISTICS OF ETHANOL-DIESEL MIX FOR AUTOMOTIVE. DIESEL ... diesel engine and the engine speed, torque, power and specific fuel consumption (sfc) were determine .... heated on an electric stove and stirred continuously.

  7. Preschooler development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Encourage the child to help cook or learn cooking skills with recipes for cold foods. Have other activities for the child to enjoy in a nearby room while you are cooking. Keep the child away from the stove, hot ...

  8. Confronting an Old Enemy: Terrorism and the Changing Face of Military Intelligence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Jack

    2002-01-01

    .... Existing cultural biases, stove-piped operational processes, and limited analyst recruitment problems have weakened the DOD intelligence community's ability to face the twenty-first century terrorist enemy...

  9. Special Issue Paper

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adewunmi

    unemployment and under employment; what is the urban-rural distribution and .... spread is often helped by low resistance among inhabitants due to malnutrition. ... necessitated by a combination of open fires, stove and coal or biomass fuels ...

  10. Acute pulmonary and innate immunity health effects in mice inhaling cookstove emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Burning of solid-fuels in rudimentary stoves generates harmful emissions that contribute to poor indoor air quality and have detrimental impacts on human health. Acute health effects include respiratory and eye irritation, cough, acute lower respiratory infection and ...

  11. The Annual Collins Center Senior Symposium: Aligning the Interagency Process for the War on Terrorism (Center for Strategic Leadership, Volume 11-05, June 2005)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tussing, Bert B; Butts, Kent H

    2005-01-01

    .... That process, developed for the challenges of the Cold War, is characterized by stove pipe operations and resourcing initiatives in an era that demands an efficient integration of efforts for results...

  12. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF SMOKE FROM CAMPFIRE BURNING OF PINE WOOD (PINUS ELLIOTTII). (R823990)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractAlthough campfires are typically enjoyable events, people are exposed to high concentrations of gaseous and particulate pollutants. The combustion conditions of wood burned in campfires are different from those of indoor wood burning in stoves or fireplaces. T...

  13. 24 CFR 3280.703 - Minimum standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Factory-Built Fireplaces, Seventh Edition—UL 127-1996, with 1999 revisions. Solid-Fuel Type Room Heaters, Fifth Edition—UL 1482, 1995, with 2000 revisions. Fireplace Stoves, Eight Edition, with 2000 revisions...

  14. 16 CFR 1212.2 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... part 1212: (a)(1) Multi-purpose lighter, (also known as grill lighter, fireplace lighter, utility..., fuel for fireplaces, charcoal or gas-fired grills, camp fires, camp stoves, lanterns, fuel-fired...

  15. Toxicology Advisory Services for the Armed Forces via the Committee on Toxicology and Toxicology Information Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bakshi, Kulbir

    2003-01-01

    The US. Department of Defense (DOD) has, for many years, faced the logistical problem of using a variety of fuels for its aircraft, ground vehicles, and other equipment, such as cooking stoves and tent heaters...

  16. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Fine Particulate Matter Emitted from Burning Kerosene, Liquid Petroleum Gas, and Wood Fuels in Household Cookstoves

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study measured polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) composition in particulate matter emissions from residential cookstoves. A variety of fuel and cookstove combinations were examined, including: (i) liquid petroleum gas (LPG), (ii) kerosene in a wick stove, (iii) wood (10%...

  17. a descriptive survey

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-06

    Jul 6, 2012 ... industry body, can in some cases intervene in the case of misleading ... The Medicines Control Council recently published draft regulations .... water, a refrigerator and freezer, an electric stove and a home security service.10.

  18. Introducing the CERT (Trademark) Resiliency Engineering Framework: Improving the Security and Sustainability Processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caralli, Richard A; Stevens, James F; Wallen, Charles M; White, David W; Wilson, William R; Young, Lisa R

    2007-01-01

    ... and controlling operational resiliency. Unfortunately, organizations often manage these activities in a reactive posture fraught with stove-piped organizational structures and poorly defined and measured goals. The result...

  19. Inventory of usage pattern for wood burning appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, David; Joeborn, Inger; Sjoedin, Aake; Munkhammar, Inger; Gustavsson, Lennart

    2005-02-01

    The Swedish Environmental Research Institute (IVL) in co-operation with the Swedish National Testing and Research Institute (SP) and Statistics Sweden (SCB) have investigated the use of domestic wood burning for wood stoves and open fireplaces. The results from a closer examination of existing national energy statistics for residential heating has enabled a division of the average consumption of firewood for each house by the category 'fireplace for open fire' and 'tiled stove/heating stove/fireplace for wood'. The estimation of emissions can therefore be improved by differentiating emission factors for different wood stoves and open fireplaces. Today, only one emission factor is used. An insight into general firing procedures, wood storage routines etc. was investigated using a questionnaire for the Teleborg area of the city Vaexjoe. The results of this study provide a foundation for further work, which will subsequently enable improvements for emission inventories on small-scale biomass combustion from household appliances

  20. Reconfiguring Logistics Command and Control for the 21st Century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dalke, Scott

    2005-01-01

    .... Without a truly joint logistic C2 structure, services will continue to rely on existing stove piped capabilities that too often result in ineffective workarounds and disjointed logistics efforts...

  1. Status of greenhouses in Eastern Mediterranean coastal areas of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-20

    Apr 20, 2009 ... climate control of greenhouses owned by villagers, having only small holdings barely adequate for supporting ... Mediterranean Sea cost line in Turkey and has rather ..... stove and combination of wood burning and gas tube.

  2. Search Results | Page 834 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 8331 - 8340 of 8497 ... A cooking stove that has become popular in Kenya and neighbouring countries has taken pressure off Africa's threatened forests by reducing the demand for wood and charcoal. Research in Action. FOREST RESOURCES Water ...

  3. Sources of Combustion Products: An Introduction to Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    In addition to environmental tobacco smoke, other sources of combustion products are unvented kerosene and gas space heaters, woodstoves, fireplaces, and gas stoves. The major pollutants released are carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and particles.

  4. Comparative performance of five Mexican plancha-type cookstoves using water boiling tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Medina

    Full Text Available While plancha-type cookstoves are very popular and widely disseminated in Latin America, few peer review articles exist documenting their detailed technical performance. In this paper we use the standard Water Boiling Tests (WBT to assess the energy and emission performance of five plancha-type cookstoves disseminated in about 450 thousand Mexican rural homes compared to the traditional 3-stone fire (TSF. In the high-power phase, average modified combustion efficiencies (MCE for plancha-type stoves were 97±1% which was higher than TSF 93±4%, and reductions in CO and PM2.5 total emissions were on average 44%. Time to boil and specific fuel consumption, however, were increased in plancha-type stoves compared to the open fire as a result of the reduced overall thermal efficiency of the plancha during WBT. In the simmering phase, plancha-type stoves showed much more consistent performance reductions compared to the TSF. MCE for plancha stoves were on average 98±1% and 95±3% for the TSF, while reductions in CO and PM2.5 total emissions were on average 55%. In this phase 27% average savings in fuel use are achieved by plancha-type stoves. Removal of the plancha rings resulted in savings of specific fuel consumption (SFC, thermal efficiency (TE, and time to boil; however, CO and PM2.5 emissions increased significantly as flue air is drawn through the comal surface rather than through the combustion zone, resulting in suboptimal combustion conditions.International Workshop Agreement (IWA energy performance Tiers for plancha-type stoves ranged from 0 to 1. However, these results contrast sharply with the well documented reductions in fuel consumption during daily cooking activities achieved by these stoves. IWA indoor emissions Tiers are 4 for both PM2.5 and CO using locally measured values for fugitive emissions. Optimization of combustion chamber design on these stoves in Mexico is desirable to further reduce indoor emissions and to reduce the

  5. Emissions from residential combustion of different solid fuels. Roekgasemissioner vid anvaendning av olika fasta braenslen i smaaskaliga system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudling, L

    1983-01-01

    The emission from different types of solid fuels during combustion in residential furnaces and stoves has been investigated. The following fules were investigated: wood pellets, peat-bark pellets, wood chips, wood logs,wood-briquets, peat briquets, lignite briquets, fuel oil. Three different 20-25 kW boilers were used and one stove and one fire place. The flue gases were analysed for carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, particulates, tar and fluoranthen.

  6. Woodstove cookery. At home on the range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J.

    1977-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of wood- or coal burning-stove cookery are discussed. The book serves as a guide or a manual. The stove, purchasing hints, and installation are described. Fuels, care, cleaning, building the fire, and uses are discussed. Recipes are included for breakfasts, soups and stews, main dishes, cheese and eggs, broiling and roasting, accompaniments, breads, desserts, dairy recipes, preserves, drying techniques, and homemade soap and other sundries. (MCW)

  7. Social, economic, and resource predictors of variability in household air pollution from cookstove emissions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam N Yadama

    Full Text Available We examine if social and economic factors, fuelwood availability, market and media access are associated with owning a modified stove and variation in household emissions from biomass combustion, a significant environmental and health concern in rural India. We analyze cross-sectional household socio-economic data, and PM(2.5 and particulate surface area concentration in household emissions from cookstoves (n=100. This data set combines household social and economic variables with particle emissions indexes associated with the household stove. The data are from the Foundation for Ecological Society, India, from a field study of household emissions. In our analysis, we find that less access to ready and free fuelwood and higher wealth are associated with owning a replacement/modified stove. We also find that additional kitchen ventilation is associated with a 12% reduction in particulate emissions concentration (p<0.05, after we account for the type of stove used. We did not find a significant association between replacement/modified stove on household emissions when controlling for additional ventilation. Higher wealth and education are associated with having additional ventilation. Social caste, market and media access did not have any effect on the presence of replacement or modified stoves or additional ventilation. While the data available to us does not allow an examination of direct health outcomes from emissions variations, adverse environmental and health impacts of toxic household emissions are well established elsewhere in the literature. The value of this study is in its further examination of the role of social and economic factors and available fuelwood from commons in type of stove use, and additional ventilation, and their effect on household emissions. These associations are important since the two direct routes to improving household air quality among the poor are stove type and better ventilation.

  8. Berkeley Lighting Cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lask, Kathleen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gadgil, Ashok [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-10-24

    A lighting cone is a simple metal cone placed on the fuel bed of a stove during ignition to act as a chimney, increasing the draft through the fuel bed. Many stoves tend to be difficult to light due to poor draft through the fuel bed, so lighting cones are used in various parts of the world as an inexpensive accessory to help with ignition.

  9. Field Testing of Alternative Cookstove Performance in a Rural Setting of Western India

    OpenAIRE

    Muralidharan, Veena; Sussan, Thomas; Limaye, Sneha; Koehler, Kirsten; Williams, D'Ann; Rule, Ana; Juvekar, Sanjay; Breysse, Patrick; Salvi, Sundeep; Biswal, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Nearly three billion people use solid fuels for cooking and heating, which leads to extremely high levels of household air pollution and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Many stove manufacturers have developed alternative cookstoves (ACSs) that are aimed at reducing emissions and fuel consumption. Here, we tested a traditional clay chulha cookstove (TCS) and five commercially available ACSs, including both natural draft (Greenway Smart Stove, Envirofit PCS-1) and forced draft stov...

  10. Emissions of carbonyl compounds from various cookstoves in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.; Smith, K.R.; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a new database of carbonyl emission factors for commonly used cookstoves in China. The emission factors, reported both on a fuel-mass basis (mg/kg) and on a defined cooking-task basis (mg/task), were determined using a carbon balance approach for 22 types of fuel/stove combinations. These include various stoves using different species of crop residues and wood, kerosene, and several types of coals and gases. The results show that all the tested cookstoves produced formaldehyde and acetaldehyde and that the vast majority of the biomass stoves produced additional carbonyl compounds such as acetone, acrolein, propionaldehyde, crotonaldehyde, 2-butanone, isobutyraldehyde, butyraldehyde, isovaleraldehyde, valeraldehyde, hexaldehyde, benzaldehyde, o-tolualdehyde, m,p-tolualdehyde, and 2,4-dimethylbenzaldehyde. Carbonyls other than formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, however, were rarely generated by burning coal, coal gas, and natural gas. Kerosene and LPG stoves generated more carbonyl compounds than coal, coal gas, and natural gas stoves, but less than biomass stoves. Indoor levels of carbonyl compounds for typical village houses during cooking hours, estimated using a mass balance model and the measured emission factors, can be high enough to cause acute health effects documented for formaldehyde exposure, depending upon house parameters and individuals' susceptibility

  11. Nouveaux critères pour juger de l'efficacité d'un fourneau à la combustion du charbon de bois

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndaysenga, M.

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available New Criteria to Judge Stove Efficiency in the Charcoal Combustion. The water boil test efficiency for choosing the most economic stove in combustion is estimated on the basis of four stoves. In addition to the heating and boiling energy usually considered as selection criterion, other criteria such as the boiling time and the combustion rate have been taken to indicate efficiency. Strangely, it appeared that the stove which maintains water at its boiling point for a long time and has the lowest combustion rate doesn 't valorize fuel energy efficiently if you only keep to the heating and boiling energy. The cooking test made it possible to explain that apparent contradiction : the fuel energy fraction which doesn't enter in the calculation of the heating and boiling energy isn't really lost. A low combustion rate associated with a long boiling time proved to be the best criteria of choosing the most economic stove in fuel. Therefore, the only water boil test doesn't make it possible to identify the most economically efficient stove. Resorting to the cooking test is compelling.

  12. First COSTECH scientific and technological conference: Science and technology for growth and poverty reduction in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raphael, L.M.; Mushi, S.J.S.

    2006-01-01

    It is the fact that, most Tanzanians are using charcoal and firewood for their domestic cooking. This will continue to be so for many years to come. Therefore, it ; imperative that we design stoves that have minimal heat losses to reduce fuel consumption and hence, reduce deforestation and reduce domestic budget on charcoal and fuel wood. Biomass utilization has led to the disappearance of forests leading to severe soil erosion, drought, and destruction of water catchments as well s the ecosystem. This paper presents the biomass energy utilization trend in Tanzania and its consequences on the environment. The design of a biomass energy saving stove (KUUTE) which cuts down the charcoal consumption by 50% is also presented. The saving of fuel is due to controlled charging volume (no overfilling) and by minimizing the heat losses by radiation, convection and conduction. According to the laboratory tests carried out on three household stoves, namely, KUUTE, improved and all metal to compare fuel savings and rate of heat transfer, the KUUTE stove showed the best performance in terms of fuel savings as compared to the other two designs. Under the energy crisis, KUUTE stove will be part of the solution to conserve the forests and environment. So far over 4000 KUUTE stoves have been disseminated and over 100 artisans have been trained. (author)

  13. Climate and mortality changes due to reductions in household cooking emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Tommi; Mielonen, Tero; Arola, Antti; Kokkola, Harri

    2016-04-01

    Household cooking is a significant cause for health and environmental problems in the developing countries. There are more than 3 billion people who use biomass for fuel in cooking stoves in their daily life. These cooking stoves use inadequate ventilation and expose especially women and children to indoor smoke. To reduce problems of the biomass burning, India launched an initiative to provide affordable and clean energy solutions for the poorest households by providing clean next-generation cooking stoves. The improved cooking stoves are expected to improve outdoor air quality and to reduce the climate-active pollutants, thus simultaneously slowing the climate change. Previous research has shown that the emissions of black carbon can be decreased substantially, as much as 90 % by applying better technology in cooking stoves. We have implemented reasonable (50% decrease) and best case (90% decrease) scenarios of the reductions in black and organic carbon due to improved cooking stoves in India into ECHAM-HAMMOZ aerosol-climate model. The global simulations of the scenarios will be used to study how the reductions of emissions in India affect the pollutant concentrations and radiation. The simulated reductions in particulate concentrations will also be used to estimate the decrease in mortality rates. Furthermore, we will study how the emission reductions would affect the global climate and mortality if a similar initiative would be applied in other developing countries.

  14. Field Testing of Alternative Cookstove Performance in a Rural Setting of Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Muralidharan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nearly three billion people use solid fuels for cooking and heating, which leads to extremely high levels of household air pollution and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Many stove manufacturers have developed alternative cookstoves (ACSs that are aimed at reducing emissions and fuel consumption. Here, we tested a traditional clay chulha cookstove (TCS and five commercially available ACSs, including both natural draft (Greenway Smart Stove, Envirofit PCS-1 and forced draft stoves (BioLite HomeStove, Philips Woodstove HD4012, and Eco-Chulha XXL, in a test kitchen in a rural village of western India. Compared to the TCS, the ACSs produced significant reductions in particulate matter less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5 and CO concentrations (Envirofit: 22%/16%, Greenway: 24%/42%, BioLite: 40%/35%, Philips: 66%/55% and Eco-Chulha: 61%/42%, which persisted after normalization for fuel consumption or useful energy. PM2.5 and CO concentrations were lower for forced draft stoves than natural draft stoves. Furthermore, the Philips and Eco-Chulha units exhibited higher cooking efficiency than the TCS. Despite significant reductions in concentrations, all ACSs failed to achieve PM2.5 levels that are considered safe by the World Health Organization (ACSs: 277–714 μg/m3 or 11–28 fold higher than the WHO recommendation of 25 μg/m3.

  15. Air pollution-related health and climate benefits of clean cookstove programs in Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anenberg, Susan C.; Henze, Daven K.; Lacey, Forrest; Irfan, Ans; Kinney, Patrick; Kleiman, Gary; Pillarisetti, Ajay

    2017-02-01

    Approximately 95% of households in Mozambique burn solid fuels for cooking, contributing to elevated indoor and outdoor fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations and subsequent health and climate impacts. Little is known about the potential health and climate benefits of various approaches for expanding the use of cleaner stoves and fuels in Mozambique. We use state-of-the-science methods to provide a first-order estimation of potential air pollution-related health and climate benefits of four illustrative scenarios in which traditional cooking fires and stoves are displaced by cleaner and more efficient technologies. For rural areas, we find that a 10% increase in the number of households using forced draft wood-burning stoves could achieve >2.5 times more health benefits from reduced PM2.5 exposure (200 avoided premature deaths and 14 000 avoided disability adjusted life years, DALYs, over a three-year project lifetime) compared to natural draft stoves in the same households, assuming 70% of households use the new technology for both cases. Expanding use of LPG stoves to 10% of households in five major cities is estimated to avoid 160 premature deaths and 11 000 DALYs from reduced PM2.5 exposure for a three-year intervention, assuming 60% of households use the new stove. Advanced charcoal stoves would achieve ∽80% of the PM2.5-related health benefits of LPG stoves. Approximately 2%-5% additional health benefits would result from reduced ambient PM2.5, depending on the scenario. Although climate impacts are uncertain, we estimate that all scenarios would reduce expected climate change-related temperature increases from continued solid fuel use by 4%-6% over the next century. All results are based on an assumed adjustment factor of 0.8 to convert from laboratory-based emission reduction measurements to exposure reductions, which could be optimistic in reality given potential for continued use of the traditional stove. We conclude that cleaner cooking stoves

  16. Environmental assessment of wood burning in independent heating devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogaume, C.; Rogaume, Y.; Zoulalian, A.; Trouve, G.

    2009-01-01

    An environmental assessment has been achieved on two domestic wood-heating devices, a closed fireplace and an open fireplace which represent 80% of the sale market of wood small-scale combustion units and around 65% of the use of wood-energy in France. Not only deals this study with the atmospheric polluting emissions produced in the exhaust stack, but also with the indoor air quality. Therefore, different pollutants were measured at the emission stage and as indoor air concentrations: carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), volatile organic compounds (VOC), methane (CH 4 ), nitrogen oxides (NO X ), particulate matter with different sizes (PM 10 to PM 0.1 ), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and dioxines and furans. The results concerning indoor air were compared to measurements that showed the influence of residential heating devices. without exhaust duct like an oil stove or a gas stove (space heater) on indoor air quality. Some combustion emission experiments achieved in normal conditions showed that the combustion in open fireplace pollutes more than the combustion in closed fire-place: around 10 times more of PM 2.5 (mass concentration), more than 4 times of total VOC, 1.5 times more of dioxines and furans. On the other hand, the opposite trend was shown for PAH emissions (between 2 and 3 times less depending on the regulations considered). The comparison of the impact of different heating appliances on indoor air quality shows that the rate of CO is the same for all the devices except for the open fireplace which is higher. The CO 2 rate is 10 times higher for the oil stove and 8 times higher for the gas stove than for the fireplaces, which is due to the lack of exhaust duct. The concentration of PM 2.5 is 16 times higher for the open fireplace, 1.6 times higher for the oil stove and 4.4 times higher for the gas stove than the closed fireplace. The percentage of the number distribution of nano-particles, that represents an enhanced health risk

  17. How many replicate tests do I need?$-$ Variability of cookstove performance and emissions has implications for obtaining useful results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yungang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Sohn, Michael D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Gadgil, Ashok J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Wang, Yilun [ISO Innovative Analytics San Francisco, CA (United States); Lask, Kathleen M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). College of Engineering Applied Science and Technology Program; Kirchstetter, Thomas W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2013-02-01

    Almost half of the world’s population still cooks on biomass cookstoves of poor efficiency and primitive design, such as three stone fires (TSF). Emissions from biomass cookstoves contribute to adverse health effects and climate change. A number of “improved cookstoves” with higher energy efficiency and lower emissions have been designed and promoted across the world. During the design development, and for selection of a stove for dissemination, the stove performance and emissions are commonly evaluated, communicated and compared using the arithmetic average of replicate tests made using a standardized laboratory-based test, commonly the water boiling test (WBT). However, published literature shows different WBT results reported from different laboratories for the same stove technology. Also, there is no agreement in the literature on how many replicate tests should be performed to ensure “significance” in the reported average performance. This matter has not received attention in the rapidly growing literature on stoves, and yet is crucial for estimating and communicating the performance of a stove, and for comparing the performance between stoves. We present results of statistical analyses using data from a number of replicate tests of performance and emission of the Berkeley-Darfur Stove (BDS) and the TSF under well-controlled laboratory conditions. We observed moderate variability in the test results for the TSF and BDS when measuring several characteristics. Here we focus on two as illustrative: time-to-boil and PM2.5 (particulate matter less than or equal to 2.5 micrometers in diameter) emissions. We demonstrate that interpretation of the results comparing these stoves could be misleading if only a small number of replicates had been conducted. We then describe a practical approach, useful to both stove testers and designers, to assess the number of replicates needed to obtain useful data. Caution should be exercised in attaching high credibility to

  18. Heart of the Hearth: Making the Popular Clean, Not the Clean Popular - Technology Research, Development, and Tools for Clean Biomass Cookstoves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gist, Ryan [BioLite, Inc., Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2016-12-28

    This technical report summarizes the work completed by BioLite in fulfilment of the US DOE EERE award. The work plan focused on three key objectives: developing an optimized combustion system that demonstrates high combustion efficiency and low PM2.5 and CO emissions, integrate the system into popular stove phenotypes – side-fed rocket stove architecture like the BioLite HomeStove, and the Patsari chimney stove in Mexico such that they maintain their important phenotypical characteristics, independently evaluate quantitative fuel and emissions performance of the integrated ‘Turbo-Patsari’ in Mexican households. The project activities were organized into six major tasks: A. Develop, fabricate, and test proof-of-concept prototypes B. Develop field prototypes, assess user feedback and field performance C. Define revised stove design for pre-production model, Identify manufacturing requirements and estimated cost to build, Conduct reliability, emissions, and performance testing of pre-production Turbo-Patsari D. Build pre-production Turbo-Patsari stove combustion cores E. Conduct pre-production field trials F. Summarize field trial results and evaluate Turbo-Patsari for potential volume production. A two-pronged approach was adopted for the above tasks. The first involved building a modular test platform that allowed parametric variation of multiple stove design parameters that directly affect its performance – heat output, thermal efficiency, and emissions. The second part of the approach comprised of building a surrogate Patsari based on GIRA’s specifications that could then be modified or retrofitted for optimum performance based on the learnings from the modular test platform. The following sections of the report will describe the findings of tests on these platform, the subsequent development, design, and installation of the Turbo-Patsari, and finally the in-home field trial.

  19. Small scale electricity generation from a portable biomass cookstove: Prototype design and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Shaughnessy, S.M.; Deasy, M.J.; Kinsella, C.E.; Doyle, J.V.; Robinson, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have integrated a thermoelectric generator with a cooking stove. ► The device has been deployed into a village in rural Malawi for up to 3 months. ► The stoves are equipped with temperature and power data logging equipment. ► Users have already charged mobile phones, lights and radios from the stove generator. ► Data loggers will provide stove usage and power usage data. -- Abstract: The World Health Organisation estimates that over 20% of the global population (∼1.4 billion people) lack access to electricity. Furthermore, 40% of the global population (∼2.7 billion people) rely on the traditional use of biomass for cooking (WHO 2011, OEDC/IEA, 2010). This study details the development of a prototype electrical generator for portable stoves commonly in use in the developing world. This generator is capable of delivering small amounts of off-grid electricity. Power is generated using the thermoelectric effect. A single thermoelectric module is utilised to convert a small portion of heat from the stove to electricity. The electricity produced is used to charge a single 3.3 V lithium–iron phosphate battery and drive a low power fan, as well as some other auxiliary features. The airflow produced by the fan is used in conjunction with a commercially available heat pipe heat sink to maintain an adequate temperature difference across the thermoelectric module. From experiments in the laboratory, a maximum TEG power output of 5.9 W has been obtained. On average, 3 W h of energy was stored in a battery during a typical 1 h long burn. Three 1 h long burns produced sufficient energy to fully charge the battery. The performance of the electricity generating cooking stove has subsequently been tested in Malawi using locally sourced fuel and fire stoking methods.

  20. Field measurement on the emissions of PM, OC, EC and PAHs from indoor crop straw burning in rural China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Siye; Shen, Guofeng; Zhang, Yanyan; Xue, Miao; Xie, Han; Lin, Pengchuan; Chen, Yuanchen; Wang, Xilong; Tao, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Field measurements were conducted to measure emission factors of particulate matter (EF PM ), organic carbon (EF OC ), elemental carbon (EF EC ), 28 parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (EF 28pPAHs ), and 4 oxygenated PAHs (EF 4oPAHs ) for four types of crop straws burned in two stoves with similar structure but different ages. The average EF PM , EF OC , EF EC , EF 28pPAHs , and EF 4oPAHs were 9.1 ± 5.7 (1.8–22 as range), 2.6 ± 2.9 (0.30–12), 1.1 ± 1.2 (0.086–5.5), 0.26 ± 0.19 (0.076–0.96), 0.011 ± 0.14 (1.3 × 10 −4 – 0.063) g/kg, respectively. Much high EF 28pPAHs was observed in field compared with the laboratory derived EFs and significant difference in EF 28pPAHs was identified among different crop residues, indicating considerable underestimation when laboratory derived EFs were used in the inventory. The field measured EF PM , EF OC , and EF EC were significantly affected by stove age and the EFs of carbonaceous particles for the 15-year old stove were approximately 2.5 times of those for the 1-year old stove. Highlights: • Field measurements provided more reliable data for the inventory. • Emissions from indoor crop residue burning were measured in field. • Much high PAHs emissions were found in field measurement in comparison with laboratory derived results. • Emissions of carbonaceous particulate matter increased by 2.5 times in the old stove compared that in a new stove. -- Emissions of incomplete combustion pollutants strongly affected by the fuel type and stove usage

  1. Biomass availability, energy consumption and biochar production in rural households of Western Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Rojas, Dorisel; Lehmann, Johannes; Hobbs, Peter; Joseph, Stephen; Neufeldt, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolytic cook stoves in smallholder farms may require different biomass supply than traditional bioenergy approaches. Therefore, we carried out an on-farm assessment of the energy consumption for food preparation, the biomass availability relevant to conventional and pyrolytic cook stoves, and the potential biochar generation in rural households of western Kenya. Biomass availability for pyrolysis varied widely from 0.7 to 12.4 Mg ha -1 y -1 with an average of 4.3 Mg ha -1 y -1 , across all 50 studied farms. Farms with high soil fertility that were recently converted to agriculture from forest had the highest variability (CV = 83%), which was a result of the wide range of farm sizes and feedstock types in the farms. Biomass variability was two times lower for farms with low than high soil fertility (CV = 37%). The reduction in variability is a direct consequence of the soil quality, coupled with farm size and feedstock type. The total wood energy available in the farms (5.3 GJ capita -1 y -1 ) was not sufficient to meet the current cooking energy needs using conventional combustion stoves, but may be sufficient for improved combustion stoves depending on their energy efficiency. However, the biomass that is usable in pyrolytic cook stoves including crop residues, shrub and tree litter can provide 17.2 GJ capita -1 y -1 of energy for cooking, which is well above the current average cooking energy consumption of 10.5 GJ capita -1 y -1 . The introduction of a first-generation pyrolytic cook stove reduced wood energy consumption by 27% while producing an average of 0.46 Mg ha -1 y -1 of biochar. -- Highlights: → Total energy from wood fuel available on smallholder farms in Western Kenya was not sufficient to meet current cooking energy needs using conventional combustion stoves, but may be sufficient for improved combustion stoves. → Feedstock options acceptable to pyrolysis cook stoves which includes crop residues, exceeded the energy needs required for daily

  2. Bio-mass stimulated absorption refrigerator for food storage in Papua New Guinea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uppal, A.H.; Komuna, K.K. (University of Technology, Papua (New Guinea). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    A medium capacity (140 litre) water-ammonia absorption refrigerator, thermally stimulated by a charcoal-stove is being developed to store food in remote locations and island communities of Papua New Guinea. The paper describes a prototype charcoal or biomass-stove thermal refrigerator in which the absorption cycle and thermo-syphonic cycle of a heating liquid has been coupled in a novel and straight forward approach. The system consisted of a heat-exchanger, in the form of a jacket surrounding the generator tube of a water-ammonia absorption cycle refrigerator, and was connected in a close-pipe work loop to a heat exchanger placed in a charcoal-stove. A heat-transfer oil flowed due to thermo-syphonic forces between the heat exchanger and the jacket. According to initial tests it took 4 hours for the system to warm up, and took another 7 hours for water in the freezer cabinet to approach 0{sup o}C from an initial 25{sup o}C. The cooling capacity of the evaporator was roughly 70% of the cooling capacity of the original system with electric heating. For a twelve hour test the stove consumed 2.5 kg of charcoal with an air port opening between 3 to 5 millimeters. Preliminary estimates indicate that the described prototype absorption unit stimulated by the wood/coconut husk stove (rather than electricity/kerosene), when manufactured commercially will cost less than US 1500 dollars at 1991 prices. (Author).

  3. Enhancing biomass energy use in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banwell, P.S.; Harriss, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper argues that in Kenya, environmental and economic factors will favour the continued use of biomass as a primary fuel for household an institutional cooking for the next decade or longer. The paper describes several successful projects which have improved the efficiency of urban charcoal use and of rural woodfuel use. The Kenya Ceramic Jiko, a more efficient version of the traditional charcoal stove, is a model programme sustained by free market competition, artisans participation, and widespread public acceptance. The Maendeleo stove is the best example of a successful rural woodstove project. The performance attributes of the stove, and its promotion through Kenya's largest women's organization, have resulted int he distribution of an estimated 26,000 Maendeleo stoves. Rural stove efficiency will become important as the cash-based economy expands in those areas. Agroforestry will also be critical to an enhanced use of biomass energy in Kenya. Experience to date shows that successful agroforestry programmes will have to be appropriate to local conditions and crops. (author). 25 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  4. Piloting improved cookstoves in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jessica J; Bhojvaid, Vasundhara; Brooks, Nina; Das, Ipsita; Jeuland, Marc A; Patange, Omkar; Pattanayak, Subhrendu K

    2015-01-01

    Despite the potential of improved cookstoves to reduce the adverse environmental and health impacts of solid fuel use, their adoption and use remains low. Social marketing-with its focus on the marketing mix of promotion, product, price, and place-offers a useful way to understand household behaviors and design campaigns to change biomass fuel use. We report on a series of pilots across 3 Indian states that use different combinations of the marketing mix. We find sales varying from 0% to 60%. Behavior change promotion that combined door-to-door personalized demonstrations with information pamphlets was effective. When given a choice amongst products, households strongly preferred an electric stove over improved biomass-burning options. Among different stove attributes, reduced cooking time was considered most valuable by those adopting a new stove. Households clearly identified price as a significant barrier to adoption, while provision of discounts (e.g., rebates given if households used the stove) or payments in installments were related to higher purchase. Place-based factors such as remoteness and nongovernmental organization operations significantly affected the ability to supply and convince households to buy and use improved cookstoves. Collectively, these pilots point to the importance of continued and extensive testing of messages, pricing models, and different stove types before scale-up. Thus, we caution that a one-size-fits-all approach will not boost improved cookstove adoption.

  5. Greenhouse gas mitigation potential of biomass energy technologies in Vietnam using the long range energy alternative planning system model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Amit; Bhattacharya, S.C.; Pham, H.L.

    2003-01-01

    The greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potentials of number of selected Biomass Energy Technologies (BETs) have been assessed in Vietnam. These include Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (BIGCC) based on wood and bagasse, direct combustion plants based on wood, co-firing power plants and Stirling engine based on wood and cooking stoves. Using the Long-range Energy Alternative Planning (LEAP) model, different scenarios were considered, namely the base case with no mitigation options, replacement of kerosene and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) by biogas stove, substitution of gasoline by ethanol in transport sector, replacement of coal by wood as fuel in industrial boilers, electricity generation with biomass energy technologies and an integrated scenario including all the options together. Substitution of coal stoves by biogas stove has positive abatement cost, as the cost of wood in Vietnam is higher than coal. Replacement of kerosene and LPG cookstoves by biomass stove also has a positive abatement cost. Replacement of gasoline by ethanol can be realized after a few years, as at present the cost of ethanol is more than the cost of gasoline. The replacement of coal by biomass in industrial boiler is also not an attractive option as wood is more expensive than coal in Vietnam. The substitution of fossil fuel fired plants by packages of BETs has a negative abatement cost. This option, if implemented, would result in mitigation of 10.83 million tonnes (Mt) of CO 2 in 2010

  6. Household firewood use and the health of children and women of Indian communities in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riojas-Rodríguez, H; Romano-Riquer, P; Santos-Burgoa, C; Smith, K R

    2001-01-01

    A follow-up study in two rural communities in the state of Chiapas, Mexico, compared families that used an improved stove for cooking with those that used traditional open-fire stoves, to assess the risks of respiratory symptoms in children and women exposed to wood smoke. 16-hour measurements showed that the concentration of particles less than 10 microm in diameter was significantly lower in households with the better stoves in the kitchen area, where children usually play, i.e., 158 microg/m3 vs 305 microg/m3 (p = 0.03). Multivariate models showed that using the better stove tended to protect against symptoms such as the common cold in children (RR 0.24; 9.5% CI 0.05, 1.02). Use of more firewood was linked to greater risks of experiencing difficulty breathing (RR 1.15; 95% CI 1.04, 1.27) and the common cold (RR 1.09; 95% CI 1.01, 1.18) in women. The use of stoves that require less wood for cooking reduces the risks of respiratory symptoms that may contribute to complicated respiratory diseases and mortality.

  7. O racjonalną krytykę racjonalizmu krytycznego - teoria postępu naukowego w ujęciu Popperowskiego racjonalizmu krytycznego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Hanuszewicz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the position of David C. Stove who accuses Popper, Kuhn, Feyerabend and Lakatos of being irrationalists. We concentrate on the subject whether this accusation is correct as far as Popper is concerned. In Stove's opinion, putting some words - like 'knowledge', 'discovery' or 'solution of a problem' - into quotation marks is irrational because our knowledge constantly grows, and we know more and more. Stove's position should be qualified as a foundationalism. He refuses Popper's fallibilism and, for this reason, cannot accept the view that all our knowledge is tentative and hypothetical. From the critical rationalism point of view, although our knowledge progresses, we are not justified in believing that we possess safe foundations for our knowledge, just because there are no such foundations. This position justifies our putting some success-words into quotation marks. If we accept fallibilism, formulated within framework of critical rationalism, there are good reasons for the neutralization procedure.

  8. Dutch Cooking and baking customers under the magnifying glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worm, J.

    1980-10-01

    Sponsored by VEGIN, the Amsterdam bureau Centrum interviewed 400 people, aged 18-60 and using gas stoves less than 15 years old, about their cooking habits on gas stoves. For reasons of energy conservation or burner malfunction, over half of the interviewees do not use the ignition burner. Foreign dishes are becoming more popular (prepared by 64% of the respondents). Some 60% use the oven for baking or for heating prepared meals, not particularly for preparing their own dishes. The growing tendency to use only the front burner (for convenience of stirring) appears universal except in homes where such practice would be hazardous to children. Over 95% of those interviewed are married or living together. About 18% of the men cook regularly, 26% occasionally, and 54% never. Those men who do cook are generally younger and in two-person households. Only 6% of the respondents have their stoves regularly checked by professionals.

  9. Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a Traditional and an Improved Cookstove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Preble, Chelsea [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Hadley, Odelle [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Gadgil, Ashok [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2010-11-05

    Traditional methods of cooking in developing regions of the world emit pollutants that endanger the lives of billions of people and contribute to climate change. This study quantifies the emission of pollutants from the Berkeley-Darfur Stove and the traditional three-stone fire at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory cookstove testing facility. The Berkeley-Darfur Stove was designed as a fuel efficient alternative to the three-stone fire to aid refugees in Darfur, who walk long distances from their camps and risk bodily harm in search of wood for cooking. A potential co-benefit of the more fuel efficient stove may be reduced pollutant emissions. This study measured emissions of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, particulate matter, and sunlight-absorbing black carbon. It also measured climate-relevant optical properties of the emitted particulate matter. Pollutant monitors were calibrated specifically for measuring cookstove smoke.

  10. Modeling emission rates and exposures from outdoor cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Rufus; Princevac, Marko; Weltman, Robert; Ghasemian, Masoud; Arora, Narendra K.; Bond, Tami

    2017-09-01

    Approximately 3 billion individuals rely on solid fuels for cooking globally. For a large portion of these - an estimated 533 million - cooking is outdoors, where emissions from cookstoves pose a health risk to both cooks and other household and village members. Models that estimate emissions rates from stoves in indoor environments that would meet WHO air quality guidelines (AQG), explicitly don't account for outdoor cooking. The objectives of this paper are to link health based exposure guidelines with emissions from outdoor cookstoves, using a Monte Carlo simulation of cooking times from Haryana India coupled with inverse Gaussian dispersion models. Mean emission rates for outdoor cooking that would result in incremental increases in personal exposure equivalent to the WHO AQG during a 24-h period were 126 ± 13 mg/min for cooking while squatting and 99 ± 10 mg/min while standing. Emission rates modeled for outdoor cooking are substantially higher than emission rates for indoor cooking to meet AQG, because the models estimate impact of emissions on personal exposure concentrations rather than microenvironment concentrations, and because the smoke disperses more readily outdoors compared to indoor environments. As a result, many more stoves including the best performing solid-fuel biomass stoves would meet AQG when cooking outdoors, but may also result in substantial localized neighborhood pollution depending on housing density. Inclusion of the neighborhood impact of pollution should be addressed more formally both in guidelines on emissions rates from stoves that would be protective of health, and also in wider health impact evaluation efforts and burden of disease estimates. Emissions guidelines should better represent the different contexts in which stoves are being used, especially because in these contexts the best performing solid fuel stoves have the potential to provide significant benefits.

  11. Proinflammatory effects of cookstove emissions on human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, B; Volckens, J

    2013-02-01

    Approximately half of the world's population uses biomass fuel for indoor cooking and heating. This form of combustion typically occurs in open fires or primitive stoves. Human exposure to emissions from indoor biomass combustion is a global health concern, causing an estimated 1.5 million premature deaths each year. Many 'improved' stoves have been developed to address this concern; however, studies that examine exposure-response with cleaner-burning, more efficient stoves are few. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of traditional and cleaner-burning stove emissions on an established model of the bronchial epithelium. We exposed well-differentiated, normal human bronchial epithelial cells to emissions from a single biomass combustion event using either a traditional three-stone fire or one of two energy-efficient stoves. Air-liquid interface cultures were exposed using a novel, aerosol-to-cell deposition system. Cellular expression of a panel of three pro-inflammatory markers was evaluated at 1 and 24 h following exposure. Cells exposed to emissions from the cleaner-burning stoves generated significantly fewer amounts of pro-inflammatory markers than cells exposed to emissions from a traditional three-stone fire. Particulate matter emissions from each cookstove were substantially different, with the three-stone fire producing the largest concentrations of particles (by both number and mass). This study supports emerging evidence that more efficient cookstoves have the potential to reduce respiratory inflammation in settings where solid fuel combustion is used to meet basic domestic needs. Emissions from more efficient, cleaner-burning cookstoves produced less inflammation in well-differentiated bronchial lung cells. The results support evidence that more efficient cookstoves can reduce the health burden associated with exposure to indoor pollution from the combustion of biomass. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Study of a thermoelectric system equipped with a maximum power point tracker for stand-alone electric generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favarel, C.; Champier, D.; Bédécarrats, J. P.; Kousksou, T.; Strub, F.

    2012-06-01

    According to the International Energy Agency, 1.4 billion people are without electricity in the poorest countries and 2.5 billion people rely on biomass to meet their energy needs for cooking in developing countries. The use of cooking stoves equipped with small thermoelectric generator to provide electricity for basic needs (LED, cell phone and radio charging device) is probably a solution for houses far from the power grid. The cost of connecting every house with a landline is a lot higher than dropping thermoelectric generator in each house. Thermoelectric generators have very low efficiency but for isolated houses, they might become really competitive. Our laboratory works in collaboration with plane`te-bois (a non governmental organization) which has developed energy-efficient multifunction (cooking and hot water) stoves based on traditional stoves designs. A prototype of a thermoelectric generator (Bismuth Telluride) has been designed to convert a small part of the energy heating the sanitary water into electricity. This generator can produce up to 10 watts on an adapted load. Storing this energy in a battery is necessary as the cooking stove only works a few hours each day. As the working point of the stove varies a lot during the use it is also necessary to regulate the electrical power. An electric DC DC converter has been developed with a maximum power point tracker (MPPT) in order to have a good efficiency of the electronic part of the thermoelectric generator. The theoretical efficiency of the MMPT converter is discussed. First results obtained with a hot gas generator simulating the exhaust of the combustion chamber of a cooking stove are presented in the paper.

  13. Theoretical and experimental studies on emissions from wood combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skreiberg, Oeyvind

    1997-12-31

    This thesis discusses experiments on emissions from wood log combustion and single wood particle combustion, both caused by incomplete combustion and emissions of nitric and nitrous oxide, together with empirical and kinetic NO{sub x} modelling. Experiments were performed in three different wood stoves: a traditional stove, a staged air stove and a stove equipped with a catalytic afterburner. Ideally, biomass fuel does not give a net contribution to the greenhouse effect. However, incomplete combustion was found to result in significant greenhouse gas emissions. Empirical modelling showed the excess air ratio and the combustion chamber temperature to be the most important input variables controlling the total fuel-N to NO{sub x} conversion factor. As the result of an international round robin test of a wood stove equipped with a catalytic afterburner, particle emission measurements were found to be the best method to evaluate the environmental acceptability of the tested stove, since the particle emission level was least dependent of the national standards, test procedures and calculation procedures used. In batch single wood particle combustion experiments on an electrically heated small-scale fixed bed reactor the fuel-N to NO conversion factor varied between 0.11-0.86 depending on wood species and operating conditions. A parameter study and homogeneous kinetic modelling on a plug flow reactor showed that, depending on the combustion compliance in question, there is an optimum combination of primary excess air ratio, temperature and residence time that gives a maximum conversion of fuel-N to N{sub 2}. 70 refs., 100 figs., 26 tabs.

  14. Maximum Regional Emission Reduction Potential in Residential Sector Based on Spatial Distribution of Population and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winijkul, E.; Bond, T. C.

    2011-12-01

    In the residential sector, major activities that generate emissions are cooking and heating, and fuels ranging from traditional (wood) to modern (natural gas, or electricity) are used. Direct air pollutant emissions from this sector are low when natural gas or electricity are the dominant energy sources, as is the case in developed countries. However, in developing countries, people may rely on solid fuels and this sector can contribute a large fraction of emissions. The magnitude of the health loss associated with exposure to indoor smoke as well as its concentration among rural population in developing countries have recently put preventive measures high on the agenda of international development and public health organizations. This study focuses on these developing regions: Central America, Africa, and Asia. Current and future emissions from the residential sector depend on both fuel and cooking device (stove) type. Availability of fuels, stoves, and interventions depends strongly on spatial distribution. However, regional emission calculations do not consider this spatial dependence. Fuel consumption data is presented at country level, without information about where different types of fuel are used. Moreover, information about stove types that are currently used and can be used in the future is not available. In this study, we first spatially allocate current emissions within residential sector. We use Geographic Information System maps of temperature, electricity availability, forest area, and population to determine the distribution of fuel types and availability of stoves. Within each country, consumption of different fuel types, such as fuelwood, coal, and LPG is distributed among different area types (urban, peri-urban, and rural area). Then, the cleanest stove technologies which could be used in the area are selected based on the constraints of each area, i.e. availability of resources. Using this map, the maximum emission reduction compared with

  15. Where there's smoke : health effects of wood smoke and risk reduction strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKinnon, B. [New Brunswick Lung Association, Fredericton, NB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents a summary of a discussion at a former workshop on smoke from both forest fires and wood stoves. Climate change is forecasted to increase the occurrence of forest fires in Canada and climate change mitigation measures may increase the use of wood stoves for home heating, resulting in an increase in respiratory and cardiovascular symptoms in the Canadian population. These health effects of wood smoke include: headaches and allergies; breathing difficulties; reduced lung function; aggravated heart disease; and increased susceptibility to lower respiratory tract infections. This paper also presented information on health effects of wood smoke and research recommendations for improved policies to protect human health. tabs., figs.

  16. Domestic wood combustion - practices, attitudes and regulation; Braendefyring i hjemmet - praksis, holdninger og regulering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjerulf Petersen, L.; Martinsen, L.

    2008-06-15

    Use of wood burning stoves for domestic heating is the subject of this report which is based on results from an interview study and a survey. The report is concerned with why people have and use stoves, how they use them and which functions the stoves serve in their homes. Of equal interest are the attitudes of users as well as non-users to environmental consequences of wood combustion and to different forms of regulation. There can be several reasons for having and using a wood burning stove for domestic heating. The main reason seems to be the sense of homeliness and cosiness and calm that it gives to the home, and the second most important reason is the economic advantages it implies in terms of reducing heating expenses. Enjoyment of the particular quality of warmth that stoves can provide and a desire to obtain higher indoor temperature are important additional motivations, while self determination in household heating supply runs through all these motivations as an underlying incentive. Potential environmental problems from domestic wood combustion depend on the properties of the stove, on the quality of the fuel, and on air intake and other aspects of the combustion process; and practices of stove users play an important role in all this. For stove users there are both sensuous experiences and social norms - e.g. regarding use of damp wood or any other type of fuel than pure wood - that support an environmentally appropriate practice. However, this study shows that even though users are inclined to follow environmentally sound practices for wood combustion other considerations in everyday life may be more important; considerations regarding what kind of effort one has time and energy for, what is practically feasible, what one can be bothered to consider, and what level of thermal comfort one wants. Almost half of the respondents, users and non-users alike, are to some extend - from slightly to extremely - bothered by smoke from wood combustion, and around

  17. Environmental programmes with refugees: abandon the blanket approach?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Grimsich

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Approaches to environmental problems in refugee emergencies have traditionally focused on two main areas: promotion of tree planting and dissemination of fuel-efficient stoves. This is done with the intention of increasing wood supply and simultaneously reducing the level of demand. Such activities are relatively easy for non-specialists to implement. They also produce two visible (and hence quantifiable assets in a short space of time: trees and stoves.A case study from western Tanzania illustrates the diminished utility of such approaches where natural resources are locally abundant.

  18. Scale-Up and Commercialisation of Improved Cookstoves in Sri Lanka: Lessons Learnt from the Anagi Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissanka, Ramani [Practical Action Consulting in Eastern Africa, Nairobi (Kenya)

    2009-12-15

    Interest in cook stove improvement in Sri Lanka started in the early 1950s. These activities were initiated among the migrant South Indian community that worked in tea plantations concentrated in the central part of the country who had been influenced by the interest generated in the South India. However, these were not replicated in other parts of the country, possibly due to the abudance of the fuel-wood in those areas and also due to a lack of wider interest and awareness of the significance if Improved Cook Stoves (ICS).

  19. Solar Powered Heat Storage for Injera Baking

    OpenAIRE

    Tesfay, Asfafaw H; Kahsay, Mulu Bayray; Nydal, Ole Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Ethiopia with a population of about 85 million meets 96% of its energy needs with bio-mass, charcoal, wood, animal dung and plant residues. More than 50% of this energy goes entirely on baking Injera. Injera the national food of the country demands 180-220 °C to be well cooked. In this article; Injera baking with solar energy on off-focus system, status of electric powered stove and the potential for solar powered stoves is discussed. The research and development of solar thermal for househol...

  20. An Applied General Equilibrium (AGE) analysis of a policy designed to reduce the household consumption of wood in the Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufournaud, C.M.; Quinn, J.T.; Harrington, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Sudan, along with all Sahelian countries, faces urgent environmental problems caused, in part, by the clear-cutting of scrub for firewood. Analyzes the economic consequences of a policy often proposed to reduce the consumption of firewood. Specifically, the authors simulate the policy of introducing more efficient wood burning stoves into households by using an Applied General Equilibrium (AGE) model. The results indicate that the anticipated reduction in the economy-wide demand for wood, based on the increase in the technical efficiency of the stoves, is not fully realized. 23 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Small scale wood combustion systems and fireplaces. Some existing markets in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankerkove, R.; Belle, J.F. van; Lemaire, P.

    1998-01-01

    Because they are seen as more economical and more environmental respectful, the national authorities intend usually to promote district heating rather than stoves and little boilers. Nevertheless these systems are yet now a very important source of energy for private houses in many European countries. The use of this kind of systems as primary or secondary tool of heating depends principally of the three following parameters: the percentage of area covered by the forest, the existing traditions concerning the use of wood stoves and the presence of local manufacturers or distributors. The aim of this presentation will be to show the situation and the states of the art in several European countries

  2. Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage, and Inflammation Induced by Ambient Air and Wood Smoke Particulate Matter in Human A549 and THP-1 Cell Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Møller, Peter; Jensen, Keld Alstrup

    2011-01-01

    PM (WSPM) is poorly assessed. We assessed a wide spectrum of toxicity end points in human A549 lung epithelial and THP-1 monocytic cell lines comparingWSPM from high or low oxygen combustion and ambient PM collected in a village with many operating wood stoves and from a rural background area...... from the wood stove area. Expression of oxoguanine glycosylase 1, lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, and interleukin-6 did not change. We conclude that WSPM has small particle size, high level of PAH, low level of water-soluble metals, and produces high levels of free radicals, DNA damage...

  3. Exposure of pregnant women to cookstove-related household air pollution in urban and periurban Trujillo, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Helen, Gideon; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Adetona, Olorunfemi; Cassidy, Brandon; Bayer, Charlene W; Hendry, Robert; Hall, Daniel B; Naeher, Luke P

    2015-01-01

    Although evidence suggests associations between maternal exposure to air pollution and adverse birth outcomes, pregnant women's exposure to household air pollution in developing countries is understudied. Personal exposures of pregnant women (N = 100) in Trujillo, Peru, to air pollutants and their indoor concentrations were measured. The effects of stove-use-related characteristics and ambient air pollution on exposure were determined using mixed-effects models. Significant differences in 48-hour kitchen concentrations of particulate matter (PM2.5), carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations were observed across fuel types (p health risks even in homes where cleaner burning gas stoves were used.

  4. Energy balance of a wood biomass combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggio, P.; Cemin, A.; Grigiante, M.; Ragazzi, M.

    2001-01-01

    This article reports the results of a project developed at the University of Trent dealing with some wood biomass combustion processes. The project has been particularly dedicated to the study of the energetic analysis of the combustion processes that occur on a gasified wood stove of advanced combustion technologies. A considerable number of experimental tests has been carried out making use of different type of wood widely in use in Trentino region. The wood stove is a part of a pilot plant providing an hydraulic circuit equipped with a specific apparatus to measure all the necessary data to determine the energy balance required and specifically the thermal efficiency of the plant [it

  5. Wood as a home heating fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, K.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes the development of clean-burning technology in three types of wood-burning appliances: catalytic, non-catalytic, and pellet stoves. A recent study by the Washington State Energy Extension Office concluded that in homes that use both electricity and wood, 73 megawatts of electricity/yr were saved by using wood. Since wood-burning stoves can now meet air quality standards, wood could be considered to be a greenhouse-neutral fuel if more trees are planted as they are consumed

  6. Emissions from wood domestic heating appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collet, S.

    2009-01-01

    Much research has been carried out to study emissions from wood domestic heating appliances. This work reviews the available emission factors about pollutants produced in different types of wood domestic heating appliances. The main sources of pollutants are older stoves that in most cases are used as an additional heating appliance. These stoves causes higher emissions than modern appliances. Then, substitution of an old type wood appliance with a modern appliance or boiler or a pellet boilers, would reduce considerably emissions in this sector. The efficiency of this measure is estimated for each pollutant. (author)

  7. 24 CFR 200.936 - Supplementary specific procedural requirements under HUD building products certification program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements under HUD building products certification program for solid fuel type room heaters and fireplace... Supplementary specific procedural requirements under HUD building products certification program for solid fuel... fireplace stoves certified under the HUD Building Products Certification Program shall be designed...

  8. Barbecue Basics: Tips to Prevent Foodborne Illness

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are brown all the way through, not pink. Chicken should be cooked to at least 165°F. If you partially cook food in the microwave, oven or stove to ... bringing hot take-out food such as fried chicken or barbecue to an outdoor ... a grill and fuel for cooking to an outdoor location, remember to pack a ...

  9. Blowing the smoke out of the kitchen : core issues in household energy and gender

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clancy, Joy S.

    2002-01-01

    A literature search for papers on the theme “Household Energy” finds most researchers equate the term with cooking and stoves, issues strongly identified with women. However, a number of researchers have taken a broader definition (see for example Clancy, 1998, Klingshirn 2000) to encompass all the

  10. Very high efficiency wood and dung mogogo in Eritrea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghebrehiwet, Debesai [Ministry of Energy and Mines, Asmara (Eritrea). Energy Research and Training Centre

    2002-04-01

    In Eritrea, the cooking of traditionally yeast-leavened flat bread (injera or taita) is responsible for over 50% of the household's energy consumption. However, no literature exists in international journals, which reviews or analyse the efficiency or energy intensity of injera production. Injera is the product of baking a fermented mixture of water and flour for about three days. The mogogo, a clay cooking plate, is the traditional stove for baking injera. Utton (intra diameter of around 60 cm) is a local name given to the three stoves for mogogo, tsahli and moklo, and are built adjacent to each other. The product of cooking is, respectively, injera, tsebhi (sauce) and kicha (hard bread). Adhanet is the name given to the improved mogogo. Recent research and developing efforts by the Energy and Training Center of the Department of Energy, has shown that an improved stove efficiency of 23% has been achieved, in contrast to the efficiency of the traditional stove of 6 to 8%.

  11. Multiple wireless protocol advertising system, enabling automatic access selection and local services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, S.A.; Baken, N.; Herve, P.; Smets, R.

    2006-01-01

    We examined efficiency within wireless access options for mobile devices and discovered that a classic pitfall is revisited. As with the proliferation of services in incumbents’ portfolios, leading to a number of coexisting so-called ‘stove-pipes’, we see an isomorphic phenomenon evolving in

  12. Gender Equity and Renewable Energies : Thematic Background Paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clancy, Joy S.; Oparaocha, Sheila; Roehr, Ulrike

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review existing evidence on the role of renewable energies in bringing gender equity. The paper first explores the evolution of thinking on gender and energy, in particular that practitioners no longer specifically focus on women and stoves (often referred to as

  13. Technology programs in support of advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    Design for Constructability's overall purpose was to identify and address changes in the nuclear industry to restore nuclear energy as an attractive option for new generating capacity. The program stove to meet the following goals related to the future construction of nuclear power plants: reduced costs; assurance of improved quality; and shortened construction schedules. This is Volume 1 of three volumes

  14. Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood smoke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Elsa; Dybdahl, Marianne; Larsen, Poul Bo

    551,000 wood stoves and 48,000 wood boilers and the particle emission from these sources make up the most dominant source of particle emission in DK. It is estimated that this emission contributes to an annual increased PM2.5 level of 0.6 microgram/m³. From the dose-response relationships used...

  15. 36 CFR 261.52 - Fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fire. 261.52 Section 261.52... in Areas Designated by Order § 261.52 Fire. When provided by an order, the following are prohibited: (a) Building, maintaining, attending or using a fire, campfire, or stove fire. (b) Using an explosive...

  16. Life Cycle Assessment of Cookstoves and Fuels in India ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation was requested by the Global Alliance to augment they scheduled to present update on the use of LCA to better understand implications of future policy that consider all pollutants including criteria, air toxics, and other pollutants impacting air quality concerns in these countries. EPA research quantitatively demonstrates through the application of LCA that both cooking fuel mix substitutions and stove technology upgrades provide promising avenues for reducing particulate matter and black carbon emissions. India’s continued reliance on crop residue and dung contributes disproportionately to particulate matter and black carbon environmental impacts. The greatest environmental benefit in China can be realized by promoting fuel mix substitutions or stove technology improvements to replace the combustion of coal powder in traditional stoves. Kenya and Ghana would benefit from adoption of improved stove designs for both firewood and charcoal fuel. Use of improved charcoal kiln technology also has the potential to significantly reduce the impact of charcoal use and production. The study generally demonstrates the positive relative environmental results associated with LPG and natural gas, which show a limited tendency to shift environmental burdens away from indoor air pollutants and to other impact categories such as fossil fuel depletion, freshwater eutrophication, and terrestrial acidification potential when substituted for traditional fuels. T

  17. Microgasification cookstoves and pellet fuels from waste biomass: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lotter;Msola Hunter;Straub

    Biochar production averaged 59 and 29% of total fuel in the ND and Philips, respectively. Interviews of 30 ND TLUD stove users showed that 60% abandoned use within one month, 80% stating that they produce too much smoke and 40% stating that controlling the air vent is too much trouble. Seventy five percent said that ...

  18. Comfort-calculation programme for wood-fired storage ovens; Komfortberechnungsprogramm fuer Holz-Speicheroefen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaegauf, Ch.; Zumsteg, H. [Oekozentrum Langenbruck, Langenbruck (Switzerland); Huber, H.; Schuetz, B.; Friedlin, R. [Hochschule fuer Technik und Architektur (HTA), Horw (Switzerland); Chiquet, C. [Verband Schweizerischer Hafner- und Plattengeschaefte (VHP), Olten (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) describes a computer aided design (CAD) tool for the design of wood-fired heating appliances to meet optimal room comfort demands. The CAD-tool combines numeric simulation of the heat requirements of dwellings with the dynamic simulation of appliances with slow heat release characteristics. The software simulates the building, the heat output of the wood stove and the heat exchange between the floors. With the help of an Internet-based interface, the user can calculate the heat demand of his building. After this, the stove designer optimises the wood stove with the help of simulation software, which runs on a central server. As a result, the user gets the temperature profile for each room of the building and also the heat output profile of the wood stove for each room by E-mail. The validation of a simulation using a mock-up of a slow heat release appliance and its application to two dwellings equipped with slow heat release appliances is described. According to the authors, the room temperatures computed by the CAD-tool fitted the temperatures measured in situ well. The numerous results are presented in graphical form and commented on.

  19. The Methanizer : A Small Scale Biogas Reactor for a Restaurant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasudevan, R.; Karlsson, O.; Dhejne, K.; Derewonko, P.; Brezet, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of a smallscale bioreactor called the Methanizer for a restaurant. The bioreactor converts organic waste produced by the restaurant into methane. This methane can be used to power the restaurant’s cooking stoves. The

  20. Barbecue Basics: Tips to Prevent Foodborne Illness

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at temperatures between 40°F and 140°F, so summer heat makes the basics of food safety ... oven or stove to reduce grilling time, do so immediately before the food goes on the hot ...

  1. An off-line two-dimensional analytical procedure for determination of polcyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in smoke aerosol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, H.A.; Lammerts van Bueren, L.G.D.

    1987-01-01

    Smoke aerosol from stoves consists of a wide variety of chemical substances of which a number have toxic properties. To study the impact of aerosol emissions on health and environment reliable analytical procedures must be available for these samples. An off-line two-dimensional HPLC method is

  2. 46 CFR 184.200 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Cooking and Heating § 184.200 General. Cooking and heating equipment must be suitable for marine use. Equipment designed and installed in accordance with American Boat and Yacht Council (ABYC) A-3, “Galley Stoves,” and A-7, “Boat Heating Systems,” or with National Fire Protection...

  3. The Development of an Energy Efficient Electric Mitad for Baking Injeras in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Robin; Diehl, J.C.; Simons, Leon; Verwaal, M.

    2017-01-01

    Preparation of Injera, the cultural staple bread food
    item in Ethiopia, is known for its intensive energy consuming
    cooking. Baking this food item in the traditional three stone stoves,
    with an efficiency of 5-15%, consumes huge amounts of firewood
    and causes consequent problems like

  4. 24 CFR 886.307 - Physical condition standards; physical inspection requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., preparation and serving of food shall be provided. There shall be adequate facilities and services for the...) The unit shall contain suitable space to store, prepare and serve foods in a sanitary manner. A cooking stove or range, a refrigerator(s) of appropriate size and in sufficient quantity for the number of...

  5. 46 CFR 25.26-1 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... preparation and extended storage of food. This does not include small alcohol or propane stoves with limited cooking capability, or ice chests or similar devices that are intended for keeping small quantities of food for short durations. High seas means the waters beyond a line three nautical miles seaward of the...

  6. 76 FR 31979 - Notice of Interim Final Supplementary Rules for Public Lands Managed by the Ukiah Field Office in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... overhanging face of rock or earth. Climbing means all-gear assisted and non-gear assisted ascent or descent... on or immediately over land, water, or other natural terrain. Open Fire means all fire with an exposed flame such as wood fires, campfires, charcoal barbecues, or camp stoves outside of fire rings in...

  7. Smoky coal, tobacco smoking, and lung cancer risk in Xuanwei, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Christopher; Chapman, Robert S.; Hu, Wei; He, Xingzhou; Hosgood, H. Dean; Liu, Larry Z.; Lai, Hong; Chen, Wei; Silverman, Debra T.; Vermeulen, Roel; Tian, Linwei; Bassig, Bryan; Shen, Min; Zhang, Yawei; Ma, Shuangge; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Lung cancer rates in Xuanwei are the highest in China. In-home use of smoky coal has been associated with lung cancer risk, and the association of smoking and lung cancer risk strengthened after stove improvement. Here, we explored the differential association of tobacco use and lung

  8. In pursuit of a light bulb and a smokeless kitchen : longitudinal analysis of the role of energy sector policies to alleviate rural energy poverty in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, S.

    2012-01-01

    After more than six decades of development planning, the majority of India’s population,especially those living in villages, continue to wait for access to energy forms that enable them to switch on an electric light bulb and to cook food on a clean stove in a smokeless kitchen. India is a country

  9. Archeological Data Recovery of the Camino Site (16JE223), A Spanish Colonial Period Site Near New Orleans, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    artifacts in the food consumption subcategory include cutlery , tableware, tin cans, pots and pans, and stoves. Cutlery and metal tableware relate to...general pattern of seed use is reflected. Various sedges have edible or medicinal plant parts, as do members of the Polygonaceae family. Considering

  10. Book 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was associated with high consumption of legumes and the use of kerosene in cooking stoves. ... maternal occupation (OR=15.4; CI 1.78-132.8), and educational attainment ... establishment of community genetic services particularly those related to .... Social class 2,3 (Teachers, ..... Janeiro, Brazil: Prevalence and associ-.

  11. Diffusion of renewable heating technologies in households. Experiences from the Norwegian Household Subsidy Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjørnstad, Even

    2012-01-01

    A sample of 896 Norwegian households participating in a subsidy programme was surveyed in order to evaluate the success of the programme. The programme subsidised investments in new heating technologies, including heat pumps and pellet stoves. The success of the programme was measured by the degree of overall satisfaction with the investment by the sampled households. Theories on diffusion of innovations and planned behaviour motivate the empirical modelling of the investment satisfaction. The economic return on the investment varied substantially both within and between the two heating technologies, with heat pumps outperforming pellet stoves in this respect. Still, the economic return showed no explanatory power toward the investment satisfaction of the household. Among the economic variables, only the electricity price had any influence on investment satisfaction. Technical quality, indoor climate and heat comfort, and the availability of the supplier of the heating equipment were the most important explanatory variables. - Highlights: ► Investments in heat pumps and pellet stoves were subsidized over a public programme. ► Heat pumps showed a strong economic return, pellet stoves performed much more poorly. ► This difference in economic return does not influence the investment satisfaction. ► Technical quality, indoor climate and heat comfort are important benefits. ► Service availability and electricity price also influence satisfaction.

  12. 77 FR 48504 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request-Coal and Woodburning Appliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... woodburning appliances who are subject to the information collection requirements may introduce up to 15 new... to begin marketing in the United States. The average number of hours per respondent is estimated at 3... it produces. Therefore, when a manufacturer introduces a new stove model, the only changes that will...

  13. Translations on Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, Number 299

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-11

    A six-man party led by the deputy OCPD [Officer in Charge of Police Department], acting ASP [Assistant Superintendent of Police] Tang Yau Hie also...just prepared from opium when police moved in. The stoves were still burning and some drugs were recovered from the pans. Kulim OCPD Deputy Supt

  14. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible Killer" because it's ... used or incorrectly-vented fuel-burning appliances such as furnaces, stoves, water heaters and fireplaces. Watch This ...

  15. Nález zbytků pozdně renesančních kachlových kamen na hradě Buštěhrad

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Durdík, Tomáš; Juřina, P.; Pavlík, Č.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, - (2010), s. 509-528 ISSN 1211-6831 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80020508 Keywords : castle * castellology * Buštěhrad * stove tiles * postmedieval archaeology * material culture * Bohemia * renaissance Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  16. Gotické a renesanční kamnové kachle z hradu a zámku v Českém Krumlově

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ernée, Michal

    -, č. 9 (2004), s. 251-268 ISSN 1211-6831 R&D Projects: GA MK PK99P04OPP011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z8002910 Keywords : Stove tiles * Český Krumlov * late Gothic Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  17. Public health - threats, concerns and key actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeskleba-Dupont, Rolf

    Public health is discussed departing from priorities related to the precautionary principle with special reference to air pollution from wood burning in individual stoves and the susceptibility of vulnerable groups, i.a. people with genetic predispositions for a lack of detoxifying capacity....

  18. Soubor kachlů z hradu a zámku Bechyně

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Durdík, Tomáš; Pavlík, Č.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2008), s. 483-494 ISSN 1211-6831 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80020508 Keywords : castle * castellology * stove tile * Bechyně * medieval archaeology * Middle Ages * Bohemia Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  19. A DEVICE AND METHOD FOR MEASURING TAR IN A TAR-ENVIRONMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present disclosure describes a device and corresponding method for measuring tar in a tar environment, e.g., a tar producing environment such as a stove or a combustion engine, based on UV absorption spectroscopy. A first measurement along an optical path in the tar environment is performed...

  20. Indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide from burning solid fuels for cooking and heating in Yunnan Province, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seow, Wei Jie; Downward, George S; Wei, Hu; Rothman, Nathaniel; Reiss, Boris; Xu, Jun; Bassig, Bryan A; Li, Jihua; He, Jun; Hosgood, H Dean; Wu, Guoping; Chapman, Robert S; Tian, Linwei; Wei, Fusheng; Caporaso, Neil E; Vermeulen, Roel; Lan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese national pollution census has indicated that the domestic burning of solid fuels is an important contributor to nitrogen dioxide (NO2 ) and sulfur dioxide (SO2 ) emissions in China. To characterize indoor NO2 and SO2 air concentrations in relation to solid fuel use and stove ventilation

  1. Výsledky přírodovědných analýz gotických kamnových kachlů z Českého Krumlova

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ernée, Michal; Hanykýř, V.; Maryška, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 95, - (2004), s. 175-222 ISSN 0031-0506 R&D Projects: GA MK(CZ) PK99P04OPP011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z8002910 Keywords : South Bohemia * Český Krumlov * stove tiles Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  2. Komorové kachle ze severovýchodního kouta nádvoří horního hradu na Křivoklátě

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Durdík, Tomáš; Hazlbauer, Z.

    10, - (2006), s. 281-306 ISSN 1211-6831 R&D Projects: GA MK(CZ) DB06P01OPP004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80020508 Keywords : castle * castellology * Křivoklát * stove tiles * medieval archeology * middle ages * Bohemia Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  3. A Yearlong Epidemiologic Study on Unintentional Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Fars Province, Southwest Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mirahmadizadeh

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Generally, the incidence and fatality rate of CO poisoning in the current study were comparable to those of the world statistics, but higher than in developed counties. Attention and emphasis on the safety of gas heaters, stoves, and other gas-powered appliances in residential places should be enforced.

  4. Rural-urban differences in cooking practices and exposures in Northern Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedinmyer, Christine; Dickinson, Katherine; Piedrahita, Ricardo; Kanyomse, Ernest; Coffey, Evan; Hannigan, Michael; Alirigia, Rex; Oduro, Abraham

    2017-07-01

    Key differences between urban and rural populations can influence the adoption and impacts of new cooking technologies and fuels. We examine these differences among urban and rural households that are part of the REACCTING study in Northern Ghana. While urban and rural populations in the study area all use multiple stoves, the types of stoves and fuels differ, with urban participants more likely to use charcoal and LPG while rural households rely primarily on wood. Further, rural and urban households tend to use different stoves/fuels to cook the same dishes—for example, the staple porridge Tuo Zaafi (TZ) is primarily cooked over wood fires in rural areas and charcoal stoves in urban settings. This suggests that fuel availability and ability to purchase fuel may be a stronger predictor of fuel choice than cultural preferences alone. Ambient concentrations of air pollutants also differ in these two types of areas, with urban areas having pollutant hot spots to which residents can be exposed and rural areas having more homogeneous and lower pollutant concentrations. Further, exposures to carbon monoxide and particulate matter differ in magnitude and in timing between urban and rural study participants, suggesting different behaviors and sources of exposures. The results from this analysis highlight important disparities between urban and rural populations of a single region and imply that such a characterization is needed to successfully implement and assess the impacts of household energy interventions.

  5. Non- chemical methods of seed treatment for control of seed- borne pathogens on vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amein, T.; Wright, S.A.I.; Wickstrom, M.; Schmitt, A.; Koch, E.; Wolf, van der J.M.; Groot, S.P.C.; Werner, S.; Jahn, M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of EU-project "Seed Treatments for Organic Vegetable Production" (STOVE) was to evaluate non-chemical methods for control of seed-borne pathogens in organic vegetable production. Physical (hot air, hot water and electron) and biologi-cal (microorganisms and different agents of natural

  6. Cleaner Cooking Solutions to Achieve Health, Climate, and Economic Cobenefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearly half the world’s population has to rely on solid fuels such as biomass (wood, charcoal, agricultural residues, and animal dung) and coal for household energy, burning them in inefficient open fires and stoves with inadequate ventilation. Household solid fuel combustion is...

  7. 75 FR 53335 - Notice of Proposed Supplementary Rules for the Upper Snake Field Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ... Pan and Ash Removal: An approved fire pan is a durable, metal pan at least 12-inches x 12-inches wide... out all ash from undeveloped dispersed camping sites. All fires must be fully contained in a metal fire grate, fire pan, or other metal device to contain ashes. Mechanical stoves and other appliances...

  8. 75 FR 38540 - Notice of Final Supplementary Rules for Public Lands in Colorado: McInnis Canyons National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... a fire in sites or areas not designated as open for such use by a BLM sign or map. 3. In areas designated as open for starting or maintaining a fire, any fire must be fully contained in a metal fire grate, fire pan, or other metal device to contain ashes. Mechanical stoves and other appliances that are...

  9. 75 FR 18877 - Notice of Final Supplementary Rules for Public Lands in Colorado: Gunnison Gorge National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... open to such use by a BLM sign or map. b. You must not start or maintain a fire in sites or areas not designated as open for such use by a BLM sign or map. c. Where allowed, any fire must be fully contained in a metal fire grate, fire pan, or other metal device to contain ashes. Mechanical stoves and other...

  10. Use of remotely reporting electronic sensors for assessing use of water filters and cookstoves in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan A; Barstow, Christina K; Rosa, Ghislaine; Majorin, Fiona; Clasen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Remotely reporting electronic sensors offer the potential to reduce bias in monitoring use of environmental health interventions. In the context of a five-month randomized controlled trial of household water filters and improved cookstoves in rural Rwanda, we collected data from intervention households on product compliance using (i) monthly surveys and direct observations by community health workers and environmental health officers, and (ii) sensor-equipped filters and cookstoves deployed for about two weeks in each household. The adoption rate interpreted by the sensors varied from the household reporting: 90.5% of households reported primarily using the intervention stove, while the sensors interpreted 73.2% use, and 96.5% of households reported using the intervention filter regularly, while the sensors interpreted no more than 90.2%. The sensor-collected data estimated use to be lower than conventionally collected data both for water filters (approximately 36% less water volume per day) and cookstoves (approximately 40% fewer uses per week). An evaluation of intrahousehold consistency in use suggests that households are not using their filters or stoves on an exclusive basis, and may be both drinking untreated water at times and using other stoves ("stove-stacking"). These results provide additional evidence that surveys and direct observation may exaggerate compliance with household-based environmental interventions.

  11. Charging as a Focal Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads

    This position paper reflects on Borgmann’s notion of ‘focal things’ and its applicability in the discourse about interaction with technologies in nature. Using the example of a combined cooking burner and thermoelectric 5W smartphone charger (a BioLite cook stove), this position paper gives...

  12. The range of ambient air pollution by effluents arising by coal combustion in different types of furnaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konieczynski, J.; Pason, A.; Zelinski, J.

    1994-01-01

    The range of ambient air contamination caused by coal incineration in different furnace types was analysed. Application of the integrated emission coefficient enabled to determine domestic stoves as the main source of air pollutants in Gliwice. (Author). 7 refs, 2 tabs

  13. Food Safety for Your Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the grocery store's dairy case) for raw eggs. Cook meat until the juices run clear. Cook ground ... F (71°C) fish: 145°F (63°C) egg dishes: 160°F (71°C) leftovers: at least 165°F (74°C) When cooking, broiling, or grilling meats on the stove, turn ...

  14. Household triggers of bronchospasm in children aged less than two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Identified household trigger factors of bronchospasm in children less than two years of age include: insecticide spray, fumes, smoke from stove and firewood, and exposure to cold air. The elimination of these factors from the environment of the affected child would go a long way in preventing the attacks.

  15. Functional evolution and accumulation of technological innovation systems: the case of renewable energy in East Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tigabu, A.D.; Berkhout, F.G.H.; van Beukering, P.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares the historical development of innovation systems related to biogas and improved cooking stove technologies in Rwanda and Kenya by applying the 'functions approach'. It argues that the accumulation of functions in these four renewable energy technological innovation systems (TISs)

  16. 16 CFR 1406.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... fuel may be wood, coal, or both. Radiant heaters transmit heat primarily by direct radiation... Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS COAL AND WOOD... of this rule: (a) Coal and wood burning appliances means fireplace stoves, room heater/fireplace...

  17. Life Cycle Assessment of Cooking Fuel Systems in India, China, Kenya, and Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily use of traditional cooking fuels and stoves in India, China, Kenya, and Ghana emits harmful air pollutants that result in over a million premature deaths annually. Reducing pollution from cookstoves is a key priority, as emissions from traditional cookstoves and open fires ...

  18. Save Energy: Save Money!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccli, Eugene; And Others

    This publication is a collection of inexpensive energy saving tips and home improvements for home owners, particularly in low-income areas or in older homes. Section titles are: (1) Keeping Warm; (2) Getting Heat Where You Need It; (3) Using the Sun; (4) Furnaces, Stoves, and Fireplaces; (5) Insulation and Other Energy Needs; (6) Do-It-Yourself…

  19. RESIDENTIAL WOOD COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY REVIEW VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report gives results of a review of the current state-of-the-art of residential wood combustion (RWC). The key environmental parameter of concern was the air emission of particles. The technological status of all major RWC categories -- cordwood stoves, fireplaces, masonry h...

  20. RESIDENTIAL WOOD COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY REVIEW - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a review of the current state-of-the-art of residential wood combustion (RWC). The key environmental parameter of concern was the air emission of particles. The technological status of all major RWC categories--cordwood stoves, fireplaces, masonry heat...

  1. Reduction of exposure to ultrafine particles by kitchen exhaust hoods: the effects of exhaust flow rates, particle size, and burner position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Donghyun; Wallace, Lance; Nabinger, Steven; Persily, Andrew

    2012-08-15

    Cooking stoves, both gas and electric, are one of the strongest and most common sources of ultrafine particles (UFP) in homes. UFP have been shown to be associated with adverse health effects such as DNA damage and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. This study investigates the effectiveness of kitchen exhaust hoods in reducing indoor levels of UFP emitted from a gas stove and oven. Measurements in an unoccupied manufactured house monitored size-resolved UFP (2 nm to 100 nm) concentrations from the gas stove and oven while varying range hood flow rate and burner position. The air change rate in the building was measured continuously based on the decay of a tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride, SF(6)). The results show that range hood flow rate and burner position (front vs. rear) can have strong effects on the reduction of indoor levels of UFP released from the stove and oven, subsequently reducing occupant exposure to UFP. Higher range hood flow rates are generally more effective for UFP reduction, though the reduction varies with particle diameter. The influence of the range hood exhaust is larger for the back burner than for the front burner. The number-weighted particle reductions for range hood flow rates varying between 100 m(3)/h and 680 m(3)/h range from 31% to 94% for the front burner, from 54% to 98% for the back burner, and from 39% to 96% for the oven. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Quelques idées sur la construction de cuisinières en terre

    OpenAIRE

    Laurent, PJ.

    1986-01-01

    A few guidelines for the building of earthen stoves. The analysis of so far published information on the eco-biology, reproduction, depths distributions and specific fishery of Epinephelus aeneus in the eastern central Atlantic enables to suggest the existence of a bathymetrie migration along the coast of Senegal.

  3. 20 CFR 654.409 - Heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) When a heating system has automatic controls, the controls shall be of the type which cut off the fuel... EMPLOYMENT SERVICE SYSTEM Housing for Agricultural Workers Housing Standards § 654.409 Heating. (a) All... concrete slab, insulated metal sheet, or other fireproof material on the floor under each stove, extending...

  4. Testing Selected Behaviors to Reduce Indoor Air Pollution Exposure in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, B. R.; Mathee, A.; Krieger, L.; Shafritz, L.; Favin, M.; Sherburne, L.

    2004-01-01

    Indoor air pollution is responsible for the deaths and illness of millions of young children in developing countries. This study investigated the acceptability (willingness to try) and feasibility (ability to perform) of four indoor air pollution reduction behaviors (improve stove maintenance practices, child location practices, ventilation…

  5. Physical properties and consumer reaction to use of compressed wood bricks in southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen M. Brackley; Robert Gorman; Karen. Peterson

    2012-01-01

    In late 2008, a group of business people and entrepreneurs in southeast Alaska became aware of a compressed wood brick product that could be used as an alternative fuel in existing wood-burning stoves and heating equipment. The product differed from many others on the market in that it contained no additive to promote binding and burn characteristics. In 2009, local...

  6. Potato Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Sarah J.; Thomas, Annie

    2010-01-01

    "Watch out, the stove will burn you," "Ooh, ice cream headache!" Students construct their conceptions about heat and temperature through their own intuitions about daily life experiences. As a result, misconceptions can be born from these constructed concepts. The activity described here addresses student misconceptions about thermal insulation…

  7. Energy-efficient cooking methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, Dilip K. [Department of Physics, University of Jos, P.M.B. 2084, Jos, Plateau State (Nigeria); Muwa Shawhatsu, N. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Technology, Yola, P.M.B. 2076, Yola, Adamawa State (Nigeria); De, N.N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Ikechukwu Ajaeroh, M. [Department of Physics, University of Abuja, Abuja (Nigeria)

    2013-02-15

    Energy-efficient new cooking techniques have been developed in this research. Using a stove with 649{+-}20 W of power, the minimum heat, specific heat of transformation, and on-stove time required to completely cook 1 kg of dry beans (with water and other ingredients) and 1 kg of raw potato are found to be: 710 {+-}kJ, 613 {+-}kJ, and 1,144{+-}10 s, respectively, for beans and 287{+-}12 kJ, 200{+-}9 kJ, and 466{+-}10 s for Irish potato. Extensive researches show that these figures are, to date, the lowest amount of heat ever used to cook beans and potato and less than half the energy used in conventional cooking with a pressure cooker. The efficiency of the stove was estimated to be 52.5{+-}2 %. Discussion is made to further improve the efficiency in cooking with normal stove and solar cooker and to save food nutrients further. Our method of cooking when applied globally is expected to contribute to the clean development management (CDM) potential. The approximate values of the minimum and maximum CDM potentials are estimated to be 7.5 x 10{sup 11} and 2.2 x 10{sup 13} kg of carbon credit annually. The precise estimation CDM potential of our cooking method will be reported later.

  8. Structures to radiate heat softly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perilae, T.; Wikstroem, T. [ed.

    1997-11-01

    Over the past fifty years, heating systems in single-family houses have taken a great leap forward. First wood-burning stoves gave way to oil heaters; then these were superseded by central heating systems; and now conventional central heating systems have lost their way with the increasingly widespread use of room-specific heating systems

  9. Advances in European cord wood testing and policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illerup, Jytte Boll

    Wood stoves have the potential of providing CO2-neutral energy without transmission loss—but with the significant drawbacks of high emissions of pollutants and particulate matter at low altitude close to private homes, and with an uneven heat release profile, which produces non-optimal heating...

  10. Development of thermoelectric generators for electrification of isolated rural homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinalde, G.F.; Taglialavore, E.; Gortari, S. [CNEA (National Atomic Energy Commission), Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Juanico, L.E. [Conicet (National Scientific and Technologic Research Council), Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Molina, M.G. [CONICET and Universidad Nacional de San Juan, Av. Libertador San Martin Oeste, 1109, 5400, San Juan (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    This work presents the experimental development of the first two prototypes of thermoelectric generators intended for initial electrification of rural isolated homes. The microcontroller system designed for these devices is oriented to develop a ''plug and play'' generator that is able to work on firewood home stoves without specialized supervision. (author)

  11. 36 CFR 1002.13 - Fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fires. 1002.13 Section 1002... § 1002.13 Fires. (a) The following are prohibited: (1) Lighting or maintaining a fire, except in... or lanterns in violation of established restrictions. (3) Lighting, tending, or using a fire, stove...

  12. Untitled

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Proc. Indian Acad. Sci., (Engg. Sci), Vol. 6, Pt. 1, March 1983, pp. 47-58, GPrinted in India. Wood burning stoves: Material selection and thermal shock testing of fired ceramic bodies. C R CHAPLIN. Department of Engineering, University of Reading, Reading RG62AY, U.K.. Abstract. The overal design philosophy of ...

  13. Evaluation of Methods for Physical Characterization of the Fine Particle Emissions from Two Residential Wood Combustion Appliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fine particulate matter (PM) emissions from a U. S. certified non-catalytic wood stove and a zero clearance fireplace burning Quercus rubra L. (northern red oak) and Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas fir) cordwood each at two different moisture levels were determined. Emission t...

  14. KAJIAN DAN TERAPAN KONSEP FISIKA DALAM DESAIN TUNGKU SEKAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Suhandi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAKTelah dilakukan kajian dan penerapan konsep Fisika dalam menyempurnakan desain tungku sekam. Konsep-konsep Fisika yang dikaji meliputi konsep pembakaran dan transfer panas. Hasil kajian mengindikasikan bahwa konsentrasi udara dalam badan tungku sekam mengendalikan pembakaran sekam, proses transfer panas dan pelepasan gas buang yang dihasilkan. Pengaturan konsentrasi udara dalam ruang bakar tungku direalisasikan dengan cara memasang sirip saluran udara. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk menyelidiki pengaruh jumlah sirip saluran udara terhadap efisiensi tungku. Proses penelitian dilakukan dengan cara menguji penggunaan tungku sekam dalam proses memasak 20 liter air. Berdasarkan data-data massa sekam yang digunakan, massa air, energi spesifik air, kalor yang dibutuhkan untuk memasak tiap satuan waktu, dan kandungan energi dalam bahan bakar sekam, efisiensi tungku sekam dapat dihitung. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa nilai efisiensi tungku sekam bergantung pada jumlah sirip lubang udara yang dipasang. Untuk ukuran tungku sekam yang digunakan dalam penelitian, efisiensi optimum  terjadi ketika jumlah sirip lubang udara berjumlah empat buah, dengan capaian efisiensi sebesar 20,25 %. ABSTRACTA study and an application of physics concepts in refining husk stove design have been done. The examined physicsconcepts include the concept of combustion and heat transfer. Results of the study indicated that the concentration of air in the stove combustion chamber could control husk burning processes, heat transfer and release of exhaust gasses produced.The management of air concentration in the stovecombustion chamber was realized by installing the fin air inlets.This research was conducted to investigate the effect of the number of fins air inlets to stove efficiency.The research process was done by testing the use of rice husk stove in the cooking of 20 liters of water. Based on the data of husk mass, water mass, the specific energy of water, the

  15. Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE: emissions of particulate matter from wood- and dung-fueled cooking fires, garbage and crop residue burning, brick kilns, and other sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jayarathne

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE characterized widespread and under-sampled combustion sources common to South Asia, including brick kilns, garbage burning, diesel and gasoline generators, diesel groundwater pumps, idling motorcycles, traditional and modern cooking stoves and fires, crop residue burning, and heating fire. Fuel-based emission factors (EFs; with units of pollutant mass emitted per kilogram of fuel combusted were determined for fine particulate matter (PM2.5, organic carbon (OC, elemental carbon (EC, inorganic ions, trace metals, and organic species. For the forced-draft zigzag brick kiln, EFPM2.5 ranged from 12 to 19 g kg−1 with major contributions from OC (7 %, sulfate expected to be in the form of sulfuric acid (31.9 %, and other chemicals not measured (e.g., particle-bound water. For the clamp kiln, EFPM2.5 ranged from 8 to 13 g kg−1, with major contributions from OC (63.2 %, sulfate (23.4 %, and ammonium (16 %. Our brick kiln EFPM2.5 values may exceed those previously reported, partly because we sampled emissions at ambient temperature after emission from the stack or kiln allowing some particle-phase OC and sulfate to form from gaseous precursors. The combustion of mixed household garbage under dry conditions had an EFPM2.5 of 7.4 ± 1.2 g kg−1, whereas damp conditions generated the highest EFPM2.5 of all combustion sources in this study, reaching up to 125 ± 23 g kg−1. Garbage burning emissions contained triphenylbenzene and relatively high concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Sb, making these useful markers of this source. A variety of cooking stoves and fires fueled with dung, hardwood, twigs, and/or other biofuels were studied. The use of dung for cooking and heating produced higher EFPM2.5 than other biofuel sources and consistently emitted more PM2.5 and OC than burning hardwood and/or twigs; this trend was consistent across traditional mud

  16. Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE): emissions of particulate matter from wood- and dung-fueled cooking fires, garbage and crop residue burning, brick kilns, and other sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarathne, Thilina; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; Bhave, Prakash V.; Praveen, Puppala S.; Rathnayake, Chathurika M.; Robiul Islam, Md.; Panday, Arnico K.; Adhikari, Sagar; Maharjan, Rashmi; Goetz, J. Douglas; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Saikawa, Eri; Yokelson, Robert J.; Stone, Elizabeth A.

    2018-02-01

    The Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE) characterized widespread and under-sampled combustion sources common to South Asia, including brick kilns, garbage burning, diesel and gasoline generators, diesel groundwater pumps, idling motorcycles, traditional and modern cooking stoves and fires, crop residue burning, and heating fire. Fuel-based emission factors (EFs; with units of pollutant mass emitted per kilogram of fuel combusted) were determined for fine particulate matter (PM2.5), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), inorganic ions, trace metals, and organic species. For the forced-draft zigzag brick kiln, EFPM2.5 ranged from 12 to 19 g kg-1 with major contributions from OC (7 %), sulfate expected to be in the form of sulfuric acid (31.9 %), and other chemicals not measured (e.g., particle-bound water). For the clamp kiln, EFPM2.5 ranged from 8 to 13 g kg-1, with major contributions from OC (63.2 %), sulfate (23.4 %), and ammonium (16 %). Our brick kiln EFPM2.5 values may exceed those previously reported, partly because we sampled emissions at ambient temperature after emission from the stack or kiln allowing some particle-phase OC and sulfate to form from gaseous precursors. The combustion of mixed household garbage under dry conditions had an EFPM2.5 of 7.4 ± 1.2 g kg-1, whereas damp conditions generated the highest EFPM2.5 of all combustion sources in this study, reaching up to 125 ± 23 g kg-1. Garbage burning emissions contained triphenylbenzene and relatively high concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Sb), making these useful markers of this source. A variety of cooking stoves and fires fueled with dung, hardwood, twigs, and/or other biofuels were studied. The use of dung for cooking and heating produced higher EFPM2.5 than other biofuel sources and consistently emitted more PM2.5 and OC than burning hardwood and/or twigs; this trend was consistent across traditional mud stoves, chimney stoves, and three-stone cooking

  17. Inspecting what you expect: Applying modern tools and techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of household energy interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillarisetti, Ajay

    Exposure to fine particles (PM2.5) resulting from solid fuel use for household energy needs - including cooking, heating, and lighting - is one of the leading causes of ill-health globally and is responsible for approximately 4 million premature deaths and 84 million lost disability-adjusted life years globally. The well-established links between cooking and ill-health are modulated by complex social, behavioral, technological, and environmental issues that pose unique challenges to efforts that seek to reduce this large health burden. Despite growing interest in the field - and numerous technical solutions that, in the laboratory at least, reduce emissions of harmful air pollutants from solid fuel combustion - there exists a need for refined tools, models, and techniques (1) for measuring environmental pollution in households using solid fuel, (2) for tracking adoption of interventions, and (3) for estimating the potential health benefits attributable to an intervention. Part of the need for higher spatial and temporal resolution data on particular concentrations and dynamics is being met by low-cost sensing platforms that provide large amounts of time-resolved data on critical parameters of interest, including PM2.5 concentrations and time-of-use metrics for heat-generating appliances, like stoves. Use of these sensors can result in non-trivial challenges, including those related to data management and analysis, and field logistics, but also enables novel lines of inquiry and insight. Chapter 2 presents a long-term deployment of real-time PM2.5 sensors in rural, solid-fuel-using kitchens, specifically seeking to evaluate how well commonly measured 24 or 48-hour samples represent long-term means. While short-term measures were poor predictors of long-term means, the dataset enabled evaluation of numerous sampling strategies - including sampling once per week, month, or season - that had much lower errors and higher probabilities of estimating the true mean

  18. Catalytic reduction of emissions from small-scale combustion of biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Magnus; Gustavsson, Patrik; Berge, Niklas

    1998-01-01

    This report covers a study on the prospect of using catalytic techniques for the abatement of emissions from small-scale combustion of biomass. The results show that there is a great potential for catalytic techniques and that the emissions of primarily CO and unburned hydrocarbons can be reduced but also that indirectly the emissions of NO x can be reduced. The aim of the project was to methodically indicate the requirement that both the catalyst and the stove must meet to enable the development of low emission stoves utilising this technique. The project should also aim at the development of catalysts that meet these requirements and apply the technique on small-scale stoves. By experimental work these appliances have been evaluated and conclusions drawn on the optimisation of the technique. The project has been performed in close collaboration between TPS Termiska Processer AB, Department of Chemical Technology at KTH, Perstorp AB and CTC-PARCA AB. The development of new catalysts have been conduc ted by KTH in collaboration with Perstorp while the work performed by TPS have been directed towards the integration of the monolithic catalysts in two different stoves that have been supplied by CTC. In one of these stoves a net based catalyst developed by KATATOR have also been tested. Within the project it has been verified experimentally that in a wood fired stove a reduction of the CO-emissions of 60% can be achieved for the monolithic catalysts. This reduction could be achieved even without any optimisation of the design. Experiments in a smaller scale and under well controlled conditions have shown that almost 100% reduction of CO can be achieved. The parameters that limits the conversion over the catalyst, and thereby prevents that the targeted low emissions can be reached, have been identified as: * Short residence time, * Mass transport limitations caused by the large channel width, * Uneven temperature profile over the catalyst, and * Insufficient mixing

  19. Diffusion of non-traditional cookstoves across western Honduras: A social network analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, Sebastian; Dwivedi, Puneet; Ghilardi, Adrian; Bailis, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A third of the world's population uses inefficient biomass stoves, contributing to severe health problems, forest degradation, and climate change. Clean burning, fuel-efficient, non-traditional cookstoves (NTCS) are a promising solution; however, numerous projects fail during the diffusion process. We use social network analysis to reveal patterns driving a successful stove intervention in western Honduras. The intervention lacks formal marketing, but has spread across a wide area in just a few years. To understand the process, we map the social network of active community members who drove diffusion across a large swath of the country. We find that most ACMs heard about stoves twice before sharing information about it with others and introducing the stove into their own communities. On average, the social distance between ACMs and the project team is 3 degrees of separation. Both men and women are critical to the diffusion process, but men tend to communicate over longer distances, while women principally communicate over shorter distances. Government officials are also crucial to diffusion. Understanding how information moves through social networks and across geographic space allows us to theorize how knowledge about beneficial technologies spreads in the absence of formal marketing and inform policies for NTCS deployment worldwide. - Highlights: • We build a chain of referrals to track spread of information about non traditional cookstoves. • We find differences among gender and occupations that should inform policy. • People hear about the stoves twice before becoming suppliers of information. • Government officials play a substantial role in the diffusion. • Males play leading role in diffusion over long distances, females in short distances

  20. Evaluation of Behavior Change Communication Campaigns to Promote Modern Cookstove Purchase and Use in Lower Middle Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William Douglas; Johnson, Michael; Jagoe, Kirstie; Charron, Dana; Young, Bonnie N; Rahman, A S M Mashiur; Omolloh, Daniel; Ipe, Julie

    2017-12-22

    Nearly three billion people worldwide burn solid fuels and kerosene in open fires and inefficient stoves to cook, light, and heat their homes. Cleaner-burning stoves reduce emissions and can have positive health, climate, and women's empowerment benefits. This article reports on the protocol and baseline data from the evaluation of four behavior change communication (BCC) campaigns carried out in lower to middle income countries aimed at promoting the sale and use of cleaner-burning stoves. Interventions implemented in Bangladesh, Kenya, and Nigeria are using a range of BCC methods including mass media, digital media, outdoor advertising, and inter-personal communication. The mixed methods evaluation comprises three large-scale surveys: one pre-BCC and two follow-ups, along with smaller scale assessments of stove uptake and patterns of use. Baseline results revealed varying levels of awareness of previous promotions and positive attitudes and beliefs about modern (i.e., relatively clean-burning) cookstoves. Differences in cookstove preferences and behaviors by gender, socio-demographics, media use, and country/region were observed that may affect outcomes. Across all three countries, cost (lack of funds) a key perceived barrier to buying a cleaner-burning stove. Future multivariate analyses will examine potential dose-response effects of BCC on cookstove uptake and patterns of use. BCC campaigns have the potential to promote modern cookstoves at scale. More research on campaign effectiveness is needed, and on how to optimize messages and channels. This evaluation builds on a limited evidence base in the field.

  1. Proposals to enhance thermal efficiency programs and air pollution control in south-central Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueftan, Alejandra; González, Alejandro D.

    2015-01-01

    Major cities in South-central Chile suffer high levels of particulate matter PM 10 and PM 2.5 due to combustion of solid fuels for heating. Exposure to these air pollutants is recognized as a major contribution to ill health in the region. Here we discuss new strategies to reduce air pollution. Regulations and subsidies focusing on improved combustion by providing drier wood fuel and better stoves have been in effect since 2007. However, air pollution due to combustion of wood fuel has been steadily rising, along with reports on health consequences. The paper analyzes a survey of 2025 households in the city of Valdivia, which found that wood fuel quality, stove renewal, and awareness of programs are strongly affected by income level, and that higher consumption of wood fuel is found in households already having better stoves and drier wood fuel. The analysis suggests that regulations intended to improve combustion are influenced by user's behavior and have limited potential for lowering pollution. We conclude that thermal refurbishment has a larger potential for improvement, not yet been implemented as an energy policy for the majority. Here we propose improvements and additions to current programs to enhance effectiveness and cover the whole social spectrum. - Highlights: • High levels of PM 2.5 from wood combustion affect cities of south-central Chile. • Current programs on dry wood fuel and stoves renewal have not reduced air pollution. • Real operation of wood stoves strongly depends on user's behavior. • Buildings' energy efficiency has greater potential for reducing emissions. • Retrofit prevents degradation of native forest and improves indoor temperature

  2. RANCANG BANGUN ALAT PENGERING TIPE RAK DENGAN SYSTEM HYBRID UNTUK USAHA PISANG SALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Makky

    2008-09-01

    A rack type solar dryer has build with a secondary heat source using gas fireplace. The rack build from light material using fickle timber and aluminums made it become portable. The dryer build with a knock down system, so it can be assemble and disassemble to reposition it in area with better solar recipient. Total weight of this dryer is only 32 kg and consists of four major parts. The first part is solar collector, height 22 cm, width 85 cm and length 187 cm at an angle of 5o to the horizontal axle. The solar collector constructed in wave shape to maximize the acceptance area of solar ray. The collector builds in a glass house frame to optimize the heat dissipation so it can reach Working temperature of 65oC. The fireplace was the second part, and made from rust proof steel. It has dimension of 85 cm width, 65 cm length and 22 cm height. The fireplace filled with 6 liters sand to maximize heat collect from the stove. The stove was the third part; consist of a gas stove and a 5 kg gas tube. The stove can be turn on in rainy day or at night as an alternative heat source for drying process. The tube contain of 3 kg gas that can fuel the stove for 60 hours. The last part was the drying rack with 360 liters volume. It has five cabinets and can fill up to 1500 pieces of dried banana. The rack equipped with a shell type door to simplify the containing process.

  3. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Fine Particulate Matter ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study measured polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) composition in particulate matter emissions from residential cookstoves. A variety of fuel and cookstove combinations were examined, including: (i) liquid petroleum gas (LPG), (ii) kerosene in a wick stove, (iii) wood (10% and 30% moisture content on a wet basis) in a forced-draft fan stove, and (iv) wood in a natural-draft rocket cookstove. LPG combustion had the highest thermal efficiency (~57%) and the lowest PAH emissions per unit fuel energy, resulting in the lowest PAH emissions per useful energy delivered (MJd). The average benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) emission factor for LPG was 0.842 µg/MJd; the emission rate was 0.043 µg/min. The highest PAH emissions were from wood burning in the natural-draft stove (209-700 µg B[a]P/MJd). PAH emissions from kerosene were significantly lower than those from the wood burning in the natural-draft cookstove, but higher than those from LPG. It is expected that in rural regions where LPG and kerosene are unavailable or unaffordable, the forced-draft fan stove may be an alternative because its emission factor (5.17-8.07 µg B[a]P/MJd) and emission rate (0.52-0.57 µg/min) are similar to kerosene (5.36 µg B[a]P/MJd and 0.45 µg/min). Compared with wood combustion emissions, LPG stoves emit less total PAH emissions and less fractions of high molecular weight PAHs. Relatively large variations in PAH emissions from LPG call for additional future tests to identify the major

  4. DESAIN DAN PENGUJIAN KINERJA KOMPOR GASIFIKASI-PIROLISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanis R Pangala

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the design and performance test of pyrolysis burning stoves that produce energy for cooking and biochar. The stove consists of two section chambers, namelycombustion chamber that produces activation heat for pyrolysis process and energy for cooking, andpyrolysis chamber that produces biochar and volatile matter (syngas and tar in gas form. Volatile matter product was introduced to the combustion chamber in addition to the biomass there and replaces biomass fuel gradually to produce energy for cooking and keeping the continuous pyrolysis process (autothermal. Methode used for performance test: direct observations/measurements and Water Boilling Test (WBT. Result of performance test: the autothermal process was going well until resulting a 100% biochar for most of the biomass used. Thermal efficiency of the stove was 11.3% (before pyrolysis and 14.72% (after pyrolysis, excluding heat to produce biochar. Time needed to boil a 5 L water was 12 minutes before pyrolysis and 6 minutes after pyrolysis. Output power ranges from 9.60 kW to 23.16 kW. The maximum temperature reached 868 °C at the pan and 860oC in combustion chamber.Input biomass capacity depending on the type of feedstock ranging from 1200 - 3000 g/process, resulting in 507-900 g biochar/process, to give biochar ratio to raw materials from 23.0% to 44.8%. All maximum conditions occurs when volatilematters produced from pyrolysis process were burned, which showed that burning volatile matters is better than burning solid biomass directly.The amount of biochar produced by this stove was three times higher compared to anila stove, with less of smoke during the biochar production.

  5. Assessment of Current Energy Consumption Practices, Carbon Emissions and Indoor Air Pollution in Samagaun, Manaslu Conservation Area, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajani Suwal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nepal is one of the lowest energy consuming countries in the world. More than 85 percent of its total energy comes from traditional biomass energy such as forests, agricultural residues and by-products from crops. Due to increasing per capita energy consumption, natural resources are being depleted with heavy emissions of GHGs in the atmosphere, which causes global warming. The main objective of the study was to investigate current energy consumption practices, to estimate particulate matter and carbon emissions from current practices and to recommend the most suitable alternative energy technologies. The fieldwork was based on primary and secondary data with a design methodology. Firewood burning was found to be the major source of energy used for cooking purposes in Samagaun. The use of this traditional fuel has negative environmental implications, such as deforestation, indoor air pollution and it ultimately affects human health. The results show that traditional cooking stoves (TCS are used more than improved cooking stoves (ICS. The total amount of firewood used per day by TCS is 2135 kg/day, and by ICS it is 349 kg/day. The average amount of firewood consumed by traditional and improved cooking stoves per day is 62.79 kg and 43.63 kg, respectively. The annual per capita firewood consumption of TCS and ICS is 4401.9 kg and 3266.7 kg, respectively. The calculation shows that per capita firewood consumption by TCS users is 1.3 times higher than that of ICS users. The annual per capita carbon emissions from TCS and ICS is 8055.47 kg CO2e and 5978.15 kg CO2e, respectively. This calculation shows that ICS emits 1.3 times less CO2 into the atmosphere than the TCS. The average mean particulate concentration at normal atmospheric conditions for a traditional cooking stove was found to be 2866 μg/Nm3 and for an improved cooking stove 1333 μg/Nm3, both of which far exceed the national standard of 230 μg/m3 TSP. Based on the study results, metallic

  6. The commercialisation of innovative woodstoves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This project developed and tested the 'Mirte' (meaning 'best' or 'excellent'), a low-cost, efficient wood stove in Ethiopia. This included tests on construction materials and the use of non-wood fuels. The project adopted a six-point approach: The identification of household needs, demands and preferences together with a definition of the private sector's abilities to meet those demands; Mirte design and testing - firstly in the laboratory using controlled cooking tests (CCTs), and secondly in households using kitchen performance tests (KPTs) - held in Awasa and Bahr Dar (An Impact Assessment was also carried out with commercial injera bakers using a modified Mirte in Addis Ababa); Producer training and technical assistance; Market trials and acceptability assessment; Full-scale marketing and commercialisation; Acceptability follow-up and adaptation of the product to meet consumer needs. Stoves produced using the new materials proved to be efficient and acceptable to consumers. (author)

  7. Economic and CO2 mitigation impacts of promoting biomass heating systems: An input-output study for Vorarlberg, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madlener, Reinhard; Koller, Martin

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on an empirical investigation about the economic and CO 2 mitigation impacts of bioenergy promotion in the Austrian federal province of Vorarlberg. We study domestic value-added, employment, and fiscal effects by means of a static input-output analysis. The bioenergy systems analysed comprise biomass district heating, pellet heating, and automated wood chip heating systems, as well as logwood stoves and boilers, ceramic stoves, and buffer storage systems. The results indicate that gross economic effects are significant, regarding both investment and operation of the systems, and that the negative economic effects caused by the displacement of conventional decentralised heating systems might be in the order of 20-40%. Finally, CO 2 mitigation effects are substantial, contributing already in 2004 around 35% of the 2010 CO 2 mitigation target of the Land Vorarlberg for all renewable energy sources

  8. Heating with wood. A guide to clean and proper heating; Heizen mit Holz. Ein Ratgeber zum richtigen und sauberen Heizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Anja [Umweltbundesamt, Dessau (Germany); Kemper, Bernd-Michael [Landesanstalt fuer Umwelt, Messungen und Naturschutz Baden-Wuerttemberg (LUBW), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    When correctly used, wood is an eco-friendly fuel. By using well-processed wood from local sources in a properly handled modern fireplace, you can enjoy the cosy warmth from your wood-burning stove or boiler without causing significant environmental damage. The environment and your neighbours will be grateful for this. This brochure is intended to give you tips on how to properly operate a wood-based heating system - in technical terms referred to as a small combustion installation. Especially the burning of poor quality wood in old and insufficiently maintained stoves and unfavourable combustion conditions will result in the emission of unnecessarily high levels of greenhouse gases having adverse effects on the climate, and pollutants detrimental to your health. Particularly in urban agglomerations and valleys, the air quality is affected by wood heating systems due to low chimneys. Often, neighbours will feel annoyed.

  9. The Stube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atzbach, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The "stube" (Danish "stue"), here defined as a smokefree heated living room, is the most important room in the central European house. North to the Alps, being exposed to maritime or even continental climate condition, it was impossible to live without heating from late autumn until spring. Since...... prehistoric times, open fireplaces provided warmth, light and energy for preparing meals. In central Europe, two new methods of smokeless heating had been developed: the complex subfloor convection air heating and the tiled stove. The first one is usually interpreted as reduced form of antic Roman hypocaust...... heating, which survived in monastic context. Since the 10th century, archaeological sources allow to describe its spread into profane context: firstly, it was used as heating for large rooms on castles, in the late Middle Ages, also in town halls. The tiled stove is not as powerful as the convection air...

  10. FAME Storage Time in an Optimized Natural Antioxidant Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Lopes Coppo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of B100 biodiesel oxidation stability, and its conservation, is extremely important to control its quality, especially regarding storage. Many spices have shown antioxidant effect and are the targets of study. Knowing the oxidation process in greater detail allows a reliable storage period to be stipulated for the biodiesel without its degradation until the time of use. Results have shown that according to the accelerated stove method, the optimal mixture, composed of 100% of oregano extract, can confer a 535-day shelf life to biodiesel without evident oxidation. According to the results obtained by the Rancimat method, the ideal mixture consists of 100% rosemary, resulting in 483 days of storage. The application of the process variable showed that the accelerated stove method was more suitable to determine oxidative stability of biodiesel.

  11. ON ETREPRENUERSHIP AT MAIN CLAY PITS AND BRICKYARDS OF CENTRAL CROATIA AT THE END OF 19TH AND BEGINNING OF 20TH CENTURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berislav šebečić

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In central Croatia at the beginning of 20th century, clay pits were mostly managed by individual entrepreneurs, and less by joint stock companies and municipal or district local authorities. Majority of clay pit met the local and regional requirements i.e. demands, and quality products were exported. Exploitation of brickwork clay was carried out from open pits, while potter's, stove-maker's and porcelain clays were exploited from mining shafts and tunnels. From the clay raw material, annual production of minor brickyards amounted to 200-300,000 bricks, and that of major ones was 1-2,000,000 pieces of bricks or roofing-tiles. The number of workers in brickyards and cement works was growing in the first decade of 20th century, while that of potter's and stove-maker's crafts was decreasing. Pottery became a secondary trade in the majority of Croatian and Slavonian counties (the paper is published in Croatian.

  12. Multi-criteria evaluation of cooking energy alternatives for promoting parabolic solar cooker in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohekar, S.D. [Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani (India). CREED; Ramachandran, M. [Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Dubai (United Arab Emirates)

    2004-07-01

    The policy formulation for cooking energy substitution by renewables is addressed in multi-criteria context. A survey is conducted to know the perceptions of different decision making groups on present dissemination of various cooking energy alternatives in India. Nine cooking energy alternatives are evaluated on 30 different criteria comprising of technical, economic, environmental/social, behavioural and commercial issues. Preference Ranking Organization METHod for Enrichment Evaluation (PROMETHEE), a multi-criteria decision making method of outranking nature is used to rank the alternatives. It is found that liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) stove is the most preferred device, followed by kerosene stove, solar box cooker and parabolic solar cooker (PSC) in that order. A sensitivity analysis is also carried out for identifying potential areas for improvement for PSC. On the basis of results, strategies for promoting wide spread use of PSC are formulated. (author)

  13. The effect of indoor air pollutants on otitis media and asthma in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daigler, G.E.; Markello, S.J.; Cummings, K.M. (State Univ. of New York, Buffalo (USA))

    1991-03-01

    This case-control study investigated the possible association between home environmental air pollutants and their effect on otitis media and asthma in children. Patients with physician-diagnosed otitis (n = 125, 74% response), with asthma (n = 137, 80% response), and controls (n = 237, 72% response) from a private pediatric practice seen between October 1986 and May 1987 were studied. A questionnaire inquired about housing characteristics (i.e., age, insulation, heating system) and sources of indoor air pollution such as cigarette smoking, use of woodburning stoves, household pets, etc. Analysis of the responses confirmed previous findings of significant relationships between maternal smoking (P = .021), and the presence of pets (P = .034) and the occurrence of asthma. A newly reported relationship between exposure to woodburning stoves and the occurrence of otitis (P less than .05) was reported. This implicates yet another risk factor (wood burning) in the etiology of otitis media.

  14. Indoor combustion and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Kathleen; Triche, Elizabeth W

    2008-08-01

    Indoor combustion produces both gases (eg, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide) and particulate matter that may affect the development or exacerbation of asthma. Sources in the home include both heating devices (eg, fireplaces, woodstoves, kerosene heaters, flued [ie, vented] or nonflued gas heaters) and gas stoves for cooking. This article highlights the recent literature examining associations between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma development and severity. Since asthma is a chronic condition affecting both children and adults, both age groups are included in this article. Overall, there is some evidence of an association between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma, particularly asthma symptoms in children. Some sources of combustion such as coal stoves have been more consistently associated with these outcomes than other sources such as woodstoves.

  15. Preliminary correlation of organic molecular tracers in residential wood smoke with the source of fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Laurel J.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    Polar cyclic di- and triterpenoids were analyzed in the extracts of residential wood combustion aerosols collected in suburban sections of Eugene, Oakridge and Corvallis, Oregon. Additional samples collected included alder wood, smoke from two wood stoves burning only alder or pine as fuel, soot from a stove burning alder and a fireplace where oak was the predominant fuel. Due to the relatively cooler temperatures present under the smoldering conditions of residential wood combustion, as compared to the active burning of forest fires and slash burns, incomplete combustion resulted in the preservation of high levels of the natural products. There were three distinct signatures which could be used to trace relative input from coniferous, alder and oak combustion products, i.e. diterpenoids, lupane-derived triterpenoids and friedelin, respectively. Conifer combustion products dominated the suburban smoke aerosols.

  16. Mobilizing local financial resources - the case of Uganda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turyareeba, P.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter addresses private sector investment in the production of households renewable energy technologies (RETs) and provides recommendations for the large-scale manufacture and dissemination of these RETs in Uganda. The following four RETs are examined in detail: improved households cookstoves, institutional stoves, biomass briquettes and biogas. The household energy sector in Uganda relies heavily on biomass, with fuelwood providing 95.5 per cent, followed by charcoal which accounts for 2.7 per cent. Petroleum products and electricity contribute 1.4 per cent and 0.5 per cent, respectively. Charcoal and fuelwood are used mainly in the open fire and the traditional metal stove whose efficiencies are very low. In parts of the country where the fuelwood deficit is imminent, agricultural wastes are the major substitutes. (Author)

  17. Particle Emission Characteristics of Modern and Old-Type Residential Boilers Fired with Wood Logs and Wood Pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, L.S.; Gustavsson, L.; Tullin, C.; Potter, A.; Leckner, B.

    2005-01-01

    Residential biofuel combustion for heating can be performed in two ways: in a stove heating the surrounding room, or in a boiler heating water to be circulated through a piping system to heat an entire house. In contrast to stoves, wood boilers can be connected to heat storage tanks, which is an advantage from an emission point of view. The present work focuses on comparing emissions from old-type and modern boilers by means of systematic variation of combustion device, fuel quality, firing behaviour, and the influence of heat storage tank. User habits are simulated in a schematic way. The purpose of the comparison is to determine the emission differences between old-type and modern residential biofuel boilers and to quantify emission characteristics of different kind of biofuel combustion

  18. The role of leak air in a double-wall chimney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenegger, Klaus; Hebenstreit, Babette; Pointner, Christian; Schmidl, Christoph; Höftberger, Ernst

    2015-06-01

    In modern buildings with tight shells, often room-independent air supply is required for proper operation of biomass stoves. One possibility to arrange this supply is to use a double-wall chimney with flue gas leaving through the pipe and fresh air entering through the annular gap. A one-dimensional quasi-static model based on balance equations has been developed and compared with experimental data. Inclusion of leak air is crucial for reproduction of the experimental results.

  19. Emission factors from residential combustion appliances burning Portuguese biomass fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, A P; Alves, C A; Gonçalves, C; Tarelho, L; Pio, C; Schimdl, C; Bauer, H

    2011-11-01

    Smoke from residential wood burning has been identified as a major contributor to air pollution, motivating detailed emission measurements under controlled conditions. A series of experiments were performed to compare the emission levels from two types of wood-stoves to those of fireplaces. Eight types of biomass were burned in the laboratory: wood from seven species of trees grown in the Portuguese forest (Pinus pinaster, Eucalyptus globulus, Quercus suber, Acacia longifolia, Quercus faginea, Olea europaea and Quercus ilex rotundifolia) and briquettes produced from forest biomass waste. Average emission factors were in the ranges 27.5-99.2 g CO kg(-1), 552-1660 g CO(2) kg(-1), 0.66-1.34 g NO kg(-1), and 0.82-4.94 g hydrocarbons kg(-1) of biomass burned (dry basis). Average particle emission factors varied between 1.12 and 20.06 g kg(-1) biomass burned (dry basis), with higher burn rates producing significantly less particle mass per kg wood burned than the low burn rates. Particle mass emission factors from wood-stoves were lower than those from the fireplace. The average emission factors for organic and elemental carbon were in the intervals 0.24-10.1 and 0.18-0.68 g kg(-1) biomass burned (dry basis), respectively. The elemental carbon content of particles emitted from the energy-efficient "chimney type" logwood stove was substantially higher than in the conventional cast iron stove and fireplace, whereas the opposite was observed for the organic carbon fraction. Pinus pinaster, the only softwood species among all, was the biofuel with the lowest emissions of particles, CO, NO and hydrocarbons.

  20. Gianco, my Brother

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Ester Gasperoni

    As a child, Gianco (the nickname by which he was known to family and friends) wanted to be a cook. Since cooking has never been my "cup of tea" I gladly allowed him to experiment on a stove that had been given to me for Christmas, a little electric marvel equipped with a real oven. He concocted sauces, baked cookies and cakes, which were eminently edible. Perhaps thanks to his childhood practice, Gianco's cooking was always far better than mine.

  1. Personal child and mother carbon monoxide exposures and kitchen levels: methods and results from a randomized trial of woodfired chimney cookstoves in Guatemala (RESPIRE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk R; McCracken, John P; Thompson, Lisa; Edwards, Rufus; Shields, Kyra N; Canuz, Eduardo; Bruce, Nigel

    2010-07-01

    During the first randomized intervention trial (RESPIRE: Randomized Exposure Study of Pollution Indoors and Respiratory Effects) in air pollution epidemiology, we pioneered application of passive carbon monoxide (CO) diffusion tubes to measure long-term personal exposures to woodsmoke. Here we report on the protocols and validations of the method, trends in personal exposure for mothers and their young children, and the efficacy of the introduced improved chimney stove in reducing personal exposures and kitchen concentrations. Passive diffusion tubes originally developed for industrial hygiene applications were deployed on a quarterly basis to measure 48-hour integrated personal carbon monoxide exposures among 515 children 0-18 months of age and 532 mothers aged 15-55 years and area samples in a subsample of 77 kitchens, in households randomized into control and intervention groups. Instrument comparisons among types of passive diffusion tubes and against a continuous electrochemical CO monitor indicated that tubes responded nonlinearly to CO, and regression calibration was used to reduce this bias. Before stove introduction, the baseline arithmetic (geometric) mean 48-h child (n=270), mother (n=529) and kitchen (n=65) levels were, respectively, 3.4 (2.8), 3.4 (2.8) and 10.2 (8.4) p.p.m. The between-group analysis of the 3355 post-baseline measurements found CO levels to be significantly lower among the intervention group during the trial period: kitchen levels: -90%; mothers: -61%; and children: -52% in geometric means. No significant deterioration in stove effect was observed over the 18 months of surveillance. The reliability of these findings is strengthened by the large sample size made feasible by these unobtrusive and inexpensive tubes, measurement error reduction through instrument calibration, and a randomized, longitudinal study design. These results from the first randomized trial of improved household energy technology in a developing country and

  2. Annex 4 - Task 08/13 final report, Producing the binary uranium alloys with alloying components Al, Mo, Zr, Nb, and B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarevic, Dj.

    1961-01-01

    Due to reactivity of uranium in contact with the gasses O 2 , N 2 , H 2 , especially under higher temperatures uranium processing is always done in vacuum or inert gas. Melting, alloying and casting is done in high vacuum stoves. This report reviews the type of furnaces and includes detailed description of the electric furnace for producing uranium alloys which is available in the Institute

  3. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, China: Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-10

    bedrock growth anticlines, buried hill fault blocks, rolling anticlines, compression anticlines, draped anticlines, volcanic diapers and others. The...development and utilization of solar , wind, geothermal and other energy resources, the energy conservation capacity and newly-added energy resources were...equivalent to 20 million tons of standard coal. The firewood-saving capacity in wood and coal-saving stoves, biogas pits and solar cookers alone was

  4. AHP 10: Folklore: Bear and Rabbit (I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.yu lha གཡུ་ལྷ།

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available G.yu Iha writes: I recorded this folktale from Thub bstan (b. 1936, the reincarnate lama in Siyuewu Village (Puxi Township, Rangtang County, Aba Tibetan and Qiang Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan Province when I visited him in the winter of 2009-2010. Thub bstan learned this folktale from his mother. I heard this tale when I was around six years old from my great grandfather when my family was having dinner near the stove one evening.

  5. Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE): Emissions of particulate matter from garbage burning, wood and dung cooking fires, motorcycles and brick kilns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarathne, T. S.; Rathnayake, C.; Stockwell, C.; Daugherty, K.; Islam, R. M.; Christian, T. J.; Bhave, P.; Praveen, P. S.; Panday, A. K.; Adhikari, S.; Rasmi, M.; Goetz, D.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Saikawa, E.; Yokelson, R. J.; Stone, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMASTE) field campaign targeted the in-situ characterization of widespread and under-sampled combustion sources in South Asia by determining emission factors (EF) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon, inorganic ions, trace metals, and organic species. Garbage burning had the highest EF PM2.5 among the sampled sources ranging 7-124 g kg-1, with maximum EFs for garbage burned under higher moisture conditions. Garbage burning emissions contained high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs) and heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Zn) that are associated with acute and chronic health effects. Triphenylbenzene and antimony (Sb) were unique to garbage burning are good candidates for tracing this source. Cook stove emissions varied largely by stove technology (traditional mud stove, 3-stone cooking fire, chimney stove, etc.) and biomass fuel (dung, hardwood, twigs, and mixtures thereof). Burning dung consistently emitted more PM2.5 than burning wood and contained characteristic fecal sterols and stanols. Motorcycle emissions were evaluated before and after servicing, which decreased EF PM2.5 from 8.8 g kg-1 to 0.7 g kg-1. Organic species analysis indicated that this reduction in PM2.5­ is largely due to a decrease in emission of motor oil. For brick kilns, the forced draft zig-zag kilns had higher EF PM2.5 (12-19 g kg-1) compared to clamp kilns (8-13 g kg-1) and also exhibited chemical differences. PM2.5 emitted from the zig-zag kiln were mainly OC (7%), sulfate (32%) and uncharacterized chemical components (60%), while clamp kiln emissions were dominated by OC (64%) and ammonium sulfate (36%). The quantitative emission factors developed in this study may be used for source apportionment and to update regional emission inventories.

  6. Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti, Part 2: Results from the Controlled Cooking Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lask, Kathleen; Jones, Jennifer; Booker, Kayje; Ceballos, Cristina; Yang, Nina; Gadgil, Ashok

    2011-11-30

    Five charcoal cookstoves were tested using a Controlled Cooking Test (CCT) developed from cooking practices in Haiti. Cookstoves were tested for total burn time, specific fuel consumption, and emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and the ratio of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO/CO2). These results are presented in this report along with LBNL testers’ observations regarding the usability of the stoves.

  7. Incentives for reducing emissions in Krakow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uberman, R.; Pierce, B.; Lazecki, A.

    1994-01-01

    This effort is identifying, specific incentives that may be used by Krakow city officials to encourage, residents to change the way they heat their homes and businesses in order to reduce pollution. This paper describes the incentives study for converting small coal or coke-fired boilers to gas in the Old Town area. A similar study looked at incentives for expanding the district heating system and future analyses will be performed for home stove options

  8. An encyclopedia on domestic electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    This book describes the footprint of domestic electrification with domestic energy and the role of electrification, basic knowledge on domestic electrification, the basic things electric equipment in domestic, materials, part and making, demand of electricity, electrification and life, various electric equipment in the kitchen, rationalization of house chore, environment and hygiene like electric iron, electric stove, electric mat and dining wagon, beauty treatment and health, refinement and entertainment and lighting in houses.

  9. Biomass resources assessment: Measuring family fuelwood consumption in Zimbabwe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brian MacGarry, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Two surveys are reported: one to test possible economic benefits to low-income urban households of using a charcoal stove for cooking, and the other covering both fuelwood collected and consumed over twelve months, in order to compare fuelwood consumption of households using a 'fuel-saving' mudstove with that of those using the more usual open hearth. The charcoal stove and charcoal as a fuel, although having desirable characteristics, do not offer an appreciable saving to current users of paraffin or most urban wood users. Consumption of paraffin was found to be 0.5 ± 0.21/household/day; of wood 7 ± 2kg/household/day and of charcoal 1.0 ± 0.4kg/household/day. Enquiries on woodfuel cost revealed that prices are influenced more by supply-side than demand-side factors, and that preferred fuel species constitute most (more than 61-91% depending on location) of the wood on sale in the streets of the suburbs surveyed. Rural users of both the mudstove and the open hearth consume about 7.5kg/household/day, although the mudstoves in question were five years old, and near the end of their useful life. Evidence of pressure on fuelwood resources and motivation towards using fuel-saving stoves appeared: only 61% of samples recorded were of preferred fuelwood species, and both collection and use patterns showed adaptations to less easily obtainable supplies. Measurements in both the rural and urban cases showed consumption per household is a more reliable basis for comparison than consumption per head. Simpler tests on recently built mud stoves are recommended and are currently being carried out. (author)

  10. Rethinking improved cookstove diffusion programs: A case study of social perceptions and cooking choices in rural Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielecki, Christopher; Wingenbach, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Promoters of improved cookstoves (ICSs) argue they provide the “triple benefits” of improving health outcomes, preserving local ecosystems, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The majority of ICS research reveals a strong pro-diffusion bias toward proving these benefits. Few studies have examined ICSs from the adopters' point-of-view. The purpose of this case study was to describe how culture and social perceptions affect the adoption and use of ICSs. Results showed that stoves in this rural Guatemalan community had several layers of practical importance beyond cooking food. Most prominently, household members valued stoves as heat and light sources, and as a social gathering point for families. Most ICS models have been purposely designed in controlled conditions to deliver maximum heating efficiency at the lowest production cost. However, this case study revealed that the fuel-efficient designs sacrificed important functional, social, and cultural needs. Efforts to increase adoption rates of ICSs will be more successful if the macro-level “triple benefits” paradigm is adapted to include functional consumer-centric benefits beyond heating food, such as providing heat and ambient light. Adoption programs should account for the cultural and social needs of users, such as recognizing that stoves often serve as a gathering point for families. - Highlights: • Social, functional, and cultural domains affected improved cookstove adoption rates. • The fuel-efficient designs of improved cookstoves sacrificed important practical needs. • Households valued stoves as heat and light sources, and as a social gathering point for families

  11. The development impact of solar cookers: A review of solar cooking impact research in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wentzel, Marlett; Pouris, Anastassios

    2007-01-01

    Solar cooking is often considered 'a solution looking for a problem'. Solar cookers have long been presented as an interesting solution to the world's problem of dwindling fuel wood sources and other environmental problems associated with wood fuel demand for cooking. However, recent GTZ field work in South Africa showed different benefits instead: the use of solar cookers resulted in appreciable fuel and time savings as well as increased energy security for households using commercial fuels. These observations are based on field tests in South Africa that started in 1996 to investigate the social acceptability of solar cookers and to facilitate local production and commercialisation of the technology. Impact studies and use rate studies have been carried out by a number of different organisations since the inception of the project and although commercialisation of the technology has not been achieved to its fullest potential, impact studies indicate that solar cookers have a positive development impact on households through fuel-, energy- and time savings. The article aims to summarise the findings of the various studies and present an overview of use rates and impact data. A variety of factors influence solar cooker use rates, which in turn determine impacts. Some factors are related to the user, some to the environment in which the cooker is used and some to the cooker itself. Ultimately, the data shows that on average, only 17% of solar cooker owners do not use their stoves after purchase and that active solar cooker users utilise their stoves on average for 31% of their cooking incidences. Since the majority of solar stove buyers actually use their stoves and obtain real benefits, this suggests that that solar cookers are indeed not a solution looking for a problem but a solution worth promoting

  12. Violates stem wood burning sustainable development?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeskleba-Dupont, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    friendly effects of substituting wood burning for fossil fuels. With reference to Bent Sørensen's classical work on 'Renewable Energy' the assumption of CO2-neutrality regarding incineration is problematised when applied to plants with long rotation periods as trees. Registered CO2-emissions from wood...... burning are characterised together with particle and PAH emissions. The positive treatment of wood stove-technology in the Danish strategy for sustainable development (draft 2007) is critically evaluated and approaches to better regulation are identified....

  13. Household air pollution following replacement of traditional open fire with an improved rocket type cookstove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochieng, Caroline; Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Tonne, Cathryn

    2017-02-15

    Cooking with biomass fuel is an important source of household air pollution (HAP) in developing countries, and a leading risk factor for ill-health. Although various designs of "improved cookstoves" (ICS) have been promoted as HAP interventions in these settings, few of them have undergone in-field evaluation, partly due to the challenge of conducting field measurements in remote settings. In this study we assessed the change in carbon monoxide (CO) exposure following the replacement of the traditional three-stone stove with a popular ICS in 49 homes in Western Kenya. We also assessed the suitability of using kitchen CO as a proxy for kitchen PM 2.5 . Reduction in 48h mean kitchen CO was 3.1ppm (95% CI: -8.1, 1.8) and in personal CO was 0.9ppm (95% CI: -4.3, 2.6) following stove replacements. Overall, 48-h kitchen and personal CO exposures were lower after stove replacement (28% and 12%, respectively) but with wide confidence intervals that also suggested possible increases in exposure. There were statistically significant reductions in peak kitchen and personal CO concentrations represented by the 8-h 95th percentile: reductions of 26.1ppm (95% CI: -44.6, -7.6) and 8.0ppm (95% CI: -12.2, -3.8), respectively. This is equivalent to 53% reduction in kitchen CO and 39% reduction in personal CO. We found good correlation between kitchen CO and PM 2.5 concentrations overall (r=0.73, n=33 over averaging periods approximating 1day), which varied by time of day and exposure setting. These variations limit the applicability of CO as a proxy measure for PM 2.5 concentrations. A combination of interventions, including better designed stoves, improved ventilation and cleaner fuels, may be needed to reduce HAP to levels that are likely to improve health. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. The "Stube" and its Heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atzbach, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of smoke-free heated living rooms between the Alps and the Norh Sea with a special focus on the tile stove. In the circum-Alpine zone, a new heating system was invented between the 8th and 11th century. It consisted of a clay cupola oven with inserted ceramic vess...... in the area between the Upper German speaking region and Southern Scandinavia until the 16th century...

  15. 78 FR 5209 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... vehicles and to keep them out of the stream of commerce; a wood-stove replacement project designed to... General U.S. DOJ--ENRD P.O. Box 7611 Washington, DC 20044-7611. During the public comment period, the... Library, U.S. DOJ--ENRD, P.O. Box 7611, Washington, DC 20044- 7611. Please enclose a check or money order...

  16. Annex 4 - Task 08/13 final report, Producing the binary uranium alloys with alloying components Al, Mo, Zr, Nb, and B; Prilog 4 - Zavrsni izvestaj o podzadatku 08/13, Dobijanje binarnih legura urana sa legirajucim komponentama Al, Mo, Zr, Nb i B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarevic, Dj [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Due to reactivity of uranium in contact with the gasses O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, especially under higher temperatures uranium processing is always done in vacuum or inert gas. Melting, alloying and casting is done in high vacuum stoves. This report reviews the type of furnaces and includes detailed description of the electric furnace for producing uranium alloys which is available in the Institute.

  17. Acquisition Modernization: Transitioning Technology Into Warfighter Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    to test and evaluate the technology and integrate the new capability into operational weapon systems (Figure 4). This funding model creates stove...misalignment between missions, TRLs, and the RDT&E funding model is a major 11 contributor to the valley of death. Technologies become obsolete on... funding model of the acquisition system. Create an individual budget account to fund the development of promising technologies. The Acquisition

  18. Welding of Armor. Summary of Ballistic Shock Test Results for 1/2, 3/8, 5/16 and 1/4 in. Homogeneous Armor ’H’ Plates Welded with Austenitic Electrodes and Tested at Aberdeen Proving Ground during the Period of 1 April 1943 through 31 March 1944

    Science.gov (United States)

    1945-02-15

    Fitigibbons Boiler Company Jones & Laughlin Carnegie-Illinois Great Lakes Youngstown Harnischfeger Lincoln Electric 3^35 2 Florence Stove...t r- k XX ~1 ot> o rirl H tnx> • • HHO CO OH • • • lOOlO i-tOi^ o s O OlOO • • • • mc\\jc\\j CTN ITM-fX) o • • • » LPir

  19. Vehicle-Dependent Disposition Kinetics of Fluoranthene in Fisher-344 Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Deacqunita L.; Hood, Darryl B.; Ramesh, Aramandla

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate how the vehicles of choice affect the pharmacokinetics of orally administered Fluoranthene [FLA] in rats. Fluoranthene is a member of the family of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon chemicals. Fluoranthene exposure to humans may occur as a result of cigarette smoking, consumption of contaminated food and water, heating woods in stoves and boilers, industrial sources such as coal gasification, carbon and graphite electrode manufacturing. Adult male Fis...

  20. Kitchen PM2.5 concentrations and child acute lower respiratory infection in Bhaktapur, Nepal: The importance of fuel type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Michael N; Pokhrel, Amod K; Chandyo, Ram K; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Mathisen, Maria; Basnet, Sudha; Strand, Tor A; Burnett, Richard T; Smith, Kirk R

    2018-02-01

    Globally, solid fuels are used by about 3 billion people for cooking and a smaller number use kerosene. These fuels have been associated with acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) in children. Previous work in Bhaktapur, Nepal, showed comparable relationships of biomass and kerosene cooking fuels with ALRI in young children, compared to those using electricity for cooking. We examine the relationship of kitchen PM 2.5 concentrations to ALRI in those households. ALRI cases and age-matched controls were enrolled from a cohort of children 2-35 months old. 24-h PM 2.5 was measured once in each participant's kitchen. The main analysis was carried out with conditional logistic regression, with PM 2.5 measures specified both continuously and as quartiles. In the kitchens of 393 cases and 431 controls, quartiles of increasing PM 2.5 concentration were associated with a monotonic increase in odds ratios (OR): 1.51 (95% CI: 1.00, 2.27), 2.22 (1.47, 3.34), 2.48 (1.63, 3.77), for the 3 highest exposure quartiles. The general kitchen concentration-response shape across all stoves was supralinear. There was evidence for increased risk with biomass stoves, but the slope for kerosene stoves was steeper, the highest quartile OR being 5.36 (1.35, 21.3). Evidence for increased risk was also found for gas stoves. Results support previous reports that biomass and kerosene cooking fuels are both ALRI risk factors, but suggests that PM 2.5 from kerosene is more potent on a unit mass basis. Further studies with larger sample sizes and preferably using electricity as the baseline fuel are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. In pursuit of a light bulb and a smokeless kitchen : longitudinal analysis of the role of energy sector policies to alleviate rural energy poverty in India

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, S.

    2012-01-01

    After more than six decades of development planning, the majority of India’s population,especially those living in villages, continue to wait for access to energy forms that enable them to switch on an electric light bulb and to cook food on a clean stove in a smokeless kitchen. India is a country of extreme economic and social contrasts, a situation that poses sustainability and development problems of varying magnitudes linked to its scale and geographical diversity. The rapidly growing eco...

  2. The Energy Conservation Guide 98/99; ENOEK guiden 99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Norwegians have the world's largest electricity consumption per capita. This booklet aims to advice house owners on efficient use of energy. The main sections discuss the concept of energy conservation in general, heating, stoves and fireplaces, central heating, insulation and sealing, windows, hot water, water saving, lighting, domestic appliances, ventilation, outdoor facilities, and finally gives some tips on investments and profitability and how to obtain expert advice. The booklet is profusely illustrated.

  3. Morphology, composition, and mixing state of primary particles from combustion sources ? crop residue, wood, and solid waste

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Lei; Kong, Shaofei; Zhang, Yinxiao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Liang; Yan, Qin; Lingaswamy, A. P.; Shi, Zongbo; Lv, Senlin; Niu, Hongya; Shao, Longyi; Hu, Min; Zhang, Daizhou; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Xiaoye

    2017-01-01

    Morphology, composition, and mixing state of individual particles emitted from crop residue, wood, and solid waste combustion in a residential stove were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our study showed that particles from crop residue and apple wood combustion were mainly organic matter (OM) in smoldering phase, whereas soot-OM internally mixed with K in flaming phase. Wild grass combustion in flaming phase released some Cl-rich-OM/soot particles and cardboard combusti...

  4. Biomass Cookstoves Technical Meeting. Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-05-01

    In regions where biomass is a traditional fuel for cooking, improved cookstoves can enhance indoor air quality, personal health, livelihoods, and the environment—while substantially reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Although ongoing efforts have successfully disseminated improved stoves that achieve many of these benefits, substantially greater emissions reductions are needed to comply with international guidelines for indoor air quality and to limit GHG emissions like black carbon.

  5. Personality and Politics: The Untold Story of Robert S. McNamara and Curtis E. Lemay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    against the shiny stove fender, while the frost snapped and crackled outside. The larder was a vague mystery which Pop didn’t bother to penetrate...their aircraft to fill out forms, grab food and refill coffee . In addition, he found the offloading of coal to be a complex and challenging task...issue of auto safety and the use of seat belts. In that hearing, John O. Moore, who had completed Automotive Crash Injury Research at Cornell

  6. Biodigestor for organic waste gas; Biodigestor para o gas do lixo organico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Carla Miranda; Fernandes, Carla Barbosa; Souza, Aline Vieira da Silva e; Melo, Cibelly Caroliny Santos; Sales, Jefferson Santos; Frade, Marcelo Lorenzo; Machado, Marcus Vinicius; Frade, Matheus Costa; Gomes, Natashua Lauar; Costa, Pedro Henrique de Andrade; Moraes, Rodrigo de Almeida; Estrella, Thales Goncalves; Lima, Miriam Cristina Pontello Barbosa [Centro Universitario de Belo Horizonte (UniBH), MG (Brazil)], e-mails: carlam.ferreira@yahoo.com.br, miriam.pontello@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    This article to present an alternative reuse os the gas produced by garbage, through the construction of a digester, with a view to preserving the environment through renewable energy. The energy produced by this system is obtained from the decomposition of organic waste is biogas, made up of gases such as methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This experiment verifies the possibility of using methane gas as an alternative to the operation of a domestic stove. (author)

  7. Compilation of air-pollutant emission factors. Volume 1. Stationary point and area sources. Fourth edition. Supplement D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyner, W.M.

    1991-09-01

    In the Supplement to the Fourth Edition of AP-42, new or revised emissions data are presented for Natural Gas Combustion; Residential Fireplaces, Residential Wood Stoves; Refuse Combustion; Nonindustrial Surface Coating; Waste Water Collection, Treatment and Storage; Polyvinyl Chloride and Polypropylene; Poly(ethylene terephthalate); Polystyrene; Ammonium Phosphates; Portland Cement Manufacturing; Sand and Gravel Processing; Western Surface Coal Mining; Wildfires and Prescribed Burning; Wet Cooling Towers and Industrial Flares

  8. A Hair & a Fungus: Showing Kids the Size of a Microbe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Dana L.

    2013-01-01

    A simple method is presented to show kids the size of a microbe--a fungus hypha--compared to a human hair. Common household items are used to make sterile medium on a stove or hotplate, which is dispensed in the cells of a weekly plastic pill box. Mold fungi can be easily and safely grown on the medium from the classroom environment. A microscope…

  9. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    A collection of magazine articles which focus on solar energy is presented. This is the final book of the four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. The articles include brief discussions on energy topics such as the sun, ocean energy, methane gas from cow manure, and solar homes. Instructions for constructing a sundial and a solar stove are also included. A glossary of energy related terms is provided. (BCS)

  10. Efficiency and emissions of charcoal use in the improved Mbaula cookstove

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaoma, J.; Kasali, G.B.; Ellegaard, A.

    1994-01-01

    An improved chamber method was used to evaluate the thermal performance and emission characteristics of charcoal in an unvented cookstove known as the Improved Mbaula. Emission factors and rates for pollutants, burn rate and stove efficiency were determined. The pollutants that were continuously monitored were carbon monoxide (CO), sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), and respirable suspended particulates (RSP). Concentrations of CO, nitrogen oxides and RSP in the test chamber (a simulated kitchen) reached levels in excess of guidelines recommended in industrialized countries. Concentrations of SO 2 did not exceed known levels. If the test chamber actually is a good simulation of a common kitchen, the levels reached warrant concern for the health of people exposed, mostly women and children. Levels of pollution in actual kitchens will be assessed in a later study. The adjustable opening of the stove proved effective in regulating the burn rate. At half air input, burn rate decreased by about 40%, while emissions increased by about 60% compared to operation at full air input. Emissions of CO were 340 g/kg charcoal at full air input, which was taken to be the normal mode of operation. The average thermal efficiency (PHU) of the improved mbaula was 25% compared to 29% for the traditional charcoal stove. 16 refs, 4 figs, 12 tabs

  11. Urban household energy consumption in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pongsapich, Amara; Wongsekiarttirat, Wathana (Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand). Social Research Inst.)

    1994-05-01

    This study was aimed at developing a better understanding of urban household energy consumption in Thailand through a series of in-depth household energy surveys. Households in urban areas used electricity, LPG, charcoal and fuelwood. Traditional biomass fuels such as husk and dung, as well as kerosene, were essentially not used in urban households. Nearly all households used electricity and most households used LPG. Some households used more than one fuel for cooking, particularly LPG and charcoal. There was a great difference in electricity used between the households in Bangkok and other urban areas. Most households in the study areas used LPG stove or burners for cooking. But charcoal stoves were also used by many households for specific culinary purposes. Electric rice-cookers are widely used for convenience. The study suggests that the number of households using charcoal stoves will decrease gradually and fuelwood use will disappear. Saturation rates for refrigerators and colour television sets were very high and air conditioners were common in Bangkok. Some users may be unaware of the benefits of LPG as a cooking fuel. To improve indoor air quality and cooking safety and reduce pressures on forests from commercial fuelwood use, measures to promote LPG should be undertaken. The government should also provide information about efficient appliances and electricity conservation. (Author)

  12. FY 2000 report on the basic survey to promote Joint Implementation, etc. Survey on the energy conservation of the Lianyuan Iron and Steel Group Complex, China; 2000 nendo kyodo jisshi nado suishin kiso chosa hokokusho. Lianyuan tekko sho energy chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    For the purpose of conserving energy and reducing greenhouse effect gas emission, a feasibility study was carried out of the installation of energy conservation facilities at the steelworks of Lianyuan Iron and Steel Group Complex, Loudi City, Hunan Province, China. The installation of the following facilities was studied: coke dry quenching (CDQ) equipment, coal moisture control (CMC) equipment, sintering ignition furnace equipment, cooler exhaust heat recovery equipment, top pressure recovery turbine (TRT), and hot stove exhaust heat recovery equipment. As a result of the study, the energy conservation amount was 20,000 toe/y by CDQ, 2,530 toe/y by CMC, 900 toe/y by improvement of ignition furnace in the sintering process, 12,300 toe/y by sintering cooler, 13,200 toe/y by TRT, and 10,300 toe/y by hot stove exhaust heat recovery equipment. Further, the amount of greenhouse effect gas reduction was 61,022 t-CO2/y, 7,843 t-CO2/y, 2,896 t-CO2/y, 38,060 t-CO2/y, 55,295 t-CO2/y, and 40,621 t-CO2/y, respectively. In the estimation of effects vs. expenses, the sintering ignition furnace, sintering cooler exhaust heat recovery, and hot stove exhaust heat recovery indicated the comparatively favorable values. (NEDO)

  13. Cooking with Fire: The Mutagenicity- and PAH-Emission ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions from solid fuels used for cooking cause ~4 million premature deaths per year. Advanced solid-fuel cookstoves are a potential solution, but they should be assessed by appropriate performance indicators, including biological effects. We evaluated two categories of solid-fuel cookstoves for 8 pollutant- and 4 mutagenicity-emission factors, correlated the mutagenicity-emission factors, and compared them to those of other combustion emissions. We burned red oak in a 3-stone fire (TSF), a natural-draft stove (NDS), and a forced-draft stove (FDS); we combusted propane as a liquified petroleum gas control fuel. We determined emission factors based on useful energy (megajoules delivered, MJd) for carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides (NOx), black carbon, methane, total hydrocarbons, 32 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PM2.5, levoglucosan (a wood-smoke marker), and mutagenicity in Salmonella. Other than NOx the emission factors per MJd correlated highly among each other (r2 ≥ 0.92); NOx correlated 0.58-0.76 with the other emission factors. Excluding NOx, the NDS and FDS reduced the emission factors on average 68 and 92%, respectively, relative to the TSF. Nonetheless, the mutagenicity-emission factor based on fuel energy used (MJthermal) for the most efficient stove (FDS) was intermediate to that of a large diesel bus engine and a small diesel generator. Both mutagenicity- and pollutant-emission factors may be informative for characterizing cookstove

  14. Efficiency and emissions of charcoal use in the improved Mbaula cookstove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaoma, J; Kasali, G B [Building and Industrial Minerals Research Unit, National Council for Scientific Research, (Zambia); Ellegaard, A [Stockholm Environment Inst. (Sweden)

    1994-12-31

    An improved chamber method was used to evaluate the thermal performance and emission characteristics of charcoal in an unvented cookstove known as the Improved Mbaula. Emission factors and rates for pollutants, burn rate and stove efficiency were determined. The pollutants that were continuously monitored were carbon monoxide (CO), sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), and respirable suspended particulates (RSP). Concentrations of CO, nitrogen oxides and RSP in the test chamber (a simulated kitchen) reached levels in excess of guidelines recommended in industrialized countries. Concentrations of SO{sub 2} did not exceed known levels. If the test chamber actually is a good simulation of a common kitchen, the levels reached warrant concern for the health of people exposed, mostly women and children. Levels of pollution in actual kitchens will be assessed in a later study. The adjustable opening of the stove proved effective in regulating the burn rate. At half air input, burn rate decreased by about 40%, while emissions increased by about 60% compared to operation at full air input. Emissions of CO were 340 g/kg charcoal at full air input, which was taken to be the normal mode of operation. The average thermal efficiency (PHU) of the improved mbaula was 25% compared to 29% for the traditional charcoal stove. 16 refs, 4 figs, 12 tabs

  15. Study of the feasibility of mixing Refuse Derived Fuels with wood pellets through the grey and Fuzzy theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J.C.; Miguez, J.L.; Porteiro, J.; Patino, D.; Granada, E.; Collazo, J. [Universidad de Vigo E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende, s/n. Dpto. Ing. Mecanica Maquinas y Motores Termicos, 36200 Vigo (Pontevedra) (Spain)

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents a combined grey relational and fuzzy analysis for the evaluation of the environmental feasibility of burning mixtures of pellet and RDF (Refuse Derived Fuel) in a small pellet boiler-stove. RDF is obtained from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) and contains a biomass fraction and a non-organic fraction (plastic). As a first step, both fuels are characterized to define their properties. A special feeding system is also used to improve the stove plant and to facilitate pellet distribution, which maintains a constant rate between the two fuels. Small scale energy converters, such as chimneys, boilers, stoves, etc., which produce heat and/or hot water by burning biomass (wood, pellets, briquettes, etc.), are especially suited to domestic purposes. However, in common commercial combustion conditions, this kind of use still has some disadvantages: some emissions (volatile organic carbons, carbon monoxide or NO{sub x}) may still be high, and it is difficult to compare the quality and performance of equipment working in very different combustion conditions. The grey relational analysis of different energy and emission variables leads to the definition of a new single variable called the grey relational grade (GRG). Thus, evaluation and optimisation of complicated multiple responses can be converted into the optimisation of a standardised single variable. The aim of the work is to research the most feasible mixture of pellets according to a grey relational analysis, taking into consideration energy-related, financial and environmental aspects. (author)

  16. Final Report: Wireless Instrument for Automated Measurement of Clean Cookstove Usage and Black Carbon Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukac, Martin [Cirrus Sense LLC, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ramanathan, Nithya [Cirrus Sense LLC, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Graham, Eric [Cirrus Sense LLC, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2013-09-10

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from traditional cooking fires and other sources are significant anthropogenic drivers of radiative forcing. Clean cookstoves present a more energy-efficient and cleaner-burning vehicle for cooking than traditional wood-burning stoves, yet many existing cookstoves reduce emissions by only modest amounts. Further research into cookstove use, fuel types, and verification of emissions is needed as adoption rates for such stoves remain low. Accelerated innovation requires techniques for measuring and verifying such cookstove performance. The overarching goal of the proposed program was to develop a low-cost, wireless instrument to provide a high-resolution profile of the cookstove BC emissions and usage in the field. We proposed transferring the complexity of analysis away from the sampling hardware at the measurement site and to software at a centrally located server to easily analyze data from thousands of sampling instruments. We were able to build a low-cost field-based instrument that produces repeatable, low-cost estimates of cookstove usage, fuel estimates, and emission values with low variability. Emission values from our instrument were consistent with published ranges of emissions for similar stove and fuel types.

  17. Prototype Combined Heater/Thermoelectric Power Generator for Remote Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champier, D.; Favarel, C.; Bédécarrats, J. P.; Kousksou, T.; Rozis, J. F.

    2013-07-01

    This study presents a prototype thermoelectric generator (TEG) developed for remote applications in villages that are not connected to the electrical power grid. For ecological and economic reasons, there is growing interest in harvesting waste heat from biomass stoves to produce some electricity. Because regular maintenance is not required, TEGs are an attractive choice for small-scale power generation in inaccessible areas. The prototype developed in our laboratory is especially designed to be implemented in stoves that are also used for domestic hot water heating. The aim of this system is to provide a few watts to householders, so they have the ability to charge cellular phones and radios, and to get some light at night. A complete prototype TEG using commercial (bismuth telluride) thermoelectric modules has been built, including system integration with an electric DC/DC converter. The DC/DC converter has a maximum power point tracker (MPPT) driven by an MC9SO8 microcontroller, which optimizes the electrical energy stored in a valve-regulated lead-acid battery. Physical models were used to study the behavior of the thermoelectric system and to optimize the performance of the MPPT. Experiments using a hot gas generator to simulate the exhaust of the combustion chamber of a stove are used to evaluate the system. Additionally, potential uses of such generators are presented.

  18. EL FOGÓN ABIERTO DE TRES PIEDRAS EN LA PENÍNSULA DE YUCATÁN: TRADICIÓN Y TRANSFERENCIA TECNOLÓGICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citlalli Cantú Gutiérrez

    2012-06-01

    In Mexico and particularly on the Yucatan peninsula, the use of the three-stone open fire cook stove and fire wood fuel is a phenomenon of great importance due to the number of people using it, its historical-cultural background and its meaning within the complex of traditional technologies. Its current existence represents a process of autonomy of the indigenous, peasant and poor populations with respect to the hegemonic networks of conventional sources of energy. Based on observations of 4000 households in 39 locations in Yucatan and Quintana Roo, Mexico, this article describes the characteristics of the open fire cook stove as well as the preferred types of firewood. It analyzes the transfer of technology and describes the process of delivery of open fire cook stoves by the federal government in Yucatan, interpreting it as a carbon subsidy policy for both local capitalist industry and developed countries, and as a way of neutralizing traditional autonomy and the efforts of organized civil society to promote participatory and community development.

  19. Fiscal 1998 research report on the feasibility study on energy conservation of Zaporozhye steelworks; Zaporozhye seitetsusho sho energy 1998 nendo chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    For the Japan-Russia joint project, this report summarizes the feasibility study results on improvement of waste heat recovery at blast furnace hot stoves (recovery of sensible heat of exhaust gas by water or other heat media, and use of preheating combustion air and fuel gas), improvement of the thermal efficiency of slabbing soaking furnaces (optimization of burner combustion by improving control of an air fuel ratio, and heat patterns in heating), and other operational improvement for Zaporozhye steelworks, Ukraine (2,370,000t/y in crude steel production). As the field survey result, various other energy-saving issues were found in addition to the above 2 themes. 9 projects thus were identified in blast furnace, steel making, rolling and energy fields as follows: improvement of combustion control at hot stoves, waste heat recovery equipment for hot stoves, blast furnace top pressure recovery turbine (TRT) power generation equipment, blast furnace top gas recovery equipment, changeover from an open hearth furnace to a basic oxygen furnace, adoption of continuous casting, improvement of slab yield in slabbing, shortening of a track time, drop of insertion temperature in direct hot charge rolling, and the gas turbine cogeneration plant. (NEDO)

  20. Investigations of combustion process in combined cooker-boiler fired on solid fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljković Dragoslava D.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to make some reconstructions on the existing stove used for cooking and baking and to obtain the combined cooker-boiler which will fulfill the demands of European standard EN 12815. Implementation of modern scientific achievements in the field of combustion on stoves and furnaces fired on solid fuels was used. During the investigations four various constructions were made with different fresh air inlet and secondary air supply with the intention to obtain more complete combustion with increased efficiency and reduced CO emission. Three different fuels were used: firewood, coal, and wood briquette. A numerous parameters were measured: fuel weight changes during the combustion process, temperature of inlet and outlet water, flue gas composition (O2, CO, SO2, CO2, NOx, flue gas temperature, ash quantity etc. The result of the investigations is the stove with the efficiency of more than 75% - boiler Class 1 (according EN 12815 and CO emission of about 1% v/v. The results obtained during the measurements were used as parameters for modeling of combustion process. .