WorldWideScience

Sample records for storage technical progress

  1. Critical experiments supporting close proximity water storage of power reactor fuel. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, M.N.; Hoovler, G.S.; Eng, R.L.; Welfare, F.G.

    1979-07-01

    Close-packed storage of LWR fuel assemblies is needed in order to expand the capacity of existing underwater storage pools. This increased capacity is required to accommodate the large volume of spent fuel produced by prolonged onsite storage. To provide benchmark criticality data in support of this effort, 20 critical assemblies were constructed that simulated a variety of close-packed LWR fuel storage configurations. Criticality calculations using the Monte Carlo KENO-IV code were performed to provide an analytical basis for comparison with the experimental data. Each critical configuration is documented in sufficient detail to permit the use of these data in validating calculational methods according to ANSI Standard N16.9-1975

  2. AFR spent fuel storage program. Technical progress report, January 1981-March 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Work on this project is focused on developing design and licensing information for the model facility. Deliverables were submitted to DOE for facility modification, security design, and licensing documentation. Work is essentially complete on the high-density rack design with deliverable planned for April 30, 1981. A continuing program for completion of design and licensing information development was initiated by AGNS in February 1981. Progress to date is satisfactory

  3. Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Storage Technical Team is to accelerate research and innovation that will lead to commercially viable hydrogen-storage technologies that meet the U.S. DRIVE Partnership goals.

  4. Critical experiments supporting close proximity water storage of power reactor fuel. Technical progress report, July 1, 1978-September 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, M.N.; Hoovler, G.S.; Eng, R.L.; Welfare, F.G.

    1978-11-01

    Experimental measurements are being taken on critical configurations of clusters of fuel rods mocking up LWR-type fuel elements in close proximity water storage. The results will serve to benchmark the computer codes used in designing nuclear power reactor fuel storage racks. KENO calculations of Cores I to VI are within two standard deviations of the measured k/sub eff/ values.

  5. Critical experiments supporting underwater storage of tightly packed configurations of spent fuel pins. Technical progress report, January 1-March 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoovler, G.S.; Baldwin, M.N.

    1981-04-01

    Critical experiments are in progress on arrays of 2 1/2% enriched UO 2 fuel pins simulating underwater pin storage of spent power reactor fuel. Pin storage refers to a spent fuel storage concept in which the fuel assemblies are dismantled and the fuel pins are tightly packed into specially designed canisters. These experiments are providing benchmark data with which to validate nuclear codes used to design spent fuel pin storage racks

  6. Hydrogen storage - are we making progress?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, L.; Milliken, J.; Satyapal, S.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The efficient storage of hydrogen in compact, lightweight systems that allow greater than 300-mile range has been identified as one of the major technical challenges facing the practical commercialization of fuel cell power systems for light-duty vehicles. Following the hydrogen vision announced by President Bush in his 2003 State of the Union address, the U.S. Department of Energy issued a Grand Challenge, soliciting ideas from universities, national laboratories, and industry. DOE's National Hydrogen Storage Project, an aggressive and innovative research program focused on materials R and D, will be launched in Fiscal Year 2005. An intensive effort is also underway in the private sector, both in the U.S. and abroad, to meet the challenging on-board hydrogen storage requirements. A historical perspective of hydrogen storage research and development will be provided and the current DOE technical targets for hydrogen storage systems will be discussed. The state-of-the-art in hydrogen storage will be summarized and recent progress assessed. Finally future research directions and areas of technical emphasis will be described. (author)

  7. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes experimental and theoretical work in basic nuclear physics carried out between October 1, 1995, the closing of our last Progress Report, and September 30, 1996 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under contracts DE-FG03-93ER-40774 and DE-FG03-95ER-40913 with the United States Department of Energy. The experimental contract supports broadly-based experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics. This report includes results from studies of Elementary Systems involving the study of the structure of the nucleon via polarized high-energy positron scattering (the HERMES experiment) and lower energy pion scattering from both polarized and unpolarized nucleon targets. Results from pion- and kaon-induced reactions in a variety of nuclear systems are reported under the section heading Meson Reactions; the impact of these and other results on understanding the nucleus is presented in the Nuclear Structure section. In addition, new results from scattering of high-energy electrons (from CEBAF/TJNAF) and pions (from KEK) from a broad range of nuclei are reported in the section on Incoherent Reactions. Finally, the development and performance of detectors produced by the laboratory are described in the section titled Instrumentation

  8. Technical study gas storage. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borowka, J.; Moeller, A.; Zander, W.; Koischwitz, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    This study will answer the following questions: (a) For what uses was the storage facility designed and for what use is it currently applied? Provide an overview of the technical data per gas storage facility: for instance, what is its capacity, volume, start-up time, etc.; (b) How often has this facility been used during the past 10 years? With what purpose was the facility brought into operation at the time? How much gas was supplied at the time from the storage facility?; (c) Given the characteristics and the use of the storage facility during the past 10 years and projected gas consumption in the future, how will the storage facility be used in the future?; (d) Are there other uses for which the gas storage facility can be deployed, or can a single facility be deployed for numerous uses? What are the technical possibilities in such cases? Questions (a) and (b) are answered separately for every storage facility. Questions (c) and (d) in a single chapter each (Chapter 2 and 3). An overview of the relevant storage data relating to current use, use in the last 10 years and use in future is given in the Annex

  9. Technical-economic study of electricity storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harriche, Farah; Souletis, Romain; Carrette, Bertille; Jarry, Gregory; Dereuddre, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    This study first reports an analysis of all services which could be provided by storage to the French electric power system. It proposes an overview of existing technologies, a comparison of their technical characteristics, and a synthesis of technologies which are the most suited to the main services. The author then discusses some regulatory evolutions which are necessary for a good development of the power storage sector in France. An economic scenario is then proposed for the development of storage by 2030. The author indicates expected capacities for each technologies and possible valorisations

  10. Technical progress and climatic change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ausubel, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    The global warming debate has neglected and thus underestimated the importance of technical change in considering reduction in greenhouse gases and adaptation to climate change. Relevant quantitative cases of long-run technical change during the past 100 years are presented in computing, communications, transport, energy, and agriculture. A noteworthy technological trajectory is that of decarbonization, or decreasing carbon intensity of primary energy. If human societies have not yet reached the end of the history of technology, the cost structure for mitigation and adaptation changes could be cheap. (Author)

  11. Progress report : Technical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalaraman, C.P.; Deshpande, R.Y.

    1978-01-01

    The research and development work carried out in the Technical Physics Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, is reported. Some of the achievements are: (1) fabrication of mass spectrometers for heavy water analysis and lithium 6/7 isotope ratio measurement, (2) fabrication of electronic components for mass spectrometers, (3) growing of sodium iodide crystals for radiation detectors, (4) development of sandwich detectors comprising of NaI(Tl) and CaI(Na), (5) fabrication of mass spectrometer type leak detectors and (6) fabrication of the high vacuum components of the vacuum system of the variable energy cyclotron based at Calcutta. (M.G.B.)

  12. FY2013 Energy Storage R&D Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-02-01

    The FY 2013 Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D focuses on advancing the development of batteries to enable a large market penetration of hybrid and electric vehicles. Program targets focus on overcoming technical barriers to enable market success including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost, (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability), (3) reducing battery weight & volume, and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush.

  13. FY2011 Progress Report for Energy Storage Research & Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-01-31

    The FY 2011 Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D focuses on advancing the development of batteries to enable a large market penetration of hybrid and electric vehicles. Program targets focus on overcoming technical barriers to enable market success including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost, (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability), (3) reducing battery weight & volume, and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush.

  14. 48 CFR 2052.211-71 - Technical progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Technical progress report... Technical progress report. As prescribed at 2011.104-70(b), the contracting officer shall insert the... solicitation. Technical Progress Report (JAN 1993) The contractor shall provide a monthly Technical Progress...

  15. National Waste Terminal Storage Program. Progress report, October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asher, J.M.

    1978-04-01

    The National Waste Terminal Storage Program Report comprises five sections: technical projects, facility projects, planning and analysis, regulatory affairs, and public affairs. Progress made in these areas during the period October 1, 1976, to September 30, 1977, is reported

  16. Tracking Progress in Carbon Capture and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-06

    At the second Clean Energy Ministerial in Abu Dhabi, April 2011 (CEM 2), the Carbon Capture, Use and Storage Action Group (CCUS AG) presented seven substantive recommendations to Energy Ministers on concrete, near-term actions to accelerate global carbon capture and storage (CCS) deployment. Twelve CCUS AG governments agreed to advance progress against the 2011 recommendations by the third Clean Energy Ministerial (London, 25-26 April 2012) (CEM 3). Following CEM 2, the CCUS AG requested the IEA and the Global CCS Institute to report on progress made against the 2011 recommendations at CEM 3. Tracking Progress in Carbon Capture and Storage: International Energy Agency/Global CCS Institute report to the third Clean Energy Ministerial responds to that request. The report considers a number of key questions. Taken as a whole, what advancements have committed CCUS AG governments made against the 2011 recommendations since CEM 2? How can Energy Ministers continue to drive progress to enable CCS to fully contribute to climate change mitigation? While urgent further action is required in all areas, are there particular areas that are currently receiving less policy attention than others, where efforts could be redoubled? The report concludes that, despite developments in some areas, significant further work is required. CCS financing and industrial applications continue to represent a particularly serious challenge.

  17. FY2014 Energy Storage R&D Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-03-01

    The Energy Storage research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for projects focusing on batteries for plug-in electric vehicles. Program targets focus on overcoming technical barriers to enable market success including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost, (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability), (3) reducing battery weight & volume, and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush. This report describes the progress made on the research and development projects funded by the Energy Storage subprogram in 2014. You can download individual sections at the following website, http://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/downloads/vehicle-technologies-office-2014-energy-storage-rd-annual-report.

  18. Technical progress and its strategic consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, G.

    1999-01-01

    The history of energy during recent decades has shown that technical progress can have consequences for the organisation of markets, company strategies and the economy in general, confounding all forecasts and going beyond simple technical change. As a consequence for example, improvements in the techniques concerning the exploration and production of hydrocarbons have led to the petrol 'counter-crisis', the reduction in the power of OPEC and undreamed of gains in wealth for certain countries. The progress in gas turbines has led to the reversal of the age-old tendency towards increases in the size of electricity production units and encouraged the liberation of this sector. When looking at the future it is therefore judicious to try and understand the forces at work, and the major trends which result. This is the aim of the articles in this edition of the Revue de l'Energie, published on the occasion of the European colloquium on 'Technical progress faced with the challenges of the energy sector in the future' organised by the Association of Energy Economists. (authors)

  19. Progress report and technical evaluation of the ISCR pilot test conducted at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Centralia, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-01-14

    In October, 2007, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented the document Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau of Environmental Remediation (KDHE/BER), for a proposed non-emergency Interim Measure (IM) at the site of the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Centralia, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The IM was recommended to mitigate existing levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the vadose zone soils beneath the former facility and in the groundwater beneath and in the vicinity of the former facility, as well as to moderate or decrease the potential future concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in the groundwater. The Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) was developed in accordance with the KDHE/BER Policy No.BERRS-029, Policy and Scope of Work: Interim Measures (KDHE 1996). The hydrogeologic, geochemical, and contaminant distribution characteristics of the Centralia site, as identified by the CCC/USDA, factored into the development of the nonemergency IM proposal. These characteristics were summarized in the Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) and were discussed in detail in previous Argonne reports (Argonne 2002a, 2003, 2004, 2005a,b,c, 2006a,b, 2007b). The identified remedial goals of the proposed IM were as follows: (1) To reduce the existing concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater in three 'hot spot' areas identified at the site (at SB01, SB05, and SB12-MW02; Figure 1.2) to levels acceptable to the KDHE. (2) To reduce carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the soils near the location of former soil boring SB12 and existing monitoring well MW02 (Figure 1.2) to levels below the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (RBSL) of 200 {micro}g/kg for this contaminant. To address these goals, the potential application of an in situ chemical reduction (ISCR) treatment technology

  20. International linear collider. A technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Ned [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States); Aderhold, Sebastian [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Adolphsen, Chris [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R and D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

  1. Progress in electrical energy storage system:A critical review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haisheng Chen; Thang Ngoc Cong; Wei Yang; Chunqing Tan; Yongliang Li; Yulong Ding

    2009-01-01

    Electrical energy storage technologies for stationary applications are reviewed.Particular attention is paid to pumped hydroelectric storage,compressed air energy storage,battery,flow battery,fuel cell,solar fuel,superconducting magnetic energy storage, flywheel, capacitor/supercapacitor,and thermal energy torage.Comparison is made among these technologies in terms of technical characteris-tics,applications and deployment status.

  2. Energy Storage Annual Progress Report for FY15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, Ahmad [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ban, Chunmei [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cao, Lei [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Graf, Peter [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Keyser, Matt [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kim, Gi-Heon [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Santhanagopalan, Shriram [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saxon, Aron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Shi, Ying [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Smith, Kandler [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tenent, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yang, Chuanbo [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Chao [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The Energy Storage research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for projects focusing on batteries for plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in support of the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge. PEVs could have a significant impact on the nation's goal of reducing dependence on imported oil and gaseous pollutant emissions. The Energy Storage program targets overcoming technical barriers to enable market success, including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost; (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability); (3) reducing battery weight and volume; and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) supports the VTO's Energy Storage program by evaluating the thermal performance of cells and packs, developing electrochemical-thermal models to accelerate the design cycle for developing batteries, investigating the behavior of lithium-ion batteries under abuse conditions such as crush, enhancing the durability of electrodes by coatings such as atomic layer deposition, synthesis of materials for higher energy density batteries, and conducting techno-economic analysis of batteries in various electric-drive vehicles. This report describes the progress made by NREL on the research and development projects funded by the DOE VTO Energy Storage subprogram in FY15.

  3. Electrochemical Energy Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    This U.S. DRIVE electrochemical energy storage roadmap describes ongoing and planned efforts to develop electrochemical energy storage technologies for plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs). The Energy Storage activity comprises a number of research areas (including advanced materials research, cell level research, battery development, and enabling R&D which includes analysis, testing and other activities) for advanced energy storage technologies (batteries and ultra-capacitors).

  4. the effects of unavailability of technical storage facilities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unavailability of the technical storage facilities to the marketing of fruits and vegetables for economic ... vegetables are important profitable small-scale juice enterprises (Thomson,. 1990). ..... Knott's handbook for vegetables growers. 2nd ed.

  5. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hua, T. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lasher, S. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, Kurtis [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, J. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Technical report describing DOE's second assessment report on a third generation (Gen3) system capable of storing hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures within a pressure vessel on-board a vehicle. The report includes an overview of technical progress to date, including the potential to meet DOE onboard storage targets, as well as independent reviews of system cost and energy analyses of the technology paired with delivery costs.

  6. Sludge Treatment Evaluation: 1992 Technical progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, L.J.; Felmy, A.R.; Ding, E.R.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents Fiscal Year 1992 technical progress on the Sludge Treatment Evaluation Task, which is being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of this task is to develop a capability to predict the performance of pretreatment processes for mixed radioactive and hazardous waste stored at Hanford and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Significant cost savings can be achieved if radionuclides and other undesirable constituents can be effectively separated from the bulk waste prior to final treatment and disposal. This work is initially focused on chemical equilibrium prediction of water washing and acid or base dissolution of Hanford single-shell tank (SST) sludges, but may also be applied to other steps in pretreatment processes or to other wastes. Although SST wastes contain many chemical species, there are relatively few constituents -- Na, Al, NO 3 , NO 2 , PO 4 , SO 4 , and F -- contained in the majority of the waste. These constituents comprise 86% and 74% of samples from B-110 and U-110 SSTS, respectively. The major radionuclides of interest (Cs, Sr, Tc, U) are present in the sludge in small molal quantities. For these constituents, and other important components that are present in small molal quantities, the specific ion-interaction terms used in the Pitzer or NRTL equations may be assumed to be zero for a first approximation. Model development can also be accelerated by considering only the acid or base conditions that apply for the key pretreatment steps. This significantly reduces the number of chemical species and chemical reactions that need to be considered. Therefore, significant progress can be made by developing all the specific ion interactions for a base model and an acid dissolution model

  7. Sludge Treatment Evaluation: 1992 Technical progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, L J; Felmy, A R; Ding, E R

    1993-01-01

    This report documents Fiscal Year 1992 technical progress on the Sludge Treatment Evaluation Task, which is being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of this task is to develop a capability to predict the performance of pretreatment processes for mixed radioactive and hazardous waste stored at Hanford and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Significant cost savings can be achieved if radionuclides and other undesirable constituents can be effectively separated from the bulk waste prior to final treatment and disposal. This work is initially focused on chemical equilibrium prediction of water washing and acid or base dissolution of Hanford single-shell tank (SST) sludges, but may also be applied to other steps in pretreatment processes or to other wastes. Although SST wastes contain many chemical species, there are relatively few constituents -- Na, Al, NO[sub 3], NO[sub 2], PO[sub 4], SO[sub 4], and F -- contained in the majority of the waste. These constituents comprise 86% and 74% of samples from B-110 and U-110 SSTS, respectively. The major radionuclides of interest (Cs, Sr, Tc, U) are present in the sludge in small molal quantities. For these constituents, and other important components that are present in small molal quantities, the specific ion-interaction terms used in the Pitzer or NRTL equations may be assumed to be zero for a first approximation. Model development can also be accelerated by considering only the acid or base conditions that apply for the key pretreatment steps. This significantly reduces the number of chemical species and chemical reactions that need to be considered. Therefore, significant progress can be made by developing all the specific ion interactions for a base model and an acid dissolution model.

  8. Works Technical Department progress report, March 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1961-04-19

    This document details the activities of the Savannah River Works Technical Department during the month of March 1961. Topics discussed are: Reactor Technology, Separations Technology, Engineering Assistance, Health Physics, Laboratories Overview, and Technical Papers Issued.

  9. Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium. Quarterly technical progress report, May 1--July 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Progress is reported on research projects related to the following: Electronic resource library; Environment, safety, and health; Communication, education, training, and community involvement; Nuclear and other materials; and Reporting, evaluation, monitoring, and administration. Technical studies investigate remedial action of high explosives-contaminated lands, radioactive waste management, nondestructive assay methods, and plutonium processing, handling, and storage.

  10. Economic and technical feasibility study of compressed air storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-03-01

    The results of a study of the economic and technical feasibility of compressed air energy storage (CAES) are presented. The study, which concentrated primarily on the application of underground air storage with combustion turbines, consisted of two phases. In the first phase a general assessment of the technical alternatives, economic characteristics and the institutional constraints associated with underground storage of compressed air for utility peaking application was carried out. The goal of this assessment was to identify potential barrier problems and to define the incentive for the implementation of compressed air storage. In the second phase, the general conclusions of the assessment were tested by carrying out the conceptual design of a CAES plant at two specific sites, and a program of further work indicated by the assessment study was formulated. The conceptual design of a CAES plant employing storage in an aquifer and that of a plant employing storage in a conventionally excavated cavern employing a water leg to maintain constant pressure are shown. Recommendations for further work, as well as directions of future turbo-machinery development, are made. It is concluded that compressed air storage is technically feasible for off-peak energy storage, and, depending on site conditions, CAES plants may be favored over simple cycle turbine plants to meet peak demands. (LCL)

  11. Technical progress by major task. Semiannual technical progress report, September 29, 1997 - March 29, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The technical progress achieved during the period 29 September 1997 through 29 March 1998 on Contract DE-AC03-91SF18852 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Ancillary Activities is described in this report. The report is organized by program task structure: spacecraft integration and liaison; engineering support; safety; qualified unicouple production; RTG fabrication, assembly, and test; ground support equipment; RTG shipping and launch support; designs, reviews, and mission applications; project management, quality assurance, reliability, contract changes, CAGO acquisition (operating funds), and CAGO maintenance and repair

  12. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Technical Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KRAHN, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this section is to explain the meaning of logical connectors with specific examples. Logical connectors are used in Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) to discriminate between, and yet connect, discrete Conditions, Required Actions, Completion Times, Surveillances, and Frequencies. The only logical connectors that appear in TSRs are AND and OR. The physical arrangement of these connectors constitutes logical conventions with specific meanings

  13. Solar lease grant program. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    Progress on a lease program for the installation of a solar water heater with no installation charge is reported. Information on the announcement of the program, the selection of participants, the contractural agreement, progress on installation of equipment, monitoring, and evaluation is summarized. The status of the budget concerned with the program is announced. Forms used for applications for the program and an announcement from Resource Alternatives for Cilco customers are presented.

  14. Technical basis for storage of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel in inert gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1983-09-01

    The technical bases to establish safe conditions for dry storage of Zircaloy-clad fuel are summarized. Dry storage of fuel with zirconium alloy cladding has been licensed in Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, and Switzerland. Dry storage demonstrations, hot cell tests, and modeling have been conducted using Zircaloy-clad fuel. The demonstrations have included irradiated boiling water reactor, pressurized heavy-water reactor, and pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies. Irradiated fuel has been emplaced in and retrieved from metal casks, dry wells, silos, and a vault. Dry storage tests and demonstrations have involved about 15,000 fuel rods, and about 5600 rods have been monitored during dry storage in inert gases with maximum cladding temperatures ranging from 50 to 570 0 C. Although some tests and demonstrations are still in progress, there is currently no evidence that any rods exposed to inert gases have failed (one PWR rod exposed to an air cover gas failed at about 270 0 C). Based on this favorable experience, it is concluded that there is sufficient information on fuel rod behavior, storage conditions, and potential cladding failure mechanisms to support licensing of dry storage in the US. This licensing position includes a requirement for inert cover gases and a maximum cladding temperature guideline of 380 0 C for Zircaloy-clad fuel. Using an inert cover gas assures that even if fuel with cladding defects were placed in dry storage, or if defects develop during storage, the defects would not propagate. Tests and demonstrations involving Zircaloy-clad rods and assemblies with maximum cladding temperatures above 400 0 C are in progress. When the results from these tests have been evaluated, the viability of higher temperature limits should be examined. Acceptable conditions for storage in air and dry storage of consolidated fuel are issues yet to be resolved

  15. Technical and economic feasibility of thermal storage. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelpuk, B.; Joy, P.; Crouthamel, M.

    1977-06-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of various thermal energy storage alternatives is determined by comparing the system performance and annualized cost which result from each storage alternative operating with the same solar collector model, the same building load model, and the same heating system and controls model. Performance and cost calculations are made on the basis of an hour-by-hour time step using actual weather bureau data for Albuquerque, N. M., and New York City for a single six-month heating season. The primary approach to comparing various storage alternatives is to allow the collector area and storage mass to vary until a minimum cost combination is achieved. In the Albuquerque location collector area of 325 ft/sup 2/, water storage mass of 12.5 lb/ft/sup 2/ of collector area, and phase change mass of 6.25 lb/ft/sup 2/ of collector area results in minimum cost systems, each of which delivers about 50% of the total building demand. The primary conclusion is that, using current costs for materials and containers, water is the cheapest storage alternative for heating applications in both Albuquerque and New York City. The cost of containing or encapsulating phase change materials, coupled with their small system performance advantage, is the main reason for this conclusion. The use of desiccant materials for thermal storage is considered to be impractical due to irreversibilities in thermal cycling.

  16. Nuclear theory research. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Progress is briefly described on the following studies: (1) Dirac phenomenology for deuteron elastic scattering, (2) Dirac wave functions in nuclear distorted wave calculations, (3) impulse approximation for p→p → dπ + reaction above the 3-3 resonance, (4) coherent π production, (5) nuclear potentials from Dirac bound state wavefunctions, (6) nonlocality effects in nuclear reactions, (7) unhappiness factors in DWBA description of (t,p) and (p,t) reactions, (8) absolute normalization of three-nucleon transfer reactions, (9) formulation of a finite-range CCBA computer program, (10) crossing symmetric solutions of the low equations, (11) pion scattering from quark bags, (12) study of the p 11 channel in the delta model, (13) isovector corrections in pion-nucleus scattering, (14) pionic excitation of nuclear giant resonances, and (15) isospin dependence of the second-order pion-nucleus optical potential

  17. Progress report [of] Technical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijendran, P.; Deshpande, R.Y.

    1975-01-01

    Activities of the Technical Physics Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, over the last few years are reported. This division is engaged in developing various technologies supporting the development of nuclear technology. The various fields in which development is actively being carried out are : (i) vacuum technology, (ii) mass spectrometry, (iii) crystal technology, (iv) cryogenics, and (v) magnet technology. For surface studies, the field emission microscope and the Auger electron spectrometer and other types of spectrometers have been devised and perfected. Electromagnets of requisite strength to be used in MHD programme and NMR instruments are being fabricated. Various crystals such as NaI(Tl), Ge, Fluorides, etc. required as windows and prisms in X and gamma-ray spectroscopy, have been grown. In the cryogenics field, expansion engines required for air liquefaction plants, vacuum insulated dewars, helium gas thermometers etc. have been constructed. In addition to the above, the Division provides consultancy and training to personnel from various institutions and laboratories. Equipment and systems perfected are transferred to commercial organizations for regular production. (A.K.)

  18. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, H L

    2007-01-01

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 612 (A612) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2006). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., drum crushing, size reduction, and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A612 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A612 fenceline is approximately 220 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A612 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage

  19. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, H L

    2007-09-07

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 612 (A612) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2006). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., drum crushing, size reduction, and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A612 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A612 fenceline is approximately 220 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A612 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage

  20. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laycak, D.T.

    2010-01-01

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2009). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting

  1. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laycak, D T

    2008-06-16

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the 'Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities' (DSA) (LLNL 2008). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas

  2. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities May 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laycak, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-04-16

    This document contains the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Building 693 (B693) Yard Area of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) at LLNL. The TSRs constitute requirements for safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analyses for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2011). The analysis presented therein concluded that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts of waste from other DOE facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities.

  3. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities May 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laycak, D. T.

    2014-01-01

    This document contains the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Building 693 (B693) Yard Area of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) at LLNL. The TSRs constitute requirements for safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analyses for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2011). The analysis presented therein concluded that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts of waste from other DOE facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities.

  4. FY2015 Energy Storage R&D Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-04-30

    The Energy Storage research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for projects focusing on batteries for plug-in electric vehicles. Program targets focus on overcoming technical barriers to enable market success including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost, (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability), (3) reducing battery weight & volume, and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush.

  5. Iowa Hill Pumped Storage Project Investigations - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, David [Sacramento Municipal Unitlity District, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This Final Technical Report is a summary of the activities and outcome of the Department of Energy (DOE) Assistance Agreement DE-EE0005414 with the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). The Assistance Agreement was created in 2012 to support investigations into the Iowa Hill Pumped-storage Project (Project), a new development that would add an additional 400 MW of capacity to SMUD’s existing 688MW Upper American River Hydroelectric Project (UARP) in the Sierra Nevada mountains east of Sacramento, California.

  6. Flexible energy-storage devices: design consideration and recent progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianfu; Lu, Xihong; Liu, Bin; Chen, Di; Tong, Yexiang; Shen, Guozhen

    2014-07-23

    Flexible energy-storage devices are attracting increasing attention as they show unique promising advantages, such as flexibility, shape diversity, light weight, and so on; these properties enable applications in portable, flexible, and even wearable electronic devices, including soft electronic products, roll-up displays, and wearable devices. Consequently, considerable effort has been made in recent years to fulfill the requirements of future flexible energy-storage devices, and much progress has been witnessed. This review describes the most recent advances in flexible energy-storage devices, including flexible lithium-ion batteries and flexible supercapacitors. The latest successful examples in flexible lithium-ion batteries and their technological innovations and challenges are reviewed first. This is followed by a detailed overview of the recent progress in flexible supercapacitors based on carbon materials and a number of composites and flexible micro-supercapacitors. Some of the latest achievements regarding interesting integrated energy-storage systems are also reviewed. Further research direction is also proposed to surpass existing technological bottle-necks and realize idealized flexible energy-storage devices. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A monitored retrievable storage facility: Technical background information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The US government is seeking a site for a monitored retrievable storage facility (MRS). Employing proven technologies used in this country and abroad, the MRS will be an integral part of the federal system for safe and permanent disposal of the nation's high-level radioactive wastes. The MRS will accept shipments of spent fuel from commercial nuclear power plants, temporarily store the spent fuel above ground, and stage shipments of it to a geologic repository for permanent disposal. The law authorizing the MRS provides an opportunity for a state or an Indian tribe to volunteer to host the MRS. The law establishes the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator, who is to seek a state or an Indian tribe willing to host an MRS at a technically-qualified site on reasonable terms, and is to negotiate a proposed agreement specifying the terms and conditions under which the MRS would be developed and operated at that site. This agreement can ensure that the MRS is acceptable to -- and benefits -- the host community. The proposed agreement must be submitted to Congress and enacted into law to become effective. This technical background information presents an overview of various aspects of a monitored retrievable storage facility, including the process by which it will be developed

  8. Swallowable Wireless Capsule Endoscopy: Progress and Technical Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guobing Pan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE offers a feasible noninvasive way to detect the whole gastrointestinal (GI tract and revolutionizes the diagnosis technology. However, compared with wired endoscopies, the limited working time, the low frame rate, and the low image resolution limit the wider application. The progress of this new technology is reviewed in this paper, and the evolution tendencies are analyzed to be high image resolution, high frame rate, and long working time. Unfortunately, the power supply of capsule endoscope (CE is the bottleneck. Wireless power transmission (WPT is the promising solution to this problem, but is also the technical challenge. Active CE is another tendency and will be the next geneion of the WCE. Nevertheless, it will not come true shortly, unless the practical locomotion mechanism of the active CE in GI tract is achieved. The locomotion mechanism is the other technical challenge, besides the challenge of WPT. The progress about the WPT and the active capsule technology is reviewed.

  9. Quarterly technical progress report, February 1, 1996--April 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-28

    This report from the Amarillo National REsource Center for PLutonium provides research highlights and provides information regarding the public dissemination of information. The center is a a scientific resource for information regarding the issues of the storage, disposition, potential utilization and transport of plutonium, high explosives, and other hazardous materials generated from nuclear weapons dismantlement. The center responds to informational needs and interpretation of technical and scientific data raised by interested parties and advisory groups. Also, research efforts are carried out on remedial action programs and biological/agricultural studies.

  10. Technical Progress of the New Worlds Observer Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Amy; Noecker, C.; Cash, W.; NWO Study Team

    2009-01-01

    We report on the technical progress of the New Worlds Observer (NWO) mission concept. NWO is a two spacecraft mission that is capable of detecting and characterizing extra-solar, terrestrial planets and planetary systems. NWO consists of an external starshade and an UV-optical space telescope, flying in tandem. The starshade is a petal-shaped, opaque screen that creates an extremely dark shadow large enough to shade the telescope aperture from the target star. The NWO team has been addressing the top technology challenges of the concept, and report here our progress. We will present the current mission configuration best suited to address Terrestrial Planet Finding requirements, and highlight the technological breakthroughs that we have achieved this year. In particular, we will report on progress made in precision deployables for the large starshade, and the trajectory & alignment control system for NWO. We will also briefly highlight advances in understanding the starshade optical performance.

  11. Technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, D.R.

    1976-02-01

    This study provides a first-look at the system elements involved in: (1) creating a market; (2) understanding and deriving the requirements; (3) performing analytical effort; (4) specifying equipment; and (5) synthesizing applications for a thermal energy storage (TES) function. The work reviews implicated markets, energy consumption patterns, TES technologies, and applications. Further, several concepts are developed and evaluated in some detail. Key findings are: (1) there are numerous technical opportunities for TES in the residential and industrial market sectors; (2) apart from sensible heat storage and transfer, significant R and D is required to fully exploit the superior heat densities of latent heat-based TES systems, particularly at temperatures above 600/sup 0/F; (3) industrial energy conservation can be favorably impacted by TES where periodic or batch-operated unit functions characterize product manufacturing processes, i.e. bricks, steel, and ceramics; and (4) a severe data shortage exists for describing energy consumption rates in real time as related to plant process operations--a needed element in designing TES systems.

  12. Technical progress safeguards future. Technischer Fortschritt sichert die Zukunft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    'Technical progress safeguards future', the guiding theme of the 1985 conference of German engineers, calls for discussion. In five lectures representatives of the subdivisions of 'VDI' issued their statements from the viewpoints of their special fields. These lectures were completed by reports on the part of the remaining VDI subdivisions, which are published together with the lectures in this volume. The complex guiding theme is meant to stimulate discussion, which should be conducted also with representatives of other sciences and the public. The volume contains a.o. contributions regarding future prospects, given certain modifications in construction engineering and user behaviour in the sector heating and air-conditioning, regarding the development of new construction techniques to protect the environment, and regarding clean air as an international concern of engineers. For these three contributions separate entries were made. Other presentations relate to: automobile production technology; energy supply as an engineering task; information, invention, innovation as stages of technical progress; progress in materials technology; noise of motor vehicles - current state and future prospects. (orig./HSCH).

  13. Technical analysis of photovoltaic/wind systems with hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakić Vukman V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The technical analysis of a hybrid wind-photovoltaic energy system with hydrogen gas storage was studied. The market for the distributed power generation based on renewable energy is increasing, particularly for the standalone mini-grid applications. The main design components of PV/Wind hybrid system are the PV panels, the wind turbine and an alkaline electrolyzer with tank. The technical analysis is based on the transient system simulation program TRNSYS 16. The study is realized using the meteorological data for a Typical Metrological Year (TMY for region of Novi Sad, Belgrade cities and Kopaonik national park in Serbia. The purpose of the study is to design a realistic energy system that maximizes the use of renewable energy and minimizes the use of fossil fuels. The reduction in the CO2 emissions is also analyzed in the paper. [Acknowledgment. This paper is the result of the investigations carried out within the scientific project TR33036 supported by the Ministry of Science of the Republic of Serbia.

  14. International Linear Collider-A Technical Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsen, Eckhard; /DESY; Harrison, Mike; /Brookhaven; Hesla, Leah; /Fermilab; Ross, Marc; /Fermilab; Royole-Degieux, Perrine; /Paris, IN2P3; Takahashi, Rika; /KEK, Tsukuba; Walker, Nicholas; /DESY; Warmbein, Barbara; /DESY; Yamamoto, Akira; /KEK, Tsukuba; Yokoya, Kaoru; /KEK, Tsukuba; Zhang, Min; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

    2011-11-04

    The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

  15. Engineered Materials for Cesium and Strontium Storage Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sean M. McDeavitt

    2010-04-14

    Closing the nuclear fuel cycle requires reprocessing spent fuel to recover the long-lived components that still have useful energy content while immobilizing the remnant waste fission products in stable forms. At the genesis of this project, next generation spent fuel reprocessing methods were being developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. One of these processes was focused on solvent extraction schemes to isolate cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) from spent nuclear fuel. Isolating these isotopes for short-term decay storage eases the design requirements for long-term repository disposal; a significant amount of the radiation and decay heat in fission product waste comes from Cs-137 and Sr-90. For the purposes of this project, the Fission Product Extraction (FPEX) process is being considered to be the baseline extraction method. The objective of this project was to evaluate the nature and behavior of candidate materials for cesium and strontium immobilization; this will include assessments with minor additions of yttrium, barium, and rubidium in these materials. More specifically, the proposed research achieved the following objectives (as stated in the original proposal): (1) Synthesize simulated storage ceramics for Cs and Sr using an existing labscale steam reformer at Purdue University. The simulated storage materials will include aluminosilicates, zirconates and other stable ceramics with the potential for high Cs and Sr loading. (2) Characterize the immobilization performance, phase structure, thermal properties and stability of the simulated storage ceramics. The ceramic products will be stable oxide powders and will be characterized to quantify their leach resistance, phase structure, and thermophysical properties. The research progressed in two stages. First, a steam reforming process was used to generate candidate Cs/Sr storage materials for characterization. This portion of the research was carried out at

  16. Engineered Materials for Cesium and Strontium Storage. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDeavitt, Sean M.

    2010-01-01

    Closing the nuclear fuel cycle requires reprocessing spent fuel to recover the long-lived components that still have useful energy content while immobilizing the remnant waste fission products in stable forms. At the genesis of this project, next generation spent fuel reprocessing methods were being developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. One of these processes was focused on solvent extraction schemes to isolate cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) from spent nuclear fuel. Isolating these isotopes for short-term decay storage eases the design requirements for long-term repository disposal; a significant amount of the radiation and decay heat in fission product waste comes from Cs-137 and Sr-90. For the purposes of this project, the Fission Product Extraction (FPEX) process is being considered to be the baseline extraction method. The objective of this project was to evaluate the nature and behavior of candidate materials for cesium and strontium immobilization; this will include assessments with minor additions of yttrium, barium, and rubidium in these materials. More specifically, the proposed research achieved the following objectives (as stated in the original proposal): (1) Synthesize simulated storage ceramics for Cs and Sr using an existing labscale steam reformer at Purdue University. The simulated storage materials will include aluminosilicates, zirconates and other stable ceramics with the potential for high Cs and Sr loading. (2) Characterize the immobilization performance, phase structure, thermal properties and stability of the simulated storage ceramics. The ceramic products will be stable oxide powders and will be characterized to quantify their leach resistance, phase structure, and thermophysical properties. The research progressed in two stages. First, a steam reforming process was used to generate candidate Cs/Sr storage materials for characterization. This portion of the research was carried out at Purdue

  17. Environmental Research Division technical progress report, January 1984-December 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    Technical progress in the various research and assessment activities of Argonne National Laboratory's Environmental Research Division is reported for the period 1984 to 1985. Textual, graphic, and tabular information is used to briefly summarize (in separate chapters) the work of the Division's Atmospheric Physics, Environmental Effects Research, Environmental Impacts, Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry, and Waste Management Programs. Information on professional qualifications, awards, and outstanding professional activities of staff members, as well as lists of publications, oral presentations, special events organized, and participants in educational programs, are provided in appendices at the end of each chapter

  18. Environmental Research Division technical progress report, January 1984-December 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    Technical progress in the various research and assessment activities of Argonne National Laboratory's Environmental Research Division is reported for the period 1984 to 1985. Textual, graphic, and tabular information is used to briefly summarize (in separate chapters) the work of the Division's Atmospheric Physics, Environmental Effects Research, Environmental Impacts, Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry, and Waste Management Programs. Information on professional qualifications, awards, and outstanding professional activities of staff members, as well as lists of publications, oral presentations, special events organized, and participants in educational programs, are provided in appendices at the end of each chapter.

  19. Carbon Capture and Storage: Progress and Next Steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Two years after the G8 leaders commitment to the broad deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) by 2020, significant progress has been made towards commercialisation of CCS technologies. Yet the 2008 Hokkaido G8 recommendation to launch 20 large-scale CCS demonstration projects by 2010 remains a challenge and will require that governments and industry accelerate the pace toward achieving this critical goal. This is one of the main findings of a new report by the International Energy Agency (IEA), the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF), and the Global CCS Institute, to be presented to G8 leaders at their June Summit in Muskoka, Canada.

  20. FY2012 Progress Report for Energy Storage Research & Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    FY 2012 annual report of the energy storage research and development effort within the VT Office. An important step for the electrification of the nation’s light duty transportation sector is the development of more cost-effective, long lasting, and abuse-tolerant PEV batteries. In fiscal year 2012, battery R&D work continued to focus on the development of high-energy batteries for PEVs and very high power devices for hybrid vehicles. This document provides a summary and progress update of the VTP battery R&D projects that were supported in 2012.

  1. Site safety progress review of spent fuel central interim storage facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurpinar, A.; Serva, L.; Giuliani

    1995-01-01

    Following the request of the Czech Power Board (CEZ) and within the scope of the Technical Cooperation Project CZR/9/003, a progress review of the site safety of the Spent Fuel Central Interim Storage Facility (SFCISF) was performed. The review involved the first two stages of the works comprising the regional survey and identification of candidate sites for the underground and surface storage options. Five sites have been identified as a result of the previous works. The following two stages will involved the identification of the preferred candidate sites for the two options and the final site qualification. The present review had the purpose of assessing the work already performed and making recommendations for the next two stages of works

  2. Research Progress in Carbon Dioxide Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Keliang; Wang, Gang; Lu, Chunjing

    2018-02-01

    With the rapid development of global economy, human beings have become highly dependent upon fossil fuel such as coal and petroleum. Much fossil fuel is consumed in industrial production and human life. As a result, carbon dioxide emissions have been increasing, and the greenhouse effects thereby generated are posing serious threats to environment of the earth. These years, increasing average global temperature, frequent extreme weather events and climatic changes cause material disasters to the world. After scientists’ long-term research, ample evidences have proven that emissions of greenhouse gas like carbon dioxide have brought about tremendous changes to global climate. To really reduce carbon dioxide emissions, governments of different countries and international organizations have invested much money and human resources in performing research related to carbon dioxide emissions. Manual underground carbon dioxide storage and carbon dioxide-enhanced oil recovery are schemes with great potential and prospect for reducing carbon dioxide emissions. Compared with other schemes for reducing carbon dioxide emissions, aforementioned two schemes exhibit high storage capacity and yield considerable economic benefits, so they have become research focuses for reducing carbon dioxide emissions. This paper introduces the research progress in underground carbon dioxide storage and enhanced oil recovery, pointing out the significance and necessity of carbon dioxide-driven enhanced oil recovery.

  3. Underground storage tank - Integrated Demonstration Technical Task Plan master schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.M.

    1994-08-01

    This document provides an integrated programmatic schedule (i.e., Master Schedule) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) Program. It includes top-level schedule and related information for the DOE Office of Technology Development (EM-50) UST-ID activities. The information is based upon the fiscal year (FY) 1994 technical task plans (TTPS) and has been prepared as a baseline information resource for program participants. The Master Schedule contains Level 0 and Level 1 program schedules for the UST-ID Program. This document is one of a number of programmatic documents developed to support and manage the UST-ID activities. It is composed of the following sections: Program Overview - provides a summary background of the UST-ID Program. This summary addresses the mission, scope, and organizational structure of the program; Activity Description - provides a programmatic description of UST-ID technology development activities and lists the key milestones for the UST-ID systems. Master Schedules - contains the Level 0 and Level 1 programmatic schedules for the UST-ID systems. References - lists the UST-ID programmatic documents used as a basis for preparing the Master Schedule. The appendixes contain additional details related to site-specific technology applications

  4. Nonequilibrium photochemical reactions induced by lasers. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinfeld, J.I.

    1978-04-01

    Research has progressed in six principal subject areas of interest to DOE advanced (laser) isotope separation efforts. These are (1) Infrared double resonance spectroscopy of molecules excited by multiple infrared photon absorption, particularly SF 6 and vinyl chloride. (2) Infrared multiphoton excitation of metastable triplet-state molecules, e.g., biacetyl. (3) An Information Theory analysis of multiphoton excitation and collisional deactivation has been carried out. (4) The mechanism of infrared energy deposition and multiphoton-induced reactions in chlorinated ethylene derivatives; and RRKM (statistical) model accounts for all observed behavior of the system, and a deuterium-specific reaction pathway has been identified. (5) Diffusion-enhanced laser isotope separation in N 16 O/N 18 O. (6) A technical evaluation of laser-induced chemistry and isotope separation

  5. Spent fuel storage facility at science and technical center 'Sosny': Experience of ten years activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigrinov, S.; Goulo, V.; Lunev, A.; Belousov, N.; Salnikov, L.; Boiko, L.

    2000-01-01

    Spent fuel storage of the Academic Science and Technical Center in Minsk is in operation already more then 10 years. In the paper aspects of its design, operation practice, problems and decisions for future are discussed. (author)

  6. Energy storage. Stakes, technical solutions and valorization opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-03-01

    As a key factor to allow the continuous growth of renewable energies, energy storage technologies are now more than ever in the spotlight. In order to grasp the stakes, understand the technology diversity, learn relevant orders of magnitudes and comprehend the close intricacy of energy storage with energy and environmental issues, ENEA has published a detailed and well-documented publication on the subject

  7. Technical and Economic Assessment of Storage Technologies for Power-Supply Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Meiwes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating power generation from renewable energies such as wind and photovoltaic are a technical challenge for grid stability. Storage systems are an option to stabilise the grid and to maximise the utilisation factors of renewable power generators. This paper analyses the state of the art of storage technologies, including a detailed life cycle cost comparison. Beside this, benefits of using storage systems in electric vehicles are analysed and quantified. A comprehensive overview of storage technologies as well as possible applications and business cases for storage systems is presented. 

  8. FY 1992 work plan and technical progress reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-11-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is a division of the University of Nevada System devoted to multidisciplinary scientific research. For more than 25 years, DRI has conducted research for the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Field Office (DOE/NV) in support of operations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). During that time, the research program has grown from an early focus on hydrologic studies to include the areas of geology, archaeology, environmental compliance and monitoring, statistics, database management, public education, and community relations. The range of DRI`s activities has also expanded to include a considerable amount of management and administrative support in addition to scientific investigations. DRI`s work plan for FY 1992 reflects a changing emphasis in DOE/NV activities from nuclear weapons testing to environmental restoration and monitoring. Most of the environmental projects from FY 1991 are continuing, and several new projects have been added to the Environmental Compliance Program. The Office of Technology Development Program, created during FY 1991, also includes a number of environmental projects. This document contains the FY 1992 work plan and quarterly technical progress reports for each DRI project.

  9. Comparison study of the technical characteristics and financial analysis of electric battery storage systems for residential grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palivos, Marios; Vokas, Georgios A.; Anastasiadis, Anestis; Papageorgas, Panagiotis; Salame, Chafic

    2018-05-01

    One of the major energy issues of our days is reliable and effective energy generation and supply of electricity grids. In recent years there has been experienced a rapid development and implementation of Renewable Energy Sources (RES) worldwide. On one hand, many Gigawatts of grid-connected renewables are being installed and on the other many Megawatts of hybrid renewable systems for residential use are being installed making use of electric battery systems, in order to cover all daily energy and power needs during. New types of batteries are being developed and many companies have made great progress providing a variety of electricity storage products. The purpose of this research is firstly to highlight the necessity and also the importance of the use of energy storage systems and secondly, through detailed technical and financial simulation analysis using HOMER Pro-optimization software, to compare the technical characteristics and performance of energy storage systems by various leading companies when installed in a residential renewable energy system with a specific load and at the same time to provide the most efficient system economically. Results concerning the operation and the choice of a storage system are derived.

  10. Technical framework to facilitate foreign spent fuel storage and geologic disposal in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, L.J.; Halsey, W.G.; Cmith, C.F.

    2000-01-01

    The option of storage and eventual geologic disposal in Russia of spent fuel of US origin used in Taiwan provides a unique opportunity that can benefit many parties. Taiwan has a near term need for a spent fuel storage and geologic disposal solution, available financial resources, but limited prospect for a timely domestic solution. Russia has significant spent fuel storage and transportation management experience, candidate storage and repository sites, but limited financial resources available for their development. The US has interest in Taiwan energy security, national security and nonproliferation interests in Russian spent fuel storage and disposal and interest in the US origin fuel. While it is understood that such a project includes complex policy and international political issues as well as technical issues, the goal of this paper is to begin the discussion by presenting a technical path forward to establish the feasibility of this concept for Russia

  11. Offshore Storage Resource Assessment - FINAL SCIENTIFIC/TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, Bill [NITEC LLC; Ozgen, Chet [NITEC LLC

    2017-12-13

    The DOE developed volumetric equation for estimating Prospective Resources (CO2 storage) in oil and gas reservoirs was utilized on each depleted field in the Federal GOM. This required assessment of the in-situ hydrocarbon fluid volumes for the fields under evaluation in order to apply the DOE equation. This project utilized public data from the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) Reserves database and from a well reputed, large database (250,000+ wells) of GOM well and production data marketed by IHS, Inc. IHS interpreted structure map files were also accessed for a limited number of fields. The databases were used along with geological and petrophysical software to identify depleted oil and gas fields in the Federal GOM region. BOEM arranged for access by the project team to proprietary reservoir level maps under an NDA. Review of the BOEM’s Reserves database as of December 31, 2013 indicated that 675 fields in the region were depleted. NITEC identified and rank these 675 fields containing 3,514 individual reservoirs based on BOEM’s estimated OOIP or OGIP values available in the Reserves database. The estimated BOEM OOIP or OGIP values for five fields were validated by an independent evaluation using available petrophysical, geologic and engineering data in the databases. Once this validation was successfully completed, the BOEM ranked list was used to calculate the estimated CO2 storage volume for each field/reservoir using the DOE CO2 Resource Estimate Equation. This calculation assumed a range for the CO2 efficiency factor in the equation, as it was not known at that point in time. NITEC then utilize reservoir simulation to further enhance and refine the DOE equation estimated range of CO2 storage volumes. NITEC used a purpose built, publically available, 4-component, compositional reservoir simulator developed under funding from DOE (DE-FE0006015) to assess CO2-EOR and CO2 storage in 73 fields/461 reservoirs. This

  12. Storage ring at HIE-ISOLDE Technical design report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grieser, M.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Raabe, R.; Blaum, K.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Butler, P. A.; Wenander, F.; Woods, P. J.; Aliotta, M.; Andreyev, A.; Artemyev, A.; Atanasov, D.; Aumann, T.; Balabanski, D.; Barzakh, A.; Batist, L.; Bernardes, A. -P.; Bernhardt, D.; Billowes, J.; Bishop, S.; Borge, M.; Borzov, I.; Boston, A. J.; Brandau, C.; Catford, W.; Catherall, R.; Cederkall, J.; Cullen, D.; Davinson, T.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dracoulis, G.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Egelhof, P.; Estrade, A.; Fischer, D.; Flanagan, K.; Fraile, L.; Fraser, M. A.; Freeman, S. J.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Greenlees, P.; Grisenti, R. E.; Habs, D.; von Hahn, R.; Hagmann, S.; Hausmann, M.; He, J. J.; Heil, M.; Huyse, M.; Jenkins, D.; Jokinen, A.; Jonson, B.; Joss, D. T.; Kadi, Y.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kay, B. P.; Kiselev, O.; Kluge, H. -J.; Kowalska, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kreim, S.; Kroell, T.; Kurcewicz, J.; Labiche, M.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lestinsky, M.; Lotay, G.; Ma, X. W.; Marta, M.; Meng, J.; Muecher, D.; Mukha, I.; Mueller, A.; Murphy, A. St J.; Neyens, G.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Noertershaeuser, W.; Page, R. D.; Pasini, M.; Petridis, N.; Pietralla, N.; Pfuetzner, M.; Podolyak, Z.; Regan, P.; Reed, M. W.; Reifarth, R.; Reiter, P.; Repnow, R.; Riisager, K.; Rubio, B.; Sanjari, M. S.; Savin, D. W.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schippers, S.; Schneider, D.; Schuch, R.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Shubina, D.; Siesling, E.; Simon, H.; Simpson, J.; Smith, J.; Sonnabend, K.; Steck, M.; Stora, T.; Stoehlker, T.; Sun, B.; Surzhykov, A.; Suzaki, F.; Tarasov, O.; Trotsenko, S.; Tu, X. L.; Van Duppen, P.; Volpe, C.; Voulot, D.; Walker, P. M.; Wildner, E.; Winckler, N.; Winters, D. F. A.; Wolf, A.; Xu, H. S.; Yakushev, A.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yuan, Y. J.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zuber, K.; Bosch, F.M.

    We propose to install a storage ring at an ISOL-type radioactive beam facility for the first time. Specifically, we intend to setup the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored secondary beams

  13. Spent nuclear fuel storage: Legal, technical and political considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, E.L. Jr.; Buren, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    In 1982, Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), assigning responsibility to the Department of Energy (DOE) for the development and implementation of a comprehensive national nuclear waste management program. The NWPA makes clear that the generators and owners of commercially-generated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) have the primary responsibility to provide for, and pay the costs of, the interim storage of such SNF until it is accepted by the DOE under the provisions of the NWPA. The shift in responsibility was expected to begin in 1998, the date specified in the NWPA and the DOE's contracts with the utilities, at which time the NWPA anticipated commencement of operations of a geologic repository and/or a monitored retrievable storage facility (MRS). Unfortunately, despite a mid-course correction to the NWPA mandated by Congress in 1987 in an effort to streamline and accelerate the program, DOE is way behind schedule. DOE's last published program schedule indicates the commencement of repository operations in 2010, a date many feel is overly optimistic. In repeated statements during the early 1990s, DOE sought to reassure utility companies and their regulatory commissions that it could still commence SNF acceptance in 1998 for storage at an MRS if such a facility were sited through a voluntary process by the end of 1992. That date has now come and gone. Although DOE is still nominally seeking a voluntary MRS host jurisdiction, the prospects for MRS operation by 1998 are dim. Putting aside for the moment the question of DOE's ability to bring the repository on line, the immediate problem facing domestic utilities is the need to augment their onsite SNF storage capacity. In addition to providing a brief overview of the Federal independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) licensing process, the author provides some insight of what the real issues are in ISFSI licensing

  14. Research progress about chemical energy storage of solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haifeng; Xie, Gengxin; Jie, Zheng; Hui, Xiong; Yang, Duan; Du, Chaojun

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, the application of solar energy has been shown obvious advantages. Solar energy is being discontinuity and inhomogeneity, so energy storage technology becomes the key to the popularization and utilization of solar energy. Chemical storage is the most efficient way to store and transport solar energy. In the first and the second section of this paper, we discuss two aspects about the solar energy collector / reactor, and solar energy storage technology by hydrogen production, respectively. The third section describes the basic application of solar energy storage system, and proposes an association system by combining solar energy storage and power equipment. The fourth section briefly describes several research directions which need to be strengthened.

  15. National Waste Terminal Storage Program. Progress report, April 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This report is divided into two parts: the Management Report and the Technical Report. Section 1 of the Management Report provides a general National Waste Terminal Storage program overview, which includes a summary of the long-range plan. Part II contains the status reports of the technical projects, facility projects, and systems projects

  16. Technical progress in planning organization of the Ostravo-Karwina coal basin, ''Mining Projects of Ostravo''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpeta, B; Kolar, J

    1979-01-01

    Based on the main task of further improvement in labor productivity and improvement in the quality of products, the leading planning organization of the Ostravo-Karwina basin is planning and realizing progressive technological plans based on new equipment. Long-term plans for basin development up to 1990 stipulate a rise in capital investments by 180%, increase in the volume of productivity by 164% with a rise in the number of workers by 142%. Corresponding technical progress in planning is based on an improvement in the system of scientific-technical information, automation and technical equipping of the planning process, improvements in the forms and organizational structure. Organization of specialized research-planning groups to substantiate and to technically-economically evaluate technical progress, and also to develop comprehensive technical assignments is stipulated.

  17. The challenge of the future. Technical progress and ecological perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jischa, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    The book introduces readers into the interrelated global problems population dynamics, energy supply, imminent climate catastrophe, environmetal pollution, finite resources and the conflict between the North and South. It encourages probing more deeply into the technical challenges of the future. The author demonstrates why economic and technical issues will soon be outstripped by questions of the environmental, human and social compatibility of new technologies. (orig./UA) [de

  18. Technical considerations and problems associated with long-term storage of low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siskind, B.

    1991-01-01

    If a state or regional compact does not have adequate disposal capacity for low-level radioactive waste (LLRW), then extended storage of certain LLRW may be necessary. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) contracted with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) several years ago (1984--86) to address the technical issues of extended storage. The dual objectives of this study were (1) to provide practical technical assessments for NRC to consider in evaluating specific proposals for extended storage and (2) to help ensure adequate consideration by NRC, Agreement States, and licensees of potential problems that may arise from existing or proposed extended storage practices. In this summary of that study, the circumstances under which extended storage of LLRW would most likely result in problems during or after the extended storage period are considered and possible mitigative measures to minimize these problems are discussed. These potential problem areas include: (1) the degradation of carbon steel and polyethylene containers during storage and the subsequent need for repackaging (resulting in increased occupational exposure), (2) the generation of hazardous gases during storage, and (3) biodegradative processes in LLRW

  19. Radioactive waste storage: historical outlook and socio technical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.C.

    1993-07-01

    The radioactive waste storage remains, in most of the industrialized concerned countries, one extremely debated question. This problem may, if an acceptable socially answer is not found, to create obstacles to the whole nuclear path. This study aim was to analyze the controversy in an historical outlook. The large technological plans have always economical, political, sociological, , psychological and so on aspects, that the experts may be inclined to neglect. ''Escape of radioactivity is unlikely, as long as surveillance of the waste is maintained, that is, as long as someone is present to check for leaks or corrosion or malfunctioning of and to take action, if any of these occur. 444 refs., 32 figs

  20. Waste Management Program. Technical progress report, October-December 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    This quarterly report provides current information on operations and development programs for the management of radioactive wastes from operation of the Savannah River Plant and offplant participants. The studies on environmental and safety assessments, in situ storage or disposal, waste from development and characterization, process and equipment development, and low-level waste management are a part of the Long-Term Waste Management Technology Program. The following studies are reported for the SR Interim Waste Operations Program: surveillance and maintenance, waste concentration, low-level effluent waste, tank replacement/waste transfer, and solid waste storage and related activities

  1. Technical feasibility of krypton-85 storage in sodalite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, R.W.; Christensen, A.B.; Del Debbio, J.A.; Keller, J.H.; Knecht, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    Based on these experimental results, the process that is technically feasible for a reference 2000 metric ton of heavy metal (MTHM) per year reprocessing plant producing approx. 17 MCi or approx. 190 m 3 at STP would encapsulate krypton at approx. 20 cm 3 /g from krypton at temperatures greater than 575 0 C and pressures greater than 1600 atm with one batch a day in a 58-L high pressure vessel. Based on preliminary measurements at 500 0 C, the same process also would be feasible for a 70% krypton and 30% xenon mixture. 7 figures

  2. Nuclear waste glass melter: an update of technical progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, R.A.; Hanson, M.S.

    1984-08-01

    The direct slurry-fed ceramic-lined melter is currently the reference US process for treating defense and civilian high-level liquid waste. Extensive nonradioactive pilot-scale testing at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Savannah River Laboratory has proven the process, defined operating parameters, and identified successful equipment design concepts. Programs at PNL continue to support several of the planned US vitrification plants through preparation of equipment designs and flowsheet testing. Current emphasis is on remotization of equipment, radioactive verification testing, and resolution of remaining technical issues. Development of this technology, technical status, and planned development activities are discussed. 9 references, 4 figures

  3. Monitoring the Durability Performance of Concrete in Nuclear Waste Containment. Technical Progress Report No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2000-01-01

    OAK-B135 Monitoring the Durability Performance of Concrete in Nuclear Waste Containment. Technical Progress Report No. 3(NOTE: Part II A item 1 indicates ''PAPER'', but a report is attached electronically)

  4. FY2007 NREL Energy Storage R&D Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, A.

    2007-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is engaged in research and development activities to support achieving targets and objectives set by the Energy Storage Program at the Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology in the U.S. Department of Energy. These activities include: 1. supporting the Battery Technology Development Program with battery thermal characterization and modeling and with energy storage system simulations and analysis; 2. supporting the Applied Research Program by developing thermal models to address abuse of Li-Ion batteries; and 3. supporting the Focused Long-Term Research Program by investigating improved Li-Ion battery electrode materials. This report summarizes the results of NREL energy storage activities in FY07.

  5. Recent Progress on Integrated Energy Conversion and Storage Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bin; Ye, Delai; Wang, Lianzhou

    2017-09-01

    Over the last few decades, there has been increasing interest in the design and construction of integrated energy conversion and storage systems (IECSSs) that can simultaneously capture and store various forms of energies from nature. A large number of IECSSs have been developed with different combination of energy conversion technologies such as solar cells, mechanical generators and thermoelectric generators and energy storage devices such as rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors. This review summarizes the recent advancements to date of IECSSs based on different energy sources including solar, mechanical, thermal as well as multiple types of energies, with a special focus on the system configuration and working mechanism. With the rapid development of new energy conversion and storage technologies, innovative high performance IECSSs are of high expectation to be realised for diverse practical applications in the near future.

  6. Annual technical progress report: reactor safety, Government fiscal year 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Progress in LMFBR safety studies on accident debris behavior is reported under the following subtask titles: high-temperature-concentration aerosols, large-scale molten fuel tests, sodium release tests, and risk analysis

  7. Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services (Technical Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Eichman, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Proceedings of an expert workshop convened by the U.S. Department of Energy and Industry Canada, and hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Air Resources Board, May 14-15, 2014, in Sacramento, California, to address the topic of hydrogen energy storage (HES). HES systems provide multiple opportunities to increase the resilience and improve the economics of energy sup supply systems underlying the electric grid, gas pipeline systems, and transportation fuels. This is especially the case when considering particular social goals and market drivers, such as reducing carbon emissions, increasing reliability of supply, and reducing consumption of conventional petroleum fuels. This report compiles feedback collected during the workshop, which focused on policy and regulatory issues related to HES systems. Report sections include an introduction to HES pathways, market demand, and the "smart gas" concept; an overview of the workshop structure; and summary results from panel presentations and breakout groups.

  8. Technical progress of nuclear energy: economic and environmental prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naudet, G.

    1994-01-01

    This document deals with three different aspects of the nuclear energy: first the operating and economic performances of nuclear power plants in the world, the French nuclear competitiveness. Then, the technical and economic perspectives about reactors and fuels cycle and the advantages towards atmospheric pollution are discussed to favour a new worldwide nuclear development. (TEC). 8 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  9. National Waste Terminal Storage Program. Progress report, July 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asher, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The report contains project reports on work performed by organizations under subcontract to OWI, by ERDA contractors, by OWI consultants, and by other federal agencies participating in the NWTS program. The reports are made under the headings of technical projects, facility projects, planning and analysis, and regulatory affairs

  10. Technical-economic analysis of electric energy storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Florian; Curuia, Marian; Brad, Sebastian; Anghel, Mihai; Stefanescu, Ioan

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuations in electric energy consumption and changes that affected last years the electric energy market, as well, entail perturbations in transport and distribution systems due to outrunning of their current physical capacities. Consequently, storing the electric energy in buffer systems appears to be a must owing to its strategic and economical importance. Indeed, it can enhance firmly the capacity of fulfilling the electric energy demands in real time and so, avoiding the blackout events caused by disruptions in power supply . Also, of great importance is the role of energy storing systems as backing ancillaries for promoting variable or uncertain renewable sources (like photovoltaic or wind sources). The Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is a promising system of direct storing of electricity by means of magnetic energy deposing in a short-circuited superconducting loop. However difficulties related to the use o superconducting systems and cryogenic temperatures (concerning construction and maintenance) hinder at present the application of SMES systems on a scale larger than some particular applications. Actually, owing to the lack of alternative solutions the rather high costs are accepted in such cases

  11. Technical bases for leak detection surveillance of waste storage tanks. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.G.; Badden, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides the technical bases for specification limits, monitoring frequencies and baselines used for leak detection and intrusion (for single shell tanks only) in all single and double shell radioactive waste storage tanks, waste transfer lines, and most catch tanks and receiver tanks in the waste tank farms and associated areas at Hanford

  12. IAEA Technical committee meeting on methods used in design of spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitikainen, E.; Silfverberg, P.

    1985-01-01

    The meeting was held in Espoo, Finland and hosted by the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), and was arranged to report and discuss design methods, licensing practise, operational experience as well as economic aspects connectied with spent fuel storage. This report contains session summaries by the session chairmen and the papers presented at the meeting

  13. Evaporation by mechanical vapor recompression. Technical progress report, September 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iverson, C.H.; Coury, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    Progress to date in the development of a study of the application of the technologies of mechanical vapor recompression and falling film evaporators as applied to the beet sugar industry is reported. Progress is reported in the following areas: technical literature search and plant visitations of existing applications of VR/FFE.

  14. Performance of stratified thermal-storage system for Oliver Springs Elementary School. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, R.L.; Bedinger, A.F.G.

    1981-01-01

    A progress report is given on the performance of a stratified thermal storage system coupled with a heat recovery refrigeration machine designed to provide space heating, cooling and service water heating. Water storage tanks utilizing a flexible membrane to resist temperature blending will be used as the thermal storage element. The two design goals of the heat recovery and thermal energy storage system are (1) to minimize the need to purchase energy for space heating and cooling and water heating and (2) to minimize electrical demand. An automatic data acquisition system will be used for system performance and data gathering. Data collection is expected to begin in September, 1981.

  15. Technical Division quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slansky, C.M.; Dickey, B.R.; Musgrave, B.C.; Rohde, K.L.

    1977-07-01

    Fuel Cycle Research and Development: Results are presented on the fluidized-bed calcination of high-level radioactive waste from reprocessing on the post treatment of the calcine, and on the removal of actinide elements from the waste prior to calcination. Other projects include the development of storage technology for /sup 85/Kr waste; a study of the hydrogen mordenite catalyzed reaction between NO/sub x/ and NH/sub 3/; the adsorption and storage of /sup 129/I on silver exchanged mordenite; physical properties, materials of construction, and unit operations studies on the evaporation of high-level waste; the behavior of volatile radionuclides during the combustion of HTGR graphite-based fuel; and the use of the uranium-ruthenium system in age-dating uranium ore bodies. Special Materials Production: The long-term management of defense waste from the ICPP covers postcalcination treatment of ICPP calcined waste; the removal of actinide elements from first-cycle raffinate; the retrieval and handling of calcined waste from ICPP storage vaults; and the preparation of the ''Defense Waste Document''. Process improvements are reported on the Fluorinel headend process for Zircaloy-clad fuels and on uranium accountability measurements. Other development results cover the process for recovering spent Rover fuel, buried pipeline transfer systems, support to the Waste Management Program, and effluent monitoring methods evaluation and development. Other Projects Supporting Energy Development: In this category are studies on nuclear materials security; application of a liquid-solid fluidized-bed heat exchanger to the recovery of geothermal heat; in-plant reactor source term measurements; burnup methods for fast breeder reactor fuels; absolute thermal fission yield measurements; analytical support to light water breeder reactor development; research on analytical methods; and the behavior of environmental species of iodine.

  16. Waste Management Program. Technical progress report, July-December, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    This report provides information on operations and development programs for the management of radioactive wastes from operation of the Savannah River Plant and offplant participants. The studies on environmental and safety assessments, other support, in situ storage or disposal, waste form development and characterization, process and equipment development, and the Defense Waste Processing Facility are a part of the Long-Term Waste Management Technology Program. The following studies are reported for the SR Interim Waste Operations: tank farm operation, inspection program, burial ground operations, and waste transfer/tank replacement

  17. Waste Management Program. Technical progress report, Aporil-June 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1984-02-01

    This quarterly report provides current information on operations and development programs for the management of radioactive wastes from operation of the Savannah River Plant. The studies on environmental and safety assessments, process and equipment development, TRU waste, and low-level waste are a part of the Long-Term Waste Management Technology Program. The following studies are reported for the SR Interim Waste Operations Program: surveillance and maintenance, waste concentration, low-level effluent waste, tank replacement/waste transfer, and solid waste storage and related activities.

  18. Conjoint utility analysis of technical maturity and project progress of construction project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, taking construction project as the research object, the relationship between the project maturity index calculated by the construction project technical risks with different fine degree and the project progress index is studied, and the equilibrium relationship between the Party A’s utility curve and the Party B’s cost curve of using project maturity index and project progress index as the research variables is analyzed. The results show that, when the construction project technical risk division is more precise, the conjoint utility of the project's technical maturity index and the project progress is higher, and the project’s Party A and Party B two sides are closer to the optimal equilibrium. This shows that the construction project technical risk must be finely divided, and managed and controlled respectively, which will help to improve the conjoint utility of the project Party A and Party B two sides.

  19. Method and system for progressive mesh storage and reconstruction using wavelet-encoded height fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxes, Gregory A. (Inventor); Linger, Timothy C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems and methods are provided for progressive mesh storage and reconstruction using wavelet-encoded height fields. A method for progressive mesh storage includes reading raster height field data, and processing the raster height field data with a discrete wavelet transform to generate wavelet-encoded height fields. In another embodiment, a method for progressive mesh storage includes reading texture map data, and processing the texture map data with a discrete wavelet transform to generate wavelet-encoded texture map fields. A method for reconstructing a progressive mesh from wavelet-encoded height field data includes determining terrain blocks, and a level of detail required for each terrain block, based upon a viewpoint. Triangle strip constructs are generated from vertices of the terrain blocks, and an image is rendered utilizing the triangle strip constructs. Software products that implement these methods are provided.

  20. Environmental Research Division technical progress report: January 1986--October 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    Technical process in the various research activities of Argonne National Laboratory's Environmental Research Division is reported for the period 1986-1987. Textual, graphic, and tabular information is used to briefly summarize (in separate chapters) the work of the Division's Atmospheric Physics, Environmental Effects Research, Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry, and Organic Geochemistry and Environmental Instrumentation Programs. Information on professional qualifications, awards, and outstanding professional activities of staff members, as well as lists of publications, oral presentations, special events organized, and participants in educational programs, are provided in appendices at the end of each chapter. Individual projects under each division are processed separately for the data bases

  1. Environmental Research Division technical progress report: January 1986--October 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    Technical process in the various research activities of Argonne National Laboratory's Environmental Research Division is reported for the period 1986-1987. Textual, graphic, and tabular information is used to briefly summarize (in separate chapters) the work of the Division's Atmospheric Physics, Environmental Effects Research, Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry, and Organic Geochemistry and Environmental Instrumentation Programs. Information on professional qualifications, awards, and outstanding professional activities of staff members, as well as lists of publications, oral presentations, special events organized, and participants in educational programs, are provided in appendices at the end of each chapter. Individual projects under each division are processed separately for the data bases.

  2. Technical progress report, 1 April-30 June 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the technical accomplishments during the quarter ending June 1981, on the commercial nuclear waste management programs under the direction of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI). The ONWI program is organized into 8 tasks entitled: systems, waste package, site, repository, regulatory and institutional, test facilities and excavations, land acquisition, and program management. Principal investigators in each of these areas have submitted summaries of quarterly highlights for inclusion in this report. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 5 of these tasks for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  3. Technical Progress and Development Directions of Oceanic Spatial Information Datum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAO Jingyang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper briefly analyzes the basic development and technical situation of oceanic spatial information datum, reviews the main processes of oceanic vertical datum and correlative oceanic tidal study, such as improvement and perfect methods of determining tidal station vertical datum, realizing form of vertical datum controlled by tidal station, effect on maintaining vertical datum by long-term tidal station, oceanic tidal model establishing, and also construction and transformation of tidal datum, and then forecasts the key development directions of oceanic spatial information datum on high-accuracy marine position service, vertical datum and the transferring model refinement and spatial datum application.

  4. Technical foundations and progress of the axial tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckmann, K.

    1980-01-01

    The X-ray-source is rotating about the object (or the object is rotating). Opposite is rotating an X-ray-image intensifier and a conventional television scanning technique. For tomographic application the total effective field is constrained by a diaphragm of the X-rays to a slit defining the slice under observation and hence the corresponding profile. The X-ray-beam source and the slit-diaphragm are rotating 180 deg around the object. For any angle the profile can be obtained as an electric signal in a time-domain by applying television technique: an X-ray image intensifier with a television-camera. A tomographic picture is the result by back-projection of the various profiles ('electronic spreading') and a process of integration ('deflection'), accumulation and storage of the density profiles. A second method is discussed: the X-ray-source-detector-system is rotating around the object and simultaneous displacing longitudinal. The detector sends its impulses to an electronic storage, off that the images can be successive transferred to a monitor. So quickly shifting the layers we obtain spatial pictures. (orig.) [de

  5. Crystalline Repository Project. Technical progress report, October 1982-March 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This document reports the progress being made periodically on the development of a geologic repository in crystalline rock for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The reporting elements are arranged by the work breakdown structure so that related studies are presented together. The studies are reported by the Office of Crystalline Respository Development (OCRD), a prime contractor of the US Department of Energy Repository Project Office. The studies include work by other prime contractors and by subcontractors to OCRD

  6. C-Mod Collaboration Informal Technical Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenneth W. Gentle

    2007-01-01

    The aims of the collaboration have not changed. A specific list of tasks was agreed upon during the Fall of 2006 in preparation for the 2007 C-Mod campaign by Earl Marmar, Head of the Alcator Project, Kenneth Gentle, Principal Investigator, and William Rowan, Collaboration Coordinator with the facilitation of Adam Rosenberg (DOE grant monitor for the collaboration). The activities follow the list of tasks and are discussed in this progress report

  7. Progress in developing repetitive pulse systems utilizing inductive energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honig, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    High-power, fast-recovery vacuum switches were used in a new repetitive counterpulse and transfer circuit to deliver a 5-kHz pulse train with a peak power of 75 MW (at 8.6 kA) to a 1-..cap omega.. load, resulting in the first demonstration of fully controlled, high-power, high-repetition-rate operation of an inductive energy-storage and transfer system with nondestructive switches. New circuits, analytical and experimental results, and feasibility of 100-kV repetitive pulse generation are discussed. A new switching concept for railgun loads is presented.

  8. Technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage. Thermal energy storage application to the brick/ceramic industry. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, D.R.

    1976-10-01

    An initial project to study the technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage (TES) in the three major consumer markets, namely, the residential, commercial and industrial sectors is described. A major objective of the study was to identify viable TES applications from which a more concise study could be launched, leading to a conceptual design and in-depth validation of the TES energy impacts. This report documents one such program. The brick/ceramic industries commonly use periodic kilns which by their operating cycle require time-variant energy supply and consequently variable heat rejection. This application was one of the numerous TES opportunities that emerged from the first study, now available from the ERDA Technical Information Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, identified as Report No. COO-2558-1.

  9. National Waste Terminal Storage Program. Progress report, January 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asher, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    Project reports are presented on work performed by commercial and/or nonprofit organizations under subcontract to OWI, by ERDA contractors, including UCC-ND, by OWI consultants, and by other federal agencies supporting and participating in the NWTS Program. Each project report identifies the OWI staff member responsible for managing the project, as well as the names of the consultants, subcontractors, or ERDA facilities conducting the work. Activities in geological, engineering repository, and technical support projects are reviewed. Information is included on planning and analysis, regulatory affairs, and public affairs

  10. Progress report of Technical Physics Division: April 1980 - March 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, Ramesh; Vijendran, P.

    1983-01-01

    Activities, with an individual summary of each, of the Technical Physics Division (TPD) of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay are reported for the period April 1980 - March 1982. The major thrust of the TPD's work has been in: (i) design and fabrication of instruments, devices and equipment and (ii) development of techniques in the frontline research and technology areas like vacuum science, surface analysis, cryogenics and crystal growing. The Division also provided custombuilt electronics equipment, vacuum systems and glass components and devices to the various Divisions of BARC and other units of the DAE. Training and manpower development activities and technology transfer activities are also reported. Lists of seminars, colloquia, publications during the period of the report are given. (M.G.B.)

  11. Progress report for 1978-79, Technical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalaraman, C.P.; Deshpande, R.Y.

    1980-01-01

    The research and development activities of the Technical Physics Division (TPD) of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during the calendar years 1978 and 1979 are reported. The TPD's major areas of work are electronics instrumentation, crystal technology, mass spectrometers, cryogenic equipment and vacuum equipment. Some of the major achievements are: (1) fabrication of various electronic instruments and components for the pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, (2) growth of large size NaI(Tl) and Ge crystals, (3) growth of CsI, KDP and arsenic selenide crystals, (4) fabrication of quadrupole mass filters and (5) fabrication of mass spectrometers for gas analysis and D/H analysis in water samples. (M.G.B.)

  12. Electronic refrigerant leak detector. Quarterly technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamas, E. Jr.

    1998-10-15

    The project comprises three main tasks. They are (1) Develop, design, and fabricate sensors, (2) Develop, design, and fabricate test instruments, (3) Testing and data analysis. The milestone includes 17 sub-tasks for the 52-weeks project period, starting on May 1, 1998 and ending on April 30, 1999. As stated in the Application for Federal Assistance, Micronic intended to relocate to a new office by June of 1998. This decision was delayed, since the first partial payment was transferred on August 12, 1998. Micronic plans to relocate this November. A second Provisional Application for a US patent has been filed. Progress made during this period is reported.

  13. Fundamental studies of separation processes. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, L.B.

    1975-06-01

    Studies using high-precision gas chromatography and supercritical fluid chromatography have produced new types of information on liquid crystals and on behavior of substances in the region of the critical temperature, respectively. In addition, the first successful studies of the effects of pressure on cation exchange have been made using aqueous solutions of alkali metal nitrates. In contrast, progress on separations of isotopic species using gas chromatography has been disappointing. In that area, the chief accomplishment has been a determination of the levels of accuracy and precision with which isotopic abundances can be measured using our quadrupole mass spectrometer. (U.S.)

  14. The role of technical progress in the process of recalculating oil reserves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulard, J.N.

    1999-01-01

    Contrary to the concept of resources (which is essentially a geological one), the notion of reserves designates the quantities that are technically and economically recoverable. Beyond the production-related effect, the reserves therefore evolve over time in accordance with numerous technical and economic parameters. Among these parameters, it can be seen that technical progress plays a considerable role throughout the process of converting resources into reserves, including progress in the identification, accessibility and processing of the resources, and improvements in economic viability. After having tackled the problem of measuring the 'technical progress effects' and citing examples, we demonstrate that the evolution in oil reserves is subject to three types of impact. These are a quantitative impact by significantly improving the recovery rates or making it possible to identify hitherto undetectable oil fields, a qualitative impact by widening the resource base thanks to the adoption of new categories of oil (in particular the so-called 'unconventional' oils) and by carrying out the gradual substitution between these resources of differing qualities. There is also a dynamic impact, through the acceleration of resource availability. Through these three approaches, technical progress makes makes it possible to ensure continuity in oil supply and contributes significantly to the recalculation of reserves. It therefore acts as a compensating factor, counterbalancing the progressive depletion of resources. (author)

  15. Final storage of radioactive waste in Germany - progress enforced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesel, H.

    1995-01-01

    In the past few years, the peaceful utilization of nuclear power, spent fuel and waste management included, has been severely hampered in Germany out of concern about technical safety. Ultimately, however, the objective is an opt-out nuclear power on political grounds. Advancing the projects to ensure the back end of the fuel cycle must be returned to the responsibility of science and technology and should not be left exclusively in the hands of politicians and lawyers. In the period between 1991 and 1994, the German Federal Government had to issue a total of 24 instructions to federal states seeking to opt-out of nuclear power; only in this way was it possible to continue project work. (orig.) [de

  16. Methodology to determine the technical performance and value proposition for grid-scale energy storage systems :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Loose, Verne William; Donnelly, Matthew K.; Trudnowski, Daniel J.

    2012-12-01

    As the amount of renewable generation increases, the inherent variability of wind and photovoltaic systems must be addressed in order to ensure the continued safe and reliable operation of the nation's electricity grid. Grid-scale energy storage systems are uniquely suited to address the variability of renewable generation and to provide other valuable grid services. The goal of this report is to quantify the technical performance required to provide di erent grid bene ts and to specify the proper techniques for estimating the value of grid-scale energy storage systems.

  17. Achieving Hydrogen Storage Goals through High-Strength Fiber Glass - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hong [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States); Johnson, Kenneth I. [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States); Newhouse, Norman L. [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Led by PPG and partnered with Hexagon Lincoln and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the team recently carried out a project “Achieving Hydrogen Storage Goals through High-Strength Fiber Glass”. The project was funded by DOE’s Fuel Cell Technologies office within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, starting on September 1, 2014 as a two-year project to assess technical and commercial feasibilities of manufacturing low-cost, high-strength glass fibers to replace T700 carbon fibers with a goal of reducing the composite total cost by 50% of the existing, commercial 700 bar hydrogen storage tanks used in personal vehicles.

  18. Technical progress report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Progress during the 12-month period, October 1, 1980 to September 30, 1981 on the University of Wisconsin Plasma Physics contract is described. Most of the work centers around two major experimental devices, the Levitated Octupole and Tokapole II. A major upgrade of the Octupole is underway to include 2 MW of ICRH and 1.8 MW of neutral beam heating. Meanwhile, gun optimization and low field operation has resulted in the attainment of 35% beta, a factor of 9 above the single fluid ballooning limit. The ICRH experiment is well underway, and the first neutral beam source has been installed. The Tokapole is operating reliably at the full design field of 10 kG with 12 msec discharges. Low q (approx. 0.4) discharges with flat current profiles are obtained at reduced (approx. 3kG) toroidal field. The device is presently being used to study shear Alfven wave heating, ECRH startup, poloidal ohmic heating, and plasma transport

  19. TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR: High Temperature Superconductors: Progress and Issues

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2002-01-01

    Monday 24 June from 14:30 to 15:30 - Training Centre Auditorium - bldg. 593-11 High Temperature Superconductors: Progress and Issues Prof. Jan Evetts / UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, UK Grappling with grain boundaries: Current transport processes in granular High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) The development of High Temperature Superconductors, seen from a materials scientist's point of view, is relevant to the superconductivity community at CERN: their possible high current applications can include high performance magnets for future accelerators. There is an urgent need to develop a quantitative description of HTS conductors in terms of their complex anisotropy, inhomogeneity and dimensionality. This is essential both for the practical specification of a conductor and for charting routes to conductor optimisation. The critical current, the n-value, dissipation and quenching characteristics are amongst most important parameters that make up an engineering specifi...

  20. Technical progress review of extraction of uranium from fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Renxi; Gao Junning; Wu Qingming; Chen Gang; Wan Hongjin; Zhang Ziyue

    2014-01-01

    The increasing of fly ash in coal-fired power plants at home and abroad year by year and the potential impacts to the environment attracted media attention. Although the extraction of uranium from the fly ash in coal-fired power plants had optional process from technique aspect and sufficient preliminary researches, but considering the low grade of the uranium in fly ash and particularity of the mineral composition, it is easy to have a high cost of extraction. As a consequence, it is not included in the development plan of uranium mining and metallurgy. The present applications of fly ash are only building materials, building roads and pit valley backfill, the resource utilization rate was low and was still in its early stages of development and application. In view of this, the research advances and the latest development trends of extraction of uranium from fly ash at home and abroad were introduced from the technical aspect, and the beneficial analyzes of the prospect and advices to this industry were given. (authors)

  1. Current progress and technical challenges of flexible liquid crystal displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikake, Hideo; Sato, Hiroto

    2009-02-01

    We focused on several technical approaches to flexible liquid crystal (LC) display in this report. We have been developing flexible displays using plastic film substrates based on polymer-dispersed LC technology with molecular alignment control. In our representative devices, molecular-aligned polymer walls keep plastic-substrate gap constant without LC alignment disorder, and aligned polymer networks create monostable switching of fast-response ferroelectric LC (FLC) for grayscale capability. In the fabrication process, a high-viscosity FLC/monomer solution was printed, sandwiched and pressed between plastic substrates. Then the polymer walls and networks were sequentially formed based on photo-polymerization-induced phase separation in the nematic phase by two exposure processes of patterned and uniform ultraviolet light. The two flexible backlight films of direct illumination and light-guide methods using small three-primary-color light-emitting diodes were fabricated to obtain high-visibility display images. The fabricated flexible FLC panels were driven by external transistor arrays, internal organic thin film transistor (TFT) arrays, and poly-Si TFT arrays. We achieved full-color moving-image displays using the flexible FLC panel and the flexible backlight film based on field-sequential-color driving technique. Otherwise, for backlight-free flexible LC displays, flexible reflective devices of twisted guest-host nematic LC and cholesteric LC were discussed with molecular-aligned polymer walls. Singlesubstrate device structure and fabrication method using self-standing polymer-stabilized nematic LC film and polymer ceiling layer were also proposed for obtaining LC devices with excellent flexibility.

  2. Texas Experimental Tokamak, a plasma research facility: Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1995-08-01

    In the year just past, the authors made major progress in understanding turbulence and transport in both core and edge. Development of the capability for turbulence measurements throughout the poloidal cross section and intelligent consideration of the observed asymmetries, played a critical role in this work. In their confinement studies, a limited plasma with strong, H-mode-like characteristics serendipitously appeared and received extensive study though a diverted H-mode remains elusive. In the plasma edge, they appear to be close to isolating a turbulence drive mechanism. These are major advances of benefit to the community at large, and they followed from incremental improvements in diagnostics, in the interpretation of the diagnostics, and in TEXT itself. Their general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The work here demonstrates a continuing dedication to the problems of plasma transport which continue to plague the community and are an impediment to the design of future devices. They expect to show here that they approach this problem consistently, systematically, and effectively

  3. Technical assessment of continued wet storage of EBR-II fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Franklin, E.M.; Ebner, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    A technical assessment of the continued wet storage of EBR-II fuel has been made. Previous experience has shown that in-basin cladding failure occurs by intergranular attack of sensitized cladding, likely assisted by basin water chlorides. Subsequent fuel oxidation is rapid and leads to loss of configuration and release of fission products. The current inventory of EBR-II fuel stored in the ICPP basins is at risk from similar corrosion reactions

  4. Means of storage and automated monitoring of versions of text technical documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonovets, S. A.; Shukalov, A. V.; Zharinov, I. O.

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents automation of the process of preparation, storage and monitoring of version control of a text designer, and program documentation by means of the specialized software is considered. Automation of preparation of documentation is based on processing of the engineering data which are contained in the specifications and technical documentation or in the specification. Data handling assumes existence of strictly structured electronic documents prepared in widespread formats according to templates on the basis of industry standards and generation by an automated method of the program or designer text document. Further life cycle of the document and engineering data entering it are controlled. At each stage of life cycle, archive data storage is carried out. Studies of high-speed performance of use of different widespread document formats in case of automated monitoring and storage are given. The new developed software and the work benches available to the developer of the instrumental equipment are described.

  5. Development of technical design for waste processing and storage facilities for Novi Han repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canizares, J.; Benitez, J.C.; Asuar, O.; Yordanova, O.; Demireva, E.; Stefanova, I.

    2005-01-01

    Empresarion Agrupados Internacional S.A. (Spain) and ENPRO Consult Ltd. (Bulgaria) were awarded a contract by the Central Finance and Contracts Unit to develop the technical design of the waste processing and storage facilities at the Novi Han repository. At present conceptual design phase is finished. This conceptual design covers the definition of the basic design requirements to be applied to the installations defined above, following both European and Bulgarian legislation. In this paper the following items are considered: 1) Basic criteria for the layout and sizing of buildings; 2) Processing of radioactive waste, including: treatment and conditioning of disused sealed sources; treatment of liquid radioactive wastes; treatment of solid radioactive waste; conditioning of liquid and solid radioactive waste; 3) Control of waste packages and 4) Storage of radioactive waste, including storage facility and waste packages. An analysis of inventories of stored and estimated future wastes and its subsequent processes is also presented and the waste streams are illustrated

  6. ERIP invention 637. Technical progress report 2nd quarter, April 1997--June 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thacker, G.W.

    1997-07-22

    This technical report describes progress in the development of the Pegasus plow, a stalk and root embedding apparatus. Prototype testing is reported, and includes the addition of precision tillage. Disease data, organic matter, and nitrogen levels results are very briefly described. Progress in marketing is also reported. Current marketing issues include test use by cotton and wheat growers, establishment of dealer relationships, incorporation of design modifications, expansion of marketing activities, and expansion of loan and lease program.

  7. Communication of technical information to lay audiences. [National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowes, J.E.; Stamm, K.R.; Jackson, K.M.; Moore, J.

    1978-05-01

    One of the objectives of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program is to provide terminal storage facilities for commercial radioactive wastes in various geologic formations at multiple locations in the United States. The activities performed under the NWTS Program will affect regional, state, and local areas, and widespread public interest in this program is expected. Since a large part of the NWTS Program deals with technical information it was considered desirable to initiate a study dealing with possible methods of effectively transmitting this technical information to the general public. This study has the objective of preparing a state-of-the-art report on the communication of technical information to lay audiences. The particular task of communicating information about the NWTS Program to the public is discussed where appropriate. The results of this study will aid the NWTS Program in presenting to the public the quite diverse technical information generated within the program so that a widespread, thorough public understanding of the NWTS Program might be achieved. An annotated bibliography is included.

  8. Technical progress in INPRO activities on modelling and innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalibre, P.; Haas, E.; Khartabil, H.; Kim, S.; Korinny, A.; Usanov, V. and others

    2010-01-01

    Among the 31 Members of the 'International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles' (INPRO) in April 2010, more than 20 are cooperating in the implementation of Collaborative Projects (CPs) related to the four substantive Programme Areas of the INPRO Action Plan. The purpose of the CPs is to contribute to the achievement of goals established in the programmatic areas. This paper presents progress status of several CPs dealing with Modelling and Innovation: - CP on Environmental Impact Benchmarking applicable to Nuclear Energy Systems under Normal Operation (ENV): A benchmark of codes and methods for determining radiation released during normal operation of nuclear facilities is performed by using established source term, release scenario, and target group (humans). - CP on Proliferation Resistance: Acquisition/Diversion Pathway Analysis (PRADA): 'PRADA' addresses the identification and analyses of high level pathways for the acquisition of weapons usable material, and makes recommendations for evaluating the multiplicity and robustness of barriers against proliferation. PRADA develops a case study based on DUPIC fuel cycle. The outcome from the project will support the assessment methodologies developed at GIF and INPRO. - CP on Global Architecture of Nuclear Energy Systems based on Thermal and Fast Reactors including Closed Fuel Cycle (GAINS): GAINS objective is to develop a methodological platform for assessing future nuclear energy systems taking into account the sustainable development, and to validate the results through sample analyses. High and moderate scenarios of nuclear energy demand and supply during the Century (5000 and 2500 GWe respectively in the year 2100) are being analysed using homogeneous and heterogeneous considerations. A non-geographic approach grouping the countries according to their planned use of nuclear energy has being established. - CP on Investigations of the 233 U/Th Fuel Cycle (ThFC): ThFC objective is to explore FC

  9. Overview of technical Issues Associated with the Long Term Storage of Light Water Reactor used Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, Ken B.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear power technical community is developing the technical basis for demonstrating the safety of storing used nuclear fuel for extended periods of time. The combination of reactor operations that off-load spent fuel to interim storage, coupled with delays in repository construction, has resulted in the expectation that storage periods may be for longer periods of time than originally intended. As more fuel continues to be off-loaded from operating reactors, the need for expanded interim storage also increases. As repository programs are delayed, interim storage requirements will likely exceed licensing term limits. To address these operational realities, there has been a concerted international effort to identify and prioritize the technical issues that need to be addressed in order to demonstrate the safety of storing used nuclear fuel for extended periods of time. Since this is an international effort, different storage systems, regulations, and policies need to be considered. This results in differences in technical issues, as well as differences in priorities. However, this effort also identifies important commonalities in some technical areas that need to be addressed. A broad-based international evaluation of these technical issues provides a better understanding of technical concerns as they relate to individual storage systems and specific national regulatory frameworks. While there are several international activities underway that are focused on long term storage, this paper will discuss the activities of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/Extended Storage Collaboration Program (ESCP) International Subcommittee. A status report detailing the identification and prioritization of the technical issues was presented at the PSAM11 Conference in June 2012 (1). Since that conference, a final report has been completed by the EPRI/ESCP International Subcommittee (2). This paper will provide important results of the final report as well as

  10. Technical and economic feasibility of membrane technology. Fourth technical progress report, June 17-September 16, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandre, A.

    1980-10-01

    Progress is reported on the investigation of the potential application of reverse osmosis, ultrafiltration and electrodialysis to the system of solids concentration in beet sugar process streams. During this period, emphasis was put on running reverse osmosis tests with a new prototype machine to select the most suitable membranes for the concentrating of sugar solutions. An economic analysis of using reverse osmosis in a factory producing 10/sup 6/ gal/day of thin juice is discussed. (DMC)

  11. Technical, economic and institutional aspects of regional spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    A particular challenge facing countries with small nuclear programmes is the preparation for extended interim storage and then disposal of their spent nuclear fuel. The costs and complications of providing for away-from-reactor storage facilities and/or geological repositories for relatively small amounts of spent fuel may be prohibitively high, motivating interest in regional solutions. This publication addresses the technical, economic and institutional aspects of regional spent fuel storage facilities (RSFSF) and is based on the results of a series of meetings on this topic with participants from IAEA Member States. Topics discussed include safety criteria and standards, safeguards and physical protection, fuel acceptance criteria, long term stability of systems and stored fuel, selection of site, infrastructure aspects, storage technology, licensing, operations, transport, decommissioning, as well as research and development. Furthermore the publication comprises economic, financial and institutional considerations including organizations and legal aspects followed by political and public acceptance and ethical considerations. Approaches and processes for implementation are discussed, as well as the overall benefits and risks of implementing a regional facility. It is illustrated that implementing a RSFSF facility would involve simultaneously addressing a wide range of diverse challenges. The appendix to this report tabulates the numerous issues that have been touched upon in the study. It appears, however, from the discussions that the challenges can in principle be met; the RSFSF concept is technically feasible and potentially economically viable. The technical committees producing this report did not identify any obvious institutional deficiencies that would prevent completion of such a project. Storing spent fuel in a few safe, reliable, secure facilities could enhance safeguards, physical protection and non-proliferation benefits. The committee also

  12. Institutional effectiveness of REDD+ MRV: Countries progress in implementing technical guidelines and good governance requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ochieng, R.M.; Visseren-Hamakers, Ingrid; Arts, B.; Brockhaus, M.; Herold, M.

    2016-01-01

    The UNFCCC requires REDD+ countries wishing to receive results-based payments to measure, report and verify (MRV) REDD+ impacts; and outlines technical guidelines and good governance requirements for MRV. This article examines institutional effectiveness of REDD+ MRV by assessing countries’ progress

  13. Studies in theoretical high energy particle physics: Technical progress report [February 1987-February 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhatme, U.P.; Keung, Wai-Yee; Kovacs, E.

    1988-02-01

    This is a technical progress report for grant No. FG02-84ER40173 for the period February 1987 to February 1988. Our research on supersymmetric quantum mechanics has yielded many interesting results. In particular, a systematic approach to the tunneling problem in double well potentials has been developed. Higgs boson related physics at the high energy hadron colliders has been extensively studied

  14. Cassini RTG Program. Monthly technical progress report, 27 November--31 December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This monthly technical progress report provided information on the following tasks: spacecraft integration and liaison; engineering support; safety analysis; qualified unicouple fabrication; ETG fabrication, assembly, and test; ground support equipment (GSE); RTG shipping and launch support; designs, reviews, and mission applications; project management, quality assurance, and reliability, and contractor acquired government owned (CAGO) property acquisition

  15. Technical progress faced with the challenges of the energy sector in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, D.

    1999-01-01

    The colloquium organised by the Association of Energy Economists dealing with the theme 'Technical progress faced with the challenges of the energy sector in the future' takes place against a backdrop of ever-increasing initiatives in this field, for example at the World Energy Council or the International Energy Agency Faith in technical progress is widespread but should be supported by studies without any preconceived ideas. Research and development efforts must be fully supported, and in a climate of opening markets and liberalization the public authorities have a major role to pay. Historically, the markets have always been able to meet new needs thanks to technology, but the ambitious targets that the international community has set itself regarding the emission of greenhouse gases imply technical improvements and major investments. (authors)

  16. A progress report on the g-2 storage ring magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunce, G.; Cullen, J.; Danby, G.

    1995-01-01

    The 3.1 GeV muon storage ring for the g-2 experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory hat three large solenoid magnets that form a continuous 1.451 tesla storage ring dipole with an average beam bond radius of 7.1 metors. In addition to the three storage ring solenoids, there is an inflector dipole with nested dipole coils that create very little stray magnetic field. A superconducting shield on the infractor gets rid of most of the remaining stray flux. This paper reports on the progress made on the storage ring solenoid magnet system and the inflector as of June 1995. The results of cryogenic system tests are briefly reported

  17. Stockholm international conference 2003 on geological repositories: Political and technical progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The conference reviewed global progress made as well as current perspectives on the activities to develop geologic repositories. The objectives were to review the progress in policy making as well as technical issues and to strengthen international co-operation on waste management and disposal issues. The first day of the conference addressed the policy aspects of geological repositories and the second day featured the more technical issues. Session 1: International progress in performing long-term safety studies and security of geological disposal were discussed and reviewed with examples from OECD/NEA, Belgium, Sweden, USA, Switzerland and Russia. Session 2: Views on stakeholder involvement and decision making process were presented by international organisations and national implementers from Japan, United Kingdom, Belgium and OECD/NEA. Session 3: Views on stakeholder involvement and decision making process were presented by regional and local stakeholders from France, Finland, Korea and Sweden. Session 4: International instruments assisting in the implementation of geological repositories were discussed, for example ICRP and IAEA/NEA safety documents, Joint Convention, Safeguard agreements, Nuclear Liability Conventions, etc. Session 5: The contribution of Research, Development and Demonstration was discussed with overviews of the progress achieved on scientific and technical issues over the past four years. Progress and key issues were presented from Switzerland, USA, Finland, Japan, Sweden and IAEA. Each of the papers and poster presentations have been analysed and indexed separately

  18. Technical and economic evaluation of hydrogen storage systems based on light metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jepsen, Julian

    2014-07-01

    Novel developments regarding materials for solid-state hydrogen storage show promising prospects. These complex hydrides exhibit high mass-related storage capacities and thus great technical potential to store hydrogen in an efficient and safe way. However, a comprehensive evaluation of economic competitiveness is still lacking, especially in the case of the LiBH4 / MgH2 storage material. In this study, an assessment with respect to the economic feasibility of implementing complex hydrides as hydrogen storage materials is presented. The cost structure of hydrogen storage systems based on NaAlH4 and LiBH4 / MgH2 is discussed and compared with the conventional high pressure (700 bar) and liquid storage systems. Furthermore, the properties of LiBH4 / MgH2, so-called Li-RHC (Reactive Hydride Composite), are scientifically compared and evaluated on the lab and pilot plant scale. To enhance the reaction rate, the addition of TiCl3 is investigated and high energy ball milling is evaluated as processing technique. The effect of the additive in combination with the processing technique is described in detail. Finally, an optimum set of processing parameters and additive content are identified and can be applied for scaled-up production of the material based on simple models considering energy input during processing. Furthermore, thermodynamic, heat transfer and kinetic properties are experimentally determined by different techniques and analysed as a basis for modelling and designing scaled-up storage systems. The results are analysed and discussed with respect to the reaction mechanisms and reversibility of the system. Heat transfer properties are assessed with respect to the scale-up for larger hydrogen storage systems. Further improvements of the heat transfer were achieved by compacting the material. In this regard, the influence of the compaction pressure on the apparent density, thermal conductivity and sorption behaviour, was investigated in detail. Finally, scaled

  19. Technical meeting on progress in managing, and limiting the consequences of events exceeding the design basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, H.

    2004-01-01

    The Technical Groups on 'Reactor Safety' and 'Thermodynamics and Fluid Dynamics' of the Kerntechnische Gesellschaft e.V. organized a joint technical meeting on 'Progress in Managing, and Limiting the Consequences of, Events Exceeding the Design Basis' at the FTU Training Center of the Karlsruhe Research Center. The topic chosen, the papers presented, the presenters, and the non-technical part of the program met with lively interest on the part of institutions in the nuclear field. These were the objectives of the technical meeting: - Establishing a forum for communicating relevant topics. - In-depth discussion of the main topic, i.e. the advanced development of reactor safety, research in the field, and its application, in twenty selected papers presented by speakers from different institutions. - Presentation of topical work in a nuclear technology institution, the Karlsruhe Research Center. (orig.) [de

  20. Key technical issues relating to safety of spent fuel dry storage in vaults: CASCAD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, F [Societe Generale pour les Techniques Nouvelles (SGN), 78 - Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France)

    1994-12-31

    The operating CASCAD Facility at the Cadarashe site (FR) was commissioned in May 1990. Fuel is received in tight canisters which are transferred to storage pits in the vault and scheduled to be stored for up to 50 years. Canistering operations are performed in a cell of the reactor building.The paper describes the main functions of the facility as: cask receipt and shipping; fuel unloading; fuel conditioning; canisters emplacements in storage location; fuel storage; fuel retrieving and shipping at the end of the storage period; operation system and operation organization. Safety characteristics of the facility discussed are: fuel decay heat removal; subcriticality control and radiological protection. The fuel decay heat removal has two main purposes: (1) maintaining rod cladding temperature below a set limit in order to keep the fuel in its as received condition; (2) maintaining structures and equipment performing a safety function below the design temperature. The features of the sub-criticality control in the storage vault are such that sub-criticality in normal and accidental conditions is provided by the arrangement of pits in the vault. Radiological protection is based on limiting collective and individual annual dose equivalent to ALARA levels ensuring that they remain in any case below the set limits. Radiological protection system described consists in: confinement of radioactive materials for protection against its dissemination; radiation shielding for protection against irradiation. It is pointed out that all technical solutions presented are based on or adapted from proven technologies used in operating facilities in France or in other countries. The solution not only benefits from the experience of SGN in the design, construction and start-up of facilities for fuel or high level waste handling and storage, but also from the experience of the CEA and COGEMA groups in operating such facilities. 2 figs., 1 ref.

  1. Total Factor Productivity Growth, Technical Progress & Efficiency Change in Vietnam Coal Industry - Nonparametric Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, Vu Hung

    2018-03-01

    This research applies Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) approach to analyze Total Factor Productivity (TFP) and efficiency changes in Vietnam coal mining industry from 2007 to 2013. The TFP of Vietnam coal mining companies decreased due to slow technological progress and unimproved efficiency. The decadence of technical efficiency in many enterprises proved that the coal mining industry has a large potential to increase productivity through technical efficiency improvement. Enhancing human resource training, technology and research & development investment could help the industry to improve efficiency and productivity in Vietnam coal mining industry.

  2. Technical and Economic Potential of Distributed Energy Storages for the Integration of Renewable Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveinbjörnsson, Dadi Þorsteinn; Trier, Daniel; Hansen, Kenneth

    Very high penetration of fluctuating renewable energy sources can lead to new challenges in balancing energy supply and demand in future energy systems. This work, carried out as a part of Annex 28 of the IEA ECES programme, addresses this. The aim of the study is to identify which role decentral...... indicate that sector coupling along with an intelligent choice of distributed energy storage technologies can enable the integration of large shares of fluctuating renewable energy in an energy efficient and cost-effective way.......Very high penetration of fluctuating renewable energy sources can lead to new challenges in balancing energy supply and demand in future energy systems. This work, carried out as a part of Annex 28 of the IEA ECES programme, addresses this. The aim of the study is to identify which role...... decentralised energy storages (DES) should play in integrating fluctuating renewable energy sources. The technical and economic potential for DES solutions is quantified using energy system modelling, and it is identified which DES technologies have the largest total (technical and economic) potential. For this...

  3. Productivity Change, Technical Progress, and Relative Efficiency Change in the Public Accounting Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Rajiv D. Banker; Hsihui Chang; Ram Natarajan

    2005-01-01

    We present evidence on components of productivity change in the public accounting industry toward the end of the 20th century. Using revenue and human resource data from 64 of the 100 largest public accounting firms in the United States for the 1995--1999 period, we analyze productivity change, technical progress, and relative efficiency change over time. The average public accounting firm experienced a productivity growth of 9.5% between 1995 and 1999. We find support for the hypothesis that...

  4. Chemical and ceramic methods for the safe storage of actinides using monazite. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boatner, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    'Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Rockwell Science Center of Thousand Oaks, California, are carrying out a joint investigation of the chemical, physical, thermal, and radiation-resistance properties of the lanthanide orthophosphates (monazites) in both ceramic and single-crystal form with the objective of developing the scientific and technical base required for the application of these materials to the storage or disposal of actinide elements, including plutonium. An additional major objective of the research effort is to investigate the technical and scientific problems associated with the formation of both phase-pure monazite ceramics and multiphase monazite-ceramic composites for waste disposal or waste storage applications. These latter investigations encompass the development of low-temperature chemical synthesis routes for the formation of monoclinic monazite phases and the study of the densification properties of lanthanide orthophosphate powders to produce stable, high-density ceramics. Research Statement This research effort addresses several basic issues associated with the characteristics of lanthanide orthophosphates that make this class of materials extremely attractive candidates for application to the storage of actinide elements in general and plutonium in particular. Additionally, these materials are potentially important refractory ceramics in their own right, and many of the scientific issues addressed in this project are applicable to the development of what will constitute a new, highly stable family of ceramics for applications in a number of energy-related areas.'

  5. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 entitled ``Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs.`` Stipulated within the Agreement is the requirement that WVU submit to METC a series of Technical Progress Reports on a quarterly basis. This report comprises the first Quarterly Technical Progress Report for Year 2 of the Agreement. This report reflects the progress and/or efforts performed on the sixteen (16) technical projects encompassed by the Year 2 Agreement for the period of January 1 through March 31, 1994. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated organic solvents; Microbial enrichment for enhancing in-situ biodegradation of hazardous organic wastes; Treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using biofilters; Drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; Chemical destruction of chlorinated organic compounds; Remediation of hazardous sites with steam reforming; Soil decontamination with a packed flotation column; Use of granular activated carbon columns for the simultaneous removal of organics, heavy metals, and radionuclides; Monolayer and multilayer self-assembled polyion films for gas-phase chemical sensors; Compact mercuric iodide detector technology development; Evaluation of IR and mass spectrometric techniques for on-site monitoring of volatile organic compounds; A systematic database of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; Dust control methods for insitu nuclear and hazardous waste handling; Winfield Lock and Dam remediation; and Socio-economic assessment of alternative environmental restoration technologies.

  6. High-performance batteries for electric-vehicle propulsion and stationary energy storage. Progress report, October 1977--September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, P.A.; Barney, D.L.; Steunenberg, R.K.

    1978-11-01

    The research, development, and management activities of the programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and at industrial subcontractors' laboratories on high-temperature batteries during the period October 1977--September 1978 are reported. These batteries are being developed for electric-vehicle propulsion and for stationary-energy-storage applications. The present cells, which operate at 400 to 500/sup 0/C, are of a vertically oriented, prismatic design with one or more inner positive electrodes of FeS or FeS/sub 2/, facing electrodes of lithium--aluminum alloy, and molten LiCl--KCl electrolyte. During this fiscal year, cell and battery development work continued at ANL, Eagle--Picher Industries, Inc., the Energy Systems Group of Rockwell International, and Gould Inc. Related work was also in progress at the Carborundum Co., General Motors Research Laboratories, and various other organizations. A major event was the initiation of a subcontract with Eagle--Picher Industries to develop, design, and fabricate a 40-kWh battery (Mark IA) for testing in an electric van. Conceptual design studies on a 100-MWh stationary-energy-storage module were conducted as a joint effort between ANL and Rockwell International. A significant technical advance was the development of multiplate cells, which are capable of higher performance than bicells. 89 figures, 57 tables.

  7. Hollow ceramic block: containment of water for thermal storage in passive solar design. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winship, C.T.

    1983-12-27

    The project activity has been the development of designs, material compositions and production procedures to manufacture hollow ceramic blocks which contain water (or other heat absorptive liquids). The blocks are designed to serve, in plurality, a dual purpose: as an unobtrusive and efficient thermal storage element, and as a durable and aesthetically appealing surface for floors and walls of passive solar building interiors. Throughout the grant period, numerous ceramic formulas have been tested for their workabilty, thermal properties, maturing temperatures and color. Blocks have been designed to have structural integrity, and textured surfaces. Methods of slip-casting and extrusion have been developed for manufacturing of the blocks. The thermal storage capacity of the water-loaded block has been demonstrated to be 2.25 times greater than that of brick and 2.03 times greater than that of concrete (taking an average of commonly used materials). Although this represents a technical advance in thermal storage, the decorative effects provided by application of the blocks lend them a more significant advantage by reducing constraints on interior design in passive solar architecture.

  8. Research and development related to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, K.W.

    1988-11-01

    This report summarizes some of the technical contributions by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project from October 1 through December 31, 1984. The report is not a detailed technical document but does indicate the status of the investigations being performed at Los Alamos

  9. Research and development related to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K.W. (comp.)

    1988-11-01

    This report summarizes some of the technical contributions by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project from October 1 through December 31, 1984. The report is not a detailed technical document but does indicate the status of the investigations being performed at Los Alamos.

  10. Experimental Facilities Division/User Program Division technical progress report 1999-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In October 1999, the two divisions of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the Accelerator Systems Division (ASD) and the Experimental Facilities Division (XFD), were reorganized into four divisions (see high-level APS organizational chart, Fig. 1.1). In addition to ASD and XFD, two new divisions were created, the APS Operations Division (AOD), to oversee APS operations, and the User Program Division (UPD), to serve the APS user community by developing and maintaining the highest quality user technical and administration support. Previous XFD Progress Reports (ANL/APS/TB-30 and ANL/APS/TB-34) covered a much broader base, including APS user administrative support and what was previously XFD operations (front ends, interlocks, etc.) This Progress Report summarizes the main scientific and technical activities of XFD, and the technical support, research and development (R and D) activities of UPD from October 1998 through November 2000. The report is divided into four major sections, (1) Introduction, (2) SRI-CAT Beamlines, Technical Developments, and Scientific Applications, (3) User Technical Support, and (4) Major Plans for the Future. Sections 2 and 3 describe the technical activities and research accomplishments of the XFD and UPD personnel in supporting the synchrotron radiation instrumentation (SRI) collaborative access team (CAT) and the general APS user community. Also included in this report is a comprehensive list of publications (Appendix 1) and presentations (Appendix 2) by XFD and UPD staff during the time period covered by this report. The organization of section 2, SRI CAT Beamlines, Technical Developments, and Scientific Applications has been made along scientific techniques/disciplines and not ''geographical'' boundaries of the sectors in which the work was performed. Therefore items under the subsection X-ray Imaging and Microfocusing could have been (and were) performed on several different beamlines by staff in different divisions. The management of

  11. Technical and economic design of photovoltaic and battery energy storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortolini, Marco; Gamberi, Mauro; Graziani, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Design of grid connected photovoltaic system integrating battery energy storage system. • A model to manage the energy flows and assess the system profitability is presented. • The model evaluates the effective PV power rate and battery energy system capacity. • An application and multi-scenario analysis based on an Italian context is discussed. • Results show the system technical feasibility and an energy cost save of 52 €/MW h. - Abstract: In the last years, the technological development and the increasing market competitiveness of renewable energy systems, like solar and wind energy power plants, create favorable conditions to the switch of the electricity generation from large centralized facilities to small decentralized energy systems. The distributed electricity generation is a suitable option for a sustainable development thanks to the environmental impact reduction, the load management benefits and the opportunity to provide electricity to remote areas. Despite the current cut off of the national supporting policies to the renewables, the photovoltaic (PV) systems still find profitable conditions for the grid connected users when the produced energy is self-consumed. Due to the intermittent and random nature of the solar source, PV plants require the adoption of an energy storage system to compensate fluctuations and to meet the energy demand during the night hours. This paper presents a technical and economic model for the design of a grid connected PV plant with battery energy storage (BES) system, in which the electricity demand is satisfied through the PV–BES system and the national grid, as the backup source. The aim is to present the PV–BES system design and management strategy and to discuss the analytical model to determine the PV system rated power and the BES system capacity able to minimize the Levelized Cost of the Electricity (LCOE). The proposed model considers the hourly energy demand profile for a reference

  12. Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of biomass. Phase 1 -- Technical and business feasibility study, technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The nine-month Phase 1 feasibility study was directed toward the application of supercritical water gasification (SCWG) for the economical production and end use of hydrogen from renewable energy sources such as sewage sludge, pulp waste, agricultural wastes, and ultimately the combustible portion of municipal solid waste. Unique in comparison to other gasifier systems, the properties of supercritical water (SCW) are ideal for processing biowastes with high moisture content or contain toxic or hazardous contaminants. During Phase I, an end-to-end SCWG system was evaluated. A range of process options was initially considered for each of the key subsystems. This was followed by tests of sewage sludge feed preparation, pumping and gasification in the SCW pilot plant facility. Based on the initial process review and successful pilot-scale testing, engineering evaluations were performed that defined a baseline system for the production, storage and end use of hydrogen. The results compare favorably with alternative biomass gasifiers currently being developed. The results were then discussed with regional wastewater treatment facility operators to gain their perspective on the proposed commercial SCWG systems and to help define the potential market. Finally, the technical and business plans were developed based on perceived market needs and the projected capital and operating costs of SCWG units. The result is a three-year plan for further development, culminating in a follow-on demonstration test of a 5 MT/day system at a local wastewater treatment plant.

  13. Hydrogen Station Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Technical Status and Costs: Systems Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, G.; Boyd, R.; Cornish, J.; Remick, R.

    2014-05-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory commissioned an independent review of hydrogen compression, storage, and dispensing (CSD) for pipeline delivery of hydrogen and forecourt hydrogen production. The panel was asked to address the (1) cost calculation methodology, (2) current cost/technical status, (3) feasibility of achieving the FCTO's 2020 CSD levelized cost targets, and to (4) suggest research areas that will help the FCTO reach its targets. As the panel neared the completion of these tasks, it was also asked to evaluate CSD costs for the delivery of hydrogen by high-pressure tube trailer. This report details these findings.

  14. A saposin deficiency model in Drosophila: Lysosomal storage, progressive neurodegeneration and sensory physiological decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Samantha J; Hebbar, Sarita; Schwudke, Dominik; Elliott, Christopher J H; Sweeney, Sean T

    2017-02-01

    Saposin deficiency is a childhood neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) that can cause premature death within three months of life. Saposins are activator proteins that promote the function of lysosomal hydrolases that mediate the degradation of sphingolipids. There are four saposin proteins in humans, which are encoded by the prosaposin gene. Mutations causing an absence or impaired function of individual saposins or the whole prosaposin gene lead to distinct LSDs due to the storage of different classes of sphingolipids. The pathological events leading to neuronal dysfunction induced by lysosomal storage of sphingolipids are as yet poorly defined. We have generated and characterised a Drosophila model of saposin deficiency that shows striking similarities to the human diseases. Drosophila saposin-related (dSap-r) mutants show a reduced longevity, progressive neurodegeneration, lysosomal storage, dramatic swelling of neuronal soma, perturbations in sphingolipid catabolism, and sensory physiological deterioration. Our data suggests a genetic interaction with a calcium exchanger (Calx) pointing to a possible calcium homeostasis deficit in dSap-r mutants. Together these findings support the use of dSap-r mutants in advancing our understanding of the cellular pathology implicated in saposin deficiency and related LSDs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following projects: systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; site remediation technologies--drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; excavation systems for hazardous waste sites; chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; development of organic sensors--monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield Lock and Dam remediation; Winfield cleanup survey; assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation--non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; assessment of environmental remediation storage technology; assessment of environmental remediation excavation technology; assessment of environmental remediation monitoring technology; and remediation of hazardous sites with steam reforming.

  16. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following projects: systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; site remediation technologies--drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; excavation systems for hazardous waste sites; chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; development of organic sensors--monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield Lock and Dam remediation; Winfield cleanup survey; assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation--non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; assessment of environmental remediation storage technology; assessment of environmental remediation excavation technology; assessment of environmental remediation monitoring technology; and remediation of hazardous sites with steam reforming

  17. Progress on first-principles-based materials design for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Noejung; Choi, Keunsu; Hwang, Jeongwoon; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Dong Ok; Ihm, Jisoon

    2012-12-04

    This article briefly summarizes the research activities in the field of hydrogen storage in sorbent materials and reports our recent works and future directions for the design of such materials. Distinct features of sorption-based hydrogen storage methods are described compared with metal hydrides and complex chemical hydrides. We classify the studies of hydrogen sorbent materials in terms of two key technical issues: (i) constructing stable framework structures with high porosity, and (ii) increasing the binding affinity of hydrogen molecules to surfaces beyond the usual van der Waals interaction. The recent development of reticular chemistry is summarized as a means for addressing the first issue. Theoretical studies focus mainly on the second issue and can be grouped into three classes according to the underlying interaction mechanism: electrostatic interactions based on alkaline cations, Kubas interactions with open transition metals, and orbital interactions involving Ca and other nontransitional metals. Hierarchical computational methods to enable the theoretical predictions are explained, from ab initio studies to molecular dynamics simulations using force field parameters. We also discuss the actual delivery amount of stored hydrogen, which depends on the charging and discharging conditions. The usefulness and practical significance of the hydrogen spillover mechanism in increasing the storage capacity are presented as well.

  18. Office of Waste Isolation. Progress report, November 1977. [National waste terminal storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhines, R.C.; Asher, J.M. (eds.)

    1977-12-28

    This program is part of the National Waste Terminal Storage program. The Geologic Review Group meeting was held in New Orleans, November 16-17. Start-up of the near-surface heater experiment in the Conasauga Shale formation is under way at Oak Ridge. The first shipment of experimental equipment from Oak Ridge to Avery Island, Louisiana, for the dome salt in-situ test was successfully completed. On November 9-10, a design status review on the spent fuel repository conceptual design was held with Kaiser Engineers, Inc. On November 2, OWI personnel reviewed the progress on the Economic Studies with TRW representatives.

  19. Volatiles combustion in fluidized beds. Technical progress report, 4 March 1993--3 June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesketh, R.P.

    1993-09-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate the conditions in which volatiles will burn within both the dense and freeboard regions of fluidized beds. Experiments using a fluidized bed operated at incipient fluidization will be performed to characterize the effect of particle surface area, initial fuel concentration, and particle type on the inhibition of volatiles within a fluidized bed. The work conducted during the period 4 March, 1993 through 3 June, 1993 is reported in this technical progress report. The work during this time period consists primarily of the startup and trouble shooting of the fluidized bed reactor and gas phase modeling of methane and propane.

  20. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements semiannual technical progress report, March 1989--August 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ney, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    This semiannual technical progress report is for the period 1 March 1989 through 31 August 1989. This National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) program is designed to provide recommendations for radiation protection based on scientific principles. During this period several reports were published covering the topics of occupational radiation exposure, medical exposure, radon control, dosimetry, and radiation protection standards. Accomplishments of various committees are also reported; including the committees on dental x-ray protection, radiation safety in uranium mining and milling, ALARA, instrumentation, records maintenance, occupational exposures of medical personnel, emergency planning, and others. (SM)

  1. Technical progress and efficiency changes in football teams participating in the UEFA Champions League

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Isabel García Cebrián

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper commits to calculate and analyze productivy levels and its components for teams that participated in the UEFA Champions League between 2003 and 2012. It will pursue three objectives: 1 evaluate resources usage, 2 analyze the productivity levels of the football teams and the sports results, and 3 see the influence of participation experience in reference to productivity and sports results. Using Malmquist Productivity Index, the results reflect a lack of consistent progression of efficiency, productivity, and technical change. This competition does not reward the efficient usage of resources and there is not a conclusive relationshop between permanence in the competition and productivity.

  2. Western Research Institute: Annual technical progress report, October 1987--September 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the technical progress made by the Western Research Institute of the University of Wyoming Research Institute of the University of Wyoming Research Corporation on work performed for the period October 1, 1987 through September 30, 1988. This research involves five resource areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. Under the terms of the cooperative agreement, an annual project plan has been approved by DOE. The work reported herein reflects the implementation of the research in the plan and follows the structure used therein. 49 refs., 32 figs., 87 tabs.

  3. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This reports reports the progress/efforts performed on six technical projects: 1. systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; 2. site remediation technologies (SRT):drain- enhanced soil flushing for organic contaminants removal; 3. SRT: in situ bio-remediation of organic contaminants; 4. excavation systems for hazardous waste sites: dust control methods for in-situ nuclear waste handling; 5. chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; and 6. development of organic sensors: monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors.

  4. Nuclear structure theory. Annual technical progress report, October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.; Koltun, D.S.

    1977-01-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year in the following areas of nuclear structure and reaction theory: (1) statistical spectroscopy, including giant resonances for beta and electromagnetic excitation and sum rules (including inverse-energy-weighted sum rules), statistical methods of truncating shell model spaces and renormalization of operators, study of state labelling and ''chains'' of groups, evaluation of fluctuation measures, technical aspects of operator averaging; (2) meson interactions with nuclei, including scattering and absorption of mesons by nuclei (general methods), models for absorption, single- and double-charge exchange of pions, role of rho mesons

  5. Cabling design of booster and storage ring construction progress of TPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Y.-S.; Liu, K.-B.; Liu, C.-Y.; Wang, B.-S.

    2017-01-01

    The 2012 Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) cable construction project started after 10 months to complete the cable laying and installation of power supply. The circumference of the booster ring (BR) is 496.8 m, whereas that of the storage ring (SR) is 518.4 m. Beam current is set to 500 mA at 3.3 GeV. The paper on grounding systems discusses the design of the ground wire (< 0.2 Ω) with low impedance, power supply of the accelerator and cabling tray. The flow and size of the ground current are carefully evaluated to avoid grounded current from flowing everywhere, which causes interference problems. In the design of the TPS, special shielding will be established to isolate the effects of electromagnetic interference on the magnet and ground current. Booster ring dipoles are connected by a series of 54-magnet bending dipole; the cable size of its stranded wire measures 250 mm"2, with a total length of 5000 m. Booster ring and storage ring quadrupoles have 150 magnets; the cable size of their stranded wire is 250 mm"2, with a total length of 17000 m. Storage ring dipole consists of 48 magnets; the cable size of its stranded wire is 325 mm"2, with a total length of 6000 m. This study discusses the power supply cabling design of the storage ring and booster ring construction progress of TPS. The sections of this paper are divided into discussions of the construction of the control and instrument area, cabling layout of booster ring and storage ring, as well as the installation and commission machine. This study also discusses the use of a high-impedance meter to determine the effect of cabling insulation and TPS power supply machine on energy transfer to ensure the use of safe and correct magnet.

  6. Office of Waste Isolation progress report, October 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress of the National Waste Terminal Storage program is reported under: technical projects, facility projects, systems projects, and regulatory affairs. Various media (salt, shales, rocks) for geologic storage are covered

  7. Develop improved metal hydride technology for the storage of hydrogen. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapru, K.

    1998-12-04

    The overall objective was to develop commercially viable metal hydrides capable of reversibly storing at least 3 wt.% hydrogen for use with PEM fuel cells and hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (HICE) applications. Such alloys are expected to result in system capacities of greater than 2 wt.%, making metal hydride storage systems (MHSS`s) a practical means of supplying hydrogen for many consumer applications. ECD`s (Energy Conversion Devices, Inc.) past work on sputtered thin films of transition metal-based alloys led to the commercialization of it`s nickel/metal hydride batteries, and similar work on thin film Mg-based alloys demonstrated potential to achieve very high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities approaching 2,500 Wh/Kg and 2,500 Wh/M{sup 3} respectively. Under this 2-year cost shared project with the DOE, the authors have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of scaling up the Mg-based hydrides from thin film to bulk production without substantial loss of storage capacity. ECD made progress in alloy development by means of compositional and process modification. Processes used include Mechanical Alloying, Melt spinning and novel Gas Phase Condensation. It was showed that the same composition when prepared by melt-spinning resulted in a more homogeneous material having a higher PCT plateau pressure as compared to mechanical alloying. It was also shown that mechanically alloyed Mg-Al-Zn results in much higher plateau pressures, which is an important step towards reducing the desorption temperature. While significant progress has been made during the past two years in alloy development and understanding the relationship between composition, structure, morphology, and processing parameters, additional R and D needs to be performed to achieve the goals of this work.

  8. Spent Fuel Test-Climax: An evaluation of the technical feasibility of geologic storage of spent nuclear fuel in granite: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    In the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site, eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized. When test data indicated that the test objectives were met during the 3-year storage phase, the spent-fuel canisters were retrieved and the thermal sources were de-energized. The project demonstrated the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner. In addition to emplacement and retrieval operations, three exchanges of spent-fuel assemblies between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility, conducted during the storage phase, furthered this demonstration. The test led to development of a technical measurements program. To meet these objectives, nearly 1000 instruments and a computer-based data acquisition system were deployed. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data were recorded on a continuing basis for the three-year storage phase and six-month monitored cool-down of the test. This report summarizes the engineering and scientific endeavors which led to successful design and execution of the test. The design, fabrication, and construction of all facilities and handling systems are discussed, in the context of test objectives and a safety assessment. The discussion progresses from site characterization and experiment design through data acquisition and analysis of test data in the context of design calculations. 117 refs., 52 figs., 81 tabs

  9. Spent Fuel Test-Climax: An evaluation of the technical feasibility of geologic storage of spent nuclear fuel in granite: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, W.C. (comp.)

    1986-03-30

    In the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site, eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized. When test data indicated that the test objectives were met during the 3-year storage phase, the spent-fuel canisters were retrieved and the thermal sources were de-energized. The project demonstrated the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner. In addition to emplacement and retrieval operations, three exchanges of spent-fuel assemblies between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility, conducted during the storage phase, furthered this demonstration. The test led to development of a technical measurements program. To meet these objectives, nearly 1000 instruments and a computer-based data acquisition system were deployed. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data were recorded on a continuing basis for the three-year storage phase and six-month monitored cool-down of the test. This report summarizes the engineering and scientific endeavors which led to successful design and execution of the test. The design, fabrication, and construction of all facilities and handling systems are discussed, in the context of test objectives and a safety assessment. The discussion progresses from site characterization and experiment design through data acquisition and analysis of test data in the context of design calculations. 117 refs., 52 figs., 81 tabs.

  10. Progress of the radioactive waste management at the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute and the role of an IAEA technical co-operation project in this process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nang, N.T.; Ngoc, O.V.; Nhu Thuy, T.T.; Nghi, D.V.; Thu, N.T.

    2002-01-01

    At present, the main radioactive waste generator in Vietnam is the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute (DNRI). For safe management of radioactive waste generated from this nuclear center, in 1982 Soviet specialists newly constructed one combined technology system for low level radioactive waste management. The existing system consists of two main parts, a Liquid Radioactive Waste Treatment Station and a Storage/Disposal Facility. The liquid treatment station can in principle meet the needs for this nuclear center but disposal technology and storage/disposal facilities are not good enough both with respect to safety and economy, especially the storage/disposal facility placed in Dalat, the tourist city. In order to help DNRI and Vietnam to solve the radioactive waste management problem, the IAEA Technical Co-operation (TC) project VIE/9/007 was implemented in Vietnam. The facilities and IAEA experts provided under this project gradually help to develop radioactive waste management at DNRI, Vietnam. This paper outlines progress under way in the management of the radioactive waste at the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI), Dalat, Vietnam, and the role of the IAEA Technical Co-operation (TC) project in this process. (author)

  11. Thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling applications. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, H.W.; Kedl, R.J.

    1976-11-01

    This is the first in a series of quarterly progress reports covering activities at ORNL to develop thermal energy storage (TES) technology applicable to building heating and cooling. Studies to be carried out will emphasize latent heat storage in that sensible heat storage is held to be an essentially existing technology. Development of a time-dependent analytical model of a TES system charged with a phase-change material was started. A report on TES subsystems for application to solar energy sources is nearing completion. Studies into the physical chemistry of TES materials were initiated. Preliminary data were obtained on the melt-freeze cycle behavior and viscosities of sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate and a mixture of Glauber's salt and Borax; limited melt-freeze data were obtained on two paraffin waxes. A subcontract was signed with Monsanto Research Corporation for studies on form-stable crystalline polymer pellets for TES; subcontracts are being negotiated with four other organizations (Clemson University, Dow Chemical Company, Franklin Institute, and Suntek Research Associates). Review of 10 of 13 unsolicited proposals received was completed by the end of June 1976.

  12. Projects at the component development and integration facility. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the third quarter of FY94. The CDIF is a major Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: Biomass Remediation Project; Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil Project; MHD Shutdown; Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; and Spray Casting Project

  13. Technical and economic assessment of hybrid photovoltaic/wind system with battery storage in Corsica island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaf, S.; Belhamel, M.; Haddadi, M.; Louche, A.

    2008-01-01

    The sizing and techno-economical optimization of a stand-alone hybrid photovoltaic/wind system (HPWS) with battery storage is presented in this paper. The main objective of the present study is to find the optimum size of system, able to fulfill the energy requirements of a given load distribution, for three sites located at Corsica island and to analyze the impact of different parameters on the system size. The methodology used provides a useful and simple approach for sizing and analyzing an HPWS. In the proposed stand-alone system, a new concept such as the supply of wind power via a uninterruptible power supply (UPS) is introduced and therefore the energy produced by the wind generator can be sent directly to the load. In this context, an optimization sizing model is developed. It consists of three submodels; system components submodels, technical submodel based on the loss of power supply probability (LPSP) and the economical submodel based on the levelized cost of energy (LCE). Applying the developed model, a set of configurations meeting the desired LPSP are obtained. The configuration with the lowest LCE gives the optimal one. Analyzing the optimal system configurations used to satisfy the requirements of typical residential home (3 kWh/day), a significant reduction in system size is observed as the available renewable potential increases leading to a considerable decrease in LCE (case of Cape corse site). The 2 days storage capacity is found to be the best for the optimal configuration with the lowest LCE. On the other hand, for low energy requirements, the LCE is found relatively high and decreases sharply with the increase in load. However, for low LPSP values, the LCE is found to rise sharply for a little increase in LPSP

  14. Surgical resident technical skill self-evaluation: increased precision with training progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Jacob A; Kudav, Vishal; Doty, Jennifer; Crane, Megan; Bukoski, Alex D; Bennett, Bethany J; Barnes, Stephen L

    2017-10-01

    Surgical resident ability to accurately evaluate one's own skill level is an important part of educational growth. We aimed to determine if differences exist between self and observer technical skill evaluation of surgical residents performing a single procedure. We prospectively enrolled 14 categorical general surgery residents (six post-graduate year [PGY] 1-2, three PGY 3, and five PGY 4-5). Over a 6-month period, following each laparoscopic cholecystectomy, residents and seven faculty each completed the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS). Spearman's coefficient was calculated for three groups: senior (PGY 4-5), PGY3, and junior (PGY 1-2). Rho (ρ) values greater than 0.8 were considered well correlated. Of the 125 paired assessments (resident-faculty each evaluating the same case), 58 were completed for senior residents, 54 for PGY3 residents, and 13 for junior residents. Using the mean from all OSATS categories, trainee self-evaluations correlated well to faculty (senior ρ 0.97, PGY3 ρ 0.9, junior ρ 0.9). When specific OSATS categories were analyzed, junior residents exhibited poor correlation in categories of respect for tissue (ρ -0.5), instrument handling (ρ 0.71), operative flow (ρ 0.41), use of assistants (ρ 0.05), procedural knowledge (ρ 0.32), and overall comfort with the procedure (ρ 0.73). PGY3 residents lacked correlation in two OSATS categories, operative flow (ρ 0.7) and procedural knowledge (ρ 0.2). Senior resident self-evaluations exhibited strong correlations to observers in all areas. Surgical residents improve technical skill self-awareness with progressive training. Less-experienced trainees have a tendency to over-or-underestimate technical skill. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Technical Feasibility Study of Thermal Energy Storage Integration into the Conventional Power Plant Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek D. Wojcik

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The current load balance in the grid is managed mainly through peaking fossil-fuelled power plants that respond passively to the load changes. Intermittency, which comes from renewable energy sources, imposes additional requirements for even more flexible and faster responses from conventional power plants. A major challenge is to keep conventional generation running closest to the design condition with higher load factors and to avoid switching off periods if possible. Thermal energy storage (TES integration into the power plant process cycle is considered as a possible solution for this issue. In this article, a technical feasibility study of TES integration into a 375-MW subcritical oil-fired conventional power plant is presented. Retrofitting is considered in order to avoid major changes in the power plant process cycle. The concept is tested based on the complete power plant model implemented in the ProTRAX software environment. Steam and water parameters are assessed for different TES integration scenarios as a function of the plant load level. The best candidate points for heat extraction in the TES charging and discharging processes are evaluated. The results demonstrate that the integration of TES with power plant cycle is feasible and provide a provisional guidance for the design of the TES system that will result in the minimal influence on the power plant cycle.

  16. Advanced converter technology. Technical progress report, May 23, 1979-May 22, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banic, C. V.; Eckhouse, S. A.; Kornbrust, F. J.; Lipman, K.; Peterson, J. L.; Rosati, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to define an advanced converter system employing 1980's technology in all subsystem and component areas for use in electrochemical energy storage systems. Additional experimental effort will validate elements of the advanced commutation circuitry on a full-scale breadboard basis. Improved models of battery electrical characteristics are beng defined and experimental apparatus is being designed to measure these characteristics and to enable better definition of the battery-power conditioner interface. Improvement of energy-storage system performance through modification of battery converter characteristics will also be investigated. During this first year of the contract, a new more advanced concept for power conditioning based on a concept defined by United Technologies Corporation for fuel cell use was evaluated. This high switching frequency concept has the potential for significantly reducing the size and cost of battery plant power conditioners. As a result, the Department of Energy authorized redirection of the program to first evaluate this new concept and then to reorient the program to adopt this concept as the primary one. Progress is reported. (WHK)

  17. Key challenges and recent progress in batteries, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage for clean energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalk, Steven G.; Miller, James F.

    Reducing or eliminating the dependency on petroleum of transportation systems is a major element of US energy research activities. Batteries are a key enabling technology for the development of clean, fuel-efficient vehicles and are key to making today's hybrid electric vehicles a success. Fuel cells are the key enabling technology for a future hydrogen economy and have the potential to revolutionize the way we power our nations, offering cleaner, more efficient alternatives to today's technology. Additionally fuel cells are significantly more energy efficient than combustion-based power generation technologies. Fuel cells are projected to have energy efficiency twice that of internal combustion engines. However before fuel cells can realize their potential, significant challenges remain. The two most important are cost and durability for both automotive and stationary applications. Recent electrocatalyst developments have shown that Pt alloy catalysts have increased activity and greater durability than Pt catalysts. The durability of conventional fluorocarbon membranes is improving, and hydrocarbon-based membranes have also shown promise of equaling the performance of fluorocarbon membranes at lower cost. Recent announcements have also provided indications that fuel cells can start from freezing conditions without significant deterioration. Hydrogen storage systems for vehicles are inadequate to meet customer driving range expectations (>300 miles or 500 km) without intrusion into vehicle cargo or passenger space. The United States Department of Energy has established three centers of Excellence for hydrogen storage materials development. The centers are focused on complex metal hydrides that can be regenerated onboard a vehicle, chemical hydrides that require off-board reprocessing, and carbon-based storage materials. Recent developments have shown progress toward the 2010 DOE targets. In addition DOE has established an independent storage material testing center

  18. The socio-technical transition of distributed electricity storage into future networks—System value and stakeholder views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grünewald, Philipp H.; Cockerill, Timothy T.; Contestabile, Marcello; Pearson, Peter J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Whole system models for the GB electricity system suggest that distributed electricity storage has the potential to significantly reduce the system integration cost for future system scenarios. From a policy perspective, this poses the question why this value should not be realised within existing market structures. Opinion among stakeholders is divided. Some believe that storage deployment constitutes a ‘special case’ in need of policy support. Others insist that markets can provide the necessary platform to negotiate contracts, which reward storage operators for the range of services they could provide. This paper seeks to inform this debate with a process of stakeholder engagement using a perspective informed by socio-technical transition literatures. This approach allows the identification of tensions among actors in the electricity system and of possibilities for co-evolution in the deployment of storage technologies during a transition towards a low carbon electricity system. It also draws attention to policy-related challenges of technology lock-in and path dependency resulting from poor alignment of incumbent regimes with the requirements for distributed electricity storage. - Highlights: ► Electricity storage is poorly aligned with existing regimes in the electricity system. ► Stakeholders perceive electricity storage as “somebody else's problem”. ► Combining stakeholder views and transition theory provides new insight. ► Transition from network to operational benefits poses regulatory challenge. ► Value aggregation made difficult due to institutional barriers.

  19. Nuclear structure theory. Annual technical progress report, July 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.; Koltun, D.S.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year in the following areas of nuclear structure and reaction theory: Meson interactions with nucleons and nuclei, including elastic and inelastic scattering of pions, three-body theories of scattering and absorption of pions by deuterons, π-p bremsstrahlung, and multiple-excitation models for meson absorption by heavier nuclei. Studies of the inverse scattering problem including 1 S 0 nucleon-nucleon scattering; the relativistic two-body problem, particularly for relativistic effects at low energies: the unitary-pole expansion in nucleon-nucleon scattering with hard-core interactions. Statistical spectroscopy including: strength distributions and sum rules(both energy weighted and inverse energy weighted) for nuclear excitations; fluctuations and correlations in spectra, strengths and expectation values; studies of Garvey-Kelson and similar mass relationships; spectroscopy in huge spaces including spectral methods for renormalization of the interaction and for using (two + three)-body Skyrme interactions; technical aspects of operator averaging

  20. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the last quarter of the Second Budget Period, January 1 through March 31, 1994, entitled {open_quotes}Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.{close_quotes} The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particulate control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size.

  1. The U.S. nuclear waste management program - technical progress at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, L.H. [U.S. Department of Energy (United States)

    2001-07-01

    This paper discusses the current status of a national program being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy for the management of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste produced by civilian nuclear power generation and defense-related activities. In 1987 the U.S. Congress directed the Department to characterize the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada and determine its suitability for development of a geologic repository. This paper will focus on the technical progress that has been made after more than 15 years of scientific and engineering investigations at Yucca Mountain, and the remaining work that is being done to support a decision on whether to recommend the site for development of a geologic repository. (author)

  2. Technologies for gas cooled reactor decommissioning, fuel storage and waste disposal. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    Gas cooled reactors (GCRs) and other graphite moderated reactors have been important part of the world's nuclear programme for the past four decades. The wide diversity in status of this very wide spectrum of plants from initial design to decommissioning was a major consideration of the International Working group on Gas Cooled Reactors which recommended IAEA to convene a Technical Committee Meeting dealing with GCR decommissioning, including spent fuel storage and radiological waste disposal. This Proceedings includes papers 25 papers presented at the Meeting in three sessions entitled: Status of Plant Decommissioning Programmes; Fuels Storage Status and Programmes; waste Disposal and decontamination Practices. Each paper is described here by a separate abstract

  3. Vision and framework for technical and management support to facilitate foreign spent fuel storage and geologic disposal in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsey, W.G.; Jardine, L.J.; Smith, C.F.

    1999-01-01

    This 'Technical and Management Support' program would facilitate the transfer of spent fuel from commercial power plants in Taiwan to a storage and geologic repository site near Krasnoyarsk, Russia. This program resolves issues of disposition of Taiwan spent fuel (including US origin fuel) and provides revenue for Russia to develop an integrated spent fuel storage and radioactive waste management system including a geologic repository. LLNL has ongoing contracts and collaborations with all the principal parties and is uniquely positioned to facilitate the development of such a program. A three-phase approach over 20 years is proposed: namely, an initial feasibility investigation followed by an engineering development phase, and then implementation

  4. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy storage system. Volume III. Preconceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

    1981-09-01

    A technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage systems is presented. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume III - Preconceptual Design contains the system analysis which led to the identification of a preferred component configuration for a fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage system, the results of the effort which transformed the preferred configuration into preconceptual power plant design, and an introductory evaluation of the performance of the power plant system during part-load operation and while load following.

  5. Technical issues and approach to license dry storage of LWR fuel in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B.; Beeman, G.H.; Creer, J.M.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    Dry storage is emerging as an important alternative to wet storage for US utilities, even though wet storage will remain the principal storage method, at least until the federal government begins to accept fuel in 1998. Dry storage has been licensed in several countries. In the USA, dry storage issues are related to storage system performance and behavior of spent fuel during storage. There is a coordinated US effort among electric utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to license two dry storage concepts: metal casks, and horizontal storage modules. The following activities are underway to resolve the licensing issues associated with dry storage and to establish the licensing basis: a) summarize and assimilate domestic and foreigh dry storage experience; b) conduct tests which resolve specific licensing issues; c) conduct cooperative demonstrations of the leading dry storage concepts; d) establish criteria and justifications for generic licensing. The paper summarizes the licensing issues and the approach to their resolution

  6. Results on Technical and Consultants Service Meetings on Lessons Learned from Operating Experience in Wet and Dry Spent Fuel Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, B.; Zou, X.

    2015-01-01

    Spent fuel storage has been and will continue to be a vital portion of the nuclear fuel cycle, regardless of whether a member state has an open or closed nuclear fuel cycle. After removal from the reactor core, spent fuel cools in the spent fuel pool, prior to placement in dry storage or offsite transport for disposal or reprocessing. Additionally, the inventory of spent fuel at many reactors worldwide has or will reach the storage capacity of the spent fuel pool; some facilities are alleviating their need for additional storage capacity by utilizing dry cask storage. While there are numerous differences between wet and dry storage; when done properly both are safe and secure. The nuclear community shares lessons learned worldwide to gain knowledge from one another’s good practices as well as events. Sharing these experiences should minimize the number of incidents worldwide and increase public confidence in the nuclear industry. Over the past 60 years, there have been numerous experiences storing spent fuel, in both wet and dry mediums, that when shared effectively would improve operations and minimize events. These lessons learned will also serve to inform countries, who are new entrants into the nuclear power community, on designs and operations to avoid and include as best practices. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a technical and several consultants’ meetings to gather these experiences and produce a technical document (TECDOC) to share spent fuel storage lessons learned among member states. This paper will discuss the status of the TECDOC and briefly discuss some lessons learned contained therein. (author)

  7. Progresso tecnico, forme di mercato e disoccupazione. ( Technical progress, market forms and unemployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. ASIMAKOPULOS A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lo scopo del presente lavoro è triplice . Il primo obiettivo è quello di sottolineare l'importanza delle intuizioni da trovare nel lavoro di Sylos Labini . Il secondo scopo è quello di espandere su di essa distinguendo tra i diversi tipi di progresso tecnico . Infine , il terzo obiettivo è quello di commentare il confronto di Labini di Ricardo e Keynes sulla possibilità di disoccupazione tecnologica . Per quanto riguarda la sua descrizione del progresso tecnologico come " risparmio di lavoro " , l'autore mostra che una descrizione più completa sarebbe più utile per i suoi scopiThe purpose of the present paper is threefold. The first purpose is to emphasise the importance of the insights to be found in Sylos Labini’s work. The second purpose is to expand upon it by distinguishing  between the different types of technical progress. Finally, the third purpose is to comment on Labini’s comparison of Ricardo and Keynes on the possibility of technological unemployment. Regarding his description of technological progress as “labour saving”, the author shows that a more comprehensive description would be more useful for his purposes.JEL: E24, J64, O33

  8. Progress in Energy Storage Technologies: Models and Methods for Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteson, Schuyler W.

    Climate change and other sustainability challenges have led to the development of new technologies that increase energy efficiency and reduce the utilization of finite resources. To promote the adoption of technologies with social benefits, governments often enact policies that provide financial incentives at the point of purchase. In their current form, these subsidies have the potential to increase the diffusion of emerging technologies; however, accounting for technological progress can improve program success while decreasing net public investment. This research develops novel methods using experience curves for the development of more efficient subsidy policies. By providing case studies in the field of automotive energy storage technologies, this dissertation also applies the methods to show the impacts of incorporating technological progress into energy policies. Specific findings include learning-dependent tapering subsidies for electric vehicles based on the lithium-ion battery experience curve, the effects of residual learning rates in lead-acid batteries on emerging technology cost competitiveness, and a cascading diffusion assessment of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle subsidy programs. Notably, the results show that considering learning rates in policy development can save billions of dollars in public funds, while also lending insight into the decision of whether or not to subsidize a given technology.

  9. Remote technology related to the handling, storage and disposal of spent fuel. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    Reduced radiation exposure, greater reliability and cost savings are all potential benefits of the application of remote technologies to the handling of spent nuclear fuel. Remote equipment and technologies are used to some extent in all facilities handling fuel and high-level wastes whether they are for interim storage, processing/repacking, reprocessing or disposal. In view of the use and benefits of remote technologies, as well as recent technical and economic developments in the area, the IAEA organized the Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Remote Technology Related to the Handling, Storage and/or Disposal of Spent Fuel. Twenty-one papers were presented at the TCM, divided into five general areas: 1. Choice of technologies; 2. Use of remote technologies in fuel handling; 3. Use of remote technologies for fuel inspection and characterization; 4. Remote maintenance of facilities; and 5. Current and future developments. Refs, figs and tabs.

  10. The effects of environmental regulation and technical progress on CO2 Kuznets curve: An evidence from China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Jianhua; Zheng, Mingzheng; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Based on environmental Kuznets curve theory, a panel data model which takes environmental regulation and technical progress as its moderating factors was developed to analyse the institutional and technical factors that affect the path of low-carbon economic development. The results indicated that there was a CO 2 emission Kuznets curve seen in China. Environmental regulation had a significant moderating effect on the curve, and the inflection of CO 2 emissions could come substantially earlier under stricter environmental regulation. Meanwhile, the impact of technical progress on the low-carbon economic development path had a longer hysteresis effect but restrained CO 2 emission during its increasing stage and accelerated its downward trend during the decreasing stage which was conducive to emission reduction. Strict environmental regulation could force the high-carbon emitting industries to transfer from the eastern regions to the central or the western regions of China, which would make the CO 2 Kuznets curve higher in its increasing stage and lower in its decreasing stage than that under looser regulation. Furthermore, energy efficiency, energy structure, and industrial structure exerted a significant direct impact on CO 2 emissions; we should consider the above factors as essential in the quest for low-carbon economic development. - Highlights: • Estimate moderating effect of environmental regulation and technical progress on EKC. • There was a CO 2 emission Kuznets curve in effect in China. • Environmental regulation presents significant moderating effect on EKC. • Technical progress moderates the relationship between income and CO 2 emissions

  11. Evaluating the Technical and Economic Performance of PV Plus Storage Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, Paul L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, Robert M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Eichman, Joshua D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-17

    The decreasing costs of both PV and energy storage technologies have raised interest in the creation of combined PV plus storage systems to provide dispatchable energy and reliable capacity. In this study, we examine the tradeoffs among various PV plus storage configurations and quantify the impact of configuration on system net value.

  12. Evaluating the Technical and Economic Performance of PV Plus Storage Power Plants: Report Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, Paul L. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, Robert M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Eichman, Joshua D. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-28

    The decreasing costs of both PV and energy storage technologies have raised interest in the creation of combined PV plus storage systems to provide dispatchable energy and reliable capacity. In this study, we examine the tradeoffs among various PV plus storage configurations and quantify the impact of configuration on system net value.

  13. The role of risk perception and technical information in scientific debates over nuclear waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins-Smith, Hank C.; Silva, Carol L.

    1998-01-01

    This article examines how members of the lay public factor risk perceptions, trust and technical information from differing scientific sources into policy judgements about potentially hazardous facilities. Focusing on radwaste storage repositories, we examine how members of the public filter new information about potential hazards through risk perceptions, and adjust their own beliefs about risks in light of that information. Scientists play a large (and increasing) role in public policy debates concerning nuclear waste issues, in which public perceptions of human health and environmental risks often differ substantially from scientific consensus about those risks. Public concerns and uncertainties are compounded when scientists from competing groups (government agencies, scientific institutions, industries, and interest groups) make different claims about the likely health and environmental consequences of different policy options. We show the processes by which the public receive and process scientific information about nuclear waste management risks using data taken from interviews with 1800 randomly selected individuals (1200 in New Mexico, and 600 nationwide). Among the more important findings are: (1) members of the public are able to make quite reasonable estimates about what kinds of positions on the risks of nuclear waste disposal will be taken by scientists from differing organizations (e.g. scientists from environmental groups, government agencies, or the nuclear industry); (2) in assessing the credibility of scientific claims, members of the public place great emphasis on the independence of the scientists from those who fund the research; and (3) prior expectations about the positions (or expected biases) of scientists from different organizations substantially affects the ways in which members of the public weigh (and utilize) information that comes from these scientists

  14. Research and development related to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Progress report, July 1-September 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, W R; Wolfsberg, K; Vaniman, D T; Erdal, B R [comps.

    1982-01-01

    This report summarizes the contribution of the Los Alamos National Laboratory to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations for the fourth quarter of FY-81. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: waste package development; nuclide migration experiments in G tunnel-laboratory studies; geochemistry of tuff; mineralogy-petrology of tuff; volcanism studies; rock physics studies; exploratory shaft; and quality assurance.

  15. Final Technical Progress Report: Development of Low-Cost Suspension Heliostat; December 7, 2011 - December 6, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, W.

    2013-01-01

    Final technical progress report of SunShot Incubator Solaflect Energy. The project succeeded in demonstrating that the Solaflect Suspension Heliostat design is viable for large-scale CSP installations. Canting accuracy is acceptable and is continually improving as Solaflect improves its understanding of this design. Cost reduction initiatives were successful, and there are still many opportunities for further development and further cost reduction.

  16. Generation and focusing of pulsed intense ion beams. Technical progress report, 20 August 1981-30 September 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, D.A.; Kusse, B.R.; Sudan, R.N.

    1983-07-01

    The progress on this contract is described in two parts. The first deals with the technical operation of the LION accelerator which is the exact equivalent to one line of PBFA-I. The second part is concerned with the experimental results on the ion diode mounted at the front end of the LION accelerator

  17. Impact of Environmental Regulation and Technical Progress on Industrial Carbon Productivity: An Approach Based on Proxy Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the main influencing factors of China’s industrial carbon productivity by incorporating environmental regulation and technical progress into an econometric model. The paper focuses on data from 35 of China’s industrial sectors and covers the period from 2006 to 2014, in order to examine the impact of environmental regulation and technical progress on carbon productivity. Methods applied include panel fixed effect model, panel random effect model and two stage least squares with instrumental variables (IV-2SLS. The effect of environmental regulation and technical progress has industrial heterogeneity. The paper subdivides industrial sectors into capital and technology intensive, resource intensive and labor intensive sectors according to factor intensiveness. The estimation results of the subgroups have uncovered that for capital and technology intensive and resource intensive sectors, environmental regulation has a more significant impact than technical progress; while for labor intensive sectors, innovation more significantly influences carbon productivity. In addition, foreign direct investment (FDI and industrialization level facilitate improving carbon productivity for the full sample. By contrast, industrial structure inhibits the overall industrial carbon productivity. The industry-specific results indicate that for capital and technology intensive sectors, optimizing of the industrial structure can improve carbon productivity; for resource intensive sectors, FDI and energy consumption structure should be emphasized more; for labor intensive sectors, industrialization levels help enhance carbon productivity. Finally the industrial sector-specific policy suggestions are proposed.

  18. PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Technical progress report No. 24, Third quarter, CY 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This is the twenty-fourth and final Technical Progress Report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the work completed during the Third Quarter of CY 1995. All activity this quarter was directed toward the completion of the program final report. A draft copy of the final report was forwarded to DOE during this quarter, and DOE submitted their comments on the report to AEPSC. DOE requested that Westinghouse write an appendix to the report covering the performance of the fail-safe regenerator devices during Tad operation, and Westinghouse subsequently prepared the appendix. Additional DOE comments were incorporated into the report, and it will be issued in camera-ready form by the end of October, 1995, which is the program end date. Appendix 1 presents the results of filter candle posttest examination by Westinghouse performed on selected filter candles following final shutdown of the system.

  19. SIGNIFICANT PROGRESS IN THE DEPLOYMENT OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE RETRIEVAL OF HANFORD RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RAYMOND RE; DODD RA; CARPENTER KE; STURGES MH

    2008-01-01

    Significant enhancements in the development and deployment of new technologies for removing waste from storage tanks at the Hanford Site have resulted in accelerated progress and reduced costs for tank cleanup. CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. is the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection's prime contractor responsible for safely storing and retrieving approximately 53 million gallons of highly-radioactive and hazardous waste stored in 177 underground tanks. The waste is stored in 149 older single-shell tanks (SST) and 28 newer double-shell tanks (DST) that are grouped in 18 so-called farms near the center of the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State. Tank contents include materials from years of World-War II and post-war weapons production, which account for 60 percent by volume of the nation's high-level radioactive waste. A key strategy for improved cleanup is the development and deployment of innovative technologies, which enhance worker safety, resolve technical challenges, streamline retrieval processes, and cut project costs and durations. During the past seven years of tank cleanout projects we have encountered conditions and waste chemistry that defy conventional approaches, requiring a variety of new tools and techniques. Through the deployment of advanced technology and the creative application of resources, we are finding ways to accomplish the retrieval process safely, swiftly, and economically. To date, retrieval operations have been completed in seven tanks, including a record six tanks in a two-year period. Retrieval operations are in progress for another three tanks. This paper describes the following tank cleanup technologies deployed at Hanford in the past few years: Modified waste sluicing, High pressure water lance, Mobile retrieval tools, Saltcake dissolution, Vacuum retrieval, Sparging of wastes, Selective dissolution for waste treatment, Oxalic acid dissolution, High-pressure water mixers, Variable height pumps

  20. [Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the following topics: the Wisconsin test facility for storage cells; results of target tests; the new UHV target test system; funding request for a new atomic beam system; and planning of storage ring experiments

  1. Technical Note: Comparison of storage strategies of sea surface microlayer samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schneider-Zapp

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The sea surface microlayer (SML is an important biogeochemical system whose physico-chemical analysis often necessitates some degree of sample storage. However, many SML components degrade with time so the development of optimal storage protocols is paramount. We here briefly review some commonly used treatment and storage protocols. Using freshwater and saline SML samples from a river estuary, we investigated temporal changes in surfactant activity (SA and the absorbance and fluorescence of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM over four weeks, following selected sample treatment and storage protocols. Some variability in the effectiveness of individual protocols most likely reflects sample provenance. None of the various protocols examined performed any better than dark storage at 4 °C without pre-treatment. We therefore recommend storing samples refrigerated in the dark.

  2. Technical Aspects Regarding the Preservation of Dry Onions in Different Storage Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Vintila

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Research refers to the ability to maintain the quality of dry onions in different conditions of temperature, the three varieties used in experimentation (De Buzau, Daytona and Countach being stored after proper preparation at ambient temperature (+20…+22°C, refrigerated (+10…+12°C and cold conditions (+3…+5°C. Storage life, the level of weight (mass and decay losses and evolution of some chemical components determined from the 9 variants led to the conclusion that the best results were obtained by De Buzau variety for storage under ambient conditions and Daytona variety for storage under refrigerated and cold conditions. Moreover large differences between varieties and their behavior depending on storage conditions require choosing resistant cultivars and optimum storage temperatures according to destination and period of marketing or consumption.

  3. Simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume I. Technical report. [SIMWEST code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, A.W.; Edsinger, R.W.; Chan, Y.K.

    1977-08-01

    The effort developed a comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic). An acronym for the program is SIMWEST (Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage). The level of detail of SIMWEST is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. Volume I gives a brief overview of the SIMWEST program and describes the two NASA defined simulation studies.

  4. Progress and future direction for the interim safe storage and disposal of Hanford high level waste (HLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wodrich, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the progress made at the largest environmental cleanup program in the United States. Substantial advances in methods to start interim safe storage of Hanford Site high-level wastes, waste characterization to support both safety- and disposal-related information needs, and proceeding with cost-effective disposal by the US DOE and its Hanford Site contractors, have been realized. Challenges facing the Tank Waste Remediation System Program, which is charged with the dual and parallel missions of interim safe storage and disposal of the high-level tank waste stored at the Hanford Site, are described

  5. Economic and Technical Aspects of Flexible Storage Photovoltaic Systems in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Zsiborács

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy has an increasing role in the global energy mix. The need for flexible storage photovoltaic systems and energy storage in electricity networks is becoming increasingly important as more generating capacity uses solar and wind energy. This paper is a study on the economic questions related to flexible storage photovoltaic systems of household size in 2018. The aim is to clarify whether it is possible in the European Union to achieve a payback of the costs of flexible storage photovoltaic system investments for residential customers considering the technology-specific storage aspects prevalent in 2018. We studied seven different flexible storage photovoltaic investments with different battery technologies in Germany, France, Italy, and Spain because, in Europe, these countries have a prominent role with regard to the spread of photovoltaic technology. These investment alternatives are studied with the help of economic indicators for the different cases of the selected countries. At the end of our paper we come to the conclusion that an investment of a flexible storage photovoltaic (PV system with Olivine-type-LiFePO4, Lithium-Ion, Vented lead-acid battery (OPzS, Sealed lead-acid battery (OPzV, and Aqueous Hybrid Ion (AHI batteries can have a positive net present value due to the high electricity prices in Germany and in Spain. The most cost-effective technology was the Olivine-type-LiFePO4 and the Lithium-Ion at the time of the study. We suggest the provision of governmental support and uniform European modifications to the regulatory framework, especially concerning grid fees and tariffs, which would be necessary in the beginning to help to introduce these flexible storage PV systems to the market.

  6. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Second Quarter of the Second Budget Period, July 1 through September 30, 1993, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scaleup of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source. Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; Combustion Gas Turbine; and Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility.

  7. Instrumentation of dynamic gas pulse loading system. Technical progress report, first quarter 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohaupt, H.

    1992-04-14

    The overall goal of this work is to further develop and field test a system of stimulating oil and gas wells, which increases the effective radius of the well bore so that more oil can flow into it, by recording pressure during the gas generation phase in real time so that fractures can be induced more predictably in the producing formation. Task 1: Complete the laboratory studies currently underway with the prototype model of the instrumentation currently being studied. Task 2: Perform field tests of the model in the Taft/Bakersfield area, utilizing operations closest to the engineers working on the project, and optimize the unit for various conditions encountered there. Task 3: Perform field test of the model in DGPL jobs which are scheduled in the mid-continent area, and optimize the unit for downhole conditions encountered there. Task 4: Analyze and summarize the results achieved during the complete test series, documenting the steps for usage of downhole instrumentation in the field, and compile data specifying use of the technology by others. Task 5: Prepare final report for DOE, and include also a report on the field tests completed. Describe and estimate the probability of the technology being commercialized and in what time span. The project has made substantial technical progress, though we are running about a month behind schedule. Expenditures are in line with the schedule. Increased widespread interest in the use of DGPL stimulation has kept us very busy. The computer modeling and test instrumentation developed under this program is already being applied to commercial operations.

  8. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized-bed-augmented compressed-air energy-storage system. Volume I. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

    1981-09-01

    An energy storage system which could be attractive for future electric utility peak-load applications is a modified gas turbine power system utilizing underground storage of very high pressure air. The compressed air energy storage (CAES) concept involves using off-peak electricity generated from indigenous coal or nuclear sources to compress air, storing the air in large underground facilities, and withdrawing the air during peak-load periods when it would be heated by combustion and expanded through gas turbines to generate power. The attractiveness of the CAES concept is based upon its potential to supply competitively priced peaking energy, to reduce peak-load power plant dependence on petroleum-based fuels, and to provide a means for leveling the utility system load demand. Therefore, a technical and economic assessment of coal-fired fluidized bed (FBC) combustor/compressed air energy storage (FBC/CAES) systems was performed and is described. The conclusions drawn from the FBC/CAES study program are encouraging. They indicate that pressurized FBC/CAES power plants should be technologically feasible, provide good performance, and be economically competitive. Specifically, it is concluded that: coal-fired FBC/CAES systems should be technically feasible in the near future and potentially attractive for peak-load power generation; and an open-bed PFBC/CAES configuration would provide the best candidate for early commercialization. It has relatively low risk combined with moderate cost and reasonable round-trip heat rate. It also has the potential for future growth options which tend to reduce costs and lower fuel consumption.

  9. Technical conservatisms in NWTS repository conceptual designs. National Waste Terminal Storage Repository No. 1: special study No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    Prior studies have developed conceptual designs for National Waste Terminal Storage Repositories 1 and 2. Due to the considerable detail and volume of the documents describing these designs, it is often difficult to identify and comprehend the substantial conservatisms contained within them. This study identifies and explains the major technical conservatisms in these two conceptual designs in a concise and readily understandable format. The areas discussed include thermal loading of the geologic structure, rock mechanics and underground design, waste throughput capacity, hoisting systems, nuclear criticality safety, confinement of radioactive materials, occupational exposure and health physics, environmental effects, and cost estimates. Conservatisms are described in detail, quantified where possible, and compared to appropriate criteria

  10. National Waste Terminal Storage Program: management and technical program plan, FY 1976--FY 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The discussion on the management plan covers the program, responsibilities, general program schedule and logic, Office of Waste Isolation organization and facilities, management approach, administrative plan, and public affairs plan. The technical program plan includes geological studies, technical support studies, engineering studies, waste facility projects, environmental studies, system studies, data management, and international activities. The information contained in this report is obsolete and of historical interest only

  11. Savannah River Plant, Works Technical Department monthly progress report for March 1956

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1956-01-01

    This document details activities of the Works Technical Department during the month of March 1956. It covers reactor technology, separations technology, engineering assistance and heavy water technology

  12. 1984 Federal Interim Storage fee study: a technical and economic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, R.L.

    1984-07-01

    JAI examined alternative methods for structuring charges for Federal Interim Storage (FIS) services were examined and the conclusion reached that the combined interests of the Department and the users would be best served, and costs most appropriately recovered, by a two-part fee involving an Initial Payment upon execution of a contract for FIS services followed by a Final Payment upon delivery of the spent fuel to the Department. The Initial Payment would be an advance payment covering the pro rata share of preoperational costs, including (1) the capital costs of the required transfer facilities and storage area, (2) development costs, (3) government administrative costs including storage fund management, and (4) impact aid payments made in accordance with section 136(e) of the Act. The Final Payment would be made at the time of delivery of the spent fuel to the Department and would be calculated to cover the sum of the following: (1) any under-or over-estimation in the costs used to calculate the Initial Payment of the fee including savings due to rod consolidation), (2) module costs (i.e., storage casks, drywells, or silos), and (3) the total estimated cost of operation and decommissioning of the FIS facilities (including government administrative costs, storage fund management and impact aid). Charges for the transport of spent fuel from the reactor site to FIS facilities would be separately assessed at cost since these will be specific to each reactor site and destination

  13. Final Technical Report: Imaging a Dry Storage Cask with Cosmic Ray Muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haori; Hayward, Jason; Can, Liao; Liu, Zhengzhi

    2018-03-31

    The goal of this project is to build a scaled prototype system for monitoring used nuclear fuel (UNF) dry storage casks (DSCs) through cosmic ray muon imaging. Such a system will have the capability of verifying the content inside a DSC without opening it. Because of the growth of the nuclear power industry in the U.S. and the policy decision to ban reprocessing of commercial UNF, the used fuel inventory at commercial reactor sites has been increasing. Currently, UNF needs to be moved to independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs), as its inventory approaches the limit on capacity of on-site wet storage. Thereafter, the fuel will be placed in shipping containers to be transferred to a final disposal site. The ISFSIs were initially licensed as temporary facilities for ~20-yr periods. Given the cancellation of the Yucca mountain project and no clear path forward, extended dry-cask storage (~100 yr.) at ISFSIs is very likely. From the point of view of nuclear material protection, accountability and control technologies (MPACT) campaign, it is important to ensure that special nuclear material (SNM) in UNF is not stolen or diverted from civilian facilities for other use during the extended storage.

  14. ISABELLE: a progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the ISABELLE project, which has the objective of constructing a high-energy proton colliding beam facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major technical features of the intersecting storage accelerators with their projected performance are described. Application of over 1000 superconducting magnets in the two rings represents the salient characteristic of the machine. The status of the entire project, the technical progress made so far, and difficulties encountered are reviewed.

  15. ISABELLE: a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the ISABELLE project, which has the objective of constructing a high-energy proton colliding beam facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major technical features of the intersecting storage accelerators with their projected performance are described. Application of over 1000 superconducting magnets in the two rings represents the salient characteristic of the machine. The status of the entire project, the technical progress made so far, and difficulties encountered are reviewed

  16. An expanded system simulation model for solar energy storage (technical report), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, A. W.

    1979-01-01

    The simulation model for wind energy storage (SIMWEST) program now includes wind and/or photovoltaic systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic) and is available for the UNIVAC 1100 series and the CDC 6000 series computers. The level of detail is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind and/or photovoltaic energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. The first program is a precompiler which generates computer models (in FORTRAN) of complex wind and/or photovoltaic source/storage/application systems, from user specifications using the respective library components. The second program provides the techno-economic system analysis with the respective I/0, the integration of system dynamics, and the iteration for conveyance of variables.

  17. Decomposing productivity growth allowing efficiency gains and price-induced technical progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.; Silva, E.; Stefanou, S.

    2000-01-01

    Time- and firm-specific output technical efficiency measures are generated within a price-induced technological change framework. The firm-specific production frontier incorporates past prices as an argument encouraging innovation and a time trend to account for exogenous technical change. The

  18. 1987 Federal interim storage fee study: A technical and economic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    This document is the latest in a series of reports that are published annually by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This information in the report, which was prepared by E.R. Johnson Associates under subcontract to PNL, will be used by the DOE to establish a payment schedule for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel under the Federal Interim Storage (FIS) Program, which was mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The information in this report will be used to establish the schedule of charges for FIS services for the year commencing January 1, 1988. 13 tabs.

  19. 1987 Federal interim storage fee study: A technical and economic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This document is the latest in a series of reports that are published annually by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This information in the report, which was prepared by E.R. Johnson Associates under subcontract to PNL, will be used by the DOE to establish a payment schedule for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel under the Federal Interim Storage (FIS) Program, which was mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The information in this report will be used to establish the schedule of charges for FIS services for the year commencing January 1, 1988. 13 tabs

  20. Coal to SNG: Technical progress, modeling and system optimization through exergy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Sheng; Ji, Xiaozhou; Zhang, Xiaosong; Gao, Lin; Jin, Hongguang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Technical progresses of coal to SNG technologies are reported. • The entire coal to SNG system is modeled. • Coupling between SNG production and power generation is investigated. • Breakthrough points for further energy saving are determined. • System performance is optimized based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics. - Abstract: For both energy security and CO 2 emission reduction, synthetic natural gas (SNG) production from coal is an important path to implement clean coal technologies in China. In this paper, an overview of the progress of coal to SNG technologies, including the development of catalysts, reactor designs, synthesis processes, and systems integration, is provided. The coal to SNG system is modeled, the coupling between SNG production and power generation is investigated, the breakthrough points for further energy savings are determined, and the system performance is optimized based on the first and the second laws of thermodynamics. From the viewpoint of the first law of thermodynamics, the energy conversion efficiency of coal to SNG system can reach 59.8%. To reduce the plant auxiliary power, the breakthrough points are the development of low-energy-consumption oxygen production technology and gas purification technology or seeking new oxidants for coal gasification instead of oxygen. From the viewpoint of the second law of thermodynamics, the major exergy destruction in a coal to SNG system occurs in the coal gasification unit, SNG synthesis unit and the raw syngas cooling process. How to reduce the exergy destruction in these units is the key to energy savings and system performance enhancement. The conversion ratio of the first SNG synthesis reactor and the split ratio of the recycle gas are key factors that determine the performance of both the SNG synthesis process and the whole plant. A “turning point” phenomenon is observed: when the split ratio is higher than 0.90, the exergy destruction of the SNG

  1. Technical factors in the site selection for a radioactive wastes storage of low and intermediate level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badillo A, V. E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Palacios H, J. C.

    2009-10-01

    The storage on surface or near surface it is viable for wastes of low and intermediate level which contain radio nuclides of short half life that would decay at insignificant levels of radioactivity in some decades and also radio nuclides of long half life but in very low concentrations. The sites selection, for the construction of radioactive waste storages, that present an appropriate stability at long term, a foreseeable behavior to future and a capacity to fulfill other operational requirements, is one of the great tasks that confront the waste disposal agencies. In the selection of potential sites for the construction of a radioactive wastes storage of low and intermediate level, several basic judgments should be satisfied that concern to physiography, climatology, geologic, geo-hydrology, tectonic and seismic aspects; as well as factors like the population density, socioeconomic develops and existent infrastructure. the necessary technician-scientific investigations for the selection of a site for the construction of radioactive waste storages are presented in this work and they are compared with the pre-selection factors realized in specify areas in previous studies in different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  2. Report on technical feasibility of underground pumped hydroelectric storage in a marble quarry site in the Northeast United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chas. T. Main, Inc.

    1982-03-01

    The technical and economic aspects of constructing a very high head underground hydroelectric pumped storage were examined at a prefeasibility level. Excavation of existing caverns in the West Rutland Vermont marble quarry would be used to construct the underground space. A plant capacity of 1200 MW and 12 h of continuous capacity were chosen as plant operating conditions. The site geology, plant design, and electrical and mechanical equipment required were considered. The study concluded that the cost of the 1200 MW underground pumped storage hydro electric project at this site even with the proposed savings from marketable material amounts to between $581 and $595 per kilowatt of installed capacity on a January 1982 pricing level. System studies performed by the planning group of the New England Power System indicate that the system could economically justify up to about $442 per kilowatt on an energy basis with no credit for capacity. To accommodate the plant with the least expensive pumping energy, a coal and nuclear generation mix of approximately 65% would have to be available before the project becomes feasible. It is not expected that this condition can be met before the year 2000 or beyond. It is therefore concluded that the West Rutland underground pumped storage facility is uneconomic at this time. Several variables however could have marked influence on future planning and should be examined on periodic basis.

  3. 1986 Federal Interim Storage fee study: a technical and economic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    JAI examined alternative methods for structuring charges for federal interim storage (FIS) services and concluded that the combined interests of the Department and the users would be best served, and costs most appropriately recovered, by a two-part fee involving an Initial Payment upon execution of a contract for FIS services followed by a Final Payment upon delivery of the spent fuel to the Department. The Initial Payment would be an advance payment covering the pro rata share of preoperational costs, including (1) the capital costs of the required transfer facilities and storage area, (2) development costs, (3) government administrative costs including storage fund management, (4) impact aid payments made in accordance with Section 136(e) of the Act, and (5) module costs (i.e., storage casks, drywells or silos). The Final Payment would be made at the time of delivery of the spent fuel to the Department and would be calculated to cover the sum of the following: (1) any under- or over-estimation in the costs used to calculate the Initial Payment of the fee (including savings due to rod consolidation), and (2) the total estimated cost of operation and decommissioning of the FIS facilities (including government administrative costs, storage fund management and impact aid). The module costs were included in the Initial Payment to preclude the possible need to obtain appropriations for federal funds to support the purchase of the modules in advance of receipt of the Final Payment. Charges for the transport of spent fuel from the reactor site to FIS facilities would be separately assessed at actual cost since these will be specific to each reactor site and destination

  4. Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium quarterly technical progress report, August 1--October 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes activities of the Center under the following topical sections: Electronic resource library; Environmental restoration and protection; Health and safety; Waste management; Communication program; Education program; Training; Analytical development; Materials science; Plutonium processing and handling; and Storage.

  5. Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium. Quarterly technical progress report, February 1, 1998--April 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    Activities from the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium are described. Areas of work include materials science of nuclear and explosive materials, plutonium processing and handling, robotics, and storage.

  6. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-01-19

    The energy storage research and development effort within the VT Program is responsible for researching and improving advanced batteries and ultracapacitors for a wide range of vehicle applications, including HEVs, PHEVs, EVs, and fuel cell vehicles (FCVs).

  7. Savannah River Plant Works Technical Department monthly progress report for May 1958: Deleted Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-06-17

    This progress report by the Atomic Energy Division of the Savannah River Plant covers: Reactor Technology; Separation Technology; Engineering Assistance; Health Physics; and General Laboratory Work. (JT)

  8. A Simple extension of Dematerialization Theory: Incorporation of Technical Progress and the Rebound Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Magee, Christopher L.; Devezas, Tessaleno C.

    2016-01-01

    Dematerialization is the reduction in the quantity of materials needed to produce something useful over time. Dematerialization fundamentally derives from ongoing increases in technical performance but it can be counteracted by demand rebound - increases in usage because of increased value (or decreased cost) that also results from increasing technical performance. A major question then is to what extent technological performance improvement can offset and is offsetting continuously increasin...

  9. Federal interim storage fee study for civilian spent nuclear fuel: a technical and economical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    This report describes the study conducted by the Department of Energy (the Department) regarding payment charges for the federal interim storage (FIS) of spent fuel and presents the details of the study results. It describes the selection of a methodology for calculating a FIS fee schedule, sets forth the estimates of cost for construction and operation of FIS facilities, provides a range of estimates for the fee for FIS services, and identifies special contractual considerations associated with providing FIS services to authorized users. The fee is structured for a range of spent fuel capacities because of uncertainties regarding the schedule of availability and amount of spent fuel that may require and qualify for FIS. The results set forth in the report were used as a basis for development of the report entitled Payment Charges for Federal Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Civilian Nuclear Power Plants in the United States, dated July 1983

  10. Final Scientific/Technical Report Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest - CCSTNW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Workman, James

    2013-09-30

    This report details the activities of the Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest (CCSTNW) program 2009 to 2013. The CCSTNW created, implemented, and provided Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) training over the period of the program. With the assistance of an expert advisory board, CCSTNW created curriculum and conducted three short courses, more than three lectures, two symposiums, and a final conference. The program was conducted in five phases; 1) organization, gap analysis, and form advisory board; 2) develop list serves, website, and tech alerts; 3) training needs survey; 4) conduct lectures, courses, symposiums, and a conference; 5) evaluation surveys and course evaluations. This program was conducted jointly by Environmental Outreach and Stewardship Alliance (dba. Northwest Environmental Training Center – NWETC) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL).

  11. 1985 Federal Interim Storage Fee Study: a technical and economic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    JAI examined alternative methods for structuring charges for FIS services and concluded that the combined interests of the Deaprtment and the users would be best served, and costs most appropriately recovered, by a two-part fee involving an Initial Payment upon execution of a contract for FIS services followed by a Final Payment upon delivery of the spent fuel to the Department. The Initial Payment would be an advance payment covering the pro rata share of preoperational costs, including (1) the capital costs of the required transfer facilities and storage area, (2) development costs, (3) government administrative costs including storage fund management, (4) impact aid payments made in accordance with section 136(e) of the Act, and (5) module costs (i.e., storage casks, drywells or silos). The Final Payment would be made at the time of delivery of the spent fuel to the Department and would be calculated to cover the sum of the following: (1) any under-or over-estimation in the costs used to calculate the Initial Payment of the fee (including savings due to rod consolidation), and (2) the total estimated cost of operation and decommissioning of the FIS facilities (including government administrative costs, storage fund management and impact aid). The module costs were included in the Initial Payment to preclude the possible need to obtain appropriations for federal funds to support the purchase of the modules in advance of receipt of the Final Payment. Charges for the transport of spent fuel from the reactor site to FIS facilities would be separately assessed at actual cost since these will be specific to each reactor site and destination

  12. AFCT/TFCT/ISFS Program. Technical progress report for the period April 1, 1978--June 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, O.F. (comp.)

    1978-08-01

    This is the tenth in a series of quarterly progress reports on studies performed for the Alternate Fuel Cycle Technologies/Thorium Fuel Cycle Technologies/International Spent Fuel Receipt and Storage (AFCT/TFCT/ISFS) Program. This program provides information needed by industry to close the back end of the power reactor fuel cycle. During the past quarter, studies were conducted in the following tasks: thorium resource price analyses; spent fuel receipt and storage; investigation of air cleaning processes for removing TBP from off-gas streams; study of iodine chemistry in process solutions, high-level waste treatment; electropolishing to decontaminate metallic waste from alternate and thorium converter fuel cycles; U.S. scale transport, dispersion and removal model comparison; safety criticality experiments; and criticality research in support of thorium fuel cycle.

  13. The Impacts of Technical Progress on Sulfur Dioxide Kuznets Curve in China: A Spatial Panel Data Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to reveal the nexus for sulfur dioxide (SO2 emission and income, as well as the effects of technical progress on SO2 emission in China based on environment Kuznets curve (EKC hypothesis. The spatial panel technique is used in case the coefficient estimates are biased due to the negligence of spatial dependence. With the provincial panel data of China from 2004 to 2014, this is the first research that finds an inverse N-trajectory of the relationship between SO2 emission and economic growth and confirms the beneficial impacts of technical advancement on SO2 emission abatement. The empirical results also suggest that the industrial structure change is an important driving force of the SO2 EKC. In addition, the direct and spillover effects of determinants on sulfur emission are clarified and estimated by a correct approach. Finally, we check the stability of our conclusions on the EKC shape for SO2 and technical progress effects when controlling for different variables and specifications, through which we find the turning points are sensitive to variables selections.

  14. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Annual Technical Progress Report of Ecological Research, June 30, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul M. Bertsch, (Director)

    2002-06-30

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of The University of Georgia (UGA) and has been conducting ecological research on the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina for 50 years. The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts fundamental and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Laboratory's research mission during the 2002 fiscal year was fulfilled with the publication of 76 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical staff, students, and visiting scientists. An additional 50 journal articles have been submitted or are in press. Other noteworthy events took place as faculty members, staff, and graduate students received awards. These are described in the section titled Special Accomplishments of Faculty, Staff, Students, and Administration on page 51. Notable scientific accomplishments include work conducted on contaminant transport, stable isotopes, sandhills ecology, and phytoremediation: (1) A collaborative study between Dr. Tom Hinton at SREL and scientists at SRTC demonstrated the feasibility of using illite clay to sequester 137Cs in sediments along the P and R reactor cooling canal system, where approximately 3,000 acres of land are contaminated. Overall, the study showed significant decreases in cesium concentrations and bioavailability following the addition of illite with no sign of harm to the ecosystem. While the cesium remains sequestered from the biosphere, its radioactivity decays and the process progresses from contaminant immobilization to remediation. (2) SREL's stable isotope laboratory is now fully functional. Stable isotope distributions in nature can provide important insights into many historical and current environmental processes. Dr. Christopher Romanek is leading SREL's research

  15. High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting. Final Technical Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul T. Fini; Shuji Nakamura

    2005-01-01

    In this final technical progress report we summarize research accomplished during Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. Two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), pursued the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging/luminaire design standpoints. The UCSB team initially pursued the development of blue gallium nitride (GaN)-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, as well as ultraviolet GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). In Year 2, the emphasis shifted to resonant-cavity light emitting diodes, also known as micro-cavity LEDs when extremely thin device cavities are fabricated. These devices have very directional emission and higher light extraction efficiency than conventional LEDs. Via the optimization of thin-film growth and refinement of device processing, we decreased the total cavity thickness to less than 1 (micro)m, such that micro-cavity effects were clearly observed and a light extraction efficiency of over 10% was reached. We also began the development of photonic crystals for increased light extraction, in particular for so-called ''guided modes'' which would otherwise propagate laterally in the device and be re-absorbed. Finally, we pursued the growth of smooth, high-quality nonpolar a-plane and m-plane GaN films, as well as blue light emitting diodes on these novel films. Initial nonpolar LEDs showed the expected behavior of negligible peak wavelength shift with increasing drive current. M-plane LEDs in particular show promise, as unpackaged devices had unsaturated optical output power of ∼ 3 mW at 200 mA drive current. The LRC's tasks were aimed at developing the subcomponents necessary for packaging UCSB's light emitting diodes, and packaging them to produce a white light

  16. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Annual Technical Progress Report of Ecological Research, June 30, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul M. Bertsch,

    2002-01-01

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of The University of Georgia (UGA) and has been conducting ecological research on the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina for 50 years. The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts fundamental and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Laboratory's research mission during the 2002 fiscal year was fulfilled with the publication of 76 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical staff, students, and visiting scientists. An additional 50 journal articles have been submitted or are in press. Other noteworthy events took place as faculty members, staff, and graduate students received awards. These are described in the section titled Special Accomplishments of Faculty, Staff, Students, and Administration on page 51. Notable scientific accomplishments include work conducted on contaminant transport, stable isotopes, sandhills ecology, and phytoremediation: (1) A collaborative study between Dr. Tom Hinton at SREL and scientists at SRTC demonstrated the feasibility of using illite clay to sequester 137Cs in sediments along the P and R reactor cooling canal system, where approximately 3, 000 acres of land are contaminated. Overall, the study showed significant decreases in cesium concentrations and bioavailability following the addition of illite with no sign of harm to the ecosystem. While the cesium remains sequestered from the biosphere, its radioactivity decays and the process progresses from contaminant immobilization to remediation. (2) SREL's stable isotope laboratory is now fully functional. Stable isotope distributions in nature can provide important insights into many historical and current environmental processes. Dr. Christopher Romanek is leading SREL's research in this area

  17. Low-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program. Annual progress report, October 1977--September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunton, G.D.; Eissenberg, D.M.; Kedl, R.J.

    1979-05-01

    The Low-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage (LTTES) Program is part of a national effort to develop means for reducing United States dependence on oil and natural gas as primary energy sources. To this end, LTTES addresses the development of advanced sensible and latent heat storage technologies that permit substitution by solar or off-peak electrical energies or permit conservation by recovery and reuse of waste heat. Emphasis is on applying these technologies to heating and cooling of buildings. As the LTTES program continued to mature, a number of technologies were identified for development emphasis, including (1) seasonal storage of hot and cold water from waste or natural sources in aquifers, (2) short-term or daily storage of heat or coolness from solar or off-peak electrical sources in phase-change materials, and (3) recovery and reuse of rejected industrial heat through thermal storage. These areas have been further divided into three major and four minor activities; significant accomplishments are reported for each.

  18. Technical study of a thermally dense long term interim storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Duigou, A.; Badie, M.; Duret, B.; Bricard, A.

    2001-01-01

    The COFRE concept is aimed at the surface and thermal densification of the interim storage facility for irradiated fuels. The facility provides the biological shielding. A conditioning cell is used to load and retrieve the fuel assemblies. The facility container is the second containment barrier. The high power levels are managed by an auxiliary cooling system whose original feature is the passive use of a water evaporation-condensation cycle in a sealed circuit. The removable evaporator abuts the container. The air cooled condenser is placed outside the facility. Contact resistance and heat pipe mode were successfully modelled and are undergoing experimental validation on the THERESE and REBECA loops. (author)

  19. Technical concept for a test of geologic storage of spent reactor fuel in the climax granite, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramspott, L.D.; Ballou, L.B.; Carlson, R.C.; Montan, D.N.; Butkovich, T.R.; Duncan, J.E.; Patrick, W.C.; Wilder, D.G.; Brough, W.G.; Mayr, M.C.

    1979-01-01

    We plan to emplace spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear reactor in the Climax granite at the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site. In this generic test, 11 canisters of spent fuel will be emplaced with 6 electrical simulator canisters in a storage drift 420 m below in surface and their effects compared. Two adjacent drifts will contain electrical heaters, operated to simulate the temperature-stress-displacement fields of a large repository. We describe the test objectives, the technical issues, the site, the preoperational measurement program, thermal and mechanical response calculations, the characteristics of the spent fuel, the field instrumentation and data-acquisition systems, and the system for handling the spent fuel

  20. Directed technical change and the adoption of CO2 abatement technology. The case of CO2 capture and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, Vincent M.; Reilly, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the cost-effectiveness of combining traditional environmental policy, such as CO 2 -trading schemes, and technology policy that has aims of reducing the cost and speeding the adoption of CO 2 abatement technology. For this purpose, we develop a dynamic general equilibrium model that captures empirical links between CO 2 emissions associated with energy use, directed technical change and the economy. We specify CO 2 capture and storage (CCS) as a discrete CO 2 abatement technology. We find that combining CO 2 -trading schemes with an adoption subsidy is the most effective instrument to induce adoption of the CCS technology. Such a subsidy directly improves the competitiveness of the CCS technology by compensating for its markup over the cost of conventional electricity. Yet, introducing R and D subsidies throughout the entire economy leads to faster adoption of the CCS technology as well and in addition can be cost-effective in achieving the abatement target. (author)

  1. Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium quarterly technical progress report, August 1, 1997--October 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes activities of the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium during the quarter. The report describes the Electronic Resource Library; DOE support activities; current and future environmental health and safety programs; pollution prevention and pollution avoidance; communication, education, training, and community involvement programs; and nuclear and other material studies, including plutonium storage and disposition studies.

  2. Technical description - interim storage, encapsulation and disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of the annex Technical description is, in accordance with Chapter 22 paragraph 1 Environmental Code to describe the candidate operations and facilities. In particular, things that are important for their environmental impact are described. SKB's goal of the appendix is to describe the facilities, activities, pollution sources, land usage and more during construction, operation and decommissioning, to the extent and on a level of detail, so that the Environment Court without requiring additions can prepare the matter for the government's admissibility test

  3. Technical feasibility and financial analysis of hybrid wind-photovoltaic system with hydrogen storage for Cooma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakya, B.D.; Aye, L. [Melbourne Univ., Victoria (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Musgrave, P. [Snowy Hydro Ltd., Cooma, NSW (Australia)

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of a stand-alone hybrid wind-photovoltaic (PV) system incorporating compressed hydrogen gas storage was studied for Cooma (Australia). Cooma has an average annual solar and wind energy availability of 1784 and 932 kWh/m{sup 2}, respectively. A system with 69 kWh{sub e}/day (load) and 483 kWh{sub e}(storage) was studied. Hydrogen is generated in electrolysers using excess electricity from the system. The system components were selected according to their availability and cost. The 'discounted cash flow' method, with the 'levelized energy cost' (LEC) as a financial indicator was used for analysis. Configurations with PV% of 100, 60, 12 and zero were analysed. The lowest LEC of AU $2.52/kWh{sub e} was found for 100% PV. The cost of hydrogen generation from 100% PV was AU $692/GJ of hydrogen. Fifty-two percent of the total project costs were due to the electrolyser. Hence, a reduction in the electrolyser cost would reduce the cost of the overall system. (Author)

  4. Theoretical particle physics. Technical progress report, May 1, 1985-April 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottlieb, S.A.; Hendry, A.W.; Kostelecky, V.A.; Lichtenberg, D.B.

    1986-05-01

    Research activities during this past year included theoretical work in lattice gauge theory, EMC effect, supersymmetry and supergravity, weak interactions including CP violation, and superstrings. Progress in all these areas is reported

  5. Symbol manipulation by computer applied to plasma physics. Technical progress report 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, B.

    1977-09-01

    Progress has been made in automating the calculation of parametric processes analytically by computer. The computations are performed automatically to lowest order quickly and efficiently. Work has started on a method for solving the nonlinear differential equations describing interacting modes

  6. University of Florida, University research program in robotics. Annual technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crane, C.D. III; Tulenko, J.S.

    1994-05-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of environmental hardening, database, world modeling, vision, man-machine interface, advanced liquid metal reactor inspection robot, and articulated transporter/manipulator system (ATMS) development

  7. Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium. Quarterly technical progress report, May 1, 1997--July 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Progress summaries are provided from the Amarillo National Center for Plutonium. Programs include the plutonium information resource center, environment, public health, and safety, education and training, nuclear and other material studies.

  8. Research in elementary particle physics. Technical progress report, June 1, 1983-May 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, L.E.; Schnitzer, H.J.; Bensinger, J.R.; Abbott, L.F.

    1984-01-01

    Under this contract, research has been performed on both the theoretical and experimental properties of elementary particles. A brief description of the work which is either in progress or has been completed is given. Publications are listed

  9. Research in elementary particle physics: Technical progress report, June 1, 1987-May 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, L.E.; Schnitzer, H.J.; Abbott, L.F.; Bensinger, J.R.; Blocker, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main topics discussed in the progress report: electron/photon algorithm groups; W and Z analysis; heavy quark analysis; gas gain monitoring; database upgrade; CDF test beam studies; string theory; cosmology; and neutral networks

  10. University of Florida, University research program in robotics. Annual technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, C.D. III; Tulenko, J.S.

    1994-05-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of environmental hardening, database, world modeling, vision, man-machine interface, advanced liquid metal reactor inspection robot, and articulated transporter/manipulator system (ATMS) development.

  11. Technical progress report for the quarter 1 October-31 December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the technical accomplishments on the commercial nuclear waste management programs and on the geologic disposal of nuclear wastes. The program is organized into eight tasks: systems, waste package, site, repository, regulatory and institutional, test facilities and excavations, land acquisition, and program management

  12. Atmospheric Effects of Nuclear Energy Centers (AENEC) Program. Annual technical progress report, July 1975--September 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrinos, A.A.; Hoffman, H.W.

    1977-04-01

    The Technical Memorandum contains information of a preliminary nature from the six participants of the Program describing their activities and presenting the results obtained during the reporting period. The birth of the Program, its definition and evolution are described, and a complete breakdown of responsibilities and tasks assigned to the six AENEC participants is presented

  13. The Michigan high-level radioactive waste program: Final technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report comprises the state of Michigan's final technical report on the location of a proposed high-level radioactive waste disposal site. Included are a list of Michigan's efforts to review the DOE proposal and a detailed report on the application of geographic information systems analysis techniques to the review process

  14. Developing Technical Writing Skills in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory: A Progressive Approach Employing Peer Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragson, Derek E.; Hagen, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Writing formal "journal-style" lab reports is often one of the requirements chemistry and biochemistry students encounter in the physical chemistry laboratory. Helping students improve their technical writing skills is the primary reason this type of writing is a requirement in the physical chemistry laboratory. Developing these skills is an…

  15. Technical progress report for the quarter 1 October-31 December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the technical accomplishments on the commercial nuclear waste management programs and on the geologic disposal of nuclear wastes. The program is organized into eight tasks: systems, waste package, site, repository, regulatory and institutional, test facilities and excavations, land acquisition, and program management. (DLC)

  16. Progress on the Design of the Storage Ring Vacuum System for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillwell, B.; Billett, B.; Brajuskovic, B.; Carter, J.; Kirkus, E.; Lale, M.; Lerch, J.; Noonan, J.; O' Neill, M.; Rocke, B.; Suthar, K.; Walters, D.; Wiemerslage, G.; Zientek, J.

    2017-06-20

    Recent work on the design of the storage ring vacuum system for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project (APS-U) includes: revising the vacuum system design to accommodate a new lattice with reverse bend magnets, modifying the designs of vacuum chambers in the FODO sections for more intense incident synchrotron radiation power, modifying the design of rf-shielding bellows liners for better performance and reliability, modifying photon absorber designs to make better use of available space, and integrated planning of components needed in the injection, extraction and rf cavity straight sections. An overview of progress in these areas is presented.

  17. Progress in measurement and understanding of beam polarization in electron positron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, D.P.; Bremer, H.D.; Kewisch, J.; Lewin, H.C.; Limberg, T.; Mais, H.; Ripken, G.; Rossmanith, R.; Schmidt, R.

    1983-07-01

    A report is presented on the status of attempts to obtain and measure spin polarization in electron-positron storage rings. Experimental results are presented and their relationship to predictions of calculations discussed. Examples of methods for decoupling orbital and spin motion and thus improving polarization are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Thermal Energy Storage for the Small Packaged Terminal Air Conditioning Unit. Quarterly progress report, February 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    To finalize the IceBear design for full-scale production, build two preproduction prototypes, and confirm cost projections for production and market analysis. The 5 tasks being carried out are: Task 1--Finalize thermal energy storage tank design; Task 2--Finalize internal heat exchanger; Task 3--Finalize refrigerant management and control components; Task 4--Preproduction prototype laboratory testing; and Task 5--Reporting.

  19. GT-MHR COMMERCIALZATION STUDY. TECHNICAL PROGRESS AND COST MANAGEMENT REPORT FOR THE PERIOD MAY 1 THROUGH MAY 31, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHENOY, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    A271 GT-MHR COMMERCIALZATION STUDY TECHNICAL PROGRESS AND COST MANAGEMENT REPORT FOR THE PERIOD MAY 1 THROUGH MAY 31, 2003. Petten advised GA the start of the HFR-EU2 irradiation is being delayed until late July 2004. HFR-EU1 (pebble fuel) is also delayed until February/March 2004. The reason for the delays was implementation of new financial regulations at Petten that delayed the contracts for capsule fabrication. Review of the MHR-2 Fuel Product Specification was completed. Revision of the specification to incorporate the review results is in progress. Detailed test matrices have been drafted for capsule irradiation tests and for post-irradiation heating tests proposed for development and qualification of advanced coated-particle fuels capable of meeting anticipated VHTR fuel performance requirements

  20. Technical progress report: Rhode Island crystalline repository project, calendar year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vild, B.F.

    1985-01-01

    A Nuclear Waste Fund established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 provides financial support to affected states to participate in the high-level radioactive waste repository siting program of the US Department of Energy. In Rhode Island, that function is performed by a multidisciplinary Project Review Team consisting of staff from three State agencies. Members of the Review Team attended several meetings in 1985 to voice their concerns directly to DOE. Written comments were also submitted on draft plans and reports. Among the issues raised were inconsistencies in the geologic and environmental data used to screen potential repository sites, the role of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) in the repository program, and regulations regarding the transportation and storage of nuclear waste. The Review Team also began work on a public information booklet describing the repository program in nontechnical terms. That booklet will be distributed widely upon completion

  1. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Korsholm, Søren Bang; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the pla......The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction...... phased out during 2007. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2007....

  2. Optically pumped polarized 23Na vapor target for use in polarized ion source. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.W.

    1984-01-01

    We are currently measuring relaxation times in an optically pumped 23 Na vapor target. Our research is directed toward improvements in the optically pumped Na vapor targets used for the production of polarized H - ions. In this progress report we review the properties of the optically pumped polarized H - ion source and especially the optically pumped Na vapor target employed in this source as well as discussing the progress of our research on relaxation times in an optically pumped Na vapor target. 30 references, 6 figures, 3 tables

  3. Experimental Program Final Technical Progress Report: 15 February 2007 to 30 September 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, Edward R. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

    2014-09-12

    This is the final technical report of the grant DE-FG02-04ER41301 to the University of Colorado at Boulder entitled "Intermediate Energy Nuclear Physics" and describes the results of our funded activities during the period 15 February 2007 to 30 September 2012. These activities were primarily carried out at Fermilab, RHIC, and the German lab DESY. Significant advances in these experiments were carried out by members of the Colorado group and are described in detail.

  4. Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics - Annual Progress Report 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom – DTU, Technical University of Denmark (until 31-12- 2011: Association Euratom – Risø DTU) covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport...... temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2011....

  5. Microwave plasma source for neutral-beam injection systems. Quarterly technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The overall program is described and the technical and programmatic reasons for the decision to pursue both the RFI and ECH sources into the current hydrogen test stage is discussed. We consider the general characteristics of plasma sources in the parameter regime of interest for neutral beam applications. The operatonal characteristics, advantages and potential problems of RFI and ECH sources are discussed. In these latter two sections we rely heavily on experience derived from developing RFI and ECH ion engine sources for NASA

  6. Technical design study. BESSY VSR. Variable pulse length Storage Ring. Upgrade of BESSY II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-06-01

    BESSY-VSR is a novel approach to create in the Storage Ring BESSY II long and short photon pulses simultaneously for all beam lines through a pair of superconducting bunch compression cavities. Pulse-picking schemes will allow each individual user to freely switch between high average flux for X-ray spectroscopy, microscopy and scattering and picosecond pulses up to 500 MHz repetition rate for dynamic studies. Thus BESSY-VSR preserves the present average brilliance of BESSY II and adds the new capability of user accessible picosecond pulses at high repetition rate. In addition, high intensities for THz radiation with intrinsic synchronization of THz and X-ray pulses can be extracted from BESSY-VSR. For the scientific challenges of quantum materials for energy, future information technologies and basic energy science BESSY-VSR is the multi-user Synchrotron Radiation facility that allows with the flexible switching between high repetition rate for picosecond dynamics and high average brightness to move classical 3rd generation Synchrotron Radiation science from the observation of static properties and their quantum mechanical description towards the function and the control of materials properties, technologically relevant switching processes and chemical dynamics and kinetics on the picosecond time scale. Strategic relevance of BESSY-VSR for science with photons BESSY-VSR creates for the highly productive Synchrotron Radiation community a uniquely attractive multi user storage ring adding the soft X-ray picosecond dynamics at MHz repetition rate. In particular investigations on reversible dynamics and switching in molecular systems and materials are accessible in a non destructive way. The investigations with X-rays from BESSY-VSR are highly complementary and compatible to dynamic studies conducted by users with optical lasers at their home universities and laboratories. Technologically, the employed superconducting bunch compression cavities in BESSY-VSR are a

  7. Technical design study. BESSY VSR. Variable pulse length Storage Ring. Upgrade of BESSY II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    BESSY-VSR is a novel approach to create in the Storage Ring BESSY II long and short photon pulses simultaneously for all beam lines through a pair of superconducting bunch compression cavities. Pulse-picking schemes will allow each individual user to freely switch between high average flux for X-ray spectroscopy, microscopy and scattering and picosecond pulses up to 500 MHz repetition rate for dynamic studies. Thus BESSY-VSR preserves the present average brilliance of BESSY II and adds the new capability of user accessible picosecond pulses at high repetition rate. In addition, high intensities for THz radiation with intrinsic synchronization of THz and X-ray pulses can be extracted from BESSY-VSR. For the scientific challenges of quantum materials for energy, future information technologies and basic energy science BESSY-VSR is the multi-user Synchrotron Radiation facility that allows with the flexible switching between high repetition rate for picosecond dynamics and high average brightness to move classical 3rd generation Synchrotron Radiation science from the observation of static properties and their quantum mechanical description towards the function and the control of materials properties, technologically relevant switching processes and chemical dynamics and kinetics on the picosecond time scale. Strategic relevance of BESSY-VSR for science with photons BESSY-VSR creates for the highly productive Synchrotron Radiation community a uniquely attractive multi user storage ring adding the soft X-ray picosecond dynamics at MHz repetition rate. In particular investigations on reversible dynamics and switching in molecular systems and materials are accessible in a non destructive way. The investigations with X-rays from BESSY-VSR are highly complementary and compatible to dynamic studies conducted by users with optical lasers at their home universities and laboratories. Technologically, the employed superconducting bunch compression cavities in BESSY-VSR are a

  8. FY2010 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-01-28

    The energy storage research and development effort within the VT Program is responsible for researching and improving advanced batteries and ultracapacitors for a wide range of vehicle applications, including HEVs, PHEVs, EVs, and fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). Over the past few years, the emphasis of these efforts has shifted from high-power batteries for HEV applications to high-energy batteries for PHEV and EV applications.

  9. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chrology, permuted title, and author, Volume 11(1) through Volume 20(6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W B; Passiakos, M

    1980-06-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review, covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Volume II, No. 1 (January-February 1970), through Volume 20, No. 6 (November-December 1979). It is divided into three sections: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts) followed by a permuted-title (KWIC) index and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC), covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 600 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last ten years are listed in this index.

  10. Accelerator research studies. Technical progress report, July 1, 1985-June 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Progress is reported in these areas: study of instabilities and emittance growth in periodic focusing systems for intense beams; study of collective ion acceleration by intense electron beams and pulse powered plasma focus; and study of microwave sources and parameter scaling for high-frequency linacs

  11. Experimental studies of elementary particle interactions at high energies: Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses progress of experiments at CERN and Fermilab. At CERN, data accumulation and analysis is discussed for the UA-6 experiment, which involves proton-antiproton collisions. At Fermilab, the testing of a collider detector for the Tevatron is discussed

  12. Accelerator research studies: Technical progress report, June 1, 1988--May 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses research progress in the following general topics: Study of transport and longitudinal compression of intense, high-brightness beams; study of collective ion acceleration by intense electron beams and pulse powered plasma focus; and study of microwave sources and parameter scaling for high-frequency electron-positron supercollider linacs

  13. High beta and second stability region transport and stability analysis: Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, M.H.; Phillips, M.W.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes MHD equilibrium and stability studies carried out at Northrop Grumman's Advanced Technology and Development Center during the 12 month period starting March 1, 1994. Progress is reported in both ideal and resistive MHD modeling of TFTR plasmas. The development of codes to calculate the significant effects of highly anisotropic pressure distributions is discussed along with results from this model

  14. Chemistry of gaseous lower-valent actinide halides. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildenbrand, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Objective is to provide thermochemical data for key actinide halide and oxyhalide systems. Progress is reported on bond dissociation energies of gaseous ThCl 4 , ThCl 3 , ThCl 2 , and ThCl; bond dissociation energies of ruthenium fluorides; and mass spectroscopy of UF 6

  15. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaitkus, M.R.; Wein, G.R. [eds.; Johnson, G.

    1993-11-01

    This progress report gives an overview of research programs at the Savannah River Site. Topics include; environmental operations support, wood stork foraging and breeding, defense waste processing, environmental stresses, alterations in the environment due to pollutants, wetland ecology, biodiversity, pond drawdown studies, and environmental toxicology.

  16. High beta and second stability region transport and stability analysis. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, M.H.; Phillips, M.W.

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes MHD equilibrium and stability studies carried out at Grumman's Corporate Research Center during the 6 month period starting March 1, 1994. Progress is reported in both ideal and resistive MHD modeling of TFTR plasmas. The development of codes to calculate the significant effects of highly anisotropic pressure distributions is discussed along with initial results from this model

  17. Technical assessment of the bedrock waste storage at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, R.F.; Corey, J.C.

    1976-11-01

    An assessment of the safety and feasibility of ultimate storage of radioactive wastes produced at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) in horizontal tunnels excavated in the bedrock beneath the plant site is presented. Results indicate that a cavern with an excavated volume of 130 million gallons could contain 80 million gallons of concentrated radioactive SRP wastes with minimal risks if the cavern is located in the impermeable Triassic Basin underlying the Savannah River site. The cavern could be placed so that it would lie wholly within the boundaries of the plantsite. The document summarizes the general geological, hydrological, and chemical knowledge of the geological structures beneath the plantsite; develops evaluation guidelines; and utilizes mathematical models to conduct risk analyses. The risk models are developed from known soil and salt solution mechanics; from past, present, and future geological behavior of the onsite rock formations; and from known waste handling technology. The greatest risk is assessed to exist during transfer of the radioactive wastes to the cavern. When the cavern is filled and sealed, further population risks are asessed to be very low

  18. Measurement of air quality within storage domes in technical area 54, areas G and L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, E.

    1994-01-01

    The concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and tritium inside of storage domes at TA-54 were measured to assess worker exposure and support the Area G site characterization, including the Radioactive Air Emissions Management (RAEM) program. Samples were collected at 2-3 locations within Domes 48, 49, and 153 on up to six days during the summer of 1994. Samples were collected to evaluate three scenarios: (1) normal working activities with the domes open; (2) after domes were closed overnight; and (3) after domes were closed for three days. Eight-hour integrated samples were collected and analyzed in Radian's Austin laboratories. Tritium activities from 17.1 to 69,900 pCi/m 3 were measured. About two dozen individual VOCs were identified in each sample, but most of the concentration levels were very low (e.g.; 20%) than when the domes were closed only overnight. The data were used to generate estimated annual dome emission rates of 0.3 Ci/yr of tritium and less than 100 lbs/yr of VOCs. The measured VOC concentrations were collected during the warmest months of the year and therefore should represent worst-case air impacts

  19. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 1. Technical Report # 0919

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grade 1. These measures, available as part of easyCBM [TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2008 and administered to approximately 2800 students from schools…

  20. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Kindergarten. Technical Report # 0921

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in kindergarten. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2008 and administered to approximately 2800 students from…

  1. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 3. Technical Report # 09-02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  2. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 5. Technical Report # 09-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  3. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 2. Technical Report # 0920

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  4. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 7. Technical Report 0908

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  5. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 4. Technical Report # 09-03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  6. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 8. Technical Report # 09-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  7. Decision Support System for Aquifer Recharge (AR) and Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) Planning, Design, and Evaluation - Principles and Technical Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquifer recharge (AR) is a technical method being utilized to enhance groundwater resources through man-made replenishment means, such as infiltration basins and injections wells. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) furthers the AR techniques by withdrawal of stored groundwater at...

  8. The atmospheric corrosion: an important technical-economic and nuclear safety factor during storage in the construction of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.; Rodriguez, J.; Diaz, J.; Gomez, J.; Galeano, N.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to show the results of the research performed to determine the atmospheric corrosion in the region of Juragua nuclear power plant and to offer some practical recommendations to increase the efficiency during the storage of materials, considering technical-economic and nuclear safety aspects

  9. New imaging systems in nuclear medicine. Technical progress report, January 1, 1985-November 1, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Developments of improved imaging systems in nuclear medicine are reported with emphasis on development of positron emission tomographs that combine high resolution, with high sensitivity and high count rate capability. A second generation cylindrical analog positron camera design has provided excellent light collection with limited light spread, characteristics needed for high spatial and temporal resolution. Other aspects of the camera development include the design of associated electronics, and provision for data storage and processing. Utilizing the above camera basic studies have been performed to evaluate blood flow in the cat brain stem during auditory stimulation, ventilation in the dog using 13 N and blood flow in the canine heart. 2 refs., 2 figs

  10. Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics - Annual Progress Report 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom – DTU, Technical University of Denmark covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium...... and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities on fusion materials research (Tungsten and ODSFS). Other activities are system analysis...

  11. Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics - Annual Progress Report 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom – DTU, Technical University of Denmark covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium...... and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities on fusion materials research (Tungsten and ODSFS). Other activities are system analysis...

  12. [Review of draft Crystalline Repository Project reports]: Technical progress report, CY 1985-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    During the period (CY 1985-86) of this report, the Wisconsin Radioactive Waste Review Board provided technical services under the contract with DOE. These included Participation in the development of variables and screening techniques that would be used in identifying those rock bodies in the Area Recommendation Report (ARR); reviewing and commenting on the report and developing a procedure in which local residents could have input into the process; sought resumption of negotiations with DOE on a full Consultation and Cooperation (CandC) agreement; and Participating in workshops and provided comments on two major DOE transportation documents, ''Transportation Business Plan: Strategy Options Document,'' and ''Transportation Institutional Plan.''

  13. New imaging systems in nuclear medicine. Technical progress report, July 1, 1975--March 15, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    This progress report covers four areas: development of positron instrumentation, development of NUMEDICS computer system and software, application of cyclotron-produced isotopes ( 11 C, 68 Ga, 13 N, 15 O, and 82 Rb), and application of the NUMEDICS computer system in nuclear medicine. The development of transverse section positron imaging has had a significant impact and a positron camera was designed specifically for transverse section imaging of heart and lungs. The computer net (NUMEDICS II) is progressing rapidly in design and software development. Clinical studies have demonstrated the feasibility of measuring cerebral blood flow using a variety of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals and oxygen utilization using 15 O 2 . Rubidium-82 also appears to be a promising agent for measurement of cerebral blood flow

  14. Nuclear structure theory. Technical progress report, September 1, 1982-August 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.; Koltun, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    Research progress is reported. Spectral Averaging studies are outlined including the theory of level densities for interacting nucleons, the properties of single-particle nuclear excitations, spectral distributions for fixed symmetries, and applications to the secular behavior of fluctuation measures in complex nuclei. Collective States research is described, in particular the boson-fermion symmetries which are related to the U(5) limit of the interacting boson model. Nuclear Reaction studies are described including the statistical theory of pion absorption, direct reactions at intermediate energies, and the properties of the off-shell πN t-matrix. Progress is reported on the quark theory of nuclear matter and the construction of models for a Fermi fluid which, near the nuclear ground state, is a fluid of nucleons composed of quarks, and, at high densities or temperatures, is a quark fluid. Applications of formal scattering theory to the study of phase-conjugate optics are discussed. Publications are listed

  15. U.C. Davis high energy particle physics research: Technical progress report -- 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    Summaries of progress made for this period is given for each of the following areas: (1) Task A--Experiment, H1 detector at DESY; (2) Task C--Experiment, AMY detector at KEK; (3) Task D--Experiment, fixed target detectors at Fermilab; (4) Task F--Experiment, PEP detector at SLAC and pixel detector; (5) Task B--Theory, particle physics; and (6) Task E--Theory, particle physics.

  16. Nuclear structure theory. Annual technical progress report, October 1, 1979-August 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.; Koltun, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year in the following areas of nuclear structure and reaction theory: statistical spectroscopy (including random matrix methods, with applications to fluctuations in spectra and in strength distributions, and to problems of ergodicity; group symmetries in spectral-distribution theory; electromagnetic and β transitions); meson scattering and absorption by nuclei (including general scattering theory with absorption, multiple scattering theory and its reactive content, statistical theory of absorption); and meson currents in electromagnetic transitions

  17. Nuclear methods in chemical kinetics. Technical progress report, April 1, 1978--March 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Significant progress was achieved in the following products: (1) gas phase thermal F-to-HF reactions; (II) gas phase thermal 18 F olefinic addition reactions; (III) steady state hot atom kinetic theory; (IV) moderator effects on nuclear recoil 18 F substitution reactions; and (V) new experimental methodology. New work has been initiated upon the development of a realisitic potential form of kinetic collision theory

  18. High energy particle physics at Purdue. Annual technical progress report, March 1982-March 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaidos, J.A.; Koltick, D.S.; Loeffler, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reported in these areas: a study of electron-positron annihilation using the High Resolution Spectrometer at SLAC; proton decay; extensive muon showers; gamma ray astronomy; the DUMAND project; theoretical work on fundamental problems in electromagnetic, weak, strong, and gravitational interactions; chi production by hadrons; p-nucleus interactions; development of the Collider Detector at Fermilab; and study of the observed hadrons as the relativistic bound states of baryons and antibaryons

  19. Deep vadose zone remediation: technical and policy challenges, opportunities, and progress in achieving cleanup endpoints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellman, D.M.; Freshley, M.D.; Truex, M.J.; Lee, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Current requirements for site remediation and closure are standards-based and are often overly conservative, costly, and in some cases, technically impractical. Use of risk-informed alternate endpoints provides a means to achieve remediation goals that are permitted by regulations and are protective of human health and the environment. Alternate endpoints enable the establishment of a path for cleanup that may include intermediate remedial milestones and transition points and/or regulatory alternatives to standards-based remediation. A framework is presented that is centered around developing and refining conceptual models in conjunction with assessing risks and potential endpoints as part of a system-based assessment that integrates site data with scientific understanding of processes that control the distribution and transport of contaminants in the subsurface and pathways to receptors. This system-based assessment and subsequent implementation of the remediation strategy with appropriate monitoring are targeted at providing a holistic approach to addressing risks to human health and the environment. This holistic approach also enables effective predictive analysis of contaminant behavior to provide defensible criteria and data for making long-term decisions. Developing and implementing an alternate endpoint-based approach for remediation and waste site closure presents a number of challenges and opportunities. Categories of these challenges include scientific and technical, regulatory, institutional, and budget and resource allocation issues. Opportunities exist for developing and implementing systems-based approaches with respect to supportive characterization, monitoring, predictive modeling, and remediation approaches. (authors)

  20. Deep vadose zone remediation: technical and policy challenges, opportunities, and progress in achieving cleanup endpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, D.M.; Freshley, M.D.; Truex, M.J.; Lee, M.H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Current requirements for site remediation and closure are standards-based and are often overly conservative, costly, and in some cases, technically impractical. Use of risk-informed alternate endpoints provides a means to achieve remediation goals that are permitted by regulations and are protective of human health and the environment. Alternate endpoints enable the establishment of a path for cleanup that may include intermediate remedial milestones and transition points and/or regulatory alternatives to standards-based remediation. A framework is presented that is centered around developing and refining conceptual models in conjunction with assessing risks and potential endpoints as part of a system-based assessment that integrates site data with scientific understanding of processes that control the distribution and transport of contaminants in the subsurface and pathways to receptors. This system-based assessment and subsequent implementation of the remediation strategy with appropriate monitoring are targeted at providing a holistic approach to addressing risks to human health and the environment. This holistic approach also enables effective predictive analysis of contaminant behavior to provide defensible criteria and data for making long-term decisions. Developing and implementing an alternate endpoint-based approach for remediation and waste site closure presents a number of challenges and opportunities. Categories of these challenges include scientific and technical, regulatory, institutional, and budget and resource allocation issues. Opportunities exist for developing and implementing systems-based approaches with respect to supportive characterization, monitoring, predictive modeling, and remediation approaches. (authors)

  1. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized-bed-augmented compressed-air energy-storage system: system load following capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessard, R.D.; Blecher, W.A.; Merrick, D.

    1981-09-01

    The load-following capability of fluidized bed combustion-augmented compressed air energy storage systems was evaluated. The results are presented in two parts. The first part is an Executive Summary which provides a concise overview of all major elements of the study including the conclusions, and, second, a detailed technical report describing the part-load and load following capability of both the pressurized fluid bed combustor and the entire pressurized fluid bed combustor/compressed air energy storage system. The specific tasks in this investigation were to: define the steady-state, part-load operation of the CAES open-bed PFBC; estimate the steady-state, part-load performance of the PFBC/CAES system and evaluate any possible operational constraints; simulate the performance of the PFBC/CAES system during transient operation and assess the load following capability of the system; and establish a start-up procedure for the open-bed PFBC and evaluate the impact of this procedure. The conclusions are encouraging and indicate that the open-bed PFBC/CAES power plant should provide good part-load and transient performance, and should have no major equipment-related constraints, specifically, no major problems associated with the performance or design of either the open-end PFBC or the PFBC/CAES power plant in steady-state, part-load operation are envisioned. The open-bed PFBC/CAES power plant would have a load following capability which would be responsive to electric utility requirements for a peak-load power plant. The open-bed PFBC could be brought to full operating conditions within 15 min after routine shutdown, by employing a hot-start mode of operation. The PFBC/CAES system would be capable of rapid changes in output power (12% of design load per minute) over a wide output power range (25% to 100% of design output). (LCL)

  2. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2011-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2010. (Author)

  3. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2010-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009. (Author)

  4. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S B; Michelsen, P K; Rasmussen, J J; Westergaard, C M [eds.

    2010-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009. (Author)

  5. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2009-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. New activities in technology related to development of high temperature superconductors have been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008. (Author)

  6. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2009-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. New activities in technology related to development of high temperature superconductors have been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008. (Author)

  7. Progress report [of] Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Division, April 1982 - March 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamurthi, S.S.; Chaudhry, Ramesh

    1985-01-01

    The work done by the Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) at Bombay during the period from April 1982 to March 1984 is described in the form of summaries. The main thrust of the work of the Division is towards designing, developing, fabricating and if needed, producing on a large scale various instruments, equipment and components required for the programmes of the BARC and the Department of Atomic Energy. The summaries describing the work are grouped under the headings:(1) vacuum, (2) surface analysis, (3) mass spectrometry, (4) electronics, (5) cryogenics, (6) crystals and detectors, (7) glass technology and devices, and (8) optoelectronics. A list of publications of the staff-members of the Division during the report period is given. (M.G.B.)

  8. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory, Technical Univ. of Denmark. Annual progress report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelsen, P.K.; Korsholm, S.B.; Rasmussen, J.J.

    2008-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. The activities in technology on investigations of radiation damage of fusion reactor materials have been phased out during 2007. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2007. (Author)

  9. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory, Technical Univ. of Denmark. Annual progress report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelsen, P.K.; Korsholm, S.B.; Rasmussen, J.J. (eds.)

    2008-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. The activities in technology on investigations of radiation damage of fusion reactor materials have been phased out during 2007. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2007. (Author)

  10. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2011-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2010. (Author)

  11. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics. Technical progress report, July 11, 1992--May 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the progress made in theoretical and experimental research funded by US Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG03-92ER54150, during the period July 11, 1992 through May 31, 1993. Four main tasks are reported: applied plasma physics theory, alpha particle diagnostic, edge and current density diagnostic, and plasma rotation drive. The report also discusses the research plans for the theory and experimental programs for the next grant year. Reports and publications supported by the grant during this period are listed in the final section.

  12. Salt repository project: Technical progress report for the quarter 1 April--30 June 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This document reports the progress being made each quarter on the development of a geologic repository in salt for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The reporting elements are arranged by the work breakdown structure so that related studies are presented together. The studies are reported by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation, a prime contractor of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Salt Repository Project Office. The studies include work by other DOE prime contractors and by contractors to the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation

  13. Nuclear structure theory. Annual technical progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.; Koltun, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year in the following areas of nuclear structure and reaction theory: Statistical spectroscopy, including: Random matrix methods, with applications to fluctuations in spectra and in strength distributions, and to problems of ergodicity; Group symmetries in spectral-distribution theory; Electromagnetic and β transitions. Meson scattering and absorption by nuclei, including: general scattering theory with absorption, multiple scattering theory and its reactive content, statistical theory of absorption, theory of the absorption operator (πNN vertex), theory of πN scattering. A list of publications is included

  14. Combined macroscopic and microscopic approach to the fracture of metals. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaro, R.J.; Gurland, J.; Needleman, A.; Rice, R.J.

    1979-06-01

    Progress is reported on microscopic fracture mechanisms, including studies of void and crack initiation in steels in the absence and presence of hydrogen, the effects of hydrogen on ductile fracture in medium and high carbon steels; elastic--plastic crack growth including the quasi-stable growth of cracks in ductile solids under increasing load and conditions of instability; and elevated temperature rupture including analysis of the stress field near a crack tip in an elastic-nonlinear viscous material under tensile load as well as the processes of diffusion, and cavitation of grain boundaries in plastically creeping materials

  15. Theoretical nuclear physics. Task B. Technical progress report, August 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following studies: (a) double delta interactions in pion double charge exchange; (b) isovector correlations in pion-nucleus scattering; (c) nuclear structure effects in pion single charge exchange; (d) a perspective on sequential transfer reactions; (e) inelastic and charge exchange scattering theory; (f) magnitude of the first order DWBA description of the two nuclear transfer reactions; (g) nonlocality effects on deuteron transfer reactions; (h) evaluation of external radial integrals in inelastic electron scattering; (i) experimental observables as a function of Dirac invariant amplitudes; (j) Dirac shell-model wavefunctions in inelastic electron scattering; and (k) impulse approximation Dirac theory of inelastic proton nucleus collective excitations. Publications are listed

  16. High energy particle physics at Purdue. Annual technical progress report, March 1983-March 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaidos, J.A.; Koltick, D.S.; Loeffler, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in these areas: a study of electron-positron annihilation using the High Resolution Spectrometer; experimental study of proton decay; gamma ray astrophysics; the DUMAND project; fundamental problems in the theory of gravitational, electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions; chi production by hadrons; study of collective phenomena; search for the onset of collective phenonmena; work on the Collider Detector at Fermilab; search for a deconfined quark-gluon phase of strongly interacting matter at the FNAL proton-antiproton collider; and development of an electrodeless drift chamber

  17. Physics of correlated systems. Technical progress report, December 1996 - June 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    During the current funding period, which covers a period of approximately 2.5 years, the authors have tackled a number of challenging problems that involve nonperturbative particle-particle interactions in two qualitatively different areas: electron-electron interactions in photoionization and photodetachment, and atom-atom interactions in Bose-Einstein condensates. The following discusses the progress achieved in these different areas. The emphasis in this summary will concentrate on approximately the last year of research accomplishments, although the bibliography below includes all research publications that were supported during the time period of this grant

  18. Plasma physics research (Tokapole II). Technical progress report, October 1, 1981-December 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Progress during the 27-month period, October 1, 1981 to December 31, 1983 on Tokapole II research is described. Tokapole II is a 4-node poloidal divertor tokamak that can also be run as an octupole. Research during this period has concentrated on studies of discharges with safety factor q less than one and on the identification of the shear Alfven wave resonance. Other topics include measurements of the loop voltage reduction through ECRH startup, plasma gun refueling, fluctuations and transport, pumped limiter studies, plasma-wall interactions, diagnostic development, polarization of electron cyclotron emission, and poloidal ohmic heating

  19. Nuclear structure theory. Annual technical progress report, October 1, 1977--September 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.; Koltun, D.S.

    1978-01-01

    Progress during the past year in the following areas of nuclear structure and reaction theory is summarized: statistical spectroscopy, including random matrix methods, with applications to fluctuations in spectra and in strength distributions, and to problems of erogodicity; group symmetries in spectral distribution theory; effective interactions; statistical reaction theory, applied to ''deep inelastic'' collisions of heavy ions, and to pion absorption by nuclei; meson scattering and absorption by nuclei, including general scattering theory with absorption, multiple scattering theory and its reactive content, models for absorption, theory of the absorption operator (πNN vertex), theory of πN scattering. A list of publications is included

  20. Salt Repository Project technical progress report for the quarter 1 January--31 March 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This document reports the progress being made each quarter on the development of a geologic repository in salt for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The reporting elements are arranged by the work breakdown structure so that related studies are presented together. The studies are reported by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation, a prime contractor of the US Department of energy (DOE) Salt Repository Project Office. The studies include work by other DOE prime contractors and by contractors to the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation. 23 refs., 1 fig

  1. Nuclear structure theory. Annual technical progress report, September 1, 1980-August 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.; Koltun, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year in the following areas of nuclear structure and reaction theory: (1) statistical spectroscopy, including: random matrix methods, with applications to fluctuations in spectra and in strength distributions; group symmetries in spectral-distribution theory; electromagnetic and β transitions, limits to time-reversal symmetry breaking in the nucleon-nucleon interaction; (2) meson scattering and absorption by nuclei, including: general scattering theory with absorption, multiple scattering theory and its reactive content, statistical theory of absorption; and (3) meson currents in electromagnetic transitions

  2. Thermionic cogeneration burner assessment study. Third quarterly technical progress report, April-June, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    The specific tasks of this study are to mathematically model the thermionic cogeneration burner, experimentally confirm the projected energy flows in a thermal mock-up, make a cost estimate of the burner, including manufacturing, installation and maintenance, review industries in general and determine what groups of industries would be able to use the electrical power generated in the process, select one or more industries out of those for an in-depth study, including determination of the performance required for a thermionic cogeneration system to be competitive in that industry. Progress is reported. (WHK)

  3. AFCT/TFCT/ISFS Program. Technical progress report for the period October 1, 1977--December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, O.F. (comp.)

    1978-02-01

    This is the eighth in a series of quarterly progress reports on studies performed for the Alternate Fuel Cycle Technologies/Thorium Fuel Cycle Technologies/International Spent Fuel Receipt and Storage (AFCT/TFCT/ISFS) Program, formerly the LWR Fuel Recycle Program. This program is designed to provide information needed by industry to close the back end of the power reactor fuel cycle. During the past quarter, studies were conducted in the following tasks: Survey of Current Technology of Fuel Handling Techniques; Investigation of Air Cleaning Processes for Removing Tributyl Phosphate (TBP) from Off-Gas Streams; Study of Iodine Chemistry in Process Solutions; Electropolishing to Decontaminate Metallic Waste from Alternate and Thorium Converter Fuel Cycles; and U.S. Scale Transport, Dispersion and Removal Mode Comparison Safety Criticality Experiments. (11 figs., 7 tables)

  4. Superconducting fault current limiter. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, August 8, 1978-November 7, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Progress in the development of fault current limiters for superconducting power transmission systems is reported. The analysis and design of a magnetically switched resistive device and the experimental program were emphasized and reported. A transient heat transfer model was developed which indicates the parameters which are important in determining the thermal heating and recovery of the superconduting film. Designs for the switching coil and the S/C element were also carried out and are reported. A four-pole magnetic coil is recommended; this generates a magnetic field which is nearly perpendicular to spiral or helical S/C film geometrics. A spirally-designed, 3000 ohm limiter is shown to be able to fit within a .5 to 1m inner radius, .05 to .03 m wide, 1.3 to 3.9 m long annualr region. The experimental program has included work on materials development and on prepartion of the switching and thermal recovery experimental facility. The material development program has uncovered several serious short-comings of NbN as the S/C film material. Macroscopic holes and surface debris, and microscopic imperfections reduce the critical current density below the expected value and, in addition, cause nonuniform switching. Reasons for these effects are postulated, and a continuing, vigorous materials program is suggested in hopes of alleviating these problems. Virtually all of the experimental equipment had been installed, and so the magnetic switching and thermal recovery experiments can begin and progress during the next quarter. (LCL)

  5. An accelerator neutron source for BNCT. Technical progress report, 1 June 1993--31 May 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blue, T.E.; Vafai, K.

    1994-02-01

    This is the progress report for the project entitled, ''An Accelerator Neutron Source for BNCT.'' The progress report is for the period from July 1, 1993 to date. The overall objective of our research project is to develop an Accelerator Epithermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (AENIF) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The AENIF consists of a 2.5 MeV high current proton accelerator, a lithium target to produce source neutrons, and a moderator/reflector assembly to obtain from the energetic source neutrons an epithermal neutron field suitable for BNCT treatments. Our project goals are to develop the non-accelerator components of the AENIF, and to specifically include in our development: (1) design, numerical simulation, and experimental verification of a target assembly which is capable of removing 75 kW of beam power; (2) re-optimization of the moderator assembly design based on in-phantom dose assessments using neutron spectra calculated in phantom and an energy-dependent neutron Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE); (3) construction of a prototype moderator assembly and confirmation of its design by measurements; (4) design of the shielding of the accelerator and treatment rooms for an AENIF; and (5) design of a high energy beam transport system which is compatible with the shielding design and the thermal-hydraulic design

  6. Technical progress report, Contracts DE-AC02-81ER40014, 40015 and 40016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This Progress Report summarizes work carried out at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado from November 1, 1980 through July 31, 1981, under contracts between the University of Colorado and the United States Department of Energy. The shorter report period of nine months is due to a change to an earlier submission date this year for our proposal for support to begin February 1, 1982. Cyclotron operation, research, and development have been supported under contract DE-AC02-81ER40014. The AVF cyclotron has continued to provide reliable and versatile beams of protons, deuterons, 3 He and 4 He. A wide variety of research results in direct reactions, nuclear structure, and compound reaction mechanisms can be noted in this Progress Report, correlated in many cases to current problems in intermediate energy physics. Theoretical work on nuclear reactions, carried out under contract DE-AC02-81ER40015, has been well matched to our experimental programs in low and intermediate energy physics. One important result has been the recasting of the DWBA in an eikonal expansion suited to high energy reactions. Our efforts in intermediate energy physics, under contract DE-AC02-81ER40016, have emphasized pion scattering studies at LAMPF and TRIUMF and proton induced charge exchange reactions at IUCF. Data for an important test of hadronic charge symmetry have been completed at two energies, using elastic pion-deuteron scattering

  7. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) program. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1981-03-01

    Work is reported on the development of two superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) units. One is a 30-MJ unit for use by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to stabilize power oscillations on their Pacific AC Intertie, and the second is a 1- to 10-GWh unit for use as a diurnal load leveling device. Emphasis has been on the stabilizing system. The manufacturing phase of the 30-MJ superconducting coil was initiated and the coil fabrication has advanced rapidly. The two converter power transformers were manufactured, successfully factory tested, and shipped. One transformer reached the Tacoma Substation in good condition; the other was dropped enroute and has been returned to the factory for rebuilding. Insulation of the 30-MJ coil has been examined for high voltage effects apt to be caused by transients such as inductive voltage spikes from the protective dump circuit. The stabilizing system converter and protective energy dump system were completed, factory tested, and delivered

  8. The role of technical progress in the process of recalculating oil reserves; Le role du progres technique dans le processus de renouvellement des reserves petrolieres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulard, J.N. [Total/Fina/Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1999-08-01

    Contrary to the concept of resources (which is essentially a geological one), the notion of reserves designates the quantities that are technically and economically recoverable. Beyond the production-related effect, the reserves therefore evolve over time in accordance with numerous technical and economic parameters. Among these parameters, it can be seen that technical progress plays a considerable role throughout the process of converting resources into reserves, including progress in the identification, accessibility and processing of the resources, and improvements in economic viability. After having tackled the problem of measuring the 'technical progress effects' and citing examples, we demonstrate that the evolution in oil reserves is subject to three types of impact. These are a quantitative impact by significantly improving the recovery rates or making it possible to identify hitherto undetectable oil fields, a qualitative impact by widening the resource base thanks to the adoption of new categories of oil (in particular the so-called 'unconventional' oils) and by carrying out the gradual substitution between these resources of differing qualities. There is also a dynamic impact, through the acceleration of resource availability. Through these three approaches, technical progress makes makes it possible to ensure continuity in oil supply and contributes significantly to the recalculation of reserves. It therefore acts as a compensating factor, counterbalancing the progressive depletion of resources. (author)

  9. Design, Fabrication, and Certification of Advanced Modular PV Power Systems Final Technical Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minyard, G.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the overall accomplishments and benefits of Solar Electric Specialties Co. (SES) under this Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract. SES addressed design issues related to their modular autonomous PV power supply (MAPPS) and a mobile photogenset. MAPPS investigations included gel-cell batteries mounted horizontally; redisgn of the SES power supply; modified battery enclosure for increased safety and reduced cost; programmable, interactive battery charge controllers; and UL and FM listings. The photogenset systems incorporate generators, battery storage, and PV panels for a mobile power supply. The unit includes automatic oil-change systems for the propane generators, collapsible array mounts for the PV enclosure, and internal stowage of the arrays. Standardizing the products resulted in product lines of MAPPS and Photogensets that can be produced more economically and with shorter lead times, while increasing product quality and reliability. Product assembly and quality control have also been improved and streamlined with the development of standardized assembly processes and QC testing procedures. SES offers the UL-listed MAPPS at about the same price as its previous non-standardized, unlisted products

  10. GT-MHR COMMERCIALZATION STUDY. TECHNICAL PROGRESS AND COST MANAGEMENT REPORT FOR THE PERIOD JUNE 1 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHENOY, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    A271 GT-MHR COMMERCIALZATION STUDY TECHNICAL PROGRESS AND COST MANAGEMENT REPORT FOR THE PERIOD JUNE 1 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2003. Petten was provided with irradiation dimensional change data for both fuel compacts and H-451 graphite for design of the graphite sleeves that hold the fuel compacts to be irradiated in HFR-EU2. The Fuel Sample Product Specification for the Fuel Performance Irradiation Test Capsule MHR-2 was completed and approved. A Work Breakdown Structure was prepared for the development and qualification of advanced coated-particle fuels capable of meeting anticipated fuel performance requirements and work was initiated on preparation of schedules and a cost estimates for the test matrices

  11. GT-MHR COMMERCIALIZATION STUDY TECHNICAL PROGRESS AND COST MANAGEMENT REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1 THROUGH AUGUST 31, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenoy, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    OAK A271 GT-MHR COMERCIALiZATION STUDY TECHNICAL PROGRESS AND COST MANAGEMENT REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1 THROUGH AUGUST 31, 2003. In the process of fabricating the MHR-1 irradiation test capsule, Petten has advised that three thermocouples (out of 24) and the Self Powered Neutron detector were damaged during high temperature brazing with the upper capsule lid. Procurement of new TCs and SPN is in process but there will be a delay in the irradiation test of about nine weeks. Startup of the irradiation is now projected to be July or August 2004. In preparation for performing the nuclear design analysis activities required by the advanced fuel studies task, a complete 3-D nuclear design analysis is first being performed of the GT-MHR reference design. This will serve as the baseline for studies of the advanced fuel nuclear design performance

  12. Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program. Technical progress report for FY-1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandstetter, A.; Harwell, M.A.; Howes, B.W.; Benson, G.L.; Bradley, D.J.; Raymond, J.R.; Serne, R.J.; Schilling, A.H.

    1979-07-01

    Associated with commercial nuclear power production in the United States is the generation of potentially hazardous radioactive wastes. The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to develop nuclear waste isolation systems in geologic formations that will preclude contact with the biosphere of waste radionuclides in concentrations which are sufficient to cause deleterious impact on humans or their environments. Comprehensive analyses of specific isolation systems are needed to assess the expectations of meeting that objective. The Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) has been established at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (operated by Battelle Memorial Institute) for developing the capability of making those analyses. Progress on the following tasks is reported: release scenario analysis, waste form release rate analysis, release consequence analysis, sorption-desorption analysis, and societal acceptance analysis

  13. Repository Technology Program: Technical progress report for the period May 29, 1986--June 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    This document reports the progress made in the 13-month period from May 29, 1986--June 30, 1987, on the development of a second geologic repository in rocks other than those being considered for a first repository. Subsequent periods will be covered in reports to be issued on a semiannual basis. The reporting elements are arranged by the work breakdown structure so that related studies are presented together. The studies are reported by the Office of Waste Technology Development (OWTD), a prime contractor of the US. Department of Energy (DOE) Repository Technology Program (RTP) Office in the Repository Technology and Transportation Division (RTTD) of the Office of Geologic Repositories (OGR). The studies include work by other DOE prime contractors and by contractors to the OWTD. 50 refs

  14. Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program. Technical progress report for FY-1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandstetter, A.; Harwell, M.A.; Howes, B.W.; Benson, G.L.; Bradley, D.J.; Raymond, J.R.; Serne, R.J.; Schilling, A.H.

    1979-07-01

    Associated with commercial nuclear power production in the United States is the generation of potentially hazardous radioactive wastes. The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to develop nuclear waste isolation systems in geologic formations that will preclude contact with the biosphere of waste radionuclides in concentrations which are sufficient to cause deleterious impact on humans or their environments. Comprehensive analyses of specific isolation systems are needed to assess the expectations of meeting that objective. The Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) has been established at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (operated by Battelle Memorial Institute) for developing the capability of making those analyses. Progress on the following tasks is reported: release scenario analysis, waste form release rate analysis, release consequence analysis, sorption-desorption analysis, and societal acceptance analysis. (DC)

  15. Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. Technical progress report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics in order to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks and in particular to understand the role of turbulence. So that they can continue to study the physics that is most relevant to the fusion program, TEXT completed a significant device upgrade this year. The new capabilities of the device and new and innovative diagnostics were exploited in all main program areas including: (1) configuration studies; (2) electron cyclotron heating physics; (3) improved confinement modes; (4) edge physics/impurity studies; (5) central turbulence and transport; and (6) transient transport. Details of the progress in each of the research areas are described.

  16. Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. Technical progress report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics in order to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks and in particular to understand the role of turbulence. So that they can continue to study the physics that is most relevant to the fusion program, TEXT completed a significant device upgrade this year. The new capabilities of the device and new and innovative diagnostics were exploited in all main program areas including: (1) configuration studies; (2) electron cyclotron heating physics; (3) improved confinement modes; (4) edge physics/impurity studies; (5) central turbulence and transport; and (6) transient transport. Details of the progress in each of the research areas are described

  17. New imaging systems in nuclear medicine. Technical progress report, October 1, 1976--May 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, G.L.

    1977-01-01

    Work carried out on the development of instrumentation and techniques for positron scintigraphy is discussed. Progress in positron imaging instrumentation and applications is detailed. The assembly and initial evaluation of the new multicrystal positron camera, PC-II, has been completed. Images have been obtained in both two and three-dimensions which demonstrate the basic physical properties of the instrument. Successful measurements using transverse section imaging have been carried out on animals and human volunteers. Physiological investigation using PC-II is proceeding. A flexible and accurate computer program has been developed for transverse section reconstruction of data acquired by PC-II. This program makes it possible to reconstruct both the activity distribution and the distribution of absorption. The program has been developed in such a way that it can handle variations in the data collection procedure. Clinical studies using PC-I and PC-II are being carried on in areas of heart, lung and brain

  18. [Geothermal system temperature-depth database and model for data analysis]. 5. quarterly technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1998-04-25

    During this first quarter of the second year of the contract activity has involved several different tasks. The author has continued to work on three tasks most intensively during this quarter: the task of implementing the data base for geothermal system temperature-depth, the maintenance of the WWW site with the heat flow and gradient data base, and finally the development of a modeling capability for analysis of the geothermal system exploration data. The author has completed the task of developing a data base template for geothermal system temperature-depth data that can be used in conjunction with the regional data base that he had already developed and is now implementing it. Progress is described.

  19. Radioecology of natural systems in Colorado. Thirteenth technical progress report, May 1, 1974--April 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies on the behavior of fallout radionuclides ( 137 Cs and 90 Sr) in selected organisms and natural ecosystems in Colorado. Components of alpine tundra, montane forests, shortgrass plains, and freshwater lakes and streams are currently under investigation. A study on the effect of gut passage on the mean diameter of monodisperse PuO 2 microspheres was initiated. Studies on plutonium in the terrestrial environs of Rocky Flats were initiated in the summer of 1972. Soil movement measurements were conducted to bear on the question of plutonium stability in contaminated areas. The relative importance of root uptake versus aerial deposition was evaluated in the field utilizing a sod block transplant procedure. The study on radiation effects on shortgrass plains vegetation was continued with emphasis on long-term changes in community structure under chronic irradiation stress and recovery patterns. (U.S.)

  20. Research in elementary particle physics. Technical progress report, June 1, 1985-May 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, L.E.; Schnitzer, H.J.; Bensinger, J.R.; Abbott, L.F.; Blocker, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Progress is reported in both experimental and theoretical elementary particle research. Experimental activities include: construction of the Forward Electromagnetic Shower Counters for the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF); a test run in the CDF, involving observation of a small number of proton-antiproton collisions; design of a self-contained single wire proportional chamber with pressure and temperature sensing for monitoring the gain of gases used by various components of the CDF; data acquisition, and calibration. Also included are a search for a dibaryon of strangeness=-1; hyperon weak radiative decay. Theoretical research is reported in the areas of quantum field theory, string theory, elementary particle phenomenology, cosmology, field theory in curved spacetimes, and cosmology. 34 refs

  1. Nuclear structure theory. Annual technical progress report, 1 July 1974--30 June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.; Koltun, D.S.

    1975-01-01

    Progress during the past year is summarized for the following areas of nuclear structure and reaction theory: Meson interactions with nucleons and nuclei, including inelastic scattering of pions, three-body theories of scattering and absorption of pions by deuterons, and π-p bremsstrahlung. Theory of the effective interaction, including behavior of the expansion in orders of the reaction matrix. Statistical spectroscopy including fluctuations in energy levels and excitation strengths, and sum rules and strength distributions for various excitation processes, including single-nucleon transfer, β decay and multipole giant resonances. Studies of the inverse scattering problem. Studies of nuclear symmetries, of nuclear clustering, and of general nuclear structure by α-transfer reactions, and of nuclear shapes by (d, 3 He) reactions. (U.S.)

  2. Scientific and technical progress in high-energy astrophysics at INPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui-Van, N.A.; Jayanthi, U.B.; Jardim, J.O.D.; Braga, J.; Santo, C.M.E.

    1984-01-01

    The recent advances in high-energy Astrophysics pertains to the study of compact objects in galactic nuclei, binary systems and pulsars. These aspects are best understood by the study of the emissions in X- and gamma rays of these objects through the temporal variation in flux and spectrum. The Southern Hemisphere offers some of the unique objects for investigations such as galactic center, the Vela pulsar etc. For high temporal and spectra resolution studies two telescopes 'GeLi' and 'Pulsar' were designed and constructed. To support these scientific activities, a program in balloon launching and data acquisition facilities has been developed since 1971. The 'Balloon Launching Center' of INPE has capacity to launch balloons of -850,000 m 3 with payloads weighting about 1,000 Kg. Taking advantage of these facilities, project 'Bantar', with the goal to measure the atmospheric gamma-ray radiation in the Antartic Region, is under progress. (Author) [pt

  3. Crystalline Repository Project: Technical progress report for the period October 1, 1982--May 28, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    This document reports the progress made on the development of a second geologic repository in crystalline rocks during the duration of the Crystalline Repository Project from its inception in October 1982 to its termination in May 1986. The reporting elements are arranged by the work breakdown structure so that related studies are presented together. The studies are reported by the Office of Waste Technology Development (OWTD), successor to the Office of Crystalline Repository Development. OWTD is a prime contractor of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Repository Technology Program Office, itself the successor to the Crystalline Repository Project Office. The studies include work by other DOE prime contractors and by contractors to the Office of Crystalline Repository Development. 151 refs

  4. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. The Laboratory's research mission was fulfilled with the publication of two books and 143 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical and students, and visiting scientists. An additional three books and about 80 journal articles currently are in press. Faculty, technician and students presented 193 lectures, scientific presentations, and posters to colleges and universities, including minority institutions. Dr. J Vaun McArthur organized and conducted the Third Annual SREL Symposium on the Environment: New Concepts in Strewn Ecology: An Integrative Approach. Dr. Michael Newman conducted a 5-day course titled Quantitative Methods in Ecotoxicology, and Dr. Brian Teppen of The Advanced Analytical Center for Environmental Sciences (AACES) taught a 3-day short course titled Introduction to Molecular Modeling of Environmental Systems. Dr. I. Lehr Brisbin co-hosted a meeting of the Crocodile Special Interest Group. Dr. Rebecca Sharitz attended four symposia in Japan during May and June 1996 and conducted meetings of the Executive Committee and Board of the International Association for Ecology (ENTECOL)

  5. Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor Program. Semiannual technical progress report, October 1, 1982-March 3, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report provides descriptions and results of the technical effort during the first half of FY 83 on the Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor Program. The work on Integration and Management (WBS 01) includes the preparation of the Advanced Systems Concept Evaluation Plan and the Advanced Systems Technology Development Plan in addition to the program management activities. The Market Definition (WBS 03) efforts considered the application of the Modular Reactor System with reforming (MRS-R) to the production of methanol and ammonia and the refining of petroleum. Within the Plant Technology (WBS 13) task there were activities to develop anlytical methods for investigation of Coolant Transport Behavior and to define methods and criteria for High Temperature Structural Engineering design. In addition to the work on the advanced HTGR for process heat users, new activities were initiated in support of the HTGR-SC/C Lead plant Protect (WBS 30 and 31). The Plant Simulation task (WBS 31) was initiated to develop a computer code for simulation of plant operation and for plant transient systems analysis. The efforts on the advanced HTGR systems was performed under the Modular Systems task (WBS 41) to study the potential for multiple small reactors to provide lower costs, improved safety, and higher availability than the large monolithic core reactors

  6. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.H.

    1996-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. The Laboratory`s research mission was fulfilled with the publication of two books and 143 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical and students, and visiting scientists. An additional three books and about 80 journal articles currently are in press. Faculty, technician and students presented 193 lectures, scientific presentations, and posters to colleges and universities, including minority institutions. Dr. J Vaun McArthur organized and conducted the Third Annual SREL Symposium on the Environment: New Concepts in Strewn Ecology: An Integrative Approach. Dr. Michael Newman conducted a 5-day course titled Quantitative Methods in Ecotoxicology, and Dr. Brian Teppen of The Advanced Analytical Center for Environmental Sciences (AACES) taught a 3-day short course titled Introduction to Molecular Modeling of Environmental Systems. Dr. I. Lehr Brisbin co-hosted a meeting of the Crocodile Special Interest Group. Dr. Rebecca Sharitz attended four symposia in Japan during May and June 1996 and conducted meetings of the Executive Committee and Board of the International Association for Ecology (ENTECOL).

  7. Dual curvature acoustically damped concentrating collector. Semiannual technical progress report, June 1-December 1, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-12-01

    The project's first objective is to establish, analytically, the cost and performance of design choices within the boundaries of the basic proposed concept. With these cost and performance measures as a guide, the second project objective is to design a cost-effective Dual Curvature collector module and collector field array. The third objective is to establish technical and economic concept feasibility through prototype fabrication and test. The final objective is to define the Dual Curvature collector commercialization requirements. The Dual Curvature collector uses a unique reflector module consisting of a reflective film that is tensioned on a reflector support frame. The tensioned membrane (film) surface approximates a hyperbolic paraboloid that is capable of linear focusing when the surface tracks the sun's apparent motion in one axis. The reflective film can be backed by polystyrene foam with an air space between the film and the foam surfaces. This provides damping of the reflector surface to minimize the effect of wind gusts and physical impacts. The baseline collector is intended to operate at a concentration of ten (10) or greater with a nominal absorber temperature of 150/sup 0/C (300/sup 0/F). The Component Research and Analysis tasks which lead to the selection of a baseline collector configuration are discussed. Also, some preliminary results of the Collector Module Design task are presented.

  8. Pulverized coal firing of aluminum melting furnaces. First annual technical progress report, May 1978-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.E.; Hines, J.E.; Stewart, D.L. Jr.; Yu, H.

    1979-10-01

    The ultimate objective of this program is the commercial demonstration of an efficient, environmentally acceptable coal firing process suitable for implementation on melting furnaces throughout the aluminum industry. To achieve this goal, the program has been divided into two phases. Phase I has begun with the design and construction of a 350 lb/h (coal) staged slagging cyclone combustor (SSCC) attached to a 7-ft dia aluminum melting ladle furnace. Process development will culminate with a 1000 pph prototype SSCC firing a 40,000 lb capacity open hearth melting furnace at the Alcoa Laboratories. Phase II implementation is currently planned for Alcoa's Lafayette, IN, Works, where two of the ingot plant's five open hearth melting furnaces will be converted to utilize coal. In addition to confirmation of data gathered in Phase I, the effect of extended production schedule operation on equipment and efficiencies will be determined. This work would begin in 1982 pursuant to technical and economic evaluation of the process development at that time. A major design subcontract for assistance in the design of the SSCC is 80% completed.

  9. Recent Progress and New Perspectives on Metal Amide and Imide Systems for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Garroni

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen storage in the solid state represents one of the most attractive and challenging ways to supply hydrogen to a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell. Although in the last 15 years a large variety of material systems have been identified as possible candidates for storing hydrogen, further efforts have to be made in the development of systems which meet the strict targets of the Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking (FCH JU and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE. Recent projections indicate that a system possessing: (i an ideal enthalpy in the range of 20–50 kJ/mol H2, to use the heat produced by PEM fuel cell for providing the energy necessary for desorption; (ii a gravimetric hydrogen density of 5 wt. % H2 and (iii fast sorption kinetics below 110 °C is strongly recommended. Among the known hydrogen storage materials, amide and imide-based mixtures represent the most promising class of compounds for on-board applications; however, some barriers still have to be overcome before considering this class of material mature for real applications. In this review, the most relevant progresses made in the recent years as well as the kinetic and thermodynamic properties, experimentally measured for the most promising systems, are reported and properly discussed.

  10. Properties and regulation of biosynthesis of cottonseed storage proteins. Comprehensive progress report, December 1, 1976 to September 1, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dure, III, L S

    1979-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression in cotton seed embryogenesis was studied by attempting to define what gene products are likely to be highly regulated during this developmental progression. The flow of nitrogen into the free amino acids pools of the developing cotyledons, and into the principal nitrogen nutritional reserve of the seed, the storage proteins was measured. This was continued by following the flow of nitrogen from the storage proteins to the principal exported amino acid asparagine that occurs during the first several days of germination. In this fashion the rise and fall of certain enzymes of amino acid intermediary metabolism could be postulated, and in some cases, verified. The subsets of abundant mRNAs whose appearance and disappearance coincided with developmental events in cotyledon embryogenesis/germination with the short range goal of identifying proteins/enzyme activities were delineated as well as their mRNAs that represent specific developmental stages and the long range goal of using these representatives as probes for studying the mechanisms controlling the rise and fall of these mRNAs and their protein products.

  11. Technical Progress Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Ben Poulter; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Gilberto Tiepolo

    2006-06-30

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st and July 30th 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. Work is being carried out in Brazil, Belize, Chile, Peru and the USA.

  12. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) program. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The 30 MJ, 10 MW superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system was devised to interact in the Western US Power System as an alternate means to damp unstable oscillations at 0.35 Hz on the Pacific HVAC Intertie. The SMES unit was installed at the Tacoma Substation of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The operating limits of the 30 MJ SMES unit were established, and different means of controlling real and reactive power were tested. The unit can follow a sinusoidal power demand signal with an amplitude of up to 8.6 MW with the converter working in a 12 pulse mode. When the converter operates in the constant VAR mode, a time varying real power demand signal of up to 5 MW can be met. Experiments showed that the Pacific ac Intertie has current and reactive power variations of the same frequency as the modulating frequency of the SMES device. Endurance tests were run to assess the reliability of the SMES subsystems with a narrow band noise input, which is characteristic of the modulation signal for stabilizer operation. During the endurance tests, parameters of the ac power system were determined. Converter short circuit tests, load tests under various control conditions, dc breaker tests for coil current interruption, and converter failure mode tests were conducted. The experimental operation of the SMES system was concluded and the operation was terminated in early 1984

  13. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) program. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1983-05-01

    Work reported is on the development of a 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit, its installation at the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Tacoma Substation, and the preliminary site tests in preparation for its use to stabilize power oscillations on the BPA Pacific AC Inertie. The seismic mounting of the 30 MJ superconducting coil to the dewar lid was completed. The manufacture and testing of the nonconducting dewar were completed. The 5 kV vapor cooled leads were assembled and tested. The refrigerator was placed in operation at the Tacoma Substation and tested by making liquid helium in a 500 l dewar. The refrigerator was connected to the coil dewar and is now used for cooling the 30 MJ coil and dewar with extended purification of the circulating helium to remove contaminants. All equipment was shipped and installed at the BPA Tacoma Substation. Assembly of the 30 MJ coil into the nonconducting dewar was done at the BPA Covington facility and transported to the Tacoma Substation. Substation preparation was completed by 11-1-82. BPA, at considerable expense, did an excellent job preparing the site and assisting with the SMES unit installation. All equipment is in place and operable except for components of the computer control and for full refrigeration of the 30 MJ coil. The converter was tested with the output shorted with the input transformers connected to the 13.8 kV. A new schedule for the SMES operation was established

  14. Optimal design and routing of power lines; ecological, technical and economic perspectives (OPTIPOL). Progress report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevanger, K.; Bartzke, G.; Broeseth, H.; Gjershaug, J.O.; Hanssen, F.; Jacobsen, K.-O.; Kvaloey, P.; May, R.; Nygaard, T.; Pedersen, H.C.; Reitan, O.; Refsnaes, S.; Stokke, S.; Vang, R.

    2009-12-15

    From 2009 inclusive, NINA has received economic support for research on power lines and wildlife from the Norwegian Research Council (NFR) through the RENERGI Programme. The project is named 'Optimal design and routing of power lines; ecological, technical and economic perspectives' (OPTIPOL). It is scheduled for 5 years (2009-1013) and is part of the activities within CEDREN, i.e. the Centre for environmental design of renewable energy (cf. http://www.cedren.no). With a grid close to 200 000 km overhead power-lines, the associated rights-of-way (ROW) affect huge land areas in Norway. The overall goal is to develop predict-ing tools for optimal routing of power lines from an environmental perspective and assess technical and economic solutions to minimize conflicts with wildlife and habitat conservation. Thus, the OPTIPOL rationale is based on the belief that the negative effects of electricity transmission and distribution can be reduced with respect to birds and mammals. OPTIPOL has several ambitious objectives, and is divided into sub-projects and specific tasks. From the first of November a PhD-student became part of the project, a position that will be held for 4 years. The main objective of the PhD-activities will be to assess how and why different wildlife species use deforested areas below power lines, evaluate possible positive and negative effects of power-line ROWs, and assess the possibilities for quality improvement. Another part of the project is dedicated the effects of linear structures on movement patterns and distribution in the landscape in native deer species. Here we will examine how different spatial scales influence the processes that guide movement patterns, and responses to linear structures. Another focus will be small game species, with mountain hare, capercaillie, black grouse and hazel grouse as model species. The main objective will be to assess the impact of transforming ROW habitats into attractive small-game foraging

  15. Solid State Sciences Committee (SSSC). Technical progress report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Solid State Sciences Committee (SSSC) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of materials science in the United States. Accordingly, the Committee identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special forums are among the mechanisms used by the SSSC to meet its charge. This progress report presents a review of SSSC activities from May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993. The details of prior activities are discussed in earlier reports. During the above period, the SSSC has continued to track and participate, when requested, in the development of a Federal initiative on advanced materials and processing. Specifically, the SSSC is presently planning the 1993 SSSC Forum (to be cosponsored with the National Materials Advisory Board (NMAB) and the Washington Materials Forum (WMF)). The thrust will be to highlight the Federal Advanced Materials and Processing Program (AMPP). In keeping with its charge to identify and highlight specific areas for scientific and technological opportunities, the SSSC continued to oversee the conduct of a study on biomolecular materials. Preliminary plans also were developed for a study on neutron science, however, further activity is pending. A proposed study on ultrasmall devices has been expanded and absorbed into a broader context; the BPA, with SSSC participation, is preparing to hold a program initiation meeting to evaluate the need for a study on information technology and hardware

  16. Exploratory research on solvent refined coal liquefaction. Annual technical progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Exploratory Research on Solvent Refined Coal Liquefaction project by The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co.'s Merriam Laboratory during 1979. In a series of experiments with varying feed gas composition, low levels (5 to 10 mole %) of carbon monoxide had little effect on the SRC II processing of Pittsburgh Seam coal (Powhatan No. 5 Mine) while higher levels (20 to 40 mole %) resulted in a general degradation of operability and reduced oil yields. Addition of finely divided (approx. 1 ..mu..m) pyrite to the reactive Powhatan coal had little effect on oil yields although the molecular weight of the distillation residue was apparently decreased. When finely divided pyrite and magnetite were added to the less reactive coals from the Loveridge and Blacksville No. 1 Mines (also Pittsburgh Seam), however, substantial increases in oil yields and product quality were obtained. In a comparison of upflow and downflow dissolver configurations with Powhatan coal in the SRC II mode, there was no difference in yields or product quality. A study characterizing specific reactors revealed a significantly higher conversion in the SRC I mode with a reactor approximating plug flow conditions compared to a completely backmixed reactor. In the SRC II mode there was only a slightly higher oil yield with the plug flow reactor.

  17. Supramolecular structures for photochemical energy conversion. Technical progress report, 1993--1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This research project is concerned with the design, synthesis and study by photochemical and spectroscopic methods of complex molecular devices that mimic some important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Properly engineered molecules of this type can functionally mimic photosynthetic light harvesting (singlet-singlet energy transfer between chromophores), photoprotection from light-initiated singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophylls to carotenoid polyenes), and, most importantly, photoinduced multistep electron transfer to generate charge-separated states that preserve some of the photon energy as chemical potential. During the last three years, progress has been made on several fronts, all of which are related to the overall goal. A biomimetic system based on carotenoid-porphyrin-quinone triads has been constructed that demonstrates photoinduced transmembrane charge separation which in turn drives transmembrane proton transfer. Another investigation has focused on the use of proton transfer reactions to stabilize the initial products of photoinduced electron transfer and thereby increase the yield of long-lived charge separation. A third study has investigated the influence of rigid molecular geometries and short donor-acceptor separations on photoinduced electron transfer reactions. Finally, generation and quenching of singlet molecular oxygen by chlorophyll aggregates has been studied. All four studies are described and results are discussed.

  18. Ion rings for magnetic fusion. Technical progress report, August 1, 1993--June 1, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudan, R.N.

    1994-01-01

    In Our Proposal ''Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion'' of January 6, 1993, Stage I of our Proposed Program plan (the 12 months) consisted of the following tasks: Experiments on the existing ion ring experimental system IREX to test a new magnetically-controlled anode plasma source (MAP) for the ion beam diode injector; numerical simulations of ion ring formation to optimize design parameters for the field reversed ion ring experiment (FIREX) to be built and operated in Stage II; and designing the power supply for the FIREX injector and the magnetic field system using results for A and B. During the past 7 1/2 months our work has progressed according to the above plan. In addition to testing the MAP diode on IREX we have tested the EMFAPS (evaporating metal film anode plasma source) anode on the Sandia National Laboratories funded LION pulsed power generator. As a result of these experiments, described this paper, we have arrived at the conclusion that EMFAPS anode for the ion at present because the MAP diode beam diode injector is our preferred choice for is still in an early stage of development

  19. Nuclear structure theory. Technical progress report, September 1, 1984-August 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.; Koltun, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes progress in the following areas of research: Spectral Averaging, including the theory of level densities and partition functions for interacting nucleons, spectral distributions for fixed symmetries, general studies of distributions (in particular of strength distributions) considered as multivariate processes, and applications to the secular behavior of fluctuation measures; spectral and strength fluctuations, including study of the transitions between different fluctuation patterns (i.e., between different types of quantum chaos) as a conserved symmetry is gradually broken, application of these results to determining values of, or upper bounds for, the goodness of symmetries in complex nuclei, reduction of values or bounds to statements about the nuclear Hamiltonian, in particular for time-reversal symmetry, and specific studies of quantum chaos; statistical theory of pion absorption, including analysis of the (π,p) inclusive reaction; and quark theory of nuclear matter, involving development of models which show two limiting behaviors - that of a Fermi gas of nucleons (quark clusters) at low density and of a Fermi gas of quarks at high density. Both variational and exact solutions of one model have been found. 9 refs

  20. University of Colorado at Boulder Nuclear Physics Laboratory technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes experimental work carried out between October 1, 1990, the closing of our Progress Report, and August 14, 1991 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under contract DE-FG02-ER40269 with the United States Department of Energy. This contract supports broadly based experimental work in intermediate energy nuclear physics. The program includes pion-nucleon studies at TRIUMF and LAMPF, inelastic pion scattering and charge exchange reactions at LAMPF, and nucleon charge exchange at LAMPF/NTOF. The first results of spin-transfer observables in the isovector (rvec p,rvec n) reaction are included in this report. Our data confirm the tentative result from (rvec p,rvec p') reactions that the nuclear isovector spin response shows neither longitudinal enhancement nor transverse queching. Our program in quasifree scattering of high energy pions shows solid evidence of isoscalar enhancement of the nuclear nonspin response. We include several comparisons of the quasifree scattering of different probes. Results from our efforts in the design of accelerator RF cavities are also included in this report

  1. Proton resonance spectroscopy. Quarterly technical progress report, December 1992--November 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shriner, J.F. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    Work on chaos in the low-lying levels of nuclei has continued on several fronts. The major effort has been study of the 29 Si(p,γ) reaction with the goal of establishing a complete level scheme for 30 P and analyzing the eigenvalue fluctuations for evidence of chaos. These measurements are in progress, and the current status is described. A related topic is the search for different signatures of chaos which do not require the extremely high degree of completeness and purity necessary for eigenvalue analyses; those efforts are discussed in Sections 2 and 3. The possibility of studying both parity violation and time-reversal invariance violation with charged particle resonances has been explored by performing calculations using experimentally measured resonance parameters. Large enhancements are indeed available; the results are discussed in Sections 4 and 5. Preparations for an experimental study of parity violation using these techniques are ongoing. An undergraduate project searching for experimental evidence of a parity dependence of level density is discussed in Section 6. A number of improvements to the operation of the TUNL KN accelerator have been implemented in the past three years. These are described in Section 7

  2. Proton resonance spectroscopy. Quarterly technical progress report, December 1992--November 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriner, J.F. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    Work on chaos in the low-lying levels of nuclei has continued on several fronts. The major effort has been study of the {sup 29}Si(p,{gamma}) reaction with the goal of establishing a complete level scheme for {sup 30}P and analyzing the eigenvalue fluctuations for evidence of chaos. These measurements are in progress, and the current status is described. A related topic is the search for different signatures of chaos which do not require the extremely high degree of completeness and purity necessary for eigenvalue analyses; those efforts are discussed in Sections 2 and 3. The possibility of studying both parity violation and time-reversal invariance violation with charged particle resonances has been explored by performing calculations using experimentally measured resonance parameters. Large enhancements are indeed available; the results are discussed in Sections 4 and 5. Preparations for an experimental study of parity violation using these techniques are ongoing. An undergraduate project searching for experimental evidence of a parity dependence of level density is discussed in Section 6. A number of improvements to the operation of the TUNL KN accelerator have been implemented in the past three years. These are described in Section 7.

  3. Technical progress report for UTSI/CFFF MHD program completion and related activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, James N.; Muehlhauser, Joel W.

    1998-01-01

    Routine preventive maintenance of the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) is being performed. Modernization programs, funded under subcontract from Foster Wheeler Development Corporation by the DOE HIPPS Program, have been completed on the coal processing system, the data acquisition and control system and the control room. Late in the quarter, all work was stopped on maintenance of the CFFF at DOE instruction. Environmental restoration actions continued with monitoring of groundwater wells and holding pond effluent. Progress is reported on the approved groundwater remediation plan. Actions are underway to dispose of spent seed/ash mixtures and excess coal remaining from the MHD POC program. The status of five (5) High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) projects is reported. A summary is included of the results attained with sol-gel experiments with buffer layers and YBCO. The status of the cost/performance study of electron beam and PLD deposition is pre-sented. A summary of work performed in diagnostics for real time control of HTS processes is presented

  4. TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR UTSI/CFFF MHD PROGRAM COMPLETION AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR. JAMES N. CHAPMAN; DR. JOEL W. MUEHLHAUSER

    1998-10-23

    Routine preventive maintenance of the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) is being performed. Modernization programs, funded under subcontract from Foster Wheeler Development Corporation by the DOE HIPPS Program, have been completed on the coal processing system, the data acquisition and control system and the control room. Late in the quarter, all work was stopped on maintenance of the CFFF at DOE instruction. Environmental restoration actions continued with monitoring of groundwater wells and holding pond effluent. Progress is reported on the approved groundwater remediation plan. Actions are underway to dispose of spent seed/ash mixtures and excess coal remaining from the MHD POC program. The status of five (5) High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) projects is reported. A summary is included of the results attained with sol-gel experiments with buffer layers and YBCO. The status of the cost/performance study of electron beam and PLD deposition is pre-sented. A summary of work performed in diagnostics for real time control of HTS processes is presented.

  5. Nuclear structure theory: Technical progress report for period September 1, 1986-August 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.; Koltun, D.S.

    1987-08-01

    This report summarizes progress in the following areas of research: (1) quark theory of nuclear matter, including further development of models in one-dimension with analytic solutions, numerical studies, bound properties, inclusion of spin and isospin degrees of freedom, excitation properties and response function; electron scattering, including application of sum rules to deeply inelastic scattering, and of quark models of nuclei; charge exchange in pion-nucleus reactions, including models of isotensor optical potential, optical theorem for double charge exchange, and coupled-channel calculations of single charge exchange; a unified theory of reaction dynamics and nuclear structure for intermediate energies, including diagrammatic formulation and development of appropriate computer programs; weak interactions: a study of the neutrino mass-matrix; bounds for time reversal noninvariance in the nucleon-nucleon interaction, obtained from spectral and strength fluctuations in complex nuclei, and separately from detailed balance in compound nuclear reactions. The relative sensitivities of the two methods are discussed; fluctuation measures for the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator; random matrices and symmetry-breaking in atomic spectra data; saturation effects for spectral measures in many-particle systems; and finally fluctuation-free statistical spectroscopy, applied to state densities and partition functions, including accurate absolute calculations of nuclear level spacings

  6. Technical progress report to the Department of Energy on the Solid State Sciences Committee (SSSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Solid State Sciences Committee (SSSC) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of materials science in the United States. Accordingly, the Committee identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special forums are among the mechanisms used by the SSSC to meet its charge. This progress report presents a review of SSSC activities from May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993. The details of prior activities are discussed in earlier reports. During the above period, the SSSC has continued to track and participate, when requested, in the development of a Federal initiative on advanced materials and processing. Specifically, the SSSC is presently planning the 1993 SSSC Forum (to be cosponsored with the National Materials Advisory Board (NMAB) and the Washington Materials Forum (WNM)). The thrust will be to highlight the Federal Advanced Materials and Processing Program (AMPP). In keeping with its charge to identify and highlight specific areas for scientific and technological opportunities, the SSSC continued to oversee the conduct of a study on biomolecular materials. Preliminary plans also have been developed for studies on neutron scattering science, on ultrasmall devices, and on molecular routes to materials

  7. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol. 11, No. 1--Vol. 17, No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1977-02-23

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970), through Vol. 17, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1976). The index includes a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by KWIC and Author Indexes. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 350 technical articles in the last six years of publication.

  8. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol. 11, No. 1--Vol. 17, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1977-01-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970), through Vol. 17, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1976). The index includes a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by KWIC and Author Indexes. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 350 technical articles in the last six years of publication

  9. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1980-March 1980. [In process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) project at the SRC Pilot Plant in Fort Lewis, Wahsington, and the Process Development Unit (P-99) in Harmarville, Pennsylvania. After the remaining runs of the slurry preheater survey test program were completed January 14, the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant was shut down to inspect Slurry Preheater B and to insulate the coil for future testing at higher rates of heat flux. Radiographic inspection of the coil showed that the welds at the pressure taps and the immersion thermowells did not meet design specifications. Slurry Preheater A was used during the first 12 days of February while weld repairs and modifications to Slurry Preheater B were completed. Two attempts to complete a material balance run on Powhatan No. 6 Mine coal were attempted but neither was successful. Slurry Preheater B was in service the remainder of the quarter. The start of a series of runs at higher heat flux was delayed because of plugging in both the slurry and the hydrogen flow metering systems. Three baseline runs and three slurry runs of the high heat flux program were completed before the plant was shut down March 12 for repair of the Inert Gas Unit. Attempts to complete a fourth slurry run at high heat flux were unsuccessful because of problems with the coal feed handling and the vortex mix systems. Process Development Unit (P-99) completed three of the four runs designed to study the effect of dissolver L/D ratio. The fourth was under way at the end of the period. SRC yield correlations have been developed that include coal properties as independent variables. A preliminary ranking of coals according to their reactivity in PDU P-99 has been made. Techniques for studying coking phenomenona are now in place.

  10. LMFBR flexible pipe joint development program. Annual technical progress report, government fiscal year 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Currently, the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code does not allow the use of flexible pipe joints (bellows) in Section III, Class 1 reactor primary piping systems. Studies have shown that the primary piping loops of LMFBR's could be simplified by using these joints. This simplification translates directly into shorter primary piping runs and reduced costs for the primary piping system. Further cost savings result through reduced vault sizes and reduced containment building diameter. In addition, the use of flexible joints localizes the motions from thermally-induced piping growth into components which are specifically designed to accommodate this motion. This reduces the stress levels in the piping system and its components. It is thus economically and structurally important that flexible piping joints be available to the LMFBR designer. The overall objective of the Flexible Joint Program is to provide this availability. This will be accomplished through the development of ASME rules which allow the appropriate use of such joints in Section III, Class 1 piping systems and through the development and demonstration of construction methods which satisfy these rules. The rule development includes analytic and testing methodology formulations which will be supported by subscale bellows testing. The construction development and demonstration encompass the design, fabrication, and in-sodium testing of prototypical LMFBR plant-size flexible pipe joints which meet all ASME rule requirements. The satisfactory completion of these developmental goals will result in an approved flexible pipe joint design for the LMFBR. Progress is summarized in the following efforts undertaken during 1977 to accomplish these goals: (1) code case support, (2) engineering and design, (3) material development, (4) testing, and (5) manufacturing development

  11. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels: Technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Boehman, A.; Coleman, M.M.

    1995-02-01

    There are five tasks within this project on thermally stable coal-based jet fuels. Progress on each of the tasks is described. Task 1, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, has 5 subtasks which are described: Literature review on thermal stability of jet fuels; Pyrolytic and catalytic reactions of potential endothermic fuels: cis- and trans-decalin; Use of site specific {sup 13}C-labeling to examine the thermal stressing of 1-phenylhexane: A case study for the determination of reaction kinetics in complex fuel mixtures versus model compound studies; Estimation of critical temperatures of jet fuels; and Surface effects on deposit formation in a flow reactor system. Under Task 2, Investigation of incipient deposition, the subtask reported is Uncertainty analysis on growth and deposition of particles during heating of coal-derived aviation gas turbine fuels; under Task 3, Characterization of solid gums, sediments, and carbonaceous deposits, is subtask, Studies of surface chemistry of PX-21 activated carbon during thermal degradation of jet A-1 fuel and n-dodecane; under Task 4, Coal-based fuel stabilization studies, is subtask, Exploratory screening and development potential of jet fuel thermal stabilizers over 400 C; and under Task 5, Exploratory studies on the direct conversion of coal to high quality jet fuels, are 4 subtasks: Novel approaches to low-severity coal liquefaction and coal/resid co-processing using water and dispersed catalysts; Shape-selective naphthalene hydrogenation for production of thermally stable jet fuels; Design of a batch mode and a continuous mode three-phase reactor system for the liquefaction of coal and upgrading of coal liquids; and Exploratory studies on coal liquids upgrading using mesopores molecular sieve catalysts. 136 refs., 69 figs., 24 tabs.

  12. Directional backlight liquid crystal autostereoscopic display: technical challenges, research progress, and prospect (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hang; Li, Kunyang; Zhou, Yangui; Liang, Haowen; Wang, Jiahui; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-09-01

    Recent upsurge on virtual and augmented realities (VR and AR) has re-ignited the interest to the immerse display technology. The VR/AR technology based on stereoscopic display is believed in its early stage as glasses-free, or autostereoscopic display, will be ultimately adopted for the viewing convenience, visual comfort and for the multi-viewer purposes. On the other hand, autostereoscopic display has not yet received positive market response for the past years neither with stereoscopic displays using shutter or polarized glasses. We shall present the analysis on the real-world applications, rigid user demand, the drawbacks to the existing barrier- and lenticular lens-based LCD autostereoscopy. We shall emphasize the emerging autostereoscopic display, and notably on directional backlight LCD technology using a hybrid spatial- and temporal-control scenario. We report the numerical simulation of a display system using Monte-Carlo ray-tracing method with the human retina as the real image receiver. The system performance is optimized using newly developed figure of merit for system design. The reduced crosstalk in an autostereoscopic system, the enhanced display quality, including the high resolution received by the retina, the display homogeneity without Moiré- and defect-pattern, will be highlighted. Recent research progress including a novel scheme for diffraction-free backlight illumination, the expanded viewing zone for autostereoscopic display, and the novel Fresnel lens array to achieve a near perfect display in 2D/3D mode will be introduced. The experimental demonstration will be presented to the autostereoscopic display with the highest resolution, low crosstalk, Moiré- and defect- pattern free.

  13. Theory of high-energy-collision processes. Technical progress report, January 1-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Progress is described in the following areas: (1) several years ago, surprisingly simple expressions were obtained for the differential cross sections of e + e - → μ + μ - γ and e + e - → e + e - γ at high energies. Such simple expressions were generalized to twelve other similar radiative processes in QED and QCD. Afterwards, it was found that these results can be derived easily with the help of helicity amplitudes. This method is being investigated for many other radiative processes; (2) in the two-dimensional Ising model, the horizontal and vertical interaction energies are usually taken to be different. When this idea of different interactions in different directions is applied to the Z 2 lattice gauge theory in four dimensions, a limiting case is found which is exactly solvable. Contrary to numerical calculations at the symmetry point, the phase transition is found to be of second order; (3) on the subject of supersymmetry, general helicity and spin sum rules were obtained for massless and massive supermultiplets, and a functional integral approach was found as a natural setting for Witten's criterion for the occurrence of dynamic symmetry breaking of supersymmetry. A systematic and exhaustive analysis of explicit soft breaking of global supersymmetry has also been carried out using the methods of superfields; (4) the renormalization of the massless Thirring model in the neighborhood of g = -π/2 was studied. The results are consistent with those found previously by placing the model on a lattice; and (5) in studying the effect of laboratory temperature on scattering processes, it was found that transport phenomena play an important role. As a preparation for this study, an exactly solvable case of the nonlinear Boltzmann equation has been found and studied

  14. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Colorado technical progress report, 1976 and proposal for continuation of contract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes the work carried out at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado during the period November 1, 1975 to November 1, 1976. The low energy nuclear physics section is dominated by light-ion reaction studies which span a wide range. These include both two-neutron and two-proton transfer reactions, charge exchange and inelastic scattering, as well as single nucleon transfer reactions. The nuclei studied vary widely in their mass and characteristics. These reaction studies have been aided by the multi-use scattering chamber which now allows the energy-loss-spectrometer beam preparation system (beam swinger) to shift from charged particle studies to neutron time-of-flight studies with a minimum loss of time. The intermediate energy section reflects the increase in activity accompanying the arrival of LAMPF data and the initiation of (p,d) studies at the Indiana separated-sector cyclotron. The nucleon removal results provided by the π beam at EPICS previous to completion of the spectrometer have shown that nuclear effects dominate this process, so that the widely used free interaction picture is inadequate. The section entitled ''Other Activities'' reveals continuing activities in new applications of nuclear techniques to problems in medicine and biology. Reactions important to astrophysics continue to be investigated and our trace-element program remains at a high level of activity. The theoretical section reports new progress in understanding magnitudes of two-step reactions by inclusion of finite-range effects. A new finite-range program which is fast and economical has been completed. Intermediate energy results include calculations of π-γ angular correlations, low energy π-nucleus interactions, as well as (p,d) and nucleon scattering calculations for intermediate energies

  15. Improved methods for water shutoff. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seright, R.S.; Liang, J.T.; Schrader, R.; Hagstrom, J. II; Liu, J.; Wavrik, K.

    1998-10-01

    In the United States, more than 20 billion barrels of salt water are produced each year during oilfield operations. A tremendous economic incentive exists to reduce water production if that can be accomplished without significantly sacrificing hydrocarbon production. This three-year research project had three objectives. The first objective was to identify chemical blocking agents that will (a) during placement, flow readily through fractures without penetrating significantly into porous rock and with screening out or developing excessive pressure gradients and (b) at a predictable and controllable time, become immobile and resistant breakdown upon exposure to moderate to high pressure gradients. The second objective was to identify schemes that optimize placement of the above blocking agents. The third objective was to explain why gels and other chemical blocking agents reduce permeability to one phase (e.g., water) more than that to another phase (e.g., oil or gas). The authors also wanted to identify conditions that maximize this phenomenon. This project consisted of three tasks, each of which addressed one of the above objectives. This report describes work performed during the third and final period of the project. During this three-year project, they: (1) Developed a procedure and software for sizing gelant treatments in hydraulically fractured production wells; (2) Developed a method (based on interwell tracer results) to determine the potential for applying gel treatments in naturally fractured reservoirs; (3) Characterized gel properties during extrusion through fractures; (4) Developed a method to predict gel placement in naturally fractured reservoirs; (5) Made progress in elucidating the mechanism for why some gels can reduce permeability to water more than that to oil; (6) Demonstrated the limitations of using water/oil ratio diagnostic plots to distinguish between channeling and coning; and (7) Proposed a philosophy for diagnosing and attacking water

  16. GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini RTG Program. Semi annual technical progress report, September 26, 1994--April 2, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The technical progress achieved during the period 26 September 1994 through 2 April 1995 on Contract DE-AC03-91SF18852 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Ancillary Activities is described herein. Monthly technical activity for the period 27 February 1995 through 2 April 1995 is included in this progress report. The report addresses tasks, including: spacecraft integration and liaison; engineering support; safety; qualified unicouple production; ETG Fabrication, assembly, and test; ground support equipment; RTG shipping and launch support; designs, reviews, and mission applications; project management, quality assurance, reliability, contract changes, CAGO acquisition (operating funds), and CAGO maintenance and repair; and CAGO acquisition (capital funds)

  17. Final Technical Progress Report Long term risk from actinides in the environment: Modes of mobility; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas B. Kirchner

    2002-01-01

    The key source of uncertainty in assessing actinide mobility is the relative importance of transport by: (1) wind erosion, (2) water erosion, and (3) vertical migration. Each of these three processes depends on several environmental factors and they compete with one another. A scientific assessment of the long-term risks associated with actinides in surface soils depends on better quantifying each of these three modes of mobility. The objective from our EMSP study was to quantify the mobility of soil actinides by wind erosion, water erosion, and vertical migration at three semiarid sites where actinide mobility is a key technical, social and legal issue. This EMSP project was the first to evaluate all three factors at a site. The approach has been to investigate both short- and long-term issues based on field and lab studies and model comparisons. Our results demonstrate the importance of incorporating threshold responses into a modeling framework that accounts for environmental factors and natural disturbances that trigger large changes in actinide mobility. The study measured erosional losses of sediment and fallout cesium (an actinide analogue) from field plots located near WIPP in 1998. The results highlight the large effect of burning as a disturbance on contaminant transport and mobility via runoff and erosion. The results show that runoff, erosion, and actinide transport are (1) strongly site specific-differences in radionuclide transport between WIPP and Rocky Flats differed by a factor of twelve because of soil and vegetation differences, and (2) are strongly impacted by disturbances such as fire, which can increase runoff, erosion, and actinide transport by more than an order of magnitude. In addition, a laboratory experiment using soil columns was conducted to investigate the vertical transport of contaminants in sandy soils. Nine columns of soil collected from the vicinity of the WIPP site were prepared. The column consisted of a piece of PVC pipe 20 cm

  18. Final Technical Progress Report Long term risk from actinides in the environment: Modes of mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, Thomas B.

    2002-01-01

    The key source of uncertainty in assessing actinide mobility is the relative importance of transport by: (1) wind erosion, (2) water erosion, and (3) vertical migration. Each of these three processes depends on several environmental factors and they compete with one another. A scientific assessment of the long-term risks associated with actinides in surface soils depends on better quantifying each of these three modes of mobility. The objective from our EMSP study was to quantify the mobility of soil actinides by wind erosion, water erosion, and vertical migration at three semiarid sites where actinide mobility is a key technical, social and legal issue. This EMSP project was the first to evaluate all three factors at a site. The approach has been to investigate both short- and long-term issues based on field and lab studies and model comparisons. Our results demonstrate the importance of incorporating threshold responses into a modeling framework that accounts for environmental factors and natural disturbances that trigger large changes in actinide mobility. The study measured erosional losses of sediment and fallout cesium (an actinide analogue) from field plots located near WIPP in 1998. The results highlight the large effect of burning as a disturbance on contaminant transport and mobility via runoff and erosion. The results show that runoff, erosion, and actinide transport are (1) strongly site specific-differences in radionuclide transport between WIPP and Rocky Flats differed by a factor of twelve because of soil and vegetation differences, and (2) are strongly impacted by disturbances such as fire, which can increase runoff, erosion, and actinide transport by more than an order of magnitude. In addition, a laboratory experiment using soil columns was conducted to investigate the vertical transport of contaminants in sandy soils. Nine columns of soil collected from the vicinity of the WIPP site were prepared. The column consisted of a piece of PVC pipe 20 cm

  19. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Annual Technical Progress Report of Ecological Research, June 30, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, Paul M.; Janecek, Laura; Rosier, Brenda

    2001-06-30

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) and has been conducting ecological research on the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina for 50 years. The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts fundamental and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SRS near Aiken, South Carolina. The Laboratory's research mission during the 2001 fiscal year was fulfilled with the publication of one book and 83 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical staff, students, and visiting scientists. An additional 77 journal articles have been submitted or are in press. Other noteworthy events took place as faculty members and graduate students received awards. These are described in the section Special Accomplishments of Faculty, Staff, Students, and Administration on page 54. Notable scientific accomplishments include work conducted on contaminant transport, global reptile decline, phytoremediation, and radioecology. Dr. Domy Adriano authored the second edition of his book ''Trace Elements in Terrestrial Environments: Biogeochemistry, Bioavailability, and Risks of Metals'', which was recently published by Springer-Verlag. The book provides a comprehensive treatment of many important aspects of trace elements in the environment. The first edition of the book, published in 1986, has become a widely acclaimed and cited reference. International attention was focused on the problem of reptile species decline with the publication of an article on this topic in the journal ''Bioscience'' in August, 2000. The article's authors included Dr. Whit Gibbons and a number of other SREL herpetologists who researched the growing worldwide problem of decline of reptile species. Factors related

  20. Final Technical Progress Report Long term risk from actinides in the environment: Modes of mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas B. Kirchner

    2002-03-22

    The key source of uncertainty in assessing actinide mobility is the relative importance of transport by: (1) wind erosion, (2) water erosion, and (3) vertical migration. Each of these three processes depends on several environmental factors and they compete with one another. A scientific assessment of the long-term risks associated with actinides in surface soils depends on better quantifying each of these three modes of mobility. The objective from our EMSP study was to quantify the mobility of soil actinides by wind erosion, water erosion, and vertical migration at three semiarid sites where actinide mobility is a key technical, social and legal issue. This EMSP project was the first to evaluate all three factors at a site. The approach has been to investigate both short- and long-term issues based on field and lab studies and model comparisons. Our results demonstrate the importance of incorporating threshold responses into a modeling framework that accounts for environmental factors and natural disturbances that trigger large changes in actinide mobility. The study measured erosional losses of sediment and fallout cesium (an actinide analogue) from field plots located near WIPP in 1998. The results highlight the large effect of burning as a disturbance on contaminant transport and mobility via runoff and erosion. The results show that runoff, erosion, and actinide transport are (1) strongly site specific-differences in radionuclide transport between WIPP and Rocky Flats differed by a factor of twelve because of soil and vegetation differences, and (2) are strongly impacted by disturbances such as fire, which can increase runoff, erosion, and actinide transport by more than an order of magnitude. In addition, a laboratory experiment using soil columns was conducted to investigate the vertical transport of contaminants in sandy soils. Nine columns of soil collected from the vicinity of the WIPP site were prepared. The column consisted of a piece of PVC pipe 20 cm

  1. I-NERI QUARTERLY TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT - JANUARY 1 - MARCH 31, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh

    2005-01-01

    codes. The three categories of experiments were performed in the facility; (1) upper pool cooling trip test, (2) LOFC experiment, (3) emissivity measurement experiment. (C) Prof. NO continued Task 3. (Prof NO) The experimental work of air ingress is going on without any concern: Geometry and size effect test has been completed. The conversion factor for internal surface area was obtained through this experiment. Burn-off test was performed and the uniformity of internal reaction was confirmed. (D) INEEL engineers continued to extend the diffusion model for multiple chemical species and made some calculations. (E) Prof. Lee and Martin at University of Michigan continued to analyze the effect of the stochastic fuel on the neutronic analysis and have initiated fuel depletion calculations for the VHTGR core. Progress during the past quarter includes: Further analysis of stochastic fuel geometry; Preliminary Monte Carlo depletion of full-core VHTGR; and Installation of MCNP5 on Unix cluster

  2. Optimal design and routing of power lines; ecological, technical and economic perspectives (OPTIPOL). Progress report 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevanger, Kjetil; Bartzke, Gundula; Broeseth, Henrik; Dahl, Espen Lie; Gjershaug, Jan Ove; Hanssen, Frank; Jacobsen, Karl-Otto; Kleven, Oddmund; Kvaloey, Paal; May, Roel; Meaas, Roger; Nygaaard, Torgeir; Resnaes, Steinar; Stokke, Sigbjoern; Thomassen, Joern

    2012-07-01

    birds in the database, compared to only 117 a year earlier. WP5 - 'A Least Cost Path (LCP) toolbox for optimal route routing of power lines', has developed an LCP-pilot to demonstrate the LCP method, based on the impact studies were undertaken prior to construction of a 420 kV transmission line in Central Norway 2005. Relevant economic, ecological and technological environment criteria based on suggestions from interested users (NGOs, government, industry, etc.), was used. LCP-pilot and a fuzzy-logic approach of this was demonstrated in the first dialogue-based workshop, 23.-24. april 2012. The seminar, which had an emphasis on criteria definitions were followed up with a working seminar that focused criterion values ??on 20 november 2012. Lecture - 'A Least Cost Path (LCP) Toolbox for Optimal Routing of Power Lines, -was presented and submitted as contributions to the conference report from 'The 10th ROW Conference' in Arizona, 'The 32nd Annual Conference of the International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA12) ' in Porto, Portugal, and 'The ESRI European User Conference' in Oslo. WP6 - 'Birds and camouflaging of power lines', has almost completed the final report, 'Power line camouflaging. An assessment of the ecological and technical challenges'. 'Because of the budget situation in CEDREN However, completion of the report postponed until the end of April 2013. WP7 - 'Effect of line marking / modifications remedial measures against bird mortality' has almost completed the final report 'Opportunities and limitations in terms of reducing mortality in birds due to collision and electrocution.' Due to overall budget situation in CEDREN the report deferred to the end of april 2013. WP8, 'guidelines for technological solutions that may reduce mortality in birds because of the power line's', has focused topics relating to the labeling, design, insulation, camouflage and wiring. The results, which are presented in the notes and articles, will be implemented in

  3. Storage of radioactive wastes in geological formations. Technical criteria for site selection. Report by the work-group chaired by Professor Goguel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goguel, Jean; Candes, Pierre; Izabel, Cecile; Autran, Albert; Barthoux, Alain; Baudin, Guy; Devillers, Christian; Habib, Pierre; Lafuma, Jacques; Lefevre, Jean; Peaudecerf, Pierre; Pradel, Jacques; Salle, Claude; Treuil, Michel; Lebrun, Patrick; Tissier, Marie-Solange

    1985-06-01

    This document is the result of a prospective mission on the long term storage of radioactive wastes containing long-period emitters (wastes of B and C categories), and notably on a definitive storage in deep continental geological formations. After a presentation of hypotheses (brief description of the storage concept, main safety principles, objectives in terms of radiological safety, safety options, time-related considerations), the authors addressed the following issues: safety before closing during the exploitation period, and safety after closure (after backfilling and sealing of all underground cavities). For the first issue, they discuss the impacts of works on safety and thermal effects during exploitation. For the second issue, they discuss the site natural hydro-geological context, the disturbances brought by the storage (access of water to the storage, and return of water into the biosphere), and the influence of external factors (geological phenomena, human intrusion). Then, the authors make recommendations regarding reconnaissance programs and studies for the selection and qualification of a site. They finally propose technical criteria and main recommendations for site selection. Appendices propose a list of hearings, a presentation of the storage concept, a report on the impact of works, a report on the presence of mineralisation in granite massifs, reports on radiological consequences of intrusions in salt formations and in granite massif containing storage of radioactive wastes or vitrified wastes, a report on the characterization of unsteady parts of the French continental construction, a presentation of the evolution of climate and icings, and a study of seismic movements in the case of deep storages

  4. Use of gamma radiation as a form of preservation of sweet potatoes. [Final technical] quarterly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This document covers: harvest and conditioning following harvest, harvest-curing-storage-irradiation schemes, irradiation, control sweet potatoes, analyses, enzymes results, and procedures for taste evaluation, storage rot, weevil

  5. Feed-in tariffs versus quotas: how to promote renewable s and stimulate technical progress for cost decrease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menanteau, Ph.; Finon, D.; Lamy, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    Incentive schemes for the development of renewable energy sources may focus on quantities (defining national targets and setting up bidding systems, or quota systems providing for green certificate trading), or they may focus on prices (feed-in tariffs). Whatever the system chosen, the role of the public authorities is quite specific: to stimulate technical progress and speed up the technological learning processes so that ultimately renewable energy technologies will be able to compete with conventional technologies, once the environmental costs have been internalized. A comparison of instruments must thus take into account the characteristics of the innovation process and adoption conditions (uncertainties regarding cost curves, learning effects) which means also looking at dynamic efficiency criteria. The paper concludes that a system of feed-in tariffs is more efficient than a bidding system, but highlights the theoretical interest of green certificate trading which must be confirmed through practice, given the influence of market structures and rules on the performance of this type of approach. (author)

  6. Research by ESS Division for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Progress report, January-June 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniman, D.

    1987-10-01

    Petrographic research for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations focused on xenolithic variability in the Topopah Spring Member and on variations of clinoptilolite composition at Yucca Mountain. Zeolite and smectite occurrences were considered in terms of their relation to a disturbed zone beneath the potential repository, and mineral stability experiments have produced a new clinoptilolite structure as a result of prolonged heating at low temperature. Limitations were defined on the abundance of erionite and of sulfur. X-ray diffraction studies lead to improved analytical methods. Progress was made in the comparative study of mineralogy in sand ramps and in faults. Geological modeling considered the differences of the diffusion of nonsorbing tracers in vertically and in horizontally fractured rock. Modeling also treated the diffusion of a nonsorbing tracer in devitrified and in zeolitized rock. The results of these experiments in all cases show relatively symmetrical two-dimensional diffusion patterns. Preliminary calculations compare the dispersion/diffusion of nonsorbing Tc with the dispersion/diffusion/sorption of U. 27 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Modeling the impacts of climate change and technical progress on the wheat yield in inland China: An autoregressive distributed lag approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Shiyan; Song, Genxin; Qin, Yaochen; Ye, Xinyue; Lee, Jay

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the impacts of climate change and technical progress on the wheat yield per unit area from 1970 to 2014 in Henan, the largest agricultural province in China, using an autoregressive distributed lag approach. The bounded F-test for cointegration among the model variables yielded evidence of a long-run relationship among climate change, technical progress, and the wheat yield per unit area. In the long run, agricultural machinery and fertilizer use both had significantly positive impacts on the per unit area wheat yield. A 1% increase in the aggregate quantity of fertilizer use increased the wheat yield by 0.19%. Additionally, a 1% increase in machine use increased the wheat yield by 0.21%. In contrast, precipitation during the wheat growth period (from emergence to maturity, consisting of the period from last October to June) led to a decrease in the wheat yield per unit area. In the short run, the coefficient of the aggregate quantity of fertilizer used was negative. Land size had a significantly positive impact on the per unit area wheat yield in the short run. There was no significant short-run or long-run impact of temperature on the wheat yield per unit area in Henan Province. The results of our analysis suggest that climate change had a weak impact on the wheat yield, while technical progress played an important role in increasing the wheat yield per unit area. The results of this study have implications for national and local agriculture policies under climate change. To design well-targeted agriculture adaptation policies for the future and to reduce the adverse effects of climate change on the wheat yield, climate change and technical progress factors should be considered simultaneously. In addition, adaptive measures associated with technical progress should be given more attention.

  8. Modeling the impacts of climate change and technical progress on the wheat yield in inland China: An autoregressive distributed lag approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyan Zhai

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the impacts of climate change and technical progress on the wheat yield per unit area from 1970 to 2014 in Henan, the largest agricultural province in China, using an autoregressive distributed lag approach. The bounded F-test for cointegration among the model variables yielded evidence of a long-run relationship among climate change, technical progress, and the wheat yield per unit area. In the long run, agricultural machinery and fertilizer use both had significantly positive impacts on the per unit area wheat yield. A 1% increase in the aggregate quantity of fertilizer use increased the wheat yield by 0.19%. Additionally, a 1% increase in machine use increased the wheat yield by 0.21%. In contrast, precipitation during the wheat growth period (from emergence to maturity, consisting of the period from last October to June led to a decrease in the wheat yield per unit area. In the short run, the coefficient of the aggregate quantity of fertilizer used was negative. Land size had a significantly positive impact on the per unit area wheat yield in the short run. There was no significant short-run or long-run impact of temperature on the wheat yield per unit area in Henan Province. The results of our analysis suggest that climate change had a weak impact on the wheat yield, while technical progress played an important role in increasing the wheat yield per unit area. The results of this study have implications for national and local agriculture policies under climate change. To design well-targeted agriculture adaptation policies for the future and to reduce the adverse effects of climate change on the wheat yield, climate change and technical progress factors should be considered simultaneously. In addition, adaptive measures associated with technical progress should be given more attention.

  9. Technical and economic assessments of storage techniques for long-term retention of industrial-beet sugar for non-food industrial fermentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Ramirez, Juan Manuel

    Industrial beets may compete against corn grain as an important source of sugars for non-food industrial fermentations. However, dependable and energy-efficient systems for beet sugar storage and processing are necessary to help establish industrial beets as a viable sugar feedstock. Therefore, technical and economic aspects of beet sugar storage and processing were evaluated. First, sugar retention was evaluated in whole beets treated externally with either one of two antimicrobials or a senescence inhibitor and stored for 36 wk at different temperature and atmosphere combinations. Although surface treatment did not improve sugar retention, full retention was enabled by beet dehydration caused by ambient air at 25 °C and with a relative humidity of 37%. This insight led to the evaluation of sugar retention in ground-beet tissue ensiled for 8 wk at different combinations of acidic pH, moisture content (MC), and sugar:solids. Some combinations of pH ≤ 4.0 and MC ≤ 67.5% enabled retentions of at least 90%. Yeast fermentability was also evaluated in non-purified beet juice acidified to enable long-term storage and partially neutralized before fermentation. None of the salts synthesized through juice acidification and partial neutralization inhibited yeast fermentation at the levels evaluated in that work. Conversely, yeast fermentation rates significantly improved in the presence of ammonium salts, which appeared to compensate for nitrogen deficiencies. Capital and operating costs for production and storage of concentrated beet juice for an ethanol plant with a production capacity of 76 x 106 L y-1 were estimated on a dry-sugar basis as U.S. ¢34.0 kg-1 and ¢2.2 kg-1, respectively. Storage and processing techniques evaluated thus far prove that industrial beets are a technically-feasible sugar feedstock for ethanol production.

  10. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report summarizes the work carried out by personnel at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado from about August 1, 1981 to October 1, 1982, under contract with the Department of Energy. The intermediate energy studies summarized in this report were carried out at the meson physics facilities at Los Alamos (LAMPF), the cyclotron at Indiana University (IUCF), and the meson physics facilities at Vancouver (TRIUMF). This year, for the first time, intermediate energy experimental studies are being reported in separate documents from the low energy and theoretical nuclear physics efforts. Experimental studies are reported on pion-nucleus interactions, charge exchange reactions, nucleon transfer reactions, and apparatus development

  11. 1996 technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Summaries of the researches are grouped into programs as follows: research and development in food and agriculture; research and development in health, environment and industry which includes all the PNRI research projects in 1996; scientific and technological services; and the nuclear regulations, licensing and safeguards of the institute

  12. 1997 technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This report presents the on-going research and development projects of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) in the fields of agriculture, environment and industry, scientific and technological services and nuclear regulations, licensing and safeguards.

  13. Annual technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    During the present contract period Phaedrus has begun operation as a true tandem mirror. This was accomplished by achieving the rf sustained mode in which the plug densities were built up by a combination of central cell gas puffing and plug ICRH following stream gun turn off. It was demonstrated that the tandem mirror plasma could be sustained by plug ICRH for up to 1 msec following decay of the external plasma. In this mode plasma characteristics were no longer dominated by problems associated with a high conductivity stream gun plasma in the external region (as was the case in many previous experiments in Phaedrus). Among these problems were (1) line tying which significantly reduced instabilities in a way that would not apply to reactors and (2) low electron temperatures which had been held to approx. 20 eV

  14. 1999 technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the on-going research and development projects of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) in the fields of agriculture, environment and industry, scientific and technological services and nuclear regulations, licensing and safeguards

  15. 1999 technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This report presents the on-going research and development projects of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) in the fields of agriculture, environment and industry, scientific and technological services and nuclear regulations, licensing and safeguards.

  16. 1996 technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Summaries of the researches are grouped into programs as follows: research and development in food and agriculture; research and development in health, environment and industry which includes all the PNRI research projects in 1996; scientific and technological services; and the nuclear regulations, licensing and safeguards of the institute.

  17. 1997 technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the on-going research and development projects of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) in the fields of agriculture, environment and industry, scientific and technological services and nuclear regulations, licensing and safeguards

  18. Final Technical Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.Y. Hwang; R.C. Greenlund

    2002-12-31

    Michigan Technological University has demonstrated major inroads in establishing the viability of utilizing aluminum smelting by-product waste materials in lightweight concrete product applications. The research identified key elements of producing various forms of lightweight concrete products through utilizing various procedures and mixture components with the by-product materials. A process was developed through pilot plant testing that results in additional aluminum recovery at finer sizes, a clean returnable salt product through spray drying technology, and a low-salt-content oxide product with enough aluminum metal content that it can be used to form lightweight cementitious mixtures. Having three distinct products aids in generating favorable process economics. Revenue projections from aluminum recovery and salt recovery are enough to cover processing costs and create a cost-free oxide product to market for lightweight concrete applications. This supply side commercialization strategy offers aluminum by-product recyclers a potentially no cost product, which has been demonstrated through this project to create desirable and marketable lightweight concrete products of various forms. Environmental benefits to the public are tremendous. At best, all dross and salt cake materials have the potential to be completely recycled and utilized. At worst, disposal sites would see a reduced amount of material: a post processed oxide product with little salt and no hydrogen sulfide or ammonia gas generating capability, which, if isolated from high alkali conditions, would pose no reactivity concerns. The US aluminum industry has historically, along with the steel industry, been a leader in recycling metal. The findings from this project, increased metal recovery, improved salt recycling, and demonstrated end uses for oxide residues, will go a long way in helping the aluminum industry obtain 100% material utilization and zero discharge.

  19. 1995 technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Summaries of the researches are grouped into programs as follows: research and development which covers all the PNRI research projects in 1994; scientific and technological services; and the nuclear regulations, licensing and safeguards of the institute

  20. Technical Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul D. Ronney

    2004-08-26

    An ignition source was constructed that is capable of producing a pulsed corona discharge for the purpose of igniting mixtures in a test chamber. The corona generator can also be used as the ignition source for one cylinder on a test engine. The first tests were performed in a cylindrical shaped chamber to study the characteristics of the corona and analyze various electrode geometries. Next a test chamber was constructed that closely represented the dimensions of the combustion chamber of the test engine at USC. Combustion tests were performed in this chamber and various electrode diameters and geometries were tested. Higher peak pressures and faster pressure rise times were realized consistently in all test chambers versus standard spark plug ignition. A test engine was purchased for the project that has two spark plug ports per cylinder to The data acquisition and control system hardware for the USC engine lab was updated with new equipment. New software was also developed to perform the engine control and data acquisition functions including cylinder pressure monitoring. A ceramic corona electrode has been designed that fits in the new test engine and is capable of withstanding the pressures and temperatures encountered inside the combustion chamber. The corona ignition system was tested on the engine and an increase in both peak pressure and IMEP were seen in the initial test. There are issues that must be addressed before on-engine testing can continue such as EMF interference from the corona generator and electrical insulation on portions of the piston and cylinder head to prevent arcing. The EMF issue can be solved with proper shielding and grounding and various ceramic coatings are being researched for electrical insulation.

  1. Technical Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelhardt, G.R.; MacDonald, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    During the past quartile (two month period) most attention has been concentrated on the problem of definition critical temperature at which ''wet'' corrosion first became operable. It has been shown that, in principle, ''wet'' corrosion processes can not be ignored for Yucca Mountain, even for initial times, when the temperature of the surface of containers is well above the boiling temperature of water for the prevailing conditions. This is because the surfaces are covered by highly hydrophilic oxides (e.g. Fe 2 O 3 , NiO, Cr 2 O 3 ) that will hydrate to the form of corresponding hydroxides, which are proton conductors, at least when in the ''wet'' condition. Because proton conduction and the presence of ''bound'' water are all that are required for the external environment to support metallic corrosion in either its general or localized form. Thus, the temperature of dehydration of the hydroxide, e.g. M(OH) 2 → MO + H 2 O(g), is a better criterion for the upper temperature limit for ''wet'' corrosion than is the boiling temperature of ''bulk'' water. During this first task, we have reviewed the existing thermodynamic data base for the dehydration of metal hydroxides and analytical expressions have been developed that allow the upper temperature limit to be estimated

  2. Assessing innovation in emerging energy technologies: Socio-technical dynamics of carbon capture and storage (CCS) and enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, Jennie C.; Jiusto, Scott

    2010-01-01

    This study applies a socio-technical systems perspective to explore innovation dynamics of two emerging energy technologies with potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from electrical power generation in the United States: carbon capture and storage (CCS) and enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). The goal of the study is to inform sustainability science theory and energy policy deliberations by examining how social and political dynamics are shaping the struggle for resources by these two emerging, not-yet-widely commercializable socio-technical systems. This characterization of socio-technical dynamics of CCS and EGS innovation includes examining the perceived technical, environmental, and financial risks and benefits of each system, as well as the discourses and actor networks through which the competition for resources - particularly public resources - is being waged. CCS and EGS were selected for the study because they vary considerably with respect to their social, technical, and environmental implications and risks, are unproven at scale and uncertain with respect to cost, feasibility, and life-cycle environmental impacts. By assessing the two technologies in parallel, the study highlights important social and political dimensions of energy technology innovation in order to inform theory and suggest new approaches to policy analysis.

  3. Safe handling, transport and storage of plutonium. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting held in Vienna, 18-21 October 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    Plutonium inventories and utilization rates worldwide are growing. It is important for nuclear power programmes everywhere that no incidents or accidents with plutonium occur. It is therefore important that all who deal with plutonium, do so safely. All those who deal with plutonium should have available the best information on safety handling and storage. Several countries have mature plutonium programmes. However, information exchange on plutonium has been limited. This has precluded the development until now of consensus documentation on safe handling and storage of plutonium. The Technical Committee has been established to address these problems and this Technical Document is the first product in this process. The purpose of the meeting was to bring together experts with significant experience in handling, transporting and storing plutonium; to exchange information and experiences dealing with plutonium at their facilities; to describe their practices (guidelines, procedures, regulations, etc.) for safely dealing with plutonium; to assess the need to develop and publish a consensus plutonium safety practices document(s), and to recommend possible future IAEA activities in this technical area. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Microscale Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer for Hydrogen Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drost, Kevin [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Jovanovic, Goran [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Paul, Brian [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The document summarized the technical progress associated with OSU’s involvement in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. OSU focused on the development of microscale enhancement technologies for improving heat and mass transfer in automotive hydrogen storage systems. OSU’s key contributions included the development of an extremely compact microchannel combustion system for discharging hydrogen storage systems and a thermal management system for adsorption based hydrogen storage using microchannel cooling (the Modular Adsorption Tank Insert or MATI).

  5. Energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaier, U.

    1981-04-01

    Developments in the area of energy storage are characterized, with respect to theory and laboratory, by an emergence of novel concepts and technologies for storing electric energy and heat. However, there are no new commercial devices on the market. New storage batteries as basis for a wider introduction of electric cars, and latent heat storage devices, as an aid for solar technology applications, with satisfactory performance standards are not yet commercially available. Devices for the intermediate storage of electric energy for solar electric-energy systems, and for satisfying peak-load current demands in the case of public utility companies are considered. In spite of many promising novel developments, there is yet no practical alternative to the lead-acid storage battery. Attention is given to central heat storage for systems transporting heat energy, small-scale heat storage installations, and large-scale technical energy-storage systems.

  6. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol 11, No. 1 through Vol. 16, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1976-04-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970) through Vol. 16, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1975). Included in the index is a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by both a KWIC index and an Author Index. Nuclear Safety is a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center and covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 300 technical articles in the last six years of publication

  7. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol. 11(1)--Vol. 18(6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1978-04-11

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Vol. 11, No. 1 (January-February 1970), through Vol. 18, No. 6 (November-December 1977). It is divided into three sections: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts) followed by a permuted-title (KWIC) index and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC), covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 450 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last eight years are listed in this index.

  8. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author, Volume 18 (1) through Volume 22 (6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Passiakos, M.

    1982-06-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Volume 18, Number 1 (January-February 1977) through Volume 22, Number 6 (November-December 1981). The index is divided into three section: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts), a permuted-title (KWIC) index, and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 300 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last 5 years are listed in this index

  9. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol 11, No. 1 through Vol. 16, No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1976-04-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970) through Vol. 16, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1975). Included in the index is a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by both a KWIC index and an Author Index. Nuclear Safety is a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center and covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 300 technical articles in the last six years of publication.

  10. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author, Volume 18 (1) through Volume 22 (6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Passiakos, M.

    1982-06-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Volume 18, Number 1 (January-February 1977) through Volume 22, Number 6 (November-December 1981). The index is divided into three section: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts), a permuted-title (KWIC) index, and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 300 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last 5 years are listed in this index.

  11. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol. 11(1)--Vol. 18(6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1978-01-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Vol. 11, No. 1 (January-February 1970), through Vol. 18, No. 6 (November-December 1977). It is divided into three sections: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts) followed by a permuted-title (KWIC) index and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC), covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 450 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last eight years are listed in this index

  12. Expectation and task for constructing the volume reduction system of removed soils. In search of the technical integrity from the intermediate storage to final disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hisaki

    2016-01-01

    The intermediate storage volume of the removed soils and incineration ash in Fukushima is supposed about 22 million cubic meters. Within 30 years after starting the intermediate storage, the final disposal outside Fukushima prefecture to these removed soils and incineration ash is determined by the law. Because these removed soils are the very-very low radio activity, the volume reduction method is most effective to reduce the burden of the final disposal. As the volume reduction technology is the stage of research and development, the possibility of the introduction of the volume reduction technology that has the consistency of the final disposal technology is evaluated from the point of view of cost. Since this business is accompanied by economic and technical risk to implement private companies, this project is considered appropriate to be implemented as a national project. (author)

  13. Technical and economic analysis on grid-connected wind farm based on hybrid energy storage system and distributed generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinhua; Zhou, Zhongkang; Chen, Xiaochun; Song, Jishuang; Shi, Maolin

    2017-05-01

    system is proposed based on NaS battery and lithium ion battery, that the former is the main large scale energy storage technology world-widely used and developed and the latter is a flexible way to have both power and energy capacities. The hybrid energy storage system, which takes advantage of the two complementary technologies to provide large power and energy capacities, is chosen to do an evaluation of econom ical-environmental based on critical excess electricity production (CEEP), CO2 emission, annual total costs calculated on the specific given condition using Energy PLAN software. The result shows that hybrid storage system has strengths in environmental benefits and also can absorb more discarded wind power than single storage system and is a potential way to push forward the application of wind power and even other types of renewable energy resources.

  14. Proceedings of the research conference on post-accident waste management safety (RCWM2016) and the technical seminar on safety research for radioactive waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motooka, Takafumi; Yamagishi, Isao

    2017-03-01

    Collaborative Laboratories for Advanced Decommissioning Science (CLADS) is responsible to promote international cooperation in the R and D activities on the decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station and to develop the necessary human resources. CLADS held the Research Conference on Post-accident Waste Management Safety (RCWM2016) on 7th November, 2016 and the Technical Seminar on Safety Research for Radioactive Waste Storage on 8th November, 2016. This report compiles the abstracts and the presentation materials in the above conference and seminar. (author)

  15. GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini Mission. Semi annual technical progress report, 1 April 1996--29 September 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This technical progress report discusses work on the Radioisotope Generators and Ancillary Activities for the Cassini spacecraft. The Cassini spacecraft is expected to launch in October 1997, and will explore Saturn and its moons. This progress report discusses issues in: spacecraft integration and liason, engineering support, safety, qualified unicouple fabrication, ETG fabrication and testing, ground support equipment, RTG shipping and launch support, designs, reviews and mission application. Safety analysis of the RTGs during reentry and launch accidents are covered. This report covers the period of April 1 to September 29, 1996

  16. Final Technical Report for GO15056 Millennium Cell: Development of an Advanced Chemical Hydrogen Storage and Generation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Oscar [Millennium Cell Inc., Eatontown, NJ (United States)

    2017-02-22

    The objectives of this project are to increase system storage capacity by improving hydrogen generation from concentrated sodium borohydride, with emphasis on reactor and system engineering; to complete a conceptual system design based on sodium borohydride that will include key technology improvements to enable a hydrogen fuel system that will meet the systembased storage capacity of 1.2 kWh/L (36 g H2/L) and 1.5 kWh/kg (45 g H2/kg), by the end of FY 2007; and to utilize engineering expertise to guide Center research in both off-board chemical hydride regeneration and on-board hydrogen generation systems.

  17. Technical report on design base events related to the safety assessment of a Low-level Waste Storage Facility (LWSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karino, Motonobu; Uryu, Mitsuru; Miyata, Kazutoshi; Matsui, Norio; Imamoto, Nobuo; Kawamata, Tatsuo; Saito, Yasuo; Nagayama, Mineo; Wakui, Yasuyuki

    1999-07-01

    The construction of a new Low-level Waste Storage Facility (LWSF) is planned for storage of concentrated liquid waste from existing Low-level Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility in Tokai Reprocessing Plant of JNC. An essential base for the safety designing of the facility is correctly implemented the adoption of the defence in depth principle. This report summarized criteria for judgement, selection of postulated events, major analytical conditions for anticipated operational occurrences and accidents for the safety assessment and evaluation of each event were presented. (Itami, H.)

  18. A methodology for the analysis and selection of alternatives for the disposition of surplus plutonium. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Office of Fissile Materials Disposition is currently involved in the development of a comprehensive approach to the long-term storage and disposition of fissile materials. A major objective of this effort is to provide a framework for US efforts to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons. This will entail both the elimination of excess highly enriched uranium and plutonium, and the insurance of the highest standards of safety, security, and international accountability. The Office of Fissile Materials Disposition is supporting an Interagency Working Group that has initiated a comprehensive review of alternatives for plutonium disposition which takes into account non-proliferation, economic, technical, institutional, schedule, environmental, and health and safety issues. These alternatives were identified by the development of screening criteria as a guide to the selection of alternatives that best achieve the fissile nuclear material long-term storage and disposition goals of the US Government

  19. Femtoslicing in Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Shaukat

    2005-01-01

    The generation of ultrashort synchrotron radiation pulses by laser-induced energy modulation of electrons and their subsequent transverse displacement, now dubbed "femtoslicing," was demonstrated at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley. More recently, a femtoslicing user facility was commissioned at the BESSY storage ring in Berlin, and another project is in progress at the Swiss Light Source. The paper reviews the principle of femtoslicing, its merits and shortcomings, as well as the variations of its technical implementation. Various diagnostics techniques to detect successful laser-electron interaction are discussed and experimental results are presented.

  20. Digital radiography - usability of experience in medical technology with fluorescent storage material for technical X-ray testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattis, A.; Winterberg, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    In nearly 100 years' development of X-ray technique, synergy effects between medical technology and non-destructive material testing (NDT) have repeatedly led to new applications. Thus digital radiography in medicine is a 'low dose' process introduced years ago which, by using a specially developed storage foil technique, offers extensive possibilities of application for NDT. (orig.) [de

  1. Technical reliability of geological disposal for high-level radioactive wastes in Japan. The second progress report. Part 1. Geological environment of Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    Based on the Advisory Committee Report on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Backend Policy submitted to the Japanese Government in 1997, JNC documents the progress of research and development program in the form of the second progress report (the first one published in 1992). It summarizes an evaluation of the technical reliability and safety of the geological disposal concept for high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) in Japan. The present document, the part 1 of the progress report, describes first in detail the role of geological environment in high-level radioactive wastes disposal, the features of Japanese geological environment, and programs to proceed the investigation in geological environment. The following chapter summarizes scientific basis for possible existence of stable geological environment, stable for a long period needed for the HLW disposal in Japan including such natural phenomena as volcano and faults. The results of the investigation of the characteristics of bed-rocks and groundwater are presented. These are important for multiple barrier system construction of deep geological disposal. The report furthermore describes the present status of technical and methodological progress in investigating geological environment and finally on the results of natural analog study in Tono uranium deposits area. (Ohno, S.)

  2. Technical and economic practicability of novel flywheel mass storage systems in electricity supply networks; Technisch-wirtschaftliche Realisierbarkeit von neuartigen Schwungmassenspeicher-Systemen (SMSS) in elektrischen Netzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornemann, H J; Baeumer, U; Kaiser, A; Gruener, A; Gutt, H J; Hampel, R; Heyder, B; Kleimaier, M; Radtke, U; Sachse, H; Schlechter, V; Schrepfer, W; Worlitz, F

    1998-12-31

    Efficient storage of electrical energy is an increasing need. New developments in high-power electronics, high-strength materials and magnetic bearings have made efficient reliable flywheel mass storage systems in the range of 1-5 MfW/50-150 kWh conceivable. According to a first assessment, these systems may provide energy to the supply grid in a range of seconds and thus ensure frequency maintenance and compensation of short interruptions. The authors present first results of a preliminary study preparatory to a feasibility study on the technical and economic practicability of flywheel mass storage systems. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Thema effiziente Speicherung von elektrischer Energie gewinnt immer mehr an Bedeutung. Durch neuere Entwicklungen in der Leistungselektronik und bei der Herstellung hochfester Werkstoffe sowie durch Fortschritte bei der Entwicklung von beruehrungsfreien Lagern im Bereich der aktiven Magnetlager (AML) und insbesondere supraleitenden Magnetlager (SML) sind effiziente und sichere Schwungmassenspeicher-Systeme (SMSS) bis in die Bereiche 1-5 MW/50-150 kWh denkbar. Nach einer ersten Einschaetzung eignen sich solche Anlagen, um im Sekundenbereich Energie in das Netz abzugeben und somit zur Frequenzstuetzung und zur Kompensation von Kurzunterbrechungen beizutragen. Praesentiert werden erste Ergebnisse einer Untersuchung zur Vorbereitung einer Machbarkeitsstudie ueber die technisch-wirtschaftliche Realisierbarkeit von Schwungmassenspeicher-Systemen. (orig.)

  3. Technical reliability of geological disposal for high-level radioactive wastes in Japan. The second progress report. An extra issue: background of the geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    Based on the Advisory Committee Report on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Backend Policy submitted to the Japanese Government in 1997, JNC documents the progress of research and development program in the form of the second progress report (the first one published in 1992). It summarizes an evaluation of the technical reliability and safety of the geological disposal concept for high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) in Japan. The present document, an extra issue of the progress report, was prepared for the expected readers of the report to have background information on the geological disposal. Thus it gives information about (1) generation of high-level radioactive wastes, (2) history of plans proposed for HLW disposal in Japan, and (3) procedure until the geological disposal plan is finally adopted and basic future schedules. It further discusses on such problems in HLW treatment and disposal, as for example a problem of reliable safety for a very long period. (Ohno, S.)

  4. Assessing socio-technical mindsets: Public deliberations on carbon capture and storage in the context of energy sources and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einsiedel, Edna F.; Boyd, Amanda D.; Medlock, Jennifer; Ashworth, Peta

    2013-01-01

    The adaptation and transition to new configurations of energy systems brought on by challenges of climate change, energy security, and sustainability have encouraged more integrative approaches that bring together the social and technical dimensions of technology. The perspectives of energy systems and climate change play an important role in the development and implementation of emerging energy technologies and attendant policies on greenhouse gas reduction. This research examines citizens’ views on climate change and a number of energy systems, with a specific focus on the use of carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a technology to address greenhouse gas emissions. An all-day workshop with 82 local participants was held in the city of Calgary in Alberta, Canada to explore the views of climate change, energy and CCS. Participants were provided the opportunity to ask experts questions and discuss in small groups their views of climate change policy and energy systems. Results demonstrate that participants’ assessments of energy systems are influenced by social–political–institutional–economic contexts such as trust in industry and government, perception of parties benefiting from the technology, and tradeoffs between energy systems. We discuss our findings in the context of understanding social learning processes as part of socio-technical systems change. - Highlight: ► Energy systems are judged in the context of wider socio-technical system dimensions. ► Skepticism about climate change may affect support for CCS. ► Concerns about CCS include: CO 2 leaks, accuracy of monitoring and costs.

  5. Technical support for an enabling policy framework for carbon dioxide capture and geological storage. Task 3. Incentivising CO2 capture and storage in the EU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Coninck, H.; Groenenberg, H.

    2007-03-01

    To date CO2 capture and storage (CCS) is not deployed at a commercial scale, and a range of policy instruments could be used to provide adequate incentives for large scale deployment of CCS in the European Union. Five groups of incentives are discussed: (1) the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (weak and strong version); (2) Member-State-based public financial support through investment support, feed-in subsidies or a CO2 price guarantee; (3) an EU-level low-carbon portfolio standard with tradable certificates; (4) an EU-wide CCS obligation for all new fossil-fuel-based power capacity, and (5) public-private partnerships for realizing a CO2 pipeline infrastructure. The nature of the policy, mainly in case the scale of the instrument matters and much public financial is involved, determines whether it will be implemented by the EU or at the Member-State level. Support for CCS projects at the Member-State level, however, will require amendment of the Community Guidelines for State Aid for Environmental Protection

  6. Technical reliability of geological disposal for high-level radioactive wastes in Japan. The second progress report. Introductory part and summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    Based on the Advisory Committee Report on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Backend Policy submitted to the Japanese Government in 1997, JNC documents the progress of research and development program in the form of the second progress report (the first one published in 1992). It summarizes an evaluation of the technical reliability and safety of the geological disposal concept for high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) in Japan and comprises seven chapters. Chapter I briefly describes the importance of HLW management in promoting nuclear energy utilization. According to the long-term program, the HLW separated from spent fuels at reprocessing plants is to be vitrified and stored for a period of 30 to 50 years to allow cooling, then be disposed of in a deep geological formation. Chapter II mainly explains the concepts of geological disposal in Japan. Chapters III to V are devoted to discussions on three important technical elements (the geological environment of Japan, engineering technology and safety assessment of the geological disposal system) which are necessary for reliable realization of the geological disposal concept. Chapter VI demonstrates the technical ground for site selection and for setup of safety standards of the disposal. Chapter VII summarizes together with plans for future research and development. (Ohno, S.)

  7. Radioactive waste storage: historical outlook and socio technical analysis; Le stockage des dechets radioactifs: perspective historique et analyse sociotechnique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, J C

    1993-07-01

    The radioactive waste storage remains, in most of the industrialized concerned countries, one extremely debated question. This problem may, if an acceptable socially answer is not found, to create obstacles to the whole nuclear path. This study aim was to analyze the controversy in an historical outlook. The large technological plans have always economical, political, sociological, psychological and so on aspects, that the experts may be inclined to neglect. ``Escape of radioactivity is unlikely, as long as surveillance of the waste is maintained, that is, as long as someone is present to check for leaks or corrosion or malfunctioning of and to take action, if any of these occur. 444 refs., 32 figs.

  8. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. Technical progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental research on nuclear structure and reactions both published and in progress is summarized. Included are fusion reactions, strongly damped heavy ion collisions, and nuclear structure at high angular momentum. A list of publications is included

  9. Effect of point defects on mechanical properties of metals. Technical progress report, January 1, 1978--November 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshii, M.

    1978-11-01

    Progress is reported on deformation behavior of niobium single crystals below 77 0 K, the effect of electron irradiation on the deformation behavior of niobium single crystals, and surface film softening phenomenon in Ni plated iron single crystals

  10. Technical description - interim storage, encapsulation and disposal of spent nuclear fuel; Teknisk beskrivning - mellanlagring, inkapsling och slutfoervaring av anvaent kaernbraensle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-15

    The purpose of the annex Technical description is, in accordance with Chapter 22 paragraph 1 Environmental Code to describe the candidate operations and facilities. In particular, things that are important for their environmental impact are described. SKB's goal of the appendix is to describe the facilities, activities, pollution sources, land usage and more during construction, operation and decommissioning, to the extent and on a level of detail, so that the Environment Court without requiring additions can prepare the matter for the government's admissibility test

  11. Technical basis for storage of elastomer-sealed produce cans in the DOE-STD-3013-94 package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horrell, D.R.; Stakebake, J.L.; Szempruch, R.W.

    1996-11-01

    Department of Energy standard DOE-STD-3013-94 establishes criteria for the long-term packaging of plutonium metal and oxide. The inclusion of organic materials in sealed packages of plutonium may produce gases that contribute to container pressurization. To expedite processing, it would be desirable to permit, within the DOE-outlined criteria, limited amounts of organic materials to be used as a sealing gasket in some packaging containers. This paper presents a technical basis for allowing elastomer-sealed cans to be packaged inside the sealed inner container of a double weld-sealed DOE-STD-3013-94 container system

  12. New York City School Survey 2008-2010: Assessing the Reliability and Validity of a Progress Report Measure. Technical Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, Lori; Cole, Rachel; Kemple, James J.; Lent, Jessica; McCormick, Meghan; Segeritz, Micha

    2013-01-01

    The Research Alliance for New York City Schools examined Department of Education (DOE) School Survey data from 2008-2010 to better understand the richness and complexities of the information elicited by the Survey from parents, students, and teachers. This document provides the appendices to the technical report "New York City School Survey…

  13. Technical basis for the ITER-FEAT outline design. Progress in resolving open design issues from the outline design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this publication the technical basis for the ITER-FEAT outline design is presented. It comprises the Plant Design Specifications, the Safety Principles and Environmental Criteria, the Site Requirements and Site Design Assumptions. The outline of the key features of the ITER-FEAT design includes main physical parameters and assessment, design overview and preliminary safety assessment, cost and schedule

  14. Research and development related to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Progress report, January 1-March 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdal, B.R.; Daniels, W.R.; Wolfsberg, K.

    1981-07-01

    Storage of radwaste in tuff was studied. Adsorption experiments were conducted with 85 Sr, 95 Tc, 137 Cs, 133 Ba, and 152 Eu. The geochemistry and mineralogy-petrology of tuff were studied. Organic and inorganic Eh buffers were investigated. Rock physics studies were also conducted

  15. GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini mission. Semi annual technical progress report, 2 October 1995--31 March 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The technical progress achieved during the period 2 October 1995 through 31 March 1996 on Contract No. DE-AC03-91SF18852, Radioisotope Generators and Ancillary Activities is described herein. This report is organized by the program task structure as follows: spacecraft integration and liaison; engineering support; safety; qualified unicouple fabrication; ETG fabrication, assembly, and test; ground support equipment (GSE); RTG shipping and launch support; designs, reviews, and mission applications; project management, quality assurance and reliability, contract changes, non-capital CAGO acquisition, and CAGO maintenance; contract acquired government-owned property (CAGO) acquisition; and program calendars

  16. Chronic cyclodextrin treatment of murine Niemann-Pick C disease ameliorates neuronal cholesterol and glycosphingolipid storage and disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristin D Davidson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused most commonly by a defect in the NPC1 protein and characterized by widespread intracellular accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and glycosphingolipids (GSLs. While current treatment therapies are limited, a few drugs tested in Npc1(-/- mice have shown partial benefit. During a combination treatment trial using two such compounds, N-butyldeoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ and allopregnanolone, we noted increased lifespan for Npc1(-/- mice receiving only 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CD, the vehicle for allopregnanolone. This finding suggested that administration of CD alone, but with greater frequency, might provide additional benefit.Administration of CD to Npc1(-/- mice beginning at either P7 or P21 and continuing every other day delayed clinical onset, reduced intraneuronal cholesterol and GSL storage as well as free sphingosine accumulation, reduced markers of neurodegeneration, and led to longer survival than any previous treatment regime. We reasoned that other lysosomal diseases characterized by cholesterol and GSL accumulation, including NPC disease due to NPC2 deficiency, GM1 gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS type IIIA, might likewise benefit from CD treatment. Treated Npc2(-/- mice showed benefits similar to NPC1 disease, however, mice with GM1 gangliosidosis or MPS IIIA failed to show reduction in storage.Treatment with CD delayed clinical disease onset, reduced intraneuronal storage and secondary markers of neurodegeneration, and significantly increased lifespan of both Npc1(-/- and Npc2(-/- mice. In contrast, CD failed to ameliorate cholesterol or glycosphingolipid storage in GM1 gangliosidosis and MPS IIIA disease. Understanding the mechanism(s by which CD leads to reduced neuronal storage may provide important new opportunities for treatment of NPC and related neurodegenerative diseases characterized by cholesterol dyshomeostasis.

  17. Technical Evaluation of Superconducting Fault Current Limiters Used in a Micro-Grid by Considering the Fault Characteristics of Distributed Generation, Energy Storage and Power Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Concerning the development of a micro-grid integrated with multiple intermittent renewable energy resources, one of the main issues is related to the improvement of its robustness against short-circuit faults. In a sense, the superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL can be regarded as a feasible approach to enhance the transient performance of a micro-grid under fault conditions. In this paper, the fault transient analysis of a micro-grid, including distributed generation, energy storage and power loads, is conducted, and regarding the application of one or more flux-coupling-type SFCLs in the micro-grid, an integrated technical evaluation method considering current-limiting performance, bus voltage stability and device cost is proposed. In order to assess the performance of the SFCLs and verify the effectiveness of the evaluation method, different fault cases of a 10-kV micro-grid with photovoltaic (PV, wind generator and energy storage are simulated in the MATLAB software. The results show that, the efficient use of the SFCLs for the micro-grid can contribute to reducing the fault current, improving the voltage sags and suppressing the frequency fluctuations. Moreover, there will be a compromise design to fully take advantage of the SFCL parameters, and thus, the transient performance of the micro-grid can be guaranteed.

  18. Investigation of lithium thionyl chloride battery safety hazards. Quarterly technical progress report 1 Apr 82-30 Jun 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, R.C.

    1982-06-30

    Storage of discharged electrolyte in AgCl cells for infrared analysis leads to artifactual absorbances. However, there are real changes in discharge and overcharge intermediates as shown by changes in infrared spectra of electrolyte stored in glass. Debye-Scherrer examination of cathodes overdischarged in cathode limited cells indicates the presence of both LiCl and LI/sub 2/O/sub 2/ as well as at least one other solid.

  19. Technical concept for test of geologic storage of spent reactor fuel in the Climax granite, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramspott, L.D.; Ballou, L.B.; Carlson, R.C.; Montan, D.N.; Butkovich, T.R.; Duncan, J.E.; Patrick, W.C.; Wilder, D.G.; Brough, W.G.; Mayr, M.C.

    1979-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Test in the Climax granite at the Nevada Test Site is a generic test in which spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear reactor are emplaced at, and retrieved from, a plausible waste repository depth in a typical granite. Eleven canisters of spent fuel are emplaced in a storage drift 420 m below the surface along with six electrical simulator canisters. Two adjacent drifts contain electrical heaters which are operated so as to simulate the initial five years of the temperature-stress-displacement fields of a large repository. The site is described, and the pre-operational measurement program and characteristics of the spent fuel are given. Both thermal and mechanical response calculations are summarized. The field instrumentation and data acquisition systems are described, as well as the system for handling the spent fuel

  20. Silicon ribbon growth by a capillary action shaping technique. Annual report (Quarterly technical progress report No. 9)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwuttke, G.H.; Ciszek, T.F.; Kran, A.

    1977-10-01

    Progress on the technological and economical assessment of ribbon growth of silicon by a capillary action shaping technique is reported. Progress in scale-up of the process from 50 mm to 100 mm ribbon widths is presented, the use of vitreous carbon as a crucible material is analyzed, and preliminary tests of CVD Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ as a potential die material are reported. Diffusion length measurements by SEM, equipment and procedure for defect display under MOS structure in silicon ribbon for lifetime interpretation, and an assessment of ribbon technology are discussed. (WHK)

  1. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its...... superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009....

  2. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its...... been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008....

  3. Technical progress, the concept of individualized cancer treatment and the innovation of computer-assisted radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, K.; Tanneberger, S.; Matschke, S.

    1985-01-01

    After a first step of cancerogenesis, the further development of the tumor is an individual process. At the end of this process the tumor is formed as an individual in the individual. The individuality of cancer exists on the level of organs, tissues and cells and includes an individual tumor-host relationship. Today, optimized cancer treatment requires a most precise biological characterization possible of the tumor and of the tumor-host relationship, which will provide objective information about the individual character of every tumor. Routine analysis and strict therapeutic consideration of the clinical and biological individuality of human cancer can offer real chances for the improvement of cancer treatment. A routine acquisition of individual tumor characteristics will be possible only if methods and equipment are available for the registration of suitable parameters. In this context technical innovations have an essential influence on the realization of the concept of individualized cancer treatment. With the method of flow cytophotometry and other techniques examples are given in how far the ideas of individual cancer management can be realized by introduction of new technical solutions into medical research and clinical practice. Unfortunately there is still a lack of methodology in individualizing cancer treatment. The individualization of radiotherapy is connected to an extremely high degree of technical innovations. Particularly this refers to the topometrical description of the target volume in relation to the adjacent anatomical structures and the body contour as well as the fitting of isodoses to the shape and size of the target volume. As an example of innovation of a technical solution for individual radiotherapy planning the computer-assisted radiotherapy planning system DOPSY is described. (author)

  4. Technical review of managed underground storage of water study of the upper Catherine Creek watershed, Union County, northeastern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Daniel T.

    2014-01-01

    Because of water diversions during summer, flow in Catherine Creek, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River in northeastern Oregon, is insufficient to sustain several aquatic species for which the stream is listed as critical habitat. A feasibility study for managed underground storage (MUS) in the upper Catherine Creek watershed in Union County, Oregon, was undertaken by Anderson Perry and Associates, Inc., to address the issue of low flows in summer. The results of the study were released as a report titled “Upper Catherine Creek Storage Feasibility Study for Grande Ronde Model Watershed,” which evaluated the possibility of diverting Catherine Creek streamflow during winter (when stream discharge is high), storing the water by infiltration or injection into an aquifer adjacent to the stream, and discharging the water back to the stream in summer to augment low flows. The method of MUS would be accomplished using either (1) aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) that allows for the injection of water that meets drinking-water-quality standards into an aquifer for later recovery and use, or (2) artificial recharge (AR) that involves the intentional addition of water diverted from another source to a groundwater reservoir. Concerns by resource managers that the actions taken to improve water availability for upper Catherine Creek be effective, cost-efficient, long-term, and based on sound analysis led the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to request that the U.S. Geological Survey conduct an independent review and evaluation of the feasibility study. This report contains the results of that review. The primary objectives of the Anderson Perry and Associates study reviewed here included (1) identifying potentially fatal flaws with the concept of using AR and (or) ASR to augment the streamflow of Catherine Creek, (2) identifying potentially favorable locations for augmenting streamflow, (3) developing and evaluating alternatives for implementing AR and (or) ASR, and

  5. Studies in chemical dynamics and radiation chemistry. Technical progress report, 1 July 1974--30 June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuppermann, A.

    1975-01-01

    Research progress in the following areas is reported: low energy electron scattering; photoelectron spectrometry; elementary reactions by photolysis at variable wavelengths; collisions in crossed molecular beams; and, diffusion kinetics in the radiation chemistry of water. Publications related to the work are included. (JGB)

  6. Sodium boiling detection in LMFBRs (Phase I). 5th quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1975--October 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, R.W.; McCormick, N.J.

    1975-01-01

    Progress summarized includes the design of a gamma heated subassembly for sodium boiling experiments and an experiment showing that neutronic noise and acoustic noise caused by sodium boiling are highly correlated in a wide frequency band about the bubble repetition frequency

  7. Effects of Water Radiolysis in Water Cooled Reactors - Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) Program. Technical Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimblott, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    OAK B188 Quarterly Progress Report on NERI Proposal No.99-0010 for the Development of an Experiment and Calculation Based Model to Describe the Effects of Radiation on Non-standard Aqueous Systems Like Those Encountered in the Advanced Light Water Reactor

  8. Effects of humic substances on the migration of radionuclides: complexation and transport of actinides. First technical progress report (work period 01.97 - 12.97)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckau, G.

    1998-08-01

    The present report describes progress within the first year of the EC-project 'Effects of Humic Substances on the Migration of Radionuclides: Complexation and Transport of Actinides'. The project is conducted within the EC-Cluster 'Radionuclide Transport/Retardation Processes'. Contrary to formal requirements of the Commission, this report with a great deal of detail is established already after one year of project work. It is scheduled to be followed by a second technical progress report covering the second year of the project. In agreement with the contractual obligations a final report of similar technical detail will also be generated. The report contains an executive summary written by the coordinator (FZK/INE) with strong support from the other three task leaders (BGS, CEA-SGC and RMC-E). More detailed results are given by individual contributions of the project partners in 13 annexes. In the executive summary report the origin of results presented is given, also serving as guidance for finding more detailed results in the annexes. Not all results are discussed or referred to in the executive summary report and thus readers with a deeper interest also need to consult the annexes. (orig.)

  9. A systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M.T.; Reed, B.E.; Gabr, M.

    1993-07-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 entitled ``Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs.`` Stipulated within the Agreement is the requirement that WVU submit to METC a series of Technical Progress Report for Year 1 of the Agreement. This report reflects the progress and/or efforts performed on the following nine technical projects encompassed by the Year 1 Agreement for the period of April 1 through June 30, 1993: Systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; site remediation technologies -- drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; site remediation technologies -- in situ bioremediation of organic contaminants; excavation systems for hazardous waste sites; chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; development of organic sensors -- monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield lock and dam remediation; Assessments of Technologies for hazardous waste site remediation -- non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; and remediation of hazardous sites with stream reforming.

  10. Technical Basis for Peak Reactivity Burnup Credit for BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel in Storage and Transportation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Mertyurek, Ugur [ORNL; Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate application of burnup credit for boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase (1) investigates applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in spent fuel pools (SFPs) to storage and transportation systems and (2) evaluates validation of both reactivity (keff) calculations and burnup credit nuclide concentrations within these methods. The second phase will focus on extending burnup credit beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the first phase, including an analysis of lattice design parameters and depletion effects, as well as both validation components. Initial efforts related to extended burnup credit are discussed in a companion paper. Peak reactivity analyses have been used in criticality analyses for licensing of BWR fuel in SFPs over the last 20 years. These analyses typically combine credit for the gadolinium burnable absorber present in the fuel with a modest amount of burnup credit. Gadolinium burnable absorbers are used in BWR assemblies to control core reactivity. The burnable absorber significantly reduces assembly reactivity at beginning of life, potentially leading to significant increases in assembly reactivity for burnups less than 15–20 GWd/MTU. The reactivity of each fuel lattice is dependent on gadolinium loading. The number of gadolinium-bearing fuel pins lowers initial lattice reactivity, but it has a small impact on the burnup and reactivity of the peak. The gadolinium concentration in each pin has a small impact on initial lattice reactivity but a significant effect on the reactivity of the peak and the burnup at which the peak occurs. The importance of the lattice parameters and depletion conditions are primarily determined by their impact on the gadolinium depletion. Criticality code validation for BWR burnup

  11. Post-Lamination Manufacturing Process Automation for Photovoltaic Modules; Annual Technical Progress Report: 15 June 1999--14 July 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowlan, M. J.; Murach, J. M.; Sutherland, S. F.; Lewis, E. R.; Hogan, S. J.

    2000-09-29

    Spire is addressing the PVMaT project goals of photovoltaic (PV) module cost reduction and improved module manufacturing process technology. New cost-effective automation processes are being developed for post-lamination PV module assembly, where post-lamination is defined as the processes after the solar cells are encapsulated. These processes apply to both crystalline and thin-film solar cell modules. Four main process areas are being addressed: (1) Module buffer storage and handling between steps; (2) Module edge trimming, edge sealing, and framing; (3) Junction-box installation; and (4) Testing for module performance, electrical isolation, and ground-path continuity.

  12. Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities: Technical progress report for the period January, February, March 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, W.S.; Cook, R.L.

    1985-04-01

    Mississippi State University is developing diagnostic instruments for MHD power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for HRSR support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with MHD Energy Center computers. Additionally, technical support of the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided

  13. Technical Division quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1977. [Fuel cycle research and development; special materials production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slansky, C.M. (ed.)

    1978-02-01

    Results are presented on the fluidized-bed calcination of simulated radioactive waste from the reprocessing of spent commercial nuclear fuel and on the removal of actinide elements from the waste prior to calcination. Other programs include the development of storage technology for /sup 85/Kr waste; and the behavior of volatile radionuclides during the combustion of HTGR graphite-based fuel. The long-term management of defense waste from the ICPP covers post-calcination treatment of ICPP calcined waste; the removal of actinide elements from first-cycle raffinate; the retrieval and handling of calcined waste from ICPP storage vaults; and the preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on ICPP waste. Process improvements are reported on the Fluorinel headend process for Zircaloy-clad fuels and on uranium accountability measurements. Other development results cover the process for recovering spent Rover fuel, buried pipeline transfer systems, support to the Waste Management Program, Waste Calcining Facility support, New Waste Calcining Facility support, and effluent monitoring methods evaluation and development. In this category are studies on nuclear materials security, application of a liquid-solid fluidized-bed heat exchanger to the recovery of geothermal heat, inplant reactor source term measurements, burnup methods for fast breeder reactor fuels, absolute thermal fission yield measurements, analytical support to light water breeder reactor development, research on analytical methods, and the behavior of environmental species of iodine.

  14. Research and development on optically pumped polarized ion sources. Technical progress report, February 1, 1985-January 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.W.

    1985-07-01

    During the past year we have studied the relaxation times in an optically pumped 23 Na vapor target, studied the effects of radiation trapping on the polarization in a Na vapor target, and have studied the effects of spin exchange collisions on a beam of fast H 0 atoms as they pass through a polarized alkali target. This research is directed toward improvements in the optically pumped Na or other alkali vapor targets used for the production of polarized H - ions. In this progress report we review the properties of the optically pumped polarized H - ion source as well as discussing the progress of our research on optically pumped Na or other alkali vapor targets. 81 refs., 9 figs

  15. Technical progress report of biological research on the Volcanic Island Surtsey and its environs for the period 1965--1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fridriksson, S.

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: changes in shoreline and surface of the island due to volcanic activity; colonization of microorganisms, algae, lichens, and vascular plants; introduction of insects and other arthropods by wind, water, and man; transport of invertebrates to the island by flotsam of the sea; species and nesting habits of birds on the island; behavior of seals on beaches of the island; and future trends of Surtsey ecosystems. (HLW)

  16. Research proposal and annual report No. 16. Part B. Technical progress, September 1, 1975--August 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-06-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: RNA synthesis in yeast; regulation of nitrogen metabolism; biological toxicity of intracellular radioisotope decay; the mechanism of energy conversion in chloroplasts; promoting vibrations in spin-orbital coupling in vibrationally deficient molecules; electronic excitation and hydrogen bonding; macromolecular biophysics; the synthesis and maturation of RNA; electronic response properties of biomolecular systems; chromosome structure and function and chromosome damage; DNA replication and chromosome structure; and influence of phospholipids on the dynamic properties of rhodopsin. (HLW)

  17. Research proposal and annual report No. 16. Part B. Technical progress, September 1, 1975--August 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: RNA synthesis in yeast; regulation of nitrogen metabolism; biological toxicity of intracellular radioisotope decay; the mechanism of energy conversion in chloroplasts; promoting vibrations in spin-orbital coupling in vibrationally deficient molecules; electronic excitation and hydrogen bonding; macromolecular biophysics; the synthesis and maturation of RNA; electronic response properties of biomolecular systems; chromosome structure and function and chromosome damage; DNA replication and chromosome structure; and influence of phospholipids on the dynamic properties of rhodopsin

  18. Advances in applications of burnup credit to enhance spent fuel transportation, storage, reprocessing and disposition. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-05-01

    Given a trend towards higher burnup power reactor fuel, the IAEA began an active programme in burnup credit (BUC) with major meetings in 1997 (IAEA-TECDOC-1013), 2000 (IAEA-TECDOC-1241) and 2002 (IAEA-TECDOC-1378) exploring worldwide interest in using BUC in spent fuel management systems. This publication contains the proceedings of the IAEA's 4th major BUC meeting, held in London. Sixty participants from 18 countries addressed calculation methodology, validation and criticality, safety criteria, procedural compliance with safety criteria, benefits of BUC applications, and regulatory aspects in BUC. This meeting encouraged the IAEA to continue its activities on burnup credit including dissemination of related information, given the number of Member States having to deal with increased spent fuel quantities and extended durations. A 5th major meeting on burnup credit is planned 2008. Burnup credit is a concept that takes credit for the reduced reactivity of fuel discharged from the reactor to improve loading density of irradiated fuel assemblies in storage, transportation, and disposal applications, relative to the assumption of fresh fuel nuclide inventories in loading calculations. This report has described a general four phase approach to be considered in burnup credit implementation. Much if not all of the background research and data acquisition necessary for successful burnup credit development in preparation for licensing has been completed. Many fuel types, facilities, and analysis methods are encompassed in the public knowledge base, such that in many cases this guidance will provide a means for rapid development of a burnup credit program. For newer assembly designs, higher enrichment fuels, and more extensive nuclide credit, additional research and development may be necessary, but even this work can build on the foundation that has been established to date. Those, it is hoped that this report will serve as a starting point with sufficient reference to

  19. Recent progress of the waste processing and disposal projects within the Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, R.D.; McGinnis, C.P.; Cruse, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Remediation has created the Office of Technology Development (OTD) to provide new and improved remediation technologies for the 1 x 10 8 gal of radioactive waste in the underground storage tanks (USTs) at five DOE sites. The OTD established and the Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) to perform demonstrations, tests, and evaluations on these new technologies before these processes are transferred to the tank sites for use in full-scale remediation of the USTs. The UST-ID projects are performed by the Characterization and Waste Retrieval Program or the Waste Processing and Disposal Program (WPDP). During FY 1994, the WPDP is funding 12 projects in the areas of supernate processing, sludge processing, nitrate destruction, and final waste forms. The supernate projects are primarily concerned with cesium removal. A mobile evaporator and concentrator for cesium-free supernate is also being demonstrated. The sludge projects are emphasizing sludge dissolution and the evaluation of the TRUEX and diamide solvent extraction processes for transuranic waste streams. One WPDP project is examining both supernate and sludge processes in an effort to develop a system-level plan for handling all UST waste. The other WPDP studies are concerned with nitrate and organic destruction as well as subsequent waste forms. The current status of these WPDP projects is presented

  20. Technical reliability of geological disposal for high-level radioactive wastes in Japan. The second progress report. Part 3. Safety assessment for geological disposal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    Based on the Advisory Committee Report on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Backend Policy submitted to the Japanese Government in 1997, JNC documents the progress of research and development program in the form of the second progress report (the first one published in 1992). It summarizes an evaluation of the technical reliability and safety of the geological disposal concept for high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) in Japan. The present document, the part 3 of the progress report, concerns safety assessment for geological disposal systems definitely introduced in part 1 and 2 of this series and consists of 9 chapters. Chapter I concerns the methodology for safety assessment while Chapter II deals with diversity and uncertainty about the scenario, the adequate model and the required data of the systems above. Chapter III summarizes the components of the geological disposal system. Chapter IV refers to the relationship between radioactive wastes and human life through groundwater, i.e. nuclide migration. In Chapter V is made a reference case which characterizes the geological environmental data using artificial barrier specifications. (Ohno. S.)

  1. High temperature turbine technology program. Phase II. Technology test and support studies. Annual technical progress report, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Work performed on the High Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Phase II - Technology Test and Support Studies during the period from January 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979 is summarized. Objectives of the program elements as well as technical progress and problems encountered during this Phase II annual reporting period are presented. Progress on design, fabrication and checkout of test facilities and test rigs is described. LP turbine cascade tests were concluded. 350 hours of testing were conducted on the LP rig engine first with clean distillate fuel and then with fly ash particulates injected into the hot gas stream. Design and fabrication of the turbine spool technology rig components are described. TSTR 60/sup 0/ sector combustor rig fabrication and testing are reviewed. Progress in the design and fabrication of TSTR cascade rig components for operation on both distillate fuel and low Btu gas is described. The new coal-derived gaseous fuel synthesizing facility is reviewed. Results and future plans for the supporting metallurgical programs are discussed.

  2. Technical reliability of geological disposal for high-level radioactive wastes in Japan. The second progress report. Part 2. Engineering technology for geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    Based on the Advisory Committee Report on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Backend Policy submitted to the Japanese Government in 1997, JNC documents the progress of research and development program in the form of the second progress report (the first one published in 1992). It summarizes an evaluation of the technical reliability and safety of the deep geological disposal concept for high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) in Japan. The present document, part 2 of the progress report, concerns engineering aspect with reference to Japanese geological disposal plan, according to which the vitrified HLW will be disposed of into a deep, stable rock mass with thick containers and surrounding buffer materials at the depth of several hundred meters. It discusses on multi-barrier systems consisting of a series of engineered and natural barriers that will isolate radioactive nuclides effectively and retard their migrations to the biosphere environment. Performance of repository components, including specifications of containers for vitrified HLW and their overpacks under design as well as buffer material such as Japanese bentonite to be placed in between are described referring also to such possible problems as corrosion arising from the supposed system. It also presents plans and designs for underground disposal facilities, and the presumed management of the underground facilities. (Ohno, S.)

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A CO2 SEQUESTRATION MODULE BY INTEGRATING MINERAL ACTIVATION AND AQUEOUS CARBONATION. ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George Alexander; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Parvana Aksoy; Harold Schobert

    2006-01-01

    Mineral carbonation provides a potential option for the long-term storage of carbon dioxide. Serpentine has been chosen as the feedstock mineral, due to its abundance and availability. However, the relatively low reactivity of serpentine has warranted research into physical and chemical treatments that have been shown to greatly increase its reactivity. The use of sulfuric acid as an accelerating medium for the removal of magnesium from serpentine has recently been investigated. In addition to the challenges presented by the dissolution of serpentine, another challenge is the subsequent carbonation of the magnesium ions. A stable hydration sphere for the magnesium ion reduces the carbonation kinetics by obstructing the formation of the carbonation products. Accordingly, this research has evaluated the solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solution, the interaction between the dissociation products of carbon dioxide, and the carbonation potential of the magnesium ion

  4. Office of Waste Isolation progress report, January 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerby, C.D.

    1978-01-01

    This document, prepared to report progress on the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program, consists of project reports on work performed by organizations under subcontract to OWI, by DOE contractors, by OWI consultants, and by other federal agencies participating in the NWTS program. The project reports are made under the headings technical projects, facility projects, planning and analysis, and regulatory affairs

  5. Office of Waste Isolation progress report, December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerby, C.D.

    1976-01-01

    This document reports progress on the OWI's portion of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. It comprises project reports on work performed by organizations under subcontract to OWI, by DOE contractors, by OWI consultants, and by other federal agencies participating in the NWTS program. They are made under the headings technical projects, facility projects, planning and analysis, and regulatory affairs

  6. Office of Waste Isolation progress report, January 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerby, C.D.

    1978-02-28

    This document, prepared to report progress on the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program, consists of project reports on work performed by organizations under subcontract to OWI, by DOE contractors, by OWI consultants, and by other federal agencies participating in the NWTS program. The project reports are made under the headings technical projects, facility projects, planning and analysis, and regulatory affairs. (DLC)

  7. Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor Program. Annual technical progress report for the period ending September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    This report provides descriptions and results of the technical effort during FY81 on the Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor Program. The FY81 work was organized according to the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for the National HTGR Program, and fell within five of the WBS tasks. The work on Market Definition and Development (WBS 03) was associated with estimating product costs for HTGR systems and their alternatives, projecting markets and market penetrations for these systems, and providing costs and market input to application analyses and component design. The Plant Technology (WBS 13) effort was mainly in the development of the systems dynamic computer code, STAR, for the transient analysis of HTGR's in reformer applications. The analysis of pebble bed reactors (PBR) was performed under Technology Transfer (WBS 15). The effort on components and systems within the nuclear heat source for reforming plants was performed under High Temperature Nuclear Heat Source (WBS 42)

  8. Realization of radiation-chemical processes in national economy-important stage of scientific and technical progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breger, A.Kh.

    1975-01-01

    Realization of energy resourses of the atomic power engineering will greatly contribute to the scientific and technological progress. The dominat role play the radiochemical methods of properties modification applied for the well-known materials and for the production of materials with modern operating characteristics necessary for their application in different branches of industry and agriculture. Radiation modeling of products from polyolefine, wood-plastic and concrete-polymer materials are considered as well as the processes in ''thin'' units of agitating systems. The future developments and present state of the art of radiation sources are presented

  9. High-performance batteries for stationary energy storage and electric-vehicle propulsion. Progress report, April--June 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-10-01

    Research, development, and management activities of the program on lithium--aluminum/metal sulfide batteries during April--June 1977 are described. These batteries are being developed for electric-vehicle propulsion and stationary energy storage. The present cells, which operate at 400--450/sup 0/C, are of a vertically oriented, prismatic design with a central positive electrode of FeS or FeS/sub 2/, two facing negative electrodes of lithium--aluminum alloy, and an electrolyte of molten LiCl--KCl. Testing and evaluation of industrially fabricated cells is continuing. Li--Al/FeS and Li--Al/FeS/sub 2/ cells from Eagle--Picher Industries and from Gould Inc. were tested. These tests provided information on the effects of design modifications and alternative materials for cells. Improved electrode and cell designs are being developed and tested, and the more promising designs are incorporated into the industrially fabricated cells. Among the concepts receiving major attention are carbon-bonded positive electrodes, scaled-up designs of stationary energy storage cells, additives to extend electrode lifetime, alternative electrode separators, and pellet-grid electrodes. Materials development efforts included the development of a lightweight electrical feedthrough; studies of various current-collector designs; investigation of powder separators; wettability and corrosion tests of materials for cell components; and postoperative examinations of cells. Cell chemistry studies were concerned with discharge mechanisms of FeS electrodes and with other transition-metal sulfides as positive electrode materials. Voltammetric studies were conducted to investigate the reversibility of the FeS/sub 2/ electrode. The use of calcium and magnesium alloys for the negative electrode in advanced battery systems were investigated. 8 figures, 12 tables.

  10. Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS). Technical progress report ampersand continuation proposal, February 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Committee on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences (CAMOS) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) science in the United States. Accordingly, the Committee identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special symposia are among the mechanisms used by the CAMOS to meet its charge. This progress report presents a review of CAMOS activities from February 1, 1993 to January 31, 1994. The details of prior activities are discussed in earlier progress reports. This report also includes the status of activities associated with the CAMOS study on the field that is being conducted by the Panel on the Future of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (FAMOS). During the above period, CAMOS has continued to track and participate in, when requested, discussions on the health of the field. Much of the perspective of CAMOS has been presented in the recently-published report Research Briefing on Selected Opportunities in Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences. That report has served as the basis for briefings to representatives of the federal government as well as the community-at-large. In keeping with its charge to monitor the health of the field, CAMOS launched a study designed to highlight future directions of the field

  11. The Community's research and development programme on radioactive waste management and storage shared cost action annual progress report 1989 volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    In 1985 the Council of Ministers of the European Communities adopted a five-year R and D programme on 'Management and storage of radioactive waste' for the period 1985-89. The R and D programme was carried out by public organizations and private firms in the Member States. By the end of 1989 over 256 contracts had been concluded with some 70 bodies. This annual report, covering the year 1989, is the fourth of its type. For each contract it gives the objectives, working programme and a summary of progress and results obtained as prepared by the contractor under the responsibility of the project leader. The report contains sections on treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste, characterization of conditioned radioactive waste, general aspects of radioactive waste disposal, and the performance of isolation systems

  12. Community's research and development programme on radioactive waste management and storage shared-cost action (1990-94). Annual progress report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In december 1989 the Council of Ministers of the European Communities adopted the fourth R and D programme on 'Management and Storage of radioactive waste' for the period 1990-1994. Contract negotiations for selected research proposals lead to the signature of contracts with some 93 bodies in charge of carrying out the working programme. This annual report, covering the year 1991 presents for each contract the objectives, the whole research programme and a synopsis of progress and results achieved as prepared by the contractor under the responsibility of the project leader. Part A deals with the study of management systems, treatment and characterization of waste, general aspects of the waste disposal and the safety of geological disposal systems. The running activities on construction and operation of underground facilities in candidated geological media for disposal is presented in part B

  13. The Community's research and development programme on radioactive waste management and storage shared cost action annual progress report 1989 volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    In 1985 the Council of Ministers of the European Communities adopted a five-year R and D programme on 'Management and storage of radioactive waste' for the period 1985-89. The R and D programme was carried out by public organizations and private firms in the Member States. By the end of 1989 over 256 contracts had been concluded with some 70 bodies. This annual report, covering the year 1989, is the fourth of its type. For each contract it gives the objectives, working programme and a summary of progress and results obtained as prepared by the contractor under the responsibility of the project leader. The report contains sections on treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste, characterization of conditioned radioactive waste, general aspects of radioactive waste disposal, and the performance of isolation systems

  14. University of Colorado, Nuclear Physics Laboratory technical progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979. Report NPL-845

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes work carried out at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado from November 1, 1978 to October 31, 1979, under contract EY-76-C-02-0535.A003 between the University of Colorado and the United States Department of Energy. Experimental studies of light ion-induced reactions were performed with the AVF cyclotron, which continues each year to produce beams of yet higher quality. Charged-particle studies continued to emphasize use of the high-resolution spectrometer system, but some return to broad-range spectroscopic studies using solid state detectors also occurred. Neutron time-of-flight experiments used 9-meter and 30-meter flight paths. Neutron-gamma ray coincidence studies developed into a new and promising field. The new PDP 11/34 data acquisition system was of great value in allowing such multiparameter experiments. Smaller programs in nuclear astrophysics, plasma diagnostic development, and medical physics were also undertaken. Research activities based at other accelerators grew. Studies of future directions for light-ion accelerators, including work on intense pulsed ion sources, orbit dynamics, and storage rings, were greatly enlarged. 19 of the articles in this report were abstracted and indexed individually. Lists of publications and personnel conclude this report

  15. Mass and energy budgets of animals: Behavioral and ecological implications. Annual technical progress report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, W.P.

    1993-07-01

    The common goal of these diverse projects is to understand the mechanisms of how animal populations respond to the continual changes in their environment in both time and space. Our models are mechanistic allowing us to explore how a wide array of environmental variables may determine individual performance. Large scale climate change and its effect on animal populations can be seen as quantitative extensions of biological responses to smaller scales of environmental variability. Changes in developmental rates or reproductive levels of individuals, extension or contraction of geographic ranges, and modification of community organization have all been documented in response to previous changes in habitats. We know from our biophysical work that some changes in function are driven by microclimate conditions directly, and some are mediated indirectly through ecological parameters such as the food supply. Our research is guided by a comprehensive conceptual scheme of the interaction of an animal with its environment. The physical and physiological properties of the organism, and the range of available microclimates, set bounds on the performance of organismal function, such as growth, reproduction, storage, and behavior. To leave the most offspring over a lifetime, animals must perform those functions in a way that maximizes the amount of resources devoted to reproduction. Maximizing the total size of the budget and minimizing those budget items not devoted to reproduction are crucial. Animals trade off among expenditures for current and future reproduction. Both water and energy are important, potentially limiting resources. Projects described here include empirical studies and theoretical models.

  16. Directed technical change and the adoption of CO{sub 2} abatement technology. The case of CO{sub 2} capture and storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, Vincent M.; Reilly, John [Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    This paper studies the cost-effectiveness of combining traditional environmental policy, such as CO{sub 2}-trading schemes, and technology policy that has aims of reducing the cost and speeding the adoption of CO{sub 2} abatement technology. For this purpose, we develop a dynamic general equilibrium model that captures empirical links between CO{sub 2} emissions associated with energy use, directed technical change and the economy. We specify CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) as a discrete CO{sub 2} abatement technology. We find that combining CO{sub 2}-trading schemes with an adoption subsidy is the most effective instrument to induce adoption of the CCS technology. Such a subsidy directly improves the competitiveness of the CCS technology by compensating for its markup over the cost of conventional electricity. Yet, introducing R and D subsidies throughout the entire economy leads to faster adoption of the CCS technology as well and in addition can be cost-effective in achieving the abatement target. (author)

  17. Theoretical research in intermediate-energy nuclear physics. [Technical progress report, April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses progress that has been made on the following seven problems: (1) (e, e'p) at high momentum transfer; (2) post,acceleration effects in two-nucleon interferometry of heavy-ion collisions; (3) pion-nucleus interactions above 0.5 GeV; (4) chiral symmetry breaking in nuclei and picnic atom anomaly; (5) atomic screening on nuclear astronomical reactions; (6) QCD related work (coherent pion production from skyrmion-antiskyrmion annihilation, QCD in 1 + 1 dimensions, and correlation functions in the QCD vacuum), and (7) kaonic hydrogen atom experiment. The problems deal with various topics mostly in intermediate-energy nuclear physics. We place priority on (1) and (2), and describe them somewhat in detail below. Other problems are our on-going projects, but we are placing lower priority on them in the second and third year

  18. Measurements of scattering processes in negative ion: Atom collisions. Technical progress report, 1 September 1991--31 December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvale, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the progress made on the research objectives during the past three years of the grant. This research project is designed to study various scattering processes which occur in H - collisions with atomic (specifically, noble gas and atomic hydrogen) targets in the intermediate energy region. These processes include: elastic scattering, single- and double-electron detachment, and target excitation/ionization. For the elastic and target inelastic processes where H - is scattered intact, the experimental technique of Ion Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (IELS) will be employed to identify the final target state(s). In most of the above processes, cross sections are unknown both experimentally and theoretically. The measurements will provide total cross sections (TCS) initially, and once the angular positioning apparatus is installed, will provide angular differential cross sections (ADCS)

  19. Combined macroscopic and microscopic approach to the fracture of metals. Technical progress report, July 1975--June 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurland, J.; Rice, J.R.; Asaro, R.J.; Needleman, A.

    1976-07-01

    Major studies have been started on (1) The conditions governing the localization of plastic flow at the onset of rupture. Specific calculations of critical conditions for a number of material models have been made possible through a theoretical framework by which localization is formulated as a constitutive instability, in the form of a bifurcation into a localized mode from a state of previously homogeneous deformation, and (2) The strength of interfaces with and without the presence of dissolved segregants. Criteria for brittle vs. ductile response of an interface were developed on the basis of dislocation mechanisms and thermodynamic relations, and applied to hydrogen embrittlement. Further progress has been achieved in the analysis of stress and deformation at a crack tip by the application of the large-strain elastic-plastic finite element program developed over the last two years. Work has continued on particle and sub-boundary strengthening in steels and an experimental study of fracture initiation at particles was begun

  20. Bench-scale testing of on-line control of column flotation using a novel analyzer. Third quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-24

    This document contains the third quarterly technical progress report for PTI`s Bench-Scale Testing Project of a circuit integrating PTI`s KEN-FLOTETM Column Flotation Technology and PTI`s On-Line Quality Monitor and Control System. The twelve-month project involves installation and testing of a 200--300 lb/hr. bench-scale flotation circuit at PETC`s Coal Preparation Process Research Facility (CPPRF) for two bituminous coals (Upper Freeport and Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Raw Coals). Figure 1 contains the project plan, as well as the approach to completing the major tasks within the twelve-month project schedule. The project is broken down into three phases, which include: Phase I -- Preparation: The preparation phase was performed principally at PTI`s Calumet offices from October through December, 1992. It involved building of the equipment and circuitry, as well as some preliminary design and equipment testing; Phase II -- ET Circuit Installation and Testing: This installation and testing phase of the project was performed at PETC`s CPPRF from January through June, 1993, and was the major focus of the project. It involved testing of the continuous 200--300 lb/hr. circuit; and Phase III -- Project Finalization: The project finalization phase is occurring from July through September, 1993, at PTI`s Calumet offices and involves finalizing analytical work and data evaluation, as well as final project reporting. This Third Quarterly Technical Progress Report principally summarizes the results from the benchscale testing with the second coal (Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Coal), which occurred in April through June, 1993. It also contains preliminary economic evaluations that will go into the Final Report, as well as the plan for the final reporting task.

  1. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of commercializing a biotechnology that uses plants to remediate soils, sediments, surface waters, and groundwaters contaminated by heavy metals and radionuclides. This technology, known as phytoremediation, is particularly suited to remediation of soils or water where low levels of contaminants are widespread. Project objectives are to provide an accurate estimate of the capability and rate of phytoremediation for removal of contaminants of concern from soils and groundwaters at Department of Energy (DOE) sites and to develop data suitable for engineering design and economic feasibility evaluations, including methods for destruction or final disposition of plants containing contaminants of concern. The bioremediation systems being evaluated could be less expensive than soil removal and treatment systems, given the areal extent and topography of sites under consideration and the investment of energy and money in soil-moving and -treating processes. In situ technology may receive regulatory acceptance more easily than ex situ treatments requiring excavation, processing, and replacement of surface soils. In addition, phytoremediation may be viable for cleanup of contaminated waters, either as the primary treatment or the final polishing stage, depending on the contaminant concentrations and process economics considerations

  2. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of commercializing a biotechnology that uses plants to remediate soils, sediments, surface waters, and groundwaters contaminated by heavy metals and radionuclides. This technology, known as phytoremediation, is particularly suited to remediation of soils or water where low levels of contaminants are widespread. Project objectives are to provide an accurate estimate of the capability and rate of phytoremediation for removal of contaminants of concern from soils and groundwaters at Department of Energy (DOE) sites and to develop data suitable for engineering design and economic feasibility evaluations, including methods for destruction or final disposition of plants containing contaminants of concern. The bioremediation systems being evaluated could be less expensive than soil removal and treatment systems, given the areal extent and topography of sites under consideration and the investment of energy and money in soil-moving and -treating processes. In situ technology may receive regulatory acceptance more easily than ex situ treatments requiring excavation, processing, and replacement of surface soils. In addition, phytoremediation may be viable for cleanup of contaminated waters, either as the primary treatment or the final polishing stage, depending on the contaminant concentrations and process economics considerations.

  3. Geohydrology of the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin pertinent to the storage of radioactive wastes; a progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosman, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Salt domes in northern Louisiana are being considered as possible storage sites for nuclear wastes. The domes are in an area that received regional sedimentation through early Tertiary (Eocene) time with lesser amounts of Quaternary deposits. The Cretaceous-Tertiary accumulation is a few thousand feet thick; the major sands are regional aquifers that extend far beyond the boundaries of the salt-dome basin. Because of multiple aquifers, structural deformation, and variations in the hydraulic characteristics of cap rock, the ground-water hydrology around a salt dome may be highly complex. The Sparta Sand is the most productive and heavily used regional aquifer. It is either penetrated by or overlies most of the domes. A fluid entering the Sparta flow system would move toward one of the pumping centers, all at or near municipalities that pump from the Sparta. Movement could be toward surface drainage where local geologic and hydrologic conditions permit leakage to the surface or to a surficial aquifer. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. Regenesys utility scale energy storage. Project summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This report summarises the work to date, the current situation and the future direction of a project carried out by Regenesys Technology Ltd. (RGN) to investigate the benefits of electrochemical energy storage for power generators using renewable energy sources focussing on wind energy. The background to the study is traced covering the progress of the Regenesys energy storage technology, and the milestones achieved and lessons learnt. Details are given of the planned renewable-store-market interface to allow renewable generators optimise revenue under the New Electricity Trading Arrangements (NETA) and help in the connection of the renewable energy to the electric grid system. The four integrated work programmes of the project are described and involve a system study examining market penetration of renewable generators, a technical study into connection of renewable generators and energy storage, a small scale demonstration, and a pilot scale energy storage plant at Little Barton in Cambridgeshire. Problems leading to the closure of the project are discussed.

  5. Regenesys utility scale energy storage. Project summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This report summarises the work to date, the current situation and the future direction of a project carried out by Regenesys Technology Ltd. (RGN) to investigate the benefits of electrochemical energy storage for power generators using renewable energy sources focussing on wind energy. The background to the study is traced covering the progress of the Regenesys energy storage technology, and the milestones achieved and lessons learnt. Details are given of the planned renewable-store-market interface to allow renewable generators optimise revenue under the New Electricity Trading Arrangements (NETA) and help in the connection of the renewable energy to the electric grid system. The four integrated work programmes of the project are described and involve a system study examining market penetration of renewable generators, a technical study into connection of renewable generators and energy storage, a small scale demonstration, and a pilot scale energy storage plant at Little Barton in Cambridgeshire. Problems leading to the closure of the project are discussed

  6. Nemaha Uplift seismotectonic study: regional tectonics and seismicity of eastern Kansas. Technical progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, F.W.

    1979-11-01

    Progress and results of all work on this project to the end of its second year, or September 30, 1978, were reported in NUREG/CR-0666, published March 1979. Project third-year activites and results include the following: continued operation of a regional microearthquake monitoring network which detected and located 26 regional events between October 1, 1978, and August 2, 1979; designing and building a triggering system to allow digitized recording of microearthquakes by a modified exploration seismography; continued surface and subsurface studies of selected areas along the Nemaha Uplift-Keweenanan Mafic belt trend; continued study of Precambrian rock types from recently drilled wells; beginning compilation of a fault catalog; terrain analysis and lineament studies which indicate that the alignment of stream drainages and divides are strongly controlled by basement and subsurface structure; continued reduction of gravity data for northeastern Kansas (a Bouguer gravity map probably will be available late Fall 1979); modification of the exploration seismograph system to a more efficient 12-channel Mini-Sosie system and completion of several line-miles of reflection profiling; and beginning integration of data from Oklahoma, Nebraska, and Iowa co-investigators. All major goals for FY 1979 were accomplished. 2 figures

  7. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, 1 November 1993--31 October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1994-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a national and international center for information exchange by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results obtained by the Institute contribute to the progress of nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power as a basic energy source. Close collaborative relationships have been developed with other university and national laboratory fusion groups, both in the US and abroad. In addition to its primary focus on mainstream fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in fusion-sidestream fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, space plasmas and astrophysics, statistical mechanics, fluid dynamics, and accelerator physics. Important research discoveries are briefly described

  8. Exotic atoms: Hadronic and muonic atoms 1969--1997. Technical progress report, February 1, 1996--August 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunselman, R.

    1997-01-01

    Since this is a terminal progress-report it is a synopsis over the total time of the grant. The author has utilized exotic hadronic and muonic atoms as tools to access information concerning questions to do with particle, nuclear, and atomic physics. The information has answered fundamental questions about lepton conservations, quark models, tests of the CPT theorem, QED energies, and nuclear structure. The present experiments involve reactions with a variety of hydrogen isotopic mixtures to form solid targets to produce muonic hydrogen isotope atoms. The method relies on muon capture by a proton and transfer of the muon from the proton to a deuteron or a triton. The resulting muonic deuterium or muonic tritium will not immediately thermalize because of the very low elastic cross sections of the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, and are emitted from the surface of the layer and escape into a vacuum region. A second solid hydrogen isotopic target is produced downstream on which the muonic hydrogen atom can react and the time of flight measured

  9. Indiana University High Energy Physics Group: Task A: Technical progress report, December 1, 1986 to November 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alyea, E.D.; Brabson, B.B.; Crittenden, R.R.; Dzierba, A.R.; Martin, H.J.; Ogren, H.O.; Zieminski, A.

    1987-05-01

    Data collection on the production of the KKπ state in π - , K - , and p-bar induced reactions is reported, with partial wave analysis in progress. Work on the design of a target calorimeter and data taking for a muon scattering experiment at CERN is completed. Analysis of a fixed-target jet experiment is reported. A dimuon detector has been prepared for an experiment at Fermilab to study hadronic processes yielding high mass dimuons and associated particles. Participation in the coordination and writing of software for the DO collider detector at Fermilab is reported. Some results from the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) are reported, including direct observation of several decay modes of the charmed mesons, directly observed meson resonances, baryon resonances, and some discoveries concerning the tau lepton. Activity is reported in the building of hardware for the muon upgrade for the Mark2 detector at the SLC and the building of the beam position monitors for the SLC, and microprocessors for Mark2 data analysis. Involvement in the SLC polarization collaboration is also reported

  10. Intermediate-energy nuclear physics. Task C. Technical progress report, October 1, 1982-October 1, 1983. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following experimental studies: (1) excitation of giant resonances in 118 Sn in inelastic pion scattering at 130 MeV; (2) giant dipole excitations of 40 Ca by inelastic pion scattering; (3) charge symmetry test using the π + and π - elastic scattering from deuterium at 143 and 256 MeV; (4) binding energy effects on the isospin amplitudes in p-shell nuclei; (5) the energy dependence of the 14 C (π + ,π 0 ) 14 N reaction to the IAS; (6) the ( 3 He,t) reaction at 2 GeV; (7) analyzing power in the (polarized p,n) IAS transitions; (8) the excitation of the 1/2 + (2.36) MeV state in the 24Mg (polarized p,d) reaction from 27 to 150 MeV; (9) the energy dependence of the (polarized p,d) reaction for 54 Fe and 140 Ce; and (10) the energy dependence of the 7 Li(p,d) 6 Li reaction. Publications are listed

  11. Molluscs and echinoderms aquaculture: biological aspects, current status, technical progress and future perspectives for the most promising species in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pais

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Shellfish aquaculture is a widespread activity in the Italian peninsula. However, only two bivalve species are mainly cultured along the coastline of that country: the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis and the Manila clam Venerupis philippinarum (Ruditapes philippinarum. By contrast, just a few other mollusc species of commercial interest are scarcely reared at a small-scale level. After analysing the current status of Italian shellfish production, this paper reports and discusses the potential for culturing several different invertebrate species [i.e., the European flat oyster Ostrea edulis, the grooved carpet shell Venerupis decussata (Ruditapes decussatus, the razor clams Ensis minor and Solen marginatus, the cephalopod Octopus vulgaris, and the purple sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus] in this country. In addition, a detailed overview of the progress made in aquacultural techniques for these species in the Mediterranean basin is presented, highlighting the most relevant bottlenecks and the way forward to shift from the experimental to the aquaculture phase. Finally, an outlook of the main economic and environmental benefits arising from these shellfish culture practices is also given.

  12. 1991 Technical progress report of the University of South Carolina's High Energy Physics Group, February 1990--July 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The high energy physics group at the University of South Carolina includes five teaching faculty members, one research faculty member, and five graduate students. Profs. Childers, Darden, and Wilson devote most of their research effort to Fermilab experiment E789, which is designed to observe charmless two-body decays of b-flavored mesons and baryons. Prof. Wilson works on Fermilab experiment E687 which studies charm physics in the wide-band photon beam. Profs. Rosenfeld and Wang participate in the AMY collaboration, which studies electron-positron interactions using the TRISTAN collider at KEK. Prof. Rosenfeld and one student collaborate with personnel from KEK and INS, Tokyo, on an experiment to detect a 17 keV neutrino in the β-decay spectrum of 63 Ni. Members of the group also participate in Fermilab Proposal P803 which will search for the oscillation of muon neutrino to tau neutrino with sensitivity better than a factor of 40 than previously achieved and in Superconducting Super Collider activities which include the development of an imaging preradiator. A brief discussion is given on progress made for each program

  13. Identification of sulfur heterocycles in coal liquids and shale oils. Technical progress report, August 1, 1980-May 1, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M. L.; Castle, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The sulfur heterocycle separation scheme which was described in the last progress report was evaluated for quantitative recovery of individual components. The results indicate that recoveries can range from 10% to approx. 30% depending on the structure of the compound. During this period, 23 unsubstituted sulfur-containing heterocyclic ring systems were synthesized in oder to confirm GC/MS identifications and for biological testing. The four possible 3-ring heterocycles and the thirteen possible 4-ring heterocycles were tested for mutagenic activity in the histidine reversion (Ames assay) system. One of the 3-ring isomers, naphtho(1,2-b)-thiophene, and six of the 4-ring isomers induced mutations in Salmonella test strains. One of these compounds, phenanthro(3,4-b)thiophene, displayed approximately the same mutagenic activity as benzo(a)pyrene. A two-step adsorption chromatographic procedure was developed in order to fractionate synthetic fuels into various chemical-type classes for studying the relative concentrations and mutagenic activities of the various types. An SRC-II Heavy Distillate was fractionated into aliphatic hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, sulfur heterocycles, indoles and carbazoles, azaarenes, and amino polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. It was found that the amino-PAH fraction contained most of the mutagenic activity. A survey was made for compounds containing both nitrogen and sulfur heteroatoms in their structures. A number of these compounds were detected by GC using nitrogen- and sulfur-selective detection.

  14. ITER technology R and D progress report. Report by the Director. ITER technical advisory committee meeting, 25-27 June 2000, St. Petersburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The overall philosophy for the ITER design has been to use established approaches through detailed analysis and to validate their application to ITER through technology R and D, including fabrication of full scale or scalable models of key components. All this R and D work has been done for ITER under collaboration among the Home Teams, with a total resource of about 660 KIUA. R and D issues for ITER-FEAT are almost the same as for the 1998 ITER design. Major developments and fabrication have been completed and tests have significantly progressed. The technical output from the R and D validates the technologies and confirms the manufacturing techniques and quality assurance incorporated in the ITER design, and supports the manufacturing cost estimates for important key cost drivers. The testing of models is continuing to demonstrate their performance margin and/or to optimize their operational use. Their realisation offers insights useful for a possible future collaborative construction activity. Valuable and relevant experience has already been gained in the management of industrial scale, cross-party ventures. The successful progress of these projects increases confidence in the possibility of jointly constructing ITER in an international project framework. The R and D present status is summarized in the following: details are given in Chapters 2 and 3. Significant efforts and resources have been devoted to the Seven Large R and D Projects which cover all the major key components of the basic machine of ITER and their maintenance tools

  15. Humic substances in performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal: Actinide and iodine migration in the far-field. First technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckau, G.

    2003-04-01

    The present project is one in a series of research activities supported by the European Commission on the role of humic substances for the long-term safety of nuclear waste disposal. These activities started in the mid eighties within the MIRAGE project (MIgration of RAdionuclides in the GEosphere) with the most recent project being ''Effects of humic substances on the migration of radionuclides: Complexation and transport of actinides (HUMICS)'' (FI4W-CT96-0028). The HUMICS project was conducted within the fourths framework of the European Commissions research program. It started January 1997 and had a duration of three years. The results of the HUMICS project can be found in three open technical progress reports and a final report [1-4]. In analogy with the HUMICS project, the present project makes use of annual technical progress reports where individual results are published as papers in the form of annexes. By this approach, results rapidly become available to interested parties in a compact form before their publication in various scientific journals and conference proceedings. Furthermore, some of the more preliminary and/or detailed results are not likely to appear in scientific journals and proceedings. The present project is conducted within the fifths framework of the European Commissions research program. It started November 2001 and has a duration of three years. The present report covers the first project year, i.e. November 2001 to September 2002. The project is divided into eight different work packages. These are (i) ''Critical assessment of experimental methods'', (ii) ''Generation and characterization of humic substances'', (iii) ''Radionuclide humate interaction data by designed system investigations'', (iv) ''Characterization of radionuclide humate complexes'', (v) ''Natural chemical analogue studies'', (vi) ''Radionuclide transport experiments'', (vii) ''Model development'', and (viii) ''Performance assessment''. Division of work into

  16. Continuous Fiber Wound Ceramic Composite (CFCC) for Commercial Water Reactor Fuel. Technical progress report for period ending April 1, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Our program began on August 1, 1999. As of April 1, 2000, the progress has been in materials selection and test planning. Three subcontracts are in place (McDermott Technologies Inc. for continuous fiber reinforced ceramic tubing fabrication, Swales Aerospace for LOCA testing of tubes, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology for In Reactor testing of tubes). With regard to materials selection we visited McDermott Technologies Inc. a number of times, including on February 23, 2000 to discuss the Draft Material Selection and Fabrication Report. The changes discussed at this meeting were implemented and the final version of this report is attached (attachment 1). McDermott Technologies Inc. will produce one type of tubing: Alumina oxide (Nextel 610) fiber, a carbon coating (left in place), and alumina-yttria matrix. A potentially desirable CFCC material of silicon carbide fiber with spinel matrix was discussed. That material selection was not adopted primarily due to material availability and cost. Gamma Engineering is exploring the available tube coatings at Northwestern University as a mechanism for reducing the permeability of the tubes, and thus, will use coating as a differentiating factor in the testing of tubing in the LOCA test as well as the In-Reactor Test. The conclusion of the Material Selection and Fabrication Report lists the possible coatings under evaluation. With regard to Test Planning, the MIT and Swales Aerospace have submitted draft Test Plans. MIT is attempting to accommodate an increased number of test specimens by evaluating alternative test configurations. Swales Aerospace held a design review at their facilities on February 24, 2000 and various engineering alternatives and safety issues were addressed. The final Test Plans are not expected until just before testing begins to allow for incorporation of changes during ''dry runs.''

  17. Secure Storage Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aderholdt, Ferrol [Tennessee Technological University; Caldwell, Blake A [ORNL; Hicks, Susan Elaine [ORNL; Koch, Scott M [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; Pogge, James R [Tennessee Technological University; Scott, Stephen L [Tennessee Technological University; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Sorrillo, Lawrence [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to clarify the challenges associated with storage for secure enclaves. The major focus areas for the report are: - review of relevant parallel filesystem technologies to identify assets and gaps; - review of filesystem isolation/protection mechanisms, to include native filesystem capabilities and auxiliary/layered techniques; - definition of storage architectures that can be used for customizable compute enclaves (i.e., clarification of use-cases that must be supported for shared storage scenarios); - investigate vendor products related to secure storage. This study provides technical details on the storage and filesystem used for HPC with particular attention on elements that contribute to creating secure storage. We outline the pieces for a a shared storage architecture that balances protection and performance by leveraging the isolation capabilities available in filesystems and virtualization technologies to maintain the integrity of the data. Key Points: There are a few existing and in-progress protection features in Lustre related to secure storage, which are discussed in (Chapter 3.1). These include authentication capabilities like GSSAPI/Kerberos and the in-progress work for GSSAPI/Host-keys. The GPFS filesystem provides native support for encryption, which is not directly available in Lustre. Additionally, GPFS includes authentication/authorization mechanisms for inter-cluster sharing of filesystems (Chapter 3.2). The limitations of key importance for secure storage/filesystems are: (i) restricting sub-tree mounts for parallel filesystem (which is not directly supported in Lustre or GPFS), and (ii) segregation of hosts on the storage network and practical complications with dynamic additions to the storage network, e.g., LNET. A challenge for VM based use cases will be to provide efficient IO forwarding of the parallel filessytem from the host to the guest (VM). There are promising options like para-virtualized filesystems to

  18. Progress report of the 600 m borehole project of the CEC programme on management and storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.F.M.

    1991-07-01

    In the framework of the CEC Programme on Radioactive Waste Disposal (1990-1994), in situ experiments in salt deposits are conducted. The experimental results will be used to validate analytical techniques and computer models for prediction of salt behaviour. The experiments take place in the Asse II salt mine in Germany. Progress of the work during the first half of 1990 is reported. Convergence data measured during the first phase of the project will be reported in the final report of phase I, issued mid 1991. Convergence measurement devices have been removed from the borehole and are temporarily stored to be used in a new 600 m deep borehole to be drilled begin 1992. The experiment with the Variable Pressure Device (VPD) started March 1991. During first 2 months it has been shown that low pressure build-up due to convergence could not be registrated. The system, which is basically designed for higher depths and thus higher convergence rates, showed more hysteresis than expected on the applied pressure levels. The measuring programme defined earlier is therefore modified. It will be concentrated first on high pressure changes which are started July 1991. A preliminary conclusion of the first pressure step is that the in-situ measured elasticity of salt is significantly lower than elasticity measured in the laboratory on small samples. More detailed analysis of the measurement results and repeated pressure steps are necessary to verify this conclusion. The predictive analyses planned for the first half of 1991 could not be made since the measuring programme was modified. FE-analyses have been concentrated on interpretation of the measurement result during the first months. Influence of the heat production of the exothermally hardening salt concrete in the behaviour of the borehole is analysed in detail. Predictions of the modified measuring programme (topical report) will be reported later. (author). 4 refs.; 3 figs

  19. Heat transport and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despois, J.

    1977-01-01

    Recalling the close connections existing between heat transport and storage, some general considerations on the problem of heat distribution and transport are presented 'in order to set out the problem' of storage in concrete form. This problem is considered in its overall plane, then studied under the angle of the different technical choices it involves. The two alternatives currently in consideration are described i.e.: storage in a mined cavity and underground storage as captive sheet [fr

  20. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed