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Sample records for storage ring cavities

  1. Conceptual design of elliptical cavities for intensity and position sensitive beam measurements in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjari, M S; Chen, X; Hülsmann, P; Litvinov, Yu A; Nolden, F; Piotrowski, J; Steck, M; Stöhlker, Th

    2015-01-01

    Position sensitive beam monitors are indispensable for the beam diagnostics in storage rings. Apart from their applications in the measurements of beam parameters, they can be used in non-destructive in-ring decay studies of radioactive ion beams as well as enhancing precision in the isochronous mass measurement technique. In this work, we introduce a novel approach based on cavities with elliptical cross-section, in order to compensate the limitations of known designs for the application in ion storage rings. The design is aimed primarily for future heavy ion storage rings of the FAIR project. The conceptual design is discussed together with simulation results. (paper)

  2. Design of coupler for the NSLS-II storage ring superconducting RF cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeddulla, M.; Rose, J.

    2011-03-28

    NSLS-II is a 3GeV, 500mA, high brightness, 1 MW beam power synchrotron facility that is designed with four superconducting cavities working at 499.68 MHz. To operate the cavities in over-damped coupling condition, an External Quality Factor (Qext) of {approx}65000 is required. We have modified the existing coupler for the CESR-B cavity which has a Qext of {approx}200,000 to meet the requirements of NSLS-II. CESR-B cavity has an aperture coupler with a coupler 'tongue' connecting the cavity to the waveguide. We have optimized the length, width and thickness of the 'tongue' as well as the width of the aperture to increase the coupling using the three dimensional electromagnetic field solver, HFSS. Several possible designs will be presented. We have modified the coupler of the CESR-B cavity to be used in the storage ring at the NSLS-II project using HFSS and verified using CST Microwave Studio. Using a combination of increasing the length and width of the coupler tongue and increasing the width of the aperture, the external Q of the cavity coupler was decreased to {approx}65000 as required for the design of the NSLS-II storage ring design.

  3. Mechanical design upgrade of the APS storage ring rf cavity tuner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.; Bromberek, D.; Kang, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring (SR) rf system employs four banks of four spherical, single-cell resonant cavities. Each cavity is tuned by varying the cavity volume through insertion/retraction of a copper piston located at the circumference of the cavity and oriented perpendicular to the accelerator beam. During the commissioning of the APS SR, the tuners and cavity tuner ports were prone to extensive arcing and overheating. The existing tuners were modified to eliminate the problems, and two new, redesigned tuners were installed. In both cases marked improvements were obtained in the tuner mechanical performance. As measured by tuner piston and flange surface temperatures, tuner heating has been reduced by a factor of five in the new version. Redesign considerations discussed include tuner piston-to-housing alignment, tuner piston and housing materials and cooling configurations, and tuner piston sliding electrical contacts. The tuner redesign is also distinguished by a modular, more maintainable assembly

  4. Collective Effects in the TLS Storage Ring after the Installation of Superconducting RF Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Ping J; Hsu, Kuo-Tung; Kuo, Chin-Cheng; Wang, Chaoen; Wang, Min-Huey

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting rf cavity designed by Cornell University was installed in the storage ring at Taiwan Light Source in December of 2004. The purpose of rf system upgrade is to achieve a stored beam current of 400 mA without collective instabilities caused by high-order-modes of rf cavities. Beam measurements related to collective effects are performed. Results are compared with those measured prior to the rf system upgrade. Theoretical studies on collective effects after the rf upgrade are also presented.

  5. Cooling the APS storage ring radio-frequency accelerating cavities: Thermal/stress/fatigue analysis and cavity cooling configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primdahl, K.; Kustom, R.

    1995-01-01

    The 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source positron storage ring requires sixteen separate 352-MHz radio-frequency (rf) accelerating cavities. Cavities are installed as groups of four, in straight sections used elsewhere for insertion devices. They occupy the first such straight section after injection, along with the last three just before injection. Cooling is provided by a subsystem of the sitewide deionized water system. Pumping equipment is located in a building directly adjacent to the accelerator enclosure. A prototype cavity was fabricated and tested where cooling was via twelve 19-mm-diameter [3/4 in] brazed-on tubes in a series-parallel flow configuration. Unfortunately, the thermal contact to some tubes was poor due to inadequate braze filler. Here, heat transfer studies, including finite-element analysis and test results, of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring 352-MHz rf accelerating cavities are described. Stress and fatigue life of the copper are discussed. Configuration of water cooling is presented

  6. Investigation on the fabrication of the 3rd harmonic superconducting cavity for the SSRF storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhenyu; Ma Guangming; Yu Haibo; Mao Dongqing; Feng Ziqiang; Hou Hongtao; Liu Jianfei

    2009-01-01

    A third harmonic superconducting niobium cavity has been proposed for installation in the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) storage ring to improve the Touschek lifetime. In order to investigate the feasibility of the superconducting cavity fabrication indigenously and the possibility to master the fabrication techniques, cavities were fabricated from copper and niobium sheets by deep drawing and electron-beam welding, and a series of measurements, such as resonant frequency, shape dimensions and wall thickness, were carried out during this process. After analysis of various problems existing in the fabrication process, technique improvements were proposed, and finally the precise shape as designed and resonant frequency within 1.2 MHz were achieved for the new completed cavities. In addition, full annealing was finally proved to be a good cure for niobium sheets' tearing up during deep drawing. By fabricating niobium cavities successfully, some problems to the next step were cleared. This paper introduces the process of cavity fabrication and its technique improvements towards forming, and the initial vertical test result of niobium cavity is also presented. (authors)

  7. Storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, Gerald K.

    1963-04-15

    The development of storage rings is discussed. Advantages of such devices are pointed out as well as their limits, requirements, and design and fabrication problems. Information gained by the operation of small electron storage rings is included, and three experiments are proposed for colliding-beam facilities. (D.C.W.)

  8. On a possibility of using a superconducting cavity in the RF system of the storage ring LESR-N100

    CERN Document Server

    Androsov, V P; Telegin, Yu P

    2002-01-01

    In the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology the design project of the 200 MeV electron storage ring LESR-N100 is under development. The essential feature of this facility is the large beam energy spread (of about 1%). To ensure a reasonable beam lifetime the RF-system should provide the accelerating voltage of about 0.5 MV, while the total energy losses do not exceed approx 700 eV/turn. The power dissipated in two 700 MHz normal-conducting (NC) cavities much exceeds the power transmitted to the beam. We considered a possibility to use in LESR-N100 a high-Q superconducting RF-cavity (SRF-cavity) in which the dissipated power is the same order of magnitude as the beam-transmitted power. The studies show that the system with SRF-cavity cannot operate in the standard mode when the cavity is matched to the power transmission line at some nominal beam current. The optimal operation mode with high overcoupling is proposed that requires the RF-power one order of magnitude less than in the case of Nc-cavities.

  9. Comparison of SW and TW non-synchronous accelerating cavities as used in electron beam storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolfaghari, A.; Demos, P.T.; Flanz, J.B.; Jacobs, K.

    1991-01-01

    The authors relate the parameters of detuned standing wave (SW) and non-synchronous beam travelling wave (TW) accelerating cavities of equivalent equilibrium performance when used to compensate for radiation and parasitic energy losses by electrons circulating in a high energy electron storage ring. The relationship is expressed in terms of the coupling parameter β and cavity tuning angle ψ of the TW accelerator's equivalent SW system. A given TW cavity corresponds to a standing wave system possessing specific settings of β and ψ. This is shown for the constant impedance TW waveguide, for which β and ψ can be expressed as explicit functions of TW cavity length 1, attenuation factor I, RF electric field phase velocity V p , and shunt impedance r. Coupling parameter β depends additionally on SW cavity shunt impedance R. The basis they have used for formulating the equivalence of the two systems follows Travelling Wave Cavity Non-Synchronous Beam Loading theory developed by G.A. Loew and Standing Wave Circuit Analysis theory as described by P.B. Wilson

  10. RF cavities of CESAR (2 MeV electron storage ring).

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Photo; CERN PhotoLab

    1968-01-01

    RF cavity. There were 2 identical ones: one for stacking (accumulation) procedures; the other for scanning with "empty buckets" (measurement of beam density distribution). Both were operated at h=2 (2nd harmonic of the revolution frequency), i.e. at around 24.4 MHz. Voltage, frequency and phase were programmed with analogue circuits.

  11. CESAR, 2 MeV electron storage ring; construction period; RF cavity.

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Photo; CERN PhotoLab

    1962-01-01

    RF cavity. There were 2 identical ones: one for stacking (accumulation) procedures; the other for scanning with "empty buckets" (measurement of beam density distribution). Both were operated at h=2 (2nd harmonic of the revolution frequency), i.e. at around 24.4 MHz. Voltage, frequency and phase were programmed with analogue circuits.

  12. Storage ring group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, N.M.

    1980-01-01

    The Storage Ring Group set out to identify and pursue salient problems in accelerator physics for heavy ion fusion, divorced from any particular reference design concept. However, it became apparent that some basic parameter framework was required to correlate the different study topics. As the Workshop progressed, ring parameters were modified and updated. Consequently, the accompanying papers on individual topics will be found to refer to slightly varied parameters, according to the stage at which the different problems were tackled

  13. SXLS storage ring design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray lithography has emerged as a strong candidate to meet the demands of ever finer linewidths on integrated circuits, particularly for linewidths less than .25 microns. Proximity printing X-ray lithography makes use of soft X-rays to shadow print an image of a mask onto a semiconductor wafer to produce integrated circuits. To generate the required X-rays in sufficient quantities to make commercial production viable, electron storage rings have been proposed as the soft X-ray sources. Existing storage rings have been used to do the initial development work and the success of these efforts has led the lithographers to request that new rings be constructed that are dedicated to X-ray lithography. As a result of a series of workshops held at BNL [10.3] which were attended by both semiconductor and accelerator scientists, the following set of zeroth order specifications' on the light and electron beam of a storage ring for X-ray lithography were developed: critical wavelength of light: λ c = 6 to 10 angstroms, white light power: P = 0.25 to 2.5 watts/mrad, horizontal collection angle per port: θ = 10 to 50 mrad, electron beam sizes: σ x ∼ σ y y ' < 1 mrad

  14. Proton storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, R.R.

    1978-04-01

    A discussion is given of proton storage ring beam dynamic characteristics. Topics considered include: (1) beam energy; (2) beam luminosity; (3) limits on beam current; (4) beam site; (5) crossing angle; (6) beam--beam interaction; (7) longitudinal instability; (8) effects of scattering processes; (9) beam production; and (10) high magnetic fields. Much of the discussion is related to the design parameters of ISABELLE, a 400 x 400 GeV proton---proton intersecting storage accelerator to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  15. Femtoslicing in Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Shaukat

    2005-01-01

    The generation of ultrashort synchrotron radiation pulses by laser-induced energy modulation of electrons and their subsequent transverse displacement, now dubbed "femtoslicing," was demonstrated at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley. More recently, a femtoslicing user facility was commissioned at the BESSY storage ring in Berlin, and another project is in progress at the Swiss Light Source. The paper reviews the principle of femtoslicing, its merits and shortcomings, as well as the variations of its technical implementation. Various diagnostics techniques to detect successful laser-electron interaction are discussed and experimental results are presented.

  16. Superconducting Storage Cavity for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi,I.

    2009-01-02

    This document provides a top-level description of a superconducting cavity designed to store hadron beams in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It refers to more detailed documents covering the various issues in designing, constructing and operating this cavity. The superconducting storage cavity is designed to operate at a harmonic of the bunch frequency of RHIC at a relatively low frequency of 56 MHz. The current storage cavities of RHIC operate at 197 MHz and are normal-conducting. The use of a superconducting cavity allows for a high gap voltage, over 2 MV. The combination of a high voltage and low frequency provides various advantages stemming from the resulting large longitudinal acceptance bucket.

  17. JAERI storage ring JSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokomizo, H.; Harada, S.; Yanagida, K.; Yokoyama, M.; Nagai, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Mashiko, K.; Ishizaki, N.; Tayama, H.

    1990-01-01

    A design study for a next generation 8 GeV synchrotron radiation facility is in progress in Japan, and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN) have join forces in this project. A compact electron storage ring JSR has been under construction in the linac building in the Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI to serve for studies of various kind of accelerator technologies, examination of insertion devices and beam monitors, and training of young researchers. This paper describes the lattice design, injection system, magnets, vacuum system, RF system, control system and beam monitors and presents some operation results regarding the electron beam injection and storage. The JSR is presently in good condition concerning it's fundamental functions such as injection, storage at around 150 MeV and 300 MeV, and acceleration from 150 MeV and 300 MeV. Photon induced gas desorption is still large because the vacuum chamber has not been aged heavily by synchrotron radiation. (N.K.)

  18. Storage ring development at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krinsky, S.; Bittner, J.; Fauchet, A.M.; Johnson, E.D.; Keane, J.; Murphy, J.; Nawrocky, R.J.; Rogers, J.; Singh, O.V.; Yu, L.H.

    1991-09-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Transverse Beam Profile Monitor; Bunch Length Measurements in the VUV Storage Ring; Photoelectric Effect Photon Beam Position Monitors; RF Receivers for Processing Electron Beam Pick-up Electrode Signals; Real-Time Global Orbit Feedback Systems; Local Orbit Feedback; Active Interlock System for High Power Insertion Devices in the X-ray Ring; Bunch Lengthening Cavity for the VUV Ring; SXLS Storage Ring Design

  19. The Circular RFQ Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, A. G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a novel idea of storage ring for the accumulation of intense beams of light and heavy ions at low energy. The new concept is a natural development of the combined features of conventional storage rings and ion traps, and is basically a linear RFQ bent on itself. The advantages are: smaller beam dimensions, higher beam intensity, and a more compact storage device

  20. Autumn study on storage rings

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The first two weeks of October have seen storage ring people from accelerator Laboratories throughout the world at CERN to study the fundamental problems of very high energy protonproton colliding beam machines.

  1. MUON STORAGE RINGS - NEUTRINO FACTORIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2000-01-01

    The concept of a muon storage ring based Neutrino Source (Neutrino Factory) has sparked considerable interest in the High Energy Physics community. Besides providing a first phase of a muon collider facility, it would generate more intense and well collimated neutrino beams than currently available. The BNL-AGS or some other proton driver would provide an intense proton beam that hits a target, produces pions that decay into muons. The muons must be cooled, accelerated and injected into a storage ring with a long straight section where they decay. The decays occurring in the straight sections of the ring would generate neutrino beams that could be directed to detectors located thousands of kilometers away, allowing studies of neutrino oscillations with precisions not currently accessible. For example, with the neutrino source at BNL, detectors at Soudan, Minnesota (1,715 km), and Gran Sasso, Italy (6,527 km) become very interesting possibilities. The feasibility of constructing and operating such a muon-storage-ring based Neutrino-Factory, including geotechnical questions related to building non-planar storage rings (e.g. at 8degree angle for BNL-Soudan, and 3degree angle for BNL-Gran Sasso) along with the design of the muon capture, cooling, acceleration, and storage ring for such a facility is being explored by the growing Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC). The authors present overview of Neutrino Factory concept based on a muon storage ring, its components, physics opportunities, possible upgrade to a full muon collider, latest simulations of front-end, and a new bowtie-muon storage ring design

  2. Pulsed rf systems for large storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1979-03-01

    The possibility is considered that by using a pulsed rf system a substantial reduction can be made in the rf power requirement for the next generation of large storage rings. For a ring with a sufficiently large circumference, the time between bunch passages, T/sub b/, can exceed the cavity filling time, T/sub f/. As the ratio T/sub b//T/sub f/ increases, it is clear that at some point the average power requirement can be reduced by pulsing the rf to the cavities. In this mode of operation, the rf power is turned on a filling time or so before the arrival of a bunch and is switched off again at the time of bunch passage. There is no rf energy in the accelerating structure, and hence no power dissipation, for most of the period between bunches

  3. A new storage-ring light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alex [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A recently proposed technique in storage ring accelerators is applied to provide potential high-power sources of photon radiation. The technique is based on the steady-state microbunching (SSMB) mechanism. As examples of this application, one may consider a high-power DUV photon source for research in atomic and molecular physics or a high-power EUV radiation source for industrial lithography. A less challenging proof-of-principle test to produce IR radiation using an existing storage ring is also considered.

  4. Quasi-isochronous storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robin, D.; Forest, E.; Pellegrini, C.; Amiry, A.

    1993-01-01

    A study is made of the single-particle dynamics of an electron-positron storage ring where the phase-slip factor is made small in order to make the ring nearly isochronous and reduce the bunch length. What is found is that a quasi-isochronous ring makes it possible to obtain a bunch length in the millimeter range, about one order of magnitude shorter than present values. In this study we have extended the work of others on isochronous storage rings by quantitatively including higher-order terms in the longitudinal equations of motion. Scaling laws are then derived relating the linear term with the next-highest-order term. These scaling laws, which are derived from a two-dimensional Hamiltonian (one dimension of position and one of momentum), establish criteria for stability. These scaling laws are then checked with full six-dimensional tracking on one particular lattice

  5. Proton storage ring summer workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, G.P.; Cooper, R.K.

    1977-10-01

    During the week of August 16, 1976 a Workshop was held at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) on the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) for the Weapons Neutron Research Facility (WNRF). Written contributions were solicited from each of the participants in the Workshop, and the contributions that were received are presented. The papers do not represent polished or necessarily complete work, but rather represent ''first cuts'' at their respective areas. Topics covered include: (1) background information on the storage ring; (2) WNRF design; (3) rf transient during filling; (4) rf capture; (5) beam bunch compression; (6) transverse space charge limits; (7) transverse resistive instability in the PSR; (8) longitudinal resistive instability; (9) synchrotron frequency splitting; (10) E Quintus Unum--off resonance; (11) first harmonic bunching in the storage ring; (12) kicker considerations; (13) beam extraction; (14) ferrite kicker magnets; and (15) E Quintus Unum: a possible ejection scheme

  6. Free electron laser in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couprie, M.E.

    1989-05-01

    Investigations on the development of a free electron laser, carried out in ACO storage ring, are reported. The emission of synchrotron radiation is obtained from the interaction of relativistic charged particles with the magnetic field of the undulator. The synchrotron radiation is stored in a cavity, where interaction with electrons occurs. From the amplification of light waves, the laser radiation is then obtained. The changes in the electron wave packets induced by LEL experiment, carried out in ACO storage ring, are reported. A better understanding of the saturation mechanism, which dictates laser equilibrium, is obtained. Experiments in Super ACO were carried out and the following topics, on the construction of the laser, were investigated: the development of an optical klystron, gain optimization, the position of the mirrors (concerning the radiation from the undulator). This work allowed the construction of a 600 MeV free electron laser, at Super ACO. The development of a laser involving UV range radiation, is considered [fr

  7. Ring cavity for a Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnit, N.A.

    1981-01-27

    A regenerative ring amplifier and regenerative ring oscillator are described which function to feed back a portion of the Stokes signal to complete the ring cavity. The ring cavity configuration allows the CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal and Stokes signal to copropagate through the Raman capillary waveguide amplifier. A Raman capillary waveguide amplifier is also provided in the return leg of the ring cavity to increase gain without increasing the round trip time. Additionally, the ring cavity can be designed such that the amplified Stokes signal is synchronous with the mode-locked spikes of the incoming CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal.

  8. Ring cavity for a Raman capillary waveguide amplifir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnit, N.A.

    1981-01-27

    A regenerative ring amplifier and regenerative ring oscillator are described which function to feed back a portion of the Stokes signal to complete the ring cavity. The ring cavity configuration allows the CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal and Stokes signal to copropagate through the Raman capillary waveguide amplifier. A Raman capillary waveguide amplifier is also provided in the return leg of the ring cavity to increase gain without increasing the round trip time. Additionally, the ring cavity can be designed such that the amplified Stokes signal is synchronous with the mode-locked spikes of the incoming CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal.

  9. Control of ring lasers by means of coupled cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Skettrup, Torben

    2000-01-01

    Summary form only. Coupling of optical cavities offers a means of controlling the properties of one cavity (e.g. a laser) by making adjustments to another, external cavity. In this contribution we consider a unidirectional ring laser (bow-tie laser) coupled to an external ring cavity. Using...... different configurations we can control the out-coupling from the ring laser thereby influencing the threshold and the circulating power in the different ring cavities. This may be used to obtain the best balance between the passive losses and a nonlinear loss such as e.g. conversion to the second harmonic...... or operation of an optical parametric oscillator....

  10. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. Cu-tubes for watercooling are brazed onto the upper half, the lower half is to follow. See also 8006061, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  11. Broadband impedance of the NESTOR storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsov, V.P.; Gladkikh, P.I.; Gvozd, A.M.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Telegin, Yu.N.

    2011-01-01

    The contributions from lossy and inductive vacuum chamber components to the broadband impedance of the NESTOR storage ring are obtained by using both low-frequency analytical approaches and computer simulations. As was expected considering the small ring circumference (15.44m), the main contributions both to the longitudinal impedance Z || /n and the loss factor k loss come from the RF-cavity. Cavity impedance was also estimated with CST Microwave Studio (CST Studio Suite TM 2006) by simulating coaxial wire method commonly used for impedance measurements. Both estimates agree well. Finally, we performed the simulations of a number of inductive elements with CST Particle Studio 2010 by using wake field solver. We have also evaluated the bunch length in NESTOR taking the conservative estimate of 3 Ohm for the ring broadband impedance and have found that the bunch length s z = 0.5 cm could be obtained in steady state operation mode for the designed bunch current of 10 mA and RF-voltage of 250 kV.

  12. Two superconducting storage rings: ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The general features of the design and the status of the ISABELLE storage ring project at the present time are reported. It brings up to date the results reported at the National Particle Accelerator Conference in March 1977. The most significant change since that time has been an upgrading of the energy of the overall facility, and acceptance of the project by the Department of Energy

  13. The LSU Electron Storage Ring, the first commercially-built storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, R.

    1990-01-01

    The Brobeck Division of Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., is building the first industrially-produced storage ring. It will be located at Louisiana State University (LSU) at the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) in Baton Rouge. The purpose of this electron storage ring is to provide intense beams of x-rays to advance the state-of-the-art in lithography and to permit research in a broad area. This facility consists of a 1.2 GeV, 400 mA electron storage ring with a 200 MeV linac injector. The magnet lattice is a Chasman-Green design (double-bend achromat), and the ring circumference is 55.2 meters. There are four 3.0 meter, dispersion-free straight sections, one for injection, one for the 500 MHz RF cavity, and two for possible future insertion devices. The storge ring construction project is in the detailed-design stage, and many systems are in the initial stages of fabrication. 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Transverse Periodic Beam Loading Effects in a Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.R.; Byrd, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Uneven beam fill patterns in storage rings, such as gaps in the fill patterns, leads to periodic, or transient loading of the modes of the RF cavities. We show that an analogous effect can occur in the loading of a dipole cavity mode when the beam passes off the electrical center of the cavity mode. Although this effect is small, it results in a variation of the transverse offset of the beam along the bunch train. For ultralow emittance beams, such as optimized third generation light sources and damping rings, this effect results in a larger projected emittance of the beam compared with the single bunch emittance. The effect is particularly strong for the case when a strong dipole mode has been purposely added to the ring, such as a deflecting, or 'crab' cavity. We derive an approximate analytic solution for the variation of the beam-induced deflecting voltage along the bunch train.

  15. Upgraded cavities for the positron accumulator ring of the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Jiang, X.; Mangra, D.

    1997-01-01

    Upgraded versions of cavities for the APS positron accumulator ring (PAR) have been built and are being tested. Two cavities are in the PAR: a fundamental 9.8-MHz cavity and a twelfth harmonic 117.3-MHz cavity. Both cavities have been manufactured for higher voltage operation with improved Q-factors, reliability, and tuning capability. Both cavities employ current-controlled ferrite tuners for control of the resonant frequency. The harmonic cavity can be operated in either a pulsed mode or a CW mode. The rf properties of the cavities are presented

  16. Storage ring proton EDM experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    sensitivity of 10^-29 e-cm.  The strength of the method originates from the fact that there are high intensity polarized proton beams available and the fact that the so-called geometric phase systematic error background cancels with clock-wise and counter-clock-wise storage possible in electric rings. The ultimate sensitivity of the method is 10^-30 e-cm. At this level it will either detect a non-zero EDM or it will eliminate electro-weak baryogenesis.

  17. Longitudinal dynamics in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The single-particle equations of motion are derived for charged particles in a storage ring. Longitudinal space charge is included in the potential assuming an infinitely conducting circular beam pipe with a distributed inductance. The framework uses Hamilton's equations with the canonical variables phi and W. The Twiss parameters for longitudinal motion are also defined for the small amplitude synchrotron oscillations. The space-charge Hamiltonian is calculated for both parabolic bunches and ''matched'' bunches. A brief analysis including second-harmonic rf contributions is also given. The final sections supply calculations of dynamical quantities and particle simulations with the space-charge effects neglected

  18. Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopic System And Method

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad Bin Saud

    2015-05-14

    A system and method for cavity ring-down spectroscopy can include a pulsed quantum cascade laser, an optical ring-down cavity, a photodetector, and an oscilloscope. The system and method can produce pulse widths of less than 200 ns with bandwidths greater than 300 pm, as well as provide temporal resolution of greater than 10 .mu.s.

  19. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  20. Saturn's Rings and Associated Ring Plasma Cavity: Evidence for Slow Ring Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    We re-examine the radio and plasma wave observations obtained during the Cassini Saturn orbit insertion period, as the spacecraft flew over the northern ring surface into a radial distance of 1.3 Rs (over the C-ring). Voyager era studies suggest the rings are a source of micro-meteoroid generated plasma and dust, with theorized peak impact-created plasma outflows over the densest portion of the rings (central B-ring). In sharp contrast, the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave System (RPWS) observations identify the presence of a ring-plasma cavity located in the central portion of the B-ring, with little evidence of impact-related plasma. While previous Voyager era studies have predicted unstable ion orbits over the C- ring, leading to field-aligned plasma transport to Saturns ionosphere, the Cassini RPWS observations do not reveal evidence for such instability-created plasma fountains. Given the passive ring loss processes observed by Cassini, we find that the ring lifetimes should extend >10(exp 9) years, and that there is limited evidence for prompt destruction (loss in <100 Myrs).

  1. Low-emittance Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The effects of synchrotron radiation on particle motion in storage rings are discussed. In the absence of radiation, particle motion is symplectic, and the beam emittances are conserved. The inclusion of radiation effects in a classical approximation leads to emittance damping: expressions for the damping times are derived. Then, it is shown that quantum radiation effects lead to excitation of the beam emittances. General expressions for the equilibrium longitudinal and horizontal (natural) emittances are derived. The impact of lattice design on the natural emittance is discussed, with particular attention to the special cases of FODO-, achromat- and theoretical-minimum-emittance-style lattices. Finally, the effects of betatron coupling and vertical dispersion (generated by magnet alignment and lattice tuning errors) on the vertical emittance are considered.

  2. Electron beam cooling at a magnetic storage ring, TARN II, and an electrostatic storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Tetsumi

    2006-01-01

    At the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), a magnetic storage ring, TARN II, with an electron cooler was operated from 1989 to 1999, while an electrostatic storage ring with a small electron cooler has been operational since 2000. In this paper, the electron cooling at TARN II and the electrostatic storage ring is described. (author)

  3. Computer program for calculating the resonant frequency, shunt impedance and quality factor of a pill-box cavity in a storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguero, V.M.; Ng, K.Y.

    1983-10-01

    Keil and Zotter have analyzed the electromagnetic fields excited by the longitudinal density fluctuations of an unbunched relativistic particle beam drifting in a corrugated vacuum chamber of circular cross section. At higher frequencies, these corrugations become resonant cavities. Zotter has written a computer program known as KN7C to compute the resonant frequencies. However, in the actual use of KN7C, some difficulties are encountered. To surmount these difficulties, the program known as CAVITY was written to analyze this pill-box shaped resonant cavity. Although there are many input variables to this program, only two are essential and need to be specified. They are BD = b/d = the ratio of the circular beampipe radius to that of the pill-box cavity and GD = g/d where g is the length of the cavity. When they are specified, CAVITY will print out the dimensionless normalized fundamental resonant frequency FD, shunt impedance Z and figure of merit Q. From these, the actual resonant frequency, shunt impedance and figure of merit can be deduced. The program is described and a listing is provided

  4. Proton storage ring: man/machine interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lander, R.F.; Clout, P.N.

    1985-01-01

    The human interface of the Proton Storage Ring Control System at Los Alamos is described in some detail, together with the software environment in which operator interaction programs are written. Some examples of operator interaction programs are given

  5. National synchrotron light source VUV storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumberg, L.; Bittner, J.; Galayda, J.; Heese, R.; Krinsky, S.; Schuchman, J.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1979-01-01

    A 700 MeV electron storage ring designed for synchrotron radiation applications is described. Lattice and stability calculations are presented and the vacuum, correction and injection systems are discussed

  6. Evaluation of ring impedance of the Photon Factory storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, T.; Izawa, M.; Tokumoto, S.; Hori, Y.; Sakanaka, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Kobayakawa, H.

    1992-05-01

    The loss parameters of the ducts in the Photon Factory (PF) storage ring were evaluated using the wire method and the code TBCI. Both the measurement and the calculation were done for a different bunch length (σ) ranging from 23 to 80 ps. The PF ring impedance was estimated to be |Z/n|=3.2 Ω using the broadband impedance model. The major contribution to the impedance comes from the bellows and the gate valve sections. Improvements of these components will lower the ring impedance by half. (author)

  7. Driven-Dissipative Supersolid in a Ring Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mivehvar, Farokh; Ostermann, Stefan; Piazza, Francesco; Ritsch, Helmut

    2018-03-01

    Supersolids are characterized by the counterintuitive coexistence of superfluid and crystalline order. Here we study a supersolid phase emerging in the steady state of a driven-dissipative system. We consider a transversely pumped Bose-Einstein condensate trapped along the axis of a ring cavity and coherently coupled to a pair of degenerate counterpropagating cavity modes. Above a threshold pump strength the interference of photons scattered into the two cavity modes results in an emergent superradiant lattice, which spontaneously breaks the continuous translational symmetry towards a periodic atomic pattern. The crystalline steady state inherits the superfluidity of the Bose-Einstein condensate, thus exhibiting genuine properties of a supersolid. A gapless collective Goldstone mode correspondingly appears in the superradiant phase, which can be nondestructively monitored via the relative phase of the two cavity modes on the cavity output. Despite cavity-photon losses the Goldstone mode remains undamped, indicating the robustness of the supersolid phase.

  8. Polarized gas targets for storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    It is widely recognized that polarized gas targets in electron storage rings represent a new opportunity for precision nuclear physics studies. New developments in polarized target technology specific to internal applications will be discussed. In particular, polarized gas targets have been used in the VEPP-3 electron ring in Novosibirsk. A simple storage cell was used to increase the total target thickness by a factor of 15 over the simple gas jet target from an atomic beam source. Results from the initial phase of this project will be reported. In addition, the plans for increasing the luminosity by an additional order or magnitude will be presented. The application of this work to polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets for the HERA ring will be noted. The influence of beam-induced depolarization, a phenomena encountered in short-pulse electron storage rings, will be discussed. Finally, the performance tests of laser-driven sources will be presented. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  9. Mode-locked Bloch oscillations in a ring cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samoylova, M; Piovella, N; Hunter, D; Robb, G R M; Bachelard, R; Courteille, Ph W

    2014-01-01

    We present a new technique for stabilizing and monitoring Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice under the action of a constant external force. In the proposed scheme, the atoms also interact with a unidirectionally pumped optical ring cavity whose one arm is collinear with the optical lattice. For weak collective coupling, Bloch oscillations dominate over the collective atomic recoil lasing instability and develop a synchronized regime in which the atoms periodically exchange momentum with the cavity field. (letter)

  10. First results of cavity ring down signals from exhaled air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revalde, G.; Grundšteins, K.; Alnis, J.; Skudra, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we report first results from the developed cavity ring-down spectrometer for application in human breath analysis for the diagnostics of diabetes and later for early detection of lung cancer. Our cavity ring-down spectrometer works in UV region with pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm wavelength. First experiments allow us to determine acetone and benzene at the level bellow ppm. In our experiment, first results from breath samples from volunteers after doing different activities were collected and examined. Influence of the smoking on the breath signals also was examined.

  11. Nonlinear frequency conversion in coupled ring cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Abitan, Haim; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The steady-state distribution of circulating power in coupled, unidirectional ring resonators containing a diode-pumped laser crystal and nonlinear optical elements is computed. The full set of transcendental nonlinear equations describing the interactions between the circulating power and the op......The steady-state distribution of circulating power in coupled, unidirectional ring resonators containing a diode-pumped laser crystal and nonlinear optical elements is computed. The full set of transcendental nonlinear equations describing the interactions between the circulating power...... and the optical elements is solved by a numerical root find function of a commercial mathematics software. The method allows computation of the output of sequential nonlinear processes such as laser gain, second harmonic generation and optical parametric amplification as a function of the input diode pump power...

  12. Stable CSR in Storage Rings: A Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannibale, F.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive historical view of the work done on coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in storage rings is given in reference [1]. Here we want just to point out that even if the issue of CSR in storage rings was already discussed over 50 years ago, it is only recently that a considerable number of observations have been reported. In fact, intense bursts of coherent synchrotron radiation with a stochastic character were measured in the terahertz frequency range, at several synchrotron light source storage rings [2-8]. It has been shown [8-11], that this bursting emission of CSR is associated with a single bunch instability, usually referred as microbunching instability (MBI), driven by the fields of the synchrotron radiation emitted by the bunch itself. Of remarkably different characteristics was the CSR emission observed at BESSY II in Berlin, when the storage ring was tuned into a special low momentum compaction mode [12, 13]. In fact, the emitted radiation was not the quasi-random bursting observed in the other machines, but a powerful and stable flux of broadband CSR in the terahertz range. This was an important result, because it experimentally demonstrated the concrete possibility of constructing a stable broadband source with extremely high power in the terahertz region. Since the publication of the first successful experiment using the ring as a CSR source [14], BESSY II has regular scheduled user's shifts dedicated to CSR experiments. At the present time, several other laboratories are investigating the possibility of a CSR mode of operation [15-17] and a design for a new ring optimized for CSR is at an advanced stage [18]. In what follows, we describe a model that first accounts for the BESSY II observations and then indicates that the special case of BESSY II is actually quite general and typical when relativistic electron storage rings are tuned for short bunches. The model provides a scheme for predicting and optimizing the performance of ring

  13. Stable CSR in storage rings: A model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannibale, Fernando; Byrd, John M.; Loftsdottir, Agusta; Venturini, Marco; Abo-Bakr, Michael; Feikes, Jorge; Holldack, Karsten; Kuske, Peter; Wustefeld, Godehart; Hubers, Heinz-Willerm; Warnock, Robert

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive historical view of the work done on coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in storage rings is given in reference [1]. Here we want just to point out that even if the issue of CSR in storage rings was already discussed over 50 years ago, it is only recently that a considerable number of observations have been reported. In fact, intense bursts of coherent synchrotron radiation with a stochastic character were measured in the terahertz frequency range, at several synchrotron light source storage rings [2-8]. It has been shown [8-11], that this bursting emission of CSR is associated with a single bunch instability, usually referred as microbunching instability (MBI), driven by the fields of the synchrotron radiation emitted by the bunch itself. Of remarkably different characteristics was the CSR emission observed at BESSY II in Berlin, when the storage ring was tuned into a special low momentum compaction mode [12, 13]. In fact, the emitted radiation was not the quasi-random bursting observed in the other machines, but a powerful and stable flux of broadband CSR in the terahertz range. This was an important result, because it experimentally demonstrated the concrete possibility of constructing a stable broadband source with extremely high power in the terahertz region. Since the publication of the first successful experiment using the ring as a CSR source [14], BESSY II has regular scheduled user s shifts dedicated to CSR experiments. At the present time, several other laboratories are investigating the possibility of a CSR mode of operation [15-17] and a design for a new ring optimized for CSR is at an advanced stage [18]. In what follows, we describe a model that first accounts for the BESSY II observations and then indicates that the special case of BESSY II is actually quite general and typical when relativistic electron storage rings are tuned for short bunches. The model provides a scheme for predicting and optimizing the performance of ring

  14. Nonlinear dynamics aspects of modern storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helleman, R.H.G.; Kheifets, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    It is argued that the nonlinearity of storage rings becomes an essential problem as the design parameters of each new machine are pushed further and further. Yet the familiar methods of classical mechanics do not allow determination of single particle orbits over reasonable lengths of time. It is also argued that the single particle dynamics of a storage ring is possibly one of the cleanest and simplest nonlinear dynamical systems available with very few degrees of freedom. Hence, reasons are found for accelerator physicists to be interested in nonlinear dynamics and for researchers in nonlinear dynamics to be interested in modern storage rings. The more familiar methods of treating nonlinear systems routinely used in acclerator theory are discussed, pointing out some of their limitations and pitfalls. 39 refs., 1 fig

  15. Latest on polarization in electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The field of beam polarization in electron storage rings is making rapid progress in recent several years. This report is an attempt to summarize some of these developments concerning how to produce and maintain a high level of beam polarization. Emphasized will be the ideas and current thoughts people have on what should and could be done on electron rings being designed at present such as HERA, LEP and TRISTAN. 23 references

  16. Polarization calculations for electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mane, S.R.

    1988-05-01

    A computer program called SMILE has been developed to calculate the equilibrium polarization in a high-energy electron storage ring. It can calculate spin resonances to arbitrary orders, in principle. Results of polarization calculations are shown for a variety of storage ring models, to elucidate various aspects of the behaviour of the polarization, such as the effects of machine symmetry, beam energy spread, and transverse momentum recoils, etc. Reasonable agreement is obtained with some experimental data from measurements at SPEAR. 12 refs., 12 figs

  17. Injection envelope matching in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minty, M.G.; Spence, W.L.

    1995-05-01

    The shape and size of the transverse phase space injected into a storage ring can be deduced from turn-by-turn measurements of the transient behavior of the beam envelope in the ring. Envelope oscillations at 2 x the β-tron frequency indicate the presence of a β-mismatch, while envelope oscillations at the β-tron frequency are the signature of a dispersion function mismatch. Experiments in injection optimization using synchrotron radiation imaging of the beam and a fast-gated camera at the SLC damping rings are reported

  18. Inauguration ceremony for the Intersecting Storage Rings

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1971-01-01

    The inauguration ceremony for the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) was held on 16 October 1971. Kjell Johnsen is seen in the picture handing a symbolic key to the ISR to Edoardo Amaldi. From left to right on the podium: Victor Frederik Weisskopf, former Director-General; M Antonioz; Willibald Jentschke as Director-General of CERN, and on the other side Werner Heisenberg.

  19. Electron Storage Ring Development for ICS Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewen, Roderick [Lyncean Technologies, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    There is an increasing world-wide interest in compact light sources based on Inverse Compton Scattering. Development of these types of light sources includes leveraging the investment in accelerator technology first developed at DOE National Laboratories. Although these types of light sources cannot replace the larger user-supported synchrotron facilities, they offer attractive alternatives for many x-ray science applications. Fundamental research at the SLAC National Laboratory in the 1990’s led to the idea of using laser-electron storage rings as a mechanism to generate x-rays with many properties of the larger synchrotron light facilities. This research led to a commercial spin-off of this technology. The SBIR project goal is to understand and improve the performance of the electron storage ring system of the commercially available Compact Light Source. The knowledge gained from studying a low-energy electron storage ring may also benefit other Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) source development. Better electron storage ring performance is one of the key technologies necessary to extend the utility and breadth of applications of the CLS or related ICS sources. This grant includes a subcontract with SLAC for technical personnel and resources for modeling, feedback development, and related accelerator physics studies.

  20. From accelerators to storage rings to

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1983-02-01

    This talk gives a general but highly subjective overview of the expectation for accelerators and colliders for high energy physics, but not extended developments of accelerators and storage rings for application to nuclear structure physics, synchrotron radiation, medical applications or industrial use

  1. Antiproton chain of the FAIR storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, T; Kamerdzhiev, V; Lehrach, A; Maier, R; Prasuhn, D; Stassen, R; Stockhorst, H; Herfurth, F; Lestinsky, M; Litvinov, Yu A; Steck, M; Stöhlker, T

    2015-01-01

    In the Modularized Start Version of the Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt Germany, the 3 GeV antiprotons are precooled in the collector ring and accumulated in the high energy storage ring (HESR). They are further accelerated to 14 GeV or decelerated to 1 GeV for the experiments with a high-density internal target. The powerful beam cooling devices, stochastic cooling and electron cooling will support the provision of a high-resolution antiproton beam. The other option of FAIR is to prepare the low energy, 300 keV antiproton beam connecting the existing storage rings ESR and CRYRING with HESR. Beam physics issues related with these concepts are described. (paper)

  2. Synchrobetatron resonant coupling mechanism in a storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouichi Jimbo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A clear synchrobetatron resonant coupling of Mg ion beam was observed experimentally in the horizontal laser beam cooling experiment in small laser equipped storage ring. Synchrotron and horizontal betatron motions were intentionally coupled in a rf cavity. Using the Hamiltonian which is composed of coasting, synchrotron and betatron motions, physical mechanism of the coupling is analyzed to explain the observed horizontal betatron tune jump near the synchrobetatron resonant coupling point. There energy exchange between the synchrotron oscillation and the horizontal betatron oscillation was mediated by coasting particles and the freedom of the horizontal direction is connected with the freedom of the longitudinal direction.

  3. Storage rings for nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper provides a brief tutorial for the physicist who is not an accelerator expert, introducing terminology and concepts useful in understanding the basic properties of beam storage devices and the beam processing that they make possible. It also deals with performance- limiting phenomena: stored beam intensity limits; beam target interactions and their effects on target thickness and beam quality; and the luminosity domains at different energies and for various ion species for applicability of the stored beam technology. Examples are presented from among facilities in operation or under construction to show some of the diversity of this rapidly evolving field. A glossary of terms and abbreviations used in this review is included for the reader's convenience

  4. Gain-assisted broadband ring cavity enhanced spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Mahmoud A.; Adib, George A.; Sabry, Yasser M.; Khalil, Diaa

    2017-02-01

    Incoherent broadband cavity enhanced spectroscopy can significantly increase the effective path length of light-matter interaction to detect weak absorption lines over broad spectral range, for instance to detect gases in confined environments. Broadband cavity enhancement can be based on the decay time or the intensity drop technique. Decay time measurement is based on using tunable laser source that is expensive and suffers from long scan time. Intensity dependent measurement is usually reported based on broadband source using Fabry-Perot cavity, enabling short measurement time but suffers from the alignment tolerance of the cavity and the cavity insertion loss. In this work we overcome these challenges by using an alignment-free ring cavity made of an optical fiber loop and a directional coupler, while having a gain medium pumped below the lasing threshold to improve the finesse and reduce the insertion loss. Acetylene (C2H2) gas absorption is measured around 1535 nm wavelength using a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) gain medium. The system is analyzed for different ring resonator forward coupling coefficient and loses, including the 3-cm long gas cell insertion loss and fiber connector losses used in the experimental verification. The experimental results are obtained for a coupler ratio of 90/10 and a fiber length of 4 m. The broadband source is the amplified spontaneous emission of another SOA and the output is measured using a 70pm-resolution optical spectrum analyzer. The absorption depth and the effective interaction length are improved about an order of magnitude compared to the direct absorption of the gas cell. The presented technique provides an engineering method to improve the finesse and, consequently the effective length, while relaxing the technological constraints on the high reflectivity mirrors and free-space cavity alignment.

  5. Asymmetric Laser Radiant Cooling in Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, E V; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    Laser pulses with small spatial and temporal dimensions can interact with a fraction of the electron bunches circulating in Compton storage rings. We studied synchrotron dynamics of such bunches when laser photons scatter off from the electrons with energy higher than the synchronous energy. In this case of ‘asymmetric cooling', as shown theoretically, the stationary energy spread is much smaller than under conditions of regular scattering; the oscillations are damped faster. Coherent oscillations of large amplitude may be damped in one synchrotron period, which makes this method feasible for injection the bunches into a ring in the longitudinal phase space. The theoretical results are validated with simulations.

  6. Instabilities in passive dispersion oscillating fiber ring cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copie, François; Conforti, Matteo; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Mussot, Arnaud; Biancalana, Fabio; Trillo, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally the development of instabilities in passive ring cavities with stepwise longitudinal variation of the dispersion. We derive an extended version of the Lugiato-Lefever equation that permits to model dispersion oscillating cavities and we demonstrate that this equation is valid well beyond the mean field approximation. We review the theory of Turing (modulational) and Faraday (parametric) instability in inhomogeneous fiber cavities. We report the experimental demonstration of the generation of stable Turing and Faraday temporal patterns in the same device, which can be controlled by changing the detuning and/or the input power. Moreover, we experimentally record the round-trip-to-round-trip dynamics of the spectrum, which shows that Turing and Faraday instabilities not only differ by their characteristic frequency but also by their dynamical behavior. Contribution to the Topical Issue: "Theory and Applications of the Lugiato-Lefever Equation", edited by Yanne K. Chembo, Damia Gomila, Mustapha Tlidi, Curtis R. Menyuk.

  7. Low emittance optics of photon factory storage ring at KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Y.; Katoh, M.; Honjo, I.; Araki, A.; Kihara, M.

    1987-01-01

    A new optics is being successfully tested at the Photon Factory Storage Ring (PF-RING) in order to reduce the emittance to 0.13 mm mrad, about one third of the present value. This optics with four additional quadrupole magnets is a modified version of one of the optics designed as an option at the early period of PF construction. One advantage of this new optics is that the beta-function at RF-sections is smaller than that of the old option. The other advantage is that the dispersion function is zero at the long straight sections for insertion devices and RF cavities. The aim of this paper is to describe the new low-emittance optics as well as the parameters of the new quadrupole magnets and power supplies. Some preliminary results of machine study are also presented

  8. RF cavity R and D at LBNL for the NLC Damping Rings, FY2000/2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Atkinson, D.; Corlett, J.N.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Rasson, J.; Saleh, T.; Weidenbach, W.

    2001-01-01

    This report contains a summary of the R and D activities at LBNL on RF cavities for the NLC damping rings during fiscal years 2000/2001. This work is a continuation of the NLC RF system R and D of the previous year [1]. These activities include the further optimization and fine tuning of the RF cavity design for both efficiency and damping of higher-order modes (HOMs). The cavity wall surface heating and stresses were reduced at the same time as the HOM damping was improved over previous designs. Final frequency tuning was performed using the high frequency electromagnetic analysis capability in ANSYS. The mechanical design and fabrication methods have been developed with the goals of lower stresses, fewer parts and simpler assembly compared to previous designs. This should result in substantial cost savings. The cavity ancillary components including the RF window, coupling box, HOM loads, and tuners have been studied in more detail. Other cavity options are discussed which might be desirable to either further lower the HOM impedance or increase the stored energy for reduced transient response. Superconducting designs and the use of external ''energy storage'' cavities are discussed. A section is included in which the calculation method is summarized and its accuracy assessed by comparisons with the laboratory measurements of the PEP-II cavity, including errors, and with the beam-sampled spectrum

  9. The CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR)

    CERN Document Server

    Hübner, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) was the first facility ever built providing colliding hadron beams. It mainly operated with protons with beam energies of 15 to 31 GeV. The ISR was conceived in the years 1960 to 1964 and was approved in 1965. It came into operation at the beginning of 1971 and was decommissioned as a collider in 1983. A number of accelerator technologies have been either much improved or developed at the ISR which subsequently have become enabling technologies for a number of hadron storage rings and large colliders. Prominent examples of such technologies are ultra-high vacuum technology, beam diagnostics based on Schottky signals and stochastic cooling. The experiences obtained with the ISR were later exploited at the proton-antiproton facility in the CERN SPS, the Tevatron at Fermilab, the RHIC at Brookhaven and, finally, by the LHC at CERN.

  10. Infrared synchrotron radiation from electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.D.; Williams, G.P.

    1983-01-01

    Simple and useful approximations, valid at infrared wavelengths, to the equations for synchrotron radiation are presented and used to quantify the brightness and power advantage of current synchrotron radiation light sources over conventional infrared broadband laboratory sources. The Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) and the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (vacuum ultraviolet) [NSLS(VUV)] storage rings are used as examples in the calculation of the properties of infrared synchrotron radiation. The pulsed nature of the emission is also discussed, and potential areas of application for the brightness, power, and time structure advantages are presented. The use of infrared free electron lasers and undulators on the next generation of storage ring light sources is briefly considered

  11. Early 500 MHz prototype LEP RF Cavity with superposed storage cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The principle of transferring the RF power back and forth between the accelerating cavity and a side-coupled storage cavity was demonstrated with this 500 MHz prototype. In LEP, the accelerating frequency was 352.2 MHz, and accelerating and storage cavities were consequently larger. See also 8002294, 8006061, 8407619X, and Annual Reports 1980, p.115; 1981, p.95; 1985, vol.I, p.13.

  12. Heavy ion storage ring without linear dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Ikegami

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A possible method to realize a dispersion-free storage ring is described. The simultaneous use of a magnetic field B and an electric field E in bending regions, where the two fields are set perpendicular to each other, enables us to control the effect of momentum dispersion. When the relation (1+1/γ_{0}^{2}E(ρ=-v_{0}×B is satisfied for a beam with the velocity v_{0}, the linear dispersion can be completely eliminated all around the ring. It is shown that the acceleration and deceleration induced by the electrostatic deflector counteracts the heating mechanism due to the shearing force from dipole magnets. The dispersion-free system is thus beneficial to producing ultracold beams. It looks probable that the technique will allow one to achieve three-dimensional crystalline beams. At ICR Kyoto University, an ion cooler storage ring S-LSR oriented for various beam physics purposes is now under construction. The application of the present idea to S-LSR is discussed and the actual design of the dispersionless bend is given.

  13. Coherent Harmonic Generation using the ELETTRA Storage Ring Optical Klystron

    CERN Document Server

    De Ninno, G; Diviacco, Bruno; Ferianis, Mario; Trovò, Mauro

    2004-01-01

    The standard process leading to CHG using single-pass devices or storage rings is based on the up-frequency conversion of a high-power laser focused into the first undulator of an optical klystron. The seeding signal, which is necessary to produce the modulation of the electron density and hence to induce the coherent emission, may be provided by an external laser or, in the case of storage-ring oscillators, by the FEL itself. The latter configuration has been recently implemented at ELETTRA allowing to generate the third harmonic of an intra-cavity signal at 660 nm. In the first part of this paper, we report about the set of measurements that have been performed, for different experimental set-ups, with the aim of characterizing the power as well as the spectral and temporal characteristics of the obtained radiation. As for seeding using an external laser, a detailed campaign of simulations, reported in the second part of the paper, shows that the ELETTRA optical klystron is also well suited for the investig...

  14. Doppler Broadening Thermometry Based on Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shui-Ming; Cheng, Cunfeng; Wang, Jin; Tan, Yan; Sun, Yu Robert; Liu, An-Wen; Zhang, Jin-Tao

    2014-06-01

    A Doppler broadening thermometry is implemented using a laser-locked cavity ring-down spectrometer [1,2] combined with a temperature-stabilized sample cell. The temperature fluctuation of the gas sample cell is kept below 1 mK for hours. The probing laser is frequency locked at a longitudinal mode of a Fabry-Pérot interferometer made of ultra-low-expansion glass, and the spectral scan is implemented by scanning the sideband produced by an electro-optic modulator. As a result, a kHz precision has been maintained during the measurement of the spectrum of 10 GHz wide. A ro-vibrational line of C_2H_2 is measured at sample pressures of a few Pa. Using a pair of mirrors with a reflectivity of 0.99997 at 787 nm, we are able to detect absorption line profiles with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10^5. Fitting of the recorded spectra allows us to determine the Doppler width with a statistical uncertainty of 10 ppm. Further improvements on the experimental reproducibility and investigations on the collision effects will probably lead to an optical determination of the Boltzmann constant with an uncertainty of a few ppm. H. Pan, C.-F. Cheng, Y. R. Sun, B. Gao, A.-W. Liu, S.-M. Hu, ``Laser-locked, continuously tunable high resolution cavity ring-down spectrometer," Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 103110 (2011) Y. R. Sun, H. Pan, C.-F. Cheng, A.-W. Liu, J.-T. Zhang, S.-M. Hu, ``Application of cavity ring-down spectroscopy to the Boltzmann constant determination," Opt. Express, 19, 19993 (2011)

  15. Cavity ring down spectrometry for disease diagnostics using exhaled air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revalde, G.; Grundšteins, K.; Alnis, J.; Skudra, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we report the current stage of the development of a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS) system using exhaled human breath analysis for the diagnostics of different diseases like diabetes and later lung cancer. The portable CRDS system is made in ultraviolet spectral region using Nd:Yag laser 266 nm pulsed light. Calibration of the CRDS system was performed using generated samples by KinTek automated permeation tube system and self-prepared mixtures with known concentration of benzene and acetone in air. First experiments showed that the limits of detection for benzene and acetone are several tens of ppb.

  16. Beam properties of UVSOR storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuga, T.; Hasumoto, M.; Kinoshita, T.; Yonehara, H.

    1985-01-01

    UVSOR constructed at the IMS (Institute for Molecular Science) is an electron storage ring dedicated to synchrotron radiation research in molecular science and its related fields. The first beam was stored on 10th Nov. in 1983. From that time on, efforts have been devoted to improvement of the performance of the ring. During the accelerator studies, some inconvenient phenomena were found. One of the big problems is ion trapping effect. Trapped ions change the operating point and enhance the coupling between horizontal and vertical oscillations. As a result, the beam height is enlarged considerably at high beam current. The beam is shaken slightly in the vertical plane and the electrostatic clearing field is applied to solve this problem. The bunch length is somewhat longer than the expected value. This effect is also a problem to be solved

  17. Superconducting conversion of the Intersecting storage Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A study is presented of design, performances and cost estimates for superconducting proton storage rings in the existing ISR tunnel at CERN. By using a proven technology for the superconducting magnets an energy of 120 GeV is attainable, which corresponds to a bending field of 5.12 T. Using injection from the PS and stacking at 25 GeV, followed by phase displacement acceleration, luminosities of up to 4.10 33 cm -2 s -1 at 120 GeV are obtained. (Auth.)

  18. APS Storage Ring vacuum chamber fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeppner, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The 1104-m circumference Advanced Photon Source Storage Ring Vacuum System is composed of 240 individual sections, which are fabricated from a combination of aluminum extrusions and machined components. The vacuum chambers will have 3800 weld joints, each subject to strict vacuum requirements, as well as a variety of related design criteria. The vacuum criteria and chamber design are reviewed, including a discussion of the weld joint geometries. The critical fabrication process parameters for meeting the design requirements are discussed. The experiences of the prototype chamber fabrication program are presented. Finally, the required facilities preparation for construction activity is briefly described. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  19. Cavity ring-down Faraday rotation spectroscopy for oxygen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberg, Jonas; Wysocki, Gerard

    2017-05-01

    A combination of the path length enhancement provided by cavity ring-down spectroscopy together with the selectivity and noise suppression capabilities of Faraday rotation spectroscopy is utilized for highly sensitive detection of oxygen at 762.3 nm. The system achieves a noise-equivalent rotation angle of 1.3 × 10-9 rad/√Hz, and a trace O2 detection limit of 160 ppb for 100 s of averaging. The technique relies on measurements of the losses in two orthogonal polarization directions simultaneously, whereby an absolute assessment of the magnetically induced polarization rotation can be retrieved, analogous to the absolute absorption measurement provided by stand-alone cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The differential nature of the technique described here eliminates the need for off-resonance decay measurements and thereby allows for efficient shot-to-shot fluctuation suppression. This is especially advantageous when operating the system under measurement conditions that severely affect the non-absorber related losses, such as particulate matter contamination typically present in combustion or open-path applications.

  20. Stochastic beam dynamics in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauluhn, A.

    1993-12-01

    In this thesis several approaches to stochastic dynamics in storage rings are investigated. In the first part the theory of stochastic differential equations and Fokker-Planck equations is used to describe the processes which have been assumed to be Markov processes. The mathematical theory of Markov processes is well known. Nevertheless, analytical solutions can be found only in special cases and numerical algorithms are required. Several numerical integration schemes for stochastic differential equations will therefore be tested in analytical solvable examples and then applied to examples from accelerator physics. In particular the stochastically perturbed synchrotron motion is treated. For the special case of a double rf system several perturbation theoretical methods for deriving the Fokker-Planck equation in the action variable are used and compared with numerical results. The second part is concerned with the dynamics of electron storage rings. Due to the synchrotron radiation the electron motion is influenced by damping and exciting forces. An algorithm for the computation of the density function in the phase space of such a dissipative stochastically excited system is introduced. The density function contains all information of a process, e.g. it determines the beam dimensions and the lifetime of a stored electron beam. The new algorithm consists in calculating a time propagator for the density function. By means of this propagator the time evolution of the density is modelled very computing time efficient. The method is applied to simple models of the beam-beam interaction (one-dimensional, round beams) and the results of the density calculations are compared with results obtained from multiparticle tracking. Furthermore some modifications of the algorithm are introduced to improve its efficiency concerning computing time and storage requirements. Finally, extensions to two-dimensional beam-beam models are described. (orig.)

  1. VUV Optics Development for the Elettra Storage Ring FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Guenster, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet optical components for the storage ring FEL at Elettra are under continuous development in the European research consortium EUFELE. Target of the project is the progress to shorter lasing wavelengths in the VUV spectral range. The current status allows lasing with oxide mirror systems down to 190 nm. The main obstacles for the development of optical coatings for shorter wavelengths is the high energetic background of the synchrotron radiation impinging onto the front mirror in the laser cavity. Investigations in single layer systems and multilayer stacks of oxide or fluoride materials demonstrate that fluoride mirrors reach highest reflectivity values down to 140 nm, and oxide coatings possess a satisfactory resistance against the high energetic background irradiation. However, pure oxide multilayer stacks exhibit significant absorption below 190 nm and pure fluoride stacks suffer from strong degradation effects under synchrotron radiation. A solution could be hybrid systems, combining fluo...

  2. Commissioning of the diamond light source storage ring vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, M P; Boussier, B; Bryan, S; Macdonald, B F; Shiers, H S

    2008-01-01

    The Diamond storage ring has been operating with a 3 GeV electron beam since September 2006 and 190 A.h of beam dose have been accumulated. The pressure in the storage ring is 4.2 10 -10 mbar without beam, rising to 7.9 10 -10 mbar with 125 mA of stored beam. Data on the storage ring vacuum performance and experience from commissioning and beam conditioning are presented

  3. Integral storage-bulb and microwave cavity for masers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, V. S.

    1980-01-01

    Mechanically-stable integral storage-bulb/microwave cavity made out of single piece of fused quartz improves frequency stability. Single-piece construction eliminates joints, making cavity dimensionally and hence frequency-stable. Fused quartz is used because of its low thermal expansion coefficient.

  4. Rf stability, control and bunch lengthening in electron synchrotron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachtel, J.M.

    1989-09-01

    A self-consistent theory for nonlinear longitudinal particle motion and rf cavity excitation in a high energy electron storage ring is developed. Coupled first order equations for the motion of an arbitrary number of particles and for the field in several rf cavities are given in the form used in control system theory. Stochastic quantum excitation of synchrotron motion is included, as are the effects of rf control system corrections. Results of computations for double cavity bunch lengthening are given. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. Measurements of carbon-14 with cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartt, A. D.; Ognibene, T.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K.

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive method for quantitation of 14C in biological samples. This technology has been used in a variety of low dose, human health related studies over the last 20 years when very high sensitivity was needed. AMS helped pioneer these scientific methods, but its expensive facilities and requirements for highly trained technical staff have limited their proliferation. Quantification of 14C by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) offers an approach that eliminates many of the shortcomings of an accelerator-based system and would supplement the use of AMS in biomedical research. Our initial prototype, using a non-ideal wavelength laser and under suboptimal experimental conditions, has a 3.5-modern, 1- σ precision for detection of milligram-sized, carbon-14-elevated samples. These results demonstrate proof of principle and provided a starting point for the development of a spectrometer capable of biologically relevant sensitivities.

  6. Introductory statistical mechanics for electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jowett, J.M.

    1986-07-01

    These lectures introduce the beam dynamics of electron-positron storage rings with particular emphasis on the effects due to synchrotron radiation. They differ from most other introductions in their systematic use of the physical principles and mathematical techniques of the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of fluctuating dynamical systems. A self-contained exposition of the necessary topics from this field is included. Throughout the development, a Hamiltonian description of the effects of the externally applied fields is maintained in order to preserve the links with other lectures on beam dynamics and to show clearly the extent to which electron dynamics in non-Hamiltonian. The statistical mechanical framework is extended to a discussion of the conceptual foundations of the treatment of collective effects through the Vlasov equation

  7. Damping rates of the SRRC storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, K.T.; Kuo, C.C.; Lau, W.K.; Weng, W.T.

    1995-01-01

    The SRRC storage ring is a low emittance synchrotron radiation machine with nominal operation energy 1.3 GeV. The design damping time due to synchrotron radiation is 10.7, 14.4, 8.7 ms for the horizontal, vertical and longitudinal plane, respectively. The authors measured the real machine damping time as a function of bunch current, chromaticity, etc. To damp the transverse beam instability, especially in the vertical plane, they need to increase chromaticity to large positive value. The damping rates are much larger than the design values. Landau damping contribution in the longitudinal plane is quite large, especially in the multibunch mode. The estimated synchrotron tune spread from the Landau damping is in agreement with the measured coherent longitudinal coupled bunch oscillation amplitude

  8. Superconducting magnets for high energy storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets were developed for the proton-proton intersecting storage accelerator ISABELLE. Full size prototypes of both kinds of magnets were constructed and successfully tested. The coils are fabricated from a single layer of wide braided superconductor and employ a low temperature iron core. This method of construction leads to two significant performance advantages; little or no training, and the ability of the coil to absorb its total magnetic stored energy without damage. A high pressure (15 atm) helium gas system is used for cooling. Measurements of the random field errors are compared with the expected field distribution. Three magnets (two dipoles and one quadrupole) were assembled into a segment of the accelerator ring structure (half cell). The performance of this magnet array, which is coupled in series both electrically and cryogenically, is also summarized

  9. Unicell structure for superconducting storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Jackson, J.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanically integrated, magnetically decoupled storage rings were designed for a heavy ion collider for 100 GeV/amu Au, at B = 2.7T. New concepts were developed, including detailed engineering design and cost estimates. A ''unicell'' contains a half-cell of both rings within a single He vessel. The unicell design is optimized for economical mass production. Survey pads welded to the laminations provide external fiducials to locate the magnet cores. Roller bearing self aligning supports accommodate cool-down shrinkage. The design tolerates relative motion of components resulting from longitudinal shrinkage in the approx.15 m long unicell without affecting performance. Magnetic and physical lengths are the same, eliminating waste space. ''Achromatic'' quadrupoles with sextupoles at both ends are located on a common precision beam tube which aligns and supports a pick-up electrode. The unicell accommodates longer dipoles compared to conventional designs, reducing B/sub max/, stored energy, and the volume of iron and superconductor. Applications to future machines will be discussed

  10. Development of longitudinal feedback system for a storage ring free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Koda, S; Yamazaki, J; Katoh, M; Hama, H

    2001-01-01

    A longitudinal feedback system for a storage ring free electron laser (SRFEL) has been developed at the UVSOR. Instantaneous temporal deviation of the FEL optical pulse with respect to the electron bunch is measured in the frequency domain by detecting a phase between higher harmonic components of respective revolution frequencies. The phase deviation is fed back to control the storage ring RF frequency so as to readjust the effective length of the optical cavity. Compensating for the temporal drift with the feedback system, synchronism between the FEL micropulse and the electron bunches was successfully maintained for a reasonably long time.

  11. HISTRAP [Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics] prototype hardware studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.K.; Atkins, W.H.; Dowling, D.T.; Johnson, J.W.; Lord, R.S.; McConnell, J.W.; Milner, W.T.; Mosko, S.W.; Tatum, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    HISTRAP, Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics, is a proposed 2.67-Tm synchrotron/cooler/storage ring optimized for advanced atomic physics research which will be injected with ions from either the HHIRF 25-MV tandem accelerator or a dedicated ECR source and RFQ linac. Over the last two years, hardware prototypes have been developed for difficult and long lead-time components. A vacuum test stand, the rf cavity, and a prototype dipole magnet have been designed, constructed, and tested. 7 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Miniaturized cavity ring-down detection in a liquid flow cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahnev, B.; van der Sneppen, L.; Wiskerke, A.E.; Ariese, F.; Gooijer, C.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2005-01-01

    A novel method for applying cavity ring-down spectroscopy in the liquid phase, compatible with LC analyses, is presented. The core of the setup is a home-built cavity ring-down flow cell (cell volume 12 μL) that is constructed using a silicon rubber spacer, which is clamped leak-tight between two

  13. Cavity ring-down technique for measurement of reflectivity of high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser & Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085,. India. *Corresponding author. E-mail: gsridhar@barc.gov.in. Abstract. .... The cavity ring-down signal measured by PMT is shown figure 2. Figure 3 shows the exponential curve fitting results of the cavity ring-down signal of figure. 2.

  14. A design of a quasi-isochronous storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Trbojevic, D.

    1993-07-01

    Isochronous electron storage rings may offer advantages for future high luminosity meson factories. A Quasi-isochronous lattice based on the design principle of flexible γτ lattice is studied. The emittance and chromatic properties of such a lattice are studied. Applications of this design techniques for electron storage rings will be discussed

  15. A Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Mercury Continuous Emission Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-12-15

    The Sensor Research & Development Corporation (SRD) has undertaken the development of a Continuous Emissions Monitor (CEM) for mercury based on the technique of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRD). The project involved building an instrument for the detection of trace levels of mercury in the flue gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. The project has occurred over two phases. The first phase concentrated on the development of the ringdown cavity and the actual detection of mercury. The second phase dealt with the construction and integration of the sampling system, used to carry the sample from the flue stack to the CRD cavity, into the overall CRD instrument. The project incorporated a Pulsed Alexandrite Laser (PAL) system from Light Age Incorporated as the source to produce the desired narrow band 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) radiation. This laser system was seeded with a diode laser to bring the linewidth of the output beam from about 150 GHz to less than 60 MHz for the fundamental beam. Through a variety of non-linear optics the 761 nm fundamental beam is converted into the 254 nm beam needed for mercury detection. Detection of the mercury transition was verified by the identification of the characteristic natural isotopic structure observed at lower cavity pressures. The five characteristic peaks, due to both natural isotopic abundance and hyperfine splitting, provided a unique identifier for mercury. SRD scientists were able to detect mercury in air down below 10 parts-per-trillion by volume (pptr). This value is dependent on the pressure and temperature within the CRD cavity at the time of detection. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) absorbs UV radiation in the same spectral region as mercury, which is a significant problem for most mercury detection equipment. However, SRD has not only been able to determine accurate mercury concentrations in the presence of SO{sub 2}, but the CRD instrument can in fact determine the SO{sub 2} concentration as well. Detection of

  16. Requirements on internal targets for the Aladdin storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of performing electron scattering experiments with polarized targets in electron storage rings is explored by considering an electron-deuteron scattering experiment at the Aladdin storage ring. It is noted that this new method is compatible with recent proposals for linac-stretcher-ring accelerator designs. A new method for producing a polarized hydrogen or deuterium target is proposed and some preliminary results are described. 21 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  17. A practical method to generate brilliant hard x-rays with a tabletop electron storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, H. [Ritsumeikan Univ., Shiga (Japan); Amano, D.; Miyade, H. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tanashi-City (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    With electron storage rings not only synchrotron radiation(SR) but also bremsstrahlung(BS) from a thin target placed in the electron orbit are mechanisms to generate brilliant x-ray beams. The calculated brilliance of BS with a 50 MeV storage ring, which is nearly 10{sup 13} photons/s, mrad{sup 2}, mm{sup 2}, 0.1% band width for 100 keV x-rays, exceeds that of SR from a 1 GeV storage ring. This photon energy spectrum is almost constant and extend up to the electron energy. The reasons for this high brilliance with this new radiation scheme is that the electron beams penetrating the thin target are utilized repeatedly, the narrow angular divergence of BS is determined by the kinematics of relativistic electron as same as SR, and the x-ray source size of the order of 1 {mu}m is determined by the size of thin target instead of electron beam sizes. Continuous injection of electron beam to the storage ring at full energy is the way to keep high and constant beam current. Peak current and repetition rate determine x-ray out put power. Note that the power of x-ray beam is also provided from a RF cavity of the storage ring. In this paper we will report some experimental results and discuss further application on a coherent bremsstrahlung generated from a set of stacked foils placed in the electron orbit of the ring. Resulting from these investigations the photon storage ring which is based on a 50 MeV exact circular electron storage ring could provide wide range of coherent and incoherent radiations from far infrared to hard x-ray in a practical amount of radiation power.

  18. VUV optical ring resonator for Duke storage ring free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.H.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The conceptual design of the multifaceted-mirror ring resonator for Duke storage ring VUV FEL is presented. The expected performance of the OK-4 FEL with ring resonator is described. We discuss in this paper our plans to study reflectivity of VUV mirrors and their resistivity to soft X-ray spontaneous radiation from OK-4 undulator.

  19. MAGNETS FOR A MUON STORAGE RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARKER, B.; ANERELLA, M.; GHOSH, A.; GUPTA, R.; HARRISON, M.; SCHMALZLE, J.; SONDERICKER, J.; WILLEN, E.

    2002-01-01

    We present a new racetrack coil magnet design, with an open midplane gap, that keeps decay particles in a neutrino factory muon storage ring from directly hitting superconducting coils. The structure is very compact because coil ends overlap middle sections top and bottom for skew focusing optics. A large racetrack coil bend radius allows ''react and wind'' magnet technology to be used for brittle Nb 3 Sn superconductors. We describe two versions: Design-A, a magnet presently under construction and Design-B, a further iterated concept that achieves the higher magnetic field quality specified in the neutrino factory feasibility Study-II report. For Design-B reverse polarity and identical end design of consecutive long and short coils offers theoretically perfect magnet end field error cancellation. These designs avoid the dead space penalty from coil ends and interconnect regions (a large fraction in machines with short length but large aperture magnets) and provide continuous bending or focusing without interruption. The coil support structure and cryostat are carefully optimized

  20. Two level triggering in storage ring experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuckenberg, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cylindrical storage ring detectors using more then tenthousand channels of drift-, proportional- and liquid argon chambers have led to an enormous increase in data acquisition rates stored in hundreds of tapes. To reduce the computer time for total analysis of the selected events one has to reject the undesired events as early as possible. Therefore the trigger should be more selective, i.e. not only by counting the number of tracks in an event but to reconstruct the track coordinates to get to know the topology. Because of the short decision time of some microseconds in typical PETRA/DORIS experiments this is done in two steps: at level 1 a parallel or sequential hardwired logic is used for getting the number of tracks together with some geometrical values, at level 2 a fast or several slower microprocessors are used running on a simple algorithm together with some hardware tricks. For future detectors with lower bunch crossing rates very fast microprocessors may be used also at the first level, at the second level more efficient algorithms are now designed and under test. (orig.)

  1. Cavity-ring-down Doppler-broadening primary thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotti, Riccardo; Moretti, Luigi; Gatti, Davide; Castrillo, Antonio; Galzerano, Gianluca; Laporta, Paolo; Gianfrani, Livio; Marangoni, Marco

    2018-01-01

    A step forward in Doppler-broadening thermometry is demonstrated using a comb-assisted cavity-ring-down spectroscopic approach applied to an isolated near-infrared line of carbon dioxide at thermodynamic equilibrium. Specifically, the line-shape of the Pe(12 ) line of the (30012 )←(00001 ) band of C O2 at 1.578 µm is accurately measured and its Doppler width extracted from a refined multispectrum fitting procedure accounting for the speed dependence of the relaxation rates, which were found to play a role even at the very low pressures explored, from 1 to 7 Pa. The thermodynamic gas temperature is retrieved with relative uncertainties of 8 ×10-6 (type A) and 11 ×10-6 (type B), which ranks the system at the first place among optical methods. Thanks to a measurement time of only ≈5 h , the technique represents a promising pathway toward the optical determination of the thermodynamic temperature with a global uncertainty at the 10-6 level.

  2. S-Nitrosothiols Observed Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Mary Lynn; Gaston, Benjamin M.; Lehmann, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    The biological importance of nitric oxide has been known for nearly forty years due to its role in cardiovascular and nervous signaling. The main carrier molecules, s-nitrosothiols (RSNOs), are of additional interest due to their role in signaling reactions. Additionally, these compounds are related to several diseases including muscular dystrophy, stroke, myocardial infarction, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cystic fibrosis, asthma, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. One of the main barriers to elucidating the role of these RSNOs is the low (nanomolar) concentration present in samples of low volume (typically ˜100 μL). To this end we have set up a cavity ring-down spectrometer tuned to observe ^{14}NO and ^{15}NO released from cell growth samples. To decrease the limit of detection we have implemented a laser locking scheme employing Zeeman modulation of NO in a reference cell and have tuned the polarization of the laser using a half wave plate to optimize the polarization for the inherent birefringence of the CRDS mirrors. Progress toward measuring RSNO concentration in biological samples will be presented.

  3. Survey and alignment of the Fermilab recycler antiproton storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arics, Babatunde O.O.

    1999-01-01

    In June of 1999 Fermilab commissioned a newly constructed antiproton storage ring, the 'Recycler Ring', in the Main Injector tunnel directly above the Main Injector beamline. The Recycler Ring is a fixed 8 GeV kinetic energy storage ring and is constructed of strontium ferrite permanent magnets. The 3319.4-meter-circumference Recycler Ring consists of 344 gradient magnets and 100 quadrupoles all of which are permanent magnets. This paper discusses the methods employed to survey and align these permanent magnets within the Recycler Ring with the specified accuracy. The Laser Tracker was the major instrument used for the final magnet alignment. The magnets were aligned along the Recycler Ring with a relative accuracy of ±0.25 mm. (author)

  4. THz wave parametric oscillator with a surface-emitted ring-cavity configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Wang, Yuye; Xu, Degang; Tang, Longhuang; Xu, Wentao; Duan, Pan; Yan, Chao; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-11-01

    A surface-emitted ring-cavity terahertz (THz) wave parametric oscillator has been demonstrated for high-energy THz output and fast frequency tuning. Through the special optical design with a Galvano optical scanner and four-mirror ring-cavity structure, a maximum THz output of 12.9 μJ/pulse is achieved at 1.359 THz under the pump pulse energy of 172.8 mJ with the repetition rate of 10 Hz. A further research on the performance of the SE ring-cavity TPO has done to explore more characteristics of THz output. The THz pulse instability and the influence of cavity loss has analyzed. Moreover, the pump depletion rate of the ring-cavity configuration is much lower than the conventional surface-emitted terahertz wave parametric oscillator at the same experimental conditions.

  5. Control of ring lasers by means of coupled cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Abitan, Haim; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Variable phase coupling to an external ring is used to control a unidirectional ring laser. The observed behavior of the coupled rings is explained theoretically. We have found experimentally that by quickly changing the phase of the feedback from the external ring it is possible to Q-switch the ......-switch the ring laser. Also, at certain values of the phase of the feedback in the external ring, instabilities in the total system occur and oscillations arise in the ring laser.......Variable phase coupling to an external ring is used to control a unidirectional ring laser. The observed behavior of the coupled rings is explained theoretically. We have found experimentally that by quickly changing the phase of the feedback from the external ring it is possible to Q...

  6. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-03-31

    The construction of the sampling system was completed during the past quarter. The sampling system has been built on a 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. The laser system, all the associated optics, and the mounts and hardware needed to couple the UV light into the fiber optic have also been condensed and placed on an identical 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. This reduces the footprint of each system for ease of operation at a field test facility. The two systems are only connected with a fiber optic, to bring the UV light to the CRD cavity, and a single coaxial cable used to apply a voltage to the diode seed laser to scan the frequency over the desired mercury transition. SRD software engineers applied a couple of software fixes to correct the problems of the diode seed laser drifting or mode hopping. Upon successful completion of the software fixes another long-term test was conducted. A nearly 3 day long, 24 hours/day, test was run to test out the new subroutines. Everything appeared to work as it should and the mercury concentrations were accurately reported for the entire test, with the exception of a small interval of time when the intensity of the UV light dropped low enough that the program was no longer triggering properly. After adjusting the power of the laser the program returned to proper operation. With the successful completion of a relatively long test SRD software engineer incorporated the new subroutine into an entirely new program. This program operates the CRD instrument automatically as a continuous emissions monitor for mercury. In addition the program also reports the concentration of SO{sub 2} determined in the sample flue gas stream. Various functions, operation of, and a description of the new program have been included with this report. This report concludes the technical work associated with Phase II of the Cavity Ring-Down project for the continuous detection of trace levels of mercury. The project is presently

  7. Light coupling and modulation in coupled nanowire ring-Fabry-Pérot cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ren-Min; Wei, Xian-Long; Dai, Lun; Liu, Shi-Feng; Chen, Ting; Yue, Song; Li, Zhi; Chen, Qing; Qin, G G

    2009-07-01

    CdS nanowire (NW) ring cavities were fabricated and studied for the first time. The rings with radii from 2.1 to 5.9 microm were fabricated by a nanoprobe system installed in a scanning electron microscope. Radius dependent whispering gallery modes (WGMs) were observed. A straight CdS NW with Fabry-Pérot (F-P) cavity structure was fabricated and placed by the side of a NW ring cavity to form a coupled ring-F-P cavity. When the NW ring was excited by a focused laser, a bright green light spot was observed at the output end of the straight NW, indicating that the latter had served as an effect waveguide to couple the light out from the ring cavity. The corresponding light spectrum showed that the WGMs had been modulated. We confirmed that the NW F-P cavity had served as a modulator. Such a coupled cavity has potential application in a nanophotonic system.

  8. Estimates of CSR Instability Thresholds for Various Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We review the key predictions and conditions by several authors for the onset of longitudinal instabilities due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), and evaluate them numerically for various storage rings, namely the KEKB High Energy Ring (HER) & Low Energy Ring (LER), SuperKEKB HER & LER, old and new designs of the SuperKEKB Damping Ring (DR), SuperB HER & LER, CLIC DR (2009 and 2010 design parameters), SLC DR, and ATF DR. We show that the theoretical uncertainty in the instability onset is at least at the level of 20-30% in bunch intensity. More importantly, we present some doubts about the general applicability for many of these storage rings of some commonly used formulae. To cast further light on these questions, an experiment at lower beam energy on the ATF Damping Ring is proposed.

  9. Ring-resonator-integrated tunable external cavity laser employing EAM and SOA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ki-Hong; Kwon, O-Kyun; Kim, Ki Soo; Choi, Byung-Seok; Oh, Su Hwan; Kim, Hyun Su; Sim, Jae-Sik; Kim, Chul Soo

    2011-12-05

    We propose and demonstrate a tunable external cavity laser (ECL) composed of a polymer Bragg reflector (PBR) and integrated gain chip with gain, a ring resonator, an electro-absorption modulator (EAM), and a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). The cavity of the laser is composed of the PBR, gain, and ring resonator. The ring resonator reflects the predetermined wavelengths into the gain region and transmits the output signal into integrated devices such as the EAM and SOA. The output wavelength of the tunable laser is discretely tuned in steps of about 0.8 nm through the thermal-optic effect of the PBR and predetermined mode spacing of the ring resonator.

  10. Orbital dynamics in a storage ring with electrostatic bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mane, S.R.

    2008-01-01

    A storage ring where electrostatic fields contribute to the bending and focusing of the orbital motion has some novel features because, unlike a magnetostatic field, an electrostatic field can change the kinetic energy of the particles. I present analytical formulas to calculate the linear focusing gradient, dispersion, momentum compaction and natural chromaticity for a storage ring with a radial electrostatic field. I solve the formulas explicitly for a weak focusing model.

  11. Beam dynamics in a storage ring for neutral (polar) molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambertson, Glen R.

    2003-01-01

    The force from a non-uniform electric field on the electric dipole moment of a molecule may be used to circulate and focus molecules in a storage ring. The nature of the forces from multipole electrodes for bending and focusing are described for strong-field-seeking and for weak-field-seeking molecules. Fringe-field forces are analyzed. Examples of storage ring designs are presented; these include long straight sections and provide bunching and acceleration

  12. COLLECTIVE EFFECTS IN THE NSLS-II STORAGE RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KRINSKY, S.; BENGTSSON, J.; BERG, J.S.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BLEDNYKH, A.; GUO, W.; MALITSKY, N.; MONTAG, C.; PODOBEDOV, B.; ROSE, J.; TOWNE, N.; YU, L.H.

    2007-01-01

    A new high-brightness synchrotron light source (NSLS-II) is under design at BNL. The 3-GeV NSLS-II storage ring has a double-bend achromatic lattice with damping wigglers installed in zero-dispersion straights to reduce the emittance below 1nm. In this paper, we present an overview of the impact of collective effects upon the performance of the storage ring. Subjects discussed include instability thresholds, Touschek lifetime and intra-beam scattering

  13. COLLECTIVE EFFECTS IN THE NSLS-II STORAGE RING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRINSKY,S.; BENGTSSON, J.; BERG, J.S.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BLEDNYKH, A.; GUO, W.; MALITSKY, N.; MONTAG, C.; PODOBEDOV, B.; ROSE, J.; TOWNE, N.; YU, L.H.

    2007-06-25

    A new high-brightness synchrotron light source (NSLS-II) is under design at BNL. The 3-GeV NSLS-II storage ring has a double-bend achromatic lattice with damping wigglers installed in zero-dispersion straights to reduce the emittance below 1nm. In this paper, we present an overview of the impact of collective effects upon the performance of the storage ring. Subjects discussed include instability thresholds, Touschek lifetime and intra-beam scattering.

  14. Storage ring at HIE-ISOLDE Technical design report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grieser, M.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Raabe, R.; Blaum, K.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Butler, P. A.; Wenander, F.; Woods, P. J.; Aliotta, M.; Andreyev, A.; Artemyev, A.; Atanasov, D.; Aumann, T.; Balabanski, D.; Barzakh, A.; Batist, L.; Bernardes, A. -P.; Bernhardt, D.; Billowes, J.; Bishop, S.; Borge, M.; Borzov, I.; Boston, A. J.; Brandau, C.; Catford, W.; Catherall, R.; Cederkall, J.; Cullen, D.; Davinson, T.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dracoulis, G.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Egelhof, P.; Estrade, A.; Fischer, D.; Flanagan, K.; Fraile, L.; Fraser, M. A.; Freeman, S. J.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Greenlees, P.; Grisenti, R. E.; Habs, D.; von Hahn, R.; Hagmann, S.; Hausmann, M.; He, J. J.; Heil, M.; Huyse, M.; Jenkins, D.; Jokinen, A.; Jonson, B.; Joss, D. T.; Kadi, Y.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kay, B. P.; Kiselev, O.; Kluge, H. -J.; Kowalska, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kreim, S.; Kroell, T.; Kurcewicz, J.; Labiche, M.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lestinsky, M.; Lotay, G.; Ma, X. W.; Marta, M.; Meng, J.; Muecher, D.; Mukha, I.; Mueller, A.; Murphy, A. St J.; Neyens, G.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Noertershaeuser, W.; Page, R. D.; Pasini, M.; Petridis, N.; Pietralla, N.; Pfuetzner, M.; Podolyak, Z.; Regan, P.; Reed, M. W.; Reifarth, R.; Reiter, P.; Repnow, R.; Riisager, K.; Rubio, B.; Sanjari, M. S.; Savin, D. W.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schippers, S.; Schneider, D.; Schuch, R.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Shubina, D.; Siesling, E.; Simon, H.; Simpson, J.; Smith, J.; Sonnabend, K.; Steck, M.; Stora, T.; Stoehlker, T.; Sun, B.; Surzhykov, A.; Suzaki, F.; Tarasov, O.; Trotsenko, S.; Tu, X. L.; Van Duppen, P.; Volpe, C.; Voulot, D.; Walker, P. M.; Wildner, E.; Winckler, N.; Winters, D. F. A.; Wolf, A.; Xu, H. S.; Yakushev, A.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yuan, Y. J.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zuber, K.; Bosch, F.M.

    We propose to install a storage ring at an ISOL-type radioactive beam facility for the first time. Specifically, we intend to setup the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored secondary beams

  15. Stability branching induced by collective atomic recoil in an optomechanical ring cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ian, Hou

    2017-02-01

    In a ring cavity filled with an atomic condensate, self-bunching of atoms due to the cavity pump mode produce an inversion that re-emits into the cavity probe mode with an exponential gain, forming atomic recoil lasing. An optomechanical ring cavity is formed when one of the reflective mirrors is mounted on a mechanical vibrating beam. In this paper, we extend studies on the stability of linear optomechanical cavities to such ring cavities with two counter-propagating cavity modes, especially when the forward propagating pump mode is taken to its weak coupling limit. We find that when the atomic recoil is in action, stable states of the mechanical mode of the mirror converge into branch cuts, where the gain produced by the recoiling strikes balance with the multiple decay sources, such as cavity leakage in the optomechanical system. This balance is obtained when the propagation delay in the dispersive atomic medium matches in a periodic pattern to the frequencies and linewidths of the cavity mode and the collective bosonic mode of the atoms. We show an input-output hysteresis cycle between the atomic mode and the cavity mode to verify the multi-valuation of the stable states after branching at the weak coupling limit.

  16. Exact solutions for the spin tune for model storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Mane, S R

    2002-01-01

    We present exact analytical expressions for the spin tune for arbitrary values of the orbital action for several storage ring models. The models we treat contain Siberian Snakes, the use of which is essential to preserve the polarization of beams in high-energy proton storage rings. Our solutions contain some novel features. We also prove a previously conjectured claim about the behavior of spin tuneshifts in rings with multiple Snakes. The conjecture is based on numerical simulations, but our proof is analytical, and also nonperturbative.

  17. Storage rings for investigation of ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuch, R.

    1987-08-01

    In this survey, we give a brief description of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, and examples for their use in ion-atom collision physics. The compression of the phase space distribution of the ions by electron cooling, and the gain factors of in-ring experiments compared to single-pass experiments are explained. Some examples of a new generation of ion-atom collision experiments which may become feasible with storage rings are given. These include the studies of angular differential single- and double-electron capture cross sections, the production of slow highly charged recoil ions, and atomic collision processes using decelerated and crossed beam. 30 refs

  18. Low emittance lattices for electron storage rings revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trbojevic, D.; Courant, E.

    1994-01-01

    Conditions for the lowest possible emittance of the lattice for electron storage rings are obtained by a simplified analytical approach. Examples of electron storage lattices with minimum emittances are presented. A simple graphical presentation in the normalized dispersion space (Floquet's transformation) is used to illustrate the conditions and results

  19. An internal polarized 3He target for electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, L.H.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA; DeSchepper, D.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA; Milner, R.G.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA; Pate, S.F.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA; Shin, T.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA

    1995-01-01

    We describe an internal polarized 3 He target currently under construction which will be used in several electron storage ring experiments. The target is based on the technique of metastability exchange laser optical pumping, where the polarized atoms flow into a cryogenically-cooled storage cell. This novel technique allows for high precision measurements where the beam interacts with the pure atomic species. Both the HERMES experiment at DESY and the BLAST detector at the MIT Bates Laboratory will use the polarized 3 He target in their measurements. Details of the target system, including the provisions needed to incorporate the target into the electron storage ring, are presented. (orig.)

  20. An in-line in-fibre ring cavity sensor for localized multi-parameter sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, Paul; Liao, YanBiao; Wong, Allan C L; Leung, Ian; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2008-01-01

    An in-line in-fibre ring cavity is fabricated by writing two blazed gratings in the one fibre to form a Fabry–Perot cavity. Interference is set up between an injected guided mode and a ring mode formed by light scattered by the gratings from the core mode to a reverse propagating ghost mode and then back into the original core mode again. The ability to measure the external refractive index and the variability of this response with a different cavity length is experimentally demonstrated. Within a given region of interest, a sensitivity to the surrounding refractive index as good as 9.5 × 10 −5 is established

  1. Optical feedback in dfb quantum cascade laser for mid-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terabayashi, Ryohei, E-mail: terabayashi.ryouhei@h.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Sonnenschein, Volker, E-mail: volker@nagoya-u.jp; Tomita, Hideki, E-mail: tomita@nagoya-u.jp; Hayashi, Noriyoshi, E-mail: hayashi.noriyoshi@h.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Kato, Shusuke, E-mail: katou.shuusuke@f.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Jin, Lei, E-mail: kin@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Yamanaka, Masahito, E-mail: yamanaka@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Nishizawa, Norihiko, E-mail: nishizawa@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan); Sato, Atsushi, E-mail: atsushi.sato@sekisui.com; Nozawa, Kohei, E-mail: kohei.nozawa@sekisui.com; Hashizume, Kenta, E-mail: kenta.hashizume@sekisui.com; Oh-hara, Toshinari, E-mail: toshinari.ohara@sekisui.com [Sekisui Medical Co., Ltd., Drug Development Solutions Center (Japan); Iguchi, Tetsuo, E-mail: t-iguchi@nucl.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    A simple external optical feedback system has been applied to a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB QCL) for cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and a clear effect of feedback was observed. A long external feedback path length of up to 4m can decrease the QCL linewidth to around 50kHz, which is of the order of the transmission linewidth of our high finesse ring-down cavity. The power spectral density of the transmission signal from high finesse cavity reveals that the noise at frequencies above 20kHz is reduced dramatically.

  2. Antiprotons in the CERN intersecting storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    High-sensitivity electronics for TTl and ring 2 had been developed and installed, the original experimental stochastic cooling systems in the ISR were rebuilt and considerably improved, the split-field magnet (SFM) vacuum chamber was modified, some steering dipoles were designed, made and installed, and finally innumerable interlocks and computer programs were revised for antiproton operation. (orig./HSI)

  3. Cavity enhanced eigenmode multiplexing for volume holographic data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bo E.; Takashima, Yuzuru

    2017-08-01

    Previously, we proposed and experimentally demonstrated enhanced recording speeds by using a resonant optical cavity to semi-passively increase the reference beam power while recording image bearing holograms. In addition to enhancing the reference beam power the cavity supports the orthogonal reference beam families of its eigenmodes, which can be used as a degree of freedom to multiplex data pages and increase storage densities for volume Holographic Data Storage Systems (HDSS). While keeping the increased recording speed of a cavity enhanced reference arm, image bearing holograms are multiplexed by orthogonal phase code multiplexing via Hermite-Gaussian eigenmodes in a Fe:LiNbO3 medium with a 532 nm laser at two Bragg angles for expedited recording of four multiplexed holograms. We experimentally confirmed write rates are enhanced by an average factor of 1.1, and page crosstalk is about 2.5%. This hybrid multiplexing opens up a pathway to increase storage density while minimizing modifications to current angular multiplexing HDSS.

  4. Cooling of PAH cations studied with an electrostatic storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Jérôme; Chen, Li; Brédy, Richard; Ji, Mingchao; Ortéga, Céline; Matsumoto, Jun; Martin, Serge

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we discuss the production of molecular PAH cations using an ECR ion source and their subsequent cooling studied with an electrostatic storage ring, the Mini-Ring on a time range up to 10 ms. We show that the ECR ion source can produce high currents of small PAH cation, here naphthalene and anthracene cations. Then, we report experimental result for the cooling of three PAH cations (anthracene, naphthalene and pyrene) stored in our compact electrostatic storage ring (the Mini-Ring). We show that the Poincaré recurrent fluorescence plays a major role in the cooling process of those PAH cations. We show that for a given internal energy, the cooling rate is much smaller for pyrene than for anthracene and naphthalene. We conclude that the Poincaré recurrent fluorescence is less efficient due to smaller oscillator strength of the D2-D0 electronic transition for pyrene.

  5. Laser Assisted Emittance Transfer for Storage Ring Lasing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2011-06-01

    In modern storage rings the transverse emittance of electron beams can be comparable to that from state-of-art photoinjectors, but the intrinsic low peak current and large energy spread pre-cludes the possibility of realizing short-wavelength high-gain free electron lasers (FELs) in storage rings. In this note I propose a technique to significantly increase beam peak current without greatly increasing beam energy spread, which is achieved by transferring part of the longitudinal emittance to transverse plane. It is shown that by properly repartitioning the emittance in 6-D phase space, the beam from a large storage ring may be used to drive a single-pass high-gain FEL in soft x-ray wavelength range.

  6. Temporal laser pulse manipulation using multiple optical ring-cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor); Kojima, Jun (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An optical pulse stretcher and a mathematical algorithm for the detailed calculation of its design and performance is disclosed. The optical pulse stretcher has a plurality of optical cavities, having multiple optical reflectors such that an optical path length in each of the optical cavities is different. The optical pulse stretcher also has a plurality of beam splitters, each of which intercepts a portion of an input optical beam and diverts the portion into one of the plurality of optical cavities. The input optical beam is stretched and a power of an output beam is reduced after passing through the optical pulse stretcher and the placement of the plurality of optical cavities and beam splitters is optimized through a model that takes into account optical beam divergence and alignment in the pluralities of the optical cavities. The optical pulse stretcher system can also function as a high-repetition-rate (MHz) laser pulse generator, making it suitable for use as a stroboscopic light source for high speed ballistic projectile imaging studies, or it can be used for high speed flow diagnostics using a laser light sheet with digital particle imaging velocimetry. The optical pulse stretcher system can also be implemented using fiber optic components to realize a rugged and compact optical system that is alignment free and easy to use.

  7. Alignment of Duke free electron laser storage ring and optical beam delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emamian, M.; Hower, N.

    1999-01-01

    Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL) hosts a 1.1 GeV electron beam storage ring facility which is capable of generating beams in the range of nearly monochromatic gamma rays to high peak power infra red (IR) laser. In this report specifications and procedures for alignment of OK-4 /Duke storage ring FEL wiggler and optical cavity mirrors will be discussed. The OK-4 FEL lasing has demonstrated a series of world record in the last few years. In August of this year the OK-4 FEL successfully commissioned to laser at 193.7 nm. Also in this article, alignment of the γ-ray and UV optical beam delivery system that is currently in progress will be described. (authors)

  8. A Model Describing Stable Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in Storage Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannibale, F.

    2004-01-01

    We present a model describing high power stable broadband coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency region in an electron storage ring. The model includes distortion of bunch shape from the synchrotron radiation (SR), which enhances higher frequency coherent emission, and limits to stable emission due to an instability excited by the SR wakefield. It gives a quantitative explanation of several features of the recent observations of CSR at the BESSY II storage ring. We also use this model to optimize the performance of a source for stable CSR emission

  9. A model describing stable coherent synchrotron radiation in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannibale, F.; Byrd, J.M.; Loftsdottir, A.; Venturini, M.; Abo-Bakr, M.; Feikes, J.; Holldack, K.; Kuske, P.; Wuestefeld, G.; Huebers, H.-W.; Warnock, R.

    2004-01-01

    We present a model describing high power stable broadband coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency region in an electron storage ring. The model includes distortion of bunch shape from the synchrotron radiation (SR), which enhances higher frequency coherent emission, and limits to stable emission due to an instability excited by the SR wakefield. It gives a quantitative explanation of several features of the recent observations of CSR at the BESSY II storage ring. We also use this model to optimize the performance of a source for stable CSR emission

  10. Workshop on compact storage ring technology: applications to lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Project planning in the area of x-ray lithography is discussed. Three technologies that are emphasized are the light source, the lithographic technology, and masking technology. The needs of the semiconductor industry in the lithography area during the next decade are discussed, particularly as regards large scale production of high density dynamic random access memory devices. Storage ring parameters and an overall exposure tool for x-ray lithography are addressed. Competition in this area of technology from Germany and Japan is discussed briefly. The design of a storage ring is considered, including lattice design, magnets, and beam injection systems

  11. Infrared Spectroscopy Beamline Based on a Tabletop Storage Ring

    OpenAIRE

    Haque, Md. Monirul; Moon, Ahsa; Yamada, Hironari

    2012-01-01

    An optical beamline dedicated to the infrared (IR) spectroscopy has been constructed at MIRRORCLE, a tabletop storage ring. The beamline has been designed for the use of infrared synchrotron radiation (IRSR) emitted from a bending magnet of 156 mm bending radius with the acceptance angle of 355(H) × 138(V) mrad to obtain high flux. The IR emission is forced by an exactly circular optics, named photon storage ring (PhSR), placed around the electron orbit and is collected by a “magic mirror” as...

  12. Genetic algorithm for chromaticity correction in diffraction limited storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Ehrlichman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A multiobjective genetic algorithm is developed for optimizing nonlinearities in diffraction limited storage rings. This algorithm determines sextupole and octupole strengths for chromaticity correction that deliver optimized dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. The algorithm makes use of dominance constraints to breed desirable properties into the early generations. The momentum aperture is optimized indirectly by constraining the chromatic tune footprint and optimizing the off-energy dynamic aperture. The result is an effective and computationally efficient technique for correcting chromaticity in a storage ring while maintaining optimal dynamic aperture and beam lifetime.

  13. A Compact Light Source: Design and Technical Feasibility Study of a Laser-Electron Storage Ring X-Ray Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewen, R

    2004-02-02

    Thomson scattering infrared photons off energetic electrons provides a mechanism to produce hard X-rays desirable for applied sciences research. Using a small, modest energy (25MeV) electron storage ring together with a resonantly-driven optical storage cavity, a narrow spectrum of hard X-rays could be produced with the quality and monochromatic intensity approaching that of beamline sources at large synchrotron radiation laboratories. The general design of this X-ray source as well as its technical feasibility are presented. In particular, the requirements of optical pulse gain enhancement in an external cavity are described and experimentally demonstrated using a CW mode-locked laser.

  14. Analytical Approach to Eigen-Emittance Evolution in Storage Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Boaz; /SLAC

    2006-05-16

    This dissertation develops the subject of beam evolution in storage rings with nearly uncoupled symplectic linear dynamics. Linear coupling and dissipative/diffusive processes are treated perturbatively. The beam distribution is assumed Gaussian and a function of the invariants. The development requires two pieces: the global invariants and the local stochastic processes which change the emittances, or averages of the invariants. A map based perturbation theory is described, providing explicit expressions for the invariants near each linear resonance, where small perturbations can have a large effect. Emittance evolution is determined by the damping and diffusion coefficients. The discussion is divided into the cases of uniform and non-uniform stochasticity, synchrotron radiation an example of the former and intrabeam scattering the latter. For the uniform case, the beam dynamics is captured by a global diffusion coefficient and damping decrement for each eigen-invariant. Explicit expressions for these quantities near coupling resonances are given. In many cases, they are simply related to the uncoupled values. Near a sum resonance, it is found that one of the damping decrements becomes negative, indicating an anti-damping instability. The formalism is applied to a number of examples, including synchrobetatron coupling caused by a crab cavity, a case of current interest where there is concern about operation near half integer {nu}{sub x}. In the non-uniform case, the moment evolution is computed directly, which is illustrated through the example of intrabeam scattering. Our approach to intrabeam scattering damping and diffusion has the advantage of not requiring a loosely-defined Coulomb Logarithm. It is found that in some situations there is a small difference between our results and the standard approaches such as Bjorken-Mtingwa, which is illustrated by comparison of the two approaches and with a measurement of Au evolution in RHIC. Finally, in combining IBS

  15. Isochronicity correction in the CR storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinov, S.; Toprek, D.; Weick, H.; Dolinskii, A.

    2013-01-01

    A challenge for nuclear physics is to measure masses of exotic nuclei up to the limits of nuclear existence which are characterized by low production cross-sections and short half-lives. The large acceptance Collector Ring (CR) [1] at FAIR [2] tuned in the isochronous ion-optical mode offers unique possibilities for measuring short-lived and very exotic nuclides. However, in a ring designed for maximal acceptance, many factors limit the resolution. One point is a limit in time resolution inversely proportional to the transverse emittance. But most of the time aberrations can be corrected and others become small for large number of turns. We show the relations of the time correction to the corresponding transverse focusing and that the main correction for large emittance corresponds directly to the chromaticity correction for transverse focusing of the beam. With the help of Monte-Carlo simulations for the full acceptance we demonstrate how to correct the revolution times so that in principle resolutions of Δm/m=10 −6 can be achieved. In these calculations the influence of magnet inhomogeneities and extended fringe fields are considered and a calibration scheme also for ions with different mass-to-charge ratio is presented

  16. Polarization-independent magneto-electric Fano resonance in hybrid ring/disk hetero-cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhiqiang; Gao, Yune; Huang, Zhenxian; Liang, Xinyi

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we study the scattering properties of the hybrid ring/disk hetero-cavity and reveal the existence of polarization-independent magneto-electric Fano resonance. Such Fano resonance occurs through the destructive interference between the orthogonal electric and magnetic modes in hetero-cavity, where the Si ring provides additional magnetic response. Furthermore, dipole radiative enhancement is used to analysis magneto-electric response of the hetero-cavity and the spectral features of cavity can be used to quantitatively characterize by coupled oscillator model. Generation of magneto-electric Fano resonance in such nanostructures does not require any symmetry breaking and presents clear advantages over their asymmetric counterparts, as it is easier to fabricate and can be used in a wider range of technological applications.

  17. Design studies for the electron storage ring EUTERPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Boling.

    1995-01-01

    The 400 MeV electron storage ring EUTERPE is under construction at Eindhoven University of Technology. The ring is to be used as an experimental tool for accelerator physics studies and synchroton radiation applications. The main task of the current research work is the electron optical design of the ring. Lattice design is a basis for machine design as a whole. Design aspects regarding the basic lattice, based on single particle dynamics, include determination of the equilibrium beam size and bunch length, design of achromatic bending sections, selection of tune values, correction of chromaticity, and minimization of the natural emittance in the ring. The basic lattice designed for the EUTERPE ring has a high flexibility so that different electron optical modes can be realized easily. In low energy storage rings with a high beam current, collective effects can cause a significant change in the bunch length, the transverse emittance and the beam lifetime. In order to ensure a good optical performance for the ring, the choice of suitable parameters concerning the vacuum and RF system are essential as far as collective effects are concerned. An estimation of the collective effects in the ring is given. The injector for EUTERPE is a 75 MeV racetrack microtron which is injected from a 10 MeV linac. In order to get sufficient beam current in the ring, a special procedure of continuous injection with an adjustable locally shifted closed orbit has been presented. Details of the injection procedure and numerical simulations are given. (orig./HSI)

  18. Design studies for the electron storage ring EUTERPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi Boling

    1995-05-18

    The 400 MeV electron storage ring EUTERPE is under construction at Eindhoven University of Technology. The ring is to be used as an experimental tool for accelerator physics studies and synchroton radiation applications. The main task of the current research work is the electron optical design of the ring. Lattice design is a basis for machine design as a whole. Design aspects regarding the basic lattice, based on single particle dynamics, include determination of the equilibrium beam size and bunch length, design of achromatic bending sections, selection of tune values, correction of chromaticity, and minimization of the natural emittance in the ring. The basic lattice designed for the EUTERPE ring has a high flexibility so that different electron optical modes can be realized easily. In low energy storage rings with a high beam current, collective effects can cause a significant change in the bunch length, the transverse emittance and the beam lifetime. In order to ensure a good optical performance for the ring, the choice of suitable parameters concerning the vacuum and RF system are essential as far as collective effects are concerned. An estimation of the collective effects in the ring is given. The injector for EUTERPE is a 75 MeV racetrack microtron which is injected from a 10 MeV linac. In order to get sufficient beam current in the ring, a special procedure of continuous injection with an adjustable locally shifted closed orbit has been presented. Details of the injection procedure and numerical simulations are given. (orig./HSI).

  19. Microsecond-resolved SDR-based cavity ring down ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofikitis, D; Spiliotis, A K; Stamataki, K; Katsoprinakis, G E; Bougas, L; Samartzis, P C; Loppinet, B; Rakitzis, T P; Surligas, M; Papadakis, S

    2015-06-20

    We present an experimental apparatus that allows microsecond-resolved ellipsometric and absorption measurements. The apparatus is based on an optical cavity containing a Dove prism, in which light undergoes total internal reflection (TIR), while the data acquisition is based on software defined radio technology and custom-built drivers. We demonstrate the ability to sense rapid variations in the refractive index above the TIR interface for arbitrarily long times with a temporal resolution of at least 2 μs.

  20. Proton storage ring (PSR) diagnostics and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clout, P.

    1983-01-01

    When any new accelerator or storage ring is built that advances the state of the art, the diagnostic system becomes extremely important in tuning the facility to full specification. This paper will discuss the various diagnostic devices planned or under construction for the PSR and their connection into the control system

  1. QCD physics at hadron storage rings: From COSY to FAIR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hadrons with charm quark content with the high energy storage ring for antiprotons at the new GSI/FAIR facility. .... of the experimental potential both of WASA and COSY, where a photon detector has been missing up to ... the structure of matter, from the quark-gluon structure of hadrons to the physics of astronomical objects.

  2. QCD physics at hadron storage rings: From COSY to FAIR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hadrons with charm quark content with the high energy storage ring for antiprotons at the new GSI/FAIR facility. Additional related perspectives will be opened at the new facility ranging from the properties of hadrons in dense nuclear matter to measurements of the nucleon's transverse spin distribution in the valence quark ...

  3. Workshop on performance optimization of synchrotron radiation storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, G.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum, with user participation, for accelerator physicists the synchrotron light source field to discuss current and planned state-of-the-art techniques storage ring performance. The scope of the workshop focused on two areas: lattice characterization and measurement, and fundamental limitations on low frequency beam stability

  4. Frequency-agile terahertz-wave parametric oscillator in a ring-cavity configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamide, Hiroaki; Ikari, Tomofumi; Ito, Hiromasa

    2009-12-01

    We demonstrate a frequency-agile terahertz wave parametric oscillator (TPO) in a ring-cavity configuration (ring-TPO). The TPO consists of three mirrors and a MgO:LiNbO(3) crystal under noncollinear phase-matching conditions. A novel, fast frequency-tuning method was realized by controlling a mirror of the three-mirror ring cavity. The wide tuning range between 0.93 and 2.7 THz was accomplished. For first demonstration using the ring-TPO, terahertz spectroscopy was performed as the verification of the frequency-agile performance, measuring the transmission spectrum of the monosaccharide glucose. The spectrum was obtained within about 8 s in good comparison to those of Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

  5. Rf systems for high-energy e/sup /minus//e/sup /plus// storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.; Wilson, P.B.

    1974-01-01

    Electron or positron beams in a storage ring radiate electromagnetic energy at a rate proportional to the fourth power of the recirculating energy, and this loss must be supplied by an rf system. Furthermore, a substantial overvoltage is required to contain the stored beam against losses due to quantum fluctuations in the emitted photons. As an example, an improvement program, SPEAR II, is now underway to increase the energy of the SPEAR ring to 4.5 GeV. At this energy, the radiation loss per turn is 2.8 MeV, and to maintain a reasonable lifetime against quantum fluctuations, a peak voltage of 7.5 MeV is required. Thus, the SPEAR II rf system is similar to a continuously-operating 7.5 MeV linear accelerator. Furthermore, the available straight-section space in the ring which is suitable for containing the accelerating structures is limited, and this means that a cavity design must be sought with a high shunt impedance per losses will be held to a reasonable level. In the case of SPEAR, about 9 meters of straight section space is available for accelerating cavities, requiring a gradient of close to 1 MV per meter. The PEP 15-GeV ring would require peak accelerating voltages of around 50 MV, with about 60 meters of straight-section space available for accelerating structures. 8 refs

  6. Storage ring free electron laser, pulse propagation effects and microwave type instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Renieri, A.; Migliorati, M.

    2000-01-01

    It has been developed a dynamical model accounting for the storage Ring Free Electron Laser evolution including pulse propagation effects and e-beam instabilities of microwave type. It has been analyzed the general conditions under which the on set of the laser may switch off the instability and focus everybody attention on the interplay between cavity mismatch, laser pulsed behavior and e-beam instability dynamics. Particular attention is also devoted to the laser operation in near threshold conditions, namely at an intracavity level just enough to counteract the instability, that show in this region new and interesting effects arises [it

  7. Lifetime and performance of NSLS storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halama, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron light sources is measured primarily in terms of beam lifetime, beam size, and the recovery of normal operation after a section of the machine has been brought to atmospheric pressure. The beam lifetime and the beam size depend on the following phenomena: Beam gas interaction which can be either elastic or inelastic scattering on residual gas nuclei or electrons. With the exception of low energy machines, this phenomenon represents the main limiting factor on lifetime; Beam interaction with trapped ions causing both beam loss and defocussing. Residual gas molecules are ionized both by circulating beam and synchrotron radiation. The cross sections for both processes are comparable. The effects of this phenomenon are most troublesome at low energies. The problem can be eliminated by switching to positron beams. Installing clearing electrodes has also been successful; Intrabeam scattering (Touschek effect) is caused by Coulomb scattering among electrons of the same bunch as they execute betatron oscillations. The Touschek effect is strongly dependent on energy and in general is a problem only in low energy machines; and Various instabilities causing both slow and fast beam decay which have been observed in both NSLS rings. A special case due to dust particles that fall into the electron beam is commonly observed in early stages of conditioning. Coherent collective instabilities will not be discussed in this paper. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. Lifetime and performance of NSLS storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halama, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron light sources is measured primarily in terms of beam lifetime, beam size, and the recovery of normal operation after a section of the machine has been brought to atmospheric pressure. The beam lifetime and the beam size depend on the following phenomena: Beam gas interaction which can be either elastic or inelastic scattering on residual gas nuclei or electrons. With the exception of low energy machines, this phenomenon represents the main limiting factor on lifetime; Beam interaction with trapped ions causing both beam loss and defocussing. Residual gas molecules are ionized both by circulating beam and synchrotron radiation. The cross sections for both processes are comparable. The effects of this phenomenon are most troublesome at low energies. The problem can be eliminated by switching to positron beams. Installing clearing electrodes has also been successful; Intrabeam scattering (Touschek effect) is caused by Coulomb scattering among electrons of the same bunch as they execute betatron oscillations. The Touschek effect is strongly dependent on energy and in general is a problem only in low energy machines; and Various instabilities causing both slow and fast beam decay which have been observed in both NSLS rings. A special case due to dust particles that fall into the electron beam is commonly observed in early stages of conditioning. Coherent collective instabilities will not be discussed in this paper. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Development of a longitudinal density monitor for storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolotorev, M.; Beche, J.-F.; Byrd, J.; Datte, P.; De Santis, S.; Denes, P.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, A.; Riot, V.; Schoenlein, R.; Turner, W.

    2003-01-01

    We report on development of a new storage ring operations tool for measurement of longitudinal beam density profile. The technique mixes synchrotron light with light from a mode locked solid-state laser oscillator in a non-linear crystal and detects the up-converted radiation with a photo-multiplier. The laser is phase locked to the storage ring RF system. The laser choices available for repetition frequency, pulse length and phase modulation give a very wide range of options for matching the bunch configuration of particular storage rings. Progress in the technology of solid-state lasers ensures this system can be made robust for routine use in storage ring operations. A very large number of important applications are possible including measurement of the fraction of untrapped particles prior to acceleration, the population of particles in the nominally unfilled RF buckets in a bunch train (''ghost bunches''), longitudinal tails, the diffusion of particles into the beam abort gap and th e normal bunch parameters of longitudinal shape and intensity. We are currently investigating application to two devices: (1) the 1.9 GeV ALS electron storage ring at LBNL with 328 RF buckets, 2ns bucket spacing, 276 nominally filled bunches, 15-30ps rms bunch length and (2) the 7 TeV LHC proton collider under construction at CERN with 35,640 RF buckets, 2.5 ns bucket spacing, 2,808 nominally filled bunches, 280-620 ps rms bunch length. A proof of principle experiment is being conducted on ALS. The results of the ALS experiment and detailed analyses of the application to LHC and its requirements are described

  10. Further Study on Fast Cooling in Compton Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, Eugene; Zimmermann, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Compton sources of gamma-ray photons can produce ultimate intensity, but suffer from large recoils experienced by the circulating electrons scattering off the laser photons. We had proposed the asymmetric fast cooling which enables to mitigate the spread of energy in Compton rings. This report presents results of further study on the fast cooling: (1) A proper asymmetric setup of the scattering point results in significant reduction of the quantum losses of electrons in Compton rings with moderate energy acceptance. (2) Proposed pulsed mode of operation in synchrotron–dominated rings enhances overall performance of such gamma-ray sources. Theoretical results are in good accordance with the simulations. Performance of an existing storage ring equipped with a laser system is also evaluated.

  11. Complex ABCD transformations for optical ring cavities with losses and gain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudashov, V N; Radin, A M; Plachenov, A B

    1999-01-01

    Complex ABCD field transformations are investigated for inhomogeneous optical ring cavities with losses and gain. It is shown that the sets of eigenfunctions, corresponding to counterpropagating waves, are really biorthogonal: the functions in each of these sets are really orthogonal relative to one another, and have a complex weighting factor independent of the mode number. Bidirectional and unidirectional stability conditions are formulated for such cavities. These conditions are qualitatively different from those for loss-free cavities. A simple algorithm is proposed for the evaluation of the ABCD matrix for a medium with an arbitrary longitudinal inhomogeneity along the beam. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  12. Beam vacuum system of Brookhaven's muon storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hseuth, H.C.; Snydstrup, L.; Mapes, M.

    1995-01-01

    A storage ring with a circumference of 45 m is being built at Brookhaven to measure the g-2 value of the muons to an accuracy of 0.35 ppm.. The beam vacuum system of the storage ring will operate at 10 -7 Torr and has to be completely non-magnetic. It consists of twelve sector chambers. The chambers are constructed of aluminum and are approximately 3.5 m in length with a rectangular cross-section of 16.5 cm high by 45 cm at the widest point. The design features, fabrication techniques and cleaning methods for these chambers are described. The beam vacuum system will be pumped by forty eight non-magnetic distributed ion pumps with a total pumping speed of over 2000 ell/sec. Monte Carlo simulations of the pressure distribution in the muon storage region are presented

  13. Permanent seal ring for a nuclear reactor cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankinson, M.F.; Marshall, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear reactor containment arrangement is described including: a. a reactor vessel which thermally expands and contracts during cyclic operation of the reactor and which has a peripheral wall; b. a containment wall spaced apart from and surrounding the peripheral wall of the reactor vessel and defining an annular thermal expansion gap therebetween for accommodating thermal expansion; and c. an annular ring seal which sealingly engages and is affixed to and extends between the peripheral wall of the reactor vessel and the containment wall

  14. Performance of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors developed for storage-ring decay experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Suzaki, F.; Izumikawa, T.; Miyazawa, S.; Morimoto, K.; Suzuki, T.; Tokanai, F.; Furuki, H.; Ichihashi, N.; Ichikawa, C.; Kitagawa, A.; Kuboki, T.; Momota, S.; Nagae, D.; Nagashima, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Ozawa, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Position-sensitive detectors were developed for storage-ring decay spectroscopy. • Fiber scintillation and silicon strip detectors were tested with heavy ion beams. • A new fiber scintillation detector showed an excellent position resolution. • Position and energy detection by silicon strip detectors enable full identification. -- Abstract: As next generation spectroscopic tools, heavy-ion cooler storage rings will be a unique application of highly charged RI beam experiments. Decay spectroscopy of highly charged rare isotopes provides us important information relevant to the stellar conditions, such as for the s- and r-process nucleosynthesis. In-ring decay products of highly charged RI will be momentum-analyzed and reach a position-sensitive detector set-up located outside of the storage orbit. To realize such in-ring decay experiments, we have developed and tested two types of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors: silicon strips and scintillating fibers. The beam test experiments resulted in excellent position resolutions for both detectors, which will be available for future storage-ring experiments

  15. Self-injection locking of the DFB laser through an external ring fiber cavity: Polarization behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Bueno Escobedo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study stability of self-injection locking realized with DFB laser coupled with an external fiber optic ring cavity. Polarization behavior of the radiation circulating in the feedback loop is reported. Two regimes of mode hopping have been observed; one of them is accompanied by polarization bistability involving two orthogonal polarization states.

  16. Cavity-ring-down spectroscopy on water vapor in the range 555-604 nm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Levelt, P.F.; Polyansky, O.L.; Zobov, N.F.; Tennyson, J.

    2001-01-01

    The method of pulsed cavity-ring-down spectroscopy was employed to record the water vapor absorption spectrum in the wavelength range 555-604 nm. The spectrum consists of 1830 lines, calibrated against the iodine standard with an accuracy of 0.01 cm

  17. Cavity ring-down technique for measurement of reflectivity of high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    grade mirrors ( > 99.5 %) based on cavity ring-down (CRD) technique has been success-fully demonstrated in our laboratory using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A fast photomultiplier tube with an oscilloscope was used to detect and analyse the CRD ...

  18. Cavity ring-down technique for measurement of reflectivity of high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A simple, accurate and reliable method for measuring the reflectivity of laser- grade mirrors (R > 99.5%) based on cavity ring-down (CRD) technique has been success- fully demonstrated in our laboratory using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A fast photomultiplier tube with an oscilloscope was used to detect and analyse ...

  19. Electron--positron storage ring PETRA: plans and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    Construction of the Electron-Positron Storage Ring PETRA was authorized October 20, 1975. At present most of the civil engineering work is completed and ring installation work is under way. All major components are on order and series production of bending magnets, quadrupoles, vacuum chambers and rf-resonators has started. Start-up of the machine is planned with a fourfold symmetry configuration with four active beam-beam interaction points. Five experimental facilities have been recommended for the first round of experiments scheduled to begin mid 79

  20. Atomic and molecular physics with ion storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, M.

    1995-01-01

    Advances in ion-source, accelerator and beam-cooling technology have made it possible to produce high-quality beams of atomic ions in arbitrary charged states as well as molecular and cluster ions are internally cold. Ion beams of low emittance and narrow momentum spread are obtained in a new generation of ion storage-cooler rings dedicated to atomic and molecular physics. The long storage times (∼ 5 s ≤ τ ≤ days) allow the study of very slow processes occurring in charged (positive and negative) atoms, molecules and clusters. Interactions of ions with electrons and/or photons can be studied by merging the stored ion beam with electron and laser beams. The physics of storage rings spans particles having a charge-to-mass ratio ranging from 60 + and C 70 + ) to 0.4 - 1.0 (H + , D + , He 2+ , ..., U 92+ ) and collision processes ranging from <1 meV to ∼ 70 GeV. It incorporates, in addition to atomic and molecular physics, tests of fundamental physics theories and atomic physics bordering on nuclear and chemical physics. This exciting development concerning ion storage rings has taken place within the last five to six years. (author)

  1. Experience with the New Digital RF Control System at the CESR Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Liepe, Matthias; Dobbins, John; Kaplan, Roger; Strohman, Charles R; Stuhl, Benjamin K

    2005-01-01

    A new digital control system has been developed, providing great flexibility, high computational power and low latency for a wide range of control and data acquisition applications. This system is now installed in the CESR storage ring and stabilizes the vector sum field of two of the superconducting CESR 500 MHz cavities and the output power from the driving klystron. The installed control system includes in-house developed digital and RF hardware, very fast feedback and feedforward control, a state machine for automatic start-up and trip recovery, cw and pulsed mode operation, fast quench detection, and cavity frequency control. Several months of continuous operation have proven high reliability of the system. The achieved field stability surpasses requirements.

  2. A potpourri of impedance measurements at the advanced photon source storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sereno, N.S.; Chae, Y.C.; Harkay, K.C.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Milton, S.V.; Yang, B.X.

    1997-01-01

    Machine coupling impedances were determined in the APS storage ring from measurements of the bunch length, synchronous phase, and synchrotron and betatron tunes vs single-bunch current. The transverse measurements were performed for various numbers of small gap insertion device (ID) chambers installed in the ring. The transverse impedance is determined from measurements of the transverse tunes and bunch length as a function of single-bunch current. The shift in the synchrotron tune was measured as a function of bunch current from which the total cavity impedance was extracted. The loss factor was determined by measuring the relative synchronous phase as a function of bunch current. The longitudinal resistive impedance is calculated using the loss factor dependence on the bunch length. From these results, the authors can estimate what the impedance would be for a full set of ID chambers

  3. Multiwire proportional chamber spectrometer for the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baksay, L.; Boehm, A.; Foeth, H.; Staude, A.; Bozzo, M.; Ellis, R.; Naroska, B.; Rubbia, C.; Strolin, P.

    1976-01-01

    The design, construction and performance of a multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) system (approximately 10 k wires) constructed for use at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) is described. This system employs hybrid integrated circuitry for pulse detection and storage, and is read via a CAMAC compatible system. The chambers plus two large-aperture magnets with accompanying scintillation and Cherenkov counters form a versatile multiparticle spectrometer system which has been used to investigate particle systems produced near 0 0 at the CERN ISR. (Auth.)

  4. CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT PROTON - NEUTRON INTERACTIONS IN THE INTERSECTING STORAGE RINGS

    CERN Document Server

    Bartl, W; Steuer, M; Hubner, K

    1969-01-01

    The pos'sibility of proton-neutron scattering experiments at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings is studied. The use of proton-deuteron collisions to measure the reaction p+d •*• p*pv+n,witheitherp.orn,asspectator nucléon is discussed. An analysing magnet around the deuteron beamline allows to detect both nucléons of the deuteron up to the zero-momentum-transfer" région. Accélération and storage of deuteron beams is considered.

  5. Feasibility of beam crystallization in a cooler storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Yuri

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been known theoretically that a charged-particle beam circulating in a storage ring exhibits an “ordered” configuration at the space-charge limit. Such an ultimate state of matter is called a crystalline beam whose emittance is ideally equal to zero except for quantum noise. This paper discusses how close one can come to various ordered states by employing currently available accelerator technologies. The dynamic nature of ultracold beams and conditions required for crystallization are briefly reviewed. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the feasibility of this unique phenomenon, considering practical situations in general cooling experiments. It is pointed out that several essential obstacles must be overcome to reach a three-dimensional crystalline state in a storage ring. Doppler laser cooling of ion beams is also numerically simulated to explore the possibility of beam crystallization in an existing machine.

  6. An induction accelerator for the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring TSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellert, C.; Habs, D.; Music, M.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.; Jaeschke, E.; Kambara, T.; Sigray, P.

    1992-01-01

    An induction accelerator has been installed in the heavy ion test storage ring TSR in Heidelberg. It allows for constant acceleration or deceleration of stored coasting ion beams without affecting their velocity profile and is well suited for ion beam manipulation in cooling experiments and for measurements of velocity dependent cooling forces. The design and operation of the device and first applications to laser cooling and to measurements of laser and electron cooling forces are described. (orig.)

  7. Application of Accelerators and Storage Rings: Accelerators in Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Amaldi, U

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the the Section '11.3 Accelerators in Medicine' of the Chapter '11 Application of Accelerators and Storage Rings' with the content: 11.3 Accelerators in Medicine 11.3.1 Accelerators and Radiopharmaceuticals 11.3.2 Accelerators and Cancer Therapy

  8. Investigation of longitudinal dynamic in laser electron storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnaukhov, I.; Zelinsky, A. E-mail: zelinsky@kipt.kharkov.ua; Telegin, Yu

    2001-09-01

    Longitudinal dynamic of electron beam due to radiation damping and quantum fluctuations in the storage ring with a laser-electron interaction section (Compton scattering) is investigated. This investigation was carried out by numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo method. The dependence of the steady-state energy spread of electron beam due to the Compton back scattering of photons on the electron beam energy and photon flash density were obtained. Simulation findings are compared with the analytical estimations by Z. Huang.

  9. Investigation of longitudinal dynamic in laser electron storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Karnaukhov, I; Telegin, Yu P

    2001-01-01

    Longitudinal dynamic of electron beam due to radiation damping and quantum fluctuations in the storage ring with a laser-electron interaction section (Compton scattering) is investigated. This investigation was carried out by numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo method. The dependence of the steady-state energy spread of electron beam due to the Compton back scattering of photons on the electron beam energy and photon flash density were obtained. Simulation findings are compared with the analytical estimations by Z. Huang.

  10. Bunch lengthening with bifurcation in electron storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-San; Hirata, Kohji [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    The mapping which shows equilibrium particle distribution in synchrotron phase space for electron storage rings is discussed with respect to some localized constant wake function based on the Gaussian approximation. This mapping shows multi-periodic states as well as double bifurcation in dynamical states of the equilibrium bunch length. When moving around parameter space, the system shows a transition/bifurcation which is not always reversible. These results derived by mapping are confirmed by multiparticle tracking. (author)

  11. A new method for beam stacking in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Recently, I developed a new beam stacking scheme for synchrotron storage rings called 'longitudinal phase-space coating' (LPSC). This scheme has been convincingly validated by multi-particle beam dynamics simulations and has been demonstrated with beam experiments at the Fermilab Recycler. Here, I present the results from both simulations and experiments. The beam stacking scheme presented here is the first of its kind.

  12. Physics and technology of superthin internal targets in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, S.G.

    1989-01-01

    The new generation of accelerators for coincidence electronuclear investigations is discussed. The luminosity and beam parameters are calculated for an electron storage ring with an internal target operating in the superthin regime. The advantages and disadvantages in comparison with conventional operation using an external beam and target are described. The intermediate results for 2 GeV electron scattering on polarized internal deuterium target are given (joint Novosibirsk-Argonne experiment). 32 refs.; 5 figs

  13. Confinement and stability of crystalline beams in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffmans, A.F.

    1995-01-01

    We present a fully analytical approach to the study of the confinement and stability of open-quote open-quote Crystalline Beams close-quote close-quote in storage rings, in terms of such fundamental accelerator concepts as tune shift and stopband. We consider a open-quote open-quote Crystalline Beam close-quote close-quote consisting of substrings, arranged symmetrically around the reference trajectory, and we examine the motion of a slightly perturbed test particle on one of them. Our approach quite naturally leads to the conclusion, that (a) storage rings need to be operated below the transition energy, and (b) the open-quote open-quote Crystalline Beam close-quote close-quote has the same periodicity as the storage ring. Each open-quote open-quote Crystalline Beam close-quote close-quote has an upper and lower limit of the spacing between the ions. The upper limit is determined by condition (b), and the lower limit is set by the stability of the test particle motion around the equilibrium. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  14. Internal target effects in ion storage rings with beam cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gostishchev, Vitaly

    2008-06-01

    The accurate description of internal target effects is important for the prediction of operation conditions which are required for experiments in the planned storage rings of the FAIR facility. The BETACOOL code developed by the Dubna group has been used to evaluate beam dynamics in ion storage rings, where electron cooling in combination with an internal target is applied. Systematic benchmarking experiments of this code were carried out at the ESR storage ring at GSI. A mode with vanishing dispersion in the target position was applied to evaluate the influence of the dispersion function on the parameters when the target is heating the beam. The influence of the internal target on the beam parameters is demonstrated in the present work. A comparison of experimental results with simple models describing the energy loss of the beam particles in the target as well as with more sophisticated simulations with the BETACOOL code is given. In order to study the conditions which can be achieved in the proposed experiments the simulation results were quantitatively compared with experimental results and simulations for the ESR. The results of this comparison are discussed in the present thesis. BETACOOL simulations of target effects were performed for the NESR and the HESR of the future FAIR facility in order to predict the beam parameters for the planned experiments. (orig.)

  15. Electron density enhancement in a quasi isochronous storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.; Robin, D.

    1991-01-01

    The six dimensional phase-space density of an electron beam in a storage ring is determined by the emission of synchrotron radiation, and by the transverse and longitudinal focusing forces determining the particle trajectories. In the simplest case of uncoupled horizontal, vertical and longitudinal motion, the phase space volume occupied by the beam can be characterized by the product of its three projections on the single degree of freedom planes, the horizontal, vertical, and longitudinal emittances. To minimize the beam phase space volume the authors can minimize the transverse and longitudinal emittances. In the case of transverse emittances this problem is very important for synchrotron radiation sources, and has been studied by several authors. A method to minimize the longitudinal emittance, and produce electron bunches with a short pulse length, small energy spread and large peak current has been proposed and discussed recently by C. Pellegrini and D. Robin. This method uses a ring in which the revolution period is weakly dependent on the particle energy, Quasi Isochronous Ring (QIR), in other words a ring with a momentum compaction nearly zero. In this paper they will extend the previous analysis of the conditions for stable single particle motion in such a ring, and give simple criteria for the estimate of the energy spread and phase acceptance of a QIR

  16. Development of Low Level RF Control Systems for Superconducting Heavy Ion Linear Accelerators, Electron Synchrotrons and Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Aminov, Bachtior; Kolesov, Sergej; Pekeler, Michael; Piel, Christian; Piel, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Since 2001 ACCEL Instruments is supplying low level RF control systems together with turn key cavity systems. The early LLRF systems used the well established technology based on discrete analogue amplitude and phase detectors and modulators. Today analogue LLRF systems can make use of advanced vector demodulators and modulators combined with a fast computer controlled analogue feed back loop. Feed forward control is implemented to operate the RF cavity in an open loop mode or to compensate for predictable perturbations. The paper will introduce the general design philosophy and show how it can be adapted to different tasks as controlling a synchrotron booster nc RF system at 500 MHz, or superconducting storage ring RF cavities, as well as a linear accelerator at 176 MHz formed by a chain of individually driven and controlled superconducting λ/2 cavities.

  17. Cavity modes with optical orbital angular momentum in a metamaterial ring based on transformation optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H W; Wang, F; Dong, Y Q; Shu, F Z; Zhang, K; Peng, R W; Xiong, X; Wang, Mu

    2015-12-14

    In this work, we theoretically study the cavity modes with transverse orbital angular momentum in metamaterial ring based on transformation optics. The metamaterial ring is designed to transform the straight trajectory of light into the circulating one by enlarging the azimuthal angle, effectively presenting the modes with transverse orbital angular momentum. The simulation results confirm the theoretical predictions, which state that the transverse orbital angular momentum of the mode not only depends on the frequency of the incident light, but also depends on the transformation scale of the azimuthal angle. Because energy dissipation inevitably reduces the field amplitude of the modes, the confined electromagnetic energy and the quality factor of the modes inside the ring are also studied in order to evaluate the stability of those cavity modes. The results show that the metamaterial ring can effectively confine light with a high quality factor and maintain steady modes with the orbital angular momentum, even if the dimension of the ring is much smaller than the wavelength of the incident light. This technique for exploiting the modes with optical transverse orbital angular momentum may provides a unique platform for applications related to micromanipulation.

  18. Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2012-04-09

    The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring design. The talk will start with an overview of the latest developments and advances in the design of synchrotron light sources based on the concept of an 'ultimate' storage ring. The review will establish how bright a ring based light source might be, where the frontier of technological challenges are, and what the limits of accelerator physics are. Emphasis will be given to possible improvements in accelerator design and developments in technology toward the goal of achieving an ultimate storage ring. An ultimate storage ring (USR), defined as an electron ring-based light source having an emittance in both transverse planes at the diffraction limit for the range of X-ray wavelengths of interest for a scientific community, would provide very high brightness photons having high transverse coherence that would extend the capabilities of X-ray imaging and probe techniques beyond today's performance. It would be a cost-effective, high-coherence 4th generation light source, competitive with one based on energy recovery linac (ERL) technology, serving a large number of users studying material, chemical, and biological sciences. Furthermore, because of the experience accumulated over many decades of ring operation, it would have the great advantage of stability and reliability. In this paper we consider the design of an USR having 10-pm-rad emittance. It is a tremendous challenge to design a storage ring having such an extremely low emittance, a factor of 100 smaller than those in existing light sources, especially such that it has adequate dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. In many ultra-low emittance designs, the injection acceptances are not large enough for accumulation of the electron beam, necessitating on-axis injection where stored electron bunches are completely replaced with newly injected ones. Recently, starting with the MAX-IV 7-bend

  19. Measurements of the electron cloud in the APS storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkey, K. C.

    1999-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation interacting with the vacuum chamber walls in a storage ring produce photoelectrons that can be accelerated by the beam, acquiring sufficient energy to produce secondary electrons in collisions with the walls. If the secondary-electron yield (SEY) coefficient of the wall material is greater than one, as is the case with the aluminum chambers in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring, a runaway condition can develop. As the electron cloud builds up along a train of stored positron or electron bunches, the possibility exists that a transverse perturbation of the head bunch will be communicated to trailing bunches due to interaction with the cloud. In order to characterize the electron cloud, a special vacuum chamber was built and inserted into the ring. The chamber contains 10 rudimentary electron-energy analyzers, as well as three targets coated with different materials. Measurements show that the intensity and electron energy distribution are highly dependent on the temporal spacing between adjacent bunches and the amount of current contained in each bunch. Furthermore, measurements using the different targets are consistent with what would be expected based on the SEY of the coatings. Data for both positron and electron beams are presented

  20. Some models of spin coherence and decoherence in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, K.

    1997-09-01

    I present some simple exactly solvable models of spin diffusion caused by synchrotron radiation noise in storage rings. I am able to use standard stochastic differential equation and Fokker-Planck methods and I thereby introduce, and exploit, the polarization density. This quantity obeys a linear evolution equation of the Bloch type, which is, like the Fokker-Planck equation, universal in the sense that it is independent of the state of the system. I also briefly consider Bloch equations for other local polarization quantities derived from the polarization density. One of the models chosen is of relevance for some existing and proposed low energy electron (positron) storage rings which need polarization. I present numerical results for a ring with parameters typical of HERA and show that, where applicable, the results of my approach are in satisfactory agreement with calculations using SLIM. These calculations provide a numerical check of a basic tenet of the conventional method of calculating depolarization using the n-vector-axis. I also investigate the equilibrium behaviour of the spin ensemble when there is no synchrotron radiation. Finally, I summarize other results which I have obtained using the polarization density and which will be published separately. (orig.)

  1. Performance of the SRRC storage ring and wiggler commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, C.C.; Hsu, K.T.; Luo, G.H.

    1995-01-01

    A 1.3 GeV synchrotron radiation storage ring at SRRC has been operated for more than a year since October 1993. Starting from April 1994, the machine has been open to the user community. In February 1995, the authors installed a wiggler magnet of 1.8 tesla 25-pole in the ring and successfully commissioned. The machine was scheduled for the users' runs from the middle of April this year. The authors describe the performance of the machine without wiggler magnet system and then report the wiggler effects on the beam dynamics of the storage ring, e.g., tune shift, beta-beating, orbit change, nonlinear dynamics effect, etc. Some measurements are compared with the model prediction and agreement between them was fairly good. Possible actions to minimize wiggler effects have been taken, such as orbit correction as a function wiggler gap change. The machine improvement projects, such as longitudinal and transverse damping systems as well as orbit stability feedback system are under construction and will be in use soon

  2. Measurements of the electron cloud in the APS storage ring.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkey, K. C.

    1999-04-16

    Synchrotron radiation interacting with the vacuum chamber walls in a storage ring produce photoelectrons that can be accelerated by the beam, acquiring sufficient energy to produce secondary electrons in collisions with the walls. If the secondary-electron yield (SEY) coefficient of the wall material is greater than one, as is the case with the aluminum chambers in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring, a runaway condition can develop. As the electron cloud builds up along a train of stored positron or electron bunches, the possibility exists that a transverse perturbation of the head bunch will be communicated to trailing bunches due to interaction with the cloud. In order to characterize the electron cloud, a special vacuum chamber was built and inserted into the ring. The chamber contains 10 rudimentary electron-energy analyzers, as well as three targets coated with different materials. Measurements show that the intensity and electron energy distribution are highly dependent on the temporal spacing between adjacent bunches and the amount of current contained in each bunch. Furthermore, measurements using the different targets are consistent with what would be expected based on the SEY of the coatings. Data for both positron and electron beams are presented.

  3. Equilibrium beam distribution in an electron storage ring near linear synchrobetatron coupling resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz Nash

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Linear dynamics in a storage ring can be described by the one-turn map matrix. In the case of a resonance where two of the eigenvalues of this matrix are degenerate, a coupling perturbation causes a mixing of the uncoupled eigenvectors. A perturbation formalism is developed to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the one-turn map near such a linear resonance. Damping and diffusion due to synchrotron radiation can be obtained by integrating their effects over one turn, and the coupled eigenvectors can be used to find the coupled damping and diffusion coefficients. Expressions for the coupled equilibrium emittances and beam distribution moments are then derived. In addition to the conventional instabilities at the sum, integer, and half-integer resonances, it is found that the coupling can cause an instability through antidamping near a sum resonance even when the symplectic dynamics are stable. As one application of this formalism, the case of linear synchrobetatron coupling is analyzed where the coupling is caused by dispersion in the rf cavity, or by a crab cavity. Explicit closed-form expressions for the sum/difference resonances are given along with the integer/half-integer resonances. The integer and half-integer resonances caused by coupling require particular care. We find an example of this with the case of a crab cavity for the integer resonance of the synchrotron tune. Whether or not there is an instability is determined by the value of the horizontal betatron tune, a unique feature of these coupling-caused integer or half-integer resonances. Finally, the coupled damping and diffusion coefficients along with the equilibrium invariants and projected emittances are plotted as a function of the betatron and synchrotron tunes for an example storage ring based on PEP-II.

  4. High-energy terahertz wave parametric oscillator with a surface-emitted ring-cavity configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Wang, Yuye; Xu, Degang; Xu, Wentao; Duan, Pan; Yan, Chao; Tang, Longhuang; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-05-15

    A surface-emitted ring-cavity terahertz (THz) wave parametric oscillator has been demonstrated for high-energy THz output and fast frequency tuning in a wide frequency range. Through the special optical design with a galvano-optical scanner and four-mirror ring-cavity structure, the maximum THz wave output energy of 12.9 μJ/pulse is achieved at 1.359 THz under the pump energy of 172.8 mJ. The fast THz frequency tuning in the range of 0.7-2.8 THz can be accessed with the step response of 600 μs. Moreover, the maximum THz wave output energy from this configuration is 3.29 times as large as that obtained from the conventional surface-emitted THz wave parametric oscillator with the same experimental conditions.

  5. Investigation of Dispersion and Performance Based on Ring Cavity by Birefringent Interleaver for DWDM Transmission Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsair-Chun Liang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically investigate a 25 GHz multichannel filter based on ring cavity birefringent optical interleaver for dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM transmission systems. The simulation tool used in this work is the Advanced System Analysis Program (ASAP optical modeling software. We improve the dispersion performance by employing λ/6 and λ/4 wave plates as birefringent compensators for interleavers. The new structure exhibits a high performance with nearly zero ripple, a channel isolation greater than 102 dB, and a passband utilization of 86% within the C-band. The research results illustrate that our modified scheme can improve the dispersion of more than 76.6% in comparison with the previous studies of optical interleaver with birefringent crystal and ring cavity structures.

  6. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E; Spiliotis, Alexandros K; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  7. Cooler Storage Ring at China Institute of Modern Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wen-Xia, Jia; Zhan, W

    2005-01-01

    CSR, a new ion cooler-storage-ring project in China IMP, is a double ring system, and consists of a main ring (CSRm) and an experimental ring (CSRe). The two existing cyclotrons SFC (K=69) and SSC (K=450) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) will be used as its injector system. The heavy ion beams with the energy range of 7-30 MeV/nucleus from the HIRFL will be accumulated, cooled and accelerated to the higher energy range of 100-500 MeV/ nucleus in CSRm, and then extracted fast to produce radioactive ion beams or highly charged heavy ions. Those secondary beams will be accepted and stored or decelerated by CSRe for many internal-target experiments or high precision spectroscopy with beam cooling. On the other hand, the beams with the energy range of 100-1000MeV/ nucleus will also be extracted from CSRm by using slow extraction or fast extraction for many external-target experiments. CSR project was started in the end of 1999 and will be finished in 2006. In this paper the outline and the act...

  8. Beam Loss Monitors for NSLS-II Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S.L.; Cameron, P.

    2011-01-01

    The shielding for the NSLS-II storage ring will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam losses in two cells of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of <10% top-off injection beam current. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed levels for a period of time that could cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring system will have beam loss monitors that will measure where the beam charge is lost around the ring, to warn operators if losses approach the design limits. To measure the charge loss quantitatively, we propose measuring the electron component of the shower as beam electrons hit the vacuum chamber (VC) wall. This will be done using the Cerenkov light as electrons transit ultra-pure fused silica rods placed close to the inner edge of the VC. The entire length of the rod will collect light from the electrons of the spread out shower resulting from the small glancing angle of the lost beam particles to the VC wall. The design and measurements results of the prototype Cerenkov BLM will be presented.

  9. Compact near-IR and mid-IR cavity ring down spectroscopy device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. Houston (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    This invention relates to a compact cavity ring down spectrometer for detection and measurement of trace species in a sample gas using a tunable solid-state continuous-wave mid-infrared PPLN OPO laser or a tunable low-power solid-state continuous wave near-infrared diode laser with an algorithm for reducing the periodic noise in the voltage decay signal which subjects the data to cluster analysis or by averaging of the interquartile range of the data.

  10. Magnet design for an ultralow emittance storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Saeidi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF is a new 3 GeV synchrotron radiation laboratory which is in the design stage. The ILSF storage ring (SR is based on a Five-Bend Achromat (5BA lattice providing an ultra-low beam emittance of 0.48 nm rad. The ring is comprised of 100 pure dipole magnets, 320 quadrupoles, and 320 sextupoles with additional coils for dipole and skew quadrupole correctors. In this paper, we present some design features of the SR magnets and discuss the detailed physical design of these electromagnets. The related electrical and cooling calculations and mechanical design issues have been investigated as well.

  11. Fast cooling of bunches in compton storage rings*

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, E; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    We propose an enhancement of laser radiative cooling by utilizing laser pulses of small spatial and temporal dimensions, which interact only with a fraction of an electron bunch circulating in a storage ring. We studied the dynamics of such electron bunch when laser photons scatter off the electrons at a collision point placed in a section with nonzero dispersion. In this case of ‘asymmetric cooling’, the stationary energy spread is much smaller than under conditions of regular scattering where the laser spot size is larger than the electron beam; and the synchrotron oscillations are damped faster. Coherent oscillations of large amplitude may be damped within one synchrotron period, so that this method can support the rapid successive injection of many bunches in longitudinal phase space for stacking purposes. Results of extensive simulations are presented for the performance optimization of Compton gamma-ray sources and damping rings.

  12. Time resolved super continuum Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy for multicomponent gas detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaema, Walter Morinobu

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we present a variation of the technique CRDS (Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy) to obtain simultaneously a multicomponent absorption spectrum in a broad visible range. This new approach uses the Supercontinuum (SC) spectrum (resulting from irradiation of nonlinear media by femtosecond lasers, or simply generated by compact sources) as a light source to illuminate the cavity. In this context it is described the features of the modules assembling a MC-SC-CRDS (Multicomponent Supercontinuum Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy): a set of high reflectivity mirrors, the resonant cavity and the detection system. Some problems related to the multimode excitation, stray light, effective use of the dynamic range of the detector, the poor resolution of the instrument to resolve narrow absorption lines are issued. We present the absorption spectra of H 2 O (polyads 4υ, 4υ + δ) and O 2 (spin-forbidden b-X branch) measured simultaneously by this technique in the visible range and a comparison with the absorption lines based on HITRAN database is made to demonstrate the functionality of this method. (author)

  13. ELASR – An electrostatic storage ring for atomic and molecular physics at KACST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed O.A. El Ghazaly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new ELectrostAtic Storage Ring (ELASR has been designed and built at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It was developed to be the core of a new storage ring laboratory for atomic and molecular physics at KACST. ELASR follows the standard design of the pioneering storage ring ELISA and it thereby features a racetrack single-bend shaped ring. Complementary simulation code packages were used to work out the design under the requirements of the projected experiments. This paper reports a short description of the ELASR storage ring through an overview of its design and construction.

  14. Vacuum characteristics of the RF-cavity for TRISTAN main ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, H.

    1987-10-01

    Vacuum characteristics of the RF-cavity for TRISTAN main ring were tested. An APS (Alternating Periodic Structure) 18-cell cavity unit was made of low carbon steel S25C, and inner surface was electro-plated with copper of 100 μm in a pyrophosphorous-acid bath. After 24-hours bake-out at 140 deg C by a boiler, the outgassing rate of a test cavity was mainly dominated by the hydrogen permeation from the cooling water channel through the low carbon steel wall into the vacuum. By the use of anti-corrosion agent, the outgassing rate of the test cavity was decreased down to 1 x 10 -13 Torr · l/sec · cm 2 , after the bake-out at 140 deg C for 24 hours. After hydrogen degassing at 140 deg C for 10-days, the APS cavity unit was baked at 140 deg C for 24 hours, the ultimate pressure of the cavity reached down to 6 x 10 -10 Torr, and 2.7 x 10 -10 Torr, pumped by four 300 l/sec ion-pumps and by two 300 l/sec ion-pumps and two Ti-sublimation pumps with liquid nitrogen shroud respectively. The APS cavity unit was conditioned up to 250 kW/9-cell for 36 hours pumped by four 300 l/sec ion pumps, the ultimate pressure of the cavity was 5 x 10 -9 Torr with the RF power of 150 kW/9-cell on. (author)

  15. Magnet design for a low-emittance storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Martin; Anderberg, Bengt; Lindgren, Lars-Johan

    2014-01-01

    The magnet design of the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring replaces the conventional support girder + discrete magnets scheme of previous third-generation light sources with a compact integrated design having several consecutive magnet elements precision-machined out of a common solid iron block. The MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring, currently under construction, pursues the goal of low electron beam emittance by using a multi-bend achromat magnet lattice, which is realised by having several consecutive magnet elements precision-machined out of a common solid iron block, 2.3–3.4 m long. With this magnet design solution, instead of having 1320 individual magnets, the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring is built up using 140 integrated ‘magnet block’ units, containing all these magnet elements. Major features of this magnet block design are compactness, vibration stability and that the alignment of magnet elements within each unit is given by the mechanical accuracy of the CNC machining rather than individual field measurement and adjustment. This article presents practical engineering details of implementing this magnet design solution, and mechanical + magnetic field measurement results from the magnet production series. At the time of writing (spring 2014), the production series, which is totally outsourced to industry, is roughly half way through, with mechanical/magnetic QA conforming to specifications. It is the conclusion of the authors that the MAX IV magnet block concept, which has sometimes been described as new or innovative, is from a manufacturing point of view simply a collection of known mature production methods and measurement procedures, which can be executed at fixed cost with a low level of risk

  16. Status of NSLS-II Storage Ring Vacuum Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doom,L.; Hseuh,H.; Ferreira, M.; Longo, C.; Ravindranath, V.; Settepani, P.; Sharma, S.; Wilson, K.

    2009-05-04

    National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), being constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, is a 3-GeV, high-flux and high- brightness synchrotron radiation facility with a nominal current of 500 mA. The storage ring vacuum system will have extruded aluminium chambers with ante-chamber for photon fans and distributed NEG strip pumping. Discrete photon absorbers will be used to intercept the un-used bending magnet radiation. In-situ bakeout will be implemented to achieve fast conditioning during initial commissioning and after interventions.

  17. Light ion EDM search in magnetic storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onderwater, C. J. G.

    2006-01-01

    Permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) violate parity and time-reversal symmetry. Within the Standard Model (SM), they require CP violation and are many orders of magnitude below present experimental sensitivity. Many extensions of the SM predict much larger EDMs, which are therefore an excellent probe for the existence of 'new physics.' So far only electrically neutral systems were used for sensitive searches of EDMs. Several techniques, based on storing fast particles in a magnetic storage ring, are being developed to probe charged particles for an EDM. With the introduction of these novel experimental methods, high sensitivity for charged systems, in particular light nuclei, is within reach.

  18. Free electron laser on the ACO storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elleaume, P.

    1984-06-01

    This dissertation presents the design and characteristics of a Free Electron Laser built on the electron storage ring ACO at Orsay. The weak optical gain available (approximately 0.1% per pass) necessitated the use of an optical klystron instead of an undulator and the use of mirror with extremely high reflectivity. The laser characteristics: spectra, micro and macro-temporal structures, transverse structure and power are presented. They are in very good agreement with a classical theory based on the Lorentz force and Maxwell equations [fr

  19. Astrochemistry in TSR and CSR Ion Storage Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Oldrich

    2017-04-01

    Dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions plays a key role in controlling the charge density and composition of the cold interstellar medium (ISM). Experimental data on DR are required in order to understand the chemical network in the ISM and related processes such as star formation from molecular clouds. Needed data include not only total reaction cross sections, but also the chemical composition and excitation states of the neutral products. Utilizing the TSR storage ring in Heidelberg, Germany, we have carried out DR measurements for astrophysically important molecular ions. We use a merged electron-ion beams technique combined with event-by-event fragment counting and fragment imaging. The count rate of detected neutral DR products yields the absolute DR rate coefficient. Imaging the distribution of fragment distances provides information on the kinetic energy released including the states of both the initial molecule and the final products. Additional kinetic energy sensitivity of the employed detector allows for identification of fragmentation channels by fragment-mass combination within each dissociation event. Such combined information is essential for studies on DR of polyatomic ions with multi-channel breakup. The recently commissioned Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) in Heidelberg, Germany, extends the experimental capabilities of TSR by operation at cryogenic temperatures down to 6 K. At these conditions residual gas densities down to 100 cm-3 can be reached resulting in beam storage times of several hours. Long storage in the cold environment allows the ions to relax down to their rotational ground state, thus mimicking well the conditions in the cold ISM. A variety of astrophysically relevant reactions will be investigated at these conditions, such as DR, electron impact excitation, ion-neutral collisions, etc. We report our TSR results on DR of HCl+ and D2Cl+. We also present first results from the CSR commissioning experiments.

  20. SOR-RING: an electron storage ring dedicated to spectroscopy, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, H.; Miyahara, T.; Sato, S.; Watanabe, M.; Mitani, S.

    1976-01-01

    A 300 MeV electron storage ring to be used exclusively as a synchrotron radiation source for spectroscopy has been constructed in Institute for Nuclear Study (INS), University of Tokyo, Tanashi. Its useful spectral range lies between 40 and 2200 A. The 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron of INS currently being operated for high energy particle experiments serves as an injector. Electron beams are extracted from the synchrotron at 300 MeV, transported about twenty meters, and injected to the ring one pulse per second. In the test operation a current of 10 mA was stored with a lifetime of one hour, while the design goal determined by the Touschek effect is 100 mA with one hour, for operation in 300 MeV. Increase of operating energy up to 375 MeV is feasible with a minor modification of the present design. (auth.)

  1. Constrained multi-objective optimization of storage ring lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Riyasat; Ghodke, A. D.

    2018-03-01

    The storage ring lattice optimization is a class of constrained multi-objective optimization problem, where in addition to low beam emittance, a large dynamic aperture for good injection efficiency and improved beam lifetime are also desirable. The convergence and computation times are of great concern for the optimization algorithms, as various objectives are to be optimized and a number of accelerator parameters to be varied over a large span with several constraints. In this paper, a study of storage ring lattice optimization using differential evolution is presented. The optimization results are compared with two most widely used optimization techniques in accelerators-genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimization. It is found that the differential evolution produces a better Pareto optimal front in reasonable computation time between two conflicting objectives-beam emittance and dispersion function in the straight section. The differential evolution was used, extensively, for the optimization of linear and nonlinear lattices of Indus-2 for exploring various operational modes within the magnet power supply capabilities.

  2. Modeling photo-desorption in high current storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    High luminosity flavor factories are characterized by high fluxes of synchrotron radiation that lead to thermal management difficulties. The associated photo-desorption from the vacuum chamber walls presents an additional design challenge, providing a vacuum system suitable for maintaining acceptable beam-gas lifetimes and low background levels of scattered radiation in the detector. Achieving acceptable operating pressures (1-10 nTorr) with practical pumping schemes requires the use of materials with low photodesorption efficiency operating in a radiation environment beyond that of existing storage rings. Extrapolating the existing photo-desorption data base to the design requirements of high luminosity colliders requires a physical model of the differential cleaning in the vacuum chamber. The authors present a simple phenomenological model of photodesorption that includes effects of dose dependence and diffuse photon reflection to compute the leveling of gas loads in beamlines of high current storage rings that typify heavy flavor factories. This model is also used to estimate chamber commissioning times

  3. CESAR, 2 MeV electron storage ring; general view.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1964-01-01

    CESAR (CERN Electron Storage and Accumulation Ring) was built as a study-model for the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings). The model had to be small (24 m circumference) and yet the particles had to be highly relativistic, which led to the choice of electrons. On the other hand, in order to model the behaviour of protons, effects from synchrotron radiation had to be negligible, which meant low magnetic fields (130 G in the bending magnets) and a corresponding low energy of 1.75 MeV. All the stacking (accumulation) procedures envisaged for the ISR were proven with CESAR, and critical aspects of transverse stability were explored. Very importantly, CESAR was the test-bed for the ultrahigh vacuum techniques and components, essential for the ISR, with a final pressure of 6E-11 Torr. The CESAR project was decided early in 1960, design was completed in 1961 and construction in 1963. After an experimental period from 1964 to 1967, CESAR was dismantled in 1968.

  4. CESAR, 2 MeV electron storage ring.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1967-01-01

    CESAR (CERN Electron Storage and Accumulation Ring) was built as a study-model for the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings). The model had to be small (24 m circumference) and yet the particles had to be highly relativistic, which led to the choice of electrons. On the other hand, in order to model the behaviour of protons, effects from synchrotron radiation had to be negligible, which meant low magnetic fields (130 G in the bending magnets) and a corresponding low energy of 1.75 MeV. All the stacking (accumulation) procedures envisaged for the ISR were proven with CESAR, and critical aspects of transverse stability were explored. Very importantly, CESAR was the test-bed for the ultrahigh vacuum techniques and components, essential for the ISR, with a final pressure of 6E-11 Torr. The CESAR project was decided early in 1960, design was completed in 1961 and construction in 1963. After an experimental period from 1964 to 1967, CESAR was dismantled in 1968.

  5. Phase measurement for driven spin oscillations in a storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempelmann, N.; Hejny, V.; Pretz, J.; Soltner, H.; Augustyniak, W.; Bagdasarian, Z.; Bai, M.; Barion, L.; Berz, M.; Chekmenev, S.; Ciullo, G.; Dymov, S.; Eversmann, D.; Gaisser, M.; Gebel, R.; Grigoryev, K.; Grzonka, D.; Guidoboni, G.; Heberling, D.; Hetzel, J.; Hinder, F.; Kacharava, A.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Keshelashvili, I.; Koop, I.; Kulikov, A.; Lehrach, A.; Lenisa, P.; Lomidze, N.; Lorentz, B.; Maanen, P.; Macharashvili, G.; Magiera, A.; Mchedlishvili, D.; Mey, S.; Müller, F.; Nass, A.; Nikolaev, N. N.; Nioradze, M.; Pesce, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Rosenthal, M.; Saleev, A.; Schmidt, V.; Semertzidis, Y.; Senichev, Y.; Shmakova, V.; Silenko, A.; Slim, J.; Stahl, A.; Stassen, R.; Stephenson, E.; Stockhorst, H.; Ströher, H.; Tabidze, M.; Tagliente, G.; Talman, R.; Thörngren Engblom, P.; Trinkel, F.; Uzikov, Yu.; Valdau, Yu.; Valetov, E.; Vassiliev, A.; Weidemann, C.; Wrońska, A.; Wüstner, P.; Zuprański, P.; Żurek, M.; JEDI Collaboration

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports the first simultaneous measurement of the horizontal and vertical components of the polarization vector in a storage ring under the influence of a radio frequency (rf) solenoid. The experiments were performed at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY in Jülich using a vector polarized, bunched 0.97 GeV /c deuteron beam. Using the new spin feedback system, we set the initial phase difference between the solenoid field and the precession of the polarization vector to a predefined value. The feedback system was then switched off, allowing the phase difference to change over time, and the solenoid was switched on to rotate the polarization vector. We observed an oscillation of the vertical polarization component and the phase difference. The oscillations can be described using an analytical model. The results of this experiment also apply to other rf devices with horizontal magnetic fields, such as Wien filters. The precise manipulation of particle spins in storage rings is a prerequisite for measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM) of charged particles.

  6. Analysis of spin depolarizing effects in electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boege, M.

    1994-05-01

    In this thesis spin depolarizing effects in electron storage rings are analyzed and the depolarizing effects in the HERA electron storage ring are studied in detail. At high beam energies the equilibrium polarization is limited by nonlinear effects. This will be particularly true in the case of HERA, when the socalled ''spin rotators'' are inserted which are designed to provide longitudinal electron polarization for the HERMES experiment in 1994 and later for the H1 and ZEUS experiment. It is very important to quantify the influence of these effects theoretically by a proper modelling of HERA, so that ways can be found to get a high degree of polarization in the real machine. In this thesis HERA is modelled by the Monte-Carlo tracking program SITROS which was originally written by J. Kewisch in 1982 to study the polarization in PETRA. The first part of the thesis is devoted to a detailed description of the fundamental theoretical concepts on which the program is based. Then the approximations which are needed to overcome computing time limitations are explained and their influence on the simulation result is discussed. The systematic and statistical errors are studied in detail. Extensions of the program which allow a comparison of SITROS with the results given by ''linear'' theory are explained. (orig.)

  7. Prospects for Next-Generation Storage Ring Light Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Storage ring light sources are among the most productive large-scale scientific user facilities in existence, owing to a combination of broad tunability, mature technology, high capacity, remarkable reliability, and high performance. The most commonly-used performance measure is the photon beam brightness, which is proportional to the flux per unit volume in six-dimensional phase space. The brightness is generally maximized by minimizing the transverse phase space area, or emittance, of the electron beam that generates the photons. Since the 1990's, most storage ring light sources have used a variant of the Chasman-Green, or double-bend-achromat (DBA), lattice, which produces transverse emittances of several nanometers. Presently, several light sources are under construction based on more challenging multi-bend-achromat (MBA) concepts, which promise an order of magnitude reduction in the emittance. Somewhat larger reductions are contemplated for upgrades of the largest facilities. This talk briefly surveys the relevant concepts in light source design, then explains both the mechanism and challenge of achieving next-generation emittances. Other factors, such as improved radiation-emitting devices, are also described. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  8. Magnet design for a low-emittance storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Martin; Anderberg, Bengt; Lindgren, Lars-Johan

    2014-01-01

    The MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring, currently under construction, pursues the goal of low electron beam emittance by using a multi-bend achromat magnet lattice, which is realised by having several consecutive magnet elements precision-machined out of a common solid iron block, 2.3–3.4 m long. With this magnet design solution, instead of having 1320 individual magnets, the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring is built up using 140 integrated ‘magnet block’ units, containing all these magnet elements. Major features of this magnet block design are compactness, vibration stability and that the alignment of magnet elements within each unit is given by the mechanical accuracy of the CNC machining rather than individual field measurement and adjustment. This article presents practical engineering details of implementing this magnet design solution, and mechanical + magnetic field measurement results from the magnet production series. At the time of writing (spring 2014), the production series, which is totally outsourced to industry, is roughly half way through, with mechanical/magnetic QA conforming to specifications. It is the conclusion of the authors that the MAX IV magnet block concept, which has sometimes been described as new or innovative, is from a manufacturing point of view simply a collection of known mature production methods and measurement procedures, which can be executed at fixed cost with a low level of risk. PMID:25177980

  9. CIRCE: A dedicated storage ring for coherent THz synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.M.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, W.R.; Munson, D.V.; Nishimura, H.; Robin, D.S.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.D.; Thur, W.G.; Jung, J.Y.; Wan, W.

    2003-01-01

    We present the concepts for an electron storage ring dedicated to and optimized for the production of stable coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) over the far-infrared terahertz wavelength range from 200 mm to about one cm. CIRCE (Coherent InfraRed CEnter) will be a 66 m circumference ring located on top of the ALS booster synchrotron shielding tunnel and using the existing ALS injector. This location provides enough floor space for both the CIRCE ring, its required shielding, and numerous beamlines. We briefly outline a model for CSR emission in which a static bunch distortion induced by the synchrotron radiation field is used to significantly extend the stable CSR emission towards higher frequencies. This model has been verified with experimental CSR results. We present the calculated CIRCE photon flux where a gain of 6-9 orders of magnitude is shown compared to existing far-IR sources. Additionally, the particular design of the dipole vacuum chamber has been optimized to allow an excellent transmission of these far-infrared wavelengths. We believe that the CIRCE source can be constructed for a modest cost

  10. Design of a lattice for JAERI storage ring (JSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Shunji; Yokomizo, Hideaki; Yanagida, Kenichi

    1990-08-01

    The new 8GeV synchrotron radiation facility (SPring-8) is planned to be constructed in Japan, and our institute (JAERI) are involved in this project with RIKEN. A compact electron storage ring JSR has been constructed in JAERI in order to study various kind of accelerator technologies, to test some devices such as the insertion devices and the beam monitors, and to train young researchers. The ring size is limited by the available space of a linac building, so that the circumference of JSR becomes 20.546 m. However, even in this small ring, one straight section with the length of ∼1.5 m, where the dispersion is free, is provided for the insertion device study. JSR takes Chasman-Green lattice with a superperiodicity of three. JSR is possible not only to suppress the dispersion but also to leave it on the long straight section. An electron beam from a linac is accepted into JSR in any operating modes. (author)

  11. Design of the WNR proton storage ring lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.K.; Lawrence, G.P.

    1977-01-01

    The Weapons Neutron Research Facility, now approaching operational status, is a pulsed neutron time-of-flight facility utilizing bursts of 800 MeV protons from the LAMPF linac. The protons strike a heavy metal target and produce a broad energy spectrum of neutrons via spallation reactions. Ideally the width of the proton pulse should approach a delta function in order to achieve good neutron energy resolution. Practically, the shortest pulse that can be employed in the facility is that produced by a single LAMPF micropulse, which, at design current, contains approximately 5 x 10 8 protons. With the addition of a storage ring capable of accumulating many micropulses, this intensity can be increased, as can the repetition rate. Moreover, by storing an unbunched beam, a low repetition rate, very intense proton burst can be generated. This latter mode of usage allows neutron time-of-flight studies using large neutron targets, for which pulse lengths of the order of several hundred nanoseconds are suitable. The primary goals of the ring are reported: (i) to increase the intensity of the burst to 10 11 protons while retaining a short pulse length; (ii) to increase the repetition rate of the bursts by at least a factor of six; and (iii) to store as many particles as possible, uniformly distributed around the ring

  12. Fiber ring laser sensor based on Fabry-Perot cavity interferometer for temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hui; Ma, Lei; Xiong, Hui; Zhang, Yunshan; Li, Yong Tao

    2018-01-01

    A ring laser temperature sensor based on a novel reflective fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer air cavity is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The reflective F-P air cavity, which consists of a segment of glass capillary inserted between two single-mode fibers, is utilized as a sensing element as well as as a filter in the fiber ring cavity. As temperature increases, the reflection spectra of the F-P sensor move towards the longer wavelength, and then cause lasing wavelength shifts. By monitoring the variation of lasing wavelength, we obtain a temperature sensor system with a high temperature sensitivity of 0.249 nm °C-1, a narrow 3 dB bandwidth of 0.1514 nm, and a high signal-to-noise ratio of 52 dB. Moreover, it is convenient to fabricate the sensor head, and the stability is very good, giving it a wide range of applications.

  13. Theoretical aspects of some collective instabilities in high-energy particle storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, F.

    1986-01-01

    After an introduction to single-particle dynamics, based on a unified Hamiltonian treatment of betatron and synchrotron oscillations, we consider two examples of collective instabilities which can limit the performances of high-energy storage rings: the transverse mode coupling instability, due to wake fields, and the incoherent beam-beam instability. Special emphasis is placed on the localization of the interactions between particles and surrounding structures, such as the accelerating RF cavities. We derive an exact invariant for the linearized synchrotron motion and, starting from the Vlasov equation, we discuss the coherent synchro-betatron resonances caused by localized impedance. Under suitable assumptions, we show that the effect of the beam-beam kicks in electron-positron machines can be described by new diffusive terms in a ''renormalized'' Fokker-Planck equation and is therefore equivalent to an additional source of noise for the betatron oscillations. (orig.)

  14. RF cavity R and D at LBNL for the NLC damping rings, FY1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Corlett, J.N.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Rasson, J.; Saleh, T.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a summary of the R and D activities at LBNL on RF cavities for the NLC damping rings during fiscal year19999. These activities include the optimization of the RF design for both efficiency and damping of higher-order (HOMs), by systematic study of the cavity profile, the effect of the beam pipe diameter, nosecone angle and gap, the cross section and position of the HOM damping waveguides and the coupler. The effect of the shape of the HOM waveguides and their intersection with the cavity wall on the local surface heating is also an important factor, since it determines the highest stresses in the cavity body. This was taken into account during the optimization so that the stresses could be reduced at the same time as the HOP damping was improved over previous designs. A new method of calculating the RF heating was employed, using a recently released high frequency electromagnetic element in ANSYS. This greatly facilitates the thermal and stress analysis of the design and fabrication methods have been developed with the goals of lower stresses, fewer parts and simpler assembly compared to previous designs. This should result in substantial cost savings. Preliminary designs are described for the cavity ancillary components including the RF window, HOM loads, and tuners. A preliminary manufacturing plan is included, with an initial estimate of the resource requirements. Other cavity options are discussed which might be desirable to either lower the R/Q, for reduced transient response, or lower the residual HOM impedance to reduce coupled-bunch growth rates further still

  15. Spectrum reshaping of micro-ring resonator via an integrated Fabry-Perot cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiayang; Moein, Tania; Xu, Xingyuan; Ren, Guanghui; Mitchell, Arnan; Moss, David J.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement in the filtering quality (Q) factor of an integrated micro-ring resonator (MRR) by embedding it in an integrated Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity formed by cascaded Sagnac loop reflectors (SLRs). By using coherent interference within the FP cavity to reshape the transmission spectrum of the MRR, both the Q factor and the extinction ratio (ER) can be greatly improved. The device is theoretically analyzed, and practically fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. Experimental results show that up to 11-times improvement in Q factor and an 8-dB increase in ER can be achieved via our proposed method. The impact of varying structural parameters on the device performance is also investigated and verified.

  16. [Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the following topics: the Wisconsin test facility for storage cells; results of target tests; the new UHV target test system; funding request for a new atomic beam system; and planning of storage ring experiments

  17. Dual-etalon cavity ring-down frequency-comb spectroscopy with broad band light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, David W; Strecker, Kevin E

    2014-04-01

    In an embodiment, a dual-etalon cavity-ring-down frequency-comb spectrometer system is described. A broad band light source is split into two beams. One beam travels through a first etalon and a sample under test, while the other beam travels through a second etalon, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges ("FSR") of the two etalons are not identical, the interference pattern at the detector will consist of a series of beat frequencies. By monitoring these beat frequencies, optical frequencies where light is absorbed may be determined.

  18. GHz-bandwidth upconversion detector using a unidirectional ring cavity to reduce multilongitudinal mode pump effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Lichun; Høgstedt, Lasse; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    narrow-linewidth lasers in a fiber coupler while tuning their wavelength difference down to 10 pm or less. The SFG crystal is placed inside an Nd:YVO4 ring cavity that provides 1064 nm circulating pump powers of up to 150 W in unidirectional operation. Measured Fabry-Perot spectrum at 1064 nm confirms...... for cooling, the GHz-bandwidth upconverter can readily be extended to the mid-IR (2 - 5 mu m) as an alternative to cooled low-bandgap semiconductor detectors for applications such as high-speed free-space optical communications. (C) 2017 Optical Society of America...

  19. Commissioning results of the APS storage ring diagnostics systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1996-01-01

    Initial commissionings of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) 7-GeV storage ring and its diagnostics systems have been done. Early studies involved single-bunch measurements for beam transverse size (σ x ∼ 150 μm, σ y ∼ 50 μm), current, injection losses, and bunch length. The diagnostics have been used in studies related to the detection of an extra contribution to beam jitter at ∼ 6.5 Hz frequency; observation of bunch lengthening (σ ∼ 30 to 60 ps) with single-bunch current; observation of an induced vertical, head-tail instability; and detection of a small orbit change with insertion device gap position. More recently, operations at 100-mA stored-beam current, the baseline design goal, have been achieved with the support of beam characterizations

  20. Numerical simulation of crystalline ion beams in storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Meshkov, I N; Katayama, T; Sidorin, A; Smirnov, A Yu; Syresin, E M; Trubnikov, G; Tsutsui, H

    2004-01-01

    The use of crystalline ion beams can increase luminosity in the collider and in experiments with targets for investigation of rare radioactive isotopes. The ordered state of circulating ion beams was observed at several storage rings: NAP-M (Proceedings of the Fourth All Union Conference on Charged Particle Accelerators, Vol. 2, Nauka, Moscow, 1975 (in Russian); Part. Accel. 7 (1976) 197; At. Energy 40 (1976) 49; Preprint CERN/PS/AA 79-41, Geneva, 1979) (Novosibirsk), ESR (Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 3803) and SIS (Proceedings of EPAC'2000, 2000) (Darmstadt), CRYRING (Proceedings of PAC'2001, 2001) (Stockholm) and PALLAS (Proceedings of the Conference on Applications of Accelerators in Research and Industry, AIP Conference Proceedings, p. 576, in preparation) (Munchen). New criteria of the beam orderliness are derived and verified with a new program code. Molecular dynamics technique is inserted in BETACOOL program (Proceedings of Beam Cooling and Related Topics, Bad Honnef, Germany, 2001) and used for numeric...

  1. Study of orbit stability in the SSRF storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Zhimin; Liu Guimin; Huang Nan

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, analysis of the beam orbit stability and conceptual study of the dynamic orbit feedback in the SSRF storage ring are presented. It is shown that beam orbit position movement at the photon source points is smaller than the orbit stability requirements in horizontal plane, but exceeds the orbit stability requirements in vertical plane. A dynamic global orbit feedback system, which consists of 38 high-bandwidth air-coil correctors and 40 high-precise BPMs, is proposed to suppress the vertical beam orbit position movement. Numerical simulations show that this dynamic orbit feedback system can stabilize the vertical beam orbit position movement in the frequency range up to 100 Hz

  2. High gradient quadrupoles for low emittance storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Le Bec

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available High gradient quadrupoles are key components for the coming generation of storage ring based light sources. The typical specifications of these magnets are: almost 100  T/m gradient, half a meter long, and a vertical aperture for the extraction of the x-ray beam. This paper presents the preparation work done at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, from the design to the manufacture and measurements of a prototype. It demonstrates the feasibility of such magnets. Different aspects of magnet engineering are discussed, including the study of the main scale factors and the preliminary design, the pole shaping, the impact of mechanical errors, and the magnetic measurements of a prototype with a stretched-wire system.

  3. Ion trapping in the high-energy storage ring HESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterberger, Frank [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik

    2011-10-15

    The problem of ion trapping in the high-energy storage ring HESR is studied in the present report. Positive ions are trapped in the negative potential well of the antiproton beam. The ions are produced by the interaction between the antiproton beam and the residual gas. The adverse effects of ion trapping like tune shifts, tune spreads and coherent instabilities are reviewed. The ion production rate by ionization of the residual gas molecules is estimated. The negative potential well and the corresponding electric fields of the antiproton beam are evaluated in order to study the transverse and longitudinal motion of the ions and the accumulation in trapping pockets. The removal of ions can be achieved using clearing electrodes and under certain conditions resonant transverse beam shaking. Diagnostic tools and measurements of trapped ion effects are sketched. (orig.)

  4. Radiative polarization in high-energy storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mane, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    Electron and positron beams circulating in high-energy storage rings become spontaneously polarized by the emission of synchrotron radiation. The asymptotic degree of polarization that can be attained is strongly affected by so-called depolarizing resonances. Detailed experimental measurements of the polarization were made SPEAR about ten years ago, but due to lack of a suitable theory only a limited theoretical fit to the data has so far been achieved. The author presents a general formalism for calculating depolarizing resonances, which has been coded into a computer program called SMILE, and use it to fit the SPEAR data. By the use of suitable approximations, the author is able to fit both higher order and nonlinear resonances, and thereby to interpret many hitherto unexplained features in the data, and to resolve a puzzle concerning the asymmetry of certain resonance widths seen in the data. 18 refs., 2 figs

  5. Radiative polarization in high-energy storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mane, S.R.

    1989-03-01

    Electron and positron beams circulating in high-energy storage rings become spontaneously polarized by the emission of synchrotron radiation. The asymptotic degree of polarization that can be attained is strongly affected by so-called depolarizing resonances. Detailed experimental measurements of the polarization were made SPEAR about ten years ago, but due to lack of a suitable theory only a limited theoretical fit to the data has so far been achieved. I present a general formalism for calculating depolarizing resonances, which as been coded into a computer program called SMILE, and use it to fit the SPEAR data. By the use of suitable approximations, I am able to fit both higher order and nonlinear resonances, and thereby to interpret many hitherto unexplained features in the data, and to resolve a puzzle concerning the asymmetry of certain resonance widths seen in the data. 18 refs., 2 figs

  6. Emittance growth induced by electron cloud in proton storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, Elena; Coppa, G

    2006-01-01

    In proton and positron storage rings with many closely spaced bunches, a large number of electrons can accumulate in the beam pipe due to various mechanisms (photoemission, residual gas ionization, beam-induced multipacting). The so-formed electron cloud interacts with the positively charged bunches, giving rise to instabilities, emittance growth and losses. This phenomenon has been observed in several existing machines such as the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), whose operation has been constrained by the electron-cloud problem, and it is a concern for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), under construction at CERN. The interaction between the beam and the electron cloud has features which cannot be fully taken into account by the conventional and known theories from accelerators and plasma physics. Computer simulations are indispensable for a proper prediction and understanding of the instability dynamics. The main feature which renders the beam-cloud interactions so peculiar is that the the electron cloud...

  7. Incoherent effects of electron cloud in proton storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, Elena; Zimmermann, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Electron clouds in the beam pipe of high-energy proton or positron storage rings can give rise to significant incoherent emittance growth, at densities far below the coherent-instability threshold. We identify two responsible echanisms, namely: (1) a beam particle periodically crosses a resonance and (2) a beam particle periodically crosses a region of the bunch where its motion is linearly unstable. Formation of halo or beam-core blow up, respectively, are the result. Key ingredients for both processes are synchrotron motion and electron-induced tune shift. The mechanisms considered provide a possible explanation for reduced beam lifetime and emittance growth observed at several operating accelerators. Similar phenomena are likely to occur in other two- stream systems.

  8. A polarized sup 3 He internal target for storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Poolman, H R; Bulten, H J; Doets, M; Ent, R; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Geurts, D G; Harvey, M; Mul, F A

    2000-01-01

    A polarized sup 3 He internal target was employed at the internal target facility of the Amsterdam electron Pulse Stretcher and Storage ring (AmPS) at the Dutch National Institute for Nuclear and High-Energy Physics (NIKHEF). The unique features of internal targets such as chemical and isotopic purity, high and rapidly reversible polarization, and the ability to manipulate the target spin orientation were successfully demonstrated. A nuclear polarization of 0.50 (0.42) at a sup 3 He gas flow of 1.0 (2.0)x10 sup 1 sup 7 at s sup - sup 1 could be obtained. Operation at a nominal flow of 1x10 sup 1 sup 7 at s sup - sup 1 resulted in a target thickness of 0.7x10 sup 1 sup 5 at cm sup - sup 2 at a target temperature of 17 K.

  9. Some hadron calorimeter properties relevant to storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corden, M.J.; Dowell, J.D.; Edwards, M.; Ellis, N.; Garvey, J.; Grant, D.; Homer, R.J.; Kenyon, I.R.; McMahon, T.; Schanz, G.; Sumorok, K.C.T.O.; Watkins, P.M.; Wilson, J.A.; Eisenhandler, E.; Gibson, W.R.; Kalmus, P.I.P.; Thompson, G.; Arnison, G.; Astbury, A.; Grayer, G.; Haynes, W.J.; Hill, D.; Nandi, A.K.; Roberts, C.; Shah, T.P.

    1982-01-01

    At wide angles in a storage ring environment, a substantial part of the energy seen by a hadron calorimeter can be in the form of very low momentum particles such as jet fragments or resonance cascade decay products. Data are presented on the deviations from Gaussian resolution and linear response for such low momentum particles. The differing responses to incident e - , μ - , π +- , K +- , p and anti p at momenta below 10 GeV/c are also compared. In addition, the authors discuss the significance of angle effects for a 4π calorimeter, and the problems of combining data from calorimeters with different physical characteristics. Experimental data are presented on the difference in hadron response between a fine grain (electromagnetic) lead calorimeter and a coarser (hadron) iron calorimeter, and on the dependence of the response on the energy sharing between the two calorimeters. (Auth.)

  10. Resonant pickups for non-destructive single-particle detection in heavy-ion storage rings and first experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjari, Mohammad Shahab

    2013-04-26

    Nuclear astrophysics studies on highly charged radionuclides benefit from accelerator facilities with storage rings, where exotic nuclides produced with small yields can be efficiently investigated. Currently there are two accelerator facilities capable of storing highly charged heavy ions, GSI in Darmstadt and IMP in Lanzhou. Non-destructive detection methods are often used for in-flight measurements based on frequency analysis. The sensitivity of such detection systems are of primary importance specially when number of stored ions is small. Furthermore, since the exotic nuclides of interest are as a rule short-lived, the detectors must be fast. One common form of such detectors are parallel plate SCHOTTKY monitors, on which particles induce a mirror charge at each passage. This method has been successfully used at ESR experimental storage ring of GSI since 1991. In this work we describe a new resonant SCHOTTKY pickup operating as a high sensitive cavity current monitor which was mounted and commissioned in the ESR early 2010. It was successfully used in several storage ring experiments. A very similar pickup was mounted in CSRe at IMP Lanzhou in 2011. First in-ring tests have been performed and new experimental results are pending. The spectral analysis of acquired signals by the new detector has enabled a broad range of new physics experiments. The theory of operation and first experimental results and future perspectives are presented in this thesis.

  11. Proceedings of the workshop on polarized targets in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-08-01

    Polarization phenomena have played an increasingly important part in the study of nuclei and nucleons in recent years. Polarization studies have been hampered by the relatively few and rather fragile polarized targets which are presently available. The concept of polarized gas targets in storage rings opens a much wider range of possibilities than is available in the external target geometry. This novel method will represent a considerable advance in nuclear physics and will continue to receive much attention in plans for future facilities. An internal, polarized-target station is being planned for the cooler ring at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Internal targets are compatible with recent designs of electron accelerators proposed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Southeastern Universities Research Association. The key to nuclear-science programs based on internal targets pivots on recent developments in polarized atomic beam methods, which include the more recent laser-driven polarized targets. The workshop drew together a unique group of physicists in the fields of high-energy, nuclear and atomic physics. The meeting was organized in a manner that stimulated discussion among the 58 participants and focused on developments in polarized target technology and the underlying atomic physics. An impressive array of future possibilities for polarized targets as well as current developments in polarized target technology were discussed at the workshop. Abstracts of individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base

  12. Nonlinear interaction of colliding beams in particle storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, J C; Month, M

    1979-01-01

    When two beams of high energy particles moving in opposite directions are brought into collision, a large amount of energy is available for the production of new particles. However to obtain a sufficiently high event rate for rare processes, such as the production of the intermediate vector boson (Z/sub 0/ and W/sup + -/), large beam currents are also required. Under this circumstance, the high charge density of one beam results in a classical electromagnetic interaction on the particles in the other beam. This very nonlinear space charge force, caled the beam-beam force, limits the total circulating charge and, thereby, the ultimate performance of the colliding ring system. The basic nature of the beam-beam force is discussed, indicating how it is quite different in the case of continuous beams, which cross each other at an angle as compared to the case of bunched beams which collide head-on. Some experimental observations on the beam-beam interaction in proton-proton and electron-positron beams are then reviewed and interpreted. An important aspect of the beam-beam problem in storage rings is to determine at what point in the analysis of the particle dynamics is it relevant to bring in the concepts of stochasticity, slow diffusion, and resonance overlap. These ideas are briefly discussed.

  13. Proceedings of the workshop on polarized targets in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, R.J. (ed.)

    1984-08-01

    Polarization phenomena have played an increasingly important part in the study of nuclei and nucleons in recent years. Polarization studies have been hampered by the relatively few and rather fragile polarized targets which are presently available. The concept of polarized gas targets in storage rings opens a much wider range of possibilities than is available in the external target geometry. This novel method will represent a considerable advance in nuclear physics and will continue to receive much attention in plans for future facilities. An internal, polarized-target station is being planned for the cooler ring at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Internal targets are compatible with recent designs of electron accelerators proposed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Southeastern Universities Research Association. The key to nuclear-science programs based on internal targets pivots on recent developments in polarized atomic beam methods, which include the more recent laser-driven polarized targets. The workshop drew together a unique group of physicists in the fields of high-energy, nuclear and atomic physics. The meeting was organized in a manner that stimulated discussion among the 58 participants and focused on developments in polarized target technology and the underlying atomic physics. An impressive array of future possibilities for polarized targets as well as current developments in polarized target technology were discussed at the workshop. Abstracts of individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base.

  14. Second order single particle dynamics in quasi-isochronous storage rings and its application to the LNLS-UVX ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Liu (Pro-Reitoria de Pesquisa, Univ. Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil) Lab. Nacional de Luz Sincrotron-LNLS, Campinas, SP (Brazil)); Concalves da Silva, C.E.T. (Inst. de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Univ. Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil) Lab. Nacional de Luz Sincrotron-LNLS, Campinas, SP (Brazil))

    1993-05-15

    We analyze the second order single particle longitudinal dynamics in a quasi-isochronous storage ring. We expand the momentum compaction factor to include the effects of second order terms taking sextupoles into account and of transverse betatron oscillations. The introduction of nonlinearities due to higher order terms results in a second stability region for longitudinal phase oscillations, in addition to the well known linear stable operation point. The conditions for this new solution to fall within the energy acceptance of the storage ring are presented. Inclusion of transverse motion coupling may lead to either a reduction or an enhancement of the stable longitudinal phase-space regions. The analysis is applied to the LNLS 1.15 GeV UVX electron storage ring, indicating that it should be possible to operate this ring in a quasi-isochronous mode. (orig.).

  15. Miniature chemical sensor combining molecular recognition with evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipino, Andrew C. R.

    2004-01-01

    A new chemical detection technology has been realized that addresses DOE environmental management needs. The new technology is based on a variant of the sensitive optical absorption technique, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Termed evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), the technology employs a miniature solid-state optical resonator having an extremely high Q-factor as the sensing element, where the high-Q is achieved by using ultra-low-attenuation optical materials, ultra-smooth surfaces, and ultra-high reflectivity coatings, as well as low-diffraction-loss designs. At least one total-internal reflection (TIR) mirror is integral to the resonator permitting the concomitant evanescent wave to probe the ambient environment. Several prototypes have been designed, fabricated, characterized, and applied to chemical detection. Moreover, extensions of the sensing concept have been explored to enhance selectivity, sensitivity, and range of application. Operating primarily in the visible and near IR regions, the technology inherently enables remote detection by optical fiber. Producing 11 archival publications, 5 patents, 19 invited talks, 4 conference proceedings, a CRADA, and a patent-license agreement, the project has realized a new chemical detection technology providing >100 times more sensitivity than comparable technologies, while also providing practical advantages

  16. Progress on the Design of the Storage Ring Vacuum System for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillwell, B.; Billett, B.; Brajuskovic, B.; Carter, J.; Kirkus, E.; Lale, M.; Lerch, J.; Noonan, J.; O' Neill, M.; Rocke, B.; Suthar, K.; Walters, D.; Wiemerslage, G.; Zientek, J.

    2017-06-20

    Recent work on the design of the storage ring vacuum system for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project (APS-U) includes: revising the vacuum system design to accommodate a new lattice with reverse bend magnets, modifying the designs of vacuum chambers in the FODO sections for more intense incident synchrotron radiation power, modifying the design of rf-shielding bellows liners for better performance and reliability, modifying photon absorber designs to make better use of available space, and integrated planning of components needed in the injection, extraction and rf cavity straight sections. An overview of progress in these areas is presented.

  17. Development of a pulsed laser with emission at 1053 nm for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcanti, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a pulsed and Q-switched laser resonator was developed using the double-beam mode-controlling technique. A Nd:LiYF4 crystal with 0,8mol% of doping concentration was used to generate a giant pulse with duration of 5,5 ns (FWHM), 1,2 mJ of energy and 220 kW peak power for the Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) technique. The CRDS technique is used to measure absorption spectra for gases, liquids and solids. With the CRDS technique it is possible to measure losses with high degree of accuracy, underscoring the sensitivity that is confirmed by the use of mirrors with high reflectivity. With this technique, the losses by reflection and scattering of transparent materials were evaluated. By calibrating the resonant cavity, it was possible to measure the losses in the samples with resolution of 0,045%, the maximum being reached by 0,18%. The calibration was possible because there was obtained to measure a decay time of approximately 20 μs with the empty cavity. Besides was obtained a method for determining the refractive index of transparent materials with accuracy of five decimals. (author)

  18. Commissioning of the Cryogenic Plant for the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at Heidelberg

    CERN Document Server

    von Hahn, R; Grieser, M; Haberstroh, C; Kaiser, D; Lange, M; Laux, F; Menk, S; Orlov, D A; Repnow, R; Sieber, T; Quack, H; Varju, J; Wolf A

    2009-01-01

    At the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg a next generation electrostatic storage ring for low velocity atomic and molecular ion beams is under construction. In contrast to existing electrostatic storage rings, the Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR will be cooled down to temperatures below 2 K. Thus acting as a large cryopump it will provide long storage times and, in addition, open a new field of quantum state controlled molecular physics due to a low heat radiation background from space-like environment. A concept for cooling the storage ring has been developed and is presently tested by means of a linear trap as a prototype with a length of 1/10 of the planned ring. A commercial refrigerator with 21 W at 2 K has been successfully commissioned and was connected to the prototype. This paper presents the status of the cryogenic plant after the commissioning and one year of operation.

  19. Cavity-enhanced eigenmode and angular hybrid multiplexing in holographic data storage systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bo E; Takashima, Yuzuru

    2016-12-26

    Resonant optical cavities have been demonstrated to improve energy efficiencies in Holographic Data Storage Systems (HDSS). The orthogonal reference beams supported as cavity eigenmodes can provide another multiplexing degree of freedom to push storage densities toward the limit of 3D optical data storage. While keeping the increased energy efficiency of a cavity enhanced reference arm, image bearing holograms are multiplexed by orthogonal phase code multiplexing via Hermite-Gaussian eigenmodes in a Fe:LiNbO3 medium with a 532 nm laser at two Bragg angles. We experimentally confirmed write rates are enhanced by an average factor of 1.1, and page crosstalk is about 2.5%. This hybrid multiplexing opens up a pathway to increase storage density while minimizing modification of current angular multiplexing HDSS.

  20. Effects of beam-beam collisions on storage-ring performance - a pedagogical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schonfeld, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of the experimental and theoretical literature on colliding-beam effects in both leptonic and hadronic storage rings. For the most part, this literature is rather technical and, to the novice, both obscurely written and hard to locate. Although there have already been several symposia on the subject, as well as a number of reviews for specialists there has up till now been no unified and pedagogical exposition. The present work represents an attempt to fill this gap. The material is grouped into four major areas: observational phenomenology, computer simulation, mathematical background, and theoretical models. 113 references, 36 figures

  1. High-pressure research at the SISSI infrared beamline of the elettra storage-ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, P.

    2016-01-01

    The SISSI infrared beamline of the Elettra storage-ring is a very valuable tool for the study of the low energy electrodynamics of materials at high pressures. Thanks to the high brightness of infrared synchrotron radiation, SISSI allows to perform reflectivity and/or transmission experiments in a Diamond Anvil Cell, from THz to visible wavelengths. This opportunity has been exploited to tackle several fundamental problems in solid-state physics, especially in the fi eld of strongly-correlated electron systems, Mott insulator to metal transitions and superconductivity. Other interesting applications range from organic semiconductors to biology and chemistry. After outlining the characteristics of the beamline and its capabilities for high-pressure research, we will review some of the most recent results from the SISSI beamline. (author)

  2. Use of eigenvectors in understanding and correcting storage ring orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A.; Bozoki, E.

    1994-01-01

    The response matrix A is defined by the equation X=AΘ, where Θ is the kick vector and X is the resulting orbit vector. Since A is not necessarily a symmetric or even a square matrix we symmetrize it by using A T A. Then we find the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of this A T A matrix. The physical interpretation of the eigenvectors for circular machines is discussed. The task of the orbit correction is to find the kick vector Θ for a given measured orbit vector X. We are presenting a method, in which the kick vector is expressed as linear combination of the eigenvectors. An additional advantage of this method is that it yields the smallest possible kick vector to correct the orbit. We will illustrate the application of the method to the NSLS X-ray and UV storage rings and the resulting measurements. It will be evident, that the accuracy of this method allows the combination of the global orbit correction and local optimization of the orbit for beam lines and insertion devices. The eigenvector decomposition can also be used for optimizing kick vectors, taking advantage of the fact that eigenvectors with corresponding small eigenvalue generate negligible orbit changes. Thus, one can reduce a kick vector calculated by any other correction method and still stay within the tolerance for orbit correction. The use of eigenvectors in accurately measuring the response matrix and the use of the eigenvalue decomposition orbit correction algorithm in digital feedback is discussed. (orig.)

  3. Beam position determination for the Test Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Peter

    1987-01-01

    The Test Storage Ring (TSR) for heavy ions, currently under design and construction at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, requires an extensive beam diagnostics system in order to enable it to operate without friction. This thesis concerns the beam position determination sub-system of this diagnostics system which is intended to determine the beam center of gravity of a bunched beam inside the cross section of the beam tube in a non-destructive manner. An electrostatic pickup is used to sense the location of the beam; the mode of operation of this device will be explained in detail. The signals go to a preamplifier from where they are then sent via a multiplex system to the measuring unit. This point also represents the interface to the computer system that controls the TSR. The prototype developed here was tested with the aid of a particle beam, as well as with other measurement methods. Resolutions of better than 1 mm about the center have been measured. In order to achieve or even improve such resolutions later in actual operation, it is possible to determine the properties of the preamplifiers with the aid of calibration signals and to take these into account in the course of the signal evaluation in the computer. The differences between the individual electrodes of a given pickup must also be compensated. These procedures and their associated electronic circuits are also described in this paper.

  4. Searching for the electron EDM in a storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawall, D

    2011-01-01

    Searches for permanent electric dipole moments (EDM) of fundamental particles have been underway for more than 50 years with null results. Still, such searches are of great interest because EDMs arise from radiative corrections involving processes that violate parity and time-reversal symmetries, and through the CPT theorem, are sensitive to CP-violation. New models of physics beyond the standard model predict new sources of CP-violation leading to dramatically enhanced EDMs possibly within the reach of a new generation of experiments. We describe a new approach to electron EDM searches using molecular ions stored in a tabletop electrostatic storage ring. Molecular ions with long-lived paramagnetic states such as tungsten nitride WN + can be injected and stored in larger numbers and with longer coherence times than competing experiments, leading to high sensitivity to an electron EDM. Systematic effects mimicking an EDM such as those due to motional magnetic fields and geometric phases are found not to limit the approach in the short term, and sensitivities of δ|d e | ∼ 10 -30 e·cm/day appear possible under conservative conditions.

  5. Electron cooling of D sup - at the ASTRID storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, J S; Andersen, L H; Balling, P; Raarup, M K

    2000-01-01

    A report of recent results on electron cooling of D sup - at an energy of 1.6 MeV in the ASTRID storage ring is given. The longitudinal velocity spread has been reduced from approx 4x10 sup - sup 4 (FWHM) to approx 7x10 sup - sup 5 (FWHM) at a current of approx 0.1 mu A. A drift in the mean velocity of the cooled beam has been reduced by application of a small RF signal on four sets of plates in the cooler. Initially, the velocity spread is found to decrease with ion current, indicating equilibrium between cooling and intra-beam scattering, whereas at later times (lower current) the velocity spread becomes constant, indicating equilibrium with the electron beam. To diagnose cooling, a simple system allowing to follow the frequency width and position of a Schottky harmonic on a sub-second time-scale, has been developed. The system uses a standard data acquisition card to digitize a down-mixed Schottky-signal and a FFT routine in Labview on a standard PC. The electron-cooled ion-beam is used for high-resolution...

  6. Storage ring lattice calibration using resonant spin depolarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Wootton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents measurements of the GeV-scale electron beam energy for the storage rings at the synchrotron light source facilities Australian Synchrotron (AS and SPEAR3 at SLAC. Resonant spin depolarization was employed in the beam energy measurement, since it is presently the highest precision technique and an uncertainty of order 10^{-6} was achieved at SPEAR3 and AS. Using the resonant depolarization technique, the beam energy was measured at various rf frequencies to measure the linear momentum compaction factor. This measured linear momentum compaction factor was used to evaluate models of the beam trajectory through combined-function bending magnets. The main bending magnets of both lattices are rectangular, horizontally defocusing gradient bending magnets. Four modeling approaches are compared for the beam trajectory through the bending magnet: a circular trajectory, linear and nonlinear hyperbolic cosine trajectories, and numerical evaluation of the trajectory through the measured magnetic field map. Within the uncertainty of the measurement the momentum compaction factor is shown to agree with the numerical model of the trajectory within the bending magnet, and disagree with the hyperbolic cosine approximation.

  7. Initial scientific uses of coherent synchrotron radiation inelectron storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basov, D.N.; Feikes, J.; Fried, D.; Holldack, K.; Hubers, H.W.; Kuske, P.; Martin, M.C.; Pavlov, S.G.; Schade, U.; Singley, E.J.; Wustefeld, G.

    2004-11-23

    The production of stable, high power, coherent synchrotron radiation at sub-terahertz frequency at the electron storage ring BESSY opens a new region in the electromagnetic spectrum to explore physical properties of materials. Just as conventional synchrotron radiation has been a boon to x-ray science, coherent synchrotron radiation may lead to many new innovations and discoveries in THz physics. With this new accelerator-based radiation source we have been able to extend traditional infrared measurements down into the experimentally poorly accessible sub-THz frequency range. The feasibility of using the coherent synchrotron radiation in scientific applications was demonstrated in a series of experiments: We investigated shallow single acceptor transitions in stressed and unstressed Ge:Ga by means of photoconductance measurements below 1 THz. We have directly measured the Josephson plasma resonance in optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} for the first time and finally we succeeded to confine the sub-THz radiation for spectral near-field imaging on biological samples such as leaves and human teeth.

  8. Planning and Prototyping for a Storage Ring Measurement of the Proton Electric Dipole Moment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talman, Richard [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Electron and proton EDM's can be measured in "frozen spin" (with the beam polarization always parallel to the orbit, for example) storage rings. For electrons the "magic" kinetic energy at which the beam can be frozen is 14.5 MeV. For protons the magic kinetic energy is 230 MeV. The currently measured upper limit for the electron EDM is much smaller than the proton EDM upper limit, which is very poorly known. Nevertheless, because the storage ring will be an order of magnitude cheaper, a sensible plan is to first build an all-electric electron storage ring as a prototype. Such an electron ring was successfully built at Brookhaven, in 1954, as a prototype for their AGS ring. This leaves little uncertainty concerning the cost and performance of such a ring. (This is documentedin one of the Physical Review papers mentioned above.)

  9. Extinction efficiencies of coated absorbing aerosols measured by cavity ring down aerosol spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Segre

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we measure the extinction efficiency at 532 nm of absorbing aerosol particles coated with a non-absorbing solid and liquid organic shell with coating thickness varying between 5 and 100 nm using cavity ring down aerosol spectrometry. For this purpose, we use nigrosin, an organic black dye, as a model absorbing core and two non-absorbing organic substances as shells, glutaric acid (GA and Di-Ethyl-Hexyl-Sebacate (DEHS. The measured behavior of the coated particles is consistent with Mie calculations of core-shell particles. Errors between measured and calculated values for nigrosin coated with GA and DEHS are between 0.5% and 10.5% and between 0.5% and 9%, respectively. However, it is evident that the calculations are in better agreement with the measured results for thinner coatings. Possible reasons for these discrepancies are discussed.

  10. Anomalous ring-down effects and breakdown of the decay rate concept in optical cavities with negative group delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauprêtre, T; Goldfarb, F; Bretenaker, F; Schwartz, S; Ghosh, R; Carusotto, I

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of light pulses through negative group velocity media is known to give rise to a number of paradoxical situations that seem to violate causality. The solution of these paradoxes has triggered the investigation of a number of interesting and unexpected features of light propagation. Here, we report a combined theoretical and experimental study of the ring-down oscillations in optical cavities filled with a medium with a sufficiently negative frequency dispersion to give a negative round-trip group delay time. We theoretically anticipate that causality imposes the existence of additional resonance peaks in the cavity transmission, resulting in a non-exponential decay of the cavity field and in a breakdown of the cavity decay rate concept. Our predictions are validated by simulations and by an experiment using a room-temperature gas of metastable helium atoms in the detuned electromagnetically induced transparency regime as the cavity medium. (paper)

  11. The phase slip factor of the electrostatic cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieser, Manfred; von Hahn, Robert; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    To determine the momentum spread of an ion beam from the measured revolution frequency distribution, the knowledge of the phase slip factor of the storage ring is necessary. The slip factor was measured for various working points of the cryogenic storage ring CSR at MPI for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg and was compared with simulations. The predicted functional relationship of the slip factor and the horizontal tune depends on the different islands of stability, which has been experimentally verified. This behavior of the slip factor is in clear contrast to that of magnetic storage rings.

  12. Polarization of electron beams in high energy storage rings. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mane, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    The spin resonances in high energy electron storage rings are calculated using perturbation theory, for various model storage rings, and the results are compared against analytical formulas (in the case of higher order synchrotron resonances), to elucidate the convergence of the perturbation series. A new analytical formula for synchrotron resonances centered on an integer is also derived, because it is shown that the older formula contains approximations not always valid in modern storage rings. The perturbation series is shown to converge and to agree with the analytical formulas, and the number of terms required for convergence is estimated. Some other pedagogical results are also presented. (orig.)

  13. Electron cloud development in the Proton Storage Ring and in the Spallation Neutron Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. F. Pivi

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available We have applied our simulation code POSINST to evaluate the contribution to the growth rate of the electron cloud instability in proton storage rings. In particular, we present here recent simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud in the storage ring of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge, and updated results for the Proton Storage Ring at Los Alamos. A key ingredient in our model is a detailed description of the secondary electron emission process, including a refined model for the emitted energy spectrum, and for the three main components of the secondary yield, namely, the true secondary, rediffused and backscattered components.

  14. Electron cloud development in the Proton Storage Ring and in theSpallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Furman, M.A.

    2002-10-08

    We have applied our simulation code "POSINST" to evaluatethe contribution to the growth rate of the electron-cloud instability inproton storage rings. Recent simulation results for the main features ofthe electron cloud in the storage ring of the Spallation Neutron Source(SNS) at Oak Ridge, and updated results for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR)at Los Alamos are presented in this paper. A key ingredient in our modelis a detailed description of the secondary emitted-electron energyspectrum. A refined model for the secondary emission process includingthe so-called true secondary, rediffused and backscattered electrons hasrecently been included in the electron-cloud code.

  15. Diversity and abundance of bacteria in an underground oil-storage cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kazuya; Kodama, Yumiko; Kaku, Nobuo

    2002-08-28

    Microorganisms inhabiting subterranean oil fields have recently attracted much attention. Since intact groundwater can easily be obtained from the bottom of underground oil-storage cavities without contamination by surface water, studies on such oil-storage cavities are expected to provide valuable information to understand microbial ecology of subterranean oil fields. DNA was extracted from the groundwater obtained from an oil-storage cavity situated at Kuji in Iwate, Japan, and 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) fragments were amplified by PCR using combinations of universal and Bacteria-specific primers. The sequence analysis of 154 clones produced 31 different bacterial sequence types (a unique clone or group of clones with sequence similarity of > 98). Major sequence types were related to Desulfotomaculum, Acetobacterium, Desulfovibrio, Desulfobacula, Zoogloea and Thiomicrospira denitrificans. The abundance in the groundwater of bacterial populations represented by these major sequence types was assessed by quantitative competitive PCR using specific primers, showing that five rDNA types except for that related to Desulfobacula shared significant proportions (more than 1%) of the total bacterial rDNA. Bacteria inhabiting the oil-storage cavity were unexpectedly diverse. A phylogenetic affiliation of cloned 16S rDNA sequences suggests that bacteria exhibiting different types of energy metabolism coexist in the cavity.

  16. Mid-infrared continuous wave cavity ring down spectroscopy of molecular ions using an optical parametric oscillator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbraak, H.; Ngai, A.K.Y.; Persijn, S.T.; Harren, F.J.M.; Linnartz, H.

    2007-01-01

    A sensitive infrared detection scheme is presented in which continuous wave cavity ring down spectroscopy is used to record rovibrational spectra of molecular ions in direct absorption through supersonically expanding planar plasma. A cw optical parametric oscillator is used as a light source and

  17. A new approach to sum frequency generation of single-frequency blue light in a coupled ring cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-01-01

    We present a generic approach for the generation of tunable single-frequency light and demonstrate generation of more than 300 mW tunable light around 460 nm. One tapered diode laser is operated in a coupled ring cavity containing the nonlinear crystal and another tapered diode laser is sent thro...

  18. Cavity ring-down study of the visible absorption spectrum of the phenyl radical and kinetics of its reactions with Cl, Br, Cl-2, and O-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonokura, K; Norikane, Y; Koshi, M

    2002-01-01

    Cavity ring-down spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser photolysis was used to study the visible absorption spectrum (490-535 nm, B-2(1)......Cavity ring-down spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser photolysis was used to study the visible absorption spectrum (490-535 nm, B-2(1)...

  19. An external-cavity quantum cascade laser operating near 5.2 µm combined with cavity ring-down spectroscopy for multi-component chemical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta Banik, Gourab; Maity, Abhijit; Som, Suman; Pal, Mithun; Pradhan, Manik

    2018-04-01

    We report on the performance of a widely tunable continuous wave mode-hop-free external-cavity quantum cascade laser operating at λ ~ 5.2 µm combined with cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) technique for high-resolution molecular spectroscopy. The CRDS system has been utilized for simultaneous and molecule-specific detection of several environmentally and bio-medically important trace molecular species such as nitric oxide, nitrous oxide, carbonyl sulphide and acetylene (C2H2) at ultra-low concentrations by probing numerous rotationally resolved ro-vibrational transitions in the mid-IR spectral region within a relatively small spectral range of ~0.035 cm-1. This continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade laser-based multi-component CRDS sensor with high sensitivity and molecular specificity promises applications in environmental sensing as well as non-invasive medical diagnosis through human breath analysis.

  20. Ring wall storages. An essential contribution of the geotechnics to te energy storage; Ringwallspeicher. Ein essentieller Beitrag der Geotechnik zur Energiespeicherung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, Matthias [Matthias Popp Ingenieurbuero Erneuerbare Energien, Energiespeicherung, Wuppertal (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The author of the contribution under consideration reports on ring wall storages as an essential contribution to the geotechnical engineering for energy storage. At first, renewable energies as well as the storage requirements for the compensation of the volatility of electricity from wind power and solar energy are described. Subsequently, the storage technologies for energy management requirements as well as the need for water and land area of pumped storage systems are presented with special emphasis of ring wall storages.

  1. Coherent instabilities of proton beams in accelerators and storage rings - experimental results, diagnosis and cures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnell, W.

    1977-01-01

    The author discusses diagnosis and cure of proton beam instabilities in accelerators and storage rings. Coasting beams and bunched beams are treated separately and both transverse and longitudinal instabilities are considered. (B.D.)

  2. Theory and analysis of nonlinear dynamics and stability in storage rings: A working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Audy, P.; Courant, E.D.

    1988-07-01

    A summary and commentary of the available theoretical and analytical tools and recent advances in the nonlinear dynamics, stability and aperture issues in storage rings are presented. 11 refs., 4 figs

  3. High and ultra-high vacuum pumping techniques: applications in accelerators and storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, G.

    1988-01-01

    A survey is given on gas transfer pumps, especially Turbomolecular pumps, and entrapment pumps (cryopumps and getter pumps) mainly with regard to their application in evacuating particle accelerators and storage rings. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  4. Electron cloud instabilities in the Proton Storage Ring and Spallation Neutron Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Blaskiewicz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron cloud instabilities in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring and those foreseen for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source are examined theoretically, numerically, and experimentally.

  5. A dedicated storage ring for Far-IR coherent synchrotron radiation at the ALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, W.C.; Baptist, K.M.; Benjegerdes, R.J.; Biocca, A.K.; Byrd, J.M.; Byrne, W.E.; Cambie, D.; Chin, M.J.; Harkins, J.P.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Li, D.; Marks, S.; Martin, M.C.; McKinney, W.R.; Munson, D.V.; Nishimura, H.; Paterson, J.A.; Plate, D.W.; Rex, K.R.; Robin, D.S.; Rossi, S.L.; Sannibale, F.; Scarvie, T.; Schlueter, R.D.; Steier, C.A.; Stover, G.D.; Thur, W.G.; Jung, J.Y.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    We present the concepts for a storage ring dedicated to and optimized for the production of stable coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) over the far-infrared wavelength range from about 200 microns to 1 mm

  6. Radiation doses at an electron and positron Linac and storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, A.; Pelliccioni, M.; Rindi, A.

    1978-01-01

    The INFN National Laboratory of Frascati (Italy) makes use of a higher energy Linac for different physics experiments and for freeding an electron-positron storage ring (ADONE). For radiation protection purposes a series of gamma dose measurements has been performed during the running of the accelerators along the Linac beam lines and the concrete tunnel that covers the Linac as well as along the storage ring. (author)

  7. Performance of quadrupole and sextupole magnets for the Advanced Photon Source storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Doose, C.L.; Kim, K.; Thompson, K.M.; Turner, L.R.

    1993-01-01

    From the magnetic measurement data of several production quadrupole and sextupole magnets for the storage ring of the Advanced Photon Source, the excitation efficiencies and systematic and random multipole coefficients of the magnets are summarized. The designs of the magnets, which are constrained due to the geometry of the vacuum chamber have rotation symmetries of 180 degrees and 120 degrees. The production data meet the allowed tolerances of a few parts in 10 -4 for the storage ring

  8. Cryogenic sub-system for the 56 MHz SRF storage cavity for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y.; Than, R.; Orfin, P.; Lederle, D.; Tallerico, T.; Masi L.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-03-28

    A 56 MHz Superconducting RF Storage Cavity is being constructed for the RHIC collider. This cavity is a quarter wave resonator that will be operated in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The cavity requires an extremely quiet environment to maintain its operating frequency. The cavity, besides being engineered for a mechanically quiet system, also requires a quiet cryogenic system. The helium is taken from RHIC's main helium supply header at 3.5 atm, 5.3K at a phase separator tank. The boil-off is sent back to the RHIC refrigeration system to recover the cooling. To acoustically separate the RHIC helium supply and return lines, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger condenses the helium vapor generated in the RF cavity bath. A system description and operating parameters are given about the cryogen delivery system. The 56 MHz superconducting storage RF cavity project is making progress. The cryogenic system design is in its final stage. The helium supply lines have been tapped into the RHIC helium distribution lines. The plate-and-fin heat exchanger design is near completion and specification will be sent out for bid soon. The cold helium vapor heating system design will start soon as well. A booster compressor specification is underway. The first phase separator and transfer line design work is near completion and will be sent out for bid soon.

  9. An analysis of the long-term stability of the particle dynamics in hadron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruening, O.S.

    1994-05-01

    This thesis extends the stability analysis of the particle motion in a storage ring and estimates the diffusion rates well inside the dynamic aperture. The calculation of the drift and diffusion coefficients focuses on an application to the proton storage ring in HERA, where the proton beam lifetime drops considerably after the proton and electron beams are brought to collision. The analysis shows that the combined effect of slow and fast modulation frequencies leads to an increased emittance growth in the storage ring. HERA the slow frequency components are caused by ground motion in the HERA tunnel and the fast frequency components by ripples in the power supplies. The thesis provides upper limits for the modultion depths of a fast tune modulation which result in tolerable growth rates for the proton emittance. The analytically calculated drift coefficients agree numerical simulations for the particle dynamics. A comparison of the calculated drift coefficients with those measured in the HERA proton storage ring shows that the analyzed mechanism can lead to growth rates of the same order of magnitude as the ones measured during the luminosity operation in the HERA storage ring. Analytical estimates for the proton growth rates predict a high sensitivity to the particle diffusion on the frequency components of the fast fast tune modulation. This prediction was confirmed by a subsequent modulation experiment in the proton storage ring of HERA, where an external tune modulation with fast frequency components led to a drastic increase in the growth rates

  10. Preliminary study of EEHG-based superradiant undulator radiation at the HLS-II storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei-Wei; Li, He-Ting; Wang, Lin

    2017-07-01

    We investigate storage ring-based Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) superradiant undulator radiation as a possible scheme to obtain shorter wavelengths at the HLS-II (Hefei Light Source-II) storage ring. In this paper we give the designation of the storage ring based EEHG up to the 26th harmonic, where 31 nm vacuum ultraviolet light is radiated from an 800 nm seeded laser. The novelty of our design is that both the two dispersion sections of EEHG are realized by the storage ring’s own magnet structure. In particular, the whole ring is used as the first dispersion section, and two modulators of the traditional EEHG can be done with the same undulator. These two dispersion sections are realized by changing the superperiod of the present lattice structure, and more precisely by changing the focusing strengths of the present structure. Since no additional magnets and chicanes are used, the beam circulates around the storage ring repeatedly, and thus this storage ring-based EEHG can have a higher repetition rate than a linac-based EEHG. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305170)

  11. HISTRAP: Proposal for a Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the physics capabilities of HISTRAP together with a brief description of the facility and a sampling of the beams which will be available for experimentation, and surveys some of the lines of investigation in the physics of multicharged ions, molecular ion spectroscopy, condensed beams, and nuclear physics that will become possible with the advent of HISTRAP. Details of the accelerator design are discussed, including computer studies of beam tracking in the HISTRAP lattice, a discussion of the HHIRF tandem and ECR/RFQ injectors, and a description of the electron beam cooling system. In the past three years, HISTRAP has received substantial support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory management and staff. The project has used discretionary funds to develop hardware prototypes and carry out design studies. Construction has been completed on a vacuum test stand which models 1/16 of the storage ring and has attained a pressure of 4 x 10/sup -12/ Torr; a prototype rf cavity capable of accelerating beams up to 90 MeV/nucleon and decelerating to 20 keV/nucleon; and a prototype dipole magnet, one of the eight required for the HISTRAP lattice. This paper also contains a summary of the work on electron cooling carried out by one of our staff members at CERN. Building structures and services are described. Details of cost and schedule are also discussed. 77 refs.

  12. Cabling design of booster and storage ring construction progress of TPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Y.-S.; Liu, K.-B.; Liu, C.-Y.; Wang, b.-S.

    2017-06-01

    The 2012 Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) cable construction project started after 10 months to complete the cable laying and installation of power supply. The circumference of the booster ring (BR) is 496.8 m, whereas that of the storage ring (SR) is 518.4 m. Beam current is set to 500 mA at 3.3 GeV. The paper on grounding systems discusses the design of the ground wire (cabling tray. The flow and size of the ground current are carefully evaluated to avoid grounded current from flowing everywhere, which causes interference problems. In the design of the TPS, special shielding will be established to isolate the effects of electromagnetic interference on the magnet and ground current. Booster ring dipoles are connected by a series of 54-magnet bending dipole; the cable size of its stranded wire measures 250 mm2, with a total length of 5000 m. Booster ring and storage ring quadrupoles have 150 magnets; the cable size of their stranded wire is 250 mm2, with a total length of 17000 m. Storage ring dipole consists of 48 magnets; the cable size of its stranded wire is 325 mm2, with a total length of 6000 m. This study discusses the power supply cabling design of the storage ring and booster ring construction progress of TPS. The sections of this paper are divided into discussions of the construction of the control and instrument area, cabling layout of booster ring and storage ring, as well as the installation and commission machine. This study also discusses the use of a high-impedance meter to determine the effect of cabling insulation and TPS power supply machine on energy transfer to ensure the use of safe and correct magnet.

  13. CESAR, 2 MeV electron storage ring; construction period; general view.

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Photo; CERN PhotoLab

    1962-01-01

    A general view of the 2-MeV electron storage-ring model during the last stages of assembly. The injection line for the electrons enters at the bottom of the picture (under the ladder) and meets the ring at the back, to the right. Near there, Joseph Karouanton (S.G.T.E, Paris) (inside the ring), and Marcel Bernasconi (AR Division) are seen testing for leaks in the vacuum system. In white coats are Mervin Barnes (left) and Boony Bruggerman (AR Division), considering the reading shown by one of the vacuum gauges.

  14. Design concepts of a storage ring for a high power XUV free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornacchia, M.; Bisognano, J.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1985-08-01

    The study of a storage ring capable of sustaining an electron beam of the quality required for a High Gain Free Electron Laser in the vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray region is reported. A method is described for the optimization of the design of the storage ring, where several competing and often conflicting requirements come into play. An example design is presented of a ring that satisfies the required conditions of beam quality and is able to produce coherent radiation at 400 A with tens of megawatts of peak power

  15. Performance of a Polarized Deuterium Internal Target in a Medium-Energy Electron Storage Ring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Z.L.; Ferro Luzzi, M.M.E.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Bulten, H.J.; Alarcon, R.; van Bommel, R.; Botto, T.; Bouwhuis, M.; Buchholz, M.; Choi, S.; Comfort, J.; Doets, M.; Dolfini, S.; Ent, R.; Gaulard, C.; de Jager, C.W.; Lang, J.; de Lange, D.J.; Miller, M.A.; Passchier, E.; Passchier, I.; Poolman, H.R.; Six, E.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Unal, O.; de Vries, H.

    1996-01-01

    A polarized deuterium target internal to a medium-energy electron storage ring is described in the context of spindependent (e, e′d) and (e ,e′p) experiments. Tensor polarized deuterium was produced in an atomic beam source and injected into a storage cell target. A Breit-Rabi polarimeter was used

  16. Pulsed modulator power supply for the g-2 muon storage ring injection kicker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mi, J.; Lee, Y. Y.; Morse, W. M.; Pai, C. I.; Pappas, G. C.; Sanders, R.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Warburton, D.; Zapasek, R.; Jungmann, K.; Roberts, L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the pulse modulator power supplies used to drive the kicker magnets that inject the muon beam into the g-2 storage ring that has been built at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Three modulators built into coaxial structures consisting of a series circuit of an energy storage

  17. Modification of a commercial cavity ring-down spectroscopy NO2 detector for enhanced sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos, Patricia; Ehrman, Sheryl H.; Luke, Winston T.; Kelley, Paul; Stehr, Jeffrey W.; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) plays a central role in atmospheric chemistry, air pollution, and biogeochemical cycles. Many analytical techniques have been developed to detect NO 2 , but only chemiluminescence-based instruments are commonly, commercially available. There remains a need for a fast, light, and simple method to directly measure NO 2 . In this work we describe the modification and characterization of a small, commercially available cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) NO 2 detector suitable for surface and aircraft monitoring. A metal oxide scrubber was added to remove NO 2 , and provide a chemical zero, improving the detection limit (3σ of the background noise) from several parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to 0.06 ppbv, integrated over 60 s. Known interferences by water and particles were removed using Nafion tubing and a 1 μm Teflon filter, respectively. A 95% response time of 18±1 s was observed for a step change in concentration. The CRDS detector was run in parallel to an ozone chemiluminescence device with photolytic conversion of NO 2 to NO. The two instruments measured ambient air in suburban Maryland. A least-squares fit to the comparison data resulted a slope of 0.960±0.002 and R of 0.995, showing agreement within experimental uncertainty.

  18. Quantification of hydrogen sulfide by near-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, C.; Hoffnagle, J.; Wahl, E. H.; Kim-Hak, D.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrogen Sulfide is an important atmospheric sulfur species. Primary natural terrestrial sources of atmospheric H2S are volcanos and wetlands; primary anthropogenic sources are landfills; wastewater treatment facilities; sewer systems; natural gas extraction, production, and distribution; and paper manufacturing. The human nose is very sensitive to H2S and other sulfur species, leading to a significant negative impact of industrial processes in which H2S is emitted into the atmosphere. However, there is a relative lack of instrumentation capable of detecting and quantifying H2S at ppb levels and below. We describe an instrument based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy for the quantitative analysis of hydrogen sulfide concentration in ambient air. In addition to H2S, the instrument measures water vapor and methane. The instrument has a precision (1-sigma) of about 1 ppb at a measurement rate of 1 second, and provides measurements of less than 100 ppt with averaging. The instrument provides stable measurements (drift applications in urban sulfur emissions. This instrument is also suitable for soil flux measurements in a recirculating chamber, with predicted detection limit of about 0.6 μg H2S / m2 / hr and 0.45 μg CH4 / m2 / hr in a 10-minute chamber closure time.

  19. 403 nm cavity ring-down measurements of brown carbon aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, D.; Grassian, V. H.; Kleiber, P.; Young, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol influences Earth's climate by absorbing and scattering incoming solar radiation and outgoing terrestrial radiation. One class of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), called brown carbon (BrC), has attracted attention for its wavelength dependent light absorbing properties with absorption coefficients that generally increase from the visible (Vis) to ultraviolet (UV) regions. Here we report results from our investigation of the optical properties of BrC aerosol products from the aqueous phase reaction of ammonium sulfate (AS) with methylglyoxal (MG) using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) at 403 nm wavelength. We have measured the optical constants of BrC SOA from the AS/MG reaction as a function of reaction time. Under dry flow conditions, we observed no apparent variation in the BrC refractive index with aging over the course of 22 days. The retrieved BrC optical constants are similar to those of AS with n = 1.52 for the real component. Despite significant UV absorption observed from the bulk BrC solution, the imaginary index value at 403 nm is below our minimum detection limit which puts an upper bound of k as 0.03. These observations are in agreement with results from our recent studies of the light scattering properties of this BrC aerosol.

  20. Detection of in vitro S-Nitrosylated Compounds with Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Mary Lynn; Mezher, Monique Michele; Gaston, Benjamin M.; Lehmann, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    Nitric oxide has been of strong biological interest for nearly 40 years due to its role in cardiovascular and nervous signaling. It has been shown that S-nitrosocompounds are the main carrier molecule for nitric oxide in biological systems. These compounds are also of interest due to their relationship to several diseases including muscular dystrophy, stroke, myocardial infarction, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cystic fibrosis, asthma, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Understanding the role of these S-nitrosocompounds in these diseases requires concentration studies in healthy and diseased tissues as well as metabolic studies using isotopically labeled S-nitroso precursors such at 15N-arginine. The current widely used techniques for these studies include chemiluminescence, which is blind to isotopic substitution, and mass spectrometry, which is known to artificially create and break S-NO bonds in the sample preparation stages. To this end we have designed and constructed a mid-IR cavity ring-down spectrometer for the detection of nitric oxide released from the target S-nitrosocompounds. Progress toward measuring S-NO groups in biological samples using the CRDS instrument will be presented.

  1. Determination of dissolved methane in natural waters using headspace analysis with cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Hannah M; Shiller, Alan M

    2015-01-26

    Methane (CH4) is the third most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG) but is vastly understudied in comparison to carbon dioxide. Sources and sinks to the atmosphere vary considerably in estimation, including sources such as fresh and marine water systems. A new method to determine dissolved methane concentrations in discrete water samples has been evaluated. By analyzing an equilibrated headspace using laser cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), low nanomolar dissolved methane concentrations can be determined with high reproducibility (i.e., 0.13 nM detection limit and typical 4% RSD). While CRDS instruments cost roughly twice that of gas chromatographs (GC) usually used for methane determination, the process presented herein is substantially simpler, faster, and requires fewer materials than GC methods. Typically, 70-mL water samples are equilibrated with an equivalent amount of zero air in plastic syringes. The equilibrated headspace is transferred to a clean, dry syringe and then drawn into a Picarro G2301 CRDS analyzer via the instrument's pump. We demonstrate that this instrument holds a linear calibration into the sub-ppmv methane concentration range and holds a stable calibration for at least two years. Application of the method to shipboard dissolved methane determination in the northern Gulf of Mexico as well as river water is shown. Concentrations spanning nearly six orders of magnitude have been determined with this method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Vortex Ring Formation Characteristics in Synthetic Jet due to Changes of Excitation Frequency in the ½-Ball Cavity Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosasih, Engkos A.; Harinaldi; Trisno, Ramon

    2017-04-01

    A jet flow that contains vortex ring has a large energy compared to a regular jet. As one of the causes of the aerodynamic drag to the vehicle, the flow separation that occurs behind the bluff body must be controlled, so that aerodynamic drag can be significantly reduced. This study is a basic work on the development of turbulent flow separation control for aerodynamic purpose, especially in the design of the vehicle body. The main objective of this study is to analyze the performance of the synthetic jet (SJA) as one of flow control tool to reduce separation area. To get the maximum performance of the synthetic jet actuator, the research starts by characterizing the actuator. Characterization of ½ ball-shaped cavity is done with excitation frequency changes and orifice diameter of 3, 5 and 8 mm. The study was conducted using computational and experimental methods. The experimental data was obtained by testing synthetic jet actuator with providing sinusoidal signal to drive the membrane and at the orifice end a hotwire probe that is set and plugged into a CTA (Constant Temperature Anemometry) to obtain the speed velocity of the exhaust jet. Computational methods used a commercial CFD software (FLUENT 6.3) with a Reynolds Stress Model as a model of turbulence. Each of these calculations or measurements was conducted under the same conditions. The research result is displayed in frequency testing curve to get the maximum velocity of the jet stream. The results are further indicative of the synthetic jet actuator capability to generate vortex rings. In the experimental results, the determination of ring vortex formation taken from the calculation of the flow velocity, while the CFD simulations, the formation of vortex rings can be seen from the visualization of the flow contour. Vortex ring formed from this ½ -ball cavity, occurred at 3 mm and 5 mm orifice diameter, while the 8 mm orifice diameter cavity cannot form a ring vortex.

  3. TSR: A Storage Ring for HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, P A; Blaum, K; Grieser, M; Davinson, T; Woods, P J; Flanagan, K; Freeman, S J; Lazarus, I H; Litvinov, Yu A; Raabe, R; Siesling, E; Wenander, F

    2016-01-01

    It is planned to install the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR, currently at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored, cooled secondary beams that is rich and varied, spanning from studies of nuclear ground-state properties and reaction studies of astrophysical relevance, to investigations with highly-charged ions and pure isomeric beams. In addition to experiments performed using beams recirculating within the ring, the cooled beams can be extracted and exploited by external spectrometers for high-precision measurements. The capabilities of the ring facility as well as some physics cases will be presented, together with a brief report on the status of the project.

  4. Single photon emission and quantum ring-cavity coupling in InAs/GaAs quantum rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, E; Nowak, A K; Sanvitto, D; Meulen, H P van der; Calleja, J M [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); MartInez, L J; Prieto, I; Alija, A R; Granados, D; Taboada, A G; GarcIa, J M; Postigo, P A [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, Centro Nacional de MicrotecnologIa, CSIC, Isaac Newton 8, PTM Tres Cantos, E-28760 Madrid (Spain); Sarkar, D, E-mail: eva.gallardo@uam.e [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-01

    Different InAs/GaAs quantum rings embedded in a photonic crystal microcavity are studied by quantum correlation measurements. Single photon emission, with g{sup (2)}(0) values around 0.3, is demonstrated for a quantum ring not coupled to the microcavity. Characteristic rise-times are found to be longer for excitons than for biexcitons, resulting in the time asymmetry of the exciton-biexciton cross-correlation. No antibunching is observed in another quantum ring weakly coupled to the microcavity.

  5. High contrast all-optical diode based on direction-dependent optical bistability within asymmetric ring cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiu-Wen; Zhang, Xin-Qin; Xu, Jing-Ping; Yang, Ya-Ping

    2016-08-01

    We propose a simple all-optical diode which is comprised of an asymmetric ring cavity containing a two-level atomic ensemble. Attributed to spatial symmetry breaking of the ring cavity, direction-dependent optical bistability is obtained in a classical bistable system. Therefore, a giant optical non-reciprocity is generated, which guarantees an all-optical diode with a high contrast up to 22 dB. Furthermore, its application as an all-optical logic AND gate is also discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274242, 11474221, and 11574229), the Joint Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. U1330203), and the National Key Basic Research Special Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB922203 and 2013CB632701).

  6. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mother's bacteria from being passed to the child. Treatment of Cavities Fluoride Fillings Root canal or tooth extraction If ... to help the world be well. From developing new therapies that treat and prevent disease to helping people ...

  7. Resonant depolarization in electron storage rings equipped with ''siberia snakes''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buon, J.

    1984-11-01

    Resonant depolarization induced by field errors and quantum emissions in an electron ring equipped with two ''siberian snakes'' is investigated with a first order perturbation calculation. It is shown that this depolarization is not reduced by the snakes when the operating energy is set out of the depolarization resonances [fr

  8. Design parameters for a small storage ring optimized as an x-ray lithography source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobman, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    This paper examines the design parameters for a ''compact storage ring'' which is matched well to x-ray lithographic requirements, but is as small as possible. This calculation uses a model of a lithographic system which obtains its input parameters from a technology of mask, resist and beam line based on the IBM program at the Brookhaven National Laboratory vacuum ultraviolet electron storage ring. Based on this lithographic system, we model exposure throughput as a function of storage ring parameters to understand which storage ring designs provide adequate but not excessive soft x-ray flux in the lithographically important region. Our scan of storage ring sources will cover a wide range of energies and magnetic fields, to permit consideration of superconducting as well as more standard strong- or weak-focusing designs. Furthermore, we will show that the results of the calculations presented here can be scaled in a simple way to cover a wide range of x-ray lithography system assumptions

  9. Relaxation of green fluorescent protein chromophore anion observed by photodissociation in an electrostatic storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, T.; Saito, M.; Noda, K.

    2011-04-01

    The gas-phase absorption properties of the green fluorescent protein chromophore anion were studied using an electrostatic storage ring. The time sequence of neutral particles produced by photodissociation was detected following laser irradiation. The lifetimes of the photo-absorbed ions depended on their storage time in an ion trap before injection into the storage ring. The lifetime increased with the storage time and saturated, indicating a change in the population of rovibrationally excited states with respect to the storage time. Photodissociation neutral spectrum of the relaxed ions measured as a function of the laser wavelength was characterized by a narrow asymmetric shape, which was in good agreement with the photo fragment ion action spectrum reported recently.

  10. Status of rf development work on a ferrite tuned amplifier cavity for the TRIUMF KAON factory booster ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, R.L.; Enegren, T.

    1987-01-01

    Of the five synchrotron rings in the proposed TRIUMF KAON factory, the Booster ring to accelerate the proton beam from 440 MeV to 3 GeV has the most demanding rf requirements, primarily because of the relatively large frequency swing of 46.1 MHz to 61.1 MHz at a high repetition rate of 50 Hz. In the current reference design, the Booster lattice has twelve 3.9 m drift spaces with 2.5 m in each drift space available for installation of rf cavities to provide a required effective acceleration voltage of up to 600 kV per turn i.e. 50 kV per cavity. Design and development studies of a suitable cavity-amplifier system are in progress. For the initial reference design a system based on the one used in the Fermilab booster synchrotron has been chosen. That is, a double-gap drift-tube cavity with parallel-biased ferrite tuners and excited with a directly coupled Eimac Y567B tetrode. To meet the tuning and voltage requirements within the various mechanical and other constraints such as tube-to-gap voltage ratio, ferrite power density and available space, the reference design had to be further modified and a cold model of the cavity and tuners was constructed from copper-covered cardboard cylinders. From the results of the cold model measurements a new reference design was established and design work has begun on a full power prototype of the cavity-amplifier system

  11. Low-emittance tuning of storage rings using normal mode beam position monitor calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wolski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new technique for low-emittance tuning of electron and positron storage rings. This technique is based on calibration of the beam position monitors (BPMs using excitation of the normal modes of the beam motion, and has benefits over conventional methods. It is relatively fast and straightforward to apply, it can be as easily applied to a large ring as to a small ring, and the tuning for low emittance becomes completely insensitive to BPM gain and alignment errors that can be difficult to determine accurately. We discuss the theory behind the technique, present some simulation results illustrating that it is highly effective and robust for low-emittance tuning, and describe the results of some initial experimental tests on the CesrTA storage ring.

  12. Lifetime improvement and beam stabilization by longitudinal phase modulation at the DELTA electron storage ring; Lebensdauerverbesserung und Strahlstabilisierung durch longitudinale Phasenmodulation am Elektronenspreicherring DELTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuersch, Jonathan

    2014-10-16

    In DELTA especially at high beam currents often the occurence of an instability of a longitudinal oscillation mode is observed. In the framework of the present thesis first with different procedure the cause of the longitudinal oscillation mode, which is especially strongly excited at high beam currents, is searched for. Thereby connections between the occurrence of this mode and parameters from the region of the storage-ring high-frequency system is observed. It is shown by comparison of different procedures, simulation calculations, and experimental pre-examinations, that especially by a phase modulation of the storage-ring high frequency an essential improvement of especially the longitudinal beam stability and the beam lifetime can be reached. For the durable and reliable improvement of these beam properties in the framework of the present thesis a system for the longitudinal phase modulation of the after-acceleration voltage in the cavity resonator of the DELTA storage ring is concipated, developed, constructed, taken in operation, and tested. Finally the results aimed hereby are presented and discussed.

  13. Storage ring to investigate cold unidimensional atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcassa, L. G.; Caires, A. R. L.; Nascimento, V. A.; Dulieu, O.; Weiner, J.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we employ a circulating ring of trapped atoms, that we have named the atomotron, to study cold collisions. The atomotron is obtained from a conventional magneto-optical trap when the two pairs of normally retroreflecting Gaussian laser beams in the x-y plane are slightly offset. Circulating stable atomic orbits then form a racetrack geometry in this plane. The circulating atom flux behaves similarly to an atomic beam with an average tangential velocity much greater than the transverse components, and is therefore suitable for one-dimensional atomic collision studies. Using the atomotron, we have investigated the polarization dependence of ultracold photoassociation collisions between Rb atoms circulating in the racetrack. The ability to investigate collisions in ultracold circulating atomic rings reveals alignment and orientation properties that are averaged away in ordinary three-dimensional magneto-optical trap collision processes

  14. Photoswitchable Molecular Rings for Solar-Thermal Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgun, E; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-03-21

    Solar-thermal fuels reversibly store solar energy in the chemical bonds of molecules by photoconversion, and can release this stored energy in the form of heat upon activation. Many conventional photoswichable molecules could be considered as solar thermal fuels, although they suffer from low energy density or short lifetime in the photoinduced high-energy metastable state, rendering their practical use unfeasible. We present a new approach to the design of chemistries for solar thermal fuel applications, wherein well-known photoswitchable molecules are connected by different linker agents to form molecular rings. This approach allows for a significant increase in both the amount of stored energy per molecule and the stability of the fuels. Our results suggest a range of possibilities for tuning the energy density and thermal stability as a function of the type of the photoswitchable molecule, the ring size, or the type of linkers.

  15. Dielectronic recombination experiments at the storage rings: From the present CSR to the future HIAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z. K.; Wen, W. Q.; Xu, X.; Wang, H. B.; Dou, L. J.; Chuai, X. Y.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhao, D. M.; Li, J.; Ma, X. M.; Mao, L. J.; Yang, J. C.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xu, W. Q.; Xie, L. Y.; Xu, T. H.; Yao, K.; Dong, C. Z.; Zhu, L. F.; Ma, X.

    2017-10-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) experiments of highly charged ions at the storage rings have been developed as a precision spectroscopic tool to investigate the atomic structure as well as nuclear properties of stable and unstable nuclei. The DR experiment on lithium-like argon ions was successfully performed at main Cooler Storage Ring (CSRm) at Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) accelerator complex. The DR experiments on heavy highly charged ions and even radioactive ions are currently under preparation at the experimental Cooler Storage Ring (CSRe) at HIRFL. The current status of DR experiments at the CSRm and the preparation of the DR experiments at the CSRe are presented. In addition, an overview of DR experiments by employing an electron cooler and a separated ultra-cold electron target at the upcoming High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility (HIAF) will be given.

  16. First optics and beam dynamics studies on the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemann, S. C.; Sjöström, M.; Andersson, Å.

    2018-03-01

    The MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring is the first light source to make use of a multibend achromat lattice to reach ultralow emittance. After extensive commissioning efforts, the storage ring is now ramping up its user program. We present results from beam commissioning of the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring as well as a summary of the beam dynamics studies that have so for been carried out. We report on injection and accumulation using a single dipole kicker, top-up injection, slow orbit feedback, restoring the linear optics to design, effects of in-vacuum undulators with closed gaps, adjusting nonlinear optics to achieve design chromaticity correction and dynamic aperture sufficient for high injection efficiency and large Touschek lifetime.

  17. NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON-STORAGE-RINGS TO MUON COLLIDERS: PHYSICS AND FACILITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Intense muon sources for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams (ν factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multi-turn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and developments, and will briefly be discussed here. A muon collider requires basically the same number of muons as for the muon storage ring neutrino factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both ± μ. We present some physics possibilities, muon storage ring based neutrino facility concept, site specific examples including collaboration feasibility studies, and upgrades to a full collider

  18. Circuit description of unipolar DC-to-DC converters for APS storage ring quadrupoles and sextupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGhee, D.G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the control, interlock, and power circuits for 680 unipolar switch mode DC-to-DC converters used to regulate the Advanced Photon Sources (APS's) storage ring quadrupole and sextupole magnet currents. Quadrupole current stability is ± 6x10 -5 and the sextupole current stability is ±3x10 -4 . The stability is obtained with pulse width modulation, operating at a switching frequency of 20kHz with full current switching. The converters are housed in 200 cabinets located on top of the storage ring tunnel. Raw DC power is distributed from 80 AC-to-DC power supplies, four at each of 20 locations around the storage ring. Voltages, currents, and temperatures are computer monitored and logged for the converters and magnets. All converters and magnets are water cooled with the flow and pressure monitored at the inlet and outlet of groups. Water is interlocked with the raw power supplies and not the individual converters

  19. Coherent-state storage and retrieval between superconducting cavities using parametric frequency conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirois, A. J.; Castellanos-Beltran, M. A.; DeFeo, M. P.; Ranzani, L.; Lecocq, F.; Simmonds, R. W.; Teufel, J. D.; Aumentado, J.

    2015-01-01

    In superconducting quantum information, machined aluminum superconducting cavities have proven to be a well-controlled, low-dissipation electromagnetic environment for quantum circuits such as qubits. They can possess large internal quality factors, Q int  > 10 8 , and present the possibility of storing quantum information for times far exceeding those of microfabricated circuits. However, in order to be useful as a storage element, these cavities require a fast “read/write” mechanism—in other words, they require tunable coupling between other systems of interest such as other cavity modes and qubits, as well as any associated readout hardware. In this work, we demonstrate these qualities in a simple dual cavity architecture in which a low-Q “readout” mode is parametrically coupled to a high-Q “storage” mode, allowing us to store and retrieve classical information. Specifically, we employ a flux-driven Josephson junction-based coupling scheme to controllably swap coherent states between two cavities, demonstrating full, sequenced control over the coupling rates between modes

  20. Dielectronic recombination experiments with tungsten ions at the test storage ring and development of a single-particle detector at the cryogenic storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruck, Kaija

    2015-05-01

    This work is about electron-ion collision experiments at the ion storage rings of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. Absolute recombination rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions featuring an open 4-f-shell structure have been measured at the heavy-ion storage ring TSR. The resulting plasma rate coefficients have been used to probe the significance of newly developed theoretical approaches. Plasma rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions are in particular interesting for the development of plasma models for nuclear fusion reactors, since tungsten is a foreseeable impurity in the fusion plasma. In the relevant temperature range, the experimental results exceed the theoretical data used so far by up to a factor of 10, showing the need for more reliable theoretical calculations. Furthermore, based on the design of the detectors which have been used in the experiments at TSR, a movable single-particle detector for electron-ion recombination studies at the cryogenic storage ring CSR has been developed and installed within the scope of this work. The device has been designed specifically to meet the requirements of the CSR regarding low ion energies and cryogenic ambient temperature conditions. In a series of experiments, the detector was carefully characterised and successfully tested for its compatibility with these requirements. The detector was part of the infrastructure used for the room-temperature commissioning of CSR (2014) and is currently operated as a single-particle counter during the first cryogenic operation of CSR in 2015.

  1. A Study of Storage Ring Requirements for an Explosive Detection System Using NRA Method.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T. F. (Tai-Sen F.); Kwan, T. J. T. (Thomas J. T.)

    2005-01-01

    The technical feasibility of an explosives detection system based on the nuclear resonance absorption (NRA) of gamma rays in nitrogen-rich materials was demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 1993 by using an RFQ proton accelerator and a tomographic imaging prototype. The study is being continued recently to examine deployment of such an active interrogation system in realistic scenarios. The approach is to use an accelerator and electron-cooling-equipped storage rings(s) to provide the high quality and high current proton beam needed in a practical application. In this work, we investigate the requirements on the storage ring(s) with external gamma-ray-production target for a variant of the airport luggage inspection system considered in the earlier LANL experiments. Estimations are carried out based on the required inspection throughput, the gamma ray yield, the proton beam emittance growth due to scatters with the photon-production target, beam current limit in the storage ring, and the electron-cooling rate. Studies using scaling and reasonable parameter values indicate that it is possible to use no more than a few storage rings per inspection station in a practical NRA luggage inspection complex having more than ten inspection stations.

  2. A perturbative formulation of nonlinear dispersion for particle motion in storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, H; Soutome, K; Hama, H; Hosaka, M

    1999-01-01

    We provide a perturbative formulation of nonlinear dispersion for particle motion in storage rings without linearizing the kinematic term and give recursion expressions for higher-order terms up to the fourth order. As an example, the nonlinear dispersion function of the SPring-8 storage ring is numerically calculated. The numerical calculation shows that the higher-order terms up to third order are not significantly modulated by magnetic error if the dispersion of the linear optics is sufficiently small. An experimental study of the nonlinear dispersion was also carried out and it was found that the agreement between the theory and the measurement was fairly good up to second order. (author)

  3. Undulator physics and coherent harmonic generation at the MAX-lab electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werin, Sverker.

    1991-01-01

    This work presents the undulator and harmonic generation project at the electron storage ring MAX-lab at University of Lund. The theory of undulator radiation, laser coherent harmonic generation, optical klystron amplifiers and FELs is treated in one uniform way, with complete solutions of the necessary equations. The permanent magnet undulator is described in some detail, along with the installation of the undulator in the storage ring. Details regarding the emitted radiation, the electron beam path in the undulator and other results are analysed. Finally harmonic generation using a Nd:YAG laser and the creation of coherent photons at the third harmonic (355 nm) is described. (author)

  4. Statistical analyses of the magnet data for the advanced photon source storage ring magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Carnegie, D.W.; Doose, C.; Hogrefe, R.; Kim, K.; Merl, R.

    1995-01-01

    The statistics of the measured magnetic data of 80 dipole, 400 quadrupole, and 280 sextupole magnets of conventional resistive designs for the APS storage ring is summarized. In order to accommodate the vacuum chamber, the curved dipole has a C-type cross section and the quadrupole and sextupole cross sections have 180 degrees and 120 degrees symmetries, respectively. The data statistics include the integrated main fields, multipole coefficients, magnetic and mechanical axes, and roll angles of the main fields. The average and rms values of the measured magnet data meet the storage ring requirements

  5. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional Content Medical News Cavities ˈkav-ət-ē (Dental Caries) By James T. Ubertalli, DMD, Private Practice, Hingham, ... access to dental care, and better treatment for tooth decay and periodontal disease. When teeth are lost, chewing is greatly hindered, and speaking ...

  6. Spin tracking for a deuteron EDM storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skawran, A.; Lehrach, A.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the Jülich Electric Dipole moment Investigations (JEDI) collaboration is the measurement of the Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) of charged particles like protons or deuterons. There are two possible concepts under consideration for the realization of EDM measurement with deuterons; the Frozen Spin (FS) and Quasi-Frozen Spin (QFS) method. Both approaches are discussed and compared in this paper. Detailed spin- and beam dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the effect of various misalignments of ring elements and systematic effects. Furthermore, the utilization of counter rotating beams is studied and checked for its validity.

  7. Near Infrared Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Isotopic Analyses of CH4 on Future Martian Surface Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Mahaffy P.; Holmes, V.; Burris, J.; Morey, P.; Lehmann, K.K.; Lollar, B. Sherwood; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.; Onstott, T.C.

    2014-01-01

    A compact Near Infrared Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (near-IR-cw-CRDS) was developed as a candidate for future planetary surface missions. The optical cavity was made of titanium with rugged quartz windows to protect the delicate super cavity from the harsh environmental changes that it would experience during space flight and a Martian surface mission. This design assured the long-term stability of the system. The system applied three distributed feedback laser diodes (DFB-LD), two of which were tuned to the absorption line peaks of (sup 12)CH4 and (sup 13)CH4 at 6046.954 inverse centimeters and 6049.121 inverse centimeters, respectively. The third laser was tuned to a spectral-lines-free region for measuring the baseline cavity loss. The multiple laser design compensated for typical baseline drift of a CRDS system and, thus, improved the overall precision. A semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was used instead of an Acousto-Optic Module (AOM) to initiate the cavity ring-down events. It maintained high acquisition rates such as AOM, but consumed less power. High data acquisition rates combined with improved long-term stability yielded precise isotopic measurements in this near-IR region even though the strongest CH4 absorption line in this region is 140 times weaker than that of the strongest mid-IR absorption band. The current system has a detection limit of 1.4 times 10( sup –12) inverse centimeters for (sup 13)CH4. This limit corresponds to approximately 7 parts per trillion volume of CH4 at 100 Torrs. With no further improvements the detection limit of our current near IR-cw-CRDS at an ambient Martian pressure of approximately 6 Torrs (8 millibars) would be 0.25 parts per billion volume for one 3.3 minute long analysis.

  8. Statistical precision in charged particle EDM search in storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksentev, A. E.; Senichev, Y. V.

    2017-12-01

    Currently, the “Jülich Electric Dipole moment Investigations” (JEDI) collaboration, together with present EDM experiments at the COSY ring, is developing the conceptual design of a ring specifically for the search for the deuteron electric dipole moment (dEDM). One of the main problems in the EDM study is the spin precession in the vertical plane caused by the non-ideal positioning of accelerator elements through the magnetic dipole moment (MDM). The idea of how to separate the EDM from MDM is based on measuring the spin tune in different processes and comparing the results. The high precision of the spin tune measurement is achieved by collecting huge amounts of data. The JEDI collaboration aims at detecting the EDM at a level better than 10-29 e · cm, for which one requires a precision in the frequency estimate ˜ 10-9 rad/sec. An estimate’s statistical precision is conditional on the following factors: the total measurement time, determining the independent variable spread; measurement error; temporal modulation and spacing of sample points. In this paper we analyze the interplay between these factors, and estimate the best achievable precision under given conditions.

  9. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric mercury using differential absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A.; Obrist, D.; Moosmuller, H.; Moore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg0) is a globally pervasive element that can be transported and deposited to remote ecosystems where it poses — particularly in its methylated form — harm to many organisms including humans. Current techniques for measurement of atmospheric Hg0 require several liters of sample air and several minutes for each analysis. Fast-response (i.e., 1 second or faster) measurements would improve our ability to understand and track chemical cycling of mercury in the atmosphere, including high frequency Hg0 fluctuations, sources and sinks, and chemical transformation processes. We present theory, design, challenges, and current results of our new prototype sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for fast-response measurement of Hg0 mass concentrations. CRDS is a direct absorption technique that implements path-lengths of multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell using high-reflectivity mirrors, thereby improving sensitivity and reducing sample volume compared to conventional absorption spectroscopy. Our sensor includes a frequency-doubled, dye-laser emitting laser pulses tunable from 215 to 280 nm, pumped by a Q-switched, frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser with a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz. We present how we successfully perform automated wavelength locking and stabilization of the laser to the peak Hg0 absorption line at 253.65 nm using an external isotopically-enriched mercury (202Hg0) cell. An emphasis of this presentation will be on the implementation of differential absorption measurement whereby measurements are alternated between the peak Hg0 absorption wavelength and a nearby wavelength "off" the absorption line. This can be achieved using a piezo electric tuning element that allows for pulse-by-pulse tuning and detuning of the laser "online" and "offline" of the Hg absorption line, and thereby allows for continuous correction of baseline extinction losses. Unexpected challenges with this approach included

  10. Generation of single-frequency tunable green light in a coupled ring tapered diode laser cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    in the broad wavelength range from 1049 nm to 1093 nm and the beam propagation factor is improved from M2 = 2.8 to below 1.1. The laser frequency is automatically locked to the cavity resonance frequency using optical feedback. Furthermore, we show that this adaptive external cavity approach leads to efficient...

  11. Single-frequency blue light generation by single-pass sum-frequency generation in a coupled ring cavity tapered laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    A generic approach for generation of tunable single frequency light is presented. 340 mW of near diffraction limited, single-frequency, and tunable blue light around 459 nm is generated by sum-frequency generation (SFG) between two tunable tapered diode lasers. One diode laser is operated in a ring...... cavity and another tapered diode laser is single-passed through a nonlinear crystal which is contained in the coupled ring cavity. Using this method, the single-pass conversion efficiency is more than 25%. In contrast to SFG in an external cavity, the system is entirely self-stabilized with no electronic...

  12. Renewal of beam position monitor electronics of the SPring-8 storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Shigeki; Fujita, Takahiro

    2007-01-01

    Signal processing electronics for the beam position monitors (BPM) of the SPring-8 Storage Ring were renewed during the summer shutdown period of 2006. The configurations of the electronics of before and after the alteration are described. The evaluation of the performance of the electronics is shown with the data taken by using the actual beams. (author)

  13. Thousand TeV in the center of mass: introduction to high-energy storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1982-09-01

    The lecture discusses, in a pedagogic way, a hypothetical 500 TeV proton storage ring accelerator. It gives machine parameters, discusses linear optics and betatron motions, surveys questions of errors, tolerances and nonlinear resonances, and discusses some of the demands on the detection apparatus, especially the apparent inevitability of multiple interactions per bunch crossing

  14. Stability of Coulomb crystals in a linear Paul trap with storage-ring-like confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Niels; Mølhave, Kristian; Drewsen, Michael

    2002-01-01

    We report experiments on the stability of ion Coulomb crystals in a linear Paul trap with storage-ring-like confinement. The transverse dynamics of charged particles in a trap of this type is analogous to that of a fast beam traveling through a channel with periodic, magnetic alternating gradient...

  15. Free electron laser and microwave instability interplay in a storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Orlandi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Collective effects, such as the microwave instability, influence the longitudinal dynamics of an electron beam in a storage ring. In a storage ring free electron laser (FEL they can compete with the induced beam heating and thus be treated as a further concomitant perturbing source of the beam dynamics. Bunch length and energy spread measurements, carried out at the Super-ACO storage ring, can be correctly interpreted according to a broad-band impedance model. Quantitative estimations of the relative role that is played by the microwave instability and the laser heating in shaping the beam longitudinal dynamics have been obtained by the analysis of the equilibrium laser power. It has been performed in terms of either a theoretical limit, implemented with the measured beam longitudinal characteristics, or the numerical results obtained by a macroparticle tracking code, which includes the laser pulse propagation. Such an analysis, carried out for different operating points of the Super-ACO storage ring FEL, indicates that the laser heating counteracts the microwave instability.

  16. An observation of the earth tides in the SPring-8 storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, S.; Kumagai, N.

    1998-01-01

    The SPring-8 storage ring is under the operation dedicated to synchrotron light users since October, 1997. The stability of the electron beam orbit during a long term of the operation is one of the main subjects to be achieved. Data on the beam orbit taken for this purpose show very clear signature of an effect of the earth tide. (author)

  17. Status of the experimental studies of the electron cloud at the Los Alamos proton storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macek, R. J. (Robert J.); Browman, A. A. (Andrew A.); Borden, M. J. (Michael J.); Fitzgerald, D. H. (Daniel H.); McCrady, R. C. (Rodney C.); Spickermann, T. J. (Thomas J.); Zaugg, T. J. (Thomas J.)

    2003-01-01

    The electron cloud (EC) at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) has been studied extensively for the past several years with an overall aim to identify and measure its important characteristics, the factors that influence these characteristics, and to relate these to the two-stream (e-p) transverse instability long observed at PSR. Some new results since PAC2001 are presented.

  18. Electrostatic storage ring with focusing provided by the space charge of an electron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, J. L.; Ordonez, C. A.; Weathers, D. L.

    2013-01-01

    Electrostatic storage rings are used for a variety of atomic physics studies. An advantage of electrostatic storage rings is that heavy ions can be confined. An electrostatic storage ring that employs the space charge of an electron plasma for focusing is described. An additional advantage of the present concept is that slow ions, or even a stationary ion plasma, can be confined. The concept employs an artificially structured boundary, which is defined at present as one that produces a spatially periodic static field such that the spatial period and range of the field are much smaller than the dimensions of a plasma or charged-particle beam that is confined by the field. An artificially structured boundary is used to confine a non-neutral electron plasma along the storage ring. The electron plasma would be effectively unmagnetized, except near an outer boundary where the confining electromagnetic field would reside. The electron plasma produces a radially inward electric field, which focuses the ion beam. Self-consistently computed radial beam profiles are reported.

  19. Superconducting rf cavities for accelerator application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proch, D.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a review of superconducting cavities for accelerator application (β = 1). The layout of a typical accelerating unit is described and important parameters are discussed. Recent cavity measurements and storage ring beam tests are reported and the present state of the art is summarized

  20. Present status of beam position stabilization at photon factory storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Norio

    1990-01-01

    Stabilization of photon beam position became a major issue in the operation of the storage rings dedicated as synchrotron radiation source. At the Photon Factory storage ring (PF ring), the orbit movement appeared remarkably when the low-emittance operation started. This orbit movement became a serious problem to synchrotron radiation users because the photon beam to drift with a large amplitude. The horizontal and vertical orbit feedback systems were constructed and developed in order to suppress the orbit movement globally. As a result, the horizontal and vertical orbit movements were reduced by a factor of five and ten, respectively. In addition, another type of feedback system using a local bump was constructed. In the test operation, this system could remove the fast photon beam motion as well as the slow photon beam drift for a beamline. (author)

  1. NSLS-II storage ring insertion device and front-end commissioning and operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G., E-mail: gwang@bnl.gov; Shaftan, T.; Amundsen, C.; Bassi, G.; Bengtsson, J.; Blednykh, A.; Blum, E.; Cheng, W.; Choi, J.; Chubar, O.; Corwin, T.; Davidsaver, M.; Doom, L.; Guo, W.; Harder, D.; Hidaka, Y.; Hu, Y.; Ilinski, P.; Kitegi, C.; Kramer, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); and others

    2016-07-27

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state of the art 3 GeV third generation light source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. During spring/ summer of 2014, the storage ring was commissioned up to 50 mA without insertion devices. In the fall of 2014, we began commissioning of the project beamlines, which included seven insertion devices on six ID ports. Beamlines IXS, HXN, CSX-1, CSX-2, CHX, SRX, and XPD-1 consist of elliptically polarized undulator (EPU), damping wigglers (DW) and in-vacuum undulators (IVU) covering from VUV to hard x-ray range. In this paper, experience with commissioning and operation is discussed. We focus on reaching storage ring performance with IDs, including injection, design emittance, compensation of orbit distortions caused by ID residual field, source point stability, beam alignment and tools for control, monitoring and protection of the ring chambers from ID radiation.

  2. New apparatus for precise synchronous phase shift measurements in storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Podobedov

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Measuring a synchronous phase shift as a function of beam current is commonly done in accelerator physics to estimate the longitudinal impedance of a storage ring vacuum chamber. This measurement is normally done with RF techniques that do not have enough accuracy to detect small phase shifts typical to the newer storage rings. In this paper we report results from a new method for precise measurement of a synchronous phase shift. Our method involves downmixing from the RF frequency to a kHz range and then using an audio DSP lock-in amplifier for the actual phase detection. This paper describes the idea and the advantages of a new method as well as its practical implementation in the apparatus we build for precise synchronous phase measurements in the Stanford Linear Collider damping rings. The results of those measurements are also presented.

  3. RF cavities for the positron accumulator ring (PAR) of the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Nassiri, A.; Bridges, J.F.; Smith, T.L.; Song, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    The cavities for the dual frequency system of the APS PAR are described. The system uses two frequencies: a 9.78MHz fundamental system for the particle accumulation and a 117.3MHz twelfth harmonic system for the bunch compression. The cavities have been built, installed, tested, and used for storing the beam in the PAR for about a year. The fundamental cavity is a reentrant coaxial type with a capacitive loading plunger and has 1.6m length. The harmonic cavity is a symmetrical reentrant coaxial type and is 0.8m long. Ferrite tuners are used for frequency tuning. During the accumulation period, the ferrite tuner of the harmonic cavity works as a damper to disable the cavity. During an injection cycle the 9.78MHz system accumulates 24 positron bunches in a bucket and the 117.3MHz system compresses the bunch into a shorter bunch. Measurements were made on the rf properties of the cavities

  4. Needle-like focus generation by radially polarized halo beams emitted by photonic-crystal ring-cavity laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Kyoko; Nishimoto, Masaya; Sakai, Kyosuke; Noda, Susumu

    2012-11-01

    Focused fields that possess a small spot size and long depth of focus (DOF) are expected to lead to the further development of optical applications. Here, we develop a photonic-crystal ring-cavity laser that emits a beam with a radially polarized halo shape (rinner/router > 0.9). This beam has a needle-like focus with a spot size of less than 0.4λ and a depth of focus longer than 10 λ for a 0.9 numerical aperture objective lens. We evaluate the focusing properties of the emitted beam and demonstrate that it has a longer depth of focus than conventional beams.

  5. Evaluation of microwave cavity gas sensor for in-vessel monitoring of dry cask storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiari, S.; Gonnot, T.; Elmer, T.; Chien, H.-T.; Engel, D.; Koehl, E.; Heifetz, A.

    2018-04-01

    Results are reported of research activities conducted at Argonne to assess the viability of microwave resonant cavities for extended in-vessel monitoring of dry cask storage system (DCSS) environment. One of the gases of concern to long-term storage in canisters is water vapor, which appears due to evaporation of residual moisture from incompletely dried fuel assembly. Excess moisture could contribute to corrosion and deterioration of components inside the canister, which would in turn compromise maintenance and safe transportation of such systems. Selection of the sensor type in this work was based on a number of factors, including good sensitivity, fast response time, small form factor and ruggedness of the probing element. A critical design constraint was the capability to mount and operate the sensor using the existing canister penetrations-use of existing ports for thermocouple lances. Microwave resonant cavities operating at select resonant frequency matched to the rotational absorption line of the molecule of interest offer the possibility of highly sensitive detection. In this study, two prototype K-band microwave cylindrical cavities operating at TE01n resonant modes around the 22 GHz water absorption line were developed and tested. The sensors employ a single port for excitation and detection and a novel dual-loop inductive coupling for optimized excitation of the resonant modes. Measurement of the loaded and unloaded cavity quality factor was obtained from the S11 parameter. The acquisition and real-time analysis of data was implemented using software based tools developed for this purpose. The results indicate that the microwave humidity sensors developed in this work could be adapted to in-vessel monitoring applications that require few parts-per-million level of sensitivity. The microwave sensing method for detection of water vapor can potentially be extended to detection of radioactive fission gases leaking into the interior of the canister through

  6. Results and analysis of free-electron-laser oscillation in a high-energy storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couprie, M.E.; Velghe, M.; Prazeres, R.; Jaroszynski, D.; Billardon, M.

    1991-01-01

    A storage-ring free-electron laser at Orsay has been operating since 1989 in the visible wavelength range. In contrast with previous experiments, it operates with positrons and at higher energies (600--800 MeV), with the storage ring Super-ACO (ACO denotes Anneau de Collisions d'Orsay). The optical gain, the laser power, the transverse profile, and the macrotemporal structure of the laser are analyzed. In particular, we show that the gain matrix possesses many off-diagonal elements, which results in lasing on a combination of noncylindrical Gaussian modes. The eigenmode of the laser oscillation is a combination of one or two main Gaussian modes and several higher-order modes, which results in most of the power being extracted in these modes

  7. The Abort Kicker System for the PEP-II Storage Rings at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delamare, Jeffrey E

    2003-01-01

    The PEP-II project has two storage rings. The HER (High Energy Ring) has up to 1.48 A of election beam at 9 GeV, and the LER (Low Energy Ring) has up to 2.14 A of positron beam at 3.1 GeV. To protect the HER and LER beam lines in the event of a ring component failure, each ring has an abort kicker system which directs the beam into a dump when a failure is detected. Due to the high current of the beams, the beam kick is tapered from 100% to 80% in 7.33 (micro)S (the beam transit time around the ring). This taper distributes the energy evenly across the window which separates the ring from the beam dump such that the window is not damaged. The abort kicker trigger is synchronized with the ion clearing gap of the beam allowing for the kicker field to rise from 0-80% while there is no beam in the kicker magnet. Originally the kicker system was designed for a rise time of 370nS [1], but because the ion clearing gap was reduced in half, so was the rise time requirement for the kicker. This report discusses the design of the system interlocks, diagnostics, and modulator with the modifications necessary to accommodate an ion clearing gap of 185nS

  8. Symplectic orbit and spin tracking code for all-electric storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, Richard M.; Talman, John D.

    2015-07-01

    Proposed methods for measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the proton use an intense, polarized proton beam stored in an all-electric storage ring "trap." At the "magic" kinetic energy of 232.792 MeV, proton spins are "frozen," for example always parallel to the instantaneous particle momentum. Energy deviation from the magic value causes in-plane precession of the spin relative to the momentum. Any nonzero EDM value will cause out-of-plane precession—measuring this precession is the basis for the EDM determination. A proposed implementation of this measurement shows that a proton EDM value of 10-29e -cm or greater will produce a statistically significant, measurable precession after multiply repeated runs, assuming small beam depolarization during 1000 s runs, with high enough precision to test models of the early universe developed to account for the present day particle/antiparticle population imbalance. This paper describes an accelerator simulation code, eteapot, a new component of the Unified Accelerator Libraries (ual), to be used for long term tracking of particle orbits and spins in electric bend accelerators, in order to simulate EDM storage ring experiments. Though qualitatively much like magnetic rings, the nonconstant particle velocity in electric rings gives them significantly different properties, especially in weak focusing rings. Like the earlier code teapot (for magnetic ring simulation) this code performs exact tracking in an idealized (approximate) lattice rather than the more conventional approach, which is approximate tracking in a more nearly exact lattice. The Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi (BMT) equation describing the evolution of spin vectors through idealized bend elements is also solved exactly—original to this paper. Furthermore the idealization permits the code to be exactly symplectic (with no artificial "symplectification"). Any residual spurious damping or antidamping is sufficiently small to permit reliable tracking for the

  9. Colliding or co-rotating ion beams in storage rings for EDM search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koop, I A

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to search for and measure the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the proton, deuteron and some other light nuclei is presented. The idea of the method is to store two ion beams, circulating with different velocities, in a storage ring with crossed electric and magnetic guiding fields. One beam is polarized and its EDM is measured using the so-called ‘frozen spin’ method. The second beam, which is unpolarized, is used as a co-magnetometer, sensitive to the radial component of the ring’s magnetic field. The particle’s magnetic dipole moment (MDM) couples to the radial magnetic field and mimics the EDM signal. Measuring the relative vertical orbit separation of the two beams, caused by the presence of the radial magnetic field, one can control the unwanted MDM spin precession. Examples of the parameters for EDM storage rings for protons and other species of ions are presented. The use of crossed electric and magnetic fields helps to reduce the size of the ring by a factor of 10–20. We show that the bending radius of such an EDM storage ring could be about 2–3 m. Finally, a new method of increasing the spin coherence time, the so-called ‘spin wheel’, is proposed and its applicability to the EDM search is discussed. (paper)

  10. Positron--electron storage ring project: Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California. Final environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    A final environmental statement is given which was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act to support the Energy Research and Development Administration project to design and construct the positron-electron colliding beam storage ring (PEP) facilities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The PEP storage ring will be constructed underground adjacent to the existing two-mile long SLAC particle accelerator to utilize its beam. The ring will be about 700 meters in diameter, buried at depths of 20 to 100 feet, and located at the eastern extremity of the SLAC site. Positron and electron beams will collide in the storage ring to provide higher energies and hence higher particle velocities than have been heretofore achieved. Some of the energy from the collisions is transformed back into matter and produces a variety of particles of immense interest to physicists. The environmental impacts during the estimated two and one-half years construction period will consist of movement of an estimated 320,000 cubic yards of earth and the creation of some rubble, refuse, and dust and noise which will be kept to a practical minimum through planned construction procedures. The terrain will be restored to very nearly its original conditions. Normal operation of the storage ring facility will not produce significant adverse environmental effects different from operation of the existing facilities and the addition of one water cooling tower. No overall increase in SLAC staff is anticipated for operation of the facility. Alternatives to the proposed project that were considered include: termination, postponement, other locations and construction of a conventional high energy accelerator

  11. Measurement of spin observables using a storage ring with polarized beam and polarized internal gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.; Miller, M.A.; Smith, A.; Hansen, J.; Bloch, C.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Bulten, H.J.; Ent, R.; Goodman, C.D.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jones, C.E.; Korsch, W.; Leuschner, M.; Lorenzon, W.; Marchlenski, D.; Meyer, H.O.; Milner, R.G.; Neal, J.S.; Pancella, P.V.; Pate, S.F.; Pitts, W.K.; von Przewoski, B.; Rinckel, T.; Sowinski, J.; Sperisen, F.; Sugarbaker, E.; Tschalaer, C.; Unal, O.; Zhou, Z.

    1993-01-01

    We report the first measurement of analyzing powers and spin correlation parameters using a storage ring with both beam and internal target polarized. Spin observables were measured for elastic scattering of 45 and 198 MeV protons from polarized 3 He nuclei in a new laser-pumped internal gas target at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility Cooler Ring. Scattered protons and recoil 3 He nuclei were detected in coincidence with large acceptance plastic scintillators and silicon detectors. The internal-target technique demonstrated in this experiment has broad applicability to the measurement of spin-dependent scattering in nuclear and particle physics

  12. Calibration of the Nonlinear Accelerator Model at the Diamond Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolini, Riccardo; Rowland, James; Martin, Ian; Schmidt, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The correct implementation of the nonlinear ring model is crucial to achieve the top performance of a synchrotron light source. Several dynamics quantities can be used to compare the real machine with the model and eventually to correct the accelerator. Most of these methods are based on the analysis of turn-by-turn data of excited betatron oscillations. We present the experimental results of the campaign of measurements carried out at the Diamond. A combination of Frequency Map Analysis (FMA) and detuning with momentum measurements has allowed a precise calibration of the nonlinear model capable of reproducing the nonlinear beam dynamics in the storage ring

  13. Optimal removal of scattered particles at medium energy storage rings with internal target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steger, U.; Koch, H.R.; Schult, O.W.B.

    1991-01-01

    We have studied at which places projectiles that have been scattered by an internal target out of the acceptance of a medium energy storage ring, can be dumped locally so that the effort for shielding can be minimized. General arguments are given where slits should be installed and their effect on the useful ring acceptance is discussed. In addition we have carried out Monte Carlo simulations for the dispersion-free mode of operation of COSY, which show that ≅ 86% of the lost beam can be removed locally with the use of only two sets of slits. (orig.)

  14. STUDY OF THE STABILITY OF PARTICLE MOTION IN STORAGE RINGS. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack J. Shi

    2012-09-07

    During this period, our research was concentrated on the study of beam-beam effects in large storage-ring colliders and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect in light sources. Our group was involved in and made significant contribution to several international accelerator projects such as the US-LHC project for the design of the LHC interaction regions, the luminosity upgrade of Tevatron and HERA, the design of eRHIC, and the U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) for the future LHC luminosity upgrade.

  15. Magnet power supply system for the ALS storage ring and booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, L.T.; Luchini, K.; Lutz, I.

    1993-05-01

    The Magnet Power Supply System is described by specification, design, hardware, and operating experience. A unique system for the one Hz, 1.5 GeV Booster, where the wideband QF and QD power supplies track the dipole current to within 0.1% at injection will be detailed. AC distribution system considerations related to inverting the stored energy of the booster magnet back into power grid will be discussed. The rational for linear correctors and individual quad supplies (225 total units) will be placed within the context of the storage-ring requirements

  16. Electron beam properties and impedance characterization for storage rings used for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Renieri, A.; Migliorati, M.; Walker, R.

    2000-01-01

    Good electron beam qualities and stability are the crucial features of Storage Rings dedicated to synchrotron radiation sources or to Free Electron Laser. Most of these characteristics depends on the coupling of the e-beam with the machine environment, which can be in turn modelled in terms of a characteristic impedance, whose absolute value and structure can be used to specify both the stability (longitudinal and transverse) of the beam and its qualities (energy spread, bunch length, peak current ...). In this paper are considered two specific examples of Storage Rings used for FEL operation and analyze their performances by means of semi analytical and numerical methods. The analysis is aimed at clarifying the dependence of beam energy spread and bunch length on beam current and at providing a set of parameters useful for the optimization of Free Electron Laser or synchrotron radiation sources [it

  17. Magnetic Measurements of Storage Ring Magnets for the APS Upgrade Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doose, C.; Dejus, R.; Jaski, M.; Jansma, W.; Collins, J.; Donnelly, A.; Liu, J.; Cease, H.; Decker, G.; Jain, A.; DiMarco, J.

    2017-06-01

    Extensive prototyping of storage ring magnets is ongoing at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in support of the APS Multi-Bend Achromat (MBA) upgrade project (APS-U) [1]. As part of the R&D activities four quadrupole magnets with slightly different geometries and pole tip materials, and one sextupole magnet with vanadium permendur (VP) pole tips were designed, built and tested. Magnets were measured individually using a rotating coil and a Hall probe for detailed mapping of the magnetic field. Magnets were then assembled and aligned relative to each other on a steel support plate and concrete plinth using precision machined surfaces to gain experience with the alignment method chosen for the APS-U storage ring magnets. The required alignment of magnets on a common support structure is 30 μm rms. Measurements of magnetic field quality, strength and magnet alignment after subjecting the magnets and assemblies to different tests are presented.

  18. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-charged ions in a storage ring. Invited lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, H.F.

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of the present lectures is to carry through the methods and procedures necessary for a meaningful spectroscopy of the heaviest few-electron ions in relation to present theories. Results achieved so far in accelerator-based X-ray experiments are highlighted with emphasis on recent developments on heavy-ion storage rings. Starting with a brief account of the basics of one-electron ions, the motivation for doing X-ray spectroscopy of the simplest atomic systems with a high nuclear charge is given. In section 2 X-ray instrumentation and techniques are discussed including the precautions necessary when dealing with fast-beam sources. Peculiarities of heavy-ion storage rings are investigated in section 3 with regard to their use for spectroscopy. In section 4 are discussed results obtained so far on the measurement of the Lamb shift in very heavy ions. Section 5 gives some perspectives for the near future. (orig.)

  19. Photo excitation and laser detachment of C60 − anions in a storage ring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støchkel, Kristian; Andersen, Jens Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the photo physics of C60 − anions in the electrostatic storage ring ELISA with ions produced in a plasma source and cooled and bunched in a He filled ion trap. A previous study using delayed electron detachment as a signal of resonance-enhanced multiphoton electron detachment...... from a principal component analysis of these spectra. In good agreement with the earlier REMPED experiment, an origin band for transitions between the two lowest electronic levels of the anion, with t 1u and t 1g symmetry, is observed at 9380 cm−1, with strong sidebands from excitation of the two A g...... level, is much weaker in the new measurements and could be an H g vibrational sideband. Also earlier studies of direct laser detachment from C60 − in the storage ring ASTRID have been revisited, with ions cooled by liquid nitrogen in the ion trap. We confirm the previous measurement with a determination...

  20. Intense inverse compton {gamma}-ray source from Duke storage ring FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We suggest using FEL intracavity power in the Duke storage ring fortrays production via Inverse Compton Backscattering (ICB). The OK-4 FEL driven by the Duke storage ring will tens of watts of average lasing power in the UV/VUV range. Average intracavity power will be in kilowatt range and can be used to pump ICB source. The {gamma}-rays with maximum energy from 40 MeV to 200 MeV with intensity of 0.1-5 10{sup 10}{gamma} per second can be generated. In this paper we present expected parameters of {gamma}-ray beam parameters including its intensity and distribution. We discuss influence of e-beam parameters on collimated {gamma}-rays spectrum and optimization of photon-electron interaction point.

  1. Calculation of gas Bremsstrahlung power from straight sections of storage ring at SSRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Zhengdong; Xu Xunjiang; Fang Keming; Xu Jiaqiang

    2008-01-01

    The Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) is a third-generation synchrotron radiation light source with 3.5 GeV in energy, which is composed of the linear accelerator, the booster and the storage ring. The storage ring provides 16 standard straight sections of 6.5 m and 4 long straight sections of 12 meters. Gas Bremsstrahlung (GB) produced by the interaction of the stored beam with the residual gas molecules in straight section, which is so intense and has a very small angular that the GB spectra, the GB power and the GB power distribution should be known. The characters of GB are studied by means of Fluka Monte Carlo code. Our result shows agreement with those obtained by the experiential formulae. (authors)

  2. Transverse coupling impedance of the storage ring at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. F. Günzel

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The vertical and horizontal impedance budgets of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF storage ring are calculated by element-by-element wake potential calculation. Resistive wall wakes are calculated analytically; the short range geometrical wakes are calculated by a 3D electromagnetic field solver. The effect of the quadrupolar wakes due to the flatness of most ESRF vacuum chambers is included in the model. It can well explain the sensitivity of the horizontal single bunch threshold on vacuum chamber changes, in particular, in low-gap sections of the ESRF storage ring. The values of the current thresholds on the transverse planes could be predicted correctly by the model within a factor of 2.

  3. A beamline for x-ray laser spectroscopy at the experimental storage ring at GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, D F A; Bagnoud, V; Ecker, B; Eisenbarth, U; Götte, S; Kuehl, Th; Stöhlker, Th; Zielbauer, B; Neumayer, P; Spielmann, C

    2013-01-01

    By combining an x-ray laser (XRL) with a heavy-ion storage ring, precision laser spectroscopy of the fine-structure splitting in heavy Li-like ions will be possible. An initial study has been performed to determine the feasibility of a first experiment at the experimental storage ring at GSI in Darmstadt, which also has great potential for the experiments planned for FAIR. We plan to perform a unique, direct and precise measurement of a fine-structure transition in a heavy Li-like ion. Such a measurement will test state-of-the-art atomic structure calculations in strong fields. This endeavour will require that the existing infrastructure is complemented by a dedicated beamline for the XRL. In this paper, we will discuss the details of this project and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. (paper)

  4. Operation of the OK-4/Duke storage ring FEL below 200 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinenko, V N; Pinayev, I V; Wu Yin

    2001-01-01

    For a number of years the wavelength of 200 nm was a psychological barrier for FEL oscillators. The progress towards short wavelength was marginal since the OK-4/VEPP-3 storage ring FEL lased at 240 nm in 1988. After 10 years, in 1998, the OK-4/Duke FEL and the NIJI-IV FEL group moved the limit to 217 and 212 nm, respectively. Improvements of the OK-4/Duke storage ring FEL gain above 10% and the use of custom manufactured mirror coatings brought the success in August 1999. The OK-4 FEL lased in the range from 193.7 to 209.8 nm using electron energies from 500 to 800 MeV. In this paper, we present the description of the OK-4/Duke FEL up-grades and the lasing results below 200 nm obtained in August and October of 1999.

  5. Electron cloud dynamics in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator wiggler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Celata

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The interference of stray electrons (also called “electron clouds” with accelerator beams is important in modern intense-beam accelerators, especially those with beams of positive charge. In magnetic wigglers, used, for instance, for transverse emittance damping, the intense synchrotron radiation produced by the beam can generate an electron cloud of relatively high density. In this paper the complicated dynamics of electron clouds in wigglers is examined using the example of a wiggler in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator experiment at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations with the WARP-POSINST computer code show different density and dynamics for the electron cloud at locations near the maxima of the vertical wiggler field when compared to locations near the minima. Dynamics in these regions, the electron cloud distribution vs longitudinal position, and the beam coherent tune shift caused by the wiggler electron cloud will be discussed.

  6. Multiple bunch longitudinal dynamics measurements at the Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Holtzapple

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring (CESR has a longitudinal dipole-coupled-bunch instability that limits the total amount of current that can be stored in the ring without feedback. As a result, it is one of the major limitations for higher stored current and luminosity. This paper reports the measurements of multiple bunch longitudinal dynamics done on CESR with a streak camera. The camera was used to measure the dependence of the bunch distribution on current and accelerating rf voltage, for multiple bunches stored in CESR, as well as the effects of the longitudinal instability on the bunch distribution. Measurements of the beam's longitudinal bunch distribution with multiple bunches present in the ring help give an understanding of the instability, how it affects the bunch distribution, and possibly give insight into a cure of the instability.

  7. CRYOGENIC AND VACUUM TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF THE LOW-ENERGY ELECTROSTATIC CRYOGENIC STORAGE RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, D. A.; Lange, M.; Froese, M.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Mallinger, V.; Sieber, T.; Weber, T.; Wolf, A.; Rappaport, M.

    2008-01-01

    The cryogenic and vacuum concepts for the electrostatic Cryogenic ion Storage Ring (CSR), under construction at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, is presented. The ring will operate in a broad temperature range from 2 to 300 K and is required to be bakeable up to 600 K. Extremely high vacuum and low temperatures are necessary to achieve long lifetimes of the molecular ions stored in the ring so that the ions will have enough time to cool by radiation to their vibrational and rotational ground states. To test cryogenic and vacuum technological aspects of the CSR, a prototype is being built and will be connected to the commercial cryogenic refrigerator recently installed, including a specialized 2-K connection system. The first results and the status of current work with the prototype are also presented

  8. QED in highly-charged high Z ions - experiments at the storage ring ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokler, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    A survey on the fundamental structure aspects of very heavy few -electron ions, in particular H-like systems, is presented. Special emphasis is given to contribution from quantum-electro-dynamics at strong central potentials. The technical possibilities to produce highly-charged heavy ions are reviewed and the ground-state Lamb-shift experiments performed at the heavy ion storage ring ESR are summarized. A short outlook on further developments in this field is added. (author). 23 refs, 9 figs

  9. A MODEL FOR PRODUCING STABLE, BROADBAND TERAHERTZ COHERENT SYNCHROTRON RADIATION IN STORAGE RINGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannibale, Fernando; Byrd, John M.; Loftsdottir, Agusta; Martin, MichaelC.; Venturini, Marco

    2003-01-01

    We present a model for producing stable broadband coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency region in an electron storage ring. The model includes distortion of bunch shape from the synchrotron radiation (SR), enhancing higher frequency coherent emission and limits to stable emission due to a microbunching instability excited by the SR. We use this model to optimize the performance of a source for CSR emission

  10. A storage ring experiment to detect a proton electric dipole moment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastassopoulos, V. [Department of Physics, University of Patras, 26500 Rio-Patras, Greece; Andrianov, S. [Faculty of Applied Mathematics and Control Processes, Saint-Petersburg State University, Saint-Petersburg, Russia; Baartman, R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T2A3, Canada; Baessler, S. [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, USA; Bai, M. [Institut für Kernphysik and JARA-Fame, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany; Benante, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Berz, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA; Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Bowcock, T. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Brown, K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Casey, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510, USA; Conte, M. [Physics Department and INFN Section of Genoa, 16146 Genoa, Italy; Crnkovic, J. D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; D’Imperio, N. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Fanourakis, G. [Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics NCSR Demokritos, GR-15310 Aghia Paraskevi Athens, Greece; Fedotov, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Fierlinger, P. [Technical University München, Physikdepartment and Excellence-Cluster “Universe,” Garching, Germany; Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Gaisser, M. O. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Giomataris, Y. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France; Grosse-Perdekamp, M. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA; Guidoboni, G. [University of Ferrara, INFN of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; Hacıömeroğlu, S. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Hoffstaetter, G. [Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA; Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Incagli, M. [Physics Department, University and INFN Pisa, Pisa, Italy; Ivanov, A. [Faculty of Applied Mathematics and Control Processes, Saint-Petersburg State University, Saint-Petersburg, Russia; Kawall, D. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, USA; Kim, Y. I. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; King, B. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Koop, I. A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia; Lazarus, D. M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Lebedev, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510, USA; Lee, M. J. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Lee, S. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Lee, Y. H. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Lehrach, A. [Institut für Kernphysik and JARA-Fame, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany; RWTH Aachen University and JARA-Fame, III. Physikalisches Institut B, Physikzentrum, 52056 Aachen, Germany; Lenisa, P. [University of Ferrara, INFN of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; Levi Sandri, P. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, I-00044 Frascati, Rome, Italy; Luccio, A. U. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Lyapin, A. [Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, United Kingdom; MacKay, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Maier, R. [Institut für Kernphysik and JARA-Fame, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany; Makino, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA; Malitsky, N. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Marciano, W. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Meng, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Metodiev, E. M. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Harvard College, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA; Miceli, L. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Moricciani, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell’Univ. di Roma “Tor Vergata” and INFN Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy; Morse, W. M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Nagaitsev, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510, USA; Nayak, S. K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Orlov, Y. F. [Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA; Ozben, C. S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul 34469, Turkey; Park, S. T. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Pesce, A. [University of Ferrara, INFN of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; Petrakou, E. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Pile, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Podobedov, B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Polychronakos, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Pretz, J. [RWTH Aachen University and JARA-Fame, III. Physikalisches Institut B, Physikzentrum, 52056 Aachen, Germany; Ptitsyn, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Ramberg, E. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510, USA; Raparia, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Rathmann, F. [Institut für Kernphysik and JARA-Fame, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany; Rescia, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Kamal Sayed, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Semertzidis, Y. K. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Senichev, Y. [Institut für Kernphysik and JARA-Fame, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany; Sidorin, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region, Russia; Silenko, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region, Russia; Research Institute for Nuclear Problems of Belarusian State University, Minsk, Belarus; Simos, N. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Stahl, A. [RWTH Aachen University and JARA-Fame, III. Physikalisches Institut B, Physikzentrum, 52056 Aachen, Germany; Stephenson, E. J. [Indiana University Center for Spacetime Symmetries, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA; Ströher, H. [Institut für Kernphysik and JARA-Fame, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany; Syphers, M. J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510, USA; Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115, USA; Talman, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Talman, R. M. [Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA; Tishchenko, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Touramanis, C. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Venanzoni, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, I-00044 Frascati, Rome, Italy; Vetter, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA; Vlassis, S. [Department of Physics, University of Patras, 26500 Rio-Patras, Greece; Won, E. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Physics Department, Korea University, Seoul 02841, South Korea; Zavattini, G. [University of Ferrara, INFN of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; Zelenski, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Zioutas, K. [Department of Physics, University of Patras, 26500 Rio-Patras, Greece

    2016-11-01

    A new experiment is described to detect a permanent electric dipole moment of the proton with a sensitivity of $10^{-29}e\\cdot$cm by using polarized "magic" momentum $0.7$~GeV/c protons in an all-electric storage ring. Systematic errors relevant to the experiment are discussed and techniques to address them are presented. The measurement is sensitive to new physics beyond the Standard Model at the scale of 3000~TeV.

  11. rf Wien filter in an electric dipole moment storage ring: The ``partially frozen spin'' effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, William M.; Orlov, Yuri F.; Semertzidis, Yannis K.

    2013-11-01

    An rf Wien filter (WF) can be used in a storage ring to measure a particle’s electric dipole moment (EDM). If the WF frequency equals the spin precession frequency without WF, and the oscillating WF fields are chosen so that the corresponding transverse Lorentz force equals zero, then a large source of systematic errors is canceled but the EDM signal is not. This effect, discovered by simulation, can be called the “partially frozen spin” effect.

  12. Design summary of the magnet support structures for the proton storage ring injection line upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardin, J.D.; Ledford, J.E.; Smith, B.G.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the technical engineering and design issues associated with the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) Injection Line upgrade of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The main focus is on the engineering design calculations of several magnet support structures. The general procedure based upon a set number of design criteria is outlined, followed by a case-by-case summary of the engineering design analyses, reutilization or fabrication callouts and design safety factors

  13. Analysis of multi-bunch instabilities at the Diamond storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolini, Riccardo; Rehm, Guenther; Smaluk, Victor

    2017-01-01

    We present the result of the analytical, numerical and experimental analysis of multi-bunch instabilities at the Diamond storage ring. This work compares the impedance estimates with CST with the analysis of the growth rates of the excited multi-bunch modes in different machine configurations. The contribution of a number of wakefield sources has been identified with very high precision thanks to high quality data provided by the existing TMBF diagnostics.

  14. Spin matching conditions in large electron storage rings with purely horizontal beam polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossmanith, R.

    1990-08-01

    In a storage ring with a purely horizontal spin and a Siberian Snake, the spin matching conditions are similar to the spin matching conditions for vertical polarization; a combination of beam bumps has to be found which compensate the depolarizing effects. These bumps compensate the random emission of synchrotron emission on the spin. The aim of this paper is to define spin matching conditions that compensate this effect

  15. Constraining astrophysical reaction rates: using the storage rings at FAIR/GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Christoph; Glorius, Jan; Slavkovská, Zuzana; Litvinov, Sergey; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Reifarth, René

    2018-01-01

    Ion optical calculations for a storage ring at the present GSI facility for direct proton-induced reactions relevant for different astrophysical processes are presented. As an example case, the 59Cu(p,γ) and 59Cu(p,α) reactions are shown. The branching of these two reactions is important in X-ray burst scenarios, since it determines the breakout out of the major 56Ni waiting point.

  16. BPM Breakdown Potential in the PEP-II B-factory Storage Ring Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, Stephen; Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2010-02-10

    High current B-Factory BPM designs incorporate a button type electrode which introduces a small gap between the button and the beam chamber. For achievable currents and bunch lengths, simulations indicate that electric potentials can be induced in this gap which are comparable to the breakdown voltage. This study characterizes beam induced voltages in the existing PEP-II storage ring collider BPM as a function of bunch length and beam current.

  17. Studies of Lifetimes in an Ion Storage Ring Using Laser Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostohar, Danijela; Derkatch, Anna; Hartman, Henrik; Norlin, Lars-Olov; Royen, Peder; Schef, Peter; Mannervik, Sven

    2003-01-01

    The laser-probing method for lifetime measurements of metastable levels, performed by applying the Fast Ion Beam Laser (FIBLAS) method to ions stored in a storage ring, has been developed by the Stockholm group. Recently, we have applied this method to lifetime measurements of close lying metastable levels. In this paper we discuss experimental studies of ions with complex structure and present the first experimentally obtained lifetimes of selected metastable levels in complex systems as Fe + , Eu + and La + .

  18. Laser cooling and ion beam diagnosis of relativistic ions in a storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, S.

    1990-08-01

    Particle accelerator and storage ring technology has reached an advanced state, so that different heavy ion storage rings are coming into operation by now, capable of storing even fully stripped ions up to U 92+ . The main purpose of these machines are the accumulation of ions and the ability of improving the beam quality, that is the phase space density of the stored beams. This beam cooling is done successfully by the well established stochastic and electron cooling techniques. A new cooling method, the laser cooling, is taken over from atomic beam and ion trap experiments, where it has yielded extremely low temperatures of atomic samples. As a canditate at storage rings 7 Li + ions are stored in the Heidelberg TSR at 13.3 MeV. The ion beam properties of the metastable fraction like momentum spread, storage time and the influence of residual gas scattering are investigated by colinear laser spectroscopy in the experimental section of the TSR. An optical pumping experiment using two dye laser systems yields information about ion kinematics and velocity mixing processes in the ring. Lifetimes in the order of 100 ms for velocity classes marked in this way show that laser cooling can be applied to the stored 7 Li + beam. In an experimental situation of two strong counterpropagating laser beams, both tuned near resonance, a dramatic reduction of the ion beam momentum spread is observed. With a special geometrical control of laser and ion beam the longitudinal beam temperature is reduced from 260 K to at least 3 K with very high collection efficiency. (orig./HSI) [de

  19. Cascade Problems in Some Atomic Lifetime Measurements at a Heavy-Ion Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabert, E; Hoffmann, J; Krantz, C; Wolf, A; Ishikawa, Y; Santana, J

    2008-10-09

    Lifetimes of 3s{sup 2}3p{sup k} ground configuration levels of Al-, Si-, P-, and S-like ions of Be, Co, and Ni have been measured at a heavy-ion storage ring. Some of the observed decay curves show strong evidence of cascade repopulation from specific 3d levels that feature lifetimes in the same multi-millisecond range as the levels of the ground configuration.

  20. Overall design concepts for the APS storage ring machine protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumpkin, A.; Fuja, R.; Votaw, A.; Wang, X.; Shu, D.; Stepp, J.; Arnold, N.; Nawrocki, G.; Decker, G.; Chung, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The basic design and status of the machine protection system for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring are discussed. The machine is passively safe to the bending magnet sources, but the high power of the insertion devices requires missteering conditions to be identified and the beam aborted in less than one millisecond. The basic aspects of waterflow, temperature, beam position, etc. monitoring are addressed. Initial commissioning of subsystems and sensors is statused

  1. Systems analysis of accelerator and storage ring systems for inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, R.; Fenster, S.; Grammel, S.

    1977-01-01

    A computerized systems model is being developed to help assess the relative merits of the various accelerator systems that appear able to meet the requirements for inertial fusion with high energy heavy ion beams. Assessment involves calculating the total cost and parameters that are critical to technical feasibility. Current results showing cost trends and important technical parameters for rf linac/storage ring systems using ions of different mass, charge state, and kinetic energy are presented.

  2. Effect of tune modulation on the transverse stability of storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jiancheng; Xia Jiawen; Wu Junxia; Xia Guoxing; Liu Wei; Yin Xuejun; Liu Yong; Zhou Xuemei; Mao Lijun

    2004-01-01

    The transverse stability is a critical issue in circular accelerator. In this paper, authors analysed the effect of tune modulation on a FODO lattice with sextupole nonlinear through estimating the dynamic aperture including the influence of the distortion along the phase. It turned out that the tune modulation decreases the stability of particle in storage ring, the extent of this decrease depends largely on the amplitude and tune of modulation. (author)

  3. Dynamical aspects on FEL interaction in single passage and storage ring devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, G.; Renieri, A. [ENEA, Frascati (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    The dynamical behaviour of the free-electron lasers is investigated using appropriate scaling relations valid for devices operating in the low and high gain regimes, including saturation. The analysis is applied to both single passage and storage ring configurations. In the latter case the interplay between the interaction of the electron bean with the laser field and with the accelerator environment is investigated. In particular we discuss the effect of FEL interaction on the microwave instability.

  4. Improving beam profiles in the Super-ALIS super conducting storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, K.; Kaneko, T.; Kuroda, K.; Nakajima, M.; Hosokawa, T.

    1996-01-01

    In the Super-ALIS superconducting storage ring for synchrotron radiation, the electron beams have been suffering from slanted profiles. The most probable reason for this slanting problem is x-y coupling originating from the combination of the sextupole components and the vertical closed orbit distortion (COD) in the superconducting bending magnets. In this work, we present the results of correcting profiles in the Super-ALIS by reducing COD and using cancellation coils for sextupole components. (orig.)

  5. Spin matching conditions in large electron storage rings with purely horizontal beam polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossmanith, R.

    1990-08-01

    In a storage ring with a purely horizontal spin and a Siberian Snake, the spin matching conditions are similar to the spin matching conditions for vertical polarization; a combination of beam bumps has to be found which compensate the depolarizing effects. These bumps compensate the random emission of synchrotron emission on the spin. The aim of this paper is to define spin matching conditions that compensate this effect.

  6. Vacuum R and D for CESR (Cornell Electron-positron Storage Ring) upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, V.P.

    1995-01-01

    The Cornell Electron-positron Storage Ring has been operating successfully for a number of years now. It has been quite productive for both high energy physics research and the use of the synchrotron radiation (CHESS-Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source) for studies of biological and physical materials/devices. Vacuum to a great extent restricts the beam current and various steps have been undertaken to improve every aspect of it. 5 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs., 1 ill

  7. Precise measurements of magnetic field parameters of the multipoles for the SLS storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Antohin, E I; Demenev, V V; Golubenko, O B; Korchuganov, V N; Mikhailov, S F; Ogurtsov, A B; Rivkin, L; Semenov, E P; Steshov, A G; Vollenweider, C; Zichy, J A

    2001-01-01

    The quadrupoles and sextupoles for the Swiss Light Source, a 2.4 GeV electron storage ring, had severe requirements on the manufacturing tolerances and the alignment of their magnetic axis. The 306 multipoles were manufactured, and magnetically measured at BINP and after delivery also at Paul Scherrer Institute. In this paper, the Rotating Coil Systems for precise magnetic measurements is described, and for the series magnets the main results of the magnetic measurements are also presented.

  8. Depolarization of the electron spin in storage rings by nonlinear spin-orbit coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kewisch, J.

    1985-10-01

    Electrons and positrons which circulate in the storage ring are polarized at the emission of synchrotron radiation by the so called Sokolov-Ternov effect. This polarization is on the one hand of large interest for the study of the weak interaction, on the other hand it can be used for the accurate measurement of the beam energy and by this of the mass of elementary particles. The transverse and longitudinal particle vibrations simultaneously excited by the synchrotron radiation however can effect that this polarization is destroyed. This effect is called spin-orbit coupling. For the calculation of the spin-orbit coupling the computer program SITROS was written. This program is a tracking program: The motion of some sample particles and their spin vectors are calculated for some thousand circulations. From this the mean depolarization and by extrapolation the degree of polarization of the equilibrium state is determined. Contrarily to the known program SLIM which is based on perturbational calculations in SITROS the nonlinear forces in the storage ring can be regarded. By this the calculation of depolarizing higher order resonances is made possible. In this thesis the equations of motion for the orbital and spin motion of the electrons are derived which form the base for the program SITROS. The functions of the program and the approximations necessary for the saving of calculational time are explained. The comparison of the SITROS results with the measurement results obtained at the PETRA storage ring shows that the SITROS program is a useful means for the planning and calculation of storage rings with polarized electron beams. (orig.) [de

  9. Design summary of the magnet support structures for the proton storage ring injection line upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardin, J.D.; Ledford, J.E.; Smith, B.G.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the technical engineering and design issues associated with the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) Injection Line upgrade of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The main focus is on the engineering design calculations of several magnet support structures. The general procedure based upon a set number of design criteria is outlined, followed by a case-by-case summary of the engineering design analyses, reutilization or fabrication callouts and design safety factors.

  10. A Dynamic Momentum Compaction Factor Lattice for Improvements to Stochastic Cooling in Storage Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivieri, David Nicholas [Massachusetts U., Amherst

    1996-01-01

    A dynamic momentum compaction factor, also referred to as a dynamic $\\Delta \\gamma \\tau$, lattice for the FNAL Antiproton Source Debuncher Storage Ring is studied, both theoretically and experimentally, for the purpose of improving stochastic precooling, and hence, improving the global antiproton production and stacking performance. A dynamic $\\Delta \\gamma \\tau$ lattice is proposed due to the competing requirements inherent within the Debuncher storage ring upon $\\gamma \\tau$· Specifically, the Debuncher storage ring performs two disparate functions, $(i)$ accepting and debunching a large number of $\\overline{p}$s/pulse at the outset of the production cycle, which would perform ideally with a large value of $\\gamma\\tau$, and $(ii)$ subsequently employing stochastic cooling throughout the remainder of the $\\overline{p}$ production cycle for improved transfer and stacking efficiency into the Accumulator, for which a small value $\\gamma \\tau$ is ideal in order to reduce the diffusive heating caused by the mixing factor. In the initial design of the Debuncher optical lattice, an intermediate value of $\\gamma \\tau$ was chosen as a compromise between the two functional requirements. The goal of the thesis is to improve stochastic precooling by changing $\\gamma \\tau$ between two desired values during each p production cycle. In particular, the dynamic $\\Delta \\gamma \\tau$ lattice accomplishes a reduction in $\\gamma \\tau$, and hence the mixing factor, through an uniform increase to the dispersion throughout the arc sections of the storage ring. Experimental measurements of cooling rates and system performance parameters, with the implementation of the dynamic $\\Delta \\gamma \\tau$ lattice, are in agreement with theoretical predictions based upon a detailed integration of the stochastic cooling Fokker Planck equations. Based upon the consistency between theory and experiment, predictions of cooling rates are presented for future operational

  11. A storage ring experiment to detect a proton electric dipole moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassopoulos, V; Andrianov, S; Baartman, R; Baessler, S; Bai, M; Benante, J; Berz, M; Blaskiewicz, M; Bowcock, T; Brown, K; Casey, B; Conte, M; Crnkovic, J D; D'Imperio, N; Fanourakis, G; Fedotov, A; Fierlinger, P; Fischer, W; Gaisser, M O; Giomataris, Y; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guidoboni, G; Hacıömeroğlu, S; Hoffstaetter, G; Huang, H; Incagli, M; Ivanov, A; Kawall, D; Kim, Y I; King, B; Koop, I A; Lazarus, D M; Lebedev, V; Lee, M J; Lee, S; Lee, Y H; Lehrach, A; Lenisa, P; Levi Sandri, P; Luccio, A U; Lyapin, A; MacKay, W; Maier, R; Makino, K; Malitsky, N; Marciano, W J; Meng, W; Meot, F; Metodiev, E M; Miceli, L; Moricciani, D; Morse, W M; Nagaitsev, S; Nayak, S K; Orlov, Y F; Ozben, C S; Park, S T; Pesce, A; Petrakou, E; Pile, P; Podobedov, B; Polychronakos, V; Pretz, J; Ptitsyn, V; Ramberg, E; Raparia, D; Rathmann, F; Rescia, S; Roser, T; Kamal Sayed, H; Semertzidis, Y K; Senichev, Y; Sidorin, A; Silenko, A; Simos, N; Stahl, A; Stephenson, E J; Ströher, H; Syphers, M J; Talman, J; Talman, R M; Tishchenko, V; Touramanis, C; Tsoupas, N; Venanzoni, G; Vetter, K; Vlassis, S; Won, E; Zavattini, G; Zelenski, A; Zioutas, K

    2016-11-01

    A new experiment is described to detect a permanent electric dipole moment of the proton with a sensitivity of 10 -29 e ⋅ cm by using polarized "magic" momentum 0.7 GeV/c protons in an all-electric storage ring. Systematic errors relevant to the experiment are discussed and techniques to address them are presented. The measurement is sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model at the scale of 3000 TeV.

  12. Storage ring design of the 8 GeV synchrotron radiation facility (SPring-8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, M.; Bc, S.H.; Motonaga, S.

    1990-01-01

    In Japan, RIKEN (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) have organized a joint design team and started a design study for an 8 GeV synchrotron radiation X-ray source. This paper outlines the status of the design study for the 8 GeV highly brilliant synchrotron radiation X-ray source ring named Super Photon Ring (SPring-8). The facility consists of a main storage ring, a full-energy injector booster synchrotron and a pre-injector 1 GeV linac. The injector linac and synchrotron are laid outside the storage ring because to permit the use of the linac and synchrotron not only as an injector but also as an electron or positron beam source. The purpose of the facility is to provide stable photon beams with high brilliance in the X-ray region. The energy of the stored electrons (positrons) is fixed at 8 GeV to fulfill the required condition using conventional type insertion devices. (N.K.)

  13. Photoswitchable Dihydroazulene Macrocycles for Solar Energy Storage: The Effects of Ring Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasceanu, Alexandru; Frandsen, Benjamin N; Skov, Anders B; Hansen, Anne Schou; Rasmussen, Mads Georg; Kjaergaard, Henrik G; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted

    2017-10-06

    Efficient energy storage and release are two major challenges of solar energy harvesting technologies. The development of molecular solar thermal systems presents one approach to address these issues by tuning the isomerization reactions of photo/thermoswitches. Here we show that the incorporation of photoswitches into macrocyclic structures is a particularly attractive solution for increasing the storage time. We present the synthesis and properties of a series of macrocycles incorporating two dihydroazulene (DHA) photoswitching subunits, bridged by linkers of varying chain length. Independent of ring size, all macrocycles exhibit stepwise, light-induced, ring-opening reactions (DHA-DHA to DHA-VHF to VHF-VHF; VHF = vinylheptafulvene) with the first DHA undergoing isomerization with a similar efficiency as the uncyclized parent system while the second (DHA-VHF to VHF-VHF) is significantly slower. The energy-releasing, VHF-to-DHA, ring closures also occur in a stepwise manner and are systematically found to proceed slower in the more strained (smaller) cycles, but in all cases with a remarkably slow conversion of the second VHF to DHA. We managed to increase the half-life of the second VHF-to-DHA conversion from 65 to 202 h at room temperature by simply decreasing the ring size. A computational study reveals the smallest macrocycle to have the most energetic VHF-VHF state and hence highest energy density.

  14. Third harmonic rf cavity for transition crossing in the Main Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, C.M.

    1992-08-01

    This paper reports the present status and future plans of the implementation of the transition crossing RF harmonic system at Fermilab. The test is being carried out in the Main Ring (MR) which is used as a 150 GeV injector to the Tevatron

  15. Some fundamental aspects of fluctuations and coherence in charged-particle beams in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual survey and exposition is presented of some fundamental aspects of fluctuations and coherence, as well as the interplay between the two, in coasting charged-particle beams - both continuous and bunched - in storage rings. A detailed study is given of the spectral properties of the incoherent phase-space Schottky fluctuations, their propagation as waves in the beam, and the analytic complex coherent beam electromagnetic response or transfer function. The modification or distortion of these by collective interactions is examined in terms of simple regeneration mechanisms. Collective or coherent forces in the beam-storage-ring system are described by defining suitable impedance functions or propagators, and a brief discussion of the coherent collective modes and their stability is provided, including a general and rigorous description of the Nyquist stability criterion. The nature of the critical fluctuations near an instability threshold is explored. The concept of Landau damping and its connection with phase-mixing within the beam is outlined. The important connection between the incoherent fluctuations and the beam response, namely the Fluctuation-Dissipation relation, is revealed. A brief discussion is given of the information degrees of freedom, and effective temperature of the fluctuation signals. Appendices provide a short resume of some general aspects of various interactions in a charged-particle beam-environment system in a storage ring and a general introduction to kinetic theory as applied to particle beams. (orig.)

  16. Modified theoretical minimum emittance lattice for an electron storage ring with extreme-low emittance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Jiao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the continuing efforts to reduce the beam emittance of an electron storage ring composed of theoretical minimum emittance (TME lattice, down to a level of several tens of picometers, nonlinear dynamics grows to be a great challenge to the performance of the storage ring because of the strong sextupoles needed to compensate for its large global natural chomaticities coupled with its small average dispersion function. To help in dealing with the challenge of nonlinear optimization, we propose a novel variation of theoretical minimum emittance (TME lattice, named as “modified-TME” lattice, with minimal emittance about 3 times of the exact theoretical minimum, while with more compact layout, lower phase advance per cell, smaller natural chromaticities, and more relaxed optical functions than that in a TME cell, by using horizontally defocusing quadrupole closer to the dipole or simply combined-function dipole with horizontally defocusing gradient. We present approximate scaling formulas to describe the relationships of the design parameters in a modified-TME cell. The applications of modified-TME lattice in the PEP-X storage ring design are illustrated and the proposed lattice appears a good candidate for synchrotron radiation light source with extremely low emittance.

  17. DWDM channel spacing tunable optical TDM carrier from a mode-locked weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode based fiber ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Guo-Hsuan; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2008-08-18

    A novel optical TDM pulsed carrier with tunable mode spacing matching the ITU-T defined DWDM channels is demonstrated, which is generated from an optically injection-mode-locked weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode (FPLD) with 10%-end-facet reflectivity. The FPLD exhibits relatively weak cavity modes and a gain spectral linewidth covering >33.5 nm. The least common multiple of the mode spacing determined by both the weak-resonant-cavity FPLD and the fiber-ring cavity can be tunable by adjusting length of the fiber ring cavity or the FPLD temperature to approach the desired 200GHz DWDM channel spacing of 1.6 nm. At a specific fiber-ring cavity length, such a least-common- multiple selection rule results in 12 lasing modes between 1532 and 1545 nm naturally and a mode-locking pulsewidth of 19 ps broadened by group velocity dispersion among different modes. With an additional intracavity bandpass filter, the operating wavelength can further extend from 1520 to 1553.5 nm. After channel filtering, each selected longitudinal mode gives rise to a shortened pulsewidth of 12 ps due to the reduced group velocity dispersion. By linear dispersion compensating with a 55-m long dispersion compensation fiber (DCF), the pulsewidth can be further compressed to 8 ps with its corresponding peak-to-peak chirp reducing from 9.7 to 4.3 GHz.

  18. Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corletti, Michael M.; Lau, Louis K.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1993-01-01

    The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

  19. The electron beam dynamics simulation in the laser-electron storage ring involving compton and intrabeam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladkikh, P.I.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Karnaukhov, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the development of intense X-ray sources based on Compton scattering in laser-electron storage rings is discussed. The results of the electron beam dynamics simulation involving Compton and intrabeam scattering are presented

  20. The electron beam dynamics simulation in the laser-electron storage ring involving compton and intrabeam scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Gladkikh, P I; Karnaukhov, I M

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the development of intense X-ray sources based on Compton scattering in laser-electron storage rings is discussed. The results of the electron beam dynamics simulation involving Compton and intrabeam scattering are presented.

  1. Pushing the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring brightness and coherence towards the limit of its magnetic lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemann, S. C.; Wurtz, W. A.

    2018-03-01

    The MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring is presently being commissioned and crucial parameters such as machine functions, emittance, and stored current have either already been reached or are approaching their design specifications. Once the baseline performance has been achieved, a campaign will be launched to further improve the brightness and coherence of this storage ring for typical X-ray users. During recent years, several such improvements have been designed. Common to these approaches is that they attempt to improve the storage ring performance using existing hardware provided for the baseline design. Such improvements therefore present more short-term upgrades. In this paper, however, we investigate medium-term improvements assuming power supplies can be exchanged in an attempt to push the brightness and coherence of the storage ring to the limit of what can be achieved without exchanging the magnetic lattice itself. We outline optics requirements, the optics optimization process, and summarize achievable parameters and expected performance.

  2. Nuclear spin state-resolved cavity ring-down spectroscopy diagnostics of a low-temperature H3+ -dominated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejduk, Michal; Dohnal, Petr; Varju, Jozef; Rubovič, Peter; Plašil, Radek; Glosík, Juraj

    2012-01-01

    We have applied a continuous-wave near-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy method to study the parameters of a H 3 + -dominated plasma at temperatures in the range 77–200 K. We monitor populations of three rotational states of the ground vibrational state corresponding to para and ortho nuclear spin states in the discharge and the afterglow plasma in time and conclude that abundances of para and ortho states and rotational temperatures are well defined and stable. The non-trivial dependence of a relative population of para- H 3 + on a relative population of para-H 2 in a source H 2 gas is described. The results described in this paper are valuable for studies of state-selective dissociative recombination of H 3 + ions with electrons in the afterglow plasma and for the design of sources of H 3 + ions in a specific nuclear spin state. (paper)

  3. Nuclear spin state-resolved cavity ring-down spectroscopy diagnostics of a low-temperature H_3^+ -dominated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, Michal; Dohnal, Petr; Varju, Jozef; Rubovič, Peter; Plašil, Radek; Glosík, Juraj

    2012-04-01

    We have applied a continuous-wave near-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy method to study the parameters of a H_3^+ -dominated plasma at temperatures in the range 77-200 K. We monitor populations of three rotational states of the ground vibrational state corresponding to para and ortho nuclear spin states in the discharge and the afterglow plasma in time and conclude that abundances of para and ortho states and rotational temperatures are well defined and stable. The non-trivial dependence of a relative population of para- H_3^+ on a relative population of para-H2 in a source H2 gas is described. The results described in this paper are valuable for studies of state-selective dissociative recombination of H_3^+ ions with electrons in the afterglow plasma and for the design of sources of H_3^+ ions in a specific nuclear spin state.

  4. Real-Tme Boron Nitride Erosion Measurements of the HiVHAc Thruster via Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brian C.; Yalin, Azer P.; Gallimore, Alec; Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani

    2013-01-01

    Cavity ring-down spectroscopy was used to make real-time erosion measurements from the NASA High Voltage Hall Accelerator thruster. The optical sensor uses 250 nm light to measure absorption of atomic boron in the plume of an operating Hall thruster. Theerosion rate of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator thruster was measured for discharge voltages ranging from 330 to 600 V and discharge powers ranging from 1 to 3 kW. Boron densities as high as 6.5 x 10(exp 15) per cubic meter were found within the channel. Using a very simple boronvelocity model, approximate volumetric erosion rates between 5.0 x 10(exp -12) and 8.2 x 10(exp -12) cubic meter per second were found.

  5. Spin motion at and near orbital resonance in storage rings with Siberian snakes I. At orbital resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, D.P.; Vogt, M.

    2006-12-01

    Here, and in a sequel, we invoke the invariant spin field to provide an in-depth study of spin motion at and near low order orbital resonances in a simple model for the effects of vertical betatron motion in a storage ring with Siberian Snakes. This leads to a clear understanding, within the model, of the behaviour of the beam polarization at and near so-called snake resonances in proton storage rings. (orig.)

  6. Spin motion at and near orbital resonance in storage rings with Siberian snakes I. At orbital resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, D.P.; Vogt, M.

    2006-12-15

    Here, and in a sequel, we invoke the invariant spin field to provide an in-depth study of spin motion at and near low order orbital resonances in a simple model for the effects of vertical betatron motion in a storage ring with Siberian Snakes. This leads to a clear understanding, within the model, of the behaviour of the beam polarization at and near so-called snake resonances in proton storage rings. (orig.)

  7. 6 MeV storage ring dedicated to hard X-ray imaging and far-infrared ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ray imaging as well as far-infrared (FIR) ... Low-energy storage ring; X-ray imaging; far-infrared spectroscopy; coherence enhancement. ... mirror system, a large dynamic aperture and small ring energy, it can deliver a bright flux of photons in the ...

  8. Ammonia emissions from air cleaners at pig farms in Denmark using a Picarro cavity ring-down spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Renato; Adamsen, Anders Peter S.

    2017-04-01

    Ammonia emissions from agricultural activities such as, cattle, pig and poultry farms have become an ever more important topic both for scientists as well as for regulatory bodies due to the severe impacts of ammonia on human health and the environment. In the European Union, the agricultural sector accounts for most of the ammonia emissions, and therefore the EU authorities have put in place reduction targets for the member states. In Denmark, most pig farmers have to deploy one or more ammonia abatement technologies in order to fulfill the national regulation when building new pig houses. A promising ammonia abatement technology is partial floor ventilation and subsequent cleaning using one or two step chemical air cleaners. The cleaned air will have ammonia concentration is the sub-ppm level and with high humidity. Here we present method of monitoring NH3 emissions from air cleaners deployed on pig farms using the G2103 Picarro laser spectrometer. The Picarro G2103 NH3 analyzer is a high precision cavity ring-down spectrometer using a high finesse optical cavity and a near infra-red light laser light source with a very narrow light band. The latter eliminates cross-interferences from other gases present in livestock air. Picarro instruments are built for field measurements and have been widely used for atmospheric monitoring of greenhouse gases and of air pollutants such as NH3.

  9. Measurements of extinction by aerosol particles in the near-infrared using continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Daniel; King, Simon J; Kim, Jin; Reid, Jonathan P; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2011-02-10

    Cavity ring-down spectroscopy using a fiber-coupled continuous wave distributed feedback laser at a wavelength of 1520 nm has been used to measure extinction of light by samples of nearly monodisperse aerosol particles analysis of the sample extinction that is based on the Poisson statistics of the number of particles within the intracavity laser beam: variances of measured extinction are used to derive values of the scattering cross section for size-selected aerosol particles, without need for knowledge of the particle number density or sample length. Experimental parameters that influence the performance of the CRD system and the application and limitations of the statistical model are examined in detail. Determinations are reported of the scattering cross sections for polystyrene spheres (PSSs), sodium chloride, and ammonium sulfate, and, for particles greater than 500 nm in diameter, are shown to be in agreement with the corresponding values calculated using Mie theory or Discrete Dipole Approximation methods. For smaller particles, the experimentally derived values of the scattering cross section are larger than the theoretical predictions, and transmission of a small fraction of larger particles into the cavity is argued to be responsible for this discrepancy. The effects of cubic structure on the determination of optical extinction efficiencies of sodium chloride aerosol particles are examined. Values are reported for the real components of the refractive indices at 1520 nm of PSS, sodium chloride, and ammonium sulfate aerosol particles.

  10. Pressure optimization of an EC-QCL based cavity ring-down spectroscopy instrument for exhaled NO detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sheng; Han, Yanling; Li, Bincheng

    2018-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled breath has gained increasing interest in recent years mainly driven by the clinical need to monitor inflammatory status in respiratory disorders, such as asthma and other pulmonary conditions. Mid-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) using an external cavity, widely tunable continuous-wave quantum cascade laser operating at 5.3 µm was employed for NO detection. The detection pressure was reduced in steps to improve the sensitivity, and the optimal pressure was determined to be 15 kPa based on the fitting residual analysis of measured absorption spectra. A detection limit (1σ, or one time of standard deviation) of 0.41 ppb was experimentally achieved for NO detection in human breath under the optimized condition in a total of 60 s acquisition time (2 s per data point). Diurnal measurement session was conducted for exhaled NO. The experimental results indicated that mid-infrared CRDS technique has great potential for various applications in health diagnosis.

  11. Low-impedance, 2.8-MHz, pulsed bunching system for the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardek, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Proton Storage Ring (PSR) now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory is a device designed to accept a proton beam from the 800-MeV linear accelerator (LAMPF) and accumulate the protons to provide short, extremely high intensity bursts that drive a high-flux pulsed-neutron source. These bunches, which circulate at a 2.8-MHz frequency, are longitudinally confined by an rf electric field produced at that frequency by a ferrite-loaded coaxial quarter-wave resonator driven by a unique low-impedance rf amplifier. The buncher develops a 14-kV peak amplitude across the resonator gap and is energized in 3 ms-long pulses at rates up to 24 Hz. A principal design challenge exists because of high circulating beam currents (up to 45 A) that would, in a system driven by a conventional high-impedance amplifier, produce an induced voltage phased to interefere with the bunching action and much higher than that of the rf drive. The chosen solution is to feed the cavity from a low-output impedance amplifier whose final stages operate in Class A with a push-pull common-anode configuration. With this approach, similar to the rf system proposed for the colliding-beam accelerator (now cancelled) at BNL, we can achieve an effective system impedance of about 25 Ω and can limit beam-induced effects to an acceptable level. This paper discusses the design of the cavity and amplifier and reports results from preliminary tests

  12. Present status of the NIJI-IV storage-ring free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, T.; Yamada, K.; Sei, N. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The tunable region of the free-electron-laser (FEL) wavelength with the NIJI-IV system is now 348{approximately}595 nm. After the lasing at 352 nm in 1994, the quality of the electron beam stored in the ring has been improved further, and the highest peak intensity of the laser obtained so far is more than 300 times as high as that of the resonated spontaneous emission. The macro-temporal structure of the lasing has been greatly improved. Recently, a single-bunch injection system was completed, and the system has been installed in the injector linac, which is expected to increase the peak stored-beam current. The commissioning and the test of the new system is under way. The beam transporting system from the linac to the ring is also being modified by increasing the number of quadrupole magnets. The experiments related to the FEL in the ultraviolet wavelength region will be begun in this coming May. The results and the status of the FEL experiments will be presented at the Conference.

  13. Detection of hydrogen cyanide from oral anaerobes by cavity ring down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Roslund, Kajsa; Fogarty, Christopher L.; Pussinen, Pirkko J.; Halonen, Lauri; Groop, Per-Henrik; Metsälä, Markus; Lehto, Markku

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) has been recognized as a potential biomarker for non-invasive diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the lung. However, the oral cavity is a dominant production site for exhaled HCN and this contribution can mask the HCN generated in the lung. It is thus important to understand the sources of HCN production in the oral cavity. By screening of oral anaerobes for HCN production, we observed that the genus of Porphyromonas, Prevotella and Fusobacterium generated low levels of HCN in vitro. This is the first study to show that oral anaerobes are capable of producing HCN in vitro. Further investigations were conducted on the species of P. gingivalis and we successfully detected HCN production (0.9-10.9 ppb) in the headspace of three P. gingivalis reference strains (ATCC 33277, W50 and OMG 434) and one clinical isolate. From P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 and W50, a strong correlation between HCN and CO2 concentrations (rs = 0.89, p < 0.001) was observed, indicating that the HCN production of P. gingivalis might be connected with the bacterial metabolic activity. These results indicate that our setup could be widely applied to the screening of in vitro HCN production by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

  14. Kinetics of IO Production in the CH2I + O2 Reaction Studied by Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Elizabeth S; Murray, Craig

    2015-08-27

    Cavity ring-down spectroscopy was used to study the kinetics of formation of IO radicals in the reaction of CH2I + O2 in a flow cell at 52 ± 3 Torr total pressure of N2 diluent and a temperature of 295 K. CH2I was produced by photolysis of CH2I2 at 355 nm and IO probed on the A(2)Π3/2–X(2)Π3/2 (3,0) and (3,1) bands at 435.70 and 448.86 nm, respectively. The rates of formation of IO(v″ = 0) and IO(v″ = 1) were measured as a function of O2 number density using either conventional transient absorption or the simultaneous kinetic and ring-down technique, respectively. IO(v″ = 1) was found to be formed with a significantly larger rate constant, but reached far smaller peak concentrations than IO(v″ = 0). Kinetic modeling supports the conclusion that IO(v″ = 0) is produced both directly and through secondary chemistry, most probably involving the initial formation of the Criegee intermediate CH2OO and subsequent reaction with I atoms, while IO(v″ = 1) is produced exclusively via a direct mechanism. We propose that the reaction mechanism (direct or indirect) depends upon the degree of initial excitation of the photolytically produced CH2I reagent.

  15. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Harkay

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  16. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkay, K.C.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  17. Symplectic orbit and spin tracking code for all-electric storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Talman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Proposed methods for measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM of the proton use an intense, polarized proton beam stored in an all-electric storage ring “trap.” At the “magic” kinetic energy of 232.792 MeV, proton spins are “frozen,” for example always parallel to the instantaneous particle momentum. Energy deviation from the magic value causes in-plane precession of the spin relative to the momentum. Any nonzero EDM value will cause out-of-plane precession—measuring this precession is the basis for the EDM determination. A proposed implementation of this measurement shows that a proton EDM value of 10^{-29}e-cm or greater will produce a statistically significant, measurable precession after multiply repeated runs, assuming small beam depolarization during 1000 s runs, with high enough precision to test models of the early universe developed to account for the present day particle/antiparticle population imbalance. This paper describes an accelerator simulation code, eteapot, a new component of the Unified Accelerator Libraries (ual, to be used for long term tracking of particle orbits and spins in electric bend accelerators, in order to simulate EDM storage ring experiments. Though qualitatively much like magnetic rings, the nonconstant particle velocity in electric rings gives them significantly different properties, especially in weak focusing rings. Like the earlier code teapot (for magnetic ring simulation this code performs exact tracking in an idealized (approximate lattice rather than the more conventional approach, which is approximate tracking in a more nearly exact lattice. The Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi (BMT equation describing the evolution of spin vectors through idealized bend elements is also solved exactly—original to this paper. Furthermore the idealization permits the code to be exactly symplectic (with no artificial “symplectification”. Any residual spurious damping or antidamping is sufficiently small to

  18. High-accuracy continuous airborne measurements of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4) using the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, H.; Winderlich, J.; Gerbig, C.; Hoefer, A.; Rella, C. W.; Crosson, E. R.; Van Pelt, A. D.; Steinbach, J.; Kolle, O.; Beck, V.; Daube, B. C.; Gottlieb, E. W.; Chow, V. Y.; Santoni, G. W.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    High-accuracy continuous measurements of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4) during the BARCA (Balancao Atmosferico Regional de Carbono na Amazonia) phase B campaign in Brazil in May 2009 were accomplished using a newly available analyzer based on the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) technique. This

  19. Integrating Log-Ratio position processing for the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring extraction line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardek, T.W.; Band, A.

    1993-01-01

    The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) compressor ring intended to accept 1-msec-long p macropulses from the LAMPF linear accelerator and compress these pulses to 250 nsec in length. Beam position monitor sensors of the terminated strip-line design centered at 200 nsec are provided in the transport line from LAMPF, the PSR injection line, the PSR ring, and the extracted beam line. Strip-line sensors used in conjunction with phase processing are a good match for linac transport lines and PSR injection lines where there exists a strong 200-MHz frequency component but lead to difficulties in the ring and extracted beam line where this component tends to wash out. This paper describes the development of Integrating Log-Ratio processing techniques, which utilize the original strip line sensors to achieve a major improvement in position monitoring for the extracted beam line. The design concepts are discussed and the present hardware is described in detail. Operational difficulties encountered during the development process are discussed and actual beam-related results are provided

  20. CESR-c Performance of a Wiggler-Dominated Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Temnykh, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    CESR-c operates now as a Wiggler-Dominated Storage Ring extending the lowest operating energy to 1.5GeV/beam. To improve beam stability at low energy, 12 super-ferric wiggler magnets with total length of 15m and 2.1T maximum field were installed in the ring. They cause ~90% of total beam radiation lost and increase radiation damping rate by factor 10 from ~3 to 40 Hz. However, the field of the wiggler magnets not only initiates the radiation, but potentially affects beam dynamics. The latter was an issue of a great concern from the planning the CESR-c project. In this paper we describe general performance of CESR-c and report the results of an experimental study on some aspects of beam dynamics. Comparisons are made between the experimental data and the model prediction. We find that all parameters, which are critically dependent on wigglers, such as beam properties and ring nonlinearity, are in good agreement with those calculated from the model. This validates the ring and wiggler models and justifies our d...

  1. New injection scheme using a pulsed quadrupole magnet in electron storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Harada

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a new injection scheme using a single pulsed quadrupole magnet (PQM with no pulsed local bump at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR in High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK. The scheme employs the basic property of a quadrupole magnet, that the field at the center is zero, and nonzero elsewhere. The amplitude of coherent betatron oscillation of the injected beam is effectively reduced by the PQM; then, the injected beam is captured into the ring without largely affecting the already stored beam. In order to investigate the performance of the scheme with a real beam, we built the PQM providing a higher field gradient over 3  T/m and a shorter pulse width of 2.4  μs, which is twice the revolution period of the PF-AR. After the field measurements confirmed the PQM specifications, we installed it into the ring. Then, we conducted the experiment using a real beam and consequently succeeded in storing the beam current of more than 60 mA at the PF-AR. This is the first successful beam injection using a single PQM in electron storage rings.

  2. Analytical solutions for the invariant spin field for model storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mane, S.R.

    2002-01-01

    We present nonperturbative analytical expressions for the invariant spin field for several storage ring models. In particular, we solve the important models of a ring with one Snake and a single resonance driving term, and a ring with two Snakes and a single resonance driving term. We also treat several other models, all of which contain Siberian Snakes. Our solutions contain some novel features, e.g. in some cases the polarization does not point along the direction of the closed-orbit spin quantization axis. We also include vertical resonance driving terms, and consider the contributions of sextupoles and higher order multipoles to the resonance driving terms, and argue that these can play a significant role in some circumstances. We offer some brief remarks on the so-called Snake resonances. We relate our results to observations of higher-order depolarizing spin resonances for polarized proton beams in a real ring, and offer some suggestions as to how our ideas might be verified

  3. OPTICAL PARAMETRIC OSCILLATORS: Optimal feedback in efficient ring double-cavity optical parametric oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petnikova, V. M.; Shuvalov, Vladimir V.

    2010-09-01

    It is shown that the use of two feedback circuits with matched transfer constants and optimal phase incursions in a nondegenerate optical parametric oscillator (OPO) makes it possible to localise the extremes of intensity distributions of interacting waves on the output face of a nonlinear crystal, which provides maximum possible conversion efficiency of pump energy. The optimisation procedure in this case is rather flexible because it is reduced to ambiguous matching of the period and shift of the extremes of exact analytic solutions of the corresponding problem in the form of cnoidal waves with respect to the nonlinear crystal position. Unlike the single-cavity OPO scheme, both these parameters can substantially exceed the nonlinear crystal length and even tend to infinity, which corresponds to solitary soliton-like solutions.

  4. Connection between zero chromaticity and long in-plane polarization lifetime in a magnetic storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidoboni, G.; Stephenson, E. J.; Wrońska, A.; Bagdasarian, Z.; Bsaisou, J.; Chekmenev, S.; Ciullo, G.; Dymov, S.; Eversmann, D.; Gaisser, M.; Gebel, R.; Hejny, V.; Hempelmann, N.; Hinder, F.; Kacharava, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; Kulessa, P.; Lenisa, P.; Lehrach, A.; Lorentz, B.; Maanen, P.; Maier, R.; Mchedlishvili, D.; Mey, S.; Nass, A.; Pesce, A.; Orlov, Y.; Pretz, J.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Rosenthal, M.; Saleev, A.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Senichev, Y.; Shmakova, V.; Stockhorst, H.; Ströher, H.; Talman, R.; Thörngren Engblom, P.; Trinkel, F.; Valdau, Yu.; Weidemann, C.; Wüstner, P.; Żurek, M.; Zyuzin, D.; JEDI Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the connection between a magnetic storage ring with additional sextupole fields set so that the x and y chromaticities vanish and the maximizing of the lifetime of in-plane polarization (IPP) for a 0.97 -GeV /c deuteron beam. The IPP magnitude was measured by continuously monitoring the down-up scattering asymmetry (sensitive to sideways polarization) in an in-beam, carbon-target polarimeter and unfolding the precession of the IPP due to the magnetic anomaly of the deuteron. The optimum operating conditions for a long IPP lifetime were made by scanning the field of the storage ring sextupole magnet families while observing the rate of IPP loss during storage of the beam. The beam was bunched and electron cooled. The IPP losses appear to arise from the change of the orbit circumference, and consequently the particle speed and spin tune, due to the transverse betatron oscillations of individual particles in the beam. The effects of these changes are canceled by an appropriate sextupole field setting.

  5. Dispersion and betatron function correction in the Advanced Photon Source storage ring using singular value decomposition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, L.

    1999-04-13

    Magnet errors and off-center orbits through sextuples perturb the dispersion and beta functions in a storage ring (SR), which affects machine performance. In a large ring such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the magnet errors are difficult to determine with beam-based methods. Also the non-zero orbit through sextuples result from user requests for steering at light source points. For expediency, a singular value decomposition (SVD) matrix method analogous to orbit correction was adopted to make global corrections to these functions using strengths of several quadrupoles as correcting elements. The direct response matrix is calculated from the model of the perfect lattice. The inverse is calculated by SVD with a selected number of singular vectors. Resulting improvement in the lattice functions and machine performance will be presented.

  6. Electron Cloud Simulations of a Proton Storage Ring Using Cold Proton Bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Dr Y [KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; Holmes, Jeffrey A [ORNL; Lee, SY [Indiana University; Macek, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2008-01-01

    Using the ORBIT code we study the sensitivity of electron cloud properties with respect to different proton beam profiles, the secondary electron yield (SEY) parameter, and the proton loss rate. Our model uses a cold proton bunch to generate primary electrons and electromagnetic field for electron cloud dynamics. We study the dependence of the prompt and swept electron signals vs the bunch charge and the recovery of electron clouds after sweeping on the beam loss rate and the SEY. The simulation results are compared with the experimental data measured at the proton storage ring at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Our simulations indicate that the fractional proton loss rate in the field-free straight section may be an exponential function of proton beam charge and may also be lower than the averaged fractional proton loss rate over the whole ring.

  7. Electron cloud simulations of a proton storage ring using cold proton bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sato

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Using the ORBIT code we study the sensitivity of electron cloud properties with respect to different proton beam profiles, the secondary electron yield (SEY parameter, and the proton loss rate. Our model uses a cold proton bunch to generate primary electrons and electromagnetic field for electron cloud dynamics. We study the dependence of the prompt and swept electron signals vs the bunch charge and the recovery of electron clouds after sweeping on the beam loss rate and the SEY. The simulation results are compared with the experimental data measured at the proton storage ring at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Our simulations indicate that the fractional proton loss rate in the field-free straight section may be an exponential function of proton beam charge and may also be lower than the averaged fractional proton loss rate over the whole ring.

  8. Head-tail instability caused by electron cloud in positron storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Ohmi, K

    2000-01-01

    In positron or proton storage rings with many closely spaced bunches, a large number of electrons can be generated in the vacuum chamber due to photoemission or secondary emission. The density of this `electron cloud' increases along a bunch train, until the growth saturates under the influence of its own space charge field. In this report, we discuss the possibility of a single-bunch two-stream instability driven by the electron cloud, where any initial head-tail perturbation of the bunch is amplified by the coherent motion of cloud electrons near the beam. Depending on the strength of the beam-electron interaction, the chromaticity and the synchrotron oscillation frequency, this instability either resembles a linac beam break up, or a head-tail instability. We present computer simulations of beam break up and head-tail instabilities for the Low Energy Ring of the KEK B factory, and compare the simulation results with analytical estimates.

  9. High-power Microwave Pulse Compression of Klystrons by Phase-Modulation of High-Q Storage Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Bossart, Rudolf; Mourier, J; Syratchev, I V; Tanner, L

    2004-01-01

    At the CERN linear electron accelerators LIL and CTF, the peak RF power from the 3GHz-klystrons was doubled by means of LIPS microwave pulse compressors. To produce constant RF power from the cavity-based pulse compressors, the klystrons were driven by a fast RF-phase modulation program. For the CLIC Test Facility CTF3, a new type of a Barrel Open Cavity (BOC) with a high quality factor Q0 has been developed. Contrary to LIPS with two resonant cavities, BOC operates with a single cavity supporting two orthogonal resonant modes TM 10,1,1 in the same cavity. For both LIPS and BOC storage cavities, it is important that the RF power reflected back to the klystron is minimal. This implies that the resonant frequencies, Q-factors and coupling factors of the two resonant modes of a pulse compressor are closely matched, and that the resonant frequencies are accurate to within a few KHz. The effects of small differences between the two orthogonal modes of the BOC cavity have been investigated. The dynamic pulse respon...

  10. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  11. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BIGI, I.; BOLTON, T.; FORMAGGIO, J.; HARRIS, D.; MORFIN, J.; SPENTZOURIS, P.; YU, J.; KAYSER, B.; KING, B.J.; MCFARLAND, K.; PETROV, A.; SCHELLMAN, H.; VELASCO, M.; SHROCK, R.

    2000-01-01

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters

  12. Longitudinal beam dynamics and FEL interaction on a negative momentum compaction storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Hama, H

    1999-01-01

    A simulation study for longitudinal phase space of the electron bunch including effects of potential-well distortion and FEL interaction has been performed for both positive and negative momentum compaction factors on a storage ring. The trend of the bunch lengthening is well interpreted by the wake field due to inductive impedance. In spite of large energy spread in the case of the negative momentum compaction, FEL oscillation may be possible. The peak power of Q-switched lasing is higher than that in positive momentum compaction. There was, however, no significant difference in FEL power and particle distribution in the longitudinal phase space at the equilibrated state.

  13. Fast-extraction modulators for Los Alamos Scientific LaboratorY Proton Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunnally, W.C.; Hudgings, D.W.; Sarjeant, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a short-bunch mode fast-extraction modulator for the LASL proton storage ring has made necessary the design and development of a resonant transformer charging circuit and the design of a new FIB line circuit to provide bipolar pulse outputs with low prepulse, postpulse, and an optimum high-voltage switch environments. The systems are now being developed to operate reliably at the high-average powers required. The short-bunch mode fast-extraction modulator prototype is presently operating. The initial construction of the long-bunch mode fast-extraction modulator prototype is under way, with results expected within the year

  14. Electric field detection of coherent synchrotron radiation in a storage ring generated using laser bunch slicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, I.; Shimosato, H.; Bito, M.; Furusawa, K.; Adachi, M.; Zen, H.; Kimura, S.; Katoh, M.; Shimada, M.; Yamamoto, N.; Hosaka, M.; Ashida, M.

    2012-01-01

    The electric field of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) generated by laser bunch slicing in a storage ring has been detected by an electro-optic sampling method. The gate pulses for sampling are sent through a large-mode-area photonic-crystal fiber. The observed electric field profile of the CSR is in good agreement with the spectrum of the CSR observed using Fourier transform far-infrared spectrometry, indicating good phase stability in the CSR. The longitudinal density profiles of electrons modulated by laser pulses were evaluated from the electric field profile.

  15. ETEAPOT: symplectic orbit/spin tracking code for all-electric storage rings

    OpenAIRE

    Talman, Richard M.; Talman, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Proposed methods for measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the proton use an intense, polarized proton beam stored in an all-electric storage ring “trap.” At the “magic” kinetic energy of 232.792 MeV, proton spins are “frozen,” for example always parallel to the instantaneous particle momentum. Energy deviation from the magic value causes in-plane precession of the spin relative to the momentum. Any nonzero EDM value will cause out-of-plane precession—measuring this precession is the ...

  16. Numerical simulation of particle dynamics in storage rings using BETACOOL program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkov, I.N.; Pivin, R.V.; Sidorin, A.O.; Smirnov, A.V.; Trubnikov, G.V.

    2006-01-01

    BETACOOL program developed by JINR electron cooling group is a kit of algorithms based on common format of input and output files. The program is oriented to simulation of the ion beam dynamics in a storage ring in the presence of cooling and heating effects. The version presented in this report includes three basic algorithms: simulation of rms parameters of the ion distribution function evolution in time, simulation of the distribution function evolution using Monte-Carlo method and tracking algorithm based on molecular dynamics technique. General processes to be investigated with the program are intrabeam scattering in the ion beam, electron cooling, interaction with residual gas and internal target

  17. Signals of R-parity violating supersymmetry in neutrino scattering at muon storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, Anindya; Gandhi, Raj; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; Mehta, Poonam

    2001-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation signals at muon storage rings can be faked by supersymmetric (SUSY) interactions in an R-parity violating scenario. We investigate the τ-appearance signals for both long-baseline and near-site experiments, and conclude that the latter is of great use in distinguishing between oscillation and SUSY effects. On the other hand, for a wide and phenomenologically consistent choice of parameters, SUSY can cause a manifold increase in the event rate for wrong-sign muons at a long-baseline setting, thereby providing us with signatures of new physics

  18. Comparison of antiproton-proton and proton-proton collisions at the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    di Ciaccio, A.; Gordon, H.; Hogue, R.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative investigation of anti pp and pp collisions at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings is reported. The study was performed using the cylindrical drift chamber of the Axial Field Spectrometer. Non-relativistic particles were identified through multiple ionization sampling. The inclusive production of pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons in the central region of rapidity (absolute value y < 0.8) is compared. Distributions in charged particle multiplicity, rapidity and P/sub T/ are found to be very similar in anti pp and pp data

  19. Sharp edge broad-band lasers for ``white-light`` cooling in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atutov, S.N.; Calabrese, R.; Guidi, V.; Lenisa, P.; Petruio, S. [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Ferrara (Italy); Mariotti, E.; Moi, L. [INFM, Siena (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Siena (Italy)

    1997-04-01

    We have developed broad-band laser sources which show a sharp edge in their spectra and are particularly suitable for ``white-laser`` cooling of ions in storage rings. They allow for a very large velocity capture range by maintaining the same cooling rate allowed by the single mode lasers. A large fraction of the circulating ions are expected to be cooled both in coasting and bunched beams. The device, which does not use an active medium, can easily operate at any frequency from UV to IR spectral region. (orig.). 13 refs.

  20. Charged-particle incoherent-motion damping in storage rings by means of dissipative elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derbenev, Ya.S.; Khejfets, S.A.

    1979-01-01

    In consecutive order a possibility of damping of beam incoherent oscillations in a storage ring was studied by means of an external dissipative system in a sufficient common case. It is shown, that a useful effect, as for the case of electron cooling, is one-particle effect of particle oscillations damping due to nonconservatism of its interaction with an external system. Each other mutual influence through the external system becomes significant with increasing beam density and results in the limitation to achievable damping decrements

  1. Conditioning of the vacuum system of the TPS storage ring without baking in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, C.K., E-mail: ckchan@nsrrc.org.tw; Chang, C.C.; Shueh, C.; Yang, I.C.; Wu, L.H.; Chen, B.Y.; Cheng, C.M.; Huang, Y.T.; Chuang, J.Y.; Cheng, Y.T.; Hsiao, Y.M.; Sheng, Albert

    2017-04-11

    To shorten the machine downtime, a maintenance procedure without baking in situ has been developed and applied to maintain and to upgrade the vacuum system of the TPS storage ring. The data of photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) reveal no obvious discrepancy between baking and not baking the vacuum system in situ. A beam-conditioning dose of extent only 11.8 A h is required to recover quickly the dynamic pressure of an unbaked vacuum system to its pre-intervention value according to the TPS maintenance experience.

  2. Intersecting-storage-rings inclusive data and the charge ratio of cosmic-ray muons

    CERN Document Server

    Yen, E

    1973-01-01

    The ( mu /sup +// mu /sup -/) ratio at sea level has been calculated by Frazer et al (1972) using the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation together with the inclusive data below 30 GeV/c. They obtained a value of mu /sup +// mu /sup -/ approximately=1.56, to be compared with experimental value of 1.2 to 1.4. The ratio has been calculated using the recent ISR (CERN Intersecting Storage Rings) data, and obtained a value of mu /sup +// mu /sup -/ approximately 1.40 in good agreement with the experimental result. (8 refs).

  3. First operation of an extended range grasshopper monochromator on the Aladdin storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    First operation of a new extended range monochromator on the 1 GeV storage ring Aladdin is described. Curves are given of output flux as a function of photon energy for the 2 m and for the 5 m gratings as measured with an NBS diode. Relatively low background and flux up to 1500 eV is obtained using a 1200 line/mm 5 m holographic grating. Highly reproducible scans were obtained of the transmission of thin films including the carbon K and titanium L edges. This reproducibility and high throughput is in large part due to the small beam size and excellent stability of Aladdin. (orig.)

  4. Proposal of a relationship between dynamic aperture adn intensity evolution in a storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannozzi, M

    2010-01-01

    A scaling law for the time-dependence of the dynamic aperture, i.e., the region of phase space where stable motion occurs, was proposed in previous papers, about ten years ago. The use of fundamental theorems of the theory of dynamical systems allowed showing that the dynamic aperture has a logarithmic dependence on time. In this paper this result, proved by mean of numerical simulations, is used as a basis for deriving a scaling law for the intensity evolution in a storage ring. The proposed scaling law is also tested against experimental data showing a remarkable agreement.

  5. Proposal to detect an emission of unusual super-high energy electrons in electron storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-peng Qian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to an extended Lorentz–Einstein mass formula taken into the uncertainty principle, it is predicted that the electron beams passing accelerating electric field should with a small probability generate abnormal super-high energy electrons which are much higher than the beam energy. Author’s preliminary experiment result at electron storage ring has hinted these signs, so suggests to more strictly detect this unusual phenomenon, and thus to test the extended mass formula as well as a more perfect special relativity.

  6. The CERN intersecting storage rings and strong interactions at high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Cocconi, Giuseppe

    1973-01-01

    The coming into operation of the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) at the European Centre of Nuclear Research (CERN), near Geneva, has made it possible in the past two years to study the behaviour of matter at the highest densities ever obtained artificially, hundreds of times greater than the density of matter in nuclei and even in the densest stars. An account is given of some of the results obtained thus far; this is followed by a brief discussion of possible future developments. (17 refs).

  7. The HERMES polarized hydrogen and deuterium gas target in the HERA electron storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Amarian, M.; Andrus, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetissian, E.; Bailey, P.; Balin, D.; Baumgarten, C.; Beckmann, M.; Belostotski, S.; Bianchi, N.; Blok, H. P.; Böttcher, H.; Borissov, A.; Borysenko, A.; Bouwhuis, M.; Braun, B.; Brüll, A.; Bryzgalov, V.; Capitani, G. P.; Capiluppi, M.; Chen, T.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Court, G.; Dalpiaz, P. F.; De Leo, R.; Demey, M.; De Nardo, L.; De Sanctis, E.; Devitsin, E.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Elalaoui-Moulay, A.; Elbakian, G.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elschenbroich, U.; Fabbri, R.; Fantoni, A.; Fechtchenko, A.; Felawka, L.; Frullani, S.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Garibaldi, F.; Garrow, K.; Gavrilov, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Graw, G.; Grebeniouk, O.; Gregor, I. M.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haeberli, W.; Hafidi, K.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Heesbeen, D.; Henoch, M.; Hertenberger, R.; Hesselink, W. H. A.; Hillenbrand, A.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hommez, B.; Hristova, I.; Iarygin, G.; Ivanilov, A.; Izotov, A.; Jackson, H. E.; Jgoun, A.; Kaiser, R.; Kinney, E.; Kisselev, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, N.; Kolster, H.; Kopytin, M.; Korotkov, V.; Kozlov, V.; Krauss, B.; Krivokhijine, V. G.; Lagamba, L.; Lapikás, L.; Laziev, A.; Lenisa, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden-Levy, L. A.; Lorenzon, W.; Lu, H.; Lu, J.; Lu, S.; Ma, B.-Q.; Maiheu, B.; Makins, N. C. R.; Mao, Y.; Marianski, B.; Marukyan, H.; Mexner, V.; Meyners, N.; Mussa, R.; Mikloukho, O.; Miller, C. A.; Miyachi, Y.; Muccifora, V.; Nagaitsev, A.; Nappi, E.; Naryshkin, Y.; Nass, A.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.-D.; Oganessyan, K.; Ohsuga, H.; Osborne, A.; Pickert, N.; Potterveld, D. H.; Raithel, M.; Reggiani, D.; Reimer, P. E.; Reischl, A.; Reolon, A. R.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, A.; Rubacek, L.; Rubin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Sanjiev, I.; Savin, I.; Schill, C.; Schnell, G.; Schüler, K. P.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seitz, B.; Shanidze, R.; Shearer, C.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shutov, V.; Sinram, K.; Sommer, W.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M.; Steffens, E.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Tait, P.; Tanaka, H.; Taroian, S.; Tchuiko, B.; Terkulov, A.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; van der Nat, P.; van der Steenhoven, G.; van Haarlem, Y.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vikhrov, V.; Vincter, M. G.; Vogel, C.; Volmer, J.; Wang, S.; Wendland, J.; Wilbert, J.; Wise, T.; Ybeles Smit, G.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yen, S.; Zihlmann, B.; Zupranski, P.

    2005-03-01

    The HERMES hydrogen and deuterium nuclear-polarized gas targets have been in use since 1996 with the polarized electron beam of HERA at DESY to study the spin structure of the nucleon. Polarized atoms from a Stern-Gerlach Atomic Beam Source are injected into a storage cell internal to the HERA electron ring. Atoms diffusing from the center of the storage cell into a side tube are analyzed to determine the atomic fraction and the atomic polarizations. The atoms have a nuclear polarization, the axis of which is defined by an external magnetic holding field. The holding field was longitudinal during 1996-2000, and was changed to transverse in 2001. The design of the target is described, the method for analyzing the target polarization is outlined, and the performance of the target in the various running periods is presented.

  8. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeberli, W.

    1992-02-01

    Polarized gas targets of atomic hydrogen and deuterium have significant advantages over conventional polarized targets, e.g. chemical and isotopic purity, large polarization including deuteron tensor polarization, absence of strong magnetic fields, rapid polarization reversal. While in principle the beam of polarized atoms from an atomic beam source (Stern-Gerlach spin separation) can be used as a polarized target, the target thickness achieved is too small for most applications. We propose to increase the target thickness by injecting the polarized atoms into a storage cell. Provided the atoms survive several hundred wall collisions without losing their polarization, it will be possible to achieve a target thickness of 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2} by injection of polarized atoms from an atomic-beam source into suitable cells. Such targets are very attractive as internal targets in storage rings.

  9. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeberli, W.

    1992-02-01

    Polarized gas targets of atomic hydrogen and deuterium have significant advantages over conventional polarized targets, e.g. chemical and isotopic purity, large polarization including deuteron tensor polarization, absence of strong magnetic fields, rapid polarization reversal. While in principle the beam of polarized atoms from an atomic beam source (Stern-Gerlach spin separation) can be used as a polarized target, the target thickness achieved is too small for most applications. We propose to increase the target thickness by injecting the polarized atoms into a storage cell. Provided the atoms survive several hundred wall collisions without losing their polarization, it will be possible to achieve a target thickness of 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2} by injection of polarized atoms from an atomic-beam source into suitable cells. Such targets are very attractive as internal targets in storage rings.

  10. Experiments with highly-charged heavy-ions performed at the storage ring ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokler, P.H.

    1992-01-01

    The new heavy ion accelerator facility SIS/ESR was inaugurated in April 1990. During 1991 the experimental storage ring, ESR, has been commissioned. Highly-charged heavy ions from O 8+ up to Bi 82+ were successfully accumulated, cooled, and stored in the ring. Now all highly-charged, heavy ions can be provided for experiments at comfortable storage times and at energies roughly between 100 and 500 MeV/u. A report on the achievements and on the first experimental results will be given. For the experiments, special emphasis is put on capture processes in the electron cooler, i.e. on radiative and dielectronic recombination processes as well as on capture events of bound target electrons from a gas jet. In this case, the capture leads either directly (REC) or by cascading to X-ray emission, which is also exploited for a precision spectroscopy of the structure of the heaviest ions. Another exciting topic is the radioactive decay of highly charged ions: For instance the β-decay into bound atomic states, which is not possible for neutral atoms, was studied for stored naked Dy ions. (orig.)

  11. Electron cooling of a bunched ion beam in a storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, He; Mao, Lijun; Yang, Jiancheng; Xia, Jiawen; Yang, Xiaodong; Li, Jie; Tang, Meitang; Shen, Guodong; Ma, Xiaoming; Wu, Bo; Wang, Geng; Ruan, Shuang; Wang, Kedong; Dong, Ziqiang

    2018-02-01

    A combination of electron cooling and rf system is an effective method to compress the beam bunch length in storage rings. A simulation code based on multiparticle tracking was developed to calculate the bunched ion beam cooling process, in which the electron cooling, intrabeam scattering (IBS), ion beam space-charge field, transverse and synchrotron motion are considered. Meanwhile, bunched ion beam cooling experiments have been carried out in the main cooling storage ring (CSRm) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou, to investigate the minimum bunch length obtained by the cooling method, and study the dependence of the minimum bunch length on beam and machine parameters. The experiments show comparable results to those from simulation. Based on these simulations and experiments, we established an analytical model to describe the limitation of the bunch length of the cooled ion beam. It is observed that the IBS effect is dominant for low intensity beams, and the space-charge effect is much more important for high intensity beams. Moreover, the particles will not be bunched for much higher intensity beam. The experimental results in CSRm show a good agreement with the analytical model in the IBS dominated regime. The simulation work offers us comparable results to those from the analytical model both in IBS dominated and space-charge dominated regimes.

  12. Photorecombination studies of highly charged ions at the storage ring ESR: a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandau, C; Kozhuharov, C; Mueller, A; Beckert, K; Beller, P; Bernhardt, D; Bosch, F; Boehm, S; Currell, F J; Gumberidze, A; Harman, Z; Jacobi, J; Mokler, P H; Nolden, F; Reuschl, R; Schippers, S; Schmidt, E W; Spillmann, U; Stachura, Z; Steck, M; Stoehlker, Th; Wolf, A

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution, we report on photorecombination measurements of highly charged ions (HCI) that were performed using the electron cooler of the heavy-ion storage ring ESR of the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) as a target of free electrons. The experimental technique of resonance reaction spectroscopy by means of dielectronic recombination (DR) was employed in two new ways: The determination of isotope shifts in the DR resonance spectrum of few-electron heavy ions is a novel method with unique properties for investigations at the interface between electrons and the atomic nucleus, e.g., charge radii and hyperfine effects. First results from a pilot experiment with the two isotopes A = 142 and A = 150 of Li-like neodymium A Nd 57+ are discussed. Until very recently, electron-ion collision experiments at high relative energies of more than a few keV were not accessible at the electron coolers of storage rings. Such high energies are needed to access DR processes that involve the K-shell electrons of very heavy ions. The novel approach of DR measurements with a stochastically (pre-)cooled ion beam resolves this problem. Results for the photorecombination of hydrogen-like U 91+ in the energy range (63 keV - 74 keV) of the KLL-DR process are presented

  13. The large superconducting solenoids for the g-2 muon storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunce, G.; Cullen, J.; Danby, G.

    1994-01-01

    The g-2 muon storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory consists of four large superconducting solenoids. The two outer solenoids, which are 15.1 meters in diameter, share a common cryostat. The two inner solenoids, which are 13.4 meters in diameter, are in separate cryostats. The two 24 turn inner solenoids are operated at an opposite polarity from the two 24 turn outer solenoids. This generates a dipole field between the inner and outer solenoids. The flux between the solenoids is returned through a C shaped iron return yoke that also shapes the dipole field. The integrated field around the 14 meter diameter storage ring must be good to about 1 part in one million over the 90 mm dia. circular cross section where the muons are stored, averaged over the azimuth. When the four solenoids carry their 5300 A design current, the field in the 18 centimeter gap between the poles is 1.45 T. When the solenoid operates at its design current 5.5 MJ is stored between the poles. The solenoids were wound on site at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The cryostats were built around the solenoid windings which are indirectly cooled using two-phase helium

  14. CESAR, 2 MeV electron storage ring; general view from above.

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Photo; CERN PhotoLab

    1967-01-01

    CESAR (CERN Electron Storage and Accumulation Ring) was built as a study-model for the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings). The model had to be small (24 m circumference) and yet the particles had to be highly relativistic, which led to the choice of electrons. On the other hand, in order to model the behaviour of protons, effects from synchrotron radiation had to be negligible, which meant low magnetic fields (130 G in the bending magnets) and a corresponding low energy of 1.75 MeV. All the stacking (accumulation) procedures envisaged for the ISR were proven with CESAR, and critical aspects of transverse stability were explored. Very importantly, CESAR was the test-bed for the ultrahigh vacuum techniques and components, essential for the ISR, with a final pressure of 6E-11 Torr. The CESAR project was decided early in 1960, design was completed in 1961 and construction in 1963. After an experimental period from 1964 to 1967, CESAR was dismantled in 1968.

  15. Improved temperature regulation of process water systems for the APS storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putnam, C.; Dortwegt, R.

    2002-01-01

    Beam stability and operational reliability of critical mechanical systems are key performance issues for synchrotron accelerators such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Stability is influenced by temperature fluctuations of the process water (PW) used for cooling and/or temperature conditioning storage ring (SR) components such as vacuum chambers, magnets, absorbers, etc. Operational reliability is crucial in maintaining facility beam operations and remaining within downtime ''budgets.'' Water systems for the APS storage ring were originally provided with a distributive control system (DCS) capable of regulation to ±1.0 F, as specified by facility design requirements. After several years of operation, a particular mode of component mortality indicated a need for upgrade of the temperature control system. The upgrade that was implemented was chosen for both improved component reliability and temperature stability (now on the order of ±0.2 F for copper components and ±0.05 F for aluminum components). The design employs a network of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) for temperature control that functions under supervision of the existing DCS. The human-machine interface (HMI) of the PLC system employs RSView32 software. The PLC system also interfaces with the EPICS accelerator control system to provide monitoring of temperature control parameters. Eventual supervision of the PLC system by EPICS is possible with this design

  16. Exact transfer functions for the PEP storage ring magnets and some general characteristics and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, J.E.

    1982-05-01

    The exact, ion-optical transfer functions for the dipoles, quadrupoles and sextupoles of the PEP standard PODC cell are calculated for any single particle with initial coordinates (r, p, s). Modifications resulting from radiative energy loss are also calculated and discussed. These functions allow one to characterize individual magnets or classes of magnets by their aberrations and thereby simplify their study and correction. In contrast to high-energy spectrometers where aberrations are often analyzed away, those in storage rings drive series of high order resonances, even for perfect magnets (2), that can produce stop bands and other effects which can seriously limit performance. Thus, one would like to eliminate them altogether or failing this to develop local and global correction schemes. Even then, one should expect higher order effects to influence injection, extraction or single-pass systems either because of orbit distortions or overly large phase spece distortions such as may occur in low-beta insertions or any final-focus optics. The term exact means that the results here are based on solving the relativistic Lorentz force equation with accurate representations of measured magnetostatic fields. Such fields satisfy Maxwell's equations and are the actual fields seen by a particle as it propagates around a real storage ring. This is discussed in detail and illustrated with examples that show that this is possible, practical and may even be useful

  17. Developments at an electrostatic cryogenic storage ring for electron-cooled keV energy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to final setup activities and the commissioning of an electrostatic cryogenic storage ring (CSR) at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg. The first cryogenic operation of CSR in 2015 has been documented and characterized using a set of non-destructive beam diagnostic tools developed within this work. These are (1) the current pick-up system for the determination of the current of the stored ion beam and its velocity, (2) a position pick-up system for measuring the transverse position of the ion beam center at six symmetric locations of the storage ring circumference, and (3) a Schottky pick-up system for the monitoring of coasting ion beams. Despite the requirements imposed by the cryogenic operation, the developed diagnostic system demonstrated its full functionality. First characterizations of the storage ring properties and the performance of the diagnostic system are presented. Based on previous work, an electron cooling system for CSR has been developed and largely realized. With the implementation into CSR in 2016, the electron cooler will enhance the storage ring into a unique experimental facility for electron-ion collision studies. With this CSR is on the track to become the first cryogenic storage ring featuring actively cooled ion beams.

  18. Photon-photon collisions, and other processes without annihilation, in e- e± storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parisi, Joseph Robert

    1974-01-01

    Chapter 1: The author here presents the historical development of the idea of photon-photon collisions in electron-positron (or electron-electron) storage rings. He shows in particular the considerations which guided the work of the College de France group since this work was started in 1969. A brief review is given of the various developments of the field in the last four years. The fundamental problem of the 'tagging' of the outgoing electrons is mentioned. Chapter 2: We study the conditions which allow the rejection of the background provided by the 'heavy photon Bremsstrahlung' diagram of the same order in Q E D as the photon-photon collision diagram. We show that this background is totally negligible in the case of 'double tagging' (both electrons detected near 0 deg.). In the case of 'single tagging' (one electron detected at large angle and the other one near 0 deg.), it appears that the background can become dangerous already at moderately large values of θ when resonant enhancements (ρ, φ, ρ''') are present. Also in the case of 'no tagging' or 'tagging through absence' (i. e. checking, in e + e - collisions, that the electrons are not scattered at large angle), it is essentially near the resonant enhancements that the background becomes about as large or larger than the γγ collision term. Various means of reducing it or eliminating it even in those cases are discussed. Chapter 3: We here consider some general features of photon-photon collision processes, in the case of double tagging; dependence on θ max (maximal tagging angle of both electrons); dependence on the beam energy; angular distributions of the particles A ± produced. We then introduce realistic experimental conditions, in particular two cutoff parameters: a minimal emission angle ψ min for the particles produced, and a minimal relative energy loss χ min for the outgoing electrons. The effect of these parameters on the invariant mass spectrum of the pair A - A + and on the integrated

  19. Temperature Dependence of Near-Infrared CO_2 Line Shapes Measured by Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghysels, Mélanie; Fleisher, Adam J.; Liu, Qingnan; Hodges, Joseph T.

    2017-06-01

    We present high signal-to-noise ratio, mode-by-mode cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) line shape measurements of air-broadened transitions in the 30013 → 0001 band of ^{12}C^{16}O_2 located near λ = 1.6 μm. Absorption spectra were acquired from (230-290) K with a variable-temperature spectrometer developed in the framework of the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 Mission to improve our understanding of carbon dioxide and oxygen line shape parameters. This system comprises a monolithic, thermally stabilized two-mirror, optical resonator exhibiting a mode stability of 200 kHz and a minimum detectable absorption coefficient of 10^{-11} cm^{-1}. Observed spectra were modeled the using the recently recommended Hartmann-Tran line profile (HTP) (and several of its limiting cases) which includes the effects of Dicke narrowing, speed dependent broadening, correlation between velocity- and phase-changing collisions and first-order line mixing effects. At fixed temperature, line shape parameters were determined by constrained multispectrum fitting of spectra acquired over the pressure range (30 - 300) Torr. For each transition considered, analysis of the temperature dependence of the fitted line shape parameters yielded the pressure-broadening temperature exponent and speed dependence parameter, where the latter quantity was found to be in good agreement with theoretical values consistent with the HTP model. Tennyson, et al., Pure Appl. Chem. 86, (2014) 1931

  20. Modification of a commercial cavity ring-down spectroscopy NO{sub 2} detector for enhanced sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos, Patricia; Ehrman, Sheryl H. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Luke, Winston T.; Kelley, Paul [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory, SSMC3, Rm. 3316, 1315 East West Hwy., Silver Spring, Maryland 20910 (United States); Stehr, Jeffrey W.; Dickerson, Russell R. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) plays a central role in atmospheric chemistry, air pollution, and biogeochemical cycles. Many analytical techniques have been developed to detect NO{sub 2}, but only chemiluminescence-based instruments are commonly, commercially available. There remains a need for a fast, light, and simple method to directly measure NO{sub 2}. In this work we describe the modification and characterization of a small, commercially available cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) NO{sub 2} detector suitable for surface and aircraft monitoring. A metal oxide scrubber was added to remove NO{sub 2}, and provide a chemical zero, improving the detection limit (3{sigma} of the background noise) from several parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to 0.06 ppbv, integrated over 60 s. Known interferences by water and particles were removed using Nafion tubing and a 1 {mu}m Teflon filter, respectively. A 95% response time of 18{+-}1 s was observed for a step change in concentration. The CRDS detector was run in parallel to an ozone chemiluminescence device with photolytic conversion of NO{sub 2} to NO. The two instruments measured ambient air in suburban Maryland. A least-squares fit to the comparison data resulted a slope of 0.960{+-}0.002 and R of 0.995, showing agreement within experimental uncertainty.

  1. Study of the effective inverse photon efficiency using optical emission spectroscopy combined with cavity ring-down spectroscopy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingwei; Li, Cong; Wang, Yong; Wang, Zhiwei; Feng, Chunlei; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    The hydrocarbon impurities formation is inevitable due to wall erosion in a long pulse high performance scenario with carbon-based plasma facing materials in fusion devices. The standard procedure to determine the chemical erosion yield in situ is by means of inverse photon efficiency D/XB. In this work, the conversion factor between CH4 flux and photon flux of CH A → X transition (effective inverse photon efficiency PE-1) was measured directly using a cascaded arc plasma simulator with argon/methane. This study shows that the measured PE-1 is different from the calculated D/XB. We compared the photon flux measured by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calculated by electron impact excitation of CH(X) which was diagnosed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). It seems that charge exchange and dissociative recombination processes are the main channels of CH(A) production and removal which lead to the inconsistency of PE -1 and D/XB at lower temperature. Meanwhile, the fraction of excited CH(A) produced by dissociative recombination processes was investigated, and we found it increased with Te in the range from 4% to 13% at Te definition instead of D/XB since the electron impact excitation is not the only channel of CH(A) production. These results have an effect on evaluating the yield of chemical erosion in divertor of fusion device.

  2. Sensitive electrochemical enzyme immunoassay microdevice based on architecture of dual ring electrodes with a sensing cavity chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, H; Li, C M; Zhou, Q; Sun, J B; Miao, J M

    2006-12-15

    A novel electrochemical detection architecture was investigated for enzyme immunoassay sensors. Microchips with dual-ring working and counter electrodes, and a sensing cavity chamber were made on glass slides. The glass surface of the microchip was coated by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Goat IgG, as a example, was covalently captured on APTES-modified glass surfaces through glutaraldehyde (GA) as a cross-linker. Enzyme substrate, p-aminophenyl phosphate (PAPP) was prepared by electrolysis. The enzyme conversion from home-synthetic PAPP to p-aminophenol (PAP) was examined by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). A competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) was designed to test the system. Experimental results demonstrate that a detection limit of 118 fg/ml of goat IgG and a dynamic range of 118 fg/ml to 1.18 ng/ml, up to five orders of magnitude could be achieved. Due to its novel architecture design and electronic detection scheme, the method can be used to fabricate portable electrochemical ELISA lab-on-chip systems. The technology could have great potential in clinical diagnostic applications.

  3. Six-dimensional modeling of coherent bunch instabilities and related freedback systems in storage rings with power-series maps for the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, J.; Briggs, D.; Meddahi, M.

    1994-06-01

    The authors have developed 6-dimensional phase-space code that tracks macroparticles for the study of coherent bunch instabilities and related feedback systems. The model is based on power-series maps to represent the lattice, and allows for straightforward inclusion of effects such as amplitude dependent tune shift, chromaticity, synchrotron oscillations, and synchrotron radiation. It simulates long range wake fields such as resistive-wall effects as well as the higher order modes in cavities. The model has served to study the dynamics relevant to the transverse feedback system currently being commissioned for the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Current work integrates earlier versions into a modular system that includes models for transverse and longitudinal feedback systems. It is designed to provide a modular approach to the dynamics and diagnostics, allowing a user to modify the model of a storage ring at run-time without recompilation

  4. Mitigation of the electron-cloud effect in the PSR and SNS proton storage rings by tailoring the bunch profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, M.; Furman, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    For the storage ring of the Spallation Neutron Source(SNS) at Oak Ridge, and for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos, both with intense and very long bunches, the electroncloud develops primarily by the mechanism of trailing-edge multipacting. We show, by means of simulations for the PSR, how the resonant nature of this mechanism may be effectively broken by tailoring the longitudinal bunch profile at fixed bunch charge, resulting in a significant decrease in the electron-cloud effect. We briefly discuss the experimental difficulties expected in the implementation of this cure

  5. An extended range soft X-ray beam line for the 1 GeV storage ring Aladdin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Stott, J.P.; Brown, F.C.

    1983-01-01

    The design and implementation of a soft X-ray beam line on the new 1 GeV storage ring Aladdin in Stoughton, Wisconsin is discussed. The beam line consists of a long horizontally focussing collection mirror, an extended range (50-1500 eV) grasshopper monochromator, an ellipsoidal refocussing mirror, and a photoemission chamber. Also discussed are the factors considered in matching the monochromator to the storage ring, flux and performance expectations, and the results of a ray tracing analysis. (orig.)

  6. Mitigation of the electron-cloud effect in the PSR and SNS proton storage rings by tailoring the bunch profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivi, M.; Furman, M.A.

    2003-05-20

    For the storage ring of the Spallation Neutron Source(SNS) at Oak Ridge, and for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos, both with intense and very long bunches, the electroncloud develops primarily by the mechanism of trailing-edge multipacting. We show, by means of simulations for the PSR, how the resonant nature of this mechanism may be effectively broken by tailoring the longitudinal bunch profile at fixed bunch charge, resulting in a significant decrease in the electron-cloud effect. We briefly discuss the experimental difficulties expected in the implementation of this cure.

  7. Design considerations for a digital feedback system to control self-bunching in ion-storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ziemann

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the feasibility of a digital feedback system to cure self-bunching of the electron-cooled coasting ion beam in ion-storage rings such as CELSIUS [S. Holm, A. Johansson, S. Kullander, and D. Reistad, Phys. Scr. 34, 513–532 (1986]. Such a system is based on a fast digital filter that acts as a tunable artificial wake potential. It may also aid stable operation of accumulator rings for future spallation neutron sources or heavy ion rings used for inertial fusion energy production.

  8. Self-injection locking of the DFB laser through an external ring fiber cavity: Application for phase sensitive OTDR acoustic sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Bueno Escobedo

    Full Text Available Self-injection locking of DFB laser implemented through the laser coupling with an external fiber optic ring cavity allows its direct employment as an interrogating light source for a phase sensitive OTDR acoustic sensor. Distributed detection and localization of dynamic perturbations of the optical fiber is experimentally demonstrated at the distance of 9270 m. Keywords: Self-injection locking, Optical fiber resonator, φ-OTDR

  9. Line intensities of the 30011e - 00001e band of 12C16O2by laser-locked cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, P.; Wang, J.; Liu, G.-L.; Sun, Y. R.; Zhou, Z.-Y.; Liu, A.-W.; Hu, S.-M.

    2018-03-01

    Thirty well isolated ro-vibrational transitions of the 30011e - 00001e band of 12C16O2 at 1.54 μm have been recorded with a laser-locked cavity ring-down spectrometer. The line intensities were obtained with accuracies better than 0.85%. Comparisons of the line intensities determined in this work with literature experimental values and those from HITRAN2016, AMES, UCL-IAO and CDSD-296 line lists are given.

  10. Application of FEL technique for constructing high-intensity, monochromatic, polarized gamma-sources at storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N. [Automatic Systems Corporation, Samara (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A possibility to construct high-intensity tunable monochromatic{gamma}-source at high energy storage rings is discussed. It is proposed to produce {gamma}-quanta by means of Compton backscattering of laser photons on electrons circulating in the storage. The laser light wavelength is chosen in such a way that after the scattering, the electron does not leave the separatrix. So as the probability of the scattering is rather small, energy oscillations are damped prior the next scattering. As a result, the proposed source can operate in {open_quotes}parasitic{close_quote} mode not interfering with the main mode of the storage ring operation. Analysis of parameters of existent storage rings (PETRA, ESRF, Spring-8, etc) shows that the laser light wavelength should be in infrared, {lambda}{approximately} 10 - 400 {mu}m, wavelength band. Installation at storage rings of tunable free-electron lasers with the peak and average output power {approximately} 10 MW and {approximately} 1 kW, respectively, will result in the intensity of the {gamma}-source up to {approximately} 10{sup 14}s{sup -1} with tunable {gamma}-quanta energy from several MeV up to several hundreds MeV. Such a {gamma}-source will reveal unique possibilities for precision investigations in nuclear physics.

  11. On the quantitative prediction of bunch lengthening in high energy electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiland, T.

    1981-12-01

    The longitudinal current dependent electromagnetic interaction between a bunch of charged particles and accelerator components can be described by a Green's Function in time domain or by an impedance in frequency domain. The aim of this paper is to describe a procedure which yields an approximate Green's Function for cylindrically symmetric objects. Once this Green's Function is quantitatively known the equation of motion for the particles can be solved easily by a turn-by-turn tracking code on a computer. Thus it is possible to predict the bunch length and width as a function of charge per bunch for future accelerators and storage rings based on pure geometrical data of the accelerator components. Results are presented for PETRA and LEP. A comparison between measurements at PETRA and computations shows an excellent agreement. (orig.)

  12. Beam position monitor multiplexer controller upgrade at the LAMPF proton storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarborough, W.K.; Cohen, S.

    1992-01-01

    The beam position monitor (BPM) is one of the primary diagnostic tools used for the tuning of the proton storage ring (PSR) at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). A replacement for the existing, monolithic, wire-wrapped microprocessor-based BPM multiplexer controller has been built. The controller has been redesigned as a modular system retaining the same functionality of the original system built in 1981. Individual printed circuit cards are used for each controller function to insure greater maintainability and ease of keeping a spare parts inventory. Programmable logic device technology has substantially reduced the component count of the new controller. Diagnostic software was written to support the development of the upgraded controller. The new software actually uncovered some flaws in the original CAMAC interface. (author)

  13. Observation of microwave radiation using low-cost detectors at the ANKA storage ring*

    CERN Document Server

    Judin, V; Hofmann, A; Huttel, E; Kehrer, B; Klein, M; Marsching, S; Müller, A S; Nasse, M; Smale, N; Caspers, F; Peier, P

    2011-01-01

    Synchrotron light sources emit Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) for wavelengths longer than or equal to the bunch length. At most storage rings CSR cannot be observed, because the vacuum chamber cuts off radiation with long wavelengths. There are different approaches for shifting the CSR to shorter wavelengths that can propagate through the beam pipe, e.g.: the accelerator optics can be optimized for a low momentum compaction factor, thus reducing the bunch length. Alternatively, laser slicing can modulate substructures on long bunches [1]. Both techniques extend the CSR spectrum to shorter wavelengths, so that CSR is emitted at wavelengths below the waveguide shielding cut off. Usually fast detectors, like superconducting bolometer detector systems or Schottky barrier diodes, are used for observation of dynamic processes in accelerator physics. In this paper, we present observations of microwave radiation at ANKA using an alternative detector, a LNB (Low Noise Block) system. These devices are usually use...

  14. Double pomeron exchange at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings and $Sp\\bar{p}S$ Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrow, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The CERN Intersecting Storage Rings, with √ {s(pp)} from 22 GeV to 63 GeV and √ {s(α α )} = 126 GeV, allowed the first observations of p + p → p + X + p with two leading protons (xF > 0.95) or two rapidity gaps Δy > 3. Studies of the central hadronic system (X) were made to search for glueballs, finding f0 and f2 resonances, and to advance our understanding of hadronic diffraction. I review the experiments, not including those at the Split Field Magnet (SFM) facility covered elsewhere in this volume. Some double pomeron exchange studies at the CERN Sp\\bar {p}S Collider are also covered.

  15. Calculation of electrodynamical characteristics and choice of accelerating structure for storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnaukhov, I.M.; Popkov, Yu.P.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Trushkin, N.A.; Dajkovskij, A.G.; Zakamskaya, L.T.; Ryabov, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    Comparative analysis of several types of accelerating structures at standing E 010 wave is conducted on the basis of numerical calculations performed with the use of the PRUD-0 and PRUD programs. Dispersion dependences of electromagnetic field distribution, quality and coupling impedance are calculated both for axially symmetric and axially asymmetric modes of oscillations in structures with 699.3 MHz operating frequency. It is shown that structure with a cell the form of which is optimized with respect to shunt resistance on the main mode possesses the numerical spurious impedance in higher modes. This is the main factor when choosing accelerating structure for storage ring with multi-bunch operation conditions. 12 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  16. The Heidelberg High Current Injector A Versatile Injector for Storage Ring Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Von Hahn, R; Repnow, R; Schwalm, D; Welsch, C P

    2004-01-01

    The High Current Injector (HCI) was designed and built as a dedicated injector for the Test Storage Ring in Heidelberg to deliver mainly singly charged Li- and Be-ions. After start for routine operation in 1999 the HCI delivered stable beams during the following years for about 50 % of the experiments with very high reliability. Due to the requirements from the experiment the HCI changed during that period from a machine for singly charged positive ions to an injector for a large variety of molecules as well as positively or negatively charged light ions. After successful commissioning of the custom built 18 GHz high power ECR-source at its present test location various modifications and additions were made in preparation of a possible conversion into an injector for highly charged heavy ions as a second phase. This paper gives an overview of the experience gained in the passed 5 years and presents the status of the upgrade of the HCI.

  17. Longitudinal holes in debunched particle beams in storage rings, perpetuated by space-charge forces

    CERN Document Server

    Koscielniak, Shane Rupert; Lindroos, M

    2001-01-01

    Stationary, self-consistent, and localized longitudinal density perturbations on an unbunched charged-particle beam, which are solutions of the nonlinearized Vlasov-Poisson equation, have recently received some attention. In particular, we address the case that space charge is the dominant longitudinal impedance and the storage ring operates below transition energy so that the negative mass instability is not an explanation for persistent beam structure. Under the customary assumption of a bell-shaped steady-state distribution, about which the expansion is made, the usual wave theory of Keil and Schnell (1969) for perturbations on unbunched beams predicts that self-sustaining perturbations are possible only (below transition) if the impedance is inductive (or resistive) or if the bell shape is inverted. Space charge gives a capacitive impedance. Nevertheless, we report numerous experimental measurements made at the CERN Proton Synchrotron Booster that plainly show the longevity of holelike structures in coast...

  18. Feasibility of diffraction radiation for noninvasive beam diagnostics as characterized in a storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobb, L.; Kieffer, R.; Lefevre, T.; Mazzoni, S.; Aumeyr, T.; Karataev, P.; Billing, M.; Conway, J.; Shanks, J.

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing demand for noninvasive beam size monitoring on particle accelerators. Ideally, these monitors should be cost effective and require little or no maintenance. These monitors should also be suitable for both linear and circular machines. Here, the experimental setup is described in detail, and the results from a diffraction radiation beam size monitor are presented. This monitor has been tested on the Cornell Electron Storage Ring using a 1 mA (1.6 ×1010 particles per bunch) single bunch electron beam at 2.1 GeV energy. Images of the target surface and the angular distribution of the emitted diffraction radiation were acquired at wavelengths of 400 and 600 nm. These measurements are compared to two analytical models.

  19. Carbon filament beam profile monitor for high energy proton-antiproton storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.R.; Shafer, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The measurement of the evolution of the transverse profile of the stored beams in high energy proton storage rings such as the p-anti p colliders at CERN and at FNAL is of considerable importance. In the present note, a simple monitor is discussed which will allow almost non-destructive measurement of the profile of each individual proton and antiproton bunch separately. It is based on the flying wire technique first used at CEA and more recently at the CPS. A fine carbon filament is passed quickly through the beam, acting as a target for secondary particle production. The flux of secondary particles is measured by two scintillator telescopes, one for protons and one for antiprotons, having an angular acceptance between 30 and 100 mrad. Measurements of secondary particle production performed at FNAL in this angular range show that a very respectable flux can be expected

  20. A review of accelerator and particle physics at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, M.; Johnsen, K.

    1984-01-01

    The last meeting of the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings Committee (ISRC) was held on 27 January 1984, following the closing of the ISR for colliding-beam physics in December 1983. This report consists of the written versions of the two review talks presented at that meeting. K. Johnsen describes the history and importance of the ISR for accelerator physics, from the first ideas on colliding-beam devices to the final operation. M. Jacob gives his view of the role of the ISR physics programme in the development of particle physics up to and including the latest available results. The preface is by G. Bellettini, the last chairman of the ISR Committee. (orig.)

  1. On-line Observation Of Electron Beam Bunches In The Large Storage Ring Of Kurchatov Srs

    CERN Document Server

    Ioudin, L I; Krylov, Y V; Rezvov, V A; Stirin, A I; Valentinov, A G; Yupinov, Y L

    2004-01-01

    A complex of instrumentation for visual quantitative estimation of electron beam bunches in the big storage ring of Kurchatov Synchrotron Radiation Centre (KSRC) is tested. The bunches pass through a cylindrical electrostatic sensor whose signal is recorded by a wide-band oscillograph. The TV camera reads the optical image of the signal from the oscillograph screen. The TV signal numbering board inputs the video image to the computer memory. The monitor displays the beam bunch structure. A special program provides on-line visualisation of bunch behaviour on the beam orbit. The images of beam structure and a series of images showing the beam behaviour in the regimes of accumulation, acceleration and in the stationary regime a full power are numbered and stored.

  2. Enhanced Schottky signals from electron-cooled, coasting beams in a heavy-ion storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, C., E-mail: claude.krantz@mpi-hd.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Blaum, K.; Grieser, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Litvinov, Yu.A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Repnow, R.; Wolf, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-02-11

    Measurements at the Test Storage Ring of the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg (Germany) have shown that the signal amplitude induced in a Schottky-noise pickup electrode by a coasting electron-cooled ion beam can be greatly enhanced by exposure of the latter to a perturbing radiofrequency signal which is detuned from the true beam revolution frequency. The centre frequencies obtained from harmonic analysis of the observed pickup signal closely follow those imposed on the ions by the electron cooling force. The phenomenon can be exploited to measure the true revolution frequency of ion beams of very low intensity, whose pure Schottky noise is too weak to be measurable under normal circumstances.

  3. Machine physics application program for control, commissioning and error findings for storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, H.P.; Chang, C.H.; Kuo, C.C.; Wang, M.H.; Lee, J.C.; Fan, J.Y.; Tsai, H.J.; Hsue, C.S.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have developed a Machine Physics Application Pro- gram (MPAP) package for control, commissioning and error finding to be used on the SRRC storage ring with user friendly graphic interface. The program gives on-line machine parameters as well as Twiss functions together with the machine elements in graphic form. It supported the following capabilities: machine modeling, orbit corrections and adjusting, tune adjustments error findings for the misalignment and strength setting, etc. The code is written in ANSI C and can be imported to both VAX and UNIX operating systems which support the standard X-window/Motif. The arrangements of the code is in such a way that the interface with the on-line Control Data Base can be easily implemented for use on any machine. It can be used both for on-line control and/or for off-line analysis

  4. Observation of the UPSILON''' at the Cornell electron-storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finocchiaro, G.; Giannini, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Schamberger, R.D. Jr.; Sivertz, M.; Spencer, L.J.; Tuts, P.M.; Boehringer, T.; Costantini, F.; Dobbins, J.; Franzini, P.; Han, K.; Herb, S.W.; Kaplan, D.M.; Lederman, L.M.; Mageras, G.; Peterson, D.; Rice, E.; Yoh, J.K.; Levman, G.

    1980-01-01

    During an energy scan at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, with use of the Columbia University-Stony Brook NaI detector, an enhancement in sigma(e + e - →hadrons) is observed at center-of-mass energy approx.10.55 GeV. The mass and leptonic width of this state (UPSILON''') suggest that it is the 4 3 S 1 bound state of the b quark and its anitquark. After applying to the data a cut in a (pseudo) thrust variable, the natural width is measured to be GAMMA=12.6 +- 6.0 MeV, indicating that the UPSILON''' is above the threshold for BB-bar production

  5. Research and Development on the Storage Ring Vacuum System for the APS Upgrade Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillwell, B.; Brajuskovic, B.; Carter, J.; Cease, H.; Lill, R.; Navrotski, G.; Noonan, J.; Suthar, K.; Walters, D.; Wiemerslage, G.; Zientek, J.; Sangroula, M.

    2016-01-01

    A number of research and development activities are underway at Argonne National Laboratory to build confidence in the designs for the storage ring vacuum system required for the Advanced Photon Source Up-grade project (APS-U) [1]. The predominant technical risks are: excessive residual gas pressures during operation; insufficient beam position monitor stability; excessive beam impedance; excessive heating by induced electrical surface currents; and insufficient operational reliability. Present efforts to mitigate these risks include: building and evaluating mockup assemblies; performing mechanical testing of chamber weld joints; developing computational tools; investigating design alternatives; and performing electrical bench measurements. Status of these activities and some of what has been learned to date will be shared.

  6. UHV seal studies for the advanced photon source storage ring vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonczy, J.D.; Ferry, R.J.; Niemann, R.C.; Roop, B.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) Storage Ring Vacuum Chambers (SRVC) are constructed of aluminum. The chamber design incorporates aluminum alloy 2219-T87 Conflat flanges welded to an aluminum alloy 6063-T5 extruded chamber body. Vacuum connections to the aluminum Conflat chamber flanges are by means of 304 stainless steel Conflat flanges. To evaluate the Conflat seal assemblies relative to vacuum bake cycles, a Conflat Bake Test Assembly (CBTA) was constructed, and thermal cycling tests were performed between room temperature and 150 degrees C on both stainless steel to aluminum Conflat assemblies and aluminum to aluminum Conflat assemblies. A Helicoflex Bake Test Assembly (HBTA) was similarly constructed to evaluate Helicoflex seals. Both Conflat and Helicoflex seals were studied in a SRVC Sector String Test arrangement of five SRVC sections. The CBTA, HBTA and SRVC tests and their results are reported. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Neural network technique for orbit correction in accelerators/storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoki, E.; Friedman, A.

    1995-01-01

    The authors are exploring the use of Neural Networks, using the SNNS simulator, for orbit control in accelerators (primarily circular accelerators) and storage rings. The orbit of the beam in those machines are measured by orbit monitors (input nodes) and controlled by orbit corrector magnets (output nodes). The physical behavior of an accelerator is changing slowly in time. Thus, an adoptive algorithm is necessary. The goal is to have a trained net which will predict the exact corrector strengths which will minimize a measured orbit. The relationship between open-quotes kickclose quotes from the correctors and open-quotes responseclose quotes from the monitors is in general non-linear and may slowly change during long-term operation of the machine. In the study, several network architectures are examined as well as various training methods for each architecture

  8. Neural network technique for orbit correction in accelerators/storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozoki, Eva; Friedman, Aharon

    1994-08-01

    We are exploring the use of Neural Networks, using the SNNS simulator, for orbit control in accelerators (primarily circular accelerators) and storage rings. The orbit of the beam in those machines are measured by orbit monitors (input nodes) and controlled by orbit corrector magnets (output nodes). The physical behavior of an accelerator is changing slowly in time. Thus, an adoptive algorithm is necessary. The goal is to have a trained net which will predict the exact corrector strengths which will minimize a measured orbit. The relationship between ``kick'' from the correctors and ``response'' from the monitors is in general non-linear and may slowly change during long-term operation of the machine. In the study, several network architectures are examined as well as various training methods for each architecture.

  9. Software package for modeling spin-orbit motion in storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyuzin, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    A software package providing a graphical user interface for computer experiments on the motion of charged particle beams in accelerators, as well as analysis of obtained data, is presented. The software package was tested in the framework of the international project on electric dipole moment measurement JEDI (Jülich Electric Dipole moment Investigations). The specific features of particle spin motion imply the requirement to use a cyclic accelerator (storage ring) consisting of electrostatic elements, which makes it possible to preserve horizontal polarization for a long time. Computer experiments study the dynamics of 106-109 particles in a beam during 109 turns in an accelerator (about 1012-1015 integration steps for the equations of motion). For designing an optimal accelerator structure, a large number of computer experiments on polarized beam dynamics are required. The numerical core of the package is COSY Infinity, a program for modeling spin-orbit dynamics.

  10. Beam size measurement of the stored electron beam at the APS storage ring using pinhole optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Z.; Lai, B.; Yun, W.

    1995-01-01

    Beam sizes of the stored electron beam at the APS storage ring were measured using pinhole optics and bending magnet x-rays in single-bunch and low-current mode. A pinhole of 25 μm and a fast x-ray imaging system were located 23.8 m and 35.4 m from the source, respectively. The x-ray imaging system consists of a CdWO 4 scintillation crystal 60 μm thick, an optical imaging system, and a CCD detector. A measurement time of a few tenths of a second was obtained on a photon beam of E>30 keV produced in a bending magnet from a 7-GeV electron beam of 2mA current. The measured vertical and horizontal sizes of the electron beam were in reasonable agreement with the expected values

  11. Damping spurious harmonic resonances in the APS storage ring beam chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The APS storage ring beam chamber has been storing the beam up to 100 mA successfully. However, in some beam chambers, spurious signals corrupted the BPM outputs. The cause of the unwanted signals was investigated, and it was found that transverse electric (TE) longitudinal harmonic resonances of the beam chamber were responsible. The beam chambers have small height in the area between the ovid beam chamber and the antechamber. The structure behaves like a ridge waveguide so that the cut-off frequency of the waveguide mode becomes lower. The pass-band then includes the frequency around 350 MHz that is important to the beam position monitors (BPMs). The spurious harmonic resonances are damped with two types of dampers to restore the useful signals of the BPMs; coaxial loop dampers and lossy ceramic slab loading are used

  12. Effects of errors on the dynamic aperture of the Advanced Photon Source storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizek, H.; Crosbie, E.; Lessner, E.; Teng, L.; Wirsbinski, J.

    1991-01-01

    The individual tolerance limits for alignment errors and magnet fabrication errors in the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source storage ring are determined by computer-simulated tracking. Limits are established for dipole strength and roll errors, quadrupole strength and alignment errors, sextupole strength and alignment errors, as well as higher order multipole strengths in dipole and quadrupole magnets. The effects of girder misalignments on the dynamic aperture are also studied. Computer simulations are obtained with the tracking program RACETRACK, with errors introduced from a user-defined Gaussian distribution, truncated at ±5 standard deviation units. For each error, the average and rms spread of the stable amplitudes are determined for ten distinct machines, defined as ten different seeds to the random distribution, and for five distinct initial directions of the tracking particle. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  13. Recent experience with inductive insert at the proton storage ring (PSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, K.-Y; Griffin, J.E.; Wildman, D.; Popovic, M.; Browman, A.A.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Macek, R.J.; Plum, M.A.; Spickermann, T.J.

    2001-01-01

    In a Fermilab-Los Alamos collaboration, inductances constructed of ferrite cores sufficient to cancel a large fraction of the space charge potential-well distortion were installed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) as one means of raising the threshold for the two-stream e-p instability. When operating at higher intensities and with sufficient inductance added for full space-charge compensation, an unacceptable longitudinal self-bunching, microwavelike, instability was encountered. Heating the cores to N 130 C proved to be an effective cure, and was found to be a means for tuning the inductance over a limited but useful range. The heated inductors were an essential ingredient in achieving a record accumulation of 9.7 pC/pulse. An engineered version of the inductors is now installed for routine operation of the PSR. A summary of the inductor characteristics, theory of operation, experimental results, and interpretation will be presented.

  14. PEP-X: An Ultimate Storage Ring Based on Fourth-Order Geometric Achromats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yunhai; Bane, Karl; Hettel, Robert; Nosochkov, Yuri; Wang, Min-Huey; /SLAC

    2012-04-06

    We have designed an 'ultimate' storage ring for the PEP-X light source that achieves the diffraction limited emittances (at 1.5 {angstrom}) of 12 pm-rad in both horizontal and vertical planes with a 4.5-GeV beam. These emittances include the contribution of intrabeam scattering at a nominal current of 200 mA in 3300 bunches. This quality beam in conjunction with a conventional 4-m undulator in a straight section can generate synchrotron radiation having a spectral brightness above 10{sup 22} [photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW] at a 10 keV photon energy. The high coherence at the diffraction limit makes PEP-X competitive with 4th generation light sources based on an energy recovery linac. In addition, the beam lifetime is several hours and the dynamic aperture is large enough to allow off-axis injection. The alignment and stability tolerances, though challenging, are achievable. A ring with all these properties is only possible because of several major advances in mitigating the effects of nonlinear resonances.

  15. Digital closed orbit feedback system for the Advanced Photon Source storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y.; Barr, D.; Decker, G.; Galayda, J.; Lenkszus, F.; Lumpkin, A.; Votaw, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Closed orbit feedback for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring employs unified global an local feedback systems for stabilization of particle and photon beams based on digital signal processing (DSP). Hardware and software aspects of the system will be described. In particular, we will discuss global and local orbit feedback algorithms, PID (proportional, integral, and derivative) control algorithm. application of digital signal processing to compensate for vacuum chamber eddy current effects, resolution of the interaction between global and local systems through decoupling, self-correction of the local bump closure error, user interface through the APS control system, and system performance in the frequency and time domains. The system hardware, including the DSPS, is distributed in 20 VNE crates around the ring, and the entire feedback system runs synchronously at 4-kHz sampling frequency in order to achieve a correction bandwidth exceeding 100 Hz. The required data sharing between the global and local feedback systems is facilitated via the use of fiber-optically-networked reflective memories

  16. Experimental demonstration and visual observation of dust trapping in an electron storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunori Tanimoto

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Sudden decreases in the beam lifetime, which are attributed to the dust trappings, sometimes occur at the electron storage ring Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR. Since these dust events cause difficulties in user operations, we have been carefully observing this phenomenon for many years. Our observations indicated that the dust trappings could be caused by electric discharges in vacuum ducts. In order to demonstrate this hypothesis experimentally, we designed a new vacuum device that intentionally generates electric discharges and installed it in PF-AR. Using this device, we could repeatedly induce sudden decreases in the beam lifetime because of the generated electric discharge. We also detected decreases in the beam lifetime caused by mechanical movement of the electrodes in the device. Moreover, we could visually observe the dust trapping phenomenon; the trapped dust particle was observed by two video cameras and appeared as a luminous body that resembled a shooting star. This was the first direct observation of a luminous dust particle trapped by the electron beam.

  17. Electron cloud generation and trapping in a quadrupole magnet at the Los Alamos proton storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Macek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent beam physics studies on the two-stream e-p instability at the LANL proton storage ring (PSR have focused on the role of the electron cloud generated in quadrupole magnets where primary electrons, which seed beam-induced multipacting, are expected to be largest due to grazing angle losses from the beam halo. A new diagnostic to measure electron cloud formation and trapping in a quadrupole magnet has been developed, installed, and successfully tested at PSR. Beam studies using this diagnostic show that the “prompt” electron flux striking the wall in a quadrupole is comparable to the prompt signal in the adjacent drift space. In addition, the “swept” electron signal, obtained using the sweeping feature of the diagnostic after the beam was extracted from the ring, was larger than expected and decayed slowly with an exponential time constant of 50 to 100  μs. Other measurements include the cumulative energy spectra of prompt electrons and the variation of both prompt and swept electron signals with beam intensity. Experimental results were also obtained which suggest that a good fraction of the electrons observed in the adjacent drift space for the typical beam conditions in the 2006 run cycle were seeded by electrons ejected from the quadrupole.

  18. Electron Cloud Generation and Trapping in a Quadrupole Magnet at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macek, Robert J.; Browman, Andrew A.; Ledford, John E.; /TechSource, Santa Fe /Los Alamos; Borden, Michael J.; O' Hara, James F.; McCrady, Rodney C.; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Spickermann, Thomas; Zaugg, Thomas J.; /Los Alamos; Pivi, Mauro T.F.; /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    Recent beam physics studies on the two-stream e-p instability at the LANL proton storage ring (PSR) have focused on the role of the electron cloud generated in quadrupole magnets where primary electrons, which seed beam-induced multipacting, are expected to be largest due to grazing angle losses from the beam halo. A new diagnostic to measure electron cloud formation and trapping in a quadrupole magnet has been developed, installed, and successfully tested at PSR. Beam studies using this diagnostic show that the 'prompt' electron flux striking the wall in a quadrupole is comparable to the prompt signal in the adjacent drift space. In addition, the 'swept' electron signal, obtained using the sweeping feature of the diagnostic after the beam was extracted from the ring, was larger than expected and decayed slowly with an exponential time constant of 50 to 100 {micro}s. Other measurements include the cumulative energy spectra of prompt electrons and the variation of both prompt and swept electron signals with beam intensity. Experimental results were also obtained which suggest that a good fraction of the electrons observed in the adjacent drift space for the typical beam conditions in the 2006 run cycle were seeded by electrons ejected from the quadrupole.

  19. Status of experimental studies of electron cloud effects at the Los Alamos proton storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macek, R. J. (Robert J.); Browman, A. A. (Andrew A.); Borden, M. J. (Michael J.); Fitzgerald, D. H. (Daniel H.); McCrady, R. C. (Rodney C.); Spickermann, T. J. (Thomas J.); Zaugg, T. J. (Thomas J.)

    2004-01-01

    Various electron cloud effects (ECE) including the two-stream (e-p) instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have been studied extensively for the past five years with the goal of understanding the phenomena, mitigating the instability and ultimately increasing beam intensity. The specialized diagnostics used in the studies are two types of electron detectors, the retarding field analyzer and the electron sweepmg detector - which have been employed to measure characteristics of the electron cloud as functions of time, location in the ring and various influential beam parameters - plus a short stripline beam position monitor used to measure high frequency motion of the beam centroid. Highlights of this research program are summarized along with more detail on recent results obtained since the ECLOUD'02 workshop. Recent work mcludes a number of parametric studies of the various factors that affect the electron cloud signals, studies of the sources of initial or 'seed' electrons, additional observations of electron cloud dissipation after the beam pulse is extracted, studies of the 'first pulse instability' issue, more data on electron suppression as a cure for the instability, and observations of the effect of a one-turn weak kick on intense beams in the presence of a significant electron cloud.

  20. Comb-assisted cavity ring down spectroscopy of 17O enriched water between 7443 and 7921 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelain, D.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Karlovets, E. V.; Béguier, S.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.

    2017-12-01

    The room temperature absorption spectrum of water vapor highly enriched in 17O has been recorded by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) between 7443 and 7921 cm-1. Three series of recordings were performed with pressure values around 0.1, 1 and 10 Torr. The frequency calibration of the present spectra benefited of the combination of the CRDS spectrometer to a self-referenced frequency comb. The resulting CRD spectrometer combines excellent frequency accuracy over a broad spectral region with a high sensitivity (Noise Equivalent Absorption, αmin∼ 10-11-10-10 cm-1). The investigated spectral region corresponds to the high energy range of the first hexade. The assignments were performed using known experimental energy levels as well as calculated line lists based on the results of Partridge and Schwenke. Overall about 4150 lines were measured and assigned to 4670 transitions of six water isotopologues (H216O, H217O, H218O, HD16O, HD17O and HD18O). Their intensities span six orders of magnitude from 10-28 to 10-22 cm/molecule. Most of the new results concern the H217O and HD17O isotopologues for which about 1600 and 400 transitions were assigned leading to the determination of 329 and 207 new energy levels, respectively. For comparison only about 300 and four transitions of H217O and HD17O were previously known in the region, respectively. By comparison to highly accurate H216O line positions available in the literature, the average accuracy on our line centers is checked to be on the order of 3 MHz (10-4 cm-1) or better for not weak well isolated lines. This small uncertainty represents a significant improvement of the line center determination of many H216O lines included in the experimental list provided as Supplementary Material.

  1. Ultra-Sensitive Elemental and Isotope Measurements with Compact Plasma Source Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CPS-CRDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Yixiang; Wang, Chuji; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2005-01-01

    The proposed research is to develop a new class of instruments for actinide isotopes and hazardous element analysis through coupling highly sensitive cavity ring-down spectroscopy to a compact microwave plasma source. The research work will combine advantages of CRDS measurement with a low power, low flow rate, tubing-type microwave plasma source to reach breakthrough sensitivity for elemental analysis and unique capability of isotope measurement. The project has several primary goals: (1) Explore the feasibility of marrying CRDS with a new microwave plasma source; (2) Provide quantitative evaluation of CMP-CRDS for ultratrace elemental and actinide isotope analysis; (3) Approach a breakthrough detection limit of ca. 10 -13 g/ml or so, which are orders of magnitude better than currently available best values; (4) Demonstrate the capability of CMP-CRDS technology for isobaric measurements, such as 238 U and 238 Pu isotopes. (5) Design and assemble the first compact, field portable CMP-CRDS instrument with a high-resolution diode laser for DOE/EM on-site demonstration. With all these unique capabilities and sensitivities, we expect CMP-CRDS will bring a revolutionary change in instrument design and development, and will have great impact and play critical roles in supporting DOE's missions in environmental remediation, environmental emission control, waste management and characterization, and decontamination and decommissioning. The ultimate goals of the proposed project are to contribute to environmental management activities that would decrease risk for the public and workers, increase worker productivity with on-site analysis, and tremendously reduce DOE/EM operating costs

  2. Ultra-Sensitive Elemental and Isotope Measurements with Compact Plasma Source Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CPS-CRDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Yixiang; Wang, Chuji; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2003-01-01

    The proposed research is to develop a new class of instruments for actinide isotopes and hazardous element analysis through coupling highly sensitive cavity ring-down spectroscopy to a compact microwave plasma source. The research work will combine advantages of CRDS measurement with a low power, low flow rate, tubing-type microwave plasma source to reach breakthrough sensitivity for elemental analysis and unique capability of isotope measurement. The project has several primary goals: (1) Explore the feasibility of marrying CRDS with a new microwave plasma source; (2) Provide quantitative evaluation of CMP-CRDS for ultratrace elemental and actinide isotope analysis; (3) Approach a breakthrough detection limit of ca. 10-13 g/ml or so, which are orders of magnitude better than currently available best values; (4) Demonstrate the capability of CMP-CRDS technology for isobaric measurements, such as 238U and 238Pu isotopes. (5) Design and assemble the first compact, field portable CMP-CRDS instrument with a high-resolution diode laser for DOE/EM on-site demonstration. With all these unique capabilities and sensitivities, we expect CMPCRDS will bring a revolutionary change in instrument design and development, and will have great impact and play critical roles in supporting DOE's missions in environmental remediation, environmental emission control, waste management and characterization, and decontamination and decommissioning. The ultimate goals of the proposed project are to contribute to environmental management activities that would decrease risk for the public and workers, increase worker productivity with on-site analysis, and tremendously reduce DOE/EM operating costs

  3. Ultra-Sensitive Elemental and Isotope Measurements with Compact Plasma Source Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CPS-CRDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Yixiang; Wang, Chuji; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2004-01-01

    The proposed research is to develop a new class of instruments for actinide isotopes and hazardous element analysis through coupling highly sensitive cavity ring-down spectroscopy to a compact microwave plasma source. The research work will combine advantages of CRDS measurement with a low power, low flow rate, tubing-type microwave plasma source to reach breakthrough sensitivity for elemental analysis and unique capability of isotope measurement. The project has several primary goals: (1) Explore the feasibility of marrying CRDS with a new microwave plasma source; (2) Provide quantitative evaluation of CMPCRDS for ultratrace elemental and actinide isotope analysis; (3) Approach a breakthrough detection limit of ca. 10-13 g/ml or so, which are orders of magnitude better than currently available best values; (4) Demonstrate the capability of CMP-CRDS technology for isobaric measurements, such as 238U and 238Pu isotopes. (5) Design and assemble the first compact, field portable CMP-CRDS instrument with a high-resolution diode laser for DOE/EM on-site demonstration. With all these unique capabilities and sensitivities, we expect CMP-CRDS will bring a revolutionary change in instrument design and development, and will have great impact and play critical roles in supporting DOE's missions in environmental remediation, environmental emission control, waste management and characterization, and decontamination and decommissioning. The ultimate goals of the proposed project are to contribute to environmental management activities that would decrease risk for the public and workers, increase worker productivity with on-site analysis, and tremendously reduce DOE/EM operating costs

  4. Ultra-Sensitive Elemental and Isotope Measurements with Compact Plasma Source Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CPS-CRDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chuji

    2003-01-01

    The proposed research is to develop a new class of instruments for actinide isotopes and hazardous element analysis through coupling highly sensitive cavity ring-down spectroscopy to a compact microwave plasma source. The research work will combine advantages of CRDS measurement with a low power, low flow rate, tubing-type microwave plasma source to reach breakthrough sensitivity for elemental analysis and unique capability of isotope measurement. The project has several primary goals: (1) Explore the feasibility of marrying CRDS with a new microwave plasma source; (2) Provide quantitative evaluation of CMP-CRDS for ultra-trace elemental and actinide isotope analysis; (3) Approach a breakthrough detection limit of ca. 10-13 g/ml or so, which are orders of magnitude better than currently available best values; (4) Demonstrate the capability of CMP-CRDS technology for isobaric measurements, such as 238U and 238Pu isotopes. (5) Design and assemble the first compact, field portable CMP-CRDS instrument with a high-resolution diode laser for DOE/EM on-site demonstration. With all these unique capabilities and sensitivities, we expect CMP-CRDS will bring a revolutionary change in instrument design and development, and will have great impact and play critical roles in supporting DOE's missions in environmental remediation, environmental emission control, waste management and characterization, and decontamination and decommissioning. The ultimate goals of the proposed project are to contribute to environmental management activities that would decrease risk for the public and workers, increase worker productivity with on-site analysis, and tremendously reduce DOE/EM operating costs

  5. A Novel Method for Analysis of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Concentration and δ13C by Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E.; Gonneea, M. E.; Boze, L. G.; Casso, M.; Pohlman, J.

    2017-12-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is the largest pool of carbon in the oceans and is where about half of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are being sequestered. Determining the concentration and stable carbon isotopic content (δ13C) of DIC allows us to delineate carbon sources that contribute to marine DIC. A simple and reliable method for measuring DIC concentration and δ13C can be used to apportion contributions from external sources and identify effects from biogeochemical reactions that contribute or remove DIC. The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a discrete sample analysis module (DSAM) that interfaces to a Picarro G-2201i cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS, Picarro Inc.) to analyze CO2 and methane concentrations and δ13C from discrete gas samples. In this study, we adapted the USGS DSAM-CRDS analysis system to include an AutoMate prep device (Automate FX, Inc.) for analysis of DIC concentration and δ13C from aqueous samples. The Automate prep device was modified to deliver CO2 extracted from DIC to the DSAM, which conditions and transfers the gas to the CRDS. LabVIEW software (National Instruments) triggers the Automate Prep device, controls the DSAM and collects data from the CRDS. CO2 mass concentration data are obtained by numerical integration of the CO2 volumetric concentrations output by the CRDS and subsequent comparison to standard materials. CO2 carbon isotope values from the CRDS (iCO2) are converted to δ13C values using a slope and offset correction calibration procedure. The system design and operation was optimized using sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) standards and a certified reference material. Surface water and pore water samples collected from Sage Lot Pond, a salt marsh in Cape Cod MA, have been analyzed for concentration by coulometry and δ13C by isotope ratio mass spectrometry and will be used to validate the DIC-DSAM-CRDS method for field applications.

  6. Quantification of Alkyl Nitrates in Ambient Air by Thermal Dissociation Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy with Preconcentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, C. Z.; Osthoff, H. D.; Taha, Y. M.; Pak, J. K.; Saowapon, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Alkyl nitrates (AN, molecular formula RONO2) play a crucial role in the troposphere as temporary reservoirs of nitrogen oxides (NOx =NO +NO2) and by acting as chain terminators in the photochemical production of ozone. Mixing ratios of AN in ambient air are commonly quantified by gas chromatography with electron capture or mass spectrometric detection (GC-ECD or GC-MS) coupled to purge-and-trap preconcentration, usually on Tenax sorbent, to improve the detection limits. The analysis, however, is quite laborious as there are many alkyl nitrates that are low in individual abundance (often less than 1 parts-per-trillion by volume, pptv) and that exhibit different instrumental response factors. An alternative method is to determine alkyl nitrates as a sum (ΣAN) by thermal dissociation (TD) to a common fragment (NO2), which can then be quantified with a uniform response factor by optical absorption, for example by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). However, the determination of ΣAN by TD-CRDS is hampered by its relatively high detection limits (several 100 pptv) and secondary chemistry following TD that results in both negative and positive interferences and depends on the composition of the ambient air sampled. In this work, a TD-CRDS equipped with a Tenax preconcentration unit is described. Matrix effects are minimized by desorbing the samples from the Tenax in a background of nitrogen. The performance of the instrument, in particular the recovery from the Tenax sorbent, was evaluated by sampling laboratory-generated mixtures of alkyl and peroxyacyl nitrates. Field data from a coastal site collected during the Ozone-depleting reactions in a coastal atmosphere (ORCA) campaign, which took place at the Amphitrite Point Observatory in Ucluelet, BC, from July 6 - 31, 2015, are presented. Advantages and disadvantages of the new method are discussed.

  7. Field-based cavity ring-down spectrometry of δ¹³C in soil-respired CO₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munksgaard, Niels C; Davies, Kalu; Wurster, Chris M; Bass, Adrian M; Bird, Michael I

    2013-06-01

    Measurement of soil-respired CO₂ at high temporal resolution and sample density is necessary to accurately identify sources and quantify effluxes of soil-respired CO₂. A portable sampling device for the analysis of δ(13)C values in the field is described herein. CO₂ accumulated in a soil chamber was batch sampled sequentially in four gas bags and analysed by Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring-down Spectrometry (WS-CRDS). A Keeling plot (1/[CO₂] versus δ(13)C) was used to derive δ(13)C values of soil-respired CO₂. Calibration to the δ(13)C Vienna Peedee Belemnite scale was by analysis of cylinder CO₂ and CO₂ derived from dissolved carbonate standards. The performance of gas-bag analysis was compared to continuous analysis where the WS-CRDS analyser was connected directly to the soil chamber. Although there are inherent difficulties in obtaining absolute accuracy data for δ(13)C values in soil-respired CO₂, the similarity of δ(13)C values obtained for the same test soil with different analytical configurations indicated that an acceptable accuracy of the δ(13)C data were obtained by the WS-CRDS techniques presented here. Field testing of a variety of tropical soil/vegetation types, using the batch sampling technique yielded δ(13)C values for soil-respired CO₂ related to the dominance of either C₃ (tree, δ(13)C=-27.8 to-31.9 ‰) or C₄ (tropical grass, δ(13)C=-9.8 to-13.6 ‰) photosynthetic pathways in vegetation at the sampling sites. Standard errors of the Keeling plot intercept δ(13)C values of soil-respired CO₂ were typically7-9 μmol m(-2) s(-1)).

  8. Time evolution of coupled-bunch modes from beta function variation in storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Meng Hock

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an analytical and numerical study of the equations of motion for bunches coupled by transverse wakefields. We base our study on a recent lattice design for the damping rings in the baseline configuration of the International Linear Collider. Using the macroparticle model, and assuming resistive wall wakefield coupling, we present numerical results on the time evolution of the multibunch modes. Decay modes display growth after initial decay, and mode amplitudes exhibit high-frequency oscillations. These phenomena are not expected if the beta function is assumed to have a constant, averaged value. We show analytically that they can come from coupling between modes caused by variation of the beta function in a real lattice. The effect is shown to be comparable to the effect of a nonuniform fill pattern and significantly larger than that of the higher-order mode wakefield localized in the rf cavities. Turning to the case of constant beta function, we develop a more complete treatment of the equations of motion. We derive general formulas for the bunch trajectories, and show that such formulas can only be valid in the limit of small wakefield coupling.

  9. Setup and commissioning of the first corner of the electrostatic cryogenic storage ring CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellenberger, Florian

    2012-01-01

    In the context of this thesis the first corner of the electrostatic cryogenic storage ring CSR was designed, built and characterized. Starting with the theoretical analysis of the utilized ion optical elements and hence resulting operational parameters and ion trajectories simulations major steps in design and manufacturing were carried out. Detailed calculations concerning the possible heat transport mechanism at the CSR were performed. This resulted in values for the expected heat load of the various components. Furthermore this calculations enabled the optimization of critical assemblies. In addition the components of the high-voltage system were tested intensively and optimized to guarantee the high-voltage stability required for the ion beam storage. During a first cooldown process major tests of the ion optical elements concerning their positions and alignment stabilities could be successfully performed. After this the first corner of the CSR was cooled down a second time to check the prior calculations on the expected heat loads and the achievable low-end temperatures. Almost all demands resulting from the experimental design parameters could be fullfilled directly during this thesis. The few exceptions missed the demands only close and will be fullfilled by appropriate modifications.

  10. 1000-TeV in the Center-Of-Mass: Introduction to High-Energy Storage Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorken, J D

    1982-09-01

    The lecture discusses, in a pedagogic way, a hypothetical 500 TeV proton storage ring accelerator. It gives machine parameters, discusses linear optics and betatron motions, surveys questions of errors, tolerances and nonlinear resonances, and discusses some of the demands on the detection apparatus, especially the apparent inevitability of multiple interactions per bunch crossing. (GHT)

  11. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  12. 6 MeV storage ring dedicated to hard X-ray imaging and far-infrared ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The tabletop storage ring, 6 MeV MIRRORCLE, is dedicated to hard X-ray imaging as well as far-infrared (FIR) spectroscopy. ... Synchrotron Light Life Science (SLLS) Center, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Noji-higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577, Japan; Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Rajshahi, ...

  13. First measurement of the Ru-96(p,gamma)Rh-97 cross section for the p process with a storage ring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, Bo; Aumann, Thomas; Bishop, Shawn; Blaum, Klaus; Boretzky, Konstanze; Bosch, Fritz; Brandau, Carsten; Braeuning, Harald; Davinson, Thomas; Dillmann, Iris; Dimopoulou, Christina; Ershova, Olga; Fueloep, Zsolt; Geissel, Hans; Glorius, Jan; Gyuerky, Gyoergy; Heil, Michael; Kaeppeler, Franz; Kelic-Heil, Aleksandra; Kozhuharov, Christophor; Langer, Christoph; Le Bleis, Tudi; Litvinov, Yuri; Lotay, Gavin; Marganiec, Justyna; Muenzenberg, Gottfried; Nolden, Fritz; Petridis, Nikolaos; Plag, Ralf; Popp, Ulrich; Rastrepina, Ganna; Reifarth, Rene; Riese, Bjoern; Rigollet, Catherine; Scheidenberger, Christoph; Simon, Haik; Sonnabend, Kerstin; Steck, Markus; Stoehlker, Thomas; Szuecs, Tamas; Suemmerer, Klaus; Weber, Guenter; Weick, Helmut; Winters, Danyal; Winters, Natalya; Woods, Philip; Zhong, Qiping

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a direct measurement of the Ru-96(p,gamma)Rh-97 cross section via a novel technique using a storage ring, which opens opportunities for reaction measurements on unstable nuclei. A proof-of-principle experiment was performed at the storage ring ESR at GSI in Darmstadt, where

  14. Beam Fields in an Integrated Cavity, Coupler and Window Configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, Stephen; Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2010-02-10

    In a multi-bunch high current storage ring, beam generated fields couple strongly into the RF cavity coupler structure when beam arrival times are in resonance with cavity fields. In this study the integrated effect of beam fields over several thousand RF periods is simulated for the complete cavity, coupler, window and waveguide system of the PEP-II B-factory storage ring collider. We show that the beam generated fields at frequencies corresponding to several bunch spacings for this case gives rise to high field strength near the ceramic window which could limit the performance of future high current storage rings such as PEP-X or Super B-factories.

  15. Beam dynamics in Compton ring gamma sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Bulyak

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Electron storage rings of GeV energy with laser pulse stacking cavities are promising intense sources of polarized hard photons which, via pair production, can be used to generate polarized positron beams. In this paper, the dynamics of electron bunches circulating in a storage ring and interacting with high-power laser pulses is studied both analytically and by simulation. Both the common features and the differences in the behavior of bunches interacting with an extremely high power laser pulse and with a moderate pulse are discussed. Also considerations on particular lattice designs for Compton gamma rings are presented.

  16. Cavity-cavity conditional logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Serge; Gao, Yvonne Y.; Reinhold, Philip; Wang, Chen; Axline, Christopher; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, Steven M.; Jiang, Liang; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.

    In a superconducting circuit architecture, the highest coherence times are typically offered by 3D cavities. Moreover, these cavities offer a hardware-efficient way of redundantly encoding quantum information. While single-qubit control on a cavity has already been demonstrated, there is a need for a universal two-qubit gate between such cavities. In this talk, we demonstrate a cavity-cavity gate by parametric pumping on a fixed-frequency transmon interacting with the two cavities. Every gate application lowers the state fidelity by only 1%, while maintaining an entangling rate on-off ratio of 29dB. Additionally, we show that the gate is applicable not only to qubits consisting of single photons, but also to more complex encodings. These results illustrate the usefulness of cavities beyond the mere storage of quantum information, and pave the way towards gates between error-corrected logical qubits.

  17. Coupled-bunch instabilities in the APS ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, L.

    1991-01-01

    A study of coupled bunch instabilities for the APS storage ring is presented. The instabilities are driven by the higher-order modes of the fifteen 352-MHz single-cell RF cavities. These modes are modeled using the 2-D cavity program URMEL. The program ZAP is then used to estimate the growth time of the instabilities for an equally-spaced bunch pattern. The cavity modes most responsible for the instabilities will be singles out for damping. 7 refs., 5 tabs

  18. Microscopic study on lasing characteristics of the UVSOR storage ring free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hama, H. [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki (Japan)]|[Graduate Univ. for Advanced Stuides, Okazaki (Japan); Yamazaki, J.; Kinoshita, T. [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Characteristics of storage ring free electron laser (SRFEL) at a short wavelength region (UV and visible) has been studied at the UVSOR facility, Institute for Molecular Science. We have measured the laser power evolution by using a biplanar photodiode, and the micro-macro temporal structure of both the laser and the electron bunch with a dualsweep streak camera. The saturated energy of the laser micropulse in the gain-switching (Q-switching) mode has been measured as a function of the ring current. We have not observed a limitation of the output power yet within the beam current can be stored. We have analyzed the saturated micropulse energy based on a model of gain reduction due to the bunch-heating. The bunch-heating process seems to be very complicate. We derived time dependent gain variations from the shape of macropulse and the bunch length. Those two gain variations are almost consistent with each other but slightly different in detail. The gain may be not only simply reduced by the energy spread but also affected by the phase space rotation due to synchrotron oscillation of the electron bunch. As reported in previous issue, the lasing macropulse consists of a couple of micropulses that are simultaneously evolved. From high resolution two-dimensional spectra taken by the dual-sweep streak camera, we noticed considerable internal substructures of the laser micropulse in both the time distribution and the spectral shape. There are a couple of peaks separated with almost same distance in a optical bunch. Such substructure does not seem to result from statistical fluctuations of laser seeds. Although the origin of the substructure of macropulse is not dear at the present, we are going to discuss about SRFEL properties.

  19. Time-resolved spectral characterization of ring cavity surface emitting and ridge-type distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers by step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Markus; Genner, Andreas; Schwarzer, Clemens; Mujagic, Elvis; Strasser, Gottfried; Lendl, Bernhard

    2014-02-10

    We present the time-resolved comparison of pulsed 2nd order ring cavity surface emitting (RCSE) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) and pulsed 1st order ridge-type distributed feedback (DFB) QCLs using a step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. Laser devices were part of QCL arrays and fabricated from the same laser material. Required grating periods were adjusted to account for the grating order. The step-scan technique provided a spectral resolution of 0.1 cm(-1) and a time resolution of 2 ns. As a result, it was possible to gain information about the tuning behavior and potential mode-hops of the investigated lasers. Different cavity-lengths were compared, including 0.9 mm and 3.2 mm long ridge-type and 0.97 mm (circumference) ring-type cavities. RCSE QCLs were found to have improved emission properties in terms of line-stability, tuning rate and maximum emission time compared to ridge-type lasers.

  20. Reconfiguration of the multiwavelength operation of optical fiber ring lasers by the modifiable intra-cavity induced losses of an in-fiber tip probe modal Michelson interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salceda-Delgado, G.; Martinez-Rios, A.; Sierra-Hernandez, J. M.; Rodríguez-Carreón, V. C.; Toral-Acosta, D.; Selvas-Aguilar, R.; Álvarez-Tamayo, R. I.; Castillo-Guzman, A. A.; Rojas-Laguna, R.

    2018-03-01

    A straightforward and versatile method for switching from single to different multiwavelength laser emission in ring cavity fiber lasers is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The method is based on using the changeable interference pattern from an optical fiber modal Michelson interferometer as a wavelength selective filter into the ring cavity laser. The interferometer is constructed using a bi-conical tapered fiber and a single-mode fiber segment, with these being spliced together to form an optical fiber tip probe. When the length of the single-mode fiber piece is modified, the phase difference between the interfering modes of the interferometer causes a change in the interferometer free spectral range. As a consequence, the laser intra-cavity losses lead to gain competition, which allows us to adjust the number of simultaneously generated laser lines. A multiwavelength reconfiguration of the laser from one up to a maximum of eight emission lines was obtained, with a maximum SNR of around 47 dBm.