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Sample records for stomach cancer care

  1. Stomach Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people ... Smoke cigarettes Have a family history of stomach cancer It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in ...

  2. Stomach Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Men, Seniors, WomenTags: cancer, gastric cancer, stomach cancer May 1, 1999 Copyright © American Academy ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ...

  3. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a disease in ...

  4. Stomach cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikako

    1992-01-01

    Malignant tumors have received much attention as delayed effects of A-bomb radiation. Above all, it is of a major concern to determine how the incidence of stomach cancer, commonly observed among Japanese, is influenced by A-bomb radiation. This article focusses on the relationship between A-bomb radiation and the incidence of stomach cancer, and its histological features with a brief review of the literature. Mass screening for stomach cancer has showed in 1973 that the incidence of stomach cancer is definitely high among the heavily exposed A-bomb survivors. Since then, data analyses using the T65DR have showed it to be higher in the 100 rad exposed group than the 0 rad exposed group. On the basis of death certificates, the incidence of stomach cancer is found to be increased around 1976. When using DS86, the calculated lowest dose that produces a significantly high mortality incidence from stomach cancer is 1 Gy at the sheilding kerma and 0.5 Gy at organ absorbed dose. Histopathologically, the incidence of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma is increased with increasing radiation doses; it is significantly increased in the 1 rad exposed group. The incidence of medullary type is decreased and the incidence of scirrhous type is increased with increasing radiation doses. (N.K.)

  5. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... following are risk factors for stomach cancer: Certain medical conditions Having any of the following medical conditions ...

  6. Variation in contour and cancer of stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Hong; Hwang, Seon Moon; Yoon, Kwon Ha

    1999-01-01

    There were four types of stomach contour included eutonic, hypotonic, steerhorn, and cascade. The aim of this study is to clarify relationship between incidence of stomach cancer and contour variation of the stomach. Double- contrast upper gastrointestinal study was performed in 1,546 patients, who had dyspepsia or other gastrointestinal tract symptoms. The radiographs were classified into the four types including eutonic, hypotonic, steerhorn, and cascade according to stomach contour in relation to body build. We also reviewed pathologic reports on endoscopic biopsy or surgical specimen. We studied the presence of relationship between incidence of stomach cancer and variation of stomach contour. We also examined the incidence of gastritis and gastric ulcer to the stomach contour variation. Of total 1,546 patients, eutonic stomach were 438(28.3%), hypotonic 911(58.9%), steerhorn 102(6.5%) and cascade 95(6.2%). Stomach cancer was found in 139(31.7%) of 438 eutonic stomachs, in 135(14.8%) of 911 hypotonic, in 42(41.2%) of 102 steerhorn, and in 24(36.9%) of 95 cascade (P=0.001). In hypotonic stomach, the incidence of stomach cancer was lower compared to the other three types significantly (p<0.05). Gastritis or gastric ulcer was found in 146(33.3%) of eutonic stomach, in 293(32.1%) of hypotonic, in 36(35.2%) of steerhorn, and in 26(27.3%) of cascade (p=0.640). In conclusion, gastric contour variation seems to be a factor affecting development of stomach cancer. The patients with hypotonic stomach may have lower incidence of stomach cancer than that of the other types. There was no relationship between the contour and gastric ulcer

  7. Variation in contour and cancer of stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Hong; Hwang, Seon Moon [Asan Medical Center, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Kwon Ha [College of Medicine, Wonkwang Univ., Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    There were four types of stomach contour included eutonic, hypotonic, steerhorn, and cascade. The aim of this study is to clarify relationship between incidence of stomach cancer and contour variation of the stomach. Double- contrast upper gastrointestinal study was performed in 1,546 patients, who had dyspepsia or other gastrointestinal tract symptoms. The radiographs were classified into the four types including eutonic, hypotonic, steerhorn, and cascade according to stomach contour in relation to body build. We also reviewed pathologic reports on endoscopic biopsy or surgical specimen. We studied the presence of relationship between incidence of stomach cancer and variation of stomach contour. We also examined the incidence of gastritis and gastric ulcer to the stomach contour variation. Of total 1,546 patients, eutonic stomach were 438(28.3%), hypotonic 911(58.9%), steerhorn 102(6.5%) and cascade 95(6.2%). Stomach cancer was found in 139(31.7%) of 438 eutonic stomachs, in 135(14.8%) of 911 hypotonic, in 42(41.2%) of 102 steerhorn, and in 24(36.9%) of 95 cascade (P=0.001). In hypotonic stomach, the incidence of stomach cancer was lower compared to the other three types significantly (p<0.05). Gastritis or gastric ulcer was found in 146(33.3%) of eutonic stomach, in 293(32.1%) of hypotonic, in 36(35.2%) of steerhorn, and in 26(27.3%) of cascade (p=0.640). In conclusion, gastric contour variation seems to be a factor affecting development of stomach cancer. The patients with hypotonic stomach may have lower incidence of stomach cancer than that of the other types. There was no relationship between the contour and gastric ulcer.

  8. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of stomach cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eun Chul; Jin, S I; Kim, J W [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1982-12-15

    The ultrasonographic features of stomach cancer were studied in 43 patients who were diagnosed by double contrast UGI study and endoscopy. Ultrasonographic study was performed immediately after UGI study and the findings were correlated with USI study. The authors observed infiltrative lesions causing thickening of gastric wall, which can be localized (16 of 31) or diffuse(15 of 31). 9 cases were exogastric masses, sonographic findings were not found in the lesions occupying the cardia (3 of 5) Ultrasonography is useful in demonstrating the extent of the tumor and the presence of metastasis elsewhere in the abdomen, facilitating tumor staging and evaluation of the response to therapy

  9. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stomach (gastric) cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. Diagnosis of early stomach cancer (Lecture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinner, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    Problems concerning diagnosis of early stomach cancer using X-ray and endoscopic investigation techniques are stated. Classification of early stomach cancer suggested by the Japan Endoscopy Society and division system of early stomach cancer into two main foms: depth (erosive-ulcerous) one and elevated (polypoid) one-is presented X-ray and endoscopic investigation techniques are shown to be high efficiency concerning revealingation of stomach mucous variations using biopsy, which allow to determine for certain whother the process is benign or malignant one

  11. Stomach Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomach (gastric) cancer risk factors include smoking and H. pylori. Learn about these and other risk factors for stomach cancer and how to prevent stomach cancer in this expert-reviewed and evidence-based summary.

  12. Stomach Cancer Following Hodgkin Lymphoma, Testicular Cancer and Cervical Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Ethel S; Curtis, Rochelle E; Hauptmann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    To further understand the risk of stomach cancer after fractionated high-dose radiotherapy, we pooled individual-level data from three recent stomach cancer case-control studies. These studies were nested in cohorts of five-year survivors of first primary Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), testicular cancer...... (TC) or cervical cancer (CX) from seven countries. Detailed data were abstracted from patient records and radiation doses were reconstructed to the site of the stomach cancer for cases and to the corresponding sites for matched controls. Among 327 cases and 678 controls, mean doses to the stomach were...... 15.3 Gy, 24.7 Gy and 1.9 Gy, respectively, for Hodgkin lymphoma, testicular cancer and cervical cancer survivors, with an overall mean dose of 10.3 Gy. Risk increased with increasing radiation dose to the stomach cancer site (P

  13. Stomach Cancer Risk After Treatment for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Lindsay M.; Dores, Graça M.; Curtis, Rochelle E.; Lynch, Charles F.; Stovall, Marilyn; Hall, Per; Gilbert, Ethel S.; Hodgson, David C.; Storm, Hans H.; Johannesen, Tom Børge; Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita E.; Andersson, Michael; Fossa, Sophie D.; Hauptmann, Michael; Holowaty, Eric J.; Joensuu, Heikki; Kaijser, Magnus; Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Langmark, Frøydis; Pukkala, Eero; Vaalavirta, Leila; van den Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Travis, Lois B.; Aleman, Berthe M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Treatment-related stomach cancer is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among the growing number of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors, but risks associated with specific HL treatments are unclear. Patients and Methods We conducted an international case-control study of stomach cancer nested in a cohort of 19,882 HL survivors diagnosed from 1953 to 2003, including 89 cases and 190 matched controls. For each patient, we quantified cumulative doses of specific alkylating agents (AAs) and reconstructed radiation dose to the stomach tumor location. Results Stomach cancer risk increased with increasing radiation dose to the stomach (Ptrend < .001) and with increasing number of AA-containing chemotherapy cycles (Ptrend = .02). Patients who received both radiation to the stomach ≥ 25 Gy and high-dose procarbazine (≥ 5,600 mg/m2) had strikingly elevated stomach cancer risk (25 cases, two controls; odds ratio [OR], 77.5; 95% CI, 14.7 to 1452) compared with those who received radiation < 25 Gy and procarbazine < 5,600 mg/m2 (Pinteraction < .001). Risk was also elevated (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.3 to 6.4) among patients who received radiation to the stomach ≥ 25 Gy but procarbazine < 5,600 mg/m2; however, no procarbazine-related risk was evident with radiation < 25 Gy. Treatment with dacarbazine also increased stomach cancer risk (12 cases, nine controls; OR, 8.8; 95% CI, 2.1 to 46.6), after adjustment for radiation and procarbazine doses. Conclusion Patients with HL who received subdiaphragmatic radiotherapy had dose-dependent increased risk of stomach cancer, with marked risks for patients who also received chemotherapy containing high-dose procarbazine. For current patients, risks and benefits of exposure to both procarbazine and subdiaphragmatic radiotherapy should be weighed carefully. For patients treated previously, GI symptoms should be evaluated promptly. PMID:23980092

  14. Cancer of the Stomach in the Mrican

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -of 98 cases of histologically proved cancer of the stomach are reported here ... origin, size and site of tumour clinical features, principles of management ... NO OF CASES STUDIED. Other surgical ... tenderness, vomiting, and anorexia (Fig. 2).

  15. Chemo Before Surgery May Help Stomach Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemotherapy given before surgery for cancer of the lower esophagus and stomach increased the number of patients surviving for five years compared to surgery alone, according to findings presented at the 2007 ASCO meeting in Chicago.

  16. Increased stomach cancer risk following radiotherapy for testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauptmann, M; Fossa, S D; Stovall, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal radiotherapy for testicular cancer (TC) increases risk for second stomach cancer, although data on the radiation dose-response relationship are sparse. METHODS: In a cohort of 22,269 5-year TC survivors diagnosed during 1959-1987, doses to stomach subsites were estimated...... for 92 patients who developed stomach cancer and 180 matched controls. Chemotherapy details were recorded. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using logistic regression. RESULTS: Cumulative incidence of second primary stomach cancer was 1.45% at 30 years after TC diagnosis. The TC survivors who received...... radiotherapy (87 (95%) cases, 151 (84%) controls) had a 5.9-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-20.7) increased risk of stomach cancer. Risk increased with increasing stomach dose (P-trend

  17. Roentgenoendoscopic diagnosis of early stomach cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinner, M.G.; Kopytov, I.I.

    1984-01-01

    Some potentialities of the X-ray and endoscopic methods in the recognition of early stomach cancer are analysed. Both methods are provided by a roentgenotogist. Of 396 operated patients with stomach cancer, early forms were detected in 78 which is equal to 8% of the detected number and 19.7% of the operated cancer pasients. Two macroscopic forms of early cancer were detected: cancer with ulceration (erosion-ulcerative form) and polypoidcancer. The first form is interpreted as primary-ulcerative cancer, malignant ulcers and cancer in the form of erosions, the second one as polyps, polypoid and patchlike cancer, malignant polyps. X-ray changes were detected in 80% of the patients, in the rest of 20% by the endoscopic method only. With the help of the roentgenological and endoscopic methods (without cytological examination) one cannot be sure of accurate differential diagnosis between malignant and benign variants of ulcerations and polypoid changes in early cancer. The potentialities of the X-ray method ir the detection of ulcerative and polypoid changes of the stomach make it possible to improve it, though under a strict condition of performing subsequent obligatory endoscopy and getting tissue specimens for biopsy. The organization of the common roentgenoendoscopic centers is found appropriate

  18. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is no standard or routine screening test for stomach (gastric) cancer. Stomach (gastric) cancer is not common in the U.S. Learn about tests that have been studied to detect or screen for stomach cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  19. Metastatic Breast Cancer to the Stomach Resembling Early Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumikata Hara

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer metastases to the stomach are very rare. As characteristics of breast cancer metastases to the stomach, metastases of lobular carcinoma, mainly with signet ring cells, are frequently observed, and they are often difficult to distinguish from a primary gastric cancer with signet ring cells. Moreover, because no characteristic symptoms are shown and they involve a submucosal lesion, it is difficult to make a radiographic diagnosis. However, if a gastric lesion is observed after breast carcinoma surgery, differentiation between a gastric primary lesion and a metastatic lesion is very important in order to determine treatment. We encountered a case that was diagnosed as early gastric cancer discovered using an endoscope 2 years after surgery and which was found to be breast cancer metastasis to the stomach by gross cystic disease fluid protein (GCDFP and cytokeratin (CK 7/20 immunostaining of the biopsy tissue. Here, we report our findings of this unique case.

  20. Radiation dose and subsequent risk for stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A; Smith, Susan A; Holowaty, Eric

    2013-01-01

    To assess the dose-response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer.......To assess the dose-response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer....

  1. Present-day potentialities of radiodiagnosis of stomach cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portnoj, L.M.; Simavonyan, K.V.; Turovskij, B.M.; Kaluzhskij, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Present-day potentialities of radiodiagnosis of stomach cancer were studied using the results of clinicoradiological examination of 209 patients, mainly with endophytic and small forms of stomach cancer and 28 with stomach polypus. It was shown that to achieve the most complete and objective estimation of tumor changes in the stomach a combination of X-ray methods including routine examination with barium suspension and double contrast should be used. One of the most promising trends in radiodiagnosis of stomach cancer is fluorographic mass screening for stomach cancer in persons at high risk with subsequent selective endoscopic examination ( according to indications ). Double contrast remains the major and most informative part of standardized technique of gastrofluorographic examination

  2. Adenocarcinoma of the stomach following radical radiotherapy for testicular cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, C.D.M.; Chadderton, R.; Bourke, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    Two male patients who underwent curative surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (with further chemotherapy in one) for testicular cancer developed adenocarcinoma of the stomach 5 and 19 years after treatment. The stomach is included in the field of radiotherapy used to treat the para-aortic lymph nodes and this may lead to dysplastic changes in the stomach mucosa which can lead to frank malignancy. Early endoscopy should be offered to patients with dyspeptic symptoms after adjuvant radiotherapy for testicular cancer. (author)

  3. Stomach cancer risk after treatment for hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morton, Lindsay M; Dores, Graça M; Curtis, Rochelle E

    2013-01-01

    Treatment-related stomach cancer is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among the growing number of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors, but risks associated with specific HL treatments are unclear.......Treatment-related stomach cancer is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among the growing number of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors, but risks associated with specific HL treatments are unclear....

  4. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk factors for stomach (gastric) cancer include certain health conditions (e.g., atrophic gastritis, pernicious anemia, H. pylori infection), genetic factors (e.g., Li-Fraumeni syndrome), or environmental factors (e.g., diet, smoking). Review the evidence on these and other risk factors and interventions to prevent stomach cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  5. Stomach cancer in atomic bomb survivors, 1950-73

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kuniomi.

    1978-04-01

    Stomach cancer mortality among atomic bomb survivors in the Life Span Study was studied using death certificates for the period 1950-73. A consistent increase in mortality with increasing radiation dose was observed in Hiroshima, the highest rate being in the dose region of 400 - 499 rad. For Nagasaki, however, the evidence of a radiation effect is very weak. An excess in stomach cancer mortality was found only at doses above 500 rad. More evidence is needed to establish radiation as a causative factor in stomach cancer. (author)

  6. Dietary habits and stomach cancer risk in the JACC Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokui, Noritaka; Yoshimura, Takesumi; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Hoshiyama, Yoshiharu; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Sakata, Kiyomi; Kondo, Takaaki; Kikuchi, Shogo; Toyoshima, Hideaki; Hayakawa, Norihiko; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2005-06-01

    Despite a declining incidence, stomach cancer is still a dominant cancer in Japan. The association between dietary habits and stomach cancer risk was investigated in a large prospective study in Japan. Data were obtained using a self-administered questionnaire from 1988 through 1990. Food frequency questionnaire was used to evaluate the consumption of 33 selected food items. Proportional hazard model was used to determine the hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of stomach cancer for different levels of the dietary intakes. A western style breakfast showed an inverse association with stomach cancer risk in males (HR=0.49, 95% CI: 0.35-0.70). Women who consumed liver three to four times per week and more than once per day had a significant increased risk, respectively (HR=2.02, 95% CI: 1.12-3.63, HR=3.16, 95% CI: 1.16-8.62 ). A clear dose-response relationship between the intake of liver and stomach cancer risk was observed. We found no association between stomach cancer mortality and the consumption of fruit such as mandarin orange, and vegetables such as carrots and spinach in both men and women. The consumption of high salt foods such as miso soup and pickles was also not significantly associated with the mortality of stomach cancer in both sexes. This prospective study suggested that a western-style breakfast is associated with a lower risk of stomach cancer, although some differences in the association were seen between men and women.

  7. Risks of Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ) which coats the esophagus and stomach as it ... to remove tissue , which is checked under a microscope for signs of disease. Enlarge Upper endoscopy. A ...

  8. Roentgenographic diagnosis of early stomach cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Jung Ho; Choi, Byung Sook; Choi, Heung Jai

    1970-01-01

    The most significant feature of early carcinoma, be defined as the gastric carcinoma confined in mucosa and submucosal regardless of its size and shape, is its excellent prognosis; 5 year survival rate after operation in early stomach carcinoma amounts to 93 percent in comparison with around 25 percent in advanced carcinoma, and so the detection of this early stomach carcinoma is most important subject to minimize the mortality from stomach carcinoma at the present time. For the diagnosis of the early stomach carcinoma the radiographic study, cytology and gastroscopic examination are practised, and of those the radiographic study has been revealed commonly best results, but by usual method of upper G-I study it is often difficult to diagnose accurately. Therefore, we have been employed the barium and air double contrast method by insertion of the gastric tube. This method is simple and by this method, the adequate amount of air may introduced into the stomach for the best visualization of the mucosal pattern and gastric juice may also aspirated in a case of which the stomach wall could not be coated by barium because of excessive gastric juice. Summary of the results of this studies of early carcinoma detection at the department of radiology, Severance Hospital during 6 months since May 1969 are as followings; of 1407 cases taken upper G-I study with double contrast method, 17 cases were diagnosed as possible early stomach carcinoma radiographically, and then only 6 cases had surgical resection of stomach. Of these 2 cases were confirmed pathologically and one was considered as precancerots lesion

  9. Roentgenographic diagnosis of early stomach cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jung Ho; Choi, Byung Sook; Choi, Heung Jai [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1970-10-15

    The most significant feature of early carcinoma, be defined as the gastric carcinoma confined in mucosa and submucosal regardless of its size and shape, is its excellent prognosis; 5 year survival rate after operation in early stomach carcinoma amounts to 93 percent in comparison with around 25 percent in advanced carcinoma, and so the detection of this early stomach carcinoma is most important subject to minimize the mortality from stomach carcinoma at the present time. For the diagnosis of the early stomach carcinoma the radiographic study, cytology and gastroscopic examination are practised, and of those the radiographic study has been revealed commonly best results, but by usual method of upper G-I study it is often difficult to diagnose accurately. Therefore, we have been employed the barium and air double contrast method by insertion of the gastric tube. This method is simple and by this method, the adequate amount of air may introduced into the stomach for the best visualization of the mucosal pattern and gastric juice may also aspirated in a case of which the stomach wall could not be coated by barium because of excessive gastric juice. Summary of the results of this studies of early carcinoma detection at the department of radiology, Severance Hospital during 6 months since May 1969 are as followings; of 1407 cases taken upper G-I study with double contrast method, 17 cases were diagnosed as possible early stomach carcinoma radiographically, and then only 6 cases had surgical resection of stomach. Of these 2 cases were confirmed pathologically and one was considered as precancerots lesion.

  10. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    For stomach (gastric) cancer, there is no standard or routine screening test for the general U.S. population. Review the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for gastric cancer using barium-meal photofluorography, gastric endoscopy, or serum pepsinogen in this expert-reviewed summary.

  11. Proliferative activity of stomach cancer and assessment of individual radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chissov, V.I.; Sergeeva, N.S.; Dar'yalova, S.L.; Petrov, A.N.; Repina, A.G.; Belous, T.A.; Pelevina, I.I.

    1991-01-01

    An indirect immunofluorescent method with polyclonal antibodies to thymidine was used to assess the proliferative activity (PA-percent of cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle) of 79 stomach tumors from primary cancer patients. Stomach cancer PA was shown to vary from 0.1 to 69.7%. Stomach cancer PA did not depend either on a tumor size or a degree of the involvement of regional lymph nodes. The mean PA of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma was slightly lower (14.9±4.7%) than that of low differentiated ones. Of 79 patients a tumor process was interpreted as a resectable one in 62. They were given preoperative irradiation at a total focal dose of 36 Gy followed by operation. It was shown that tumor radioresistance could be predicted in unchanged PA indices of their increase at the beginning of a course of irradiation with the probability of 95%

  12. Stomach cancer screening in the adult health study population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mitoshi; Yamakido, Michio; Otake, Masanori; Belsky, J.L.; Pastore, J.O.

    1978-04-01

    Examinations for parietal cell antibody (PCA) were performed on 1334 subjects of the Adult Health Study (AHS), Hiroshima, during a 1-year period. Findings revealed PCA in 112 subjects (8.4%), but no difference in frequency was noted by sex. The relationship of PCA to age showed the positive rate to be significantly higher in those age 50 or over than in those under 50. No correlation was noted between estimated A-bomb exposure dose and PCA frequency. PCA was found in 58 (11.6%) of the 502 cases presenting achlorhydria on tubeless gastric analysis, and particularly in the age 50 and over group, PCA was demonstrated in 43 (14.2%) of the 302 subjects presenting achlorhydria, which is a significant difference compared with the under 50 age group in which PCA was demonstrated in 15 (7.5%) of 200 such subjects. PCA was detected in 11 (7.2%) of 152 subjects with abnormal, or low, serum pepsinogen levels and in 20 (16.3%) of 123 subjects with high levels. The frequency of positive PCA was higher in patients diagnosed on upper gastrointestinal (GI) series as atrophic gastritis than in patients diagnosed as some other gastric disorder. PCA was negative in both of the two cases in whom a definite diagnosis of stomach cancer was established. However, in light of the finding of abnormal Diagnex Blue (DB) tests and positive PCA at a high frequency in the gastritis group and reports that gastritis provides the groundwork for stomach cancer, it is considered that care should be taken in cases with findings of abnormal DB test, abnormal serum pepsinogen levels, and positive PCA. (author)

  13. The Synchronous Prevalence of Colorectal Neoplasms in Patients with Stomach Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Su; Jung, Woon Tae; Kim, Cha Young; Ha, Chang Yoon; Min, Hyun Ju; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae Hyo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The association between stomach cancer and colorectal cancer is controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the synchronous prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in patients with stomach cancer. Methods A total of 123 patients with stomach cancer (86 male) and 246 consecutive, age- and sex-matched persons without stomach cancer were analyzed from July 2005 to June 2010. All of them underwent colonoscopy within 6 months after undergoing gastroscopy. Results The prevalence of...

  14. Pembrolizumab Secures FDA Approval in Stomach Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer,” said the lead investigator of Keynote-059, Charles Fuchs, M.D., M.P.H., director of ... on Biomarkers, Combinations Drugs that target PD-L1 “will clearly have a role in advanced gastric cancer,” ...

  15. Stomach cancer burden in Central and South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Monica S; Cueva, Patricia; Bravo, Luis Eduardo; Forman, David

    2016-09-01

    Stomach cancer mortality rates in Central and South America (CSA) are among the highest in the world. We describe the current burden of stomach cancer in CSA. We obtained regional and national-level cancer incidence data from 48 population-based registries (13 countries) and nation-wide cancer deaths from WHO's mortality database (18 countries). We estimated world population age-standardized incidence (ASR) and mortality (ASMR) rates per 100,000 and estimated annual percent change to describe time trends. Stomach cancer was among the 5 most frequently diagnosed cancers and a leading cause of cancer mortality. Between CSA countries, incidence varied by 6-fold and mortality by 5-6-fold. Males had up to 3-times higher rates than females. From 2003 to 2007, the highest ASRs were in Chile, Costa Rica, Colombia, Ecuador, Brazil and Peru (males: 19.2-29.1, females: 9.7-15.1). The highest ASMRs were in Chilean, Costa Rican, Colombian and Guatemalan males (17.4-24.6) and in Guatemalan, Ecuadorian and Peruvian females (10.5-17.1). From 1997 to 2008, incidence declined by 4% per year in Brazil, Chile and Costa Rica; mortality declined by 3-4% in Costa Rica and Chile. 60-96% of all the cancer cases were unspecified in relation to gastric sub-site but, among those specified, non-cardia cancers occurred 2-13-times more frequently than cardia cancers. The variation in rates may reflect differences in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and other risk factors. High mortality may additionally reflect deficiencies in healthcare access. The high proportion of unspecified cases calls for improving cancer registration processes. Copyright © 2015 International Agency for Research on Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Nutrition deficiency increases the risk of stomach cancer mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Li Qing

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the study is to determine whether exposure to malnutrition during early life is associated with increased risk of stomach cancer in later life. Methods The design protocol included analyzing the trend of gastric cancer mortality and nutrition and evaluating the association between nutrient deficiency in early life and the risk of gastric cancer by hierarchical age–period–birth cohort (APC analysis using general log-linear Poisson models and to compare the difference between birth cohorts who were exposed to the 1959–1961 Chinese famine and those who were not exposed to the famine. Data on stomach cancer mortality from 1970 to 2009 and the dietary patterns from 1955 to 1985 which included the 1959–1961 Chinese famine period in the Zhaoyuan County population were obtained. The nutrition information was collected 15 years prior to the mortality data as based on the latest reference of disease incubation. Results APC analysis revealed that severe nutrition deficiency during early life may increase the risk of stomach cancer. Compared with the 1960–1964 birth cohort, the risk for stomach cancer in all birth cohorts from 1900 to 1959 significantly increased; compared with the 1970–1974 cohort, the risk for stomach cancer in the 1975–1979 cohort significantly increased, whereas the others had a steadily decreased risk; compared with 85–89 age group in the 2005–2009 death survey, the ORs decreased with younger age and reached significant levels for the 50–54 age group after adjusting the confounding factors. The 1930 to 1964 group (exposed to famine had a higher mortality rate than the 1965 to 1999 group (not exposed to famine. For males, the relative risk (RR was 2.39 and the 95% confidence interval (CI was 1.51 to 3.77. For females, RR was 1.64 and 95% CI was 1.02 to 2.62. Conclusion The results of the present study suggested that prolonged malnutrition during early life may increase the risk of

  17. Metaplasia in the Stomach-Precursor of Gastric Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hiroto; Hayakawa, Yoku; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-09-27

    Despite a significant decrease in the incidence of gastric cancer in Western countries over the past century, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Most human gastric cancers develop after long-term Helicobacter pylori infection via the Correa pathway: the progression is from gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, to cancer. However, it remains unclear whether metaplasia is a direct precursor of gastric cancer or merely a marker of high cancer risk. Here, we review human studies on the relationship between metaplasia and cancer in the stomach, data from mouse models of metaplasia regarding the mechanism of metaplasia development, and the cellular responses induced by H. pylori infection.

  18. Microfluidic optoelectronic sensor for salivary diagnostics of stomach cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, Yael; Sonkusale, Sameer R

    2015-05-15

    We present a microfluidic optoelectronic sensor for saliva diagnostics with a potential application for non-invasive early diagnosis of stomach cancer. Stomach cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. The primary identified cause is infection by a gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori. These bacteria secrete the enzyme urease that converts urea into carbon dioxide (CO2) and ammonia (NH3), leading to their elevated levels in breath and body fluids. The proposed optoelectronic sensor will detect clinically relevant levels of CO2 and NH3 in saliva that can potentially be used for early diagnosis of stomach cancer. The sensor is composed of the embedded in a microfluidic device array of microwells filled with ion-exchange polymer microbeads doped with various organic dyes. The optical response of this unique highly diverse sensor is monitored over a broad spectrum, which provides a platform for cross-reactive sensitivity and allows detection of CO2 and NH3 in saliva at ppm levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Diagnostic significance of gas distension technique of the stomach with gas-forming agent on CT scan of stomach cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Tae Jin; Song, Chang June; Choi, Joong Chan; Park, Cheong Hee; Cho, June Sik; Rhee, Byung Chull

    1988-01-01

    CT is a valuable method for preoperative staging of patients with stomach cancers. However, in patients with poor distension of the stomach and scanty fat between the stomach and adjacent organs, CT findings may indicate a false impression of gastric wall thickening and cannot provide the precise extent of stomach cancer. We studied the usefulness of gastric distension by gas-forming agent in 28 cases of pathologically confirmed gastric cancers on CT. Comparative analysis between CT findings and surgical pathologic findings was done in 22 cases who underwent surgery. The results were as follows; 1. Conventional CT failed to define the wall thickening or masses of the stomach, in 14 cases of 23 advanced gastric cancers, while CT with gas distension technique allowed good visualization in all advanced gastric cancers. 2. In 2 cases of 5 early gastric cancers, CT with gas distension technique could detect focal thickening of the gastric wall, even less than 1cm thickness. 3. Among 13 cases with indistinguishable border between stomach and liver on conventional CT, 7 cases were diagnosed as negative invasion on CT with gas distension technique and 5 cases of these were confirmed by surgery. 4. Among 11 cases with indistinguishable border between stomach and pancreas on conventional CT, 3 cases were diagnosed as negative invasion on CT with gas distension technique, all of which were confirmed by surgery. 5. There was no significant difference between conventional CT and CT with gas distension technique of the stomach to diagnose invasion into transverse colon, transverse colon, transverse mesocolon, lymph node metastasis, and various distant metastasis.

  20. Diagnostic significance of gas distension technique of the stomach with gas-forming agent on CT scan of stomach cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rho, Tae Jin; Song, Chang June; Choi, Joong Chan; Park, Cheong Hee; Cho, June Sik; Rhee, Byung Chull [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Dajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-10-15

    CT is a valuable method for preoperative staging of patients with stomach cancers. However, in patients with poor distension of the stomach and scanty fat between the stomach and adjacent organs, CT findings may indicate a false impression of gastric wall thickening and cannot provide the precise extent of stomach cancer. We studied the usefulness of gastric distension by gas-forming agent in 28 cases of pathologically confirmed gastric cancers on CT. Comparative analysis between CT findings and surgical pathologic findings was done in 22 cases who underwent surgery. The results were as follows; 1. Conventional CT failed to define the wall thickening or masses of the stomach, in 14 cases of 23 advanced gastric cancers, while CT with gas distension technique allowed good visualization in all advanced gastric cancers. 2. In 2 cases of 5 early gastric cancers, CT with gas distension technique could detect focal thickening of the gastric wall, even less than 1cm thickness. 3. Among 13 cases with indistinguishable border between stomach and liver on conventional CT, 7 cases were diagnosed as negative invasion on CT with gas distension technique and 5 cases of these were confirmed by surgery. 4. Among 11 cases with indistinguishable border between stomach and pancreas on conventional CT, 3 cases were diagnosed as negative invasion on CT with gas distension technique, all of which were confirmed by surgery. 5. There was no significant difference between conventional CT and CT with gas distension technique of the stomach to diagnose invasion into transverse colon, transverse colon, transverse mesocolon, lymph node metastasis, and various distant metastasis.

  1. Radiation Dose and Subsequent Risk for Stomach Cancer in Long-term Survivors of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A., E-mail: kleinerr@mail.nih.gov [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Holowaty, Eric [Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hall, Per [Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Pukkala, Eero [Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Helsinki (Finland); Vaalavirta, Leila [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gilbert, Ethel [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Aleman, Berthe M.P. [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kaijser, Magnus [Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Andersson, Michael [Department of Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Storm, Hans [Cancer Prevention and Documentation, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen (Denmark); Joensuu, Heikki [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Lynch, Charles F. [Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the dose–response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested, matched case–control study of 201 cases and 378 controls among 53,547 5-year survivors of cervical cancer diagnosed from 1943 to 1995, from 5 international, population-based cancer registries. We estimated individual radiation doses to the site of the stomach cancer for all cases and to corresponding sites for the matched controls (overall mean stomach tumor dose, 2.56 Gy, range 0.03-46.1 and after parallel opposed pelvic fields, 1.63 Gy, range 0.12-6.3). Results: More than 90% of women received radiation therapy, mostly with external beam therapy in combination with brachytherapy. Stomach cancer risk was nonsignificantly increased (odds ratio 1.27-2.28) for women receiving between 0.5 and 4.9 Gy to the stomach cancer site and significantly increased at doses ≥5 Gy (odds ratio 4.20, 95% confidence interval 1.41-13.4, P{sub trend}=.047) compared with nonirradiated women. A highly significant radiation dose–response relationship was evident when analyses were restricted to the 131 cases (251 controls) whose stomach cancer was located in the middle and lower portions of the stomach (P{sub trend}=.003), whereas there was no indication of increasing risk with increasing dose for 30 cases (57 controls) whose cancer was located in the upper stomach (P{sub trend}=.23). Conclusions: Our findings show for the first time a significant linear dose–response relationship for risk of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer.

  2. Radiation Dose and Subsequent Risk for Stomach Cancer in Long-term Survivors of Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Smith, Susan A.; Holowaty, Eric; Hall, Per; Pukkala, Eero; Vaalavirta, Leila; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita; Gilbert, Ethel; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Kaijser, Magnus; Andersson, Michael; Storm, Hans; Joensuu, Heikki; Lynch, Charles F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the dose–response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested, matched case–control study of 201 cases and 378 controls among 53,547 5-year survivors of cervical cancer diagnosed from 1943 to 1995, from 5 international, population-based cancer registries. We estimated individual radiation doses to the site of the stomach cancer for all cases and to corresponding sites for the matched controls (overall mean stomach tumor dose, 2.56 Gy, range 0.03-46.1 and after parallel opposed pelvic fields, 1.63 Gy, range 0.12-6.3). Results: More than 90% of women received radiation therapy, mostly with external beam therapy in combination with brachytherapy. Stomach cancer risk was nonsignificantly increased (odds ratio 1.27-2.28) for women receiving between 0.5 and 4.9 Gy to the stomach cancer site and significantly increased at doses ≥5 Gy (odds ratio 4.20, 95% confidence interval 1.41-13.4, P trend =.047) compared with nonirradiated women. A highly significant radiation dose–response relationship was evident when analyses were restricted to the 131 cases (251 controls) whose stomach cancer was located in the middle and lower portions of the stomach (P trend =.003), whereas there was no indication of increasing risk with increasing dose for 30 cases (57 controls) whose cancer was located in the upper stomach (P trend =.23). Conclusions: Our findings show for the first time a significant linear dose–response relationship for risk of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer

  3. Breast cancer metastasizing to the stomach mimicking primary gastric cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Kwangil; Ro, Sang Mi; Lee, Jieun

    2017-03-28

    Breast cancer with stomach metastasis rare with an incidence of 1% or less among metastatic breast cancer patients. We experienced a case of breast cancer metastasizing to the stomach in 65-year-old female patient. She experienced dyspepsia and poor oral intake before visiting the clinic. Diffuse infiltration with nodular mucosal thickening of the stomach wall was observed, suggesting advanced gastric cancer based on gross endoscopic finding. Spread of poorly cohesive tumor cells in the gastric mucosa observed upon hematoxylin and eosin stain resembled signet ring cell carcinoma, but diffuse positive staining for GATA3 in immunohistochemical stain allowed for a conclusive diagnosis of breast cancer metastasizing to the stomach. Based on the final diagnosis, systemic chemotherapy was administered instead of primary surgical resection. After 2 cycles of docetaxel administration, she showed a partial response based on abdominal computed tomography scan. This case is an unusual presentation of breast cancer metastasizing to the gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Stem cells and cancer of the stomach and intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vries, Robert G J; Huch, Meritxell; Clevers, Hans

    2010-10-01

    Cancer in the 21st century has become the number one cause of death in developed countries. Although much progress has been made in improving patient survival, tumour relapse is one of the important causes of cancer treatment failure. An early observation in the study of cancer was the heterogeneity of tumours. Traditionally, this was explained by a combination of genomic instability of tumours and micro environmental factors leading to diverse phenotypical characteristics. It was assumed that cells in a tumour have an equal capacity to propagate the cancer. This model is currently known as the stochastic model. Recently, the Cancer stem cell model has been proposed to explain the heterogeneity of a tumour and its progression. According to this model, the heterogeneity of tumours is the result of aberrant differentiation of tumour cells into the cells of the tissue the tumour originated from. Tumours were suggested to contain stem cell-like cells, the cancer stem cells or tumour-initiating cells, which are uniquely capable of propagating a tumour much like normal stem cells fuel proliferation and differentiation in normal tissue. In this review we discuss the normal stem cell biology of the stomach and intestine followed by both the stochastic and cancer stem cell models in light of recent findings in the gastric and intestinal systems. The molecular pathways underlying normal and tumourigenic growth have been well studied, and recently the stem cells of the stomach and intestine have been identified. Furthermore, intestinal stem cells were identified as the cells-of-origin of colon cancer upon loss of the tumour suppressor APC. Lastly, several studies have proposed the positive identification of a cancer stem cell of human colon cancer. At the end we compare the cancer stem cell model and the stochastic model. We conclude that clonal evolution of tumour cells resulting from genetic mutations underlies tumour initiation and progression in both cancer models. This

  5. Intervening factors for the initiation of treatment of patients with stomach and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaína Dalla Valle

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to identify the time between symptoms, the request for care and the beginning of treatment in patients with stomach and colorectal cancer as well as the factors that interfere in these processes. Method: correlational descriptive study, including 101 patients diagnosed with stomach or colorectal cancer, treated in a hospital specialized in oncology. Results: the 101 patients investigated there was predominance of males, mean age of 61.7 years. The search for medical care occurred within 30 days after the onset of symptoms, in most cases. The mean total time between the onset of symptoms and the beginning of treatment ranged from 15 to 16 months, and the mean time between the search for medical care and the diagnosis was 4.78 months. The family history of cancer (p=0.008 and the implementation of preventive follow-up (p<0.001 were associated with shorter periods between the search for care and the beginning of treatment. Nausea, vomiting, hematochezia, weight loss and pain were associated with faster demand for care. Conclusion: the longer interval between the search for medical care and the diagnosis was possibly due to the non-association between the presented symptoms and the disease.

  6. The Synchronous Prevalence of Colorectal Neoplasms in Patients with Stomach Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Su; Kim, Cha Young; Ha, Chang Yoon; Min, Hyun Ju; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae Hyo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The association between stomach cancer and colorectal cancer is controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the synchronous prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in patients with stomach cancer. Methods A total of 123 patients with stomach cancer (86 male) and 246 consecutive, age- and sex-matched persons without stomach cancer were analyzed from July 2005 to June 2010. All of them underwent colonoscopy within 6 months after undergoing gastroscopy. Results The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was significantly higher in the stomach cancer group (35.8%) than in the control group (17.9%) (P neoplasms were more prevalent in the patients with stomach cancer (odds ratio [OR], 3.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71 to 5.63). In particular, the difference in the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was more prominent in the patients above 50 years old (OR, 3.54; 95% CI, 1.80 to 6.98). Conclusion The results showed that the synchronous prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was higher in patients with stomach cancer than in those without stomach cancer. Therefore, patients with stomach cancer should be regarded as a high-risk group for colorectal neoplasms, and colonoscopy should be recommended for screening. PMID:22102975

  7. Does stomach have mesentery? Learning from gastric cancer surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Objective:This study will first confirm the existence of mesogastrium (gastric mesentery) and then examine its architecture and suggest improvements in the surgical methods for excision of gastric cancer.Methods:By employing video laparoscopy, a number of proximal segments of dorsal mesogastrium were found being extensively scattered around the pancreas. In this study, these segments were histologically analyzed and studied.Results:The structure of the mesogastrium was identiifed intraoperatively and then conifrmed both grossly and histologically atfer the operation. Conclusion:This study suggests for the first time a “Table Model” to describe the relationship between the stomach and gastric mesenteries.

  8. Study on effectiveness and tolerance of pre-and postoperative radiochemotherapy for patients with stomach cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wydmanski, J.

    2008-01-01

    Postoperative radiochemotherapy was included to the therapeutic scheme of stomach cancer. The effectiveness and tolerance of pre- and postoperative radiochemotherapy were studied. A Range Scale Risk reflecting the risk of treatment failure , selecting patients with bad prognosis to intensive therapy was established on the base of identified predictive and prognostic factors. 426 patients with stomach cancer were undergone radiochemotherapy between 1999 and 2005. The therapeutic schemes with operation followed by adjuvant radiochemotherapy or pre-and postoperative radiochemotherapy were arranged.The overall survival was better in the second group. Body weight loss, age and performance status of patients, location of tumor, cancer stage evaluation, resected lymph nodes, operation radicality were identified as the independent prognostic factors. In conclusions, combined modality approaches in treatment of stomach cancer were shown as more effective than surgery alone. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be more effective than postoperative one. Postoperative radiochemotherapy started and completed within 5 weeks positively influenced all prognostic factors. 5-year overall survival rate was 66% and risk of local recurrence less than 15%. 4 prognostics groups of patients selected in 10 points scale of range scale risk by careful evaluation using hazard model were established and detailed results have been presented. (author)

  9. Platinum derivatives in chemoradiotherapy of patients with cancer of esophagus and stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monakhov, B.V.; Chichka, N.A.; Fedina, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Investigation into the testing of a complex platinum compound-platidiam as part of chemoradiotherapy in 101 patients suffering from cancer of esophagus and stomach is conducted. Schemes of combined chemoradio treatment and evaluation of results of treatment of patients suffering from esophagus and stomach cancer are presented. Side effects under the treatment realized are studied. Advisability of platidiam inclusion into the complex programs of chemoradiotherapy of spread form of esophagus and stomach cancer is demonstrated

  10. Methods of Molecular Biology in Predictive Diagnostics of Her/neu in Stomach Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Důra, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Stomach cancer is a malignant neoplastic disease, which is caused by malignant transformation of the gastric mucosal epithelium. Elderly patients are more frequently affected, the majority of the patients are males. Stomach cancer has some typical features like minor symptomatology and early metastasis founding. Nowadays, a mild decrease of incidence is registered. Treatment of stomach cancer depends on its location and stage. Because of its relative chemo- and radioresistance, surgical resec...

  11. Incidence of Cancers of the Lower Stomach Increasing among Younger Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News & Events Cancer Currents Blog Cancer Currents Blog Incidence of Cancers of the Lower Stomach Increasing among ... younger individuals, she added. Risk Factors and Shifting Incidence Rates Two of the main causes of noncardia ...

  12. A comparative study on radiological and endoscopic examinations of the stomach cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Sook; Lee, Yong Chul; Kim, Han Suk [National Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-12-15

    An analysis was done for the diagnostic accuracy of radiological and endoscopic examinations in 132 cases of the histologically proved stomach cancer at the national Medical Center from Jan. 1975 to Jan. 1979. The problem in radiological misdiagnosis was especially discussed aimed to improve the further diagnostic accuracy. The following results were obtained: 1. The incidence of the stomach cancer was higher in male than that of female, and was most prevalent in 5th and 6th decades. 2. The misdiagnosis rate of radiological examination of the stomach cancer was 13.5% (18 cases), that of endoscopic examination was 8.3% (11 cases) and that of both examination was 4.6% (6 cases). 3. In most cases of misdiagnosis, the majority were diagnosed as benign gastric ulcer. 4. The causative factors of misdiagnosis in radiological examination were interpretation error in 8 cases and technically poor, unsatisfactory study in 10 cases. 5. In order to decrease the misdiagnosis rate, standardization of radiological examination and careful interpretation are necessary. 6. Complementary examinations of radiology and endoscopy can decrease the misdiagnosis rate.

  13. Nursing practice with the patient before complete removal of the stomach from cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Medak

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastric cancer (RZ is the second leading cause of cancer in the world leading to death. Although each year the incidence of RZ is lower, it is still one of the highest in the group of most common malignancies. Due to the fact that cancer patients have similar symptoms to other gastrointestinal diseases, it is often detected at an advanced stage. This cancer can be located in different parts of the stomach and often has an unusual course. Surgical treatment of patients with RZ is most often associated with complete gastric excision and causes numerous ailments. Correct preparation of patients for surgery has a significant impact on therapeutic success. A nurse who carries a cancer patient is not only concerned with assessing his / her current state of health, executing medical orders, education on post-hospital leave, but also providing emotional support before surgery. [1,2,3,16]. Aim of the study: Evaluation of patient treatment before complete removal of the stomach from cancer. Material and method: The study was conducted in the period from 17.09.2012 to 15.05.2013 in the group of 60 patients (35 men and 25 women of the II Department and Clinic of General Surgery, Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Cancer of the Independent Public Clinical Hospital No. 1 in Lublin. Patients have been qualified for total abdominal surgery for cancer. The research tool was the author's questionnaire survey. The results of the study were statistically analyzed. Results: According to data obtained, more than half (60% of patients presenting with gastric resection at the Clinic of General Surgery, Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Diseases of the Independent Public Clinical Hospital No. 1 in Lublin have a high level of care in this department. There was no case for the patient to underestimate nursing care. Conclusions: The majority of patients rated nursing care performed prior to surgery at a high level.

  14. A prospective cohort study on vegetable and fruit consumption and stomach cancer risk in the netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botterweck, A.A.M.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goldbohm, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    The association between vegetable and fruit consumption and stomach cancer risk was investigated in the Netherlands Cohort Study among 120,852 men and women aged 55-69 years at the start in September 1986. Analyses were based on 282 incident stomach cancer cases after 6.3 years of follow-up. Age-

  15. Ultrasonic diagnosis of hepatic metastases in patients with stomach cancer and colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kye, Jong Sik; Lim, Jae Hoon; Ko, Young Tae; Ahn, Chi Yul

    1987-01-01

    To assess the value of hepatic ultrasound in cancer patients, a prospective evaluation was performed by comparing the preoperative ultrasound report and surgeon's diagnosis at the time of operation in 86 patients with stomach cancer and 26 patients with colon cancer. In a total of 112 patients considered to have a metastasis free liver on ultrasound scanning 10 patients were turned out to have had hepatic metastasis at the time of laparotomy. Among these, 4 patients had miliary metastasis, 4 patients had nodular metastasis at the dome of the right hepatic lobe, and 2 patients had surface metastasis or direct invasion from the primary tumor. These observations suggest that false negative preoperative hepatic ultrasound scanning is 9% had this is considered due to small size of the metastatic lesions, and lesions roundabout the dome of the right hepatic lobe or surface metastasis. Thus one should keep in mind the possibility of miliary metastasis in cancer patient was has coarse hepatic echotexture. In addition, the hepatic dome as well as hepatic surfaces should be searched carefully as the lesions in these areas tend to be easily neglected by ultrasound

  16. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) dynamics in stomach cancer patients receiving cryotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myasoedov, D.V.; Krupka, I.N.; V'yunitskaya, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    Radioimmunologic assays of blood serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level were conducted at major stages of treatment of gastric cancer by subtotal stomach resection and gastrectomy with preliminary cryotreatment and thawing of tumor. A short-term rise in CEA level occurred in 53.9 % of cases 3-4 days after combined therapy. A decrease in CEA concentration at discharge from hospital as compared with preoperative level and that registered 3-4 days after operation was observed in 50 and 75 % of cases of combined therapy, respectively, and 47.5 and 37.5 % of controls (surgery without cryotreatment). There was nocorrelation between cryotreatment and changes in CEA level in gastric ulcer patients

  17. Stomach cancer incidence rates among Americans, Asian Americans and Native Asians from 1988 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeerae Kim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Stomach cancer is the second most common cancer in Eastern Asia, accounting for approximately 50% of all new cases of stomach cancer worldwide. Our objective was to compare the stomach cancer incidence rates of Asian Americans in Los Angeles with those of native Asians to assess the etiology of stomach cancer from 1988 to 2011. To examine these differences, Asian Americans (Korean, Japanese, Chinese, and Filipino Americans living in Los Angeles, California, USA and native Asians (from Korea, Japan, China, and the Philippines were selected for this study. Using the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents database, stomach cancer incidence rates were examined. Data from the National Cancer Registry of Korea were used for native Koreans. Between native countries, the incidence rates in Japan, China, the Philippines, and the US declined over time, but the incidence in Korea has remained constant. The incidences among Asian immigrants were lower than those among native Asians. The incidence rates of males were approximately 2 times higher than those among females in Asian countries were. The effect of immigration on stomach cancer incidence suggests that lifestyle factors are a significant determinant of stomach cancer risk. However, the incidence in Korea remains the highest of these countries

  18. Breast and stomach cancer incidence and survival in migrants in the Netherlands, 1996-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, Melina; Aarts, Mieke Josepha; Siesling, Sabine; van der Aa, Maaike; Visser, Otto; Coebergh, Jan Willem

    2011-01-01

    Migrant populations experience a health transition that influences their cancer risk, determined by environmental changes and acculturation processes. In this retrospective cohort study, we investigated differences in breast and stomach cancer risk and survival in migrants to the Netherlands.

  19. Implications of Helicobacter pylori infection for stomach cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman Karen J.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has implicated Helicobacter pylori, an established cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer, in the etiology of gastric cancer. Control of this infection would reduce the occurrence of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer and might substantially lower the risk of stomach cancer as well. The public health impact of this infectious agent warrants efforts to identify preventive measures. This paper reviews the evidence linking H. pylori infection to gastric cancer and evaluates the potential for control in high-risk populations. Current obstacles to H. pylori control are discussed, including the link to poor socioeconomic conditions, difficulty in identifying incident cases, lack of natural immunity to reinfection, limited effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in high-prevalence populations, and incomplete knowledge regarding the reservoir of infection, mode of transmission, host susceptibility factors, and the potential for developing an effective vaccine. Worthwhile avenues of research include studies designed to identify modifiable risk factors for acquisition of the infection, modifiable host factors that may increase resistance to chronic infection, more effective antibiotic therapies, and effective vaccines.

  20. Localized amyloidosis of the stomach mimicking a superficial gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Miwako; Fujino, Yasuteru; Muguruma, Naoki; Murayama, Noriaki; Okamoto, Koichi; Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Kishi, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Uehara, Hisanori; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2016-06-01

    A 73-year-old man was referred to our hospital for further examination of a depressed lesion in the stomach found by cancer screening gastroscopy. A barium upper gastrointestinal series showed an area of irregular mucosa measuring 15 mm on the anterior wall of the gastric body. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a 15 mm depressed lesion on the anterior wall of the lower gastric body. We suspected an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma from the appearance and took some biopsies. However, histology of the specimens revealed amyloidal deposits in the submucosal layer without malignant findings. Congo red staining was positive for amyloidal protein and green birefringence was observed under polarized light microscopy. Congo red staining with prior potassium permanganate incubation confirmed the light chain (AL) amyloid type. There were no amyloid deposits in the colon or duodenum. Computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no remarkable findings. Thus, this case was diagnosed as a localized gastric amyloidosis characterized by AL type amyloid deposition in the mucosal or submucosal layer. As the clinical outcome of gastric AL amyloidosis seems favorable, this case is scheduled for periodic examination to recognize potential disease progression and has been stable for 2 years.

  1. Serum ferritin and stomach cancer risk among A-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Suminori; Neriishi, Kazuo; Blot, W.J.; Kabuto, Michinori; Stevens, R.G.; Kato, Hiroo; Land, C.E.

    1990-02-01

    Using stored serum samples collected from 1970-72 and/or from 1977-79, serum ferritin, transferrin, and ceruloplasmin levels were immunologically determined for 233 stomach cancer and 84 lung cancer cases diagnosed from 1973-83 and for 385 matched controls from a fixed population of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. Elevated stomach cancer risk was associated with low serum ferritin levels, with more than a threefold excess among those in the lowest quintile as compared to the highest ferritin quintile. The average serum ferritin concentration was 8% lower in the stomach cancer cases than in the controls. Risk did not vary with the time between blood collection and stomach cancer onset, remaining high among those with low ferritin levels five or more years before cancer diagnosis. Low ferritin combined with achlorhydria, diagnosed about 10 years before the blood collection and up to 25 years before cancer diagnosis, was an exceptionally strong marker of increased stomach cancer risk. No effect of transferrin or ceruloplasmin independent of ferritin was observed on gastric cancer risk. Lung cancer risk was not related to these three serum proteins. (author)

  2. Compined preoperative diagnosis of stomach cancer involvement of the abdominal and retroperitoneal organs and tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, M.E.; Gabuniya, R.I.; Kolesnikova, E.K.; Bal'ter, S.A.; Ostrovtsev, I.V.; Dolgushin, B.I.; Mazurov, S.T.; Mironova, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of 136 cases of stomach cancer led to the determination of the role and place of gammatopography, echography, computerized X-ray tomography, angiography and laparoscopy in specified preoperative diagnosis of extraorganic spreading of primary tumors. The informative value and shortcomings of certain methods were shown. A high accuracy of the entire set of diagnostic procedures (94.8%) in the preoperative definition of stomach cancer involvement of the abdominal and retroperitoneal organs and tissues was emphasized

  3. [FTIR study on the normal and cancerous stomach tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Y; Lin, Y

    2001-06-01

    Tissues of cancerous and corresponding normal stomach were studied by FTIR technique. The results showed that there are obvious differences between FTIR spectra of them in spectral parameters such as frequency, intensity and band shape etc. The changes involving the phosphate symmetric stretching nu s, PO2- and asymmetric stretching nu as, PO2- modes, the CH3 and CH2 groups stretching (nu s, CH2, nu as, CH3) and bending (delta CH2) modes and the C-O stretching nu C-O mode were discussed. In addition, the changes of structure of hydrogen-bonding of nucleic acid and cell proteins and the packing and the conformational structure of the membrance lipids were analysed further. The average wavenumber of band of nu s, PO2- shifted from 1,080.92 cm-1 to 1,085.93 cm-1 and that of nu as, PO2- shifted from 1,239.64 cm-1 to 1,238.73 cm-1 which indicated that the degree of hydrogen-bonding formed by oxygen atom of the phosphodiester groups of nucleic acids was increased. The average wavenumber of band of delta CH2 of membrance lipids shifted from 1,455.23 cm-1 to 1,457.37 cm-1 that suggested that the conformational structure of the methylene chains of membrance lipids is more disordered than in normal tissues. The shift of band of nu C-O of cell proteins from 1,166.08 cm-1 to 1,166.58 cm-1 indicated that the hydrogen-bond of cell proteins become weaker.

  4. ROLES OF RADIATION DOSE AND CHEMOTHERAPY IN THE ETIOLOGY OF STOMACH CANCER AS A SECOND MALIGNANCY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W.; Aleman, Berthe M. P.; Besseling, Gijs; de Bruin, Marie L.; Hauptmann, Michael; van 't Veer, Mars B.; de Wit, Ronald; Ribot, Jacques G.; Noordijk, Evert M.; Kerst, J. Martijn; Gietema, Jourik A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the roles of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and other factors in the etiology of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of testicular cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cohort study in 5,142 survivors of testicular cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma treated

  5. Reevaluation of benefit and risk of mass screening for stomach cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, Takeshi; Tateno, Yukio

    1990-01-01

    Mass screening for stomach cancer has been performed widely because of the the most prevalent malignancy in Japan. Since X-ray diagnosis is used in stomach cancer screening, the risk of X-ray exposure must be considered by comparing the benefit of mass screening. We have reported in the previous article in 1977 that the benefit and risk of stomach cancer mass screening become equal at the age of 40 yr. Since then, various conditions of the mass screening for stomach cancer have changed so that reevaluation of the benefit and risk relationship is necessary. The risk coefficient of radiation-induced stomach cancer has been revised drastically in the report of United Nations Scientific Committee on the effects of radiation in 1988. In this report, the benefit of mass screening of stomach cancer is defined as the net elongation of average life expectancy due to the life saved, and the risk of the screening is defined as the net shortage of average life expectancy due to the radiation-induced stomach cancer and leukemia. Since the benefit increases rapidly and the risk decreases with age, an appropriate age when the benefit and risk become identical is required, and under this age the mass screening is not justified to be performed. Assuming X-ray dose equivalent to stomach of 10 mSv and risk coefficient of stomach cancer of 12.6x10 -3 Sv -1 from the United Nations report, the critical age is found to be about 35 yr. for men and women. It is strongly recommended that the dose equivalent should be lowered less than 5 mSv. In a calculation of the risk of endoscopic examination in mass screening using reported figures of fatal accident (1.6x10 -5 ) and severe injury (48x10 -5 ) of the stomach endoscopic examination, the critical ages are found to be 40 yr for men and 45 yr for women which are higher than those with X-rays. A screening test using stomach endoscopy cannot be accepted. (J.P.N.)

  6. The burden of stomach cancer in indigenous populations: a systematic review and global assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Melina; Moore, Suzanne P; Hassler, Sven; Ellison-Loschmann, Lis; Forman, David; Bray, Freddie

    2014-01-01

    Stomach cancer is a leading cause of cancer death, especially in developing countries. Incidence has been associated with poverty and is also reported to disproportionately affect indigenous peoples, many of whom live in poor socioeconomic circumstances and experience lower standards of health. In this comprehensive assessment, we explore the burden of stomach cancer among indigenous peoples globally. The literature was searched systematically for studies on stomach cancer incidence, mortality and survival in indigenous populations, including Indigenous Australians, Maori in New Zealand, indigenous peoples from the circumpolar region, native Americans and Alaska natives in the USA, and the Mapuche peoples in Chile. Data from the New Zealand Health Information Service and the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program were used to estimate trends in incidence. Elevated rates of stomach cancer incidence and mortality were found in almost all indigenous peoples relative to corresponding non-indigenous populations in the same regions or countries. This was particularly evident among Inuit residing in the circumpolar region (standardised incidence ratios (SIR) males: 3.9, females: 3.6) and in Maori (SIR males: 2.2, females: 3.2). Increasing trends in incidence were found for some groups. We found a higher burden of stomach cancer in indigenous populations globally, and rising incidence in some indigenous groups, in stark contrast to the decreasing global trends. This is of major public health concern requiring close surveillance and further research of potential risk factors. Given evidence that improving nutrition and housing sanitation, and Helicobacter pylori eradication programmes could reduce stomach cancer rates, policies which address these initiatives could reduce inequalities in stomach cancer burden for indigenous peoples.

  7. Chromium VI and stomach cancer: a meta-analysis of the current epidemiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welling, Roberta; Beaumont, James J; Petersen, Scott J; Alexeeff, George V; Steinmaus, Craig

    2015-02-01

    Chromium VI (hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI)) is an established cause of lung cancer, but its association with gastrointestinal cancer is less clear. The goal of this study was to examine whether the current human epidemiological research on occupationally inhaled Cr(VI) supports the hypothesis that Cr(VI) is associated with human stomach cancer. Following a thorough literature search and review of individual studies, we used meta-analysis to summarise the current epidemiological literature on inhaled Cr(VI) and stomach cancer, explore major sources of heterogeneity, and assess other elements of causal inference. We identified 56 cohort and case-control studies and 74 individual relative risk (RR) estimates on stomach cancer and Cr(VI) exposure or work in an occupation associated with high Cr(VI) exposure including chromium production, chrome plating, leather work and work with Portland cement. The summary RR for all studies combined was 1.27 (95% CI 1.18 to 1.38). In analyses limited to only those studies identifying increased risks of lung cancer, the summary RR for stomach cancer was higher (RR=1.41, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.69). Overall, these results suggest that Cr(VI) is a stomach carcinogen in humans, which is consistent with the tumour results reported in rodent studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. X-ray echoscopic diagnosis of advanced cancer of the stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serova, T.N.; Smirnova, T.S.

    1990-01-01

    To determine the extent of tumoral process in patients with cancer of the stomach, roentgenoechoscopic methods for examining the stomach is developed. Three main versions of sonographic image of developed cancer of the stomach depending on the anatomical shape of tumors are considered. Possible resolutions of ultrasonic tomography in diagnostics of metastases and germination of cancer of the stomach to different organs and tissues in the abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space are studied. It is established that the method provides to specify the location and echostructure of parenchimatous organs, to determine the number, shape, density and depth of metastases localization. It is shown that it is reasonable to carry out echoscopy of the stomach for all patients at the first stage of examination, when tumors in this organ are suspected. Ultrasonic tomography is recommended as a screening method to determine the extent of the tumoral process for patients with cancer of the stomach. It is noted that ultrasonic tomography is harmless, safe, simple in use and provides much information. 8 refs

  9. Medical expenses of urban Chinese patients with stomach cancer during 2002-2011: a hospital-based multicenter retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Jie; Shi, Ju-Fang; Guo, Lan-Wei; Huang, Hui-Yao; Yao, Neng-Liang; Gong, Ji-Yong; Sun, Ya-Wen; Liu, Guo-Xiang; Mao, A-Yan; Liao, Xian-Zhen; Bai, Ya-Na; Ren, Jian-Song; Zhu, Xin-Yu; Zhou, Jin-Yi; Mai, Ling; Song, Bing-Bing; Liu, Yu-Qin; Zhu, Lin; Du, Ling-Bin; Zhou, Qi; Xing, Xiao-Jing; Lou, Pei-An; Sun, Xiao-Hua; Qi, Xiao; Wang, Yuanzheng; Cao, Rong; Ren, Ying; Lan, Li; Zhang, Kai; He, Jie; Wang, Jia-Lin; Dai, Min

    2018-04-17

    In China, stomach cancer is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death. Few studies have examined Chinese stomach cancer patients' medical expenses and their associated trends. The Cancer Screening Program in Urban China (CanSPUC) is a Major Public Health Project funded by the central government. Through this project, we have extracted patients' medical expenses from hospital billing data to examine the costs of the first course treatments (which refers to 2 months before and 10 months after the date of cancer diagnosis) in Chinese patients with stomach cancer and the associated trends. The expense data of 14,692 urban Chinese patients with stomach cancer were collected from 40 hospitals in 13 provinces. We estimated the inflation-adjusted medical expenses per patient during 2002-2011. We described the time trends of medical expenses at the country-level, and those trends by subgroup, and analyzed the compositions of medical expenses. We constructed the Generalized Linear Mixed (GLM) regression model with Poisson distribution to examine the factors that were associated with medical expenses per patient. The average medical expenses of the first course treatments were about 43,249 CNY (6851 USD) in 2011, more than twice of that in 2002. The expenses increased by an average annual rate of 7.4%. Longer stay during hospitalization and an increased number of episodes of care are the two main contributors to the expense increase. The upward trend of medical expenses was observed in almost all patient subgroups. Drug expenses accounted for over half of the medical expenses. The average medical expenses of the first course (2 months before and 10 months after the date of cancer diagnosis) treatments per stomach cancer patient in urban China in 2011 were doubled during the previous 10 years, and about twice as high as the per capita disposable income of urban households in the same year. Such high expenses indicate that it makes economic

  10. Stomach Polyps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pylori) bacteria are a common cause of the gastritis that contributes to hyperplastic polyps and adenomas. Familial adenomatous polyposis. This rare, inherited syndrome increases the risk of colon cancer and other conditions, including stomach polyps. Certain medications. ...

  11. Roles of radiation dose and chemotherapy in the etiology of stomach cancer as a second malignancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W; Aleman, Berthe M P; Besseling, Gijs

    2009-01-01

    in the Netherlands between 1965 and 1995. In a nested case-control study, detailed information on treatment, smoking, gastrointestinal diseases, and family history was collected for 42 patients with stomach cancer and 126 matched controls. For each subject, the mean radiation dose to the stomach was estimated...... of procarbazine and related agents, needs further study, because of the relatively small numbers of chemotherapy-treated subjects....

  12. Survival of Patients with Stomach Cancer and its Determinants in Kurdistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Ghobad; Karimi, Kohsar; Esmailnasab, Nader; Roshani, Daem

    2016-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of death from cancer in the world. In Iran, this type of cancer has high rates of incidence and mortality. This study aimed to assess the survival rate of patients with stomach cancer and its determinants in Kurdistan, a province with one of the highest incidence rates of stomach cancer in the country. We studied a total of 202 patients with stomach cancer who were admitted to Tohid Hospital in Sanandaj from 2009 to 2013. Using KaplanMeier nonparametric methods the survival rate of patients was calculated in terms of different levels of age at diagnosis, gender, education, residential area, occupation, underweight, and clinical variables including tumor histology, site of tumor, disease stage, and type of treatment. In addition, we compared the survival rates using the logrank test. Finally, Cox proportional hazards regression was applied using Stata 12 and R 3.1.0 software. The significance level was set at 0.05. The mean age at diagnosis was 64.7 ± 12.0 years. The survival rate of patients with stomach cancer was 43.9% and 7% at the first and the fifth year after diagnosis, respectively. The results of logrank test showed significant relationships between survival and age at diagnosis, education, disease stage, type of treatment, and degree of being underweight (P<0.05). Moreover, according to the results of Cox proportional hazards regression model, the variables of education, disease stage, and type of treatment were associated with patient survival (P<0.05). The survival rate of patients with stomach cancer is low and the prognosis is very poor. Given the poor prognosis of the patients, it is critical to find ways for early diagnosis and facilitating timely access to effective treatment methods.

  13. Lack of Any Relationship of Stomach Cancer Incidence and Mortality with Development in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RaFiei, Elahe; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Towhidi, Farhad; Makhsosi, Behnam Reza; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and mortality of stomach cancer, and its relationship with the Human Development Index (HDI) and its components in Asia in 2012. This ecological study was conducted based on GLOBOCAN project of WHO for Asian countries. We assessed the correlations between standardized incidence rates (SIR) and standardized mortality rates (SMR) of stomach cancer with HDI and its components using SPSS18. A total of 696,231 cases (68.7% in males and 31.3% in females, ratio of 2.19:1) and 524,465 deaths (67.1% in men and 33.0% in women, ratio 2.03:1) were included in 2012. Five countries with the highest SIR of stomach cancer were Republic Korea, Mongolia, Japan, China and Tajikistan. Five countries with the highest SMR of stomach cancer were Mongolia, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan and China. Correlation between HDI and SIR was 0.241 (p = 0.106), in men 0.236 (p = 0.114) and in women -0.250 (p = 0.094). Also between HDI and SMR -0.250 (p = 0.871) in men -0.018 (p = 0.903) and in women -0.014 (p = 0.927). No significant correlation was observed between the SIR of stomach cancer, and the HDI and its dimensions, such as life expectancy at birth, mean years of schooling, and income level of the population.

  14. Six-fold difference in the stomach cancer mortality rate between northern and southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendehdel, Kazem; Marzban, Maryam; Nahvijou, Azin; Jafari, Nahid

    2012-12-01

    Stomach cancer is the most common cancer in Iran. A multi-ethnic population and wide variation in the environmental risk factors may lead to variations in cancer risk within this country. We have designed an ecological study and evaluated geographical variation regarding mortality from stomach cancer and its established risk factors in Iran.  We used the Iranian National Causes of Death Registry and estimated the age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) of stomach cancer in 29 Iranian provinces, stratified by sex and area of residence (rural/urban).  The average ASMR of stomach cancer among Iranian males was 15 per 100,000 and for females it was 8.1 per 100,000. The highest and lowest mortality rates were observed in Kurdistan with an ASMR of 29.1 per 100,000 in northwestern Iran and Hormozgan that had an ASMR of 5.0 per 100,000 in southern Iran. Males had approximately a two-fold higher ASMR compared to females, as did rural residents when compared with urban residents. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was about 90% in the province of Ardabil (a high-risk area) and 27% in the province of Sistan-Baluchistan (a low-risk area).  The wide geographical variation and high mortality rate of stomach cancer in Iran is likely due to differences in the exposure to the environmental risk factors among people living in the high- and low-risk areas, particularly H. pylori infection, a well-established risk factor of stomach cancer.

  15. Comparative Study of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Tumor Marker in Stomach and Colon Cancer Patients in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Bashir; Gul, Bushra; Ali, Sajid; Bashir, Shumaila; Mahmood, Nourin; Ahmad, Jamshed; Nawaz, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increase in morbidity and mortality rate, cancer has become an alarming threat to the human population worldwide. Since cancer is a progressive disorder, timely diagnosis would be helpful to prevent/stop cancer from progressing to severe stage. In Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, most of the time, tumors are diagnosed with endoscopy and biopsy; therefore rare studies exist regarding the diagnosis of gastrointestinal (GIT) carcinomas based on tumor markers, especially CEA. This study made a comparative analysis of CEA in admitted hospitalized stomach and colon cancer patients diagnosed as GIT with biopsy. In this study, a total of 66 cases were included. The level of CEA was determined in the blood of these patients using ELISA technique. Out of 66 patients, the level of CEA was high in 59.1% of the total, 60.7% in colon cancer patients and 57.9 % in stomach cancer patients. Moreover, the incidence of colorectal and stomach cancer was greater in males as compared to females. Patients were more of the age group of 40- 60 and the level of CEA was comparatively higher in patients (51.5%) with histology which was moderately differentiated, than patients with well differentiated and poorly differentiated tumor histology. CEA level was high in more than 50% of the total patients. Moreover, CEA exhibited higher sensitivity for colon than stomach cancer.

  16. Socioeconomic status and stomach cancer incidence in men: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, A.J.M. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    1998-01-01

    Study objective - To study the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and stomach cancer incidence (cardia and non-cardia) and the role of lifestyle factors in explaining this association. Design - Prospective cohort study on diet and cancer that started in 1986. Data were collected by means

  17. Radioimmunoassay of serum pepsinogen 1 in chronic gastritis and stomach cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinovskij, V.P.; Gamayumova, V.B.; Shumakov, A.R.; Khanson, K.P.

    2000-01-01

    Blood serum in stomach cancer and chronic gastritis has been compared. A sharp decrease in pepsinogen 1 level both in cancer and gastritis patients was found as compared with healthy subjects. Pepsinogen 1 level in poorly-differentiated tumor (37.4 ng/ml) was lower than in well-differentiated one (58.2 ng/ml) [ru

  18. Clinical outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer in remnant stomach or gastric tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishide, N; Ono, H; Kakushima, N; Takizawa, K; Tanaka, M; Matsubayashi, H; Yamaguchi, Y

    2012-06-01

    Little information exists regarding the optimal treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC) in a remnant stomach or gastric tube. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and clinical outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for EGC in a remnant stomach and gastric tube. Between September 2002 and December 2009, ESD was performed in 62 lesions in 59 patients with EGC in a remnant stomach (48 lesions) or gastric tube (14 lesions). Clinicopathological data were retrieved retrospectively to assess the en bloc resection rate, complications, and outcomes. Treatment results were assessed according to the indications for endoscopic resection, and were compared with those of ESD performed in a whole stomach during the same study period. The en bloc resection rates for lesions within the standard and expanded indication were 100 % and 93 %, respectively. Postoperative bleeding occurred in five patients (8 %). The perforation rate was significantly higher (18 %, 11 /62) than that of ESD in a whole stomach (5 %, 69 /1479). Among the perforation cases, eight lesions involved the anastomotic site or stump line, and ulcerative changes were observed in five lesions. The 3-year overall survival rate was 85 %, with eight deaths due to other causes and no deaths from gastric cancer. A high en bloc resection rate was achieved by ESD for EGC in a remnant stomach or gastric tube; however, this procedure is still technically demanding due to the high complication rate of perforation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Three cases of laparoscopic total gastrectomy with intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy for gastric cancer in remnant stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yu; Mou, Yi-Ping; Chen, Ke; Xu, Xiao-Wu; Cai, Jia-Qin; Wu, Di; Zhou, Yu-Cheng

    2014-11-13

    Gastric cancer in remnant stomach is a rare tumor but with poor prognosis. Compared with conventional open surgery, laparoscopic gastrectomy has potential benefits for these patients due to advantages resulting from its minimally invasive approach. Herein, we report on three patients with gastric cancer in remnant stomach who underwent laparoscopic total gastrectomy with intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy successfully. The operative time was 280, 250 and 225 minutes, the estimated blood loss was 100, 80 and 50 ml and the length of postoperative hospital stay was seven, eight and nine days respectively. Our experience has suggested that laparoscopic total gastrectomy with intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy can be a safe, feasible and promising option for patients with gastric cancer in remnant stomach.

  20. Stomach cancer screening in the adult health study population, Hiroshima, 1971--1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, M; Yamakido, M; Otake, M; Belsky, J L; Pastore, J O; Kawamoto, S; Okawa, T; Dock, D S

    1978-04-01

    Examinations for parietal cell antibody (PCA) were performed on 1334 subjects of the Adult Health Study (AHS), Hiroshima, during a 1-year period. Findings revealed PCA in 112 subjects (8.4%), but no difference in frequency was noted by sex. The positive rate was significantly higher in those age 50 or over. No correlation was noted between estimated A-bomb exposure dose and PCA frequency. PCA was found in 58 of the 502 cases presenting achlorhydria on tubeless gastric analysis, and particularly in the age 50 and over group, PCA was demonstrated in 43 of the 302 subjects presenting achlorhydria. PCA was detected in 11 of 152 subjects with low, serum pepsinogen levels and in 20 of 123 subjects with high levels. The frequency of positive PCA in subjects presenting achlorhydria and abnormal (low or high) serum pepsinogen levels was 19 in 100, higher than 7 in 106 in those subjects in whom gastric acidity and serum pepsinogen levels were both normal. The frequency of positive PCA was higher in patients diagnosed on upper gastrointestinal (GI) series as atrophic gastritis than in patients diagnosed as some other gastric disorder. PCA was negative in both of the two cases in whom a definite diagnosis of stomach cancer was established. However, in light of the finding of abnormal Diagnex Blue (DB) tests and positive PCA at a high frequency in the gastritis group and reports that gastritis provides the groundwork for stomach cancer, care should be taken in cases with findings of abnormal DB test, abnormal serum pepsinogen levels, and positive PCA.

  1. Clinicopathological characteristics of clinical early gastric cancer in the upper-third stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Daisuke; Komatsu, Shuhei; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Hirotaka; Okamoto, Kazuma; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-12-07

    To elucidate the clinicopathological characteristics of clinically early gastric cancer in the upper-third stomach and to clarify treatment precautions. A total of 683 patients with clinical early gastric cancer were enrolled in this retrospective study, 128 of whom had gastric cancer in the upper-third stomach (U group). All patients underwent a double contrast barium examination, endoscopy, and computed tomography (CT), and were diagnosed preoperatively based on the findings obtained. The clinicopathological features of these patients were compared with those of patients with gastric cancer in the middle- and lower-third stomach (ML group). We also compared clinicopathological factors between accurate-diagnosis and under-diagnosis groups in order to identify factors affecting the accuracy of a preoperative diagnosis of tumor depth. Patients in the U group were older (P = 0.029), had a higher ratio of males to females (P = 0.015), and had more histologically differentiated tumors (P = 0.007) than patients in the ML group. A clinical under-diagnosis occurred in 57 out of 683 patients (8.3%), and was more frequent in the U group than in the ML group (16.4% vs 6.3%, P cancer recurrence was not detected in the U group in the present study. Clinical early gastric cancer in the upper-third stomach has distinguishable characteristics that increase the risk of a clinical under-diagnosis, especially in patients with larger or undifferentiated tumors.

  2. Intervening factors for the initiation of treatment of patients with stomach and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Thaína Dalla; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2017-05-15

    to identify the time between symptoms, the request for care and the beginning of treatment in patients with stomach and colorectal cancer as well as the factors that interfere in these processes. correlational descriptive study, including 101 patients diagnosed with stomach or colorectal cancer, treated in a hospital specialized in oncology. the 101 patients investigated there was predominance of males, mean age of 61.7 years. The search for medical care occurred within 30 days after the onset of symptoms, in most cases. The mean total time between the onset of symptoms and the beginning of treatment ranged from 15 to 16 months, and the mean time between the search for medical care and the diagnosis was 4.78 months. The family history of cancer (p=0.008) and the implementation of preventive follow-up (pel tiempo entre los síntomas, la búsqueda de asistencia y el inicio del tratamiento en pacientes con cáncer gástrico y colorrectal y los factores que interfieren en estos procesos. estudio descriptivo correlacional, incluyendo 101 pacientes con diagnostico de cáncer gástrico o colorrectal, atendidos en un hospital especializado en oncología. de 101 pacientes investigados la mayoria eran hombres, con edad media de 61,7 años. La búsqueda de la atención médica se produjo dentro de los 30 días después de la aparición de los síntomas, en la mayoría de los casos. El promedio de tiempo total entre el inicio de los síntomas y el inicio del tratamiento fue de 15,16 meses y el tiempo medio entre la búsqueda de la atención médica y el diagnóstico fue de 4,78 meses. La historia familiar de cáncer (p=0,008) y la realización de seguimiento preventivo (pel tratamiento temprano. Náuseas, vómitos, hematoquecia, pérdida de peso y dolor se asociaron con la búsqueda más rápida de la asistencia. el intervalo más largo entre la búsqueda de la atención médica y el diagnóstico se produjo posiblemente por asociación negativa entre los síntomas que se

  3. Laparoscopic stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy with reduced-port techniques for unresectable distal gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirahara, Noriyuki; Matsubara, Takeshi; Hyakudomi, Ryoji; Hari, Yoko; Fujii, Yusuke; Tajima, Yoshitsugu

    2014-03-01

    The improvement of quality of life is of great importance in managing patients with far-advanced gastric cancer. We report a new cure and less invasive method of creating a stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy in reduced-port laparoscopic surgery for unresectable gastric cancers with gastric outlet obstruction. A 2.5-cm vertical intraumbilical incision was made, and EZ Access (Hakko Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) was placed. After pneumoperitoneum was created, an additional 5-mm trocar was inserted in the right upper abdomen. A gastrojejunostomy was performed in the form of an antiperistaltic side-to-side anastomosis, in which the jejunal loop was elevated in the antecolic route and anastomosed to the greater curvature of the stomach using an endoscopic linear stapler. The jejunal loop together with the stomach was dissected with additional linear staplers just proximal to the common entry hole so that a functional end-to-end gastrojejunostomy was completed. At the same time, the stomach was partitioned using a linear stapler to leave a 2-cm-wide lumen in the lesser curvature. Subsequently, jejunojejunostomy was performed 30 cm distal to the gastrojejunostomy, and the stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy resembling Roux-en Y anastomosis was completed. All patients resumed oral intake on the day of operation. Neither anastomotic leakage nor anastomotic stricture was observed. Our less invasive palliative operation offers the utmost priority to improve quality of life for patients with unresectable gastric cancer.

  4. Stem cells and cancer of the stomach and intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, R.G.J.; Huch, M.; Clevers, H.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer in the 21st century has become the number one cause of death in developed countries. Although much progress has been made in improving patient survival, tumour relapse is one of the important causes of cancer treatment failure. An early observation in the study of cancer was the heterogeneity

  5. Salt intake, cured meat consumption, refrigerator use and stomach cancer incidence: A prospective cohort study (Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, P.A. van den; Botterweck, A.A.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Many case-control studies have reported that salt and cured meat intake are positively, and refrigerator use is inversely, associated with stomach cancer risk. In the current prospective study these associations were evaluated. Methods: The Netherlands Cohort Study consisted of 120,852

  6. Trends in Mortality from Ischemic Heart Disease, Stroke, and Stomach Cancer: from past to future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Amiri (Masoud)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe common occurrence of chronic diseases – such as ischemic heart diseases (IHD, stroke, and stomach cancer in most populations and the attendant mortality, loss of independence, impaired quality of life, and social and economic costs are compelling reasons for public health

  7. Photodynamic therapy of early stage cancer of lung, esophagus, and stomach with two different photosensitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chissov, Valery I.; Sokolov, Victor V.; Trakhtenberg, A. K.; Mamontov, A. S.; Vaschakmadze, L. A.; Frank, George A.; Filonenko, E. V.; Telegina, L. V.; Belous, T. A.; Gladunov, V. K.; Aristarkhova, E. I.; Zharkova, Natalia N.; Menenkov, V. D.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents the results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of early-stage cancer of lung (17 patients), esophagus (8 patients) and stomach (10 patients). Fifteen patients had second primary tumors. New drugs photoheme and photosens were used as photosensitizers. Complete remission was obtained in 87%. The patients are followed up without relapses to 2.5 years.

  8. Role of modern fluorography in the detection of stomach cancer during prophylactic medical examination of the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portnoj, L.M.; Turovskij, B.M.; Kaluzhskij, A.A.; Vasil'ev, Yu.D.; Khasidashvili, I.Sh.; Surenchik, V.I.; Simavonyan, K.V.

    1986-01-01

    Large picture frame fluorography was shown to be promising in the diagnosis of stomach cancer during dispensarization of the population on the basis of over 10000 gastrofluorographic examinations in a specialized unit. Gastrofluorographic units were shown to be one of the optimum organizational forms of performing stomach fluorography. Its advantages (a high informative value, low radiation exposure, etc.) were emphasized. The use of stomach fluorography in persons with a high risk of developing stomach cancer without clear gastric complaints resulted in a significant increase in the number of early diagnosed forms of tumors

  9. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya; Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Identified stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type gastric cancer. •In silico pathway scanning identified estrogen-α signaling is a putative regulator of SLSGS in gastric cancer. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. -- Abstract: Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC

  10. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya, E-mail: sathiyapandi@gmail.com; Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Identified stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type gastric cancer. •In silico pathway scanning identified estrogen-α signaling is a putative regulator of SLSGS in gastric cancer. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. -- Abstract: Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  11. Roentgenological findings in the non-cancerous portion of the stomach with early gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Yukihisa

    1987-10-01

    Roentgenological findings of the fine reliefs in the non-cancerous portion were studied in 61 patients with early gastric cancer by double contrast examination. Incidence of the various types of the fine reliefs in the non-cancerous portion were as follows;verrucae 4 %, granularity 34 %, fine granularity 58 %, islet 24 %, network 17 % and irregular network 16 %, respectively. Fine granularity and network were observed in 61 % and 46 % of the cases with poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, respectively. Granularity, fine granularity and irregular network were observed in 30 %, 55 % and 40 % of the cases with signet-ring cell carcinoma, respectively. Granularity, fine granularity and islet were observed in 41 %, 59 % and 30 % of the cases with tubular adenocarcinoma, respectively. These results suggest that fine reliefs in the non-cancerous portion of the stomach with early gastric cancer showed both findings those found in atrophic gastritis (verrucae, granularity, fine granularity and network) and those in gastric cancer (granularity, fine granularity, islet and irregular network).

  12. Roentgenological findings in the non-cancerous portion of the stomach with early gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Yukihisa

    1987-01-01

    Roentgenological findings of the fine reliefs in the non-cancerous portion were studied in 61 patients with early gastric cancer by double contrast examination. Incidence of the various types of the fine reliefs in the non-cancerous portion were as follows ; verrucae 4 %, granularity 34 %, fine granularity 58 %, islet 24 %, network 17 % and irregular network 16 %, respectively. Fine granularity and network were observed in 61 % and 46 % of the cases with poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, respectively. Granularity, fine granularity and irregular network were observed in 30 %, 55 % and 40 % of the cases with signet-ring cell carcinoma, respectively. Granularity, fine granularity and islet were observed in 41 %, 59 % and 30 % of the cases with tubular adenocarcinoma, respectively. These results suggest that fine reliefs in the non-cancerous portion of the stomach with early gastric cancer showed both findings those found in atrophic gastritis (verrucae, granularity, fine granularity and network) and those in gastric cancer (granularity, fine granularity, islet and irregular network). (author)

  13. Physiological antioxidant system and oxidative stress in stomach cancer patients with normal renal and hepatic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Prabhakar Reddy

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Role of free radicals has been proposed in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Gastric cancer is a common disease worldwide, and leading cause of cancer death in India. Severe oxidative stress produces reactive oxygen species (ROS and induces uncontrolled lipid peroxidation. Albumin, uric acid (UA and Bilirubin are important physiological antioxidants. We aimed to evaluate and assess the role of oxidative stress (OS and physiological antioxidant system in stomach cancer patients. Lipid peroxidation measured as plasma Thio Barbituric Acid Reactive substances (TBARS, was found to be elevated significantly (p=0.001 in stomach cancer compared to controls along with a decrease in plasma physiological antioxidant system. The documented results were due to increased lipid peroxidation and involvement of physiological antioxidants in scavenging free radicals but not because of impaired hepatic and renal functions.

  14. [Stomach cancer in patients with systemic non-differentiated connective tissue dysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zil'ber, V S

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed as a comparative analysis of clinical and anamnestic data and results of morphological studies of surgically obtained tissues from 61 patients with stomach cancer (SC) aged 29-78 yr with (group 1) and without (group 2) signs of connective tissue dysplasia (CTD). The groups had an identical structure of SC hystological types, but in group 1 the tumours were localized mainly in the stomach body (60.6%, p connective tissue under physiological conditions, the above epithelial-stromal relationships and peculiarities of reparative processes in gastric mucosa one can not exclude effect of CTD on gastric cancerogenesis. This implies the necessity of further studies.

  15. [Application of pylorus-vagus-preserving gastrectomy in early gastric cancer in middle third of stomach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junfeng; Shao, Qinshu; Sun, Yuanshui; Xu, Xiaodong; Xu, Ji

    2015-04-14

    To evaluate the long-term outcomes of pylorus-vagus-preserving partial gastrectomy for early gastric cancer in middle third of stomach. Between January 2004 and June 2009, 46 patients with early gastric cancer in middle third of stomach underwent pylorus-vagus-preserving partial gastrectomy (PPG) while another 85 patients had conventional distal gastrectomy (DG). Clinicopathologic data and follow-up results of two groups were analyzed retrospectively, including the results of subjective nutritional assessments, laboratory blood biochemical data, endoscopic findings of remnant stomach and total 5-year survival rates. Postprandial dumping syndrome occurred in 7 patients (8.2%) in DG group while no syndrome occurred in PPG group. The incidence of gallbladder stones at 18 months after operation in DG group was higher than that in PPG group. Significant difference existed between two groups (Pgastric remnant was frequently observed in PPG (31.1%) than in DG (10.8%, Pgastric cancer in middle third of stomach, pylorus-vagus-preserving partial gastrectomy is effective in maintaining postoperative function. And it has the same postoperative survival rate as conventional distal gastrectomy.

  16. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase gene polymorphisms and oropharyngolaryngeal, esophageal and stomach cancers in Japanese alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, A; Muramatsu, T; Omori, T; Yokoyama, T; Matsushita, S; Higuchi, S; Maruyama, K; Ishii, H

    2001-03-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase-2 (ADH2) and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) gene polymorphisms play roles in ethanol metabolism, drinking behavior and esophageal carcinogenesis in Japanese; however, the combined influence of ADH2 and ALDH2 genotypes on other aerodigestive tract cancers have not been investigated. ADH2/ALDH2 genotyping was performed on lymphocyte DNA samples from Japanese alcoholic men (526 cancer-free; 159 with solitary or multiple aerodigestive tract cancers, including 33 oropharyngolaryngeal, 112 esophageal, 38 stomach and 22 multiple primary cancers in two or three organs). After adjustment for age, drinking and smoking habits, and ADH2/ALDH2 genotypes, the presence of either ADH2*1/2*1 or ALDH2*1/2*2 significantly increased the risk for oropharyngolaryngeal cancer [odds ratios (ORs), 6.68 with ADH2*1/2*1 and 18.52 with ALDH2*1/2*2] and esophageal cancer (ORs, 2.64 and 13.50, respectively). For patients with both ADH2*1/2*1 and ALDH2*1/2*2, the risks for oropharyngolaryngeal and esophageal cancers were enhanced in a multiplicative fashion (OR = 121.77 and 40.40, respectively). A positive association with ALDH2*1/2*2 alone was observed for stomach cancer patients who also had oropharyngolaryngeal and/or esophageal cancer (OR = 110.58), but it was not observed for those with stomach cancer alone. Furthermore, in the presence of ALDH2*1/2*2, the risks for multiple intra-esophageal cancers (OR = 3.43) and for esophageal cancer with oropharyngolaryngeal and/or stomach cancer (OR = 3.95) were higher than the risks for solitary intra-esophageal cancer and for esophageal cancer alone, but these tendencies were not observed for ADH2*1/2*1 genotype. Alcoholics' population attributable risks due to ADH2/ALDH2 polymorphisms were estimated to be 82.0% for oropharyngolaryngeal cancer and 63.9% for esophageal cancer.

  17. Factors influencing suicidal ideation among Chinese patients with stomach cancer: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X K; Procter, N G; Xu, Q; Chen, X Y; Lou, F L

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the influencing factors of suicidal ideation in Chinese patients diagnosed with stomach cancer. More recently, links have been made between suicide and cancer. For inpatients with cancer, nurses are at the front line to cope with suicidal issues in clinical settings. This study was part of a larger study that investigated psychological strains and related factors associated with suicidal ideation. Thirty-two patients with stomach cancer participated in a face-to-face interview. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the qualitative data. Four themes were identified as protective factors against suicidal ideation: suicidal denial and fears of stigmatization; positive coping skills; family connectedness; and desire to live well and longer. Consistent with previous research, these four protective factors may encourage participants to think more positively about life and cancer. Our findings suggest four protective factors for targeted suicide prevention, which may play an important role in future suicide-prevention programmes for Chinese patients diagnosed with stomach cancer. Nurses may help reduce patients' risk for suicidal ideation more effectively by discussing beliefs, family and meaning in life perspectives, as well as offering health education about positive coping skills. Clinical nurses, hospitals and the government should work collaboratively with each other. It is suggested that Chinese national guidelines for working with the high-risk suicide populations should be considered within a future mental health working plan. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  18. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya; Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. How to stomach an epigenetic insult: the gastric cancer epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Nisha; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Tan, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a deadly malignancy afflicting close to a million people worldwide. Patient survival is poor and largely due to late diagnosis and suboptimal therapies. Disease heterogeneity is a substantial obstacle, underscoring the need for precision treatment strategies. Studies have identified different subgroups of gastric cancer displaying not just genetic, but also distinct epigenetic hallmarks. Accumulating evidence suggests that epigenetic abnormalities in gastric cancer are not mere bystander events, but rather promote carcinogenesis through active mechanisms. Epigenetic aberrations, induced by pathogens such as Helicobacter pylori, are an early component of gastric carcinogenesis, probably preceding genetic abnormalities. This Review summarizes our current understanding of the gastric cancer epigenome, highlighting key advances in recent years in both tumours and pre-malignant lesions, made possible through targeted and genome-wide technologies. We focus on studies related to DNA methylation and histone modifications, linking these findings to potential therapeutic opportunities. Lessons learned from the gastric cancer epigenome might also prove relevant for other gastrointestinal cancers.

  20. Molecular Characterization of the Human Stomach Microbiota in Gastric Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqin Yu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (Hp is the primary cause of gastric cancer but we know little of its relative abundance and other microbes in the stomach, especially at the time of gastric cancer diagnosis. Here we characterized the taxonomic and derived functional profiles of gastric microbiota in two different sets of gastric cancer patients, and compared them with microbial profiles in other body sites. Paired non-malignant and tumor tissues were sampled from 160 gastric cancer patients with 80 from China and 80 from Mexico. The 16S rRNA gene V3–V4 region was sequenced using MiSeq platform for taxonomic profiles. PICRUSt was used to predict functional profiles. Human Microbiome Project was used for comparison. We showed that Hp is the most abundant member of gastric microbiota in both Chinese and Mexican samples (51 and 24%, respectively, followed by oral-associated bacteria. Taxonomic (phylum-level profiles of stomach microbiota resembled oral microbiota, especially when the Helicobacter reads were removed. The functional profiles of stomach microbiota, however, were distinct from those found in other body sites and had higher inter-subject dissimilarity. Gastric microbiota composition did not differ by Hp colonization status or stomach anatomic sites, but did differ between paired non-malignant and tumor tissues in either Chinese or Mexican samples. Our study showed that Hp is the dominant member of the non-malignant gastric tissue microbiota in many gastric cancer patients. Our results provide insights on the gastric microbiota composition and function in gastric cancer patients, which may have important clinical implications.

  1. Night shift work and stomach cancer risk in the MCC-Spain study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyarmati, Georgina; Turner, Michelle C; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Espinosa, Ana; Papantoniou, Kyriaki; Alguacil, Juan; Costas, Laura; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Martin Sanchez, Vicente; Ardanaz, Eva; Moreno, Victor; Gómez-Acebo, Inés; Fernández-Tardon, Guillermo; Villanueva Ballester, Vicent; Capelo, Rocio; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Santibáñez, Miguel; Pollán, Marina; Aragonés, Nuria; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2016-08-01

    Night shift work has been classified as a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, based on experimental studies and limited evidence on human breast cancer risk. Evidence at other cancer sites is scarce. We evaluated the association between night shift work and stomach cancer risk in a population-based case-control study. A total of 374 incident stomach adenocarcinoma cases and 2481 population controls were included from the MCC-Spain study. Detailed data on lifetime night shift work were collected including permanent and rotating shifts, and their cumulative duration (years). Adjusted unconditional logistic regression models were used in analysis. A total of 25.7% of cases and 22.5% of controls reported ever being a night shift worker. There was a weak positive, non-significant association between ever having had worked for at least 1 year in permanent night shifts and stomach cancer risk compared to never having worked night shifts (OR=1.2, 95% CI 0.9 to 1.8). However, there was an inverse 'U' shaped relationship with cumulative duration of permanent night shifts, with the highest risk observed in the intermediate duration category (OR 10-20 years=2.0, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.6) (p for trend=0.19). There was no association with ever having had worked in rotating night shifts (OR=0.9, 95% CI 0.6 to 1.2) and no trend according to cumulative duration (p for trend=0.68). We found no clear evidence concerning an association between night shift work and stomach cancer risk. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Identification of valid reference genes for gene expression studies of human stomach cancer by reverse transcription-qPCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Byoung-Chan; Choi, Eun-Seok; Choi, Il-Ju; Lee, Yeon-Su; Goh, Sung-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a powerful method for the analysis of gene expression. Target gene expression levels are usually normalized to a consistently expressed reference gene also known as internal standard, in the same sample. However, much effort has not been expended thus far in the search for reference genes suitable for the study of stomach cancer using RT-qPCR, although selection of optimal reference genes is critical for interpretation of results. We assessed the suitability of six possible reference genes, beta-actin (ACTB), glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase 1 (HPRT1), beta-2-microglobulin (B2M), ribosomal subunit L29 (RPL29) and 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) in 20 normal and tumor stomach tissue pairs of stomach cancer patients and 6 stomach cancer cell lines, by RT-qPCR. Employing expression stability analyses using NormFinder and geNorm algorithms we determined the order of performance of these reference genes and their variation values. This RT-qPCR study showed that there are statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences in the expression levels of HPRT1 and 18S rRNA in 'normal-' versus 'tumor stomach tissues'. The stability analyses by geNorm suggest B2M-GAPDH, as best reference gene combination for 'stomach cancer cell lines'; RPL29-HPRT1, for 'all stomach tissues'; and ACTB-18S rRNA, for 'all stomach cell lines and tissues'. NormFinder also identified B2M as the best reference gene for 'stomach cancer cell lines', RPL29-B2M for 'all stomach tissues', and 18S rRNA-ACTB for 'all stomach cell lines and tissues'. The comparisons of normalized expression of the target gene, GPNMB, showed different interpretation of target gene expression depend on best single reference gene or combination. This study validated RPL29 and RPL29-B2M as the best single reference

  3. Production of ghrelin by the stomach of patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizaki, Junya; Aoyagi, Keishiro; Sato, Takahiro; Kojima, Masayasu; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Poor nutrition and weight loss are important factors contributing to poor quality of life (QOL) after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer. Ghrelin is a hormone produced by the stomach that, plays a role in appetite increase and fat storage. The present study aims to clarify the location of ghrelin mRNA in the stomach, changes in blood ghrelin concentrations after gastrectomy and whether or not they are associated with the reconstruction method in patients with gastric cancer. We collected seven normal mucosa samples from different parts of six totally resected stomachs with gastric cancer. We extracted RNA from the normal mucosa, synthesized cDNA from total RNA (1 μg), and then quantified ghrelin mRNA using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Ghrelin blood concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits in 74 patients with gastric cancer (total gastrectomy (TG), n=23; distal gastrectomy (DG), n=30; proximal gastrectomy (PG), n=11; pylorus preserving gastrectomy (PPG), n=10). In order, the ghrelin gene was expressed most frequently in the gastric body, followed by the fornix, cardia, antrum and pylorus ring. Blood ghrelin concentrations after surgery similarly changed in all groups. The average blood ghrelin concentrations were significantly higher in the DG and PPG groups than in the TG group on postoperative days (POD) 1, 7, 30, 90 and 180. However, blood ghrelin concentrations did not significantly differ between the DG and TG groups on POD 270 and 360. Cells that produce ghrelin are supposed to be located mostly in the fundic gland of the stomach. We speculate that the production of ghrelin from other organs increases from around nine months after total gastrectomy. Therefore, evaluating the nutritional status and the weight of patients at nine months after total gastrectomy is important to help these patients improve their QOL.

  4. Medicinal Plants, Effective Plant Compounds (Compositions) and their Effects on Stomach Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleebrahim-Dehkordy, Elahe; Nasri, Hamid; Baradaran, Azar; Nasri, Parto; Tamadon, Mohammad Reza; Hedaiaty, Mahrang; Beigrezaei, Sara; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Medicinal plants have special importance around the world. Further, they have been noticed for nutrition and illness treatment such as preparation of anticancer new drugs. Therefore, a wide range of studies have been done on different plants, and their anticancer effects have been investigated. Nowadays, cancer is the most important factor of death rate in the developed and developing countries. Among them, stomach cancer is one of the most common malignancies around the world. At present, it is recognized as the fourth common cancer and the second factor of death rate due to cancer. So far, there has been wide range of effort for cancer treatment; however, in most cases, the response to the treatment has been very weak and often accompanied improper subsidiary effects. The present problems as a consequence of chemical treatment and radiotherapy and many subsidiary problems created due to their use for patients, and also, the resistance to the current treatment has motivated researchers to apply new medicines with more effect and less toxicity. The secondary metabolisms existent in the plants have an important role in the treatment of several diseases such as cancer. This study was conducted to investigate and collect scientific results for stomach cancer and to clarify the role of medicinal plants and secondary plant compounds on its treatment.

  5. Improving Goals of Care Discussion in Advanced Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-23

    Primary Stage IV Hepatobiliary; Esophageal; Colorectal Cancer; Glioblastoma; Cancer of Stomach; Cancer of Pancreas; Melanoma; Head or Neck Cancer; Stage III; Stage IV; Lung Cancers; Pancreatic Cancers

  6. Intake of butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene and stomach cancer risk : results from analyses in the Netherlands : cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botterweck, A.A.M.; Verhagen, H.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Kleinjans, J.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2000-01-01

    Both carcinogenic and anticarcinogenic properties have been reported for the synthetic antioxidants butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). The association between dietary intake of BHA and BHT and stomach cancer risk was investigated in the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS)

  7. Family history and the risk of stomach cancer death in Japan: differences by age and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Toyoshima, Hideaki; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Kondo, Takaaki; Tamakoshi, Koji; Hori, Yoko; Tokui, Noritaka; Hoshiyama, Yoshiharu; Kikuchi, Shogo; Sakata, Kiyomi; Hayakawa, Norihiko; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Ohno, Yoshiyuki; Yoshimura, Takesumi

    2002-02-10

    Familial aggregation of stomach cancer has long been observed. The effect on disease risk of family history and its magnitude according to the type of affected relatives, however, is not well known. We conducted a prospective analysis using the JACC study (Japan Collaborative Cohort Study For Evaluation of Cancer Risk, sponsored by Monbusho) data. During the follow-up period, 662 stomach cancer deaths were documented. A positive history of stomach cancer in one or more first-degree relatives was associated with a significantly increased risk of death from the disease in both men (RR 1.60; 95% CI 1.11-2.31) and women (RR 2.47; 95% CI 1.50-4.06). In the subanalysis stratified by age, the association between positive family history and stomach cancer was stronger in the age group from 40-59 (RR 2.62; 95% CI 1.34-5.11 for men and RR 5.88; 95% CI 2.70-12.82 for women) than in the age group from 60-79 (RR 1.31; 95% CI 0.84-2.05 for men and RR 1.44; 95% CI 0.72-2.88 for women). In the age group from 40-59, men with father's history and women with mother's and sister's history of the disease had a significantly increased risk (RR 3.14; 95% CI 1.51-6.55, RR 10.46; 95% CI 4.54-24.12, RR 13.39; 95% CI 3.89-46.12, respectively). When 2 or more family members were affected, the increment in the risk was prominent especially in women (RR 9.45; 95% CI 4.46-20.05). These results suggest the existence of a certain subtype of stomach cancer that is inherited more often by women from one generation to the next in gender-influenced fashion. Any preventive strategy should take into account the degree of individual susceptibility. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. A prospective study of stomach cancer death in relation to green tea consumption in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshiyama, Y; Kawaguchi, T; Miura, Y; Mizoue, T; Tokui, N; Yatsuya, H; Sakata, K; Kondo, T; Kikuchi, S; Toyoshima, H; Hayakawa, N; Tamakoshi, A; Ohno, Y; Yoshimura, T

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate whether green tea consumption provides protection against stomach cancer death, relative risks were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis in the Japan Collaborative Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk, sponsored by the Ministry of Health and Welfare (JACC Study). The study was based on 30 370 men and 42 481 women aged 40–79. After adjustment for age, smoking status, history of peptic ulcer, family history of stomach cancer along with certain dietary items, the risks associated with drinking one or two, three or four, five to nine, and 10 or more cups of green tea per day, relative to those of drinking less than one cup per day, were 1.6 (95% CI: 0.9–2.9), 1.1 (95% CI: 0.6–1.9), 1.0 (95% CI: 0.5–2.0), and 1.0 (95% CI: 0.5–2.0), respectively, in men (P for trend=0.669), and 1.1 (95% CI: 0.5–2.5), 1.0 (95% CI: 0.5–2.5), 0.8 (95% CI: 0.4–1.6), and 0.8 (95% CI: 0.3–2.1), respectively, in women (P for trend=0.488). We found no inverse association between green tea consumption and the risk of stomach cancer death. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 309–313. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600487 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12177800

  9. Feasibility and Nutritional Benefits of Laparoscopic Proximal Gastrectomy for Early Gastric Cancer in the Upper Stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Komatsu, Shuhei; Okamoto, Kazuma; Konishi, Hirotaka; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy (LPG) has recently been applied for early gastric cancer (EGC) in the upper stomach as a minimally invasive and function-preserving surgery. This study aimed to clarify the feasibility and nutritional benefits of LPG over laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG). This was a retrospective study of 77 patients with clinical stage I gastric cancer in the upper stomach. Of these patients, 25 underwent LPG, while 52 underwent LTG. Surgical outcomes and postoperative nutritional status such as changes in body weight and blood chemistries were compared between LPG and LTG. Intraoperative blood loss and C-reactive protein levels at 3 and 7 days after surgery were significantly lower in LPG than in LTG (p = 0.018, 0.036, and 0.042, respectively). No significant differences were observed in postoperative early or late complication rates between LPG and LTG. The incidence of Los Angeles Grade B or more severe reflux esophagitis after LPG was 9.1 %, which was similar to that after LTG (9.3 %). Postoperative changes in body weight at 6 months and 1 and 2 years after surgery were consistently less in LPG than in LTG (p = 0.001, 0.022, and 0.001, respectively). Moreover, postoperative levels of hemoglobin and serum albumin and total lymphocyte count were also higher in LPG than in LTG. LPG may be a better choice for EGC in the upper stomach than LTG because it has distinct advantages in terms of surgical invasiveness and postoperative nutritional status.

  10. Synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast imaging of human stomach and gastric cancer: in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lei; Li, Gang; Sun, Ying-Shi; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Peng

    2012-05-01

    The electron density resolution of synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast imaging (SR-PCI) is 1000 times higher than that of conventional X-ray absorption imaging in light elements, through which high-resolution X-ray imaging of biological soft tissue can be achieved. For biological soft tissue, SR-PCI can give better imaging contrast than conventional X-ray absorption imaging. In this study, human resected stomach and gastric cancer were investigated using in-line holography and diffraction enhanced imaging at beamline 4W1A of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. It was possible to depict gastric pits, measuring 50-70 µm, gastric grooves and tiny blood vessels in the submucosa layer by SR-PCI. The fine structure of a cancerous ulcer was displayed clearly on imaging the mucosa. The delamination of the gastric wall and infiltration of cancer in the submucosa layer were also demonstrated on cross-sectional imaging. In conclusion, SR-PCI can demonstrate the subtle structures of stomach and gastric cancer that cannot be detected by conventional X-ray absorption imaging, which prompt the X-ray diagnosis of gastric disease to the level of the gastric pit, and has the potential to provide new methods for the imageology of gastric cancer.

  11. A New Suggestion for the Radiation Target Volume After a Subtotal Gastrectomy in Patients With Stomach Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Heerim; Lim, Do Hoon; Kim, Sung; Kang, Won Ki; Sohn, Tae Sung; Noh, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yong Il; Park, Chan Hyung; Park, Chul Keun; Ahn, Yong Chan; Huh, Seung Jae

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment results between the use of two different radiation fields including and excluding remnant stomach and suggest new target volumes excluding remnant stomach after subtotal gastrectomy (STG) in patients with stomach cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 291 patients treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy after STG and D2 dissection at the Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. Eighty-three patients registered from 1995 to 1997 underwent irradiation according to the INT 0116 protocol that recommended the inclusion of remnant stomach within the target volume (Group A). After this period, we excluded remnant stomach from the target volume for 208 patients (Group B). Median follow-up was 67 months. Results: Treatment failure developed in 93 patients (32.0%). Local and regional recurrence rates for Group A vs. Group B were 10.8% vs. 5.3% (p = not significant) and 9.6% vs. 6.3% (p = not significant), and recurrence rates for remnant stomach were 7.2% vs. 1.4% (p = 0.018), respectively. Overall and disease-free survival rates were not different between the two groups. Grade 3 or 4 vomiting and diarrhea developed more frequently in Group A than Group B (4.8% vs. 1.4% and 6.0% vs. 1.9%, respectively; p = 0.012; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Exclusion of remnant stomach from the radiation field had no effect on failure rates or survival, and a low complication rate occurred in patients treated excluding remnant stomach. We suggest that remnant stomach be excluded from the radiation target volume for patients with stomach cancer who undergo STG and D2 dissection

  12. Benefit-risk analysis for mass screening of stomach cancer in Japan, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, Takeshi; Tateno, Yukio; Umegaki, Yoichiro; Hashizume, Tadashi; Kitabatake, Takashi.

    1978-01-01

    Mass screening of stomach cancer is one of the largest screening systems in Japan. In the previous paper, we have described the benefit-risk analysis in terms of life-saving due to early detection of stomach cancer and loss of life due to late induction of cancer by radiation. In this paper, we report the genetic effect of x-ray diagnosis used in the mass screening and cost-effectiveness for the screening program. The former is calculated by the product of genetically significant dose and rate of induction for genetic effects. Since the genetically significant dose in woman is about 10 times larger than that in man, the genetic risk is greater in woman accordingly. It is also found that the genetic risk over 40 years old is only 3% of the risk in the whole population and that it is almost neglected if the screening is performed only over age of 40. Cost of the screening is estimated to be yen 3,000/person which includes that of photofluorography and a part of other detailed examinations. Since total population screened is about 4 million in 1975, the total amount of cost is 1.2 x 10 10 yen/year. Cost per person-year is mainly dependent upon the age of the person: for one person-year in man or woman of 15 - 19 years old, the cost is about 20 million yen, but it is about 150,000 yen for man of 70 - 74 years old. These information is useful in the decision on the mass screening policy for stomach cancer in Japan. (auth.)

  13. Rare Helicobacter pylori Infection May Explain Low Stomach Cancer Incidence: Ecological Observations in Bali, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Mulyadi, I Ketut; Moestikaningsih; Oka, Tjok Gede; Soeripto; Triningsih, Fx Ediati; Triyono, Teguh; Heriyanto, Didik Setyo; Hosono, Akihiro; Suzuki, Sadao; Tokudome, Shinkan

    2016-01-01

    The incidence rate of stomach cancer in Bali, Indonesia, is estimated to be strikingly lower than that in Japan. We conducted an on-site ecological study to investigate the association between the stomach cancer incidence and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Recruiting 291 healthy persons (136 men and 155 women) from the general population in Bali, Indonesia, we conducted a urea breath test (UBT) to examine H. pylori infection, along with a pepsinogen test to detect chronic atrophic gastritis and urine analysis to estimate sodium and potassium excretion. UBT positivities were 9% (2-15, 95% confidence interval) for men and 7% (1-12) for women, and positive cases for H. pylori IgG antibodies were 1% (0-3) for men and 3% (0-5) for women, significantly lower than the respective values in Japan. Positive pepsinogen tests in Bali were 0% (0-0) for men and 1% (0-4) for women, also significantly lower than the Japanese figures. Computed values for daily salt excretion were 13.3±4.1 g (mean ± SD) for men and 11.1±3.1 g for women, as high as corresponding Japanese consumption values. Moreover, the estimated potassium excretion was 3.2±0.7 g for men and 2.8±0.6 g for women in Bali, significantly higher than the figures in Japan. There were no associations across genetic polymorphisms of IL-beta, TNF-alpha, and PTPN11 with UBT positivity. The low incidence of stomach cancer in Bali may thus mainly be due to the rare H. pylori infection. Namely, the bacterium infection seems to be a critical factor for gastric cancer rather than host or other environmental factors.

  14. Comparison of characteristics between frequent participants and non-participants in screening program for stomach cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukao, A; Hisamichi, S; Komatsu, S; Shimizu, H; Satoh, H; Nakatsuka, H; Watanabe, T; Fujisaku, S; Ichinowatari, Y; Kuroda, S

    1992-04-01

    To clarify the differences in characteristics between participants and non-participants in the screening program for stomach cancer, life-style and medical histories were compared among 20, 169 subjects who lived in an urban area (Sendai) and a rural area (Wakuya and Tajiri) in Miyagi Prefecture, Japan. All subjects were classified into three groups according to the frequency of participation in the screening program during the last 5 years; i.e., frequent participating group (FPG) for 4 or 5 times, reference group (RG) for 1-3 times and non-participating group (NPG) for 0 times. Subjects in the FPG consumed more milk and green-yellow vegetable whereas those in the NPG consumed less these foods. The age-adjusted proportions of present smokers were higher in the NPG but lower in the FPG significantly. The proportions of subjects who had parental histories of all cancers and stomach cancer and past history of gastro-duodenal ulcer were higher in the FPG and lower in the NPG. To control influences among the variables a stepwise multiple regression analysis was done, and it revealed that smoking and parental history of cancers were strong predictors to explain the frequency of participation.

  15. [New molecular classification of colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer and stomach cancer: Towards "à la carte" treatment?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chantal; Afchain, Pauline; Trouilloud, Isabelle; André, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    This review reports 3 of recently published molecular classifications of the 3 main gastro-intestinal cancers: gastric, pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma. In colorectal adenocarcinoma, 6 independent classifications were combined to finally hold 4 molecular sub-groups, Consensus Molecular Subtypes (CMS 1-4), linked to various clinical, molecular and survival data. CMS1 (14% MSI with immune activation); CMS2 (37%: canonical with epithelial differentiation and activation of the WNT/MYC pathway); CMS3 (13% metabolic with epithelial differentiation and RAS mutation); CMS4 (23%: mesenchymal with activation of TGFβ pathway and angiogenesis with stromal invasion). In gastric adenocarcinoma, 4 groups were established: subtype "EBV" (9%, high frequency of PIK3CA mutations, hypermetylation and amplification of JAK2, PD-L1 and PD-L2), subtype "MSI" (22%, high rate of mutation), subtype "genomically stable tumor" (20%, diffuse histology type and mutations of RAS and genes encoding integrins and adhesion proteins including CDH1) and subtype "tumors with chromosomal instability" (50%, intestinal type, aneuploidy and receptor tyrosine kinase amplification). In pancreatic adenocarcinomas, a classification in four sub-groups has been proposed, stable subtype (20%, aneuploidy), locally rearranged subtype (30%, focal event on one or two chromosoms), scattered subtype (36%,200 structural variation events, defects in DNA maintenance). Although currently away from the care of patients, these classifications open the way to "à la carte" treatment depending on molecular biology. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Gastric-tube versus whole-stomach esophagectomy for esophageal cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxiong Zhang

    Full Text Available To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies comparing the gastric-tube vs. whole-stomach for esophageal cancer in order to determine the optimal surgical technique of esophagectomy.A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, ScienceDirect, Ovid MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus. Clinical trials that compared the gastric-tube versus whole-stomach for esophageal cancer were selected. The clinical endpoints included anastomotic leakage, anastomotic stenosis, reflux esophagitis, pneumonia, delayed gastric emptying, and thoracic stomach syndrome.A total of 6 articles (1571 patients were included. Compared to the whole-stomach approach, the gastric-tube approach was associated with a lower incidence of reflux esophagitis (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.16 to 0.81, p = 0.01 and thoracic stomach syndrome (95% CI: 0.17 to 0.55, p < 0.0001. The rates of anastomotic leakage, anastomotic stenosis, pneumonia, and delayed gastric emptying did not significantly differ between the two groups.The gastric-tube esophagectomy is superior to the whole-stomach approach, as it is associated with a lower incidence of postoperative reflux esophagitis and thoracic stomach syndrome. Our findings must be validated in large-scale randomized controlled trials.

  17. Totally laparoscopic pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for early gastric cancer in the middle stomach: technical report and surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Koshi; Hiki, Naoki; Nunobe, Souya; Sekikawa, Sayuri; Chiba, Takehiro; Kiyokawa, Takashi; Jiang, Xiaohua; Tanimura, Shinya; Sano, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility, safety, and improved quality of postoperative life following laparoscopy-assisted pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (LAPPG) with a hand-sewn anastomosis via a mini-laparotomy for early gastric cancer (EGC) have been previously established. Here we describe the surgical procedure of totally laparoscopic pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (TLPPG) using an intracorporeal delta-shaped anastomosis technique, and the short-term surgical outcomes of 60 patients with EGC in the middle stomach are reported. After lymphadenectomy and mobilization of the stomach, intraoperative gastroscopy was performed in order to verify the location of the tumor, and then the distal and proximal transecting lines were established, 5 cm from the pyloric ring and just proximal to Demel's line, respectively. Following transection of the stomach, a delta-shaped intracorporeal gastrogastrostomy was made with linear staplers. There were no intraoperative complications or conversions to open surgery. Mean operation time and blood loss were 259 min and 28 mL, respectively. Twelve patients (20.0%) experienced postoperative complications classified as grade II using the Clavien-Dindo classification, with the most frequent complication being gastric stasis (6 cases, 10.0 %). The incidence of severe complications classified as grade III or above was 1.7%; only one patient required reoperation and intensive care due to postoperative intraabdominal bleeding and subsequent multiple organ failure. TLPPG with an intracorporeal delta-shaped anastomosis was found to be a safe procedure, although it tended to require a longer operating time than the well-established LAPPG with a hand-sewn gastrogastrostomy.

  18. Combined effects of radiation and other agents on the stomach cancer incidence among Mayak Atomic Plant workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D. [Branch No 1 of State Research Center of Public Health Ministry of the Russian Federation, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation). Biophysics Inst.; Rovny, S.I.; Sirchikov, V.A.

    2000-05-01

    The gravity of a problem of the combined action of radiation and other factors again was confirmed sessions UNSCEAR in May, 1998. It especially is important at study of cancer diseases in connection with the polyetiology and multistage of them development. The estimation of radiation, medico-biological factors and condition of life in occurrence of a stomach cancer among Mayak personnel was specified by case-cohort research. For a quota 503 men (157 cases of a stomach cancer, 346 men of the healthy personnel) attributive risk of the radiation factors was 8.8%, medico-biological - 57,2% (from them by greatest was influence chronic gastritis with secreting insufficiency - 35.4%), tobacco consumption - 31,6%. At an estimation of risk of a stomach cancer depending on external {gamma}-irradiation best fitting was received at use of square-law model. The excess relative risk was 0,27 Gr{sup -2} (F=44,5; P=0,007). For {sup 239}Pu incorporation was not revealed of distinct connection with stomach cancer incidences. Interaction of the radiation and non-radiation factors also was appreciated. The interaction of gastritis with external {gamma}-irradiation or {sup 239}Pu was multiplicate. The interaction of smoking with {gamma}-irradiation or {sup 239}Pu incorporation was multiplicate also. The distribution histological types of a stomach cancer among the workers of Mayak plant differed in comparison with not working. Among the workers the increase poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was observed. (author)

  19. Combined effects of radiation and other agents on the stomach cancer incidence among Mayak Atomic Plant workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D.; Rovny, S.I.; Sirchikov, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    The gravity of a problem of the combined action of radiation and other factors again was confirmed sessions UNSCEAR in May, 1998. It especially is important at study of cancer diseases in connection with the polyetiology and multistage of them development. The estimation of radiation, medico-biological factors and condition of life in occurrence of a stomach cancer among Mayak personnel was specified by case-cohort research. For a quota 503 men (157 cases of a stomach cancer, 346 men of the healthy personnel) attributive risk of the radiation factors was 8.8%, medico-biological - 57,2% (from them by greatest was influence chronic gastritis with secreting insufficiency - 35.4%), tobacco consumption - 31,6%. At an estimation of risk of a stomach cancer depending on external γ-irradiation best fitting was received at use of square-law model. The excess relative risk was 0,27 Gr -2 (F=44,5; P=0,007). For 239 Pu incorporation was not revealed of distinct connection with stomach cancer incidences. Interaction of the radiation and non-radiation factors also was appreciated. The interaction of gastritis with external γ-irradiation or 239 Pu was multiplicate. The interaction of smoking with γ-irradiation or 239 Pu incorporation was multiplicate also. The distribution histological types of a stomach cancer among the workers of Mayak plant differed in comparison with not working. Among the workers the increase poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was observed. (author)

  20. Your cancer care team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000929.htm Your cancer care team To use the sharing features on this page, ... help your body heal. Working with Your Care Team Each member of your care team plays an ...

  1. Multivariate analysis of the risk of stomach cancer after ulcer surgery in an Amsterdam cohort of postgastrectomy patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tersmette, A. C.; Goodman, S. N.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Tersmette, K. W.; Giardiello, F. M.; Vandenbroucke, J. P.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    Although gastric cancer incidence is decreasing in the western world, it remains an important cause of death, and there has been debate about screening persons who have undergone gastrectomy for benign ulcers. The authors analyzed risk factors for stomach cancer mortality in an Amsterdam cohort of

  2. Identification of valid reference genes for gene expression studies of human stomach cancer by reverse transcription-qPCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Yeon-Su

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR is a powerful method for the analysis of gene expression. Target gene expression levels are usually normalized to a consistently expressed reference gene also known as internal standard, in the same sample. However, much effort has not been expended thus far in the search for reference genes suitable for the study of stomach cancer using RT-qPCR, although selection of optimal reference genes is critical for interpretation of results. Methods We assessed the suitability of six possible reference genes, beta-actin (ACTB, glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase 1 (HPRT1, beta-2-microglobulin (B2M, ribosomal subunit L29 (RPL29 and 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA in 20 normal and tumor stomach tissue pairs of stomach cancer patients and 6 stomach cancer cell lines, by RT-qPCR. Employing expression stability analyses using NormFinder and geNorm algorithms we determined the order of performance of these reference genes and their variation values. Results This RT-qPCR study showed that there are statistically significant (p Conclusion This study validated RPL29 and RPL29-B2M as the best single reference genes and combination, for RT-qPCR analysis of 'all stomach tissues', and B2M and B2M-GAPDH as the best single reference gene and combination, for 'stomach cancer cell lines'. Use of these validated reference genes should provide more exact interpretation of differential gene expressions at transcription level in stomach cancer.

  3. Câncer de estômago: fatores de risco Stomach cancer: risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Valéria de Britto

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Há cinqüenta anos o câncer de estômago vem perdendo a importância em termos de morbi-mortalidade em países considerados de primeiro mundo. Isso não ocorre no Brasil. Os principais fatores de risco evidenciados a partir de estudos epidemiológicos em várias populações do mundo e associados a essa neoplasia são alguns padrões de dieta. Com a descoberta do papel carcinogênico das nitrosaminas e do potencial anti-oxidante da vitamina C, algumas das associações entre câncer gástrico e padrões de dieta passaram a ser parcialmente entendidas. Com a descrição da Helicobacter pylori em 1983 e as evidências da relação dessa bactéria com certos processos patológicos do estômago, alguns precursores do câncer gástrico, novos elementos foram agregados ao processo fisiopatológico dessa entidade. O conhecimento hoje adquirido sobre a fisiopatologia do câncer gástrico, mesmo que parcial, fornece perspectivas estimulantes para prevenção e diagnóstico precoce.For the last fifty years, stomach cancer has become less important in terms of morbidity and mortality in developed countries, but the same pattern has not occurred in Brazil. The main risk factors for this neoplasm are certain diet patterns that became evident through epidemiological studies in various population groups. After the carcinogenic effects of nitrosamines and the anti-oxidant activity of vitamin C were discovered, some of the associations between stomach cancer and diet were partially understood. After the description of Helicobacter pylori in 1983 and the evidence of the relationship between this bacteria and certain stomach diseases, new elements were added to the knowledge about the development of this neoplasm. Current knowledge, albeit incomplete, provides interesting prospects for the prevention and early diagnosis of stomach cancer.

  4. Radiotherapy for stomach cancer: the dosimetric consequences of physiological movement of organs at risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, C.; Joon, D.L.; Joon, M.L.; Quong, G.; Feigen, M.; Wada, M.; Choy, T.; Chui, T.; Mantle, C.; Viotto, A.; Rolfo, A.; Rykers, K.; Grace, M.; Fernando, W.; Liu, G.; Khoo, V.; Chao, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    To assess the impact of movement of the liver and kidneys (organs at risk) on the dose volume histogram (DVH) when treating stomach cancer with radiation therapy. Immediate serial CT non-contrast and contrast scans are obtained as part of the planning process for treating stomach cancer with radiation in the neo-adjuvant and adjuvant setting at our institution. In a series of five patients the liver and right and left kidneys were contoured on both sets of scans. The maximal translational movement in three planes and volume changes of each structure was measured. The maximum, minimum and mean dose was calculated and compared for each organ at risk in both scans. To assess the change in the DVH, the following dose volume parameters were analysed: V50Gy, V35Gy, V30Gy, and V10GY for liver; V50Gy, V30Gy, V23Gy and V15Gy for both kidneys. A complete analysis of results will be presented

  5. Effects of nutritional and psychological status of the patients with advanced stomach cancer on physical performance status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Chen, Zhen-chun; Hang, Li-Fang

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the associations between coping mode, nutritional status, and psychological status and performance status of the patients with advanced stomach cancer. An epidemiological survey was conducted among 233 patients with advanced stomach cancer in Fujian, China. In-person interviews were performed for the participants with respect to information of psychological status prior to chemotherapy, nutritional status during chemotherapy, and physical performance status after chemotherapy. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that the level of hemoglobin (HB), level of daily calorie intake, score of Depression Status Inventory (DSI), and score of confrontation subscale of Medical Coping Modes Questionnaire had a significant influence on performance status (P or =40 versus DSI score confrontation versus high score of confrontation, respectively. Depression, low score of "Confrontation", low levels of HB, and low level of daily calorie intake may be the risk factors of poor performance status of the patients with advanced stomach cancer.

  6. Stomach ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... erode the stomach wall. A major cause of stomach ulcers is the bacteria called Helicobacter pylori . Treatment regimens for ulcers caused this bacterium usually include medications to suppress the stomach acid as well as antibiotics to eradicate the ...

  7. Cooking temperature, heat-generated carcinogens, and the risk of stomach and colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoan, Le Tran; Thu, Nguyen Thi; Lua, Nguyen Thi; Hang, Lai Thi Minh; Bich, Nguyen Ngoc; Hieu, Nguyen Van; Quyet, Ha Van; Tai, Le Thi; Van, Do Duc; Khan, Nguyen Cong; Mai, Le Bach; Tokudome, Shinkan; Yoshimura, Takesumi

    2009-01-01

    Food change due to cooking temperature and unrecognized heat-formed chemical carcinogens may impact on the risk of stomach and colo-rectal cancers. To test this hypothesis a case-control study was performed. A total of 670 cases of stomach and colo-rectal cancers matched with 672 hospital controls for sex and -/+5 years age admitted to three hospitals in Hanoi city in the North Viet Nam from October 2006 to September 2007 were the subjects. Five levels of food change due to cooking temperature were based on food color; white, pale yellow, yellow, dark yellow, and burnt. We asked study subjects to themselves report which of these five colors was their preferable intake before the onset of disease. The present study included; fried fishes-meats-eggs-potato-tofu; grilled foods; roasted foods; sugar, bread, heated wheat, and biscuits. These were cooked at temperatures as high as from 165 to 240 degrees C, based on the literature. Adjusted estimation of odds ratio was conducted controlling for possible confounding factors using STATA 8.0. A high intake of roasted meats, bread and biscuit significantly increased the risk of cancer as much as OR= 1.63, 95%CI= 1.04-2.54; OR= 1.40, 95%CI= 1.03-1.90; OR= 1.60, 95%CI= 1.03-2.46 with probabilities for trend = 0.029, 0.035, and 0.037, respectively. For exposure among controls: 529 (79%) were not exposed at all to roasted meats; 449 (67%) were not exposed at all to bread; and 494 (74%) were not exposed at all to biscuit. Observation of food change due to cooking temperature based on color is practically feasible for detecting associations with risk of developing cancer.

  8. Prognostic value of determination of carcinoembryonic antigen and α-fetoprotein level in blood plasma in patients with cancer stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyslova, V.N.; Vygonnyj, I.I.

    1986-01-01

    60 donors and 129 patients with cancer stomach were examined. Tumor antigens were determined in blood plasma by the method of radioimmunoassay. The upper boundary of the norm of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) is 12 ng/ml. Increased concentration of antigens studied is detected in most patients. It is established that the level of antigens increases depending on generalization of the process, cancer stage, tumor propagation in the stomach wall, patient's age. High volumes of AFP and CEA after operation give evidence about non-radicality of operation and bad prognosis

  9. Differential response to gamma radiation of human stomach cancer cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, V.K.; Barranco, S.C.; Townsend, C.M. Jr.; Perry, R.R.; Ives, K.L.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro effects of radiation were studied in two permanent cell lines (AGS and SII) from two patients with stomach adenocarcinoma and three permanent sublines from each cell line. Radiation survival parameters for AGS and SII parent cell lines and sublines were determined after in vitro irradiation with 0.5 to 10 Gy of 60 Co gamma rays. AGS and SII cell lines had different growth properties. DNA contents and radiation survival curves. Surviving fractions of SII parent cells (76 chromosomes) after 2.0 and 10 Gy were 1.22 and 17.8 times greater, respectively, than values for AGS parent cells (47 chromosomes). Sensitivities (D 0 ) were 1.08 and 1.45 Gy for AGS and SII parent lines, respectively. D 0 values for AGS parent cells and sublines were similar (1.01 to 1.08 Gy), but SII parent cells and sublines had D 0 values of 1.45, 1.36, 1.37 and 1.12 Gy (for SII-A). The SII parent cells had survival fractions after 2.0 and 10 Gy that were 1.3 and 11.3 times greater, respectively, than values for the SII-A cells. These data show differences in radiation responses among stomach cancer cell lines and sublines that may relate to DNA content, but there was no consistent correlation between radiation response and a particular cell characteristic. (author)

  10. Association Between Amplification and Expression of C-MYC Gene and Clinicopathological Characteristics of Stomach Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleghian, Malihea; Jahanzad, Issa; Shakoori, Abbas; Emami Razavi, Amirnader; Azimi, Cyrus

    2016-02-01

    The incidence rate of gastric cancer in western countries has shown a remarkable decline in the recent years while it is still the most common cancer among males in Iran. The proto-oncogene MYC, located at 8q24.1, regulates almost 15% of human genes and is activated in 20% of all tumors. The amplification of MYC and overexpression of its protein product are observed in 15 - 30% of gastric neoplasias. The objective of this study was to find the preferences of Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization (CISH) and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) in diagnosis and prognosis of gastric cancer. We studied 102 samples of gastric cancer in Iran and all the patients had undergone primary surgical resection at the Cancer Institute Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The CISH and IHC techniques were applied for all our samples. All of the samples had adenocarcinoma gastric cancer and were selected randomly. Also, the type of study was cross sectional. The sample size was 100 patients. Our data revealed that both diffuse and intestinal types of gastric cancer occurred significantly more in males than females. Our results showed that there was an indication of some correlation between grades and CISH, although the difference was not significant. Our data also showed that CISH positive patients (43%) were more frequent compared to IHC positive patients (14.7%). There was a correlation between CISH and IHC. These results revealed that there was a significant difference between grades and IHC. There was also no statistical difference between CISH amplification in diffuse and intestinal types. From the results, it could be concluded that for administration of the treatment of stomach cancer, and progress and prognosis of tumor, which is important for patients and clinicians, the CISH is a better and more feasible test than IHC, in regards to sensitivity and specificity.

  11. Radiation diagnosis of stomach cancer. A critical analysis of deeply rooted misconceptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, P.V.

    2000-01-01

    Present notions on the problem of early diagnosis of stomach carcinoma are presented. Achievements in the field of realizing preventive examinations for early identification of stomach carcinoma are shown. Technique for biomedical radiography study is described, local and organ semiotics of stomach carcinoma are presented. Potentialities of present techniques (computerized tomography, ultrasonography, video-laparoscopy) in the assessment of spreading and staging of stomach carcinoma are analysed [ru

  12. A case report of prostate cancer metastasis to the stomach resembling undifferentiated-type early gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Chiaki; Suzuki, Takuto; Kitagawa, Yoshiyasu; Hara, Taro; Yamaguchi, Taketo

    2017-08-07

    Occurrence of metastatic cancer to the stomach is rare, particularly in patients with prostate cancer. Gastric metastasis generally presents as a solitary and submucosal lesion with a central depression. We describe a case of gastric metastasis arising from prostate cancer, which is almost indistinguishable from the undifferentiated-type gastric cancer. A definitive diagnosis was not made until endoscopic resection. On performing both conventional and magnifying endoscopies, the lesion appeared to be slightly depressed and discolored area and it could not be distinguished from undifferentiated early gastric cancer. Biopsy from the lesion was negative for immunohistochemical staining of prostate-specific antigen, a sensitive and specific marker for prostate cancer. Thus, false initial diagnosis of an early primary gastric cancer was made and endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed. Pathological findings from the resected specimen aroused suspicion of a metastatic lesion. Consequently, immunostaining was performed. The lesion was positive for prostate-specific acid phosphatase and negative for prostate-specific antigen, cytokeratin 7, and cytokeratin 20. Accordingly, the final diagnosis was a metastatic gastric lesion originating from prostate cancer. In this patient, the definitive diagnosis as a metastatic lesion was difficult due to its unusual endoscopic appearance and the negative stain for prostate-specific antigen. We postulate that both of these are consequences of hormonal therapy against prostate cancer.

  13. [A study of growth and malignancy grading of stomach and colorectal cancers by serial serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Y; Miyahara, T; Yoshida, M; Isobe, S; Oba, N; Harada, Y

    1990-06-01

    Changes in serum CEA levels were analyzed on a time-course basis in 33 patients with stomach cancer and 20 patients with colorectal cancer. A linear relationship between log CEA and time could be evaluated and individual CEA doubling time (CEA D.T.) was calculated. The results obtained are as follows. 1) The CEA D.T. was not constant from the onset of the disease to death in stomach cancer and colorectal cancer. 2) The CEA D.T. was distributed widely with 5 to 140 days in stomach cancer and 8 to 134 days in colorectal cancer. It tended to be shortened at the terminal stage in both tumors. 3) In terms of age, sex and histology, the CEA D.T. tended to be short in the young, female and poorly differentiated cancer. These background appeared to have an influence on the growth of tumor. 4) The CEA D.T. was well correlated with the period of survival of the patients with gastric cancer (r = 0.636, p less than 0.001). The analysis of serial CEA levels on a time-course basis is considered useful in studying the relationship between tumor-bearing hosts and malignancy of the tumor.

  14. Three phase dynamic CT with double spiral CT: utility of determination of stomach cancer stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Min Ha; Kim, Hong In; Kim, Tae Hyung; Lee, Ki Yeol; Cho, June Il; Park, Cheol Min; Cha, In Ho

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of three phases of spiral CT in the diagnosis of stomach cancer. Between August 1994 and March 1995, thirty eight patients with stomach cancer, demonstrated on spiral CT, underwent surgery. Twenty-eight cases were advanced and ten were early. There were 27 men, and 11 women, and their average age was 52.8 years old (33-77). After ingestion of 600-700ml of water, 120-140ml of nonionic contrast material was injected intravenously. Spiral CT scanning was performed in 10mm slice thickness and of 10mm/sec table speed. Three phase image were obtained at 25sec (arterial phase), 60-65sec (venous phase) and 4min (equilibrium phase) after the start of bolus injection. On each phase, CT findings were compared with pathologic results, and tumor detectibility, depth of tumor invasion and lymph node metastasis was analysed. Thirty of the 38 carcinomas (79%) were detected on the arterial phase, 33 (81%) on the venous phase and 30 (79%) on the equilibrium phase. Depth of tumor invasion was measured accurately in 27 of 38 cases (71%) : T1-4/10 (40%), T2-8/11 (73%), T3-13/15 (87%), T4-2/2 (100%). We overstaged one case of T1 as T2 and two cases of T2 as T3, and understaged one case of T2 as T1 and two cases of T3 as T2. Among the 16 enlarged lymph nodes larger than 8mm, 13 cases were positive on pathologic examination and the sensitivity was 65%. With three-phase spiral CT scanning, we obtained 71% accuracy of depth of tumor invasion. The venous phase is most useful for tumor detection and for determining depth of tumor invasion and lymph node metastasis

  15. [The joint effects of major lifestyle factors on stomach cancer risk among Chinese men: a prospective cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q L; Zheng, W; Li, H L; Gao, J; Fang, J; Gao, L F; Liu, D K; Shu, X O; Xiang, Y B

    2017-05-06

    Objective: To investigate the combined impact of lifestyle factors on stomach cancer risk. Methods: We analyzed the data from the Shanghai Men's Health Study (SMHS) (2002-2013). The SMHS was conducted in eight neighborhood communities of urban Shanghai. From 2002 through June 2006, 61 480 residents aged 40 to 74 years old with no history of cancer were recruited. Failure time was the date of stomach cancer incidence, death or date of the last follow-up (December 31, 2013). The first two in-person follow-up surveys were conducted in 2004-2008, and 2008-2011, respectively. Using data on lifestyle, the healthy lifestyle index (HLI) was developed. The following lifestyle factors were included: smoking, alcohol consumption, diet habit, overweighted and physical activity. Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the association of stomach cancer risk with lifestyle factors and HLI. Results: Over 9.28 years' follow-up, 477 incident cases of stomach cancer were identified from 59 503 study participants. Participants with zero, one, two, three, four, and five favorable lifestyle behaviors accounted for 3.44% ( n= 2 045), 18.14% ( n= 10 793), 33.68% ( n= 20 041), 29.43% ( n= 17 511), 12.82% ( n= 7 627), and 2.50% ( n= 1 486), respectively. Among all the five lifestyle factors, smoking and alcohol use were significantly related to stomach cancer risk. The relative risk of stomach cancer was 0.71 (95 %CI : 0.57-0.87) for those who never smoked or quitted smoking for no less than 10 years and 0.70 (95 %CI : 0.55-0.90) for those who consumed alcohol no more than 14 drinks per week. For each increment of healthy lifestyle index, the relative risk of stomach cancer was 0.86 (95 %CI : 0.79-0.95). Compared to men with none or one healthy lifestyle factor, the relative risk for those with four or five was 0.62 (95 %CI : 0.46-0.83). When we rebuilt HLI using more categories of each lifestyle factors, the HLI ranged from 0 to 11. For each point increase, the relative risk

  16. Global Incidence and Mortality Rates of Stomach Cancer and the Human Development Index: an Ecological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, Salman; Rezaeian, Shahab; Soheylizad, Mokhtar; Khazaei, Somayeh; Biderafsh, Azam

    2016-01-01

    Stomach cancer (SC) is the second leading cause of cancer death with the rate of 10.4% in the world. The correlation between the incidence and mortality rates of SC and human development index (HDI) has not been globally determined. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the association between the incidence and mortality rates of SC and HDI in various regions. In this global ecological study, we used the data about the incidence and mortality rate of SC and HDI from the global cancer project and the United Nations Development Programme database, respectively. In 2012, SCs were estimated to have affected a total of 951,594 individuals (crude rate: 13.5 per 100,000 individuals) with a male/female ratio of 1.97, and caused 723,073 deaths worldwide (crude rate: 10.2 per 100,000 individuals). There was a positive correlation between the HDI and both incidence (r=0.28, countries with high and very high HDI is remarkable which should be the top priority of interventions for global health policymakers. In addition, health programs should be provided to reduce the burden of this disease in the regions with high incidence and mortality rates of SC.

  17. Surgical resection of late solitary locoregional gastric cancer recurrence in stomach bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masanori; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Maejima, Kentaro; Komine, Osamu; Mizutani, Satoshi; Yoshino, Masanori; Bo, Hideki; Kitayama, Yasuhiko; Uchida, Eiji

    2012-07-01

    Late-onset and solitary recurrence of gastric signet ring cell (SRC) carcinoma is rare. We report a successful surgical resection of late solitary locoregional recurrence after curative gastrectomy for gastric SRC carcinoma. The patient underwent total gastrectomy for advanced gastric carcinoma at age 52. Seven years after the primary operation, he visited us again with sudden onset of abdominal pain and vomiting. We finally decided to perform an operation, based on a diagnosis of colon obstruction due to the recurrence of gastric cancer by clinical findings and instrumental examinations. The laparotomic intra-abdominal findings showed that the recurrent tumor existed in the region surrounded by the left diaphragm, colon of splenic flexure, and pancreas tail. There was no evidence of peritoneal dissemination, and peritoneal lavage fluid cytology was negative. We performed complete resection of the recurrent tumor with partial colectomy, distal pancreatectomy, and partial diaphragmectomy. Histological examination of the resected specimen revealed SRC carcinoma, identical in appearance to the previously resected gastric cancer. We confirmed that the intra-abdominal tumor was a locoregional gastric cancer recurrence in the stomach bed. The patient showed a long-term survival of 27 months after the second operation. In the absence of effective alternative treatment for recurrent gastric carcinoma, surgical options should be pursued, especially for late and solitary recurrence.

  18. Your cancer survivorship care plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000822.htm Your cancer survivorship care plan To use the sharing features on this page, ... get one. What Is a Cancer Survivorship Care Plan? A cancer survivorship care plan is a document ...

  19. [Surgical treatment and prognosis of Borrmann type IIII( gastric cancer involving the whole stomach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ruizeng; Zhang, Zewei; Zhou, Yiming; Hua, Yonghong; Guo, Jianmin

    2018-02-25

    To explore the surgical treatment and prognosis of Borrmann type IIII( gastric cancer involving the whole stomach. Clinicopathological characteristics and survival data of 223 patients with Borrmann type IIII( gastric cancer involving the whole stomach (defined as the tumor infiltrating 3 regions of the stomach) receiving surgical treatment at the Department of Abdominal Surgery of Zhejiang Cancer Hospital between January 2002 and December 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. The survival time of patients with different clinicopathological features and different treatment methods was compared. Cox regression was used to analyze the independent prognostic factors. Two hundred and twenty-three patients with Borrmann type IIII( gastric cancer involving the whole stomach accounted for 24.0% (223/930) of all Borrmann type IIII( gastric cancer cases undergoing surgical resection at the same period. There were 147 males and 76 females with an average age of 57.8 years. All the patients underwent total gastrectomy. Of these patients, radical resection was performed in 149 cases(66.8%) and palliative resection in 74 cases (33.2%). Combined organ resection was performed in 43 patients (19.3%), including 25 splenectomies, 6 pancreatic body and tail plus spleen and transverse colon resections, 2 transverse colon plus spleen resections, 2 right colon resections, 2 transverse colon resections, 2 ovariectomies, 1 partial jejunal resection, 1 pancreatoduodenectomy, 1 pancreatic tail plus transverse colon resection, and 1 partial pancreatectomy. Postoperative complications occurred in 28 patients(12.6%), including 10 patients with combined organ resection. Esophagojejunal fistula was the most frequent complication, accounting for 39.3%(11/28). Perioperative mortality occurred in 3 patients (1.3%). Thirty-nine patients underwent preoperative adjuvant chemotherapy (clinical stage: cT4aN0M0 in 1 patient, cT4bN1-2M0 in 12 patients, cT4aN1-2M0 in 20 patients, and cT4aN3M0 in 6 patients

  20. Assessment of Lymph Node Metastasis of the Stomach Cancer by {sup 99m}Tc Phytate Lymphoscintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jong Tae; Park, Chang Yun; Min, Jin Sik; Kim, Choong Bai [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-09-15

    Prospective study of lymph node imaging of twenty stomach cancer cases with dissected lymph nodes being injected into the submucosa layer of stomach under surgical field was done. Total dose of 5 mCi in 5 cc of volume was injected along the multiple sites of the lesser and greater curvature of stomach and collected lymph nodes within 2 hour of surgical time were placed under gamma camera and lymph node imagings were obtained, Pathological invasion of tumor and correlation of cold defect or hot uptake was compared each other. Tumor invasion of nodes revealed cold defect area which was correlated well with the pathological specimen. Correlation rate was 84.6%. We are planning to extend these procedures and trying endoscopic injection of positive imaging agents such as GR-73-3 Ig{sub 2} alpha in future.

  1. Assessment of lymph node metastasis of the stomach cancer by /sup 99m/Tc phytate lymphoscintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jong Tae; Park, Chang Yun; Min, Jin Sik; Kim, Choong Bai

    1985-11-01

    Prospective study of lymph node imaging of twenty stomach cancer cases with dissected lymph nodes being injected into the submucosa laser of stomach under surgical field was done. Total dose of 5 mci in 5 cc of volume was injected along the multiple sites of the lesser and greater curvature of stomach and collected lymph nodes within 2 hour of surgical time were placed under gamma camera and lymph node imagings were obtained. Pathological invasion of tumor and correlation of cold defect or hot uptake was compared each other. Tumor invasion of nodes revealed cold defect area which was correlated well with the pathological specimen. Correlation rate was 84.6%. We are planning to extend these procedures and trying endoscopic injection of positive imaging agents such as Ga-73-3 Ig 2 alpha in future.

  2. [Economic burden of stomach cancer in China during 1996-2015: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, F; Shi, C L; Liu, C C; Wang, L; Song, S M; Ren, J S; Guo, C G; Lou, P A; Dai, M; Zhu, L; Shi, J F

    2017-08-06

    Objective: To clarify the research status of economic burden of stomach cancer in China from 1996 to 2015. Methods: Based on three electronic literature databases (China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database, Wanfang Database and PubMed), a total of 2 873, 1 244 and 84 articles published during 1996 to 2015 were found, respectively, using keywords of"cancer","neoplasms","malignant tumor","tumor","economic burden","health expenditure","cost","cost of illness", and"China". According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 30 literatures were included in the final analysis. Then the basic information and study subjects, indicators and main results of economic burden were abstracted and analyzed. All the expenditure data were discounted to the values in 2013 by using China's percapita consumer price index. Results: Totally, 30 articles were included, covering 14 provinces and of which 16 were published during 2011-2015. One article was based on population-level and the remaining studies were all based on individual-level. The number of individual-level articles that reported direct medical, non-medical and indirectly economic burden was 29, 1 and 2, respectively. The main indicators of direct medical expenditure were expenditure per patient (22), per clinical visit (9) and per diem (11), respectively. The median expenditure per patient was 7 387-28 743 RMB (CNY), with average annual growth rate (AAGR) of 1.7% (1996-2013). The median expenditure per clinical visit was 18 504-41 871 RMB (2003-2013), with AAGR of 5.5%. The median expenditure per diem was 313-1 445 RMB (1996-2012), with AAGR of 3.7%. Difference was found among provinces. Conclusions: The evidence for economic burden of stomach cancer was still limited over the past two decades and mainly focused on individual and regional levels. An increase and differences in provinces were observed in direct medical expenditure. Evaluation on direct non-medical and indirect medical expenditure needs to be addressed.

  3. Breast cancer metastases to the stomach and colon mimicking primary gastrointestinal cancer: Four cases and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necdet Uskent

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Intraluminal gastric and colonic metastases of the breast cancer are very rare and may sometimes prove a  diagnostic dilemma to distinguish from primary gastric and colonic cancers. It is important to make the distinction in order to navigate the proper treatment approach, which is a systemic treatment rather than surgery if the disease is me- tastatic. The spread to the gastrointestinal (GI tract is more frequent in lobular histology and according to a number of investigators, it is related to a particular tropism of lobular cells toward gastrointestinal mucosa. Any region of GI tract may be involved, from the tongue to the anus. Over the last decade, among the 1,100 breast cancer cases registered at our institutions, we diagnosed four patients with breast cancer who had metastases to the stomach and/or colon and presented symptoms that simulated primary gastrointestinal cancer. A total of 84 out of the 1,100 patients experienced invasive lobular histology. Among the four patients with GI tract metastases, three were diagnosed with lobular histology – two of whom had the signet ring cell subtype. The remaining patient was diagnosed with triple negative invasive ductal carcinoma; however, it clinically resembled invasive lobular carcinoma. Clinical and pathological features of these cases, as well as the review of related literature are discussed in this report.

  4. Viable Cancer Cells in the Remnant Stomach are a Potential Source of Peritoneal Metastasis after Curative Distal Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Kaida, Sachiko; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Kodama, Hirokazu; Takebayashi, Katsushi; Shimizu, Tomoharu; Miyake, Toru; Tani, Tohru; Kushima, Ryoji; Tani, Masaji

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying peritoneal metastasis (PM) after curative gastrectomy for gastric cancer (GC) are not well elucidated. This study assessed whether viable cancer cells, including cancer stemlike cells (CSCs), were present in the remnant stomach immediately before gastrointestinal (GI) tract reconstruction because these could be a source of PM after gastrectomy. Saline fluid used for remnant stomach lumen irrigation before GI reconstruction was prospectively collected from 142 consecutive patients undergoing distal gastrectomy for GC and cytologically examined. Proliferative activity (Ki67 staining) and stemness (expression of the CSC surface markers CD44s or CD44v6) were evaluated in detected cancer cells. Viable cancer cells were detected in 33 (23.2 %) of the 142 remnant stomachs. These cells formed clusters and stained positively for Ki67, indicating proliferation. Cancer cells in remnant stomachs and surface cancer cells in primary GCs from 10 (30.3 %) of these 33 cases also stained positively for CD44s or CD44v6. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, advanced cancer (odds ratio [OR], 4.65; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.32-16.4; P = 0.017), tumor size of 40 mm or larger (OR, 3.78; 95 % CI, 1.12-12.8; P = 0.033), and histologic differentiation (OR, 3.10; 95 % CI, 1.30-7.40; P = 0.011) were associated independently with the presence of cancer cells in the remnant stomach. Viable, proliferative, and clustered cancer cells, including CSCs, were found in remnant gastric lumens immediately before GI reconstruction, indicating a possible cellular source of PM after curative gastrectomy for GC. Dissemination of gastric contents into the peritoneal cavity should be avoided during GI reconstruction.

  5. Incidence and survival of stomach cancer in a high-risk population of Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Katy; Bertran, Enriqueta; Andia, Marcelo E; Ferreccio, Catterina

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the incidence and survival rate of stomach cancer (SC) and its associated factors in a high risk population in Chile. METHODS: The population-based cancer registry of Valdivia, included in the International Agency for Research on Cancer system, covers 356 396 residents of Valdivia Province, Southern Chile. We studied all SC cases entered in this Registry during 1998-2002 (529 cases). Population data came from the Chilean census (2002). Standardized incidence rates per 100 000 inhabitants (SIR) using the world population, cumulative risk of developing cancer before age 75, and rate ratios by sex, age, ethnicity and social factors were estimated. Relative survival (Ederer II method) and age-standardized estimates (Brenner method) were calculated. Specific survival rates (Kaplan-Meier) were measured at 3 and 5 years and survival curves were analyzed with the Logrank and Breslow tests. Survival was studied in relation to demographics, clinical presentation, laboratory results and medical management of the cases. Those variables significantly associated with survival were later included in a Cox multivariate model. RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2002, 529 primary gastric cancers occurred in Valdivia (crude incidence rate 29.2 per 100 000 inhabitants). Most cases were male (69.0%), residents of urban areas (57.5%) and Hispanic (83.2%), with a low education level (84.5% Mapuche ethnicity only significant for women (RR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.2-3.7). Of all cases, 76.4% were histologically confirmed, 11.5% had a death certificate only (DCO), 56.1% were TNM stage IV; 445 cases (84.1%) were eligible for survival analysis, all completed five years follow-up; 42 remained alive, 392 died of SC and 11 died from other causes. Specific 5-year survival, excluding cases with DCO, was 10.6% (95% CI: 7.7-13.5); 5-year relative survival rate was 12.3% (95% CI: 9.1-16.1), men 10.9% (95% CI: 7.4-15.2) and women 16.1% (95% CI: 9.5-24.5). Five-year specific survival was higher for patients

  6. Geographic distribution of lung and stomach cancers in England and Wales over 50 years: changing and unchanging patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerdlow, A J; dos Santos Silva, I

    1991-05-01

    The distribution of cancers of the lung and stomach in the counties of England and Wales in 1968-81 was mapped, and compared to the distribution in the country in 1921-30 described by Stocks. The high risk of stomach cancer in North Wales noted by Stocks was found still to exist in each sex, although its disparity from the rest of the country has diminished. In general the geographic distribution of stomach cancer in both periods has paralleled that of post-neonatal mortality, at the same time and earlier, as an index of general poverty, but postneonatal mortality in North Wales has not been exceptionally high. In 1921-30 the highest risk of lung cancer was in and around London. In the modern data this was still true for older women, but for men and women under 45 years of age, and to a lesser extent for older men, the pattern has changed greatly; the epidemic has moved north, and highest risk is now in Northumberland and Durham. This spread appears to have occurred earlier for men than for women, and for urban than for rural areas, occurring latest of all for women in rural areas. Regional disparity has also increased, especially in males: risks in the northern regions are now over twice those in much of Wales and the South.

  7. Classification of molecular structure images by using ANN, RF, LBP, HOG, and size reduction methods for early stomach cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytaç Korkmaz, Sevcan; Binol, Hamidullah

    2018-03-01

    Patients who die from stomach cancer are still present. Early diagnosis is crucial in reducing the mortality rate of cancer patients. Therefore, computer aided methods have been developed for early detection in this article. Stomach cancer images were obtained from Fırat University Medical Faculty Pathology Department. The Local Binary Patterns (LBP) and Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) features of these images are calculated. At the same time, Sammon mapping, Stochastic Neighbor Embedding (SNE), Isomap, Classical multidimensional scaling (MDS), Local Linear Embedding (LLE), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), t-Distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding (t-SNE), and Laplacian Eigenmaps methods are used for dimensional the reduction of the features. The high dimension of these features has been reduced to lower dimensions using dimensional reduction methods. Artificial neural networks (ANN) and Random Forest (RF) classifiers were used to classify stomach cancer images with these new lower feature sizes. New medical systems have developed to measure the effects of these dimensions by obtaining features in different dimensional with dimensional reduction methods. When all the methods developed are compared, it has been found that the best accuracy results are obtained with LBP_MDS_ANN and LBP_LLE_ANN methods.

  8. Benchmarking comprehensive cancer care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Anke

    2017-01-01

    The number of cancer patients and survivors is steadily increasing and despite or perhaps because of rapid improvements in diagnostics and therapeutics, important inequalities in cancer survival exist within and between different countries in Europe. Improving the quality of care is part of the

  9. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of one-carbon metabolism and cancers of the esophagus, stomach, and liver in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Chih Chang

    Full Text Available One-carbon metabolism (folate metabolism is considered important in carcinogenesis because of its involvement in DNA synthesis and biological methylation reactions. We investigated the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in folate metabolic pathway and the risk of three GI cancers in a population-based case-control study in Taixing City, China, with 218 esophageal cancer cases, 206 stomach cancer cases, 204 liver cancer cases, and 415 healthy population controls. Study participants were interviewed with a standardized questionnaire, and blood samples were collected after the interviews. We genotyped SNPs of the MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, DNMT1, and ALDH2 genes, using PCR-RFLP, SNPlex, or TaqMan assays. To account for multiple comparisons and reduce the chances of false reports, we employed semi-Bayes (SB shrinkage analysis. After shrinkage and adjusting for potential confounding factors, we found positive associations between MTHFR rs1801133 and stomach cancer (any T versus C/C, SB odds-ratio [SBOR]: 1.79, 95% posterior limits: 1.18, 2.71 and liver cancer (SBOR: 1.51, 95% posterior limits: 0.98, 2.32. There was an inverse association between DNMT1 rs2228612 and esophageal cancer (any G versus A/A, SBOR: 0.60, 95% posterior limits: 0.39, 0.94. In addition, we detected potential heterogeneity across alcohol drinking status for ORs relating MTRR rs1801394 to esophageal (posterior homogeneity P = 0.005 and stomach cancer (posterior homogeneity P = 0.004, and ORs relating MTR rs1805087 to liver cancer (posterior homogeneity P = 0.021. Among non-alcohol drinkers, the variant allele (allele G of these two SNPs was inversely associated with the risk of these cancers; while a positive association was observed among ever-alcohol drinkers. Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms related to one-carbon metabolism may be associated with cancers of the esophagus, stomach, and liver. Heterogeneity across alcohol consumption status of

  10. Incidence of metachronous gastric cancer in the remnant stomach after synchronous multiple cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Isao; Hato, Shinji; Kobatake, Takaya; Ohta, Koji; Kubo, Yoshirou; Nishimura, Rieko; Kurita, Akira

    2014-01-01

    In the preoperative evaluation for gastric cancer, high-resolution endoscopic technologies allow us to detect small accessory lesions. However, it is not known if the gastric remnant after partial gastrectomy for synchronous multiple gastric cancers has a greater risk for metachronous cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of metachronous cancer in this patient subset compared with that after solitary cancer surgery. Data on a consecutive series of 1,281 patients gastrectomized for early gastric cancer from 1991 to 2007 were analyzed retrospectively. The 715 gastric remnants after distal gastrectomy were periodically surveyed by endoscopic examination in Shikoku Cancer Center. Among those surveyed cases, 642 patients were pathologically diagnosed with solitary lesion (SO group) and 73 patients with synchronous multiple lesions (MU group) at the time of the initial surgery. In the follow-up period, 15 patients in the SO group and 3 patients in the MU group were diagnosed as having metachronous cancer in the gastric remnant. The cumulative 4-year incidence rate was 1.9 % in the SO group and 5.5 % in the MU group. The difference did not reach the significant level by the log-rank test. The incidence of metachronous cancer is higher after multiple cancer surgery; however, the difference is not statistically significant.

  11. Ingested nitrate and nitrite and stomach cancer risk: an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Nathan S; Alexander, Dominik D; Coughlin, James R; Milkowski, Andrew L; Boffetta, Paolo

    2012-10-01

    Nitrite and nitrate are naturally occurring molecules in vegetables and also added to cured and processed meats to delay spoilage and pathogenic bacteria growth. Research over the past 15 years has led to a paradigm change in our ideas about health effects of both nitrite and nitrate. Whereas, historically nitrite and nitrate were considered harmful food additives and listed as probable human carcinogens under conditions where endogenous nitrosation could take place, they are now considered by some as indispensible nutrients essential for cardiovascular health by promoting nitric oxide (NO) production. We provide an update to the literature and knowledge base concerning their safety. Most nitrite and nitrate exposure comes from naturally occurring and endogenous sources and part of the cell signaling effects of NO involve nitrosation. Nitrosation must now be considered broadly in terms of both S- and N-nitrosated species, since S-nitrosation is kinetically favored. Protein S-nitrosation is a significant part of the role of NO in cellular signal transduction and is involved in critical aspects of cardiovascular health. A critical review of the animal toxicology literature of nitrite indicates that in the absence of co-administration of a carcinogenic nitrosamine precursor, there is no evidence for carcinogenesis. Newly published prospective epidemiological cohort studies indicate that there is no association between estimated intake of nitrite and nitrate in the diet and stomach cancer. This new and growing body of evidence calls for a reconsideration of nitrite and nitrate safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasonic detection of lymph nodes in stomach cancer: Around celiac axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, An Lee; Yang, Gyu Seob; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    1990-01-01

    From January 1987 to December 1989, we did ultrasound examination for lymph nodes(LNs) around the celiac axis in 159 patients of stomach cancer. And surgically removed LNs were correlated with sonographic result and pathologic confirmation for metastasis. The celiac axis as a landmark for location of LN was identified in 87%(138/159). On ultrasonic examination. 77 LNs were detected around the celiac axis from 62 patients, however no LNs was detected from the remaining 97 patients. In detail, the outputs of pathologic correlation are; sensitivity=80%(35/44), specificity=77%(88/115), overall accuracy=77%. When the size criteria was designated as diameters of 10, 15 and 20 mm, sensitivity was 89%, 68% and 39%, whereas the specificity was 55%, 79%, and 97% respectively. On the analysis of LNs according to their sizes, LNs with diameter of above 15 mm were significant for diagnosis of LN metastasis(P value<0.0005). On the analysis of LNs according to their shapes, LN with notched or lobulated margin was more significant than LN with discrete margin, especially when diameter of LN was below 15 mm. However the shape of LN played not so big role, when diameter of LN was above 15 mm

  13. Intrathoracic stomach mimicking bone metastasis from thyroid cancer in whole-body iodine-131 scan diagnosed by SPECT/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Gomez, Francisco Javier; Riva-Perez, Pablo Antonio de la; Calvo-Moron, Cinta; Bujan-Lloret, Cristina; Cambil-Molina, Teresa; Castro-Montano, Juan [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Virgen Macarena University Hospital, Sevilla (Spain)

    2017-05-15

    The whole-body iodine-131 scintigraphy is an imaging technique in monitoring patients with a history of thyroid cancer. Although the rate of false positives is negligible, it is not nonexistent. We report the case of an intervened and treated patient for thyroid cancer with good clinical and biochemical response. Scintigraphic findings were consistent with unsuspected bone metastasis. Fused SPECT/CT data allowed accurate diagnosis of giant diaphragmatic hernia associated with intrathoracic stomach, a very rare pathology that can lead to false positive results. (author)

  14. Global patterns and trends in stomach cancer incidence: Age, period and birth cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ganfeng; Zhang, Yanting; Guo, Pi; Wang, Li; Huang, Yuanwei; Li, Ke

    2017-10-01

    The cases of stomach cancer (SC) incidence are increasing per year and the SC burden has remained very high in some countries. We aimed to evaluate the global geographical variation in SC incidence and temporal trends from 1978 to 2007, with an emphasis on the effect of birth cohort. Joinpoint regression and age-period-cohort model were applied. From 2003 to 2007, male rate were 1.5- to 3-fold higher than female in all countries. Rates were highest in Eastern Asian and South American countries. Except for Uganda, all countries showed favorable trends. Pronounced cohort-specific increases in risk for recent birth cohorts were seen in Brazil, Colombia, Iceland, New Zealand, Norway, Uganda and US white people for males and in Australia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Ecuador, Iceland, India, Malta, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland, United Kingdom, Uganda, US black and white people for females. The cohort-specific ratio for male significantly decreased in Japan, Malta and Spain for cohorts born since 1950 and in Austria, China, Croatia, Ecuador, Russia, Switzerland and Thailand for cohorts born since 1960 and for female in Japan for cohorts born since 1950 and in Canada, China, Croatia, Latvia, Russia and Thailand for cohorts born since 1960. Disparities in incidence and carcinogenic risk persist worldwide. The favorable trends may be due to changes in environmental exposure and lifestyle, including decreased Helicobacter pylori prevalence, increased intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, the availability of refrigeration and decreased intake of salted and preserved food and smoking prevalence. © 2017 UICC.

  15. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomach (gastric) cancer occurs when cancer cells form in the lining of the stomach. Risk factors include smoking, infection with H. pylori bacteria, and certain inherited conditions. Start here to find information on stomach (gastric) cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  16. Mortality study of nickel platers with special reference to cancers of the stomach and lung, 1945-93.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, D; Burges, D C; Sorahan, T

    1996-10-01

    To re-examine mortality patterns in a cohort of nickel platers with no history of chromium plating. All 284 men first employed by the company in 1945-75 with a minimum employment of three months in the nickel plating department were identified. Workers who had worked in the chromium plating or nickel/chromium plating departments were excluded. Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs), P values, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Poisson regression was used to carry out statistical modelling of mortalities within the cohort (internal standard). Four variables were considered to have the potential to influence mortality within the cohort: attained age (age at follow up or age at death), year of starting nickel work, period of follow up (measured from the first period of work with nickel exposure), and duration of exposure to nickel. The only significant difference between observed and expected numbers, when investigated by site of cancer and by broad non-cancer groupings, was that for stomach cancer (observed eight, expected 2.49, SMR 322). The study provides only weak evidence that nickel plating is associated with an excess risk of stomach cancer. This cohort of nickel platers does not seem to have experienced any discernible risk of occupational lung cancer. Other studies of nickel platers rather than nickel/chromium platers would be useful.

  17. CancerCare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E-News Blog En Español Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram LinkedIn Get Support Through counseling, support groups, education ... HOPE (4673) info@cancercare.org Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram LinkedIn © 2017 Cancer Care ® — All Rights Reserved Copyright ...

  18. Radiodiagnosis of stomach diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Description of roentgenologial image of stomach diseases is given. Characteristic roentgenological symptoms of various stomach diseases are presented. It is shown that the role of roentgenological investigation when detecting changes, which may indicate cancer of the 1st stage, has substantially increased. However, due to frequent nonspecificity of x-ray and endoscopic symptoms at cancers of the 1st stage, benign polyps and ulcers, as well as due to mucous membrane reconstruction under several forms of gastritis, the final diagnosis may be ascertained only using a complex investigation (roentgenological, endoscopic with obligatory taking of biopsy from several places with subsequent cytologic and histologic

  19. BREAST CANCER METASTASIS IN THE STOMACH: WHEN THE GASTRECTOMY IS INDICATED ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Marcus Vinicius Rozo; Tercioti-Junior, Valdir; Lopes, Luiz Roberto; Coelho-Neto, João de Souza; Andreollo, Nelson Adami

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant neoplasm in the female population. However, stomach is a rare site for metastasis, and can show up many years after initial diagnosis and treatment of the primary tumor. Analyze a case series of this tumor and propose measures that can diagnose it with more precocity. Were analyzed 12 patients with secondary gastric tumors. Immunohistochemistry has demonstrated that primary tumor was breast cancer. We retrieved information of age, histological type, interval between diagnosis of the primary breast cancer and its metastases, immunohistochemistry results, treatment and survival. The mean age was 71.3 years (ranging 40-86). Ten cases had already been underwent mastectomy in the moment of the diagnosis of gastric metastasis. Two patients had diagnosis of both primary and secondary tumors concomitantly. At average, diagnosis of gastric metastasis was seven years after diagnosis of primary breast cancer (ranging 0-13). Besides, nine cases had also metastases in other organs, being bones the most affected ones. Immunohistochemistry of the metastases has shown positivity for CK7 antibody in 83.34%, estrogen receptor in 91.67%, progesterone receptor in 66.67% and AE1AE3 antibody in 75%, considering all 12 cases. Moreover, CK20 was absent significantly (66.67%). The positivity of BRST2 marker did not present statistical significance (41.67%). Eight cases were treated with chemotherapy associated or not with hormonal blockade. Surgical treatment of gastric metastasis was performed in four cases: three of them with total gastrectomy and one with distal gastrectomy. Follow-up has shown a mean survival of 14.58 months after diagnosis of metastasis, with only two patients still alive. Patients with a history of breast cancer presenting endoscopic diagnosis of gastric cancer it is necessary to consider the possibility of gastric metastasis of breast cancer. The confirmation is by immunohistochemistry and gastrectomy should be oriented in

  20. Air pollution and incidence of cancers of the stomach and the upper aerodigestive tract in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagel, Gabriele; Stafoggia, Massimo; Pedersen, Marie; Andersen, Zorana J; Galassi, Claudia; Munkenast, Jule; Jaensch, Andrea; Sommar, Johan; Forsberg, Bertil; Olsson, David; Oftedal, Bente; Krog, Norun H; Aamodt, Geir; Pyko, Andrei; Pershagen, Göran; Korek, Michal; De Faire, Ulf; Pedersen, Nancy L; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Fratiglioni, Laura; Sørensen, Mette; Tjønneland, Anne; Peeters, Petra H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Vermeulen, Roel; Eeftens, Marloes; Plusquin, Michelle; Key, Timothy J; Concin, Hans; Lang, Alois; Wang, Meng; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Grioni, Sara; Marcon, Alessandro; Krogh, Vittorio; Ricceri, Fulvio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Ranzi, Andrea; Cesaroni, Giulia; Forastiere, Francesco; Tamayo-Uria, Ibon; Amiano, Pilar; Dorronsoro, Miren; de Hoogh, Kees; Beelen, Rob; Vineis, Paolo; Brunekreef, Bert; Hoek, Gerard; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Weinmayr, Gudrun

    2018-01-01

    Air pollution has been classified as carcinogenic to humans. However, to date little is known about the relevance for cancers of the stomach and upper aerodigestive tract (UADT). We investigated the association of long-term exposure to ambient air pollution with incidence of gastric and UADT cancer

  1. Expression of Fas ligand by human gastric adenocarcinomas: a potential mechanism of immune escape in stomach cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, M W; O'connell, J; O'sullivan, G C; Roche, D; Brady, C; Kelly, J; Collins, J K; Shanahan, F

    1999-02-01

    Despite being immunogenic, gastric cancers overcome antitumour immune responses by mechanisms that have yet to be fully elucidated. Fas ligand (FasL) is a molecule that induces Fas receptor mediated apoptosis of activated immunocytes, thereby mediating normal immune downregulatory roles including immune response termination, tolerance acquisition, and immune privilege. Colon cancer cell lines have previously been shown to express FasL and kill lymphoid cells by Fas mediated apoptosis in vitro. Many diverse tumours have since been found to express FasL suggesting that a "Fas counterattack" against antitumour immune effector cells may contribute to tumour immune escape. To ascertain if human gastric tumours express FasL in vivo, as a potential mediator of immune escape in stomach cancer. Thirty paraffin wax embedded human gastric adenocarcinomas. FasL protein was detected in gastric tumours using immunohistochemistry; FasL mRNA was detected in the tumours using in situ hybridisation. Cell death was detected in situ in tumour infiltrating lymphocytes using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). Prevalent expression of FasL was detected in all 30 resected gastric adenocarcinomas examined. In the tumours, FasL protein and mRNA were co-localised to neoplastic gastric epithelial cells, confirming expression by the tumour cells. FasL expression was independent of tumour stage, suggesting that it may be expressed throughout gastric cancer progression. TUNEL staining disclosed a high level of cell death among lymphocytes infiltrating FasL positive areas of tumour. Human gastric adenocarcinomas express the immune downregulatory molecule, FasL. The results suggest that FasL is a prevalent mediator of immune privilege in stomach cancer.

  2. Expression of Fas ligand by human gastric adenocarcinomas: a potential mechanism of immune escape in stomach cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bennett, M W

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Despite being immunogenic, gastric cancers overcome antitumour immune responses by mechanisms that have yet to be fully elucidated. Fas ligand (FasL) is a molecule that induces Fas receptor mediated apoptosis of activated immunocytes, thereby mediating normal immune downregulatory roles including immune response termination, tolerance acquisition, and immune privilege. Colon cancer cell lines have previously been shown to express FasL and kill lymphoid cells by Fas mediated apoptosis in vitro. Many diverse tumours have since been found to express FasL suggesting that a "Fas counterattack" against antitumour immune effector cells may contribute to tumour immune escape. AIM: To ascertain if human gastric tumours express FasL in vivo, as a potential mediator of immune escape in stomach cancer. SPECIMENS: Thirty paraffin wax embedded human gastric adenocarcinomas. METHODS: FasL protein was detected in gastric tumours using immunohistochemistry; FasL mRNA was detected in the tumours using in situ hybridisation. Cell death was detected in situ in tumour infiltrating lymphocytes using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). RESULTS: Prevalent expression of FasL was detected in all 30 resected gastric adenocarcinomas examined. In the tumours, FasL protein and mRNA were co-localised to neoplastic gastric epithelial cells, confirming expression by the tumour cells. FasL expression was independent of tumour stage, suggesting that it may be expressed throughout gastric cancer progression. TUNEL staining disclosed a high level of cell death among lymphocytes infiltrating FasL positive areas of tumour. CONCLUSIONS: Human gastric adenocarcinomas express the immune downregulatory molecule, FasL. The results suggest that FasL is a prevalent mediator of immune privilege in stomach cancer.

  3. Hypnosis in Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortzel, Joshua; Spiegel, David

    2017-07-01

    Cancer affects a growing proportion of the population as survival improves. The illness and its treatment brings a substantial burden of symptoms, including pain, anxiety, insomnia, and grief. Here, the uses of hypnosis in the treatment of these cancer-related problems will be reviewed. The utility of measuring hypnotizability in the clinical setting will be discussed. The current neurobiology of hypnotizability and hypnosis will be reviewed. Methods and results of using hypnosis for pain control in acute and chronic settings will be presented. Effects of hypnotic analgesia in specific brain regions associated with pain reduction, notably the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and the somatosensory cortex, underlies its utility as a potent and side-effect free analgesic. Methods for helping those with cancer to better manage their anxiety, insomnia, and grief will be described. These involve facing disease-related stressors while dissociating the experience from somatic arousal. Given the serious complications of medications widely used to treat pain, anxiety, and insomnia, this article provides methods and an evidence base for wider use of techniques involving hypnosis in cancer care. Altering patients' perception of pain, disease-related stress, and anxiety can help change the reality of their life with cancer.

  4. X-ray diagnosis of diseases of operated stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrova, I.S.; Rozenfel'd, L.G.; Ostapenko, T.A.; Shpontak, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    Principal methods for operations on the stomach, X-ray examinations of patients with the operated stomach are described as well as the state of the stomach after different surgical treatments. Radiodiagnosis of operated stomach complications in early and late postoperative periods, diseases of the operated stomach, cancer relapse after an operation, dumping syndrome, are considered

  5. C-MYC amplification and expression in stomach cancer samples in Iranian population using two techniques of CISH and IHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihea Khaleghian

    2015-07-01

    Results: Our data revealed that both diffuse and intestinal types of gastric cancer occurred significantly in men more than women. Our results showed an indication of some correlation between grades and CISH results, although the difference was not significant. Our data also showed that CISH+ patients (43.1% were more frequent in comparison with IHC+ patients (14.7%. There was a correlation between CISH and IHC. This result revealed that there was a significant difference between grades and IHC. There was also no statistically significant difference between CISH amplification in diffuse and intestinal types. Conclusion: Our conclusion is that for the treatment, management of stomach cancer, and monitoring of progress and prognosis of the tumor that is almost important for patients and clinicians, CISH test is a better and feasible to IHC test, with regards to sensitivity and specificity.

  6. Feasibility and nutritional impact of laparoscopy-assisted subtotal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer in the upper stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Hiki, Naoki; Nunobe, Souya; Noma, Hisashi; Honda, Michitaka; Tanimura, Shinya; Sano, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2014-06-01

    Laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy (LATG) is commonly performed for early gastric cancer (EGC) in the upper stomach; however, the incidence of anastomotic complications remains high, and postoperative nutritional status is not satisfactory. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and nutritional impact of a novel surgical procedure, laparoscopy-assisted subtotal gastrectomy (LAsTG). This was a retrospective study of 167 patients with EGC in the upper stomach. Of these, 57 patients underwent LAsTG, while 110 patients underwent LATG. Postoperative change in body weight, and serum concentration of albumin (Alb) and total protein (TP) were compared between the LAsTG and LATG groups. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to assess the influence of potential confounding factors. Frequency of anastomotic complications was significantly higher in the LATG group (16.3 %) than in the LAsTG group (5.3 %, P = 0.040). Postoperative recovery of body weight at 12 months after surgery was significantly better in the LAsTG group (89.8 ± 1.4 %) than in the LATG group (82.1 ± 1.0 %, P nutritional status.

  7. Associations of genetic variants in the PSCA, MUC1 and PLCE1 genes with stomach cancer susceptibility in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Sun

    Full Text Available Several genetic variants including PSCA rs2294008 C>T and rs2976392 G>A, MUC1 rs4072037 T>C, and PLCE1 rs2274223 A>G have shown significant association with stomach cancer risk in the previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs.To evaluate associations of these SNPs in the Han Chinese, an independent hospital based case-control study was performed by genotyping these four polymorphisms in a total of 692 stomach cancer cases and 774 healthy controls acquired by using frequency matching for age and gender. False-positive report probability (FPRP analysis was also performed to validate all statistically significant findings.In the current study, significant association with stomach cancer susceptibility was observed for all the four polymorphisms of interest. Specifically, a significant increased stomach cancer risk was associated with PSCA rs2294008 (CT vs. CC: adjusted OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.07-1.74, and CT/TT vs.CC: adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.03-1.63, PSCA rs2976392 (AG vs. GG: adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.02-1.65, and AG/AA vs. GG: adjusted OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.00-1.59, or PLCE1 rs2274223 (AG vs. AA: adjusted OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.15-1.90, and AG/GG vs. AA: adjusted OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.14-1.84, respectively. In contrast, MUC1 rs4072037 was shown to decrease the cancer risk (CT vs. TT: adjusted OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.60-0.98. Patients with more than one risk genotypes had significant increased risk to develop stomach cancer (adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.03-1.64, when compared with those having 0-1 risk genotypes. Stratified analysis indicated that the increased risk was more pronounced in younger subjects, men, ever smokers, smokers with pack years ≤ 27, patients with high BMI, or non-cardia stomach cancer.This study substantiated the associations between four previous reported genetic variants and stomach cancer susceptibility in an independent Han Chinese population. Further studies with larger sample size and different

  8. Palliative Care in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care is usually provided by palliative care specialists, health care practitioners who have received special training and/or certification in palliative care. They provide holistic care to the patient and family or caregiver ...

  9. Scenarios cancer in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, L.F.J. van der; Schellevis, F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Previous studies predicted an increase in both the incidence and prevalence of cancer in the Netherlands. Other studies showed that cancer patients use primary care more frequently than non-cancer patients. Finally, during the “chronic phase” of the disease, task substitution from

  10. Gastric washing by distilled water can reduce free gastric cancer cells exfoliated into the stomach lumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki, Atsuko; Abe, Nobutsugu; Yoshimoto, Eri; Hashimoto, Yoshikazu; Takeuchi, Hirohisa; Nagao, Gen; Masaki, Tadahiko; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ohkura, Yasuo; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2018-04-25

    Intragastric free cancer cells in patients with gastric cancer have rarely been studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detection rate of intragastric free cancer cells in gastric washes using two types of solutions during endoscopic examination. We further clarified risk factors affecting the presence of exfoliated free cancer cells. A total of 175 patients with gastric cancer were enrolled. Lactated Ringer's solution (N = 89) or distilled water (DW; N = 86) via endoscopic working channel was sprayed onto the tumor surface, and the resultant fluid was collected for cytological examination. We compared the cancer-cell positivity rate between the two (Ringer and DW) groups. We also tested the correlation between cancer-cell positivity and clinicopathological factors in the Ringer group to identify risk factors for the presence of exfoliated cancer cells. The cancer-cell positivity rate was significantly higher in the Ringer group than that in the DW group (58 vs 6%). Cytomorphology in the Ringer group was well maintained, but not in the DW group. The larger tumor size (≥ 20 mm) and positive lymphatic involvement were significant risk factors of exfoliated free cancer cells. Cancer cells can be highly exfoliated from the tumor surface into the gastric lumen by endoscopic irrigation in large gastric cancer with lymphatic involvement. Gastric washing by DW can lead to cytoclasis of free cancer cells; therefore, it may minimize the possibility of cancer-cell seeding in procedures carrying potential risks of tumor-cell seeding upon transluminal communication, such as endoscopic full-thickness resection and laparoscopy-endoscopy cooperative surgery.

  11. Psychosocial cancer care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    family members to cancer is an increasing interest in education, ... all stages of the cancer journey and is passionate about enabling more professionals in South Africa to provide psychosocial cancer .... therapeutic support together with more.

  12. Diverse pathways to care for children with stomach pain in a Canadian cosmopolitan city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Sylvie; Gauthier, Annie; Gomez, Liliana; Bibeau, Gilles; Rasquin, Andrée; Faure, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    In Montreal, Quebec, 31% of the population is born outside Canada. Yet, only 9% of patient consultations for symptoms associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are from immigrants at the Paediatric Gastroenterology Clinic at Sainte-Justine's University Hospital Centre. This discrepancy inspired a multidisciplinary exploratory study (anthropological and paediatric) to examine the sociological, interpretative and pragmatic aspects of immigrant and non-immigrant patients and family life with FGIDs. This paper examines the discrepancy between immigrant and non-immigrant paediatric patients with FGIDs and presents the different pathways to care utilised by families. Semi-structured interviews were carried out between November 2008 and June 2009, with children and their parents. In total, 38 families were recruited: with 27 families (including a child experiencing abdominal pain, his/her siblings, mother and/or father as well as any other significant individual living in the family home) from the community and 11 from the paediatric gastroenterology clinic. A comparative analysis between the immigrant and non-immigrant groups focused on perceptions, meanings and actions taken to relieve/alleviate symptoms. Immigrant and non-immigrant families alternate and combine different therapeutic environments: home, alternative healing therapies and medical paths to care. Our analysis suggests that culture (as a set of values, beliefs and ways of being), as well as social interactions within family life and the clinic, shape pathways to care. The analysis highlights the centrality of receptiveness--and more widely the social dimensions--of all medical encounters. Treatment disparities between immigrant and non-immigrant families in pathways to care help us to understand these patients' social world and the intricate relationships between values and social milieux, between culture, practices of symptom management and rationales guiding diverse therapeutic actions

  13. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer on the lesser curvature in upper third of the stomach is a risk factor for postoperative delayed gastric emptying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizaki, Tetsuya; Obata, Daisuke; Aoki, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Norihiro; Hashimura, Hiroki; Kano, Chise; Matsushita, Megumi; Kanamori, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Kei; Tsujimae, Masahiro; Momose, Kenji; Eguchi, Takaaki; Okuyama, Shunsuke; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Fujita, Mikio; Okada, Akihiko

    2018-02-07

    Advances in Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) technology have established ESD for early gastric cancer as a safe and stable technique. However, ESD may induce delayed gastric emptying and the cause of food residue retention in the stomach after ESD is not clear. This study aimed to clarify risk factors for delayed gastric emptying with food retention after gastric ESD. We retrospectively examined for food residue in the stomach 1 week after ESD was performed for early gastric carcinoma at Osaka Saiseikai Nakatsu Hospital from February 2008 to November 2016. Food residue was observed in 68 (6.1%) of 1114 patients who underwent gastric ESD. The percentage of lesions located on the lesser curvature of the upper third of the stomach was 45.6% (31/68) in the food residue group and 3.5% (37/1046) in the non-food residue group, which was significantly different (P gastric ESD. Of the 68 patients, 3 had food residue in the stomach on endoscopic examination for follow-up observation after the ESD ulcer had healed. Delayed gastric emptying with food retention after gastric ESD was associated with lesions located in the lesser curvature of the upper stomach, submucosal invasion of the lesion, age older than 80 years, and post-ESD bleeding, though it was temporary in most cases.

  14. Radiotherapy in Cancer Care. Chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblatt, E.; Zubizarreta, E.; Camacho, R.; Vikram, B.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer control, cancer care and cancer treatment are three different concepts, although the terms are often used interchangeably. Cancer control is the reduction in the incidence, morbidity and mortality of cancer, as well as the improvement in the quality of life of cancer patients and their families. As such, cancer control includes actions relating to prevention, early detection and screening, diagnosis, treatment and palliative care. Cancer care includes all actions and interventions aimed at supporting, assisting and treating cancer patients. Cancer care includes cancer treatment, but also other forms of support such as nutrition, symptom relief, speech therapy, physiotherapy, stoma care, nursing care, lymphoedema care and psychosocial care. Cancer treatment includes medical interventions aimed at the cure or palliation of a patient who has been diagnosed with cancer. As such, cancer treatment modalities include surgery, radiotherapy, systemic therapies such as chemotherapy, hormone therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy and other investigational strategies.

  15. Molecular characterization of the stomach microbiota in patients with gastric cancer and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dicksved, J.; Lindberg, M.; Rosenquist, M.; Enroth, H.; Jansson, J.K.; Engstrand, L.

    2009-01-15

    Persistent infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, can initiate an inflammatory cascade that progresses into atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with reduced capacity for secretion of gastric acid and an increased risk in developing gastric cancer. The role of H. pylori as an initiator of inflammation is evident but the mechanism for development into gastric cancer has not yet been proven. A reduced capacity for gastric acid secretion allows survival and proliferation of other microbes that normally are killed by the acidic environment. It has been postulated that some of these species may be involved in the development of gastric cancer, however their identities are poorly defined. In this study, the gastric microbiota from ten patients with gastric cancer was characterized and compared with five dyspeptic controls using the molecular profiling approach, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in combination with 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing. T-RFLP analysis revealed a complex bacterial community in the cancer patients that was not significantly different from the controls. Sequencing of 140 clones revealed 102 phylotypes, with representatives from five bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria). The data revealed a relatively low abundance of H. pylori and showed that the gastric cancer microbiota was instead dominated by different species of the genera Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Prevotella. The respective role of these species in development of gastric cancer remains to be determined.

  16. DUOX2 Expression Is Increased in Barrett Esophagus and Cancerous Tissues of Stomach and Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Qi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To detect the expression of dual oxidase (DUOX 2 in Barrett esophagus, gastric cancer, and colorectal cancer (CRC. Materials and Methods. The endoscopic biopsies were collected from patients with Barrett esophagus, while the curative resection tissues were obtained from patients with gastric cancer, CRC, or hepatic carcinoma. The DUOX2 protein and mRNA levels were detected with immunohistochemistry (IHC and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR. The correlation of DUOX2 expression with clinicopathological parameters of tumors was identified. Results. Low levels of DUOX2 mRNA were detected in Barrett esophagus and the adjacent normal tissues, and there was no difference between these two groups. DUOX2 protein was found in Barrett esophagus and undetectable in the normal epithelium. The DUOX2 mRNA and protein levels in the gastric cancer and CRC were increased compared to the adjacent nonmalignant tissues. The elevated DUOX2 in the gastric cancer was significantly associated with smoking history. In CRC tissues, the DUOX2 protein expression level in stages II–IV was significantly higher than that in stage I. In both hepatic carcinoma and the adjacent nonmalignant tissue, the DUOX2 was virtually undetectable. Conclusion. DUOX2 in Barrett esophagus, gastric cancer, and CRC may be involved in the tumorigenesis of these tissues.

  17. Detection and characterization of stomach cancer and atrophic gastritis with fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Lin, Junxiu; Jia, Chunde; Wang, Rong

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, we attempt to find a valid method to distinguish gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis. Auto-fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy of laser induced (514.5 nm and 488.0 nm) was measured. The serum spectrum is different between normal and cancer. Average value of diagnosis parameter for normal serum, red shift is less than 12 nm and Raman relative intensity of peak C by 514.5 nm excited is stronger than that of 488.0 nm. To gastric cancer, its red shift of average is bigger than 12 nm and relative intensity of Raman peak C by 514.5 nm excited is weaker than that by 488.0 nm. To atrophic gastritis, the distribution state of Raman peaks is similar with normal serum and auto-fluorescence spectrum's shape is similar to that of gastric cancer. Its average Raman peak red shift is bigger than 12 nm and the relative intensity of peak C by 514.5 excited is stronger than that of by 488.0. We considered it as a criterion and got an accuracy of 85.6% for diagnosis of gastric cancer compared with the result of clinical diagnosis.

  18. Spirituality in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... help patients with spiritual needs during cancer care, medical staff will listen to the wishes of the ...

  19. Breast Cancer Metastasis to the Stomach That Was Diagnosed after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Kita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 52-year-old woman presented with stage IIB primary breast cancer (cT2N1M0, which was treated using neoadjuvant chemotherapy (epirubicin, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel. However, the tumor persisted in patchy areas; therefore, we performed modified radical mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection. Routine endoscopy at 8 months revealed a depressed lesion on the gastric angle’s greater curvature, and histology revealed signet ring cell proliferation. We performed endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastric cancer, although immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumor was positive for estrogen receptor, mammaglobin, and gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 (E-cadherin-negative. Therefore, we revised the diagnosis to gastric metastasis from the breast cancer.

  20. Modularity in Cancer Care Provision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gobbi, Chiara; Hsuan, Juliana

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the findings of a case study research conducted within the Danish healthcare system aimed at analyzing how modularity is deployed in the process of delivery cancer care. Three cancer packages are presented into detailed describing the process of defining the diagnosis and treat...

  1. Suppression of the cell proliferation in stomach cancer cells by the ZNRD1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Liu; Zhang Yumei; Liu Na; Liu Changjiang; Zhi Min; Pan Yanglin; Lan Mei; Sun Li; Fan Daiming

    2004-01-01

    Zinc ribbon domain-containing 1 (ZNRD1), a transcription-associated gene, was recently found to be downregulated in human gastric cancer tissues as compared to the matched adjacent nonneoplastic tissues. In this study, we constructed the siRNA eukaryotic expression vectors of ZNRD1 and transfected them into normal gastric epithelial cells (GES-1). We also introduced the ZNRD1 gene into gastric cancer cells that do (SGC7901) and do not (AGS) express ZNRD1 endogenously. GES-1 cells stably transfected with the ZNRD1-RNAi were found to exhibit significantly quicker proliferation than empty vector transfectants. AGS cells stably transfected with the ZNRD1 cDNA exhibited significantly decreased growth rate as compared to control vector transfectants, whereas SGC7901 cells did not. Furthermore, ZNRD1 suppresses growth of AGS cells in soft agar and tumor formation in athymic nude mice. This study clearly demonstrates that ZNRD1 may play an important role in the control of human gastric cancer development by regulating cell proliferation. These results provide new insights into the function of ZNRD1 and further validate ZNRD1 as a potential therapeutic target in gastric cancer

  2. Integrating Acupuncture into Cancer Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Ju Chien

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Oncology acupuncture has become a new and promising field of research because more and more cancer patients have sought non-pharmacological alternatives for symptom management. While different mechanisms have been proposed to explain its efficacy, including theories of the neural system, endocrine cytokine or immunological regulation, its eventual role has become that of alleviating the side effects induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In this paper, we have reviewed the related articles focusing on acupuncture mechanisms and applications in cancer care to provide a quick sketch of acupuncture in cancer care. A detailed search was performed to identify the randomized controlled trials (RCTs and systematic reviews on acupuncture in oncology, using PUBMED and Cochrane. The search terms included: Acupuncture, acupressure, and cancer. Additional terms were used to target specific symptoms (i.e., breast cancer, hot flash, xerostomia, nausea, vomiting, cancer pain, insomnia, fatigue. Two authors independently extracted data for analysis and review. Ultimately, 25 articles underwent full-text review. Recent trials made efforts in studying (a hot flashes in breast cancer, (b xerostomia induced by radiotherapy in head and neck cancer, (c nausea and vomiting post-chemotherapy, (d cancer pain, and (e fatigue and insomnia in cancer patients. Controversial results for acupuncture application in cancer care appeared in different categories, but a trend emerged that acupuncture can palliate cancer-related symptoms. The research to date certainly offers us a valid complementary therapy in treating cancer-related symptoms. Meanwhile, practical strategies with safe measures for enhancing the efficacy are needed in further interventions, as well as continuing research with a validated methodology.

  3. Clinical significance of determination of serum contents of gastrin in patients with cancer of stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Huaikai; Liu Suxia

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of serum contents of gastrin in patients with various benign and malignant gastric diseases. Methods: Serum contents of gastrin were determined with RIA in 40 patients with chronic superficial gastritis, 42 patients with gastric ulcer, 39 patients with gastric carcinoma and 38 controls. Results: Serum contents of gastrin in patients with chronic superficial gastritis (96.99 ± 19.80ng/L), gastric ulcer (99.61 ± 26.39ng/L) and gastric cancer (128.58 ± 21.39ng/L) were all significantly higher than those in controls (81.96 ± 13.67ng/L) (P<0.01). The contents in patients with gastric cancer were the highest and were significantly higher than those in both of the other two groups of patients (both P<0.01). Conclusion: Gastric cancer could express gastrin as an autocrine product, which in turn enhance the tumor proliferation of gastric adenocarcinoma cells. (authors)

  4. The stomach and duodenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amberg, J.R.; Juhl, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Symptoms of epigastric pain raise the possibility of peptic ulcer disease and lead to an examination of the stomach and duodenum. Hematemesis or melena is also a strong indication. The nausea-vomiting complex on a subacute or chronic basis raises the possibility of an obstructive lesion. A palpable mass in the upper abdomen may involve the stomach. Weight loss and anorexia are less specific symptoms but can occur with gastric cancer. Major changes in indications have occurred now that ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are available. No longer is the gut studied to detect extra-gut disease. Currently, the duodenal contour is not important in the search for pancreatic disease. All intra-abdominal structures can now be seen directly using CT or ultrasound

  5. Diversity in cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, Nanna; Halvorsen, Ida; Mygind, Anna

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The burden of breast cancer is a key challenge for women's health globally. Rehabilitation needs and strategies for living with long-term consequences of breast cancer and its treatment cannot be isolated from the social contexts of patients, including relationships with relatives...... and healthcare professionals. AIM: This study explores how healthcare professionals' categorisations engage with breast cancer patients' social identities in encounters about rehabilitation before hospital discharge. METHOD: We conducted a multiperspective case-based qualitative study at a Danish department...... for a greater focus on improving encounters between breast cancer patients and healthcare professionals to ensure that rehabilitation needs are accommodated for among diverse patient groups....

  6. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) of the Stomach: Retrospective Experience with Surgical Resection at the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NAGUIB, Sh.F.; ZAGHLOUL, A.S.; El MARAKBY, H.

    2008-01-01

    Gastric Gist's account for more than half of all gastrointestinal stromal tumors and represent less than 5% of all gastric tumors. The peak age for harboring Gist of the stomach is around 60 years and a slight male preponderance is reported. These tumors are identified by expression of CD117 or CD34 antigen. Symptoms at presentation usually include bleeding, ab¬dominal pain or abdominal mass. Endoscopically, they typically appear as a submucosal mass with or without ulceration and on CT scans an extra gastric mass is usually seen. Complete surgical resection provides the only chance for cure, with only l-2 cm free margins needed. However, local recurrence and/or metastases supervene in almost half the patients treated with surgery alone, even when no gross residual is left. Thereby imatinib mesylate was advocated as an adjuvant to surgery, which appears to have improved disease-free and overall survival. Aim of the Work: The aim of this work was to assess clinico-pathological features of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) of the stomach and to appraise the results of treatment by surgery in patients treated at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of Cairo between January 2002 and December 2007. Patients and Methods: Nineteen patients with histologically and immuno-histochemically proven GIST of the stomach were treated by surgery at the NCI during the 6-year study period. Preoperative assessment included detailed history, clinical examination, full laboratory tests, endoscopy, abdominal ultrasound and CT. General medical assessment included chest X-ray, ECG and echocardiography. Results: The patients' age ranged from 26 to 77 years with a median of 51 years. Obvious male/female preponderance was noticed (68.4% to 31.6%). Tumors were located at the upper 1/3 in 42.1%, at the middle 1/3 in 31.6% and at the lower 1/3 in 26.3%. The most common clinical presentation was related to bleeding (hematemesis, melena or anaemia) and was seen in 63.2%. No tumors were

  7. Gastric cancer arising from the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeno, Shinsuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Maki, Kenji; Shibata, Ryosuke; Shiwaku, Hironari; Yamana, Ippei; Yamashita, Risako; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2014-10-14

    Gastric stump carcinoma was initially reported by Balfore in 1922, and many reports of this disease have since been published. We herein review previous reports of gastric stump carcinoma with respect to epidemiology, carcinogenesis, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, Epstein-Barr virus infection, clinicopathologic characteristics and endoscopic treatment. In particular, it is noteworthy that no prognostic differences are observed between gastric stump carcinoma and primary upper third gastric cancer. In addition, endoscopic submucosal dissection has recently been used to treat gastric stump carcinoma in the early stage. In contrast, many issues concerning gastric stump carcinoma remain to be clarified, including molecular biological characteristics and the carcinogenesis of H. pylori infection. We herein review the previous pertinent literature and summarize the characteristics of gastric stump carcinoma reported to date.

  8. Palliative care content on cancer center websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B; Rebesco, Gina; Schenker, Yael; Torke, Alexia M; Gramelspacher, Gregory

    2018-03-01

    Professional guidelines recommend that palliative care begin early in advanced cancer management, yet integration of palliative and cancer care remains suboptimal. Cancer centers may miss opportunities to provide palliative care information online. In this study, we described the palliative care content on cancer center websites. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 62 National Cancer Institute- (NCI) designated cancer center websites. We assessed the content of center homepages and analyzed search results using the terms palliative care, supportive care, and hospice. For palliative and supportive care webpages, we assessed services offered and language used to describe care. Two researchers analyzed all websites using a standardized coding manual. Kappa values ranged from 0.78 to 1. NCI-designated cancer center homepages presented information about cancer-directed therapy (61%) more frequently than palliative care (5%). Ten percent of cancer centers had no webpage with palliative care information for patients. Among centers with information for patients, the majority (96%) defined palliative or supportive care, but 30% did not discuss delivery of palliative care alongside curative treatment, and 14% did not mention provision of care early in the disease process. Cancer center homepages rarely mention palliative care services. While the majority of centers have webpages with palliative care content, they sometimes omit information about early use of care. Improving accessibility of palliative care information and increasing emphasis on early provision of services may improve integration of palliative and cancer care.

  9. Development of gastric cancer in nonatrophic stomach with highly active inflammation identified by serum levels of pepsinogen and Helicobacter pylori antibody together with endoscopic rugal hyperplastic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mika; Kato, Jun; Inoue, Izumi; Yoshimura, Noriko; Yoshida, Takeichi; Mukoubayashi, Chizu; Deguchi, Hisanobu; Enomoto, Shotaro; Ueda, Kazuki; Maekita, Takao; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Tamai, Hideyuki; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Iwane, Masataka; Tekeshita, Tatsuya; Mohara, Osamu; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Ichinose, Masao

    2012-12-01

    This study aimed to elucidate groups at high risk of developing cancer among patients with serologically identified Helicobacter pylori infection and nonatrophic stomach. Annual endoscopy was performed for a mean of 5.4 years in 496 asymptomatic middle-aged men who were H. pylori antibody-positive and pepsinogen (PG) test-negative. Subjects were stratified according to the activity of H. pylori-associated gastritis measured by serum levels of PG and H. pylori antibody, and/or by endoscopic findings of rugal hyperplastic gastritis (RHG), and cancer development was investigated. During the study period, seven cases of cancer developed in the cohort (incidence rate, 261/100,000 person-years), with 85.7% developing in the group showing a PGI/II ratio ≤ 3.0, reflecting active inflammation-based high PGII levels. Cancer incidence was significantly higher in this group (750/100,000 person-years) than in groups with less active gastritis. Furthermore, cancer incidence for this group was significantly higher in the subgroup with high H. pylori antibody titers than in the low-titer subgroup. Meanwhile, endoscopic findings revealed that 11.7% of subjects showed RHG reflecting localized highly active inflammation, and cancer risk was significantly higher in patients with RHG than in patients without. Combining the two serum tests and endoscopic examination for RHG allowed identification of subjects with more active gastritis and higher cancer risk. No cancer development was observed in these high-risk subjects after H. pylori eradication. Subjects with highly active gastritis identified by the two serological tests and endoscopic RHG constitute a group at high risk of cancer development with H. pylori-infected nonatrophic stomach. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  10. The Effect of External Radiation Therapy in management of malignant obstructive Jaundice due to Porta Hepatis metastasis from Stomach Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kwang Mo; Kim, Joon Hee; Kim, Chul Soo; Suh, Hyun Suk; Kim, Re Hwe

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : Since 1983, authors have conducted a study to evaluate the effect of external radiation therapy an to determine affected factors in management of the patients with malignant obstructive jaundice due to porta hepatis metastasis from stomach cancer. Materials and methods : Thirty two patients with malignant obstructive jaundice due to porta hepatis metastasis from gastric cancer were presented. We have analysed 23 patients who were treated with external radiation therapy of more than 3000 cGy. The radiation dose, disease extent at development of jaundice, total bilirubin levels before radiation therapy, differentiation of histology, combined treatment, intent of primary surgery, initial stage of gastric cancer were analyzed to determine affected factors in radiation therapy. External radiation therapy was delivered with a daily dose of 180-300 cGy. 5 times a week fractionation using 4 MeV linear accelerator. The radiation field included the porta hepatis with tumor mass by the abdominal ultrasonography or CT scan. In twenty three patients received more than 3000 cGy, total irradiation dose was ranged from 3000 cGy to 5480 cGy, median 3770 cGy. Among 23 patients, 13 patients were delivered more than equivalent dose of TDF 65(4140 cGy/23fx). Results : Among 23 patients, complete, partial and no response were observed in 13, 5, 5 patients, respectively. The median survival for all patients was 5 months. He significant prolongation of median survival was observed in complete responders(11 months) as compared to partial and no responders(5 months, 5 months, respectively). Out of 13 patients with complete response, 6 patients lived more than a year. Among 13 patients received more than 4140 cGy equivalent dose, complete, partial and no response were observed in 10, 2 and 1 patients, respectively. The median survival for all these patients was 9.5 months. The median survival for complete responders(10/13) was 11.5 months. Among 10 patients receiving less than 4140

  11. Double contrast study of the operated stomach in lateroposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volodina, G.I.; Novakovskij, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    Anastomosis was diagnosed in 34 patients, anastomosis ulcer in 3, cancer of the stump in 2, recurrence of stomach polyposis in 1 and cicatrical structure of the jejunum in 1. The great potentialities of a double contrast study of the operated stomach in lateroposition in the differential diagnosis of cancer of the stomach stump, deformities and other diseases were noted. The above method of examination of the operated stomach was recommended as an adjuvant to the commonly used method

  12. Disparity in cancer care: a Canadian perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, S.; Shahid, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Canada is facing cancer crisis. Cancer has become the leading cause of death in Canada. Despite recent advances in cancer management and research, growing disparities in cancer care have been noticed, especially in socio-economically disadvantaged groups and under-served communities. With the rising incidence of cancer and the increasing numbers of minorities and of social disparities in general, and without appropriate interventions, cancer care disparities will become only more pronounced. ...

  13. Cannabis in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, D I; Guzman, M

    2015-06-01

    Cannabis has been used in medicine for thousands of years prior to achieving its current illicit substance status. Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, mimic the effects of the endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), activating specific cannabinoid receptors, particularly CB1 found predominantly in the central nervous system and CB2 found predominantly in cells involved with immune function. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main bioactive cannabinoid in the plant, has been available as a prescription medication approved for treatment of cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and anorexia associated with the AIDS wasting syndrome. Cannabinoids may be of benefit in the treatment of cancer-related pain, possibly synergistic with opioid analgesics. Cannabinoids have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of HIV-related peripheral neuropathy, suggesting that they may be worthy of study in patients with other neuropathic symptoms. Cannabinoids have a favorable drug safety profile, but their medical use is predominantly limited by their psychoactive effects and their limited bioavailability. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  14. Spirituality in childhood cancer care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima NN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nádia Nara Rolim Lima,1 Vânia Barbosa do Nascimento,1 Sionara Melo Figueiredo de Carvalho,1 Modesto Leite Rolim Neto,2 Marcial Moreno Moreira,2 Aline Quental Brasil,2 Francisco Telésforo Celestino Junior,2 Gislene Farias de Oliveira,2 Alberto Olavo Advíncula Reis3 1Health Sciences Postgraduate Program, ABC Region Medical School, Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Department of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Barbalha, Ceará, Brazil; 3Public Health Postgraduate Program, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: To deal with the suffering caused by childhood cancer, patients and their families use different coping strategies, among which, spirituality appears a way of minimizing possible damage. In this context, the purpose of the present study was to analyze the influence of spirituality in childhood cancer care, involving biopsychosocial aspects of the child, the family, and the health care team facing the disease. To accomplish this purpose, a nonsystematic review of literature of articles on national and international electronic databases (Scientific Electronic Library Online [SciELO], PubMed, and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature [LILACS] was conducted using the search terms “spirituality,” “child psychology,” “child,” and “cancer,” as well as on other available resources. After the search, 20 articles met the eligibility criteria and were included in the final sample. Our review showed that the relation between spirituality and health has lately become a subject of growing interest among researchers, as a positive influence of spirituality in the people's welfare was noted. Studies that were retrieved using the mentioned search strategy in electronic databases, independently assessed by the authors according to the systematic review, showed that spirituality emerges as a driving force that helps pediatric patients and their families in coping with cancer. Health care workers

  15. The Association between Charlson Comorbidity Index and the Medical Care Cost of Cancer: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Jun Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study compared comorbidity-related medical care cost associated with different types of cancer, by examining breast (N=287, colon (N=272, stomach (N=614, and lung (N=391 cancer patients undergoing surgery. Methods. Using medical benefits claims data, we calculated Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI and total medical cost. The effect of comorbidity on the medical care cost was investigated using multiple regression and logistic regression models and controlling for demographic characteristics and cancer stage. Results. The treatment costs incurred by stomach and colon cancer patients were 1.05- and 1.01-fold higher, respectively, in patients with higher CCI determined. For breast cancer, the highest costs were seen in those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, but the increase in cost reduced as CCI increased. Colon cancer patients with diabetes mellitus and a CCI = 1 score had the highest medical costs. The lowest medical costs were incurred by lung cancer patients with COPD and a CCI = 2 score. Conclusion. The comorbidities had a major impact on the use of medical resources, with chronic comorbidities incurring the highest medical costs. The results indicate that comorbidities affect cancer outcomes and that they must be considered strategies mitigating cancer’s economic and social impact.

  16. Mass-like Dieulafoy's lesion associated with advanced gastric cancer at the antrum of stomach: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsi-Lan; Leung, Chi Yan; Cheng, Chien-Jui

    2017-10-10

    Dieulafoy's lesion, also known as a caliber-persistent artery, is a shallow, small, and rare lesion that occurs along the lesser curvature of proximal stomach. It is rare for a Dieulafoy's lesion to present as a mass-like lesion that coexists with gastric cancer. To our best knowledge, we report the first case and histopathological pictures of a mass-like Dieulafoy's lesion coexisting with advanced gastric cancer in the antrum of the stomach. A 57-year-old female presented with a 6-month history of intermittent epigastric dull pain and dyspepsia. Subsequent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a friable mass that was located between the distal antrum and the pyloric ring. Biopsy revealed it to be an intestinal type adenocarcinoma. Subtotal gastrectomy was performed after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Grossly, a large irregular plaque-like tumor lesion was noted at the anterior wall of the distal antrum and pylorus ring near the lesser curvature, measuring 5.6 × 4.8 × 1.0 cm. Histopathological examination of the resected stomach revealed that the plaque-like lesion largely consisted of numerous abnormally large-caliber and tortuous arteries in the submucosa. The increased fibrosis of the submucosa resulted in the formation of elevated plaque. The intestinal type adenocarcinoma was noted to be largely confined to the mucosa layer, with focal submucosal and muscular propria involvement. The patient was discharged one week after the subtotal gastrectomy, and she was alive and well 17 months after discharge, with no major complications. This is the first case of a mass-like Dieulafoy's lesion coexisting with advanced gastric cancer at the distal antrum area. This case highlights the possibility of life-threatening gastric bleeding after mucosal resection or biopsy that could be encountered by endoscopists.

  17. LGBT Populations' Barriers to Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmer, Ulrike

    2018-02-01

    To describe lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals' barriers to accessing and receiving quality cancer care. Published data on cancer care and studies of LGBT individuals. There is a clustering of barriers among LGBT individuals, which suggests multiple inequities exist in LGBT individuals' cancer care, although data on disparities along the cancer control continuum are not consistently available. Nurses can make a difference in LGBT individuals' cancer care by obtaining training on LGBT health and their cancer-related needs and by providing a welcoming and respectful relationship with LGBT patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An investigation of compositions and effects of local herbal Glycyrrhiza glabra and Mentha pulegium extracts on Helicobacter pylori and cell Line of stomach cancer (AGS by MTT assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Salmani Jamaat1

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim:According to globally development of stomach cancer especially in Ardabil, Iran, as the second major cause of mortality throughout the world, increased drug-resistant bacteria including Helicobacter pylori as the most important risk factors for stomach cancer, and side effects of antibiotics and chemical drugs normally used to treat. Experimental: The current research was conducted to investigate the anticancer and antimicrobial effects of native herbs of liquorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra and pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium extractions for finding a solution with the lowest complications in control or treatment of stomach cancer.The extractions were firstly obtained using Soxhlet and methanol solvent and then their compounds were determined by GC/MS. Antimicrobial activity, MIC and MBC of the extractions were assessed respectively using agar diffusion and broth dilution test and the anticancer effect on stomach cancer (cell line AGS was assessed by MTT assay. H. pylori ATCC 26695 was respectively revived and purified on Brucella broth containing 7% citrated horse serum and Columbia agar. Results: The analysis showed that liquorice extract contains 15 compositions, mainly consists of 26.48% Nonane, 23.38% Ethylcyclohexan, 8.29% 3-Bromodecane, 10.31% trans-2-Heptenal, 8.93% 9-Octadecenamide and 4.68% β-pregna and pennyroyal extract contains 17 compositions, mainly including 3.36% Camphor, 22.79% Pulegone, 4.92% Paramenth-3-n8-l, 8.06% Menthoforan, 7.54% Cis-Isopulegon and 24.58% α-Selinene. The bacteria were resistant or semi-sensitive to common antibiotics, whereas had considerable sensitivity to herbal extracts and liquorice showed almost three times more antibacterial effect. Pennyroyal extract had no cytotoxic effects, but the anticancer effect was observed in liquorice extract with optimal concentration of 25 μg/ml after 48 hours. Recommended applications/industries: In conclusion, liquorice extract due to the significant health

  19. Trends of stomach cancer mortality in Eastern Asia in 1950-2004: comparative study of Japan, Hong Kong and Singapore using age, period and cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Ma, Enbo; Tanaka, Hideo; Ioka, Akiko; Nakahara, Toshitaka; Takahashi, Hideto

    2012-02-15

    To characterize the temporal trends of stomach cancer mortality in Eastern Asia and to better interpret the causes of the trends, we performed age, period and cohort analysis (APC analysis) on the mortality rates in Japan, Hong Kong and Singapore during 1950-2004, as well as the rates in the US as a control population. For the APC analysis, Holford's approach was used to avoid the identification problem. Age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) decreased consistently in all four areas during the observation period in both males and females. Japan had the highest ASMR in both sexes, followed by Singapore, Hong Kong and the US, but the differences in ASMR among the four areas diminished with time. The results of APC analysis suggested that the decreasing mortality rates in Eastern Asia were caused by the combination of decreasing cohort effect since the end of the 1800s and decreasing period effect from the 1950s. The US showed similar results, but its decreases in the period and cohort effect preceded those of Eastern Asia. Possible causes for the decrease in the cohort effect include improvement in the socioeconomic conditions during childhood and a decrease in the prevalence of H. pylori infection, while possible causes for the decrease in the period effect include a decrease in dietary salt intake and improvements in cancer detection and treatment. These findings may help us to predict future changes in the mortality rates of stomach cancer. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  20. Mobile Technology Applications in Cancer Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire de Castro Silva, Sandro Luís; Gonçalves, Antônio Augusto; Cheng, Cezar; Fernandes Martins, Carlos Henrique

    2018-01-01

    Mobile devices frequently used in other specialties can find great utility in palliative care. For healthcare professionals, the use of mobile technology not only can bring additional resources to the care, but it can actually radically change the cancer remote care practices. The Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) has developed the largest cancer home care program in Latin America, which currently benefits more than 500 patients. The purpose of this paper is to show the development of an ICT environment of mobile applications developed to support the palliative cancer care program at INCA.

  1. Regional Multiteam Systems in Cancer Care Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, John R.T.; Rizvi, Irfan; Savastano, Ann; Green, James S.A.; Sevdalis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Teamwork is essential for addressing many of the challenges that arise in the coordination and delivery of cancer care, especially for the problems that are presented by patients who cross geographic boundaries and enter and exit multiple health care systems at various times during their cancer care journeys. The problem of coordinating the care of patients with cancer is further complicated by the growing number of treatment options and modalities, incompatibilities among the vast variety of technology platforms that have recently been adopted by the health care industry, and competing and misaligned incentives for providers and systems. Here we examine the issue of regional care coordination in cancer through the prism of a real patient journey. This article will synthesize and elaborate on existing knowledge about coordination approaches for complex systems, in particular, in general and cancer care multidisciplinary teams; define elements of coordination derived from organizational psychology and human factors research that are applicable to team-based cancer care delivery; and suggest approaches for improving multidisciplinary team coordination in regional cancer care delivery and avenues for future research. The phenomenon of the mobile, multisystem patient represents a growing challenge in cancer care. Paradoxically, development of high-quality, high-volume centers of excellence and the ease of virtual communication and data sharing by using electronic medical records have introduced significant barriers to effective team-based cancer care. These challenges urgently require solutions. PMID:27650833

  2. [A Case of Gastric Cancer with Splenic Artery Aneurysm, Intraoperative ICG Fluorography Is Useful in Evaluating the Blood Flow of Stomach and Spleen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Kenji; Sakamoto, Kaoru; Akabane, Kentaro; Hayasaka, Kazuki; Mizuki, Toru; Yagi, Yutaka; Shirahata, Yasuhiro; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Hanyu, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Saito, Kiyohiro; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2017-11-01

    An 81-year-oldwoman with advancedgastric cancer was referredto our hospital. Preoperative contrast-enhancedCT revealeda roundcalcification of the splenic hilum with 15mm in diameter as a splenic artery aneurysm. She underwent transcatheter arterial embolization(TAE)for the splenic artery aneurysm. Celiac artery angiography showedcollateral arterial network of the spleen from left gastric artery. Surgery for the gastric cancer was performed1 4 days after TAE. We cut the right gastric andbilateral epigastric arteries. After the left gastric artery clamping, we performedintraoperative indocyanine green(ICG)fluorography. ICG fluorography confirmedthat the bloodflow of the upper thirdof the stomach andspleen were maintained. We safely performed distal gastrectomy, and the postoperative course was uneventful.

  3. Comparison of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography, hydro-stomach computed tomography, and their combination for detecting primary gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hye Young; Chung, Woo Suk; Song, E Rang; Kim, Jin Suk [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Konyang University Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    To retrospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy for detecting primary gastric cancer on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and hydro-stomach CT (S-CT) and determine whether the combination of the two techniques improves diagnostic performance. A total of 253 patients with pathologically proven primary gastric cancer underwent PET/CT and S-CT for the preoperative evaluation. Two radiologists independently reviewed the three sets (PET/CT set, S-CT set, and the combined set) of PET/CT and S-CT in a random order. They graded the likelihood for the presence of primary gastric cancer based on a 4-point scale. The diagnostic accuracy of the PET/CT set, the S-CT set, and the combined set were determined by the area under the alternative-free receiver operating characteristic curve, and sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and NPV for detecting all gastric cancers and early gastric cancers (EGCs) were significantly higher with the combined set than those with the PET/CT and S-CT sets. Specificity and PPV were significantly higher with the PET/CT set than those with the combined and S-CT set for detecting all gastric cancers and EGCs. The combination of PET/CT and S-CT is more accurate than S-CT alone, particularly for detecting EGCs.

  4. Comparison of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography, hydro-stomach computed tomography, and their combination for detecting primary gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Hye Young; Chung, Woo Suk; Song, E Rang; Kim, Jin Suk

    2015-01-01

    To retrospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy for detecting primary gastric cancer on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and hydro-stomach CT (S-CT) and determine whether the combination of the two techniques improves diagnostic performance. A total of 253 patients with pathologically proven primary gastric cancer underwent PET/CT and S-CT for the preoperative evaluation. Two radiologists independently reviewed the three sets (PET/CT set, S-CT set, and the combined set) of PET/CT and S-CT in a random order. They graded the likelihood for the presence of primary gastric cancer based on a 4-point scale. The diagnostic accuracy of the PET/CT set, the S-CT set, and the combined set were determined by the area under the alternative-free receiver operating characteristic curve, and sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and NPV for detecting all gastric cancers and early gastric cancers (EGCs) were significantly higher with the combined set than those with the PET/CT and S-CT sets. Specificity and PPV were significantly higher with the PET/CT set than those with the combined and S-CT set for detecting all gastric cancers and EGCs. The combination of PET/CT and S-CT is more accurate than S-CT alone, particularly for detecting EGCs.

  5. Air pollution and incidence of cancers of the stomach and the upper aerodigestive tract in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Gabriele; Stafoggia, Massimo; Pedersen, Marie; Andersen, Zorana J; Galassi, Claudia; Munkenast, Jule; Jaensch, Andrea; Sommar, Johan; Forsberg, Bertil; Olsson, David; Oftedal, Bente; Krog, Norun H; Aamodt, Geir; Pyko, Andrei; Pershagen, Göran; Korek, Michal; De Faire, Ulf; Pedersen, Nancy L; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Fratiglioni, Laura; Sørensen, Mette; Tjønneland, Anne; Peeters, Petra H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Vermeulen, Roel; Eeftens, Marloes; Plusquin, Michelle; Key, Timothy J; Concin, Hans; Lang, Alois; Wang, Meng; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Grioni, Sara; Marcon, Alessandro; Krogh, Vittorio; Ricceri, Fulvio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Ranzi, Andrea; Cesaroni, Giulia; Forastiere, Francesco; Tamayo-Uria, Ibon; Amiano, Pilar; Dorronsoro, Miren; de Hoogh, Kees; Beelen, Rob; Vineis, Paolo; Brunekreef, Bert; Hoek, Gerard; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Weinmayr, Gudrun

    2018-04-26

    Air pollution has been classified as carcinogenic to humans. However, to date little is known about the relevance for cancers of the stomach and upper aerodigestive tract (UADT). We investigated the association of long-term exposure to ambient air pollution with incidence of gastric and UADT cancer in 11 European cohorts. Air pollution exposure was assigned by land-use regression models for particulate matter (PM) below 10 µm (PM 10 ), below 2.5 µm (PM 2.5 ), between 2.5 and 10 µm (PM coarse ), PM 2.5 absorbance and nitrogen oxides (NO 2 and NO X ) as well as approximated by traffic indicators. Cox regression models with adjustment for potential confounders were used for cohort-specific analyses. Combined estimates were determined with random effects meta-analyses. During average follow-up of 14.1 years of 305 551 individuals, 744 incident cases of gastric cancer and 933 of UADT cancer occurred. The hazard ratio for an increase of 5 µg/m 3 of PM 2.5 was 1.38 (95%-CI 0.99;1.92) for gastric and 1.05 (95%-CI 0.62;1.77) for UADT cancers. No associations were found for any of the other exposures considered. Adjustment for additional confounders and restriction to study participants with stable addresses did not influence markedly the effect estimate for PM 2.5 and gastric cancer. Higher estimated risks of gastric cancer associated with PM 2.5 was found in men (HR 1.98 (1.30;3.01)) as compared to women (HR 0.85 (0.5;1.45)). This large multicentre cohort study shows an association between long-term exposure to PM 2.5 and gastric cancer, but not UADT cancers, suggesting that air pollution may contribute to gastric cancer risk. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 UICC.

  6. Splenic hilar lymph node metastasis independently predicts poor survival for patients with gastric cancers in the upper and/or the middle third of the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guo-Lian; Sun, Zhe; Wang, Zhen-Ning; Xu, Ying-Ying; Huang, Bao-Jun; Xu, Yan; Zhu, Zhi; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2012-06-15

    Effectiveness of splenectomy for advanced gastric cancers occupying the upper and/or the middle third of the stomach is still in debate. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the impact of splenectomy on patient survival by investigating the pathological characteristics and prognostic significance of splenic hilar lymph node metastasis. Clinicopathologic and prognostic data of 265 patients with gastric cancer in the upper and/or the middle third of the stomach who underwent the operation of en bloc resection of primary cancer and D2/D3 lymphadenectomy combined with splenectomy were retrospectively reviewed. Multivariate analysis revealed pT category, pN category, and distant lymph node metastasis independently correlated with the presence of splenic hilar lymph node metastasis. Prognoses of patients with positive splenic hilar lymph nodes were significantly poorer than that of patients with negative splenic hilar lymph nodes for the entire study population and for those who underwent R0 resection, but not for those who underwent R1-2 resection. There was no significant difference in survival between patients who underwent R0 resection with positive splenic hilar lymph nodes and those who underwent R1-2 resection. Splenic hilar lymph node metastasis was one of independent indicators predicting worse prognosis and the presence of distant metastasis after surgery. Subset analysis according to the TNM stage revealed there were significant differences in survival between patients with and without splenic hilar lymph node metastasis. Splenic hilar lymph node metastasis should be considered as one of incurable factors. Consequently, the efficiency of splenectomy aiming at prolonging survival for patients with high risk of splenic hilar lymph nodes metastasis should be questioned, although resection of invasive organs form gastric cancers has been recommended if R0 surgery could be achieved. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nationwide quality improvement in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik Winther; Green, Anders; Oesterlind, Kell

    2013-01-01

    To improve prognosis and quality of lung cancer care the Danish Lung Cancer Group has developed a strategy consisting of national clinical guidelines and a clinical quality and research database. The first edition of our guidelines was published in 1998 and our national lung cancer registry...... was opened for registrations in 2000. This article describes methods and results obtained by multidisciplinary collaboration and illustrates how quality of lung cancer care can be improved by establishing and monitoring result and process indicators....

  8. The stomach in health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, R H; Camilleri, M; Crowe, S E; El-Omar, E M; Fox, J G; Kuipers, E J; Malfertheiner, P; McColl, K E L; Pritchard, D M; Rugge, M; Sonnenberg, A; Sugano, K; Tack, J

    2016-01-01

    The stomach is traditionally regarded as a hollow muscular sac that initiates the second phase of digestion. Yet this simple view ignores the fact that it is the most sophisticated endocrine organ with unique physiology, biochemistry, immunology and microbiology. All ingested materials, including our nutrition, have to negotiate this organ first, and as such, the stomach is arguably the most important segment within the GI tract. The unique biological function of gastric acid secretion not only initiates the digestive process but also acts as a first line of defence against food-borne microbes. Normal gastric physiology and morphology may be disrupted by Helicobacter pylori infection, the most common chronic bacterial infection in the world and the aetiological agent for most peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. In this state-of-the-art review, the most relevant new aspects of the stomach in health and disease are addressed. Topics include gastric physiology and the role of gastric dysmotility in dyspepsia and gastroparesis; the stomach in appetite control and obesity; there is an update on the immunology of the stomach and the emerging field of the gastric microbiome. H. pylori-induced gastritis and its associated diseases including peptic ulcers and gastric cancer are addressed together with advances in diagnosis. The conclusions provide a future approach to gastric diseases underpinned by the concept that a healthy stomach is the gateway to a healthy and balanced host. This philosophy should reinforce any public health efforts designed to eradicate major gastric diseases, including stomach cancer. PMID:26342014

  9. Stomach development, stem cells and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.

    2016-01-01

    The stomach, an organ derived from foregut endoderm, secretes acid and enzymes and plays a key role in digestion. During development, mesenchymal-epithelial interactions drive stomach specification, patterning, differentiation and growth through selected signaling pathways and transcription factors. After birth, the gastric epithelium is maintained by the activity of stem cells. Developmental signals are aberrantly activated and stem cell functions are disrupted in gastric cancer and other disorders. Therefore, a better understanding of stomach development and stem cells can inform approaches to treating these conditions. This Review highlights the molecular mechanisms of stomach development and discusses recent findings regarding stomach stem cells and organoid cultures, and their roles in investigating disease mechanisms. PMID:26884394

  10. The role of three-dimensional multidetector CT gastrography in the preoperative imaging of stomach cancer: Emphasis on detection and localization of the tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Heo, Suk Hee; Lim, Hyo Soon; Park, Young Kyu; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Nam Yeol [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) gastrography has been regarded as a promising technique for the preoperative imaging of gastric cancer. It has the ability to produce various three-dimensional (3D) images. Because 3D reconstruction images are more effective and intuitive for recognizing abnormal changes in the gastric folds and subtle mucosal nodularity than two-dimensional images, 3D MDCT gastrography can enhance the detection rate of early gastric cancer, which, in turn, contributes to the improvement of the accuracy of preoperative tumor (T) staging. In addition, shaded surface display and tissue transition projection images provide a global view of the stomach, with the exact location of gastric cancer, which may replace the need for barium studies. In this article, we discuss technical factors in producing high-quality MDCT gastrographic images and present cases demonstrating the usefulness of MDCT gastrography for the detection and T staging of gastric cancer while emphasizing the significance of preoperative localization of gastric cancer in terms of surgical margin.

  11. MRI: Imaging of stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, W. W. M; Lee, J. S. W.; Ho, G.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The study is to determine the optimal MRI bowel preparation regime for visualization of the stomach anatomy, Eight healthy volunteers were asked to take water, 75% barium and blueberry juice. The image quality and tolerance of different stomach distension regime were evaluated. Blueberry juice gave the best distension, but the signal intensity was not very homogeneous. Taking into account the image quality, tolerability and adverse effects, it is concluded that water is the most desirable oral contrast for MR stomach imaging

  12. Effect of doxorubicin, oxaliplatin, and methotrexate administration on the transcriptional activity of BCL-2 family gene members in stomach cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florou, Dimitra; Patsis, Christos; Ardavanis, Alexandros; Scorilas, Andreas

    2013-07-01

    Defective apoptosis comprises the main reason for tumor aggressiveness and chemotherapy tolerance in solid neoplasias. Among the BCL-2 family members, whose mRNA or protein expression varies considerably in different human malignancies, BCL2L12 is the one for which we have recently shown its propitious prognostic value in gastric cancer. The purpose of the current work was to investigate the expression behavior of BCL2L12, BAX, and BCL-2 in human stomach adenocarcinoma cells following their exposure to anti-tumor substances. The 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and trypan blue methods assessed the impact of doxorubicin, oxaliplatin and methotrexate on AGS cells' viability and growth. Following isolation from cells, total RNA was reverse-transcribed to cDNA. Quantification of target genes' expression was performed with real-time PCR using SYBR Green detection system. The relative changes in their mRNA levels between drug-exposed and untreated cells were calculated with the comparative Ct method (2(-ddCt)). All three drugs, as a result of their administration to AGS cancer cells for particular time intervals, provoked substantial fluctuations in the transcriptional levels of the apoptosis-related genes studied. While BAX was principally upregulated, striking similar were the notable changes regarding BCL-2 and BCL2L12 expression in our cellular system. Our findings indicate the growth suppressive effects of doxorubicin, oxaliplatin and methotrexate treatment on stomach carcinoma cells and the implication of BCL2L12, BAX, and BCL-2 expression profiles in the molecular signaling pathways triggered by chemotherapy.

  13. Optimizing Cancer Care Delivery through Implementation Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather B Neuman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2013 Institute of Medicine report investigating cancer care concluded that the cancer care delivery system is in crisis due to an increased demand for care, increasing complexity of treatment, decreasing work force and rising costs. Engaging patients and incorporating evidence-based care into routine clinical practice are essential components of a high quality cancer delivery system. However, a gap currently exists between the identification of beneficial research findings and application in clinical practice. Implementation research strives to address this gap. In this review, we discuss key components of high quality implementation research. We then apply these concepts to a current cancer care delivery challenge in women’s health, specifically the implementation of a surgery decision aid for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer.

  14. Supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A supportive needs assessment is an essential component of any care program. There is no research evidence regarding the supportive care needs of cancer patients in Iran or other Middle Eastern countries. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in a referral medical center in the northwest of Iran. A total of 274 cancer patients completed the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-59. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: In 18 items of the SCNS, more than 50% of the participants reported that their needs were unmet. Most frequently, unmet needs were related to the health system, information, physical, and daily living domains, and most met needs were related to sexuality, patient care, and support domains. Conclusions: Iranian cancer patients experience many unmet needs and there is an urgent need for establishing additional supportive care services in Iran.

  15. Two-Step Laparoscopic Surgery for a Patient with Synchronous Double Cancer of the Colon and Stomach Accompanied by Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhito Yajima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic treatment strategies for synchronous intra-abdominal malignancies have not yet been standardized. We report a successful case of two-step laparoscopic surgery for synchronous double cancer of the colon and stomach accompanied by severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. A 66-year-old man with COPD was diagnosed as having advanced colon cancer and early gastric cancer. On admission, he could not go upstairs (Grade III according to the Hugh-Jones classification and his forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 600 mL (35.9%. The patient initially underwent laparoscopy-assisted sigmoidectomy with D3 lymphadenectomy, followed by laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy with D1 lymphadenectomy 68 days later. The patient's each postoperative course was uneventful with no pulmonary complications, and the patient was discharged 9 and 11 days after the first and second operations, respectively. The present case demonstrates that two-step laparoscopic surgery may be a safe and feasible surgical procedure for high-risk patients with synchronous intra-abdominal malignancies.

  16. Choriocarcinoma of the Stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae; Lim, Jae Hee

    1987-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma is considered to be a malignant tumor of the trophoblast originating within the uterus. But it may be rarely encountered in the stomach. We have experienced a case of extragonadal choriocarcinoma arising from the stomach and present its ultrasonographic findings

  17. Ulcers of stomach body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oster, A.N.; Rizaev, M.N.

    1986-01-01

    Symptoms of the roentgenologic image in differential diagnosis of nonmalignant ulcers and stomach carcinomas ulcerated are presented. Problems on X-ray semiotics of ulcerations, data on X-ray represenetation of ulcer evolution as well as postulcer changes in the stomach are interpreted

  18. "Stomach Flu" (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Educators Search English Español "Stomach Flu" KidsHealth / For Kids / "Stomach Flu" Print Many people talk about the " ...

  19. Stomach acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour (mEq/ ...

  20. Social Media Use in Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joni

    2018-05-01

    To describe the increasing professional use of social media within oncology health care practice. Peer-reviewed and lay publications. Social media has changed the communication landscape over the last 15 years. An integral part of worldwide culture, oncology health care professionals can utilize social media to listen, learn, engage, and co-create to advance cancer care. Nurses must be aware of the professional uses for social media, how to use the media, and where to find evidence supporting health care social media efforts within cancer care. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictive value of pretreatment metabolic activity measured by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in patients with metastatic advanced gastric cancer: the maximal SUV of the stomach is a prognostic factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Chul; Cheoi, Kungseok; Chung, Hyunsoo; Lee, Hyuk; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong Chan [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Institute of Gastroenterology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Hoon; Yun, Mi Jin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Few studies have evaluated metabolic activity by {sup 18}F-FDG PET as a prognostic factor in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). We investigated its prognostic role in metastatic AGC. We enrolled 82 patients with metastatic AGC, who were treatment-naive and underwent pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scanning. In each patient, the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was measured in each target lesion. Stomach{sub SUVmax} was defined as SUVmax in the stomach, while Total{sub SUVmax} was defined as the highest SUVmax among all the target lesions. The stomach was the organ most frequently displaying the highest SUVmax among all the target lesions (in 67.1 % of patients). A Total{sub SUVmax} value of 11.5 was the value with the maximum sum of sensitivity and specificity from receiver-operating characteristic curves for progression-free survival (PFS). PFS was significantly longer in patients with a Total{sub SUVmax} value <11.5 than in those with a Total{sub SUVmax} value {>=}11.5 (P = 0.023); however, overall survival (OS) was not (P = 0.055). A Stomach{sub SUVmax} value of 6.0 was derived by similar methods. PFS and OS were significantly longer in those with a Stomach{sub SUVmax} value <6.0 than in those with a Stomach{sub SUVmax} value {>=}6.0 (P = 0.001 and P = 0.006, respectively). Furthermore, those with a low Total{sub SUVmax} and those with a low Stomach{sub SUVmax} showed better chemotherapeutic responses (P = 0.016 and P = 0.034, respectively). Among patients with histologically undifferentiated carcinomas, those with lower Total{sub SUVmax} and those with lower Stomach{sub SUVmax} showed longer median PFS (P = 0.027 and P = 0.005, respectively) and OS (P = 0.009 and P <0.001, respectively). Multivariate analysis demonstrated Stomach{sub SUVmax} as an independent predictor of PFS (P = 0.002) and OS (P = 0.038). Pretreatment metabolic activity may be a useful prognostic marker in patients with metastatic AGC undergoing palliative chemotherapy. Notably

  2. Survivorship care needs among LGBT cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seay, Julia; Mitteldorf, Darryl; Yankie, Alena; Pirl, William F; Kobetz, Erin; Schlumbrecht, Matthew

    2018-05-23

    To better understand survivorship care needs among LGBT cancer survivors. We administered an anonymous online survey. LGBT cancer survivors living in the United States. Participants were recruited via the National LGBT Cancer Project. The survey measured sociodemographic characteristics, social support, posttraumatic stress, and survivorship care needs. Approximately 72% of our 114 participants were cisgender male and 87% were white. Almost all participants reported at least some unmet survivorship care needs (73%), with over half of participants reporting unmet psychological and sexuality care needs. Participants who reported their oncologist was not LGBT-competent had greater unmet needs (t(82) = 2.5, p = 0.01) and greater posttraumatic stress (t(91) = 2.1, p = 0.035). LGBT cancer survivors have significant unmet survivorship care needs, and lack of oncologist LGBT-competence is associated with unmet needs. Implications for Psychosocial Providers: Our results suggest the need for LGBT competency training for providers.

  3. Overview on Patient Centricity in Cancer Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarunas Narbutas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Successful implementation of treatment in cancer care partially depends on how patients' perspectives are taken into account, as preferences of health care professionals and patients may differ. Objectives of this exploratory research were (I to identify patient preferences and values (PPVs in cancer care as indicated by patient organizations (POs, (II to determine how these PPVs are captured in cancer care guidelines and (III to review how guidelines take into account these PPVs. Based on a survey developed and completed by 19 POs, a literature review was conducted to analyse how patient perspectives are incorporated in oncology treatment guidelines. Based on survey results traditional health technology assessment value propositions of oncology care, such as extended life, treatment-free remission and pain reduction, were also highly rated by POs. However, the heterogeneity of cancer PPVs were clearly reflected in the survey results. PPVs in cancer care guidelines were mostly limited to those micro-level aspects that are strictly related to health care provision, such as side-effects and comorbidities. Patient experience, emotional support and convenience of care were relatively neglected fields in the reviewed guidelines. Patient engagement was rarely presented in the guideline development phase. POs believe that patients should be encouraged to take an active role in their own care due to the heterogeneity of cancer patients and PPVs. Even if patient-centricity is a leading paradigm in cancer policy, based on our research it is not yet standard practice to include patients or POs at all appropriate levels of decision-making processes that are related to their health and well-being. Patient engagement should be an integral part of cancer care decision-making. This complexity must be reflected throughout policy making, avoiding a population level “one-size-fits-all” solution.

  4. Managing Cancer Care - Finding Health Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... my condition? Has it been rated by state, consumer, or other groups for its quality of care? ... be both rewarding and demanding. It can change relationships and require families to cope with all aspects ...

  5. Diagnosis of Stomach Carcinoma by Radioisotope Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerniak, P.; Meytes, E.; Sinkover, A.; Bank, H. [Tel-Hashomer Government Hospital, University of Tel Aviv School of Medicine (Israel)

    1969-05-15

    Scanning of the stomach after administration of {sup 131}I and {sup 99m}Tc is presented. Experiments on 20 dogs were performed and 105 patients were examined. The studies with {sup 131}I are only mentioned briefly as they have been summarized in a previous publication and we have concentrated on our experience with {sup 99m}Tc and on stomach carcinoma. The turnover of the nuclide in blood, urine, gastric juice and gastric mucosa was tested: in-vivo and post-operative scannings were performed. The scans are classified in four groups. Carcinoma of the stomach results in space-occupying lesions or foggy scans. A correlation of 85 - 90% between scan results and clinical findings is noted. A special group of 10 volunteers was examined to establish the possibility of a screening examination for the detection of stomach cancer using the technique presented. (author)

  6. Prediction of Helicobacter pylori status by conventional endoscopy, narrow-band imaging magnifying endoscopy in stomach after endoscopic resection of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Kazuyoshi; Saka, Akiko; Nozawa, Yujiro; Nakamura, Atsuo

    2014-04-01

    To reduce the incidence of metachronous gastric carcinoma after endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy has been endorsed. It is not unusual for such patients to be H. pylori negative after eradication or for other reasons. If it were possible to predict H. pylori status using endoscopy alone, it would be very useful in clinical practice. To clarify the accuracy of endoscopic judgment of H. pylori status, we evaluated it in the stomach after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of gastric cancer. Fifty-six patients treated by ESD were enrolled. The diagnostic criteria for H. pylori status by conventional endoscopy and narrow-band imaging (NBI)-magnifying endoscopy were decided, and H. pylori status was judged by two endoscopists. Based on the H. pylori stool antigen test as a diagnostic gold standard, conventional endoscopy and NBI-magnifying endoscopy were compared for their sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV). Interobserver agreement was assessed in terms of κ value. Interobserver agreement was moderate (0.56) for conventional endoscopy and substantial (0.77) for NBI-magnifying endoscopy. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 0.79, 0.52, 0.70, and 0.63 for conventional endoscopy and 0.91, 0.83, 0.88, and 0.86 for NBI-magnifying endoscopy, respectively. Prediction of H. pylori status using NBI-magnifying endoscopy is practical, and interobserver agreement is substantial. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [Perspectives of the stomach cancer treatment: the introduction of molecular targeted therapy and the hope for cure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jae Kwang

    2013-03-25

    The overall survival of patients with gastric cancer has increased markedly in Korea, even higher than those of developed nations in Western world. It is due to the virtue of Korean National Cancer Screening Program and nowadays more than half of patients are diagnosed at the early stage of gastric cancer. However, for patients with unresectable gastric cancer, the outcomes of traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens stay at a median survival of 9-11 months. The knowledge of cancer biology and the data from gene expression profiling has explosively expanded. Alternations in the expression of receptor tyrosine kinases pathways including Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), phosphatydyl inositol 3 kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/mTOR), hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR/MET), and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) were proved to be critical in cancer cell survival and biological agents targeting those altered receptor tyrosine kinases, their ligands and downstream effector molecules are developed for anti-cancer purpose. Until now, only trastuzumab succeeded to significantly increase overall survival of patients with HER2 overexpressing gastric cancer. Other agents including bevacizumab, gefitinib, erlotinib, and lapatinib failed to achieve the efficacy in survival gain over standard chemotherapy. Insights about the variations between regions, races, and individuals call for the effort to find reliable predictive biomarkers for drug efficacy and to design finely stratified clinical trials. Compared to current treatment paradigms, it is hoped that molecularly targeted treatment along with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy will lead to significant gains in survival.

  8. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  9. Haplotype analysis of the HFE gene among populations of Northern Eurasia, in patients with metabolic disorders or stomach cancer, and in long-lived people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, S V; Babenko, V N; Ivanoshchuk, D E; Gubina, M A; Maksimov, V N; Solovjova, I G; Voevoda, M I

    2016-06-17

    Previously, it was shown that the HFE gene (associated with human hereditary hemochromatosis) has several haplotypes of intronic polymorphisms. Some haplotype frequencies are race specific and hence can be used in phylogenetic analysis. We assumed that analysis of Caucasoid patients-living now in Western Siberia and having diseases associated with dietary habits and metabolic rate-will allow us to understand the processes of possible selection during settling of the northern part of Asia. Haplotype analysis of Northern Eurasian native and recently settled ethnic groups was performed on polymorphisms rs1799945, rs1800730, rs1800562, rs2071303, rs1800708, rs1572982, rs2794719, rs807209, and rs2032451 of this gene. The CCA haplotype of the rs2071303, rs1800708, and rs1572982 was found to be associated with HLA-A2 (39 %) in Asian populations. Haplotype analysis for the rs1799945, rs1800730, rs1800562, rs2071303, rs1800708, and rs1572982 was performed on Russian patients with some metabolic disorders or stomach cancer and among long-lived people. Decreased frequencies of the TTA haplotype (T in rs2071303, T in rs1800708, and A in rs1572982) were observed in the groups of patients with diseases associated with overweight (fatty liver disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, or metabolic syndrome + arterial hypertension) as compared with the control sample. We detected significant differences in this haplotype's frequency between the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and Russian adolescents, elderly citizens, and long-lived people (χ(2) P value = 0.003, 0.010, and 0.015, respectively). No significant differences in frequencies of the alleles with mutations in coding regions of the HFE gene (C282Y, H63D, and S65C) were detected between the analyzed patients (with stomach cancer, metabolic syndrome, fatty liver disease, or type 2 diabetes mellitus) and the control Caucasoid sample. Monophyletic origin of H63D (rs1799945) was confirmed in Caucasoids and Northern

  10. Neoplasms of the Stomach, Liver & Pancreas: Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment among High-Risk Populations | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agenda - Day 1, September 18, 2015 08:00 am - Registration 08:30 am - Welcome remarks and overview of the Conference Dr. Leslie Ford (NCI) – 5 min Dr. Edgar Colon (RCM and UPRCCC) - 5 min Luz Maria Rodriguez – Conference objectives & structure  Global Cancer Burden: An Overview and State of the Problem Moderators: Dr. Luz Maria Rodriguez and Dr. Victor Jose Carlo (PR

  11. Removal of Nasogastric Tube Accidentally Stitched to Roux-en-Y Oesophagojejunostomy Following a Radical Gastrectomy for Stomach Cancer: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Z. Azzam

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nasogastric tubes (NGTs are important for feeding, stenting and decompression after gastrointestinal surgeries, particularly in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Resistance in the removal of a NGT is a rare surgical complication and may be due to a knot in the tube or a stitch anchoring the tube to an anastomosis. We report a 41-year-old male patient who was admitted to the King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in 2015 with stomach cancer. He underwent a radical total gastrectomy with a Roux-en-Y oesophagojejunostomy. One week after the surgery, removal of the NGT was attempted; however, this was very difficult and the proximal end of the tube was cut off as a temporary measure. Six weeks later, an upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy revealed that the distal end of the NGT had been accidentally stitched to the Roux-en-Y oesophagojejunostomy. The stitch was removed and the rest of the NGT was successfully extracted using a snare.

  12. A Comparative Dosimetric Study of Adjuvant 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Operable Stomach Cancer Versus AP-PA Conventional Radiotherapy in NCI-Cairo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hossiny, H.A.; Diab, N.A.; El-Taher, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study was to compare this multiple field conformal technique to the AP-PA technique with respect to target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with stages II-III denocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant postoperative chemoradiotherapy presented to radiotherapy department in National Cancer Institute, Cairo in period between February 2009 to March 2010 using 3D conformal radiotherapy technique that consisted of a mono isocentric arrangement employing 4-6 radiation fields. For each patient, a second radiotherapy treatment plan was done using an antroposterior (AP-PA) fields, the two techniques were then compared using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Results: Comparing different DVHs, it was found that the planning target volume (PTV) was adequately covered in both (3D and 2D) plans while the left kidney and spinal cord demonstrate lower radiation doses on using the conformal technique. The liver doses is higher in the 3D tecq, but still well below liver tolerance. Conclusions: Both 3D conformal radiotherapy and AP-PA conventional techniques doses are within range of normal tissues tolerance. Regarding the left kidney and spinal cord the 3D conformal radiotherapy is superior than the AP-PA conventional techniques but with higher doses to the liver in the 3D conformal radiotherapy compared to the AP-PA conventional techniques

  13. Cancer Patient Navigator Tasks across the Cancer Care Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Holden, Alan E. C.; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Tran, Jacqueline H.; Seals, Brenda F.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Tsark, JoAnn U.; Harjo, Lisa; Foo, Mary Anne; Ramirez, Amelie G.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patient navigation (PN) programs have been shown to increase access to and utilization of cancer care for poor and underserved individuals. Despite mounting evidence of its value, cancer patient navigation is not universally understood or provided. We describe five PN programs and the range of tasks their navigators provide across the cancer care continuum (education and outreach, screening, diagnosis and staging, treatment, survivorship, and end-of-life). Tasks are organized by their potential to make cancer services understandable, available, accessible, affordable, appropriate, and accountable. Although navigators perform similar tasks across the five programs, their specific approaches reflect differences in community culture, context, program setting, and funding. Task lists can inform the development of programs, job descriptions, training, and evaluation. They also may be useful in the move to certify navigators and establish mechanisms for reimbursement for navigation services. PMID:22423178

  14. Cancer Survivorship Care: Person Centered Care in a Multidisciplinary Shared Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Loonen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of childhood and adult-onset cancer are at lifelong risk for the development of late effects of treatment that can lead to serious morbidity and premature mortality. Regular long-term follow-up aiming for prevention, early detection and intervention of late effects can preserve or improve health. The heterogeneous and often serious character of late effects emphasizes the need for specialized cancer survivorship care clinics. Multidisciplinary cancer survivorship care requires a coordinated and well integrated health care environment for risk based screening and intervention. In addition survivors engagement and adherence to the recommendations are also important elements. We developed an innovative model for integrated care for cancer survivors, the “Personalized Cancer Survivorship Care Model”, that is being used in our clinic. This model comprises 1. Personalized follow-up care according to the principles of Person Centered Care, aiming to empower survivors and to support self management, and 2. Organization according to a multidisciplinary and risk based approach. The concept of person centered care is based on three components: initiating, integrating and safeguarding the partnership with the patient. This model has been developed as a universal model of care that will work for all cancer survivors in different health care systems. It could be used for studies to improve self efficacy and the cost-effectiveness of cancer survivorship care.

  15. Stomach microbiota composition varies between patients with non-atrophic gastritis and patients with intestinal type of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles-Jimenez, Francisco; Vazquez-Jimenez, Flor; Medrano-Guzman, Rafael; Mantilla, Alejandra; Torres, Javier

    2014-02-26

    We aimed to characterize microbiota of the gastric mucosa as it progress to intestinal type of cancer. Study included five patients each of non-atrophic gastritis (NAG), intestinal metaplasia (IM) and intestinal-type gastric cancer (GC). Gastric tissue was obtained and DNA extracted for microbiota analyses using the microarray G3 PhyloChip. Bacterial diversity ranged from 8 to 57, and steadily decreased from NAG to IM to GC (p = 0.004). A significant microbiota difference was observed between NAG and GC based on Unifrac-presence/absence and weighted-Unifrac-abundance metrics of 283 taxa (p < 0.05). HC-AN analyses based on presence/absence of 238 taxa revealed that GC and NAG grouped apart, whereas IM overlapped with both. An ordinated analyses based on weighted-Unifrac distance given abundance of 44 taxa showing significance across categories revealed significant microbiota separation between NAG and GC. This study is the first to show a gradual shift in gastric microbiota profile from NAG to IM to GC.

  16. Practical multimodal care for cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddocks, Matthew; Hopkinson, Jane; Conibear, John; Reeves, Annie; Shaw, Clare; Fearon, Ken C H

    2016-12-01

    Cancer cachexia is common and reduces function, treatment tolerability and quality of life. Given its multifaceted pathophysiology a multimodal approach to cachexia management is advocated for, but can be difficult to realise in practice. We use a case-based approach to highlight practical approaches to the multimodal management of cachexia for patients across the cancer trajectory. Four cases with lung cancer spanning surgical resection, radical chemoradiotherapy, palliative chemotherapy and no anticancer treatment are presented. We propose multimodal care approaches that incorporate nutritional support, exercise, and anti-inflammatory agents, on a background of personalized oncology care and family-centred education. Collectively, the cases reveal that multimodal care is part of everyone's remit, often focuses on supported self-management, and demands buy-in from the patient and their family. Once operationalized, multimodal care approaches can be tested pragmatically, including alongside emerging pharmacological cachexia treatments. We demonstrate that multimodal care for cancer cachexia can be achieved using simple treatments and without a dedicated team of specialists. The sharing of advice between health professionals can help build collective confidence and expertise, moving towards a position in which every team member feels they can contribute towards multimodal care.

  17. Value of ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of primary gastric cancer via stomach distension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Quanmei; Xin, Jun; Zhao, Zhoushe; Guo, Qiyong; Yu, Shupeng; Xu, Weina; Liu, Changping; Zhai, Wei

    2013-06-01

    To clarify the usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for detecting primary gastric cancer via gastric distention using a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine. A total of 68 patients (male: 47, female: 21; age: 41-87 years) suspected of gastric carcinoma underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging. After whole-body PET/CT imaging in a fasting state, the patients drank a measured amount of milk with Diatrizoate Meglumine. Local gastric district PET/CT imaging was performed 30 min later. The imaging was analyzed by semi-quantitative analysis, standardized uptake value (SUV) of the primary tumor was measured in a region of interest. The diagnosis results were confirmed by gastroscopy, pathology, and follow-up results. Of the 68 patients, 56 malignant gastric neoplasm patients (male: 37, female: 19) were conformed. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of fasting whole-body PET/CT imaging for a primary malignant tumor were 92.9%, 75.0%, 94.5%, and 69.0%, respectively. The values for distension with a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine were 91.1%, 91.7%, 98.1%, and 68.8%, respectively. The area under the curve was 0.919 ± 0.033 and 0.883 ± 0.066 for the diagnosis of gastric cancer with SUVmax in a fasting state and after intake of mixture respectively, the differences were not statistically significant (P=0.359). Using gastric distension with a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine, the mean ratio of the lesion's SUVmax to the adjacent gastric wall SUVmax increased significantly from 3.30 ± 3.05 to 13.50 ± 15.05, which was statistically significant (Pgastric carcinoma. Gastric distention can display the lesions more clearly, however, it cannot significantly improve diagnostic accuracy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of primary gastric cancer via stomach distension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Quanmei, E-mail: 444656285@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Xin, Jun, E-mail: xinj@sj-hospital.org [Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zhao, Zhoushe, E-mail: zhoushe.zhao@ge.com [GE, Shenyang 110004 (China); Guo, Qiyong, E-mail: guoqy@vip.sina.com [Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Yu, Shupeng, E-mail: drizzleyu@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Xu, Weina, E-mail: xuwn@sj-hospital.org [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liu, Changping, E-mail: liucp1698@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zhai, Wei, E-mail: zhw69@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: To clarify the usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for detecting primary gastric cancer via gastric distention using a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine. Materials and methods: A total of 68 patients (male: 47, female: 21; age: 41–87 years) suspected of gastric carcinoma underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging. After whole-body PET/CT imaging in a fasting state, the patients drank a measured amount of milk with Diatrizoate Meglumine. Local gastric district PET/CT imaging was performed 30 min later. The imaging was analyzed by semi-quantitative analysis, standardized uptake value (SUV) of the primary tumor was measured in a region of interest. The diagnosis results were confirmed by gastroscopy, pathology, and follow-up results. Results: Of the 68 patients, 56 malignant gastric neoplasm patients (male: 37, female: 19) were conformed. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of fasting whole-body PET/CT imaging for a primary malignant tumor were 92.9%, 75.0%, 94.5%, and 69.0%, respectively. The values for distension with a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine were 91.1%, 91.7%, 98.1%, and 68.8%, respectively. The area under the curve was 0.919 ± 0.033 and 0.883 ± 0.066 for the diagnosis of gastric cancer with SUV{sub max} in a fasting state and after intake of mixture respectively, the differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.359). Using gastric distension with a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine, the mean ratio of the lesion's SUV{sub max} to the adjacent gastric wall SUV{sub max} increased significantly from 3.30 ± 3.05 to 13.50 ± 15.05, which was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusions: {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging is highly accurate for the diagnosis of primary gastric carcinoma. Gastric distention can display the lesions more clearly, however, it cannot significantly improve diagnostic accuracy.

  19. Laparoscopic ischemic conditioning of the stomach increases neovascularization of the gastric conduit in patients undergoing esophagectomy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thai H; Melton, Shelby D; McLaren, Patrick J; Mokdad, Ali A; Huerta, Sergio; Wang, David H; Perry, Kyle A; Hardaker, Hope L; Dolan, James P

    2017-09-01

    Gastric ischemic preconditioning has been proposed to improve blood flow and reduce the incidence of anastomotic complications following esophagectomy with gastric pull-up. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of prolonged ischemic preconditioning on the degree of neovascularization in the distal gastric conduit at the time of esophagectomy. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database identified 30 patients who underwent esophagectomy. The patients were divided into three groups: control (no preconditioning, n = 9), partial (short gastric vessel ligation only, n = 8), and complete ischemic preconditioning (left and short gastric vessel ligation, n = 13). Microvessel counts were assessed, using immunohistologic analysis to determine the degree of neovascularization at the distal gastric margin. The groups did not differ in age, gender, BMI, pathologic stage, or cancer subtype. Ischemic preconditioning durations were 163 ± 156 days for partial ischemic preconditioning, compared to 95 ± 50 days for complete ischemic preconditioning (P = 0.2). Immunohistologic analysis demonstrated an increase in microvessel counts of 29% following partial ischemic preconditioning (P = 0.3) and 67% after complete ischemic preconditioning (P gastric conduit. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Home care to Older adult with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagra, J; Castro, C; Meneses, S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Home care of the elderly with cancer. After the development of a program of oncology home care and over a period of five years, we believe that the evaluation allows us to have our proposal and challenges in the continuity of the program. This evidence is based in our old advanced Uruguayan population, and consequently increase this cancer population, we should define which pointed toward our objective, in order to get the best quality life. After one year with a project based on general rules, the evidence threw an evaluation, that we should review the model of care with which we were working. We continue to Auto-care model Dorothea Orem. The main objective became q uality of life : Take care as the primary Older Adult; Specific care their cancer to become symptomatic secondary complications to the evolution of tumor biology; Secondary prevention of cause therapeutic effect; Family integration, without changing the pace of life that the elderly had before being with cancer. Nursing challenge: Maintain autonomy achieved in these 5 years. Deepen the social equilibrium that we are committed daily between patient and family.Do not miss the professionalism achieved today.Proposal for nursing: Consider a wide field of nursing and for this achievement is need knowledge of 2nd level of community work, knowledge Clinical knowledge in Oncology Nursing, autonomy in decision making. For older adults with cancer: No out of its middle. Maintain priority habits and customs. Do not let it lose their self-esteem with their own values. Caution changes must take care to better manage the evolution of their illness. Conclusion: Oncology nursing is a specialty. Without this formation will be ever more away the development of these programs in our environment, or fall in applying for only economic convenience, losing professionalism. Our population is increasing

  1. Breast cancer prevention across the cancer care continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemp, Jennifer R

    2015-05-01

    To review the current state of breast cancer prevention from primary prevention through survivorship, highlight cross-cutting issues, and discuss strategies for clinical integration and future research. Published articles between 1985 and 2015 and original research. Cancer risk persists across the lifespan. Interprofessional strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality from cancer include primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention (survivorship). Prevention strategies across the cancer care continuum are cross-cutting and focus on measures to: prevent the onset of disease, identify and treat asymptomatic persons who have already developed risk factors or preclinical disease, and restore function, minimize the negative effects of disease, and prevent disease-related complications. Oncology nurses and advanced practice nurses are vital in the delivery of breast cancer prevention strategies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Uncommon mucosal metastases to the stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanthan R

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastases to the stomach from an extra-gastric neoplasm are an unusual event, identified in less than 2% of cancer patients at autopsy. The stomach may be involved by hematogenous spread from a distant primary (most commonly breast, melanoma or lung, or by contiguous spread from an adjacent malignancy, such as the pancreas, esophagus and gallbladder. These latter sites may also involve the stomach via lymphatic or haematogenous spread. We present three cases of secondary gastric malignancy. Methods/Results The first is a 19-year-old male who received a diagnosis of testicular choriocarcinoma in September 2004. Metastatic malignancy was demonstrated in the stomach after partial gastrectomy was performed to control gastric hemorrhage. The second is a 75-year-old male, generally well, who was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the lung in September 2005. Poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lung was demonstrated in a subsequent biopsy of "gastric polyps". The third is an 85-year-old man with no known history of malignancy who presented for evaluation of iron deficiency anemia by endoscopy in February 2006. Biopsies of the colonic and gastric mucosa demonstrated moderately differentiated invasive colonic adenocarcinoma with metastatic deposits in the stomach. Conclusion While the accurate recognition of these lesions at endoscopy is fraught with difficulty, pathological awareness of such uncommon metastases in the gastric mucosa is essential for accurate diagnosis and optimal patient management.

  3. Inequity in Cancer Care: A Global Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The strategies of United Nations system organizations such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) are based on guiding principles, the attainment of health equality being an important one. Therefore, their strategies focus on the needs of low and middle income countries and of vulnerable and marginalized populations. The IAEA is committed to gender equality. In keeping with the United Nations policies and agreements on both gender equality and gender mainstreaming, the IAEA has the responsibility of integrating gender equality into its programmes, as well as for contributing to worldwide gender equality. In addition, the IAEA strongly emphasizes the attainment of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, of which gender equality is a central tenet. This publication focuses on the issue of inequality (disparity) as it applies to cancer care in general, and access to prevention, screening, palliative and treatment services in particular. The problem of inequality in access to radiation oncology services is addressed in detail. Access to cancer care and radiotherapy services for women and children is specifically considered, reflecting the currently published literature. The report is aimed at radiotherapy professionals, health programme managers and decision makers in the area of cancer control. It was developed to create awareness of the role of socioeconomic inequality in access to cancer care, and to eventually mobilize resources to be equitably allocated to public health programmes in general, and to cancer control and radiotherapy programmes in particular

  4. Supportive care for children with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wetering, Marianne D.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Netteke Y. N.

    2011-01-01

    In developed countries the survival rate of children with cancer exceeds 75%. Optimal supportive care is necessary to deliver the burdensome treatment protocols. As the intensity of primary treatment has escalated, so have the side effects like myelosuppression and infection. Children who receive

  5. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjørstad, Odd Jarle; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg

    2013-02-19

    The criteria for refraining from cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients are based on patients' right to refuse treatment and the duty of the treating personnel not to exacerbate their suffering and not to administer futile treatment. When is cardiopulmonary resuscitation futile in these patients? Systematic literature searches were conducted in PubMed for the period 1989-2010 on the results of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation in advanced cancer patients and on factors that affected the results of CPR when special mention was made of cancer. The searches yielded 333 hits and 18 included articles: four meta-analyses, eight retrospective clinical studies, and six review articles. Cancer patients had a poorer post-CPR survival than non-cancer patients. Survival declined with increasing extent of the cancer disease. Widespread and therapy-resistant cancer disease coupled with a performance status lower than WHO 2 or a PAM score (Pre-Arrest Morbidity Index) of above 8 was regarded as inconsistent with survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is futile for in-hospital cancer patients with widespread incurable disease and poor performance status.

  6. Stochastic stomach theory of fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beyer, Jan

    1998-01-01

    searching time and meal size as well as the average rate of food consumption decrease considerably in the more realistic case of variable meal sizes. The model is able to account for the high frequency of empty stomachs, which occurs simultaneously with a relatively high observed mean stomach content. Need......Fish stomach dynamics is discussed and introduced analytically by a simple individually-based stomach model for total stomach content. The predator encounters food (meals) in a Poisson process, starting to search for a new meal when the stomach is empty. Basic equations for the frequency...... distributions of stomach content are derived for general classes of meal-size distributions and rate models of gastric evacuation. Probability characteristics in steady-state of empty and non-empty stomachs are evaluated from first principles with particular attention to the square root rate model of gastric...

  7. Danish cancer patients’ perspective on health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandager, Mette; Sperling, Cecilie; Jensen, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Patient’s experiences and patient surveys are increasingly being used for the evaluation of the quality of health care. Patient information is valuable input when we aim to improve healthcare services. The aim of this study was to assess Danish cancer patients’ experiences and assessment...... of the health care they have received, in regard to access to diagnostics, coordination and continuity of care, information and communication and involvement of patients and relatives. Questions and the opportunity to comment in free text were distributed to 6,720 newly diagnosed cancer patients in the summer...... 2010. A total of 4,346 patients (64.7 %) returned a questionnaire and were finally included in the study. The results exposed patient experienced problems with regard to easier access to diagnostics, GP’s responsiveness to patients’ worries, better coordination between different healthcare units...

  8. [Laparoscopic resection of stomach in case of stomach ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazhin, I V; Sazhin, V P; Nuzhdikhin, A V

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic resection of stomach was done in 84 patients with complicated peptic ulcer of stomach and duodenum. There were 1.2% post-operative complications in case of laparoscopic resection of stomach in comparison with open resection, which had 33.3% complications. There were not deaths in case of laparoscopic resection of stomach. This indication was about 4% in patients after open resection. It was determined that functionalefficiency afterlaparoscopic resection was in 1.6-1.8 times higher than afteropen resectionof stomach.

  9. Radiological diagnosis of stomach cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horlacher, B

    1981-05-01

    The problems of routine radiology and the differential diagnosis of malignant and benign gastric ulcers are gone into. The value of endoscopy combined with radiology is stressed. The patient, the physician, and the X-ray equipment have to meet certain requirements in order to obtain good images and make a correct interpretation. The most important aspect of radiology today is radiation protection, which is possible only with efficient equipment and experienced medical examiners.

  10. Investigation of stomach diseases in atomic bomb survivors, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, Motoki; Ito, Chikako

    1980-01-01

    Mass examinations of the stomach were performed on 13,412 a-bomb survivors from Oct. 1975 to Mar. 1979. The necessity rate for detailed examinations was 13.6% on the average, and it was a little lower than the average in Japan. That in women was higher than that in men. The performance rate of detailed examinations was very high (91.8%), which might be influenced by active appeals to have detailed examinations. The estimated discovery rate of stomach cancer was 0.27% on the average, and it was higher than that in mass examinations of Chugoku and Shikoku districts. A relationship between the estimated discovery rate of stomach cancer and exposure conditions was not clarified. The discovery rate of stomach cancer was supposed to be influenced strongly by aging of a-bomb survivors. (Tsunoda, M.)

  11. The financial burden of cancer: Estimates from patients undergoing cancer care in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaidi Adnan A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The emotional burden associated with the diagnosis of cancer is sometimes overshadowed by financial burden sustained by patient and the family. This is especially relevant for a developing country as there is limited state support for cancer treatment. We conducted this study to estimate the cost of cancer care for two major types of cancer and to assess the perception of patients and families regarding the burden of the cost for undergoing cancer treatment at a private tertiary care hospital. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at day care and radiotherapy unit of Aga Khan University, Hospital (AKUH Karachi, Pakistan. All adult patients with breast and head & neck cancers diagnosed for 3 months or more were included. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire and analysed using SPSS. Results Sixty seven patients were interviewed during the study period. The mean and median monthly income of these patients was 996.4 USD and 562.5 USD respectively. Comparatively the mean and median monthly cost of cancer care was 1093.13 USD and 946.42 USD respectively. The cost of the treatment either fully or partially was borne by the family in most cases (94%. The financial burden of cancer was perceived as significant by 28 (42% patients and unmanageable by 18 (27% patients. This perceived level of burden was associated significantly with average monthly income (p = Conclusion Our study indicates that the financial burden of cancer care is substantial and can be overwhelming. There is a desperate need for treatment support programs either by the government or other welfare organisations to support individuals and families who are already facing a difficult and challenging situation.

  12. STUDY OF GASTROINTESTINAL CANCERS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Nair Sarkar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cancer is one of the leading cause of death both in developed and developing countries. In India, it accounts for 0.3 million deaths per year. Cancers of lung, GIT and oral cancers dominated among men while breast, cervix, ovary and oral cavity were commonest cancer seen in women. Among the gastrointestinal cancers, cancers of the oesophagus, stomach, colon, rectum and liver cancers were commonest. The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence of the various GIT cancers in a tertiary hospital of Coastal Andhra when compared to other studies. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this retrospective study, a total of 509 health records of patients affected by cancers were studied and relevant details noted. RESULTS A total of 509 cancer cases were reported in this period of 18 months (January 2016 - June 2017 of which 85 cases (16.3% were of Gastrointestinal (GIT cancers. The age group between 40 and 60 recorded the maximum incidence of 47 cancers (55.1%. The incidence of gastrointestinal cancers were significantly higher in the men (56 cases (65.8% than the women (29 cases (34.11%. The commonest site of GIT cancers was the colorectal region (30 cases (35.7%. The most common type of cancer seen was adenocarcinoma seen in 73 cases (85.8%. CONCLUSION Public education and awareness for the warning symptoms should be increased to prevent reduction of the life span and health caused by the gastrointestinal cancers with intense awareness drive using various means including social media undertaken to educate the public regarding the warning symptoms and screening of such group for GIT cancers.

  13. Specialized palliative care in advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmenlund, Kristina; Sjogren, Per; Nordly, Mie

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Due to the multiple physical, psychological, existential, and social symptoms involved, patients with advanced cancer often have a reduced quality of life (QoL), which requires specialized palliative care (SPC) interventions. The primary objective of the present systematic review...... was to review the existing literature about SPC and its effect on QoL, on physical and psychological symptoms, and on survival in adult patients with advanced cancer. Method: We utilized a search strategy based on the PICO (problem/population, intervention, comparison, and outcome) framework and employed....... The evidence in this field of study in general is still nascent, but there is growing support for the utilization of SPC to improve the quality of life of adult patients with advanced cancer. The evidence that SPC reduces physical and psychological symptoms is moderate, while the evidence that it prolongs...

  14. Cultural aspects of communication in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surbone, Antonella

    2008-03-01

    Cultural competence in oncology requires the acquisition of specific knowledge, clinical skills, and attitudes that facilitate effective cross-cultural negotiation in the clinical setting, thus, leading to improved therapeutic outcomes and decreased disparities in cancer care. Cultural competence in oncology entails a basic knowledge of different cultural attitudes and practices of communication of the truth and of decision-making styles throughout the world. Cultural competence always presupposes oncology professionals' awareness of their own cultural beliefs and values. To be able to communicate with cancer patients in culturally sensitive ways, oncologists should have knowledge of the concept of culture in its complexity and of the risks of racism, classism, sexism, ageism, and stereotyping that must be avoided in clinical practice. Oncologists should develop a sense of appreciation for differences in health care values, based on the recognition that no culture can claim hegemony over others and that cultures are evolving under their reciprocal influence on each other. Medical schools and oncology training can teach communication skills and cultural competence, while fostering in all students and young doctors those attitudes of humility, empathy, curiosity, respect, sensitivity, and awareness that are needed to deliver effective and culturally sensitive cancer care.

  15. Meta-analysis of the risk of gastric stump cancer: detection of high risk patient subsets for stomach cancer after remote partial gastrectomy for benign conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tersmette, A. C.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Tersmette, K. W.; Giardiello, F. M.; Moore, G. W.; Tytgat, G. N.; Vandenbroucke, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    Controversy about gastric cancer risk after partial gastrectomy exists, especially in the United States. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to determine overall relative risk and weighted mean relative risk for subsets of postgastrectomy patients, define possible high risk patients suitable for

  16. Palliative Care Use Among Patients With Solid Cancer Tumors: A National Cancer Data Base Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osagiede, Osayande; Colibaseanu, Dorin T; Spaulding, Aaron C; Frank, Ryan D; Merchea, Amit; Kelley, Scott R; Uitti, Ryan J; Ailawadhi, Sikander

    2018-01-01

    Palliative care has been increasingly recognized as an important part of cancer care but remains underutilized in patients with solid cancers. There is a current gap in knowledge regarding why palliative care is underutilized nationwide. To identify the factors associated with palliative care use among deceased patients with solid cancer tumors. Using the 2016 National Cancer Data Base, we identified deceased patients (2004-2013) with breast, colon, lung, melanoma, and prostate cancer. Data were described as percentages. Associations between palliative care use and patient, facility, and geographic characteristics were evaluated through multivariate logistic regression. A total of 1 840 111 patients were analyzed; 9.6% received palliative care. Palliative care use was higher in the following patient groups: survival >24 months (17% vs 2%), male (54% vs 46%), higher Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score (16% vs 8%), treatment at designated cancer programs (74% vs 71%), lung cancer (76% vs 28%), higher grade cancer (53% vs 24%), and stage IV cancer (59% vs 13%). Patients who lived in communities with a greater percentage of high school degrees had higher odds of receiving palliative care; Central and Pacific regions of the United States had lower odds of palliative care use than the East Coast. Patients with colon, melanoma, or prostate cancer had lower odds of palliative care than patients with breast cancer, whereas those with lung cancer had higher odds. Palliative care use in solid cancer tumors is variable, with a preference for patients with lung cancer, younger age, known insurance status, and higher educational level.

  17. Cultural aspects of communication in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surbone, A

    2006-01-01

    Cancer is increasing in incidence and prevalence worldwide, and the WHO has recently included cancer and its treatments as a health priority in developed and developing countries. The cultural diversity of oncology patients is bound to increase, and cultural sensitivity and competence are now required of all oncology professionals. A culturally competent cancer care leads to improved therapeutic outcome and it may decrease disparities in medical care. Cultural competence in medicine is a complex multilayered accomplishment, requiring knowledge, skills and attitudes whose acquisition is needed for effective cross-cultural negotiation in the clinical setting. Effective cultural competence is based on knowledge of the notion of culture; on awareness of possible biases and prejudices related to stereotyping, racism, classism, sexism; on nurturing appreciation for differences in health care values; and on fostering the attitudes of humility, empathy, curiosity, respect, sensitivity and awareness. Cultural competence in healthcare relates to individual professionals, but also to organizations and systems. A culturally competent healthcare system must consider in their separateness and yet in there reciprocal influences social, racial and cultural factors. By providing a framework of reference to interpret the external world and relate to it, culture affects patients' perceptions of disease, disability and suffering; degrees and expressions of concern about them; their responses to treatments and their relationship to individual physicians and to the healthcare system. Culture also influences the interpretation of ethical norms and principles, and especially of individual autonomy, which can be perceived either as synonymous with freedom or with isolation depending on the cultural context. This, in turn, determines the variability of truth-telling attitudes and practices worldwide as well as the different roles of family in the information and decision-making process of

  18. Monitoring the delivery of cancer care: Commission on Cancer and National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richelle T; Stewart, Andrew K; Winchester, David P

    2012-07-01

    The primary objective of the Commission on Cancer (CoC) is to ensure the delivery of comprehensive, high-quality care that improves survival while maintaining quality of life for patients with cancer. This article examines the initiatives of the CoC toward achieving this goal, utilizing data from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) to monitor treatment patterns and outcomes, to develop quality measures, and to benchmark hospital performance. The article also highlights how these initiatives align with the Institute of Medicine's recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care and briefly explores future projects of the CoC and NCDB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Care for a Patient With Cancer As a Project: Management of Complex Task Interdependence in Cancer Care Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Trosman, Julia R.; Carlos, Ruth C.; Simon, Melissa A.; Madden, Debra L.; Gradishar, William J.; Benson, Al B.; Rapkin, Bruce D.; Weiss, Elisa S.; Gareen, Ilana F.; Wagner, Lynne I.; Khan, Seema A.; Bunce, Mikele M.; Small, Art; Weldon, Christine B.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer care is highly complex and suffers from fragmentation and lack of coordination across provider specialties and clinical domains. As a result, patients often find that they must coordinate care on their own. Coordinated delivery teams may address these challenges and improve quality of cancer care. Task interdependence is a core principle of rigorous teamwork and is essential to addressing the complexity of cancer care, which is highly interdependent across specialties and modalities. W...

  20. Individualized Integrative Cancer Care in Anthroposophic Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Gunver S.; Mussler, Milena; Fuchs, Dieter; Kiene, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cancer patients widely seek integrative oncology which embraces a wide variety of treatments and system approaches. Objective. To investigate the concepts, therapeutic goals, procedures, and working conditions of integrative oncology doctors in the field of anthroposophic medicine. Methods. This qualitative study was based on in-depth interviews with 35 highly experienced doctors working in hospitals and office-based practices in Germany and other countries. Structured qualitative content analysis was applied to examine the data. Results. The doctors integrated conventional and holistic cancer concepts. Their treatments aimed at both tumor and symptom control and at strengthening the patient on different levels: living with the disease, overcoming the disease, enabling emotional and cognitive development, and addressing spiritual or transcendental issues according to the patient’s wishes and initiatives. Therapeutic procedures were conventional anticancer and symptom-relieving treatments, herbal and mineral remedies, mistletoe therapy, art therapies, massages and other external applications, nutrition and lifestyle advice, psychological support, and multiple forms of empowerment. The approach emphasised good patient-doctor relationships and sufficient time for patient encounters and decision-making. Individualization appeared in several dimensions and was interwoven with standards and mindlines. The doctors often worked in teams and cooperated with other cancer care–related specialists. Conclusion. Integrative cancer care pursues an individualized and patient-centered approach, encompassing conventional and multimodal complementary interventions, and addressing, along with physical and functional needs, the emotional and spiritual needs of patients. This seems to be important for tumor and symptom control, and addresses major challenges and important goals of modern cancer care. PMID:27151589

  1. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effective communication in cancer care between the health care team, cancer patients, and their family is important. Learn about communication skills that support a patient-centered practice and how to talk with adults and children about their diagnosis, prognosis, and transition to end-of-life care in this expert-reviewed summary.

  2. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David

    2014-01-01

    . The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility...... study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide...... countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe....

  3. Follow-up Medical Care After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Questions to Ask About Cancer Research Follow-Up Medical Care Once you’re done with cancer treatment, ...

  4. Social inequality and incidence of and survival from cancers of the oesophagus, stomach and pancreas in a population-based study in Denmark, 1994-2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Rikke Baastrup; Sørensen, Mette; Hansen, Johnni

    2008-01-01

    with increasing social advantage; this was most pronounced for oesophageal cancer and least for pancreatic cancer. The effect of socioeconomic position on survival after these cancers was less clear, perhaps due to the poor relative survival from these cancers and the fact that all three cancers are relatively...

  5. The lymphatics of the cardia of stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonemura, Yutaka; Katayama, Kanji; Sawa, Toshiharu

    1985-01-01

    The lymphatics of the cardia of stomach was examined using lymphoscintigraphy with technetium 99m colloid in 98 patients with gastric cancer and 4 patients with esophageal cancer. The colloidal Tc-99m was injected into the submucosa of stomach 12 hr before operation with the aid of endoscopy. Each lymph node dissected from the specimens was measured by scintillation counter. Lymph nodes located along the left gastric, splenic and left inferior phrenic arteries were mainly involved in the lymphatics of the cardia of stomach. There was strong relationship between the cardia and the node of number 16. The lymphatics was also present in the mediastinum. These results suggest the necessities of the complete removal of the gastropancreatic mesenteriolum including the left inferior phrenic artery and the extirpation of the regional lymph nodes around the aorta above and below the left renal artery, in addition to the removal of both pancreas and spleen in cases of cardia tumors. Furthermore, in cases of squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma metastasizing to the intraperitoneal lymph nodes, it seems necessary to extirpate the complete mediastinal lymph nodes. (Namekawa, K.)

  6. PROGRAM OF PALLIATIVE CANCER CARE – OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Slánská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Annually more than 27,000 persons die of cancer in the Czech Republic and the overall incidence of malignancies is still increasing. These data shows the need for affordable and good follow-up care especially for patients without any cancer treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Currently the outpatient palliative cancer care gets more into the forefront. Prerequisite for a well working outpatient palliative care is cooperation with general practitioners and home health care agencies. The purpose of the so called program of palliative cancer care is to guide a patient in palliative cancer care and to improve the cooperation among health care providers. Methods: During the period from January 2008 to October 2010 we evaluated in patient without any oncology treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Results: In palliative outpatient clinic we treated 446 patients, 119 of them received home care services with average length of 27.8 days. 77 patients died at home, 51 in health facilities and 41 in inpatient hospice care. Conclusion: We present pilot study focusing on outpatient palliative cancer care which shows the real benefit from early indication of palliative cancer care. This type of care allows patients to stay as long as possible at home among their close relatives.

  7. Iatrogenic stomach perforation complicating unrecognized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with traumatic diaphragmatic herniation of the stomach that is misdiagnosed as a hemo-pneumothorax with the resulting insertion of a chest tube causing iatrogenic perforation of the stomach and draining of gastric content into the pleural cavity. An emergency thoracotomy was ...

  8. Pathogenic enablers — toxic relationships in the stomach

    OpenAIRE

    Wroblewski, Lydia E.; Peek, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori is the strongest known risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Saju et al. shed new light on mechanisms by which Epstein–Barr virus, a viral initiator of gastric cancer, potentiates the oncogenic effects of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach.

  9. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    Objective: This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential

  10. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential patterns

  11. Chemotherapy for carcinoma of stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salek, T.

    2011-01-01

    Of all patients with gastric cancer 80 % to 90 % are either diagnosed at an advanced stage when the tumour is inoperable, or develop a recurrence within five years after surgery. Chemotherapy clearly improves survival in comparison to best supportive care only. No chemotherapy regimen showed a survival benefit better than 5-fluorouracil alone in a phase III trial for advanced gastric cancer in 1990s, and several new cytotoxic agents became available in late 1990s. Thereafter, a couple of phase III trials supported the substitution of infusional 5-fluorouracil by orally administered agents and the replacement of cisplatin by oxaliplatin in early 2000s. Trastuzumab has succeeded in showing a survival benefit for patients with Her-2 positive gastric cancer which accounts for about 10 - 20 % of the cancer. This means that the door is opened to the new era of chemotherapy with molecular target agents and with individualization for advanced gastric cancer. (author)

  12. Bicalutamide 150 mg plus standard care vs standard care alone for early prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLeod, David G; Iversen, Peter; See, William A

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate, in the ongoing Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) trial programme, the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg once daily in addition to standard care for localized or locally advanced, nonmetastatic prostate cancer....

  13. Public perception of cancer care in Poland and Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jȩdrzejewski, Mariusz; Thallinger, Christiane; Mrozik, Magda; Kornek, Gabriela; Zielinski, Christoph; Jassem, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    We compared the public perception of cancer care in Poland and Austria. Both countries are members of the European Union (EU) but reflect two extremes in health-related per capita spending. Recently, the EUROCARE-5 study reported on very discrepant cancer outcomes between the two countries. A one-time survey was conducted to compare the public perception of cancer treatment in Poland and Austria. In total, 3,649 subjects, representing the general population, cancer patients, and cancer patients' family members, were surveyed. In both countries, cancer was considered the most challenging problem of the health care system, and health care was indicated as the most important issue influencing political election decisions. Polish compared with Austrian cancer patients gave a significantly lower positive assessment of overall cancer treatment efficacy and detection methods. Cancer cure rates estimated by Polish and Austrian citizens were 29% and 44%, respectively. The majority of all citizens interviewed thought that cancer patients should have access to all available registered cancer drugs. However, only 18% of Poles versus 62% of Austrians agreed with the notion that the available cancer treatment in their countries is of a standard comparable to that of other EU countries. Consequently, 24% of Poles and 7% of Austrians identified financial status, age, gender, and residence as factors influencing the availability of cancer treatments. In both countries, cancer is considered the most challenging problem of the health care system, and health care issues may strongly influence decisions for political elections. Vast differences in the two populations' perceptions of cancer care reflect actual cancer outcomes and the national per capita spending on health-related issues. ©AlphaMed Press.

  14. FDG uptake in the stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, M. J.; Cho, H. J.; Cho, E. H.; Kim, T. S.; Kang, W. J.; Lee, J. D.

    2007-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate histopathologic features of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) to predict FDG uptake on PET. 153 patients(102 men; mean age, 55 y) were diagnosed with AGC by surgery were included in this study. PET images were evaluated by visual and semi-quantitative analysis of FDG uptake in primary tumors. Primary tumors size were measured and divided according to Borrmann classification. Tumor histology was classified under WHO classification, depth of invasion and Iymphovascular invasion. The tumors were also grouped by high cellular(cellularity = 50%) and low cellular group (<50%). Microscopic growth type was based on Lauren classification. Stromal fibrosis degree and inflammatory cell infiltration amount was graded as low(none∼mild), or high(moderate∼severe). Lymph node metastases was assessed in all patients. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate differences in SUV as to histopathologic factors. Of the 153 patients, 21 patients(14%) had primary tumor invisible on initial whole body images. After water ingestion, the tumors became visible in 15 of the 21 patients due to disappearance of physiologic stomach uptake. Polypoid or ulcerofungating tumors, high cellularity, intestinal growth pattern, and larger tumors significantly predicted increased tumor SUVs. Well or moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma tended to show high cellularity and intestinal growth pattern. Poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma had diverse spectrum of histopathology. Signet ring cell carcinomas were mostly ulceroinfiltrative or diffusely infiltrative in macroscopic type and diffuse in microscopic tumor growth. Mucinous adenocarcinomas were mostly low in cellularity. FDG uptake patterns are useful in representing histopathologic characteristics of the entire tumor in gastric cancers. The degree of FDG uptake depends on tumor size, macroscopic type, cellularity, and microscopic growth pattern and it shows no association with well known important prognostic

  15. The postoperative stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodfield, Courtney A. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Levine, Marc S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: marc.levine@uphs.upenn.edu

    2005-03-01

    Gastric surgery may be performed for the treatment of a variety of benign and malignant diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. Radiographic studies with water-soluble contrast agents often are obtained to rule out leaks, obstruction, or other acute complications during the early postoperative period. Barium studies may also be obtained to evaluate for anastomotic strictures or ulcers, bile reflux gastritis, recurrent tumor, or other chronic complications during the late postoperative period. Cross-sectional imaging studies such as CT are also helpful for detecting abscesses or other postoperative collections, recurrent or metastatic tumor, or less common complications such as afferent loop syndrome or gastrojejunal intussusception. It is important for radiologists to be familiar not only with the radiographic findings associated with these various abnormalities but also with the normal appearances of the postoperative stomach on radiographic examinations, so that such appearances are not mistaken for pseudoleaks or other postoperative complications. The purpose of this article is to describe the normal postsurgical anatomy after the most commonly performed operations (including partial gastrectomy, esophagogastrectomy and gastric pull-through, and total gastrectomy and esophagojejunostomy) and to review the acute and chronic complications, normal postoperative findings, and major abnormalities detected on radiographic examinations in these patients.

  16. The postoperative stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodfield, Courtney A.; Levine, Marc S.

    2005-01-01

    Gastric surgery may be performed for the treatment of a variety of benign and malignant diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. Radiographic studies with water-soluble contrast agents often are obtained to rule out leaks, obstruction, or other acute complications during the early postoperative period. Barium studies may also be obtained to evaluate for anastomotic strictures or ulcers, bile reflux gastritis, recurrent tumor, or other chronic complications during the late postoperative period. Cross-sectional imaging studies such as CT are also helpful for detecting abscesses or other postoperative collections, recurrent or metastatic tumor, or less common complications such as afferent loop syndrome or gastrojejunal intussusception. It is important for radiologists to be familiar not only with the radiographic findings associated with these various abnormalities but also with the normal appearances of the postoperative stomach on radiographic examinations, so that such appearances are not mistaken for pseudoleaks or other postoperative complications. The purpose of this article is to describe the normal postsurgical anatomy after the most commonly performed operations (including partial gastrectomy, esophagogastrectomy and gastric pull-through, and total gastrectomy and esophagojejunostomy) and to review the acute and chronic complications, normal postoperative findings, and major abnormalities detected on radiographic examinations in these patients

  17. Health care use after diagnosis of cancer in children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Lorenzi, M.F.; Korevaar, J.C.; McBride, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Young patients with cancer often require extensive care during and shortly after cancer treatment for medical, psychosocial and educational problems. Approximately 85% are treated by an oncologist; however, their additional health care in this phase has barely been studied. The role of the

  18. Original Research Characterising cancer burden and quality of care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancer burden at two palliative care clinics in Malawi 130 ... Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. ... Health Organization (WHO) defines palliative care as an .... period, patients aged 15 years ..... GLOBOCAN 2012 ... Young People: A Case Series of 109 Cases and Review of the Literature.

  19. Challenges in volunteering from cancer care volunteers perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaludin, Kauthar Mohamad; Muhammad, Mazanah; Wahat, Nor Wahiza Abdul; Ibrahim, Rahimah

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of non-government organizations (NGOs) and support groups has helped strengthen public health services in addressing cancer care burden. Owing to the contribution of volunteers in cancer care, this article documents a qualitative study that examined challenges in attracting and retaining cancer care volunteers as part of the effort to develop a volunteer recruitment model. Data were collected through three focus group discussions involving 19 cancer support group members in Malaysia. Findings of the study revealed that mobility and locality appeared to be significant in Malaysian context, while the need for financial support and time flexibility are challenges faced by cancer support groups to attract and retain volunteers. The findings imply that cancer care initiatives can benefit from more local volunteers but at the same time these volunteers require flexibility and financial support to sustain their engagement.

  20. Diet and Nutrition in Cancer Survivorship and Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Bazzan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of palliative cancer care is typically to relieve suffering and improve quality of life. Most approaches to diet in this setting have focused only on eating as many calories as possible to avoid cachexia. However, as the concept of palliative care has evolved to include all aspects of cancer survivorship and not just end of life care, there is an increasing need to thoughtfully consider diet and nutrition approaches that can impact not only quality of life but overall health outcomes and perhaps even positively affect cancer recurrence and progression. In this regard, there has been a recent emphasis in the literature on nutrition and cancer as an important factor in both quality of life and in the pathophysiology of cancer. Hence, the primary purpose of this paper is to review the current data on diet and nutrition as it pertains to a wide range of cancer patients in the palliative care setting.

  1. Care for a Patient With Cancer As a Project: Management of Complex Task Interdependence in Cancer Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosman, Julia R; Carlos, Ruth C; Simon, Melissa A; Madden, Debra L; Gradishar, William J; Benson, Al B; Rapkin, Bruce D; Weiss, Elisa S; Gareen, Ilana F; Wagner, Lynne I; Khan, Seema A; Bunce, Mikele M; Small, Art; Weldon, Christine B

    2016-11-01

    Cancer care is highly complex and suffers from fragmentation and lack of coordination across provider specialties and clinical domains. As a result, patients often find that they must coordinate care on their own. Coordinated delivery teams may address these challenges and improve quality of cancer care. Task interdependence is a core principle of rigorous teamwork and is essential to addressing the complexity of cancer care, which is highly interdependent across specialties and modalities. We examined challenges faced by a patient with early-stage breast cancer that resulted from difficulties in understanding and managing task interdependence across clinical domains involved in this patient's care. We used team science supported by the project management discipline to discuss how various task interdependence aspects can be recognized, deliberately designed, and systematically managed to prevent care breakdowns. This case highlights how effective task interdependence management facilitated by project management methods could markedly improve the course of a patient's care. This work informs efforts of cancer centers and practices to redesign cancer care delivery through innovative, practical, and patient-centered approaches to management of task interdependence in cancer care. Future patient-reported outcomes research will help to determine optimal ways to engage patients, including those who are medically underserved, in managing task interdependence in their own care.

  2. Palliative Care Specialist Consultation Is Associated With Supportive Care Quality in Advanced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne M; Tisnado, Diana; Ettner, Susan L; Asch, Steven M; Dy, Sydney M; Pantoja, Philip; Lee, Martin; Ahluwalia, Sangeeta C; Schreibeis-Baum, Hannah; Malin, Jennifer L; Lorenz, Karl A

    2016-10-01

    Although recent randomized controlled trials support early palliative care for patients with advanced cancer, the specific processes of care associated with these findings and whether these improvements can be replicated in the broader health care system are uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of palliative care consultation and its association with specific processes of supportive care in a national cohort of Veterans using the Cancer Quality ASSIST (Assessing Symptoms Side Effects and Indicators of Supportive Treatment) measures. We abstracted data from 719 patients' medical records diagnosed with advanced lung, colorectal, or pancreatic cancer in 2008 over a period of three years or until death who received care in the Veterans Affairs Health System to evaluate the association of palliative care specialty consultation with the quality of supportive care overall and by domain using a multivariate regression model. All but 54 of 719 patients died within three years and 293 received at least one palliative care consult. Patients evaluated by a palliative care specialist at diagnosis scored seven percentage points higher overall (P specialist consultation is associated with better quality of supportive care in three advanced cancers, predominantly driven by improvements in information and care planning. This study supports the effectiveness of early palliative care consultation in three common advanced cancers within the Veterans Affairs Health System and provides a greater understanding of what care processes palliative care teams influence. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Scientific Evidence on the Supportive Cancer Care with Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William CS CHO

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine has been increasingly utilized by cancer patients in developed countries. Among the various forms of complementary and alternative medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine is one of the few that has a well constructed theoretical framework and established treatment approaches for diseases including cancer. Recent research has revealed growing evidence suggesting that Traditional Chinese Medicine is effective in the supportive care of cancer patients during and after major conventional cancer treatments. This paper succinctly summarizes some published clinical evidence and meta-analyses which support the usage of various Traditional Chinese Medicine treatment strategies including Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture and Qigong in supportive cancer care.

  4. Health reforms as examples of multilevel interventions in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Ann B; Fennell, Mary L; Devers, Kelly J

    2012-05-01

    To increase access and improve system quality and efficiency, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act with sweeping changes to the nation's health-care system. Although not intended to be specific to cancer, the act's implementation will profoundly impact cancer care. Its components will influence multiple levels of the health-care environment including states, communities, health-care organizations, and individuals seeking care. To illustrate these influences, two reforms are considered: 1) accountable care organizations and 2) insurance-based reforms to gather evidence about effectiveness. We discuss these reforms using three facets of multilevel interventions: 1) their intended and unintended consequences, 2) the importance of timing, and 3) their implications for cancer. The success of complex health reforms requires understanding the scientific basis and evidence for carrying out such multilevel interventions. Conversely and equally important, successful implementation of multilevel interventions depends on understanding the political setting and goals of health-care reform.

  5. The hyperprolactinemic breast cancer in radiooncologic care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, G.; Luethgens, M.; Schoen, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    Serum prolactin has been determined in 334 patients with breast cancer within the radiooncologic care. In addition 54 healthy female blood donors were analysed as controls. Values above 600 mU/l were called hyperprolactinemic. 15% of the patients showed elevated prolactin levels, 25% of which coincided with recurrent disease. Preoperative evaluation of prolactin in combination with TPA and CEA may be an aid in selecting a special group of patients with poor prognosis. Following 31 patients under therapy it could be demonstrated that any successful treatment modality leads to a normalization of elevated prolactin levels. In refractory cases addition of bromocriptine may be effective. Furthermore, drug induced hyperprolactinemia ought to be treated. (orig.) [de

  6. Area-level variations in cancer care and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Nancy L; Landrum, Mary Beth; Lamont, Elizabeth B; Bozeman, Samuel R; McNeil, Barbara J

    2012-05-01

    : Substantial regional variations in health-care spending exist across the United States; yet, care and outcomes are not better in higher-spending areas. Most studies have focused on care in fee-for-service Medicare; whether spillover effects exist in settings without financial incentives for more care is unknown. : We studied care for cancer patients in fee-for-service Medicare and the Veterans Health Administration (VA) to understand whether processes and outcomes of care vary with area-level Medicare spending. : An observational study using logistic regression to assess care by area-level measures of Medicare spending. : Patients with lung, colorectal, or prostate cancers diagnosed during 2001-2004 in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) areas or the VA. The SEER cohort included fee-for-service Medicare patients aged older than 65 years. : Recommended and preference-sensitive cancer care and mortality. : In fee-for-service Medicare, higher-spending areas had higher rates of recommended care (curative surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer and chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer) and preference-sensitive care (chemotherapy for stage IV lung and colon cancer and primary treatment of local/regional prostate cancer) and had lower lung cancer mortality. In the VA, we observed minimal variation in care by area-level Medicare spending. : Our findings suggest that intensity of care for Medicare beneficiaries is not driving variations in VA care, despite some overlap in physician networks. Although the Dartmouth Atlas work has been of unprecedented importance in demonstrating variations in Medicare spending, new measures may be needed to better understand variations in other populations.

  7. A Primary Care Initiative for Cancer Survivorship: A Case Study of Cancer in Obese Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamdouh M. Shubair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Men in rural and northern areas of Canada experience considerable challenges in health care access for chronic conditions such as obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D, and cancer. Obese men (body mass index/BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 in rural/remote northern British Columbia (BC experience poorer health outcomes due to cancer risk compared to other men elsewhere in urban Canada. Context: Challenges faced by men who develop cancer as a complication of being obese are paramount in terms of primary care treatment of their cancers. Oftentimes cancer treatment is multi-modal and complex. Models of shared care have been proposed to provide coordinated survivorship care to the growing population of rural male cancer patients suffering from obesity and the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS. Methods: Objectives: The main objective of the study was to examine the type of cancer care programs that may have focused on men with cancer in northern British Columbia (BC. A secondary objective is to identify challenges in care experienced by men with cancer during their transition from in-hospital care back to their home communities. Population: We conducted a comprehensive literature review and a qualitative focus group interview with primary care physicians (PCPs, oncologists (n=8, and a convenience sample of male cancer patients (n=6 who have underlying obesity and Metabolic Syndrome (MetS. We examined the types of cancer care programs that may have targeted such men. We further identified challenges experienced by male cancer patients while transitioning back to their home communities. Results: The focus group results outlined themes speaking to a comprehensive shared care model that goes beyond surveillance of cancer recurrence in men with obesity. Conclusion: A shared survivorship care plan or model integrates collaboration among specialists in clinical decision making and best practice for treatment of cancer in obese men.

  8. Care managers' views on death and caring for older cancer patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Miho; Kanai, Emi; Kitagawa, Akiko; Hattori, Keiko

    2013-12-01

    Care managers (CMs) have an important role in coordinating care for cancer patients who are in the end-of-life stage; however, little is known about their views of death and their experiences while caring for older cancer patients. This study was conducted to examine CMs' views of death and caring for older cancer patients in a home care setting in Japan. Convenience sampling was undertaken, and 35 offices from 43 approached services agreed to participate. The final valid sample included responses from 136 CMs (90.7%). Most CMs, including nurses, care workers, home helpers, and social workers in home care settings, experienced difficulty in managing the care of cancer patients in the end-of-life stage. Respondents reported a wide array of experiences with end-of-life care, care management, and seminar attendance, and their ages and Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scores were associated factors. Moreover, multiple regression analysis indicated that better attitudes toward caring for the dying were positively associated with seminar attendance. These results suggest that CMs need education about palliative and end-of-life care in order to promote good home care for cancer patients.

  9. Diet and Nutrition in Cancer Survivorship and Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony J. Bazzan; Andrew B. Newberg; William C. Cho; Daniel A. Monti

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of palliative cancer care is typically to relieve suffering and improve quality of life. Most approaches to diet in this setting have focused only on eating as many calories as possible to avoid cachexia. However, as the concept of palliative care has evolved to include all aspects of cancer survivorship and not just end of life care, there is an increasing need to thoughtfully consider diet and nutrition approaches that can impact not only quality of life but overall health ...

  10. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care: Survey of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients felt that integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer improves symptom control, end-of-life care, health-related communication, and continuity of care. The perceptions of benefit of the palliative care intervention in the components surveyed, differed among the three groups.

  11. Cancer Trends: Influencing Care and Research Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many of the trends being seen in cancer are changing how we view cancer and how we address it, from prompting research to identify the underlying causes of cancers increasing in incidence to informing research on treatment and prevention.

  12. Impact of investigations in general practice on timeliness of referral for patients subsequently diagnosed with cancer: analysis of national primary care audit data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, G P; Saunders, C L; Abel, G A; McPhail, S; Lyratzopoulos, G; Neal, R D

    2015-02-17

    For patients with symptoms of possible cancer who do not fulfil the criteria for urgent referral, initial investigation in primary care has been advocated in the United Kingdom and supported by additional resources. The consequence of this strategy for the timeliness of diagnosis is unknown. We analysed data from the English National Audit of Cancer Diagnosis in Primary Care on patients with lung (1494), colorectal (2111), stomach (246), oesophagus (513), pancreas (327), and ovarian (345) cancer relating to the ordering of investigations by the General Practitioner and their nature. Presenting symptoms were categorised according to National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance on referral for suspected cancer. We used linear regression to estimate the mean difference in primary-care interval by cancer, after adjustment for age, gender, and the symptomatic presentation category. Primary-care investigations were undertaken in 3198/5036 (64%) of cases. The median primary-care interval was 16 days (IQR 5-45) for patients undergoing investigation and 0 days (IQR 0-10) for those not investigated. Among patients whose symptoms mandated urgent referral to secondary care according to NICE guidelines, between 37% (oesophagus) and 75% (pancreas) were first investigated in primary care. In multivariable linear regression analyses stratified by cancer site, adjustment for age, sex, and NICE referral category explained little of the observed prolongation associated with investigation. For six specified cancers, investigation in primary care was associated with later referral for specialist assessment. This effect was independent of the nature of symptoms. Some patients for whom urgent referral is mandated by NICE guidance are nevertheless investigated before referral. Reducing the intervals between test order, test performance, and reporting can help reduce the prolongation of primary-care intervals associated with investigation use. Alternative models of

  13. Caring for cancer patients on non-specialist wards.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Finola

    2012-02-01

    As cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, every nurse will be required to care for patients with the condition at some point in his\\/her career. However, non-specialized oncology nurses are often ill-prepared to nurse patients suffering from cancer. This literature review aims to provide an overview of current trends and developments in cancer care nursing in an attempt to identify the range of previous research pertaining to caring for patients with cancer on non-specialist wards. The review finds that non-specialized cancer nurses report a lack of education and training with regard to cancer care and cancer treatments, which acts as a barrier to providing quality nursing care. Emotional and communication issues with patients and their families can also cause non-specialist nurses significant distress. International research has shown that specialist oncology nurses make a considerable difference to physical and psychosocial patient care. It is therefore paramount that non-speciality nurses\\' educational needs are met to develop clinical competence and to provide supportive holistic care for both patients and their families.

  14. Relatives' level of satisfaction with advanced cancer care in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustussen, Mikaela; Hounsgaard, Lise; Pedersen, Michael Lynge

    2017-01-01

    Palliative cancer care in Greenland is provided by health professionals at local level, the national Queen Ingrid's Hospital and at Rigshospitalet in Denmark. To improve and develop care for relatives of patients with advanced cancer, we conducted a mixed method study examining relatives' level...... of satisfaction with care and treatment and their current main concerns. The aim was to investigate relatives' level of satisfaction with advanced cancer care and bring to light their current main concerns. The FAMCARE-20 questionnaire was translated to Greenlandic and pilot tested. The questionnaire...... (66%) and relatives were the most dissatisfied with the lack of inclusion in decision making related to treatment and care (71%) and the length of time required to diagnose cancer (70%). Responses to the open-ended questions revealed that relatives faced challenges in gaining access to information...

  15. Proactive cancer care in primary care: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Marilyn; Mason, Bruce; Momen, Natalie; Barclay, Stephen; Munday, Dan; Lovick, Roberta; Macpherson, Stella; Paterson, Euan; Baughan, Paul; Cormie, Paul; Kiehlmann, Peter; Free, Amanda; Murray, Scott A

    2013-06-01

    Current models of post-treatment cancer care are based on traditional practices and clinician preference rather than evidence of benefit. To assess the feasibility of using a structured template to provide holistic follow-up of patients in primary care from cancer diagnosis onwards. A two-phase mixed methods action research project. An electronic cancer ongoing review document (CORD) was first developed with patients and general practitioners, and used with patients with a new diagnosis of cancer. This was evaluated through documentary analysis of the CORDs, qualitative interviews with patients, family carers and health professionals and record reviews. The records of 107 patients from 13 primary care teams were examined and 45 interviews conducted. The document was started in 54% of people with newly diagnosed cancer, and prompted clear documentation of multidimension needs and understanding. General practitioners found using the document helped to structure consultations and cover psychosocial areas, but they reported it needed to be better integrated in their medical records with computerized prompts in place. Few clinicians discussed the review openly with patients, and the template was often completed afterwards. Anticipatory cancer care from diagnosis to cure or death, 'in primary care', is feasible in the U.K. and acceptable to patients, although there are barriers. The process promoted continuity of care and holism. A reliable system for proactive cancer care in general practice supported by hospital specialists may allow more survivorship care to be delivered in primary care, as in other long-term conditions.

  16. Integrated Care Planning for Cancer Patients: A Scoping Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anum Irfan Khan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There has been a growing emphasis on the use of integrated care plans to deliver cancer care. However little is known about how integrated care plans for cancer patients are developed including featured core activities, facilitators for uptake and indicators for assessing impact. Methods: Given limited consensus around what constitutes an integrated care plan for cancer patients, a scoping review was conducted to explore the components of integrated care plans and contextual factors that influence design and uptake. Results: Five types of integrated care plans based on the stage of cancer care: surgical, systemic, survivorship, palliative and comprehensive (involving a transition between stages are described in current literature. Breast, esophageal and colorectal cancers were common disease sites. Multi-disciplinary teams, patient needs assessment and transitional planning emerged as key features. Provider buy-in and training alongside informational technology support served as important facilitators for plan uptake. Provider-level measurement was considerably less robust compared to patient and system-level indicators. Conclusions: Similarities in design features, components and facilitators across the various types of integrated care plans indicates opportunities to leverage shared features and enable a management lens that spans the trajectory of a patient’s journey rather than a phase-specific silo approach to care.

  17. CT findings of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the stomach: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Lee, Chang Hee; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Park, Cheol Min

    2008-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma is a rare tumor of the stomach with an incidence ranging from 0.04% to 0.4% of all diagnosed gastric cancers. We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma in the stomach associated with hypertrophic gastropathy and observed as a huge mass and wall thickening on the greater curvature site by a multidetector CT

  18. Palliative nursing care for children and adolescents with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmer MJ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrah L Foster,1,2 Cynthia J Bell,1 Carey F McDonald,2 Joy S Harris,3 Mary Jo Gilmer,1,21Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, 2Monroe Carell Jr Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, 3Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Pediatric palliative care aims to enhance life and decrease suffering of children and adolescents living with life-threatening conditions and their loved ones. Oncology nurses are instrumental in providing palliative care to pediatric oncology populations. This paper describes pediatric palliative care and provides an overview of literature related to the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual domains of palliative nursing care for children and adolescents with cancer. Nurses can provide optimal palliative care by accounting for children's understanding of death, encouraging early initiation of palliative care services, and improving utilization of pediatric palliative care in cancer settings. Specific roles of registered nurses and advanced practice nurses in pediatric palliative care will be addressed. Recommendations for future research are made to further advance the science of pediatric palliative care and decrease suffering for children and teens with cancer.Keywords: pediatric palliative care, pediatric cancer, oncology, child, suffering

  19. The nursing contribution to nutritional care in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, Jane B

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex syndrome. Its defining feature is involuntary weight loss, which arises, in part, because of muscle atrophy and is accompanied by functional decline. International expert consensus recommends that nutritional support and counselling is a component of multimodal therapy for cancer cachexia, as poor nutritional intake can contribute to progression of the syndrome. The present paper focuses on what is presently known about the nursing contribution to nutritional care in cancer cachexia. There is potential for nurses to play an important role. However, obstacles to this include lack of a robust evidence base to support their nutritional care practices and unmet need for education about nutrition in cancer. The nursing role's boundaries and the outcomes of nurse-delivered nutritional care in cancer cachexia are both uncertain and should be investigated.

  20. Association of Palliative Care Consultation With Reducing Inpatient Chemotherapy Use in Elderly Patients With Cancer in Japan: Analysis Using a Nationwide Administrative Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Motoko; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2017-08-01

    The administration of chemotherapy at the end of life is considered an aggressive life-prolonging treatment. The use of unnecessarily aggressive therapy in elderly patients at the end of life is an important health-care concern. To explore the impact of palliative care consultation (PCC) on chemotherapy use in geriatric oncology inpatients in Japan by analyzing data from a national database. We conducted a multicenter cohort study of patients aged ≥65 years, registered in the Japan National Administrative Healthcare Database, who died with advanced (stage ≥3) lung, stomach, colorectal, liver, or breast cancer while hospitalized between April 2010 and March 2013. The relationship between PCC and chemotherapy use in the last 2 weeks of life was analyzed using χ 2 and logistic regression analyses. We included 26 012 patients in this analysis. The mean age was 75.74 ± 6.40 years, 68.1% were men, 81.8% had recurrent cancer, 29.5% had lung cancer, and 29.5% had stomach cancer. Of these, 3134 (12%) received PCC. Among individuals who received PCC, chemotherapy was administered to 46 patients (1.5%) and was not administered to 3088 patients (98.5%). Among those not receiving PCC, chemotherapy was administered to 909 patients (4%) and was not administered to the remaining 21 978 patients (96%; odds ratio [OR], 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.26-0.48). The OR of chemotherapy use was higher in men, young-old, and patients with primary cancer. Palliative care consultation was associated with less chemotherapy use in elderly Japanese patients with cancer who died in the hospital setting.

  1. PRIMARY PALLIATIVE CARE? - Treating terminally ill cancer patients in the primary care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Olesen, Frede

    BACKGROUND. Palliative care for cancer patients is an important part of a GP's work. Although every GP is frequently involved in care for terminally ill cancer patients, only little is known about how these palliative efforts are perceived by the patients and their families, a knowledge...... that is vital to further improve palliative care in the primary sector.AIM. The aim of the study was to analyse the quality of palliative home care with focus on the GP's role based on evaluations by relatives of recently deceased cancer patients and professionals from both the primary and secondary health care...... approach.RESULTS. The analyses revealed several key areas, e.g.: 1) How to take, give and maintain professional responsibility for palliative home care. 2) A need for transparent communication both among primary care professionals and among professionals across the primary/secondary interface. 3...

  2. Impact of Chronic Conditions on the Cost of Cancer Care...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in Impact of Chronic Conditions on the Cost of Cancer Care for Medicaid Beneficiaries, published in Volume 2, Issue 4 of the Medicare...

  3. Radiotherapy in Palliative Cancer Care: Development and Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that in 2008 there were over 12 million new cancer diagnoses and 7 million cancer deaths worldwide. The World Health Organisation (WHO) predicts that cancer rates will increase from 10 million to 24 million in the next 50 years. More than half of cancer cases will be diagnosed in low income nations, where 80% or more of patients will have incurable disease at diagnosis. In situations where most patients are diagnosed with incurable disease or where curative treatment is logistically unavailable, as is the case in many low income countries, the allocation of limited health care resources should reflect a greater emphasis on palliative care. Ironically, access to palliative care is greater in health care systems with well developed infrastructures and facilities for prevention, early detection, and curative treatment of cancer. To provide comprehensive cancer care, a multidisciplinary approach is needed. This maximizes the available treatments and interventions, whilst ensuring a cost effective and ethically sound approach to the treatment of patients at each stage of the disease. Barriers to palliative care may result from its low prioritization in health care policy and education. The WHO expert committee on cancer pain and palliative care report of 1990 called for the integration of efforts directed at maintaining patient quality of life through all stages of cancer treatment. As a result supportive interventions aimed at improving quality of life are needed for patients undergoing both curative and palliative cancer treatment. The International Atomic Energy Agency is currently collaborating with the Open Society Institute to develop palliative care programmes in Eastern Europe, Africa and India, as well as supporting programmes in other regions of the world, through the International Palliative Care Initiative. OSI partners with the IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy, the World Health Organization, the International Agency for Research

  4. Documenting coordination of cancer care between primary care providers and oncology specialists in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, Melissa C; Vukmirovic, Marija; Tomasone, Jennifer R; Grunfeld, Eva; Urquhart, Robin; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Walker, Melanie; Webster, Fiona; Fitch, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    To report on the findings of the CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum) Casebook project, which systematically documented Canadian initiatives (ie, programs and projects) designed to improve or support coordination and continuity of cancer care between primary care providers (PCPs) and oncology specialists. Pan-Canadian environmental scan. Canada. Individuals representing the various initiatives provided data for the analysis. Initiatives included in the Casebook met the following criteria: they supported coordination and collaboration between PCPs and oncology specialists; they were related to diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, or personalized medicine; and they included breast or colorectal cancer or both. Data were collected on forms that were compiled into summaries (ie, profiles) for each initiative. Casebook initiatives were organized based on the targeted stage of the cancer care continuum, jurisdiction, and strategy (ie, model of care or type of intervention) employed. Thematic analysis identified similarities and differences among employed strategies, the level of primary care engagement, implementation barriers and facilitators, and initiative evaluation. The CanIMPACT Casebook profiles 24 initiatives. Eleven initiatives targeted the survivorship stage of the cancer care continuum and 15 focused specifically on breast or colorectal cancer or both. Initiative teams implemented the following strategies: nurse patient navigation, multidisciplinary care teams, electronic communication or information systems, PCP education, and multicomponent initiatives. Initiatives engaged PCPs at various levels. Implementation barriers included lack of care standardization across jurisdictions and incompatibility among electronic communication systems. Implementation facilitators included having clinical and program leaders publicly support the initiative, repurposing existing resources, receiving financial support, and

  5. Massage Therapy in Outpatient Cancer Care: A Metropolitan Area Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Robin Streit; Parikh, Bijal

    2017-01-01

    Massage offers cancer patients general quality of life benefits as well as alleviation of cancer-related symptoms/cancer-treatment–related symptoms including pain, anxiety, and fatigue. Little is known about whether massage is accessible to cancer patients who receive treatment in the outpatient setting and how massage is incorporated into the overall cancer treatment plan. Outpatient cancer centers (n = 78) in a single metropolitan area were included this mixed-methods project that included a systematic analysis of website information and a telephone survey. Massage was offered at only 40 centers (51.3% of total). A range of massage modalities were represented, with energy-based therapies (Reiki and Therapeutic Touch) most frequently provided. Although massage therapists are licensed health care providers in the states included in this analysis, massage was also provided by nurses, physical therapists, and other health care professionals. PMID:28845677

  6. Massage Therapy in Outpatient Cancer Care: A Metropolitan Area Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Virginia S; Miccio, Robin Streit; Parikh, Bijal

    2017-10-01

    Massage offers cancer patients general quality of life benefits as well as alleviation of cancer-related symptoms/cancer-treatment-related symptoms including pain, anxiety, and fatigue. Little is known about whether massage is accessible to cancer patients who receive treatment in the outpatient setting and how massage is incorporated into the overall cancer treatment plan. Outpatient cancer centers (n = 78) in a single metropolitan area were included this mixed-methods project that included a systematic analysis of website information and a telephone survey. Massage was offered at only 40 centers (51.3% of total). A range of massage modalities were represented, with energy-based therapies (Reiki and Therapeutic Touch) most frequently provided. Although massage therapists are licensed health care providers in the states included in this analysis, massage was also provided by nurses, physical therapists, and other health care professionals.

  7. [Supportive care during chemotherapy for lung cancer in daily practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Veronika; Tamási, Lilla; Gálffy, Gabriella; Losonczy, György

    2012-09-01

    Active oncotherapy, combination chemotherapy of lung cancer is accompanied with many side effects which may impair patients' quality of life and compromise the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Most side effects of chemotherapy are preventable or treatable with optimal supportive care which enhances success in patient care and treatment. The aim of this review is to summarize the most important conditions that may be associated with combined chemotherapy of lung cancer from the practical point of view.

  8. Nursing workload for cancer patients under palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Fuly, Patrícia dos Santos Claro; Pires, Livia Márcia Vidal; Souza, Claudia Quinto Santos de; Oliveira, Beatriz Guitton Renaud Baptista de; Padilha, Katia Grillo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To verify the nursing workload required by cancer patients undergoing palliative care and possible associations between the demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients and the nursing workload. METHOD This is a quantitative, cross-sectional, prospective study developed in the Connective Bone Tissue (TOC) clinics of Unit II of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute José Alencar Gomes da Silva with patients undergoing palliative care. RESULTS Analysis of 197 ...

  9. Roentgenodiagnosis of stomach postulcer scar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strunin, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of the X-ray picture of the stomach postulcer scar in correlation with fibrogastroscopy in 39 patients. The X-ray picture was characterized by considerable polymorphism and at the same time it was difficult to single out pathognomonic features. For specified diagnosis and differentiation the detection of the postulcer scar must become a multifaceted roentgenoendoscopic problem. Stomach ulcers may scar, sometimes with the complete regeneration of the mucosa relief, however their recurrences can develop in the zone of the postulcer scar

  10. The organization of multidisciplinary care teams: modeling internal and external influences on cancer care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Mary L; Das, Irene Prabhu; Clauser, Steven; Petrelli, Nicholas; Salner, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Quality cancer treatment depends upon careful coordination between multiple treatments and treatment providers, the exchange of technical information, and regular communication between all providers and physician disciplines involved in treatment. This article will examine a particular type of organizational structure purported to regularize and streamline the communication between multiple specialists and support services involved in cancer treatment: the multidisciplinary treatment care (MDC) team. We present a targeted review of what is known about various types of MDC team structures and their impact on the quality of treatment care, and we outline a conceptual model of the connections between team context, structure, process, and performance and their subsequent effects on cancer treatment care processes and patient outcomes. Finally, we will discuss future research directions to understand how MDC teams improve patient outcomes and how characteristics of team structure, culture, leadership, and context (organizational setting and local environment) contribute to optimal multidisciplinary cancer care.

  11. African Americans' and Hispanics' information needs about cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Ung, Danielle; Montiel-Ishino, F Alejandro; Nelson, Alison; Canales, Jorge; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have reported on African American and Hispanic (AA and H) populations' informational needs when seeking cancer care at an institution that offers clinical trials. Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) sought to identify and examine the decision making process, the perceptions, and the preferred channels of communication about cancer care services for AA and H communities in order to develop a list of marketing recommendations. Five focus groups (N = 45) consisting of two AA and three H were conducted in four counties of the MCC catchment area in Tampa, FL. Participants were asked about their perceptions, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer care and MCC. Focus groups were audio-recorded and verbatim transcripts were analyzed using content analysis. Similarities in responses were found between AA and H participants. Participants received general health and cancer information from media sources and word of mouth and preferred to hear patient testimonials. There were concerns about costs, insurance coverage, and the actual geographic location of the cancer center. In general, H participants were not opposed to participating in cancer clinical trials/research, whereas, AA participants were more hesitant. A majority of participants highly favored an institution that offered standard care and clinical trials. AA and H participants shared similar concerns and preferences in communication channels, but each group had specific informational needs. The perceptions and preferences of AA and H must be explored in order to successfully and efficiently increase cancer clinical trial participation.

  12. Financial Burden of Cancer Care | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  13. Advance Care Planning: Experience of Women With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    recorded along with other characteristics. Inclusion criteria for the primary studies required that women with breast cancer be at least 21 years of age; cog ...W81XWH-04-1-0469 TITLE: Advance Care Planning: Experience of Women with Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ardith Z. Doorenbos...with Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0469 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Ardith Z. Doorenbos, Ph.D

  14. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the stomach: report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sok Hyun; Choi, Chul Soon; Kim, Ho Chul; Han, Sang Wook; Yoon, Dae Young; Bae, Sang Hoon; Nam, Eun Sook

    2000-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare neoplasm of epithelial origin but consists partly of variable differentiated tumor cells of mesenchymal origin. Accurate diagnosis, including differentiation from adenocarcinoma or gastrointestinal stromal tumor, is difficult. We experienced three cases of sarcomatoid carcinoma of the stomach, and describe the radiological and pathologic findings. One case involved a polypoid mass in the antrum, another a mass with a large ulcer mimicking a Bormann type-II adenocarcinoma in the body, while in the third case, an intraluminal bulky mass arising from the cardia of the stomach was present. This was not differentiated from cancer or stromal tumor. (author)

  15. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the stomach: report of three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sok Hyun; Choi, Chul Soon; Kim, Ho Chul; Han, Sang Wook; Yoon, Dae Young; Bae, Sang Hoon; Nam, Eun Sook [College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-08-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare neoplasm of epithelial origin but consists partly of variable differentiated tumor cells of mesenchymal origin. Accurate diagnosis, including differentiation from adenocarcinoma or gastrointestinal stromal tumor, is difficult. We experienced three cases of sarcomatoid carcinoma of the stomach, and describe the radiological and pathologic findings. One case involved a polypoid mass in the antrum, another a mass with a large ulcer mimicking a Bormann type-II adenocarcinoma in the body, while in the third case, an intraluminal bulky mass arising from the cardia of the stomach was present. This was not differentiated from cancer or stromal tumor. (author)

  16. Oncologists' perspectives on post-cancer treatment communication and care coordination with primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabunde, C N; Haggstrom, D; Kahn, K L; Gray, S W; Kim, B; Liu, B; Eisenstein, J; Keating, N L

    2017-07-01

    Post-treatment cancer care is often fragmented and of suboptimal quality. We explored factors that may affect cancer survivors' post-treatment care coordination, including oncologists' use of electronic technologies such as e-mail and integrated electronic health records (EHRs) to communicate with primary care physicians (PCPs). We used data from a survey (357 respondents; participation rate 52.9%) conducted in 2012-2013 among medical oncologists caring for patients in a large US study of cancer care delivery and outcomes. Oncologists reported their frequency and mode of communication with PCPs, and role in providing post-treatment care. Seventy-five per cent said that they directly communicated with PCPs about post-treatment status and care recommendations for all/most patients. Among those directly communicating with PCPs, 70% always/usually used written correspondence, while 36% always/usually used integrated EHRs; telephone and e-mail were less used. Eighty per cent reported co-managing with PCPs at least one post-treatment general medical care need. In multivariate-adjusted analyses, neither communication mode nor intensity were associated with co-managing survivors' care. Oncologists' reliance on written correspondence to communicate with PCPs may be a barrier to care coordination. We discuss new research directions for enhancing communication and care coordination between oncologists and PCPs, and to better meet the needs of cancer survivors post-treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Delivering affordable cancer care in high-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Richard; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Sikora, Karol; Zalcberg, John; Meropol, Neal J; Amir, Eitan; Khayat, David; Boyle, Peter; Autier, Philippe; Tannock, Ian F; Fojo, Tito; Siderov, Jim; Williamson, Steve; Camporesi, Silvia; McVie, J Gordon; Purushotham, Arnie D; Naredi, Peter; Eggermont, Alexander; Brennan, Murray F; Steinberg, Michael L; De Ridder, Mark; McCloskey, Susan A; Verellen, Dirk; Roberts, Terence; Storme, Guy; Hicks, Rodney J; Ell, Peter J; Hirsch, Bradford R; Carbone, David P; Schulman, Kevin A; Catchpole, Paul; Taylor, David; Geissler, Jan; Brinker, Nancy G; Meltzer, David; Kerr, David; Aapro, Matti

    2011-09-01

    The burden of cancer is growing, and the disease is becoming a major economic expenditure for all developed countries. In 2008, the worldwide cost of cancer due to premature death and disability (not including direct medical costs) was estimated to be US$895 billion. This is not simply due to an increase in absolute numbers, but also the rate of increase of expenditure on cancer. What are the drivers and solutions to the so-called cancer-cost curve in developed countries? How are we going to afford to deliver high quality and equitable care? Here, expert opinion from health-care professionals, policy makers, and cancer survivors has been gathered to address the barriers and solutions to delivering affordable cancer care. Although many of the drivers and themes are specific to a particular field-eg, the huge development costs for cancer medicines-there is strong concordance running through each contribution. Several drivers of cost, such as over-use, rapid expansion, and shortening life cycles of cancer technologies (such as medicines and imaging modalities), and the lack of suitable clinical research and integrated health economic studies, have converged with more defensive medical practice, a less informed regulatory system, a lack of evidence-based sociopolitical debate, and a declining degree of fairness for all patients with cancer. Urgent solutions range from re-engineering of the macroeconomic basis of cancer costs (eg, value-based approaches to bend the cost curve and allow cost-saving technologies), greater education of policy makers, and an informed and transparent regulatory system. A radical shift in cancer policy is also required. Political toleration of unfairness in access to affordable cancer treatment is unacceptable. The cancer profession and industry should take responsibility and not accept a substandard evidence base and an ethos of very small benefit at whatever cost; rather, we need delivery of fair prices and real value from new technologies

  18. Key elements of communication in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maex, E; De Valck, C

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter the "communication compass" is introduced. It defines the key elements of communication and provides a language with which to communicate about communication in cancer care. The communication compass consists of two axes. One axis defines the associated perspectives of the clinician and the patient, the other axis the content of information and emotional experience. "Two lovers sat on a park bench with their bodies touching each other, holding hands in the moonlight. There was silence between them. So profound was their love for each other, they needed no words to express it." (Samuel Johnson). Sometimes communication just flows. There are these special moments, as fleeting as they are intense. Often communication is stuck. It is as if we speak another language and never manage to understand one another. The lovers on the park bench need no words to express what they feel, neither do they need words to speak about communication. Where communication gets stuck, we need a suitable language to speak about communication. Professional communication cannot be learned from a cookbook. Most of all it implies a readiness to communicate, which means openness to the other. The old adage that it is impossible not to communicate is only true if no criterion of quality is applied. As soon as some mutual understanding is implied in the definition of communication, the fact that it is at all possible to communicate becomes a miracle. Since there is an important gap between theory and practice, we created a tool that aims to bridge that gap. We call it the communication compass. It does not propose a model of "ideal communication," but provides a language with which to examine and analyze specific situations and to determine what the pitfalls and possibilities are. It is useful as a tool for identifying communicational difficulties in daily clinical practice and it can serve as a model for training basic communication skills.

  19. Patient Care Coordinator | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    blood diseases and conditions; parasitic infections; rheumatic and inflammatory diseases; and rare and neglected diseases. CMRP’s collaborative approach to clinical research and the expertise and dedication of staff to the continuation and success of the program’s mission has contributed to improving the overall standards of public health on a global scale. The Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides comprehensive, dedicated clinical research, study coordination, and administrative support to the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), Urologic Oncology Branch (UOB) located at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES - THIS POSITION IS CONTINGENT UPON FUNDING APPROVAL The Patient Care Coordinator III (PCC III) provides administrative services, as well as patient care coordination. Responsibilities will include: Communicates with various clinical administrative support offices/clinics/diagnostic centers concerning scheduling of patient appointments, new and existing work scopes and clinical protocols (Surgery, X-ray, etc.). Consults with the patient, chooses the appropriate appointment, and enters ID and demographic data supplied by patient to secure an appointment in order to update clinic and physician schedules. Composes correspondence on various administrative issues including patient letters and notices to the patient’s home and physicians. Provides patients with information about their appointments, including medical materials the patient will need to bring, dates and times, clinic information, hospital maps and appropriate travel and hotel information. Arranges Admission Travel Voucher (ATV) travel, including lodging, meals and direct bill requests and enters data in the ATV system daily. Obtains up-to-date patient records and other pertinent information prior to patient appointments or admission. Maintains a roster of all patients and tracks their appointments

  20. Evaluating the effect of clinical care pathways on quality of cancer care: analysis of breast, colon and rectal cancer pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Han; Yang, Fengjuan; Su, Shaofei; Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Meiqi; Xiao, Yaming; Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jiaying; Liu, Meina

    2016-05-01

    Substantial gaps exist between clinical practice and evidence-based cancer care, potentially leading to adverse clinical outcomes and decreased quality of life for cancer patients. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of clinical pathways as a tool for improving quality of cancer care, using breast, colon, and rectal cancer pathways as demonstrations. Newly diagnosed patients with invasive breast, colon, and rectal cancer were enrolled as pre-pathway groups, while patients with the same diagnoses treated according to clinical pathways were recruited for post-pathway groups. Compliance with preoperative core biopsy or fine-needle aspiration, utilization of sentinel lymph node biopsy, and proportion of patients whose tumor hormone receptor status was stated in pathology report were significantly increased after implementation of clinical pathway for breast cancer. For colon cancer, compliance with two care processes was significantly improved: surgical resection with anastomosis and resection of at least 12 lymph nodes. Regarding rectal cancer, there was a significant increase in compliance with preoperative evaluation of depth of tumor invasion, total mesorectal excision treatment of middle- or low-position rectal cancer, and proportion of patients who had undergone rectal cancer surgery whose pathology report included margin status. Moreover, total length of hospital stay was decreased remarkably for all three cancer types, and postoperative complications remained unchanged following implementation of the clinical pathways. Clinical pathways can improve compliance with standard care by implementing evidence-based quality indicators in daily practice, which could serve as a useful tool for narrowing the gap between clinical practice and evidence-based care.

  1. Investigation of stomach diseases in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Chikako; Naitoh, Yasuo; Kumasawa, Toshihiko

    1976-01-01

    Fluororoentogenography of stomach was carried out on the cases of which stool-test was positive at the time of general physical examinations from October, 1971 to September, 1975. Necessity rate of detailed examination was high in male, but there was no difference by exposure condition between female and male. Rate of detailed examination carried out tended to be high in female, but there was no difference by exposure condition. Rate showing abnormal findings was high in male, and was high in the aged of both female and male. Rate showing abnormal findings according to exposure condition was higher in the group exposed directly to atomic bomb over 2.1 km from the hypocenter, in the group who entered city after explosion, and in other groups than in the group exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter. In findings of the detailed examinations, incidence of gastric ulcer was high in young fellows and male, and incidence of gastric polyp was high in the aged of female. Incidence rate of stomach cancer was high in male, and it increased with increase of age in both female and male. Estimated incidence rate of stomach cancer by exposure condition seemed to be high in the group exposed directly within 1 km from the hypocenter. However, a statistically significant difference was not recognized because of small samples. Incidence rate of stomach cancer by sex was higher in females exposed proximally. (Kanao, N.)

  2. Investigation of stomach diseases in atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, C; Naitoh, Y; Kumasawa, T [Hiroshima A-Bomb Survivors Health Control Clinic (Japan)

    1976-09-01

    Fluororoentogenography of stomach was carried out on the cases of which stool-test was positive at the time of general physical examinations from October, 1971 to September, 1975. Necessity rate of detailed examination was high in male, but there was no difference by exposure condition between female and male. Rate of detailed examination carried out tended to be high in female, but there was no difference by exposure condition. Rate showing abnormal findings was high in male, and was high in the aged of both female and male. Rate showing abnormal findings according to exposure condition was higher in the group exposed directly to atomic bomb over 2.1 km from the hypocenter, in the group who entered city after explosion, and in other groups than in the group exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter. In findings of the detailed examinations, incidence of gastric ulcer was high in young fellows and male, and incidence of gastric polyp was high in the aged of female. Incidence rate of stomach cancer was high in male, and it increased with increase of age in both female and male. Estimated incidence rate of stomach cancer by exposure condition seemed to be high in the group exposed directly within 1 km from the hypocenter. However, a statistically significant difference was not recognized because of small samples. Incidence rate of stomach cancer by sex was higher in females exposed proximally.

  3. The stomach, cholecystokinin, and satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, P R; Moran, T H

    1986-04-01

    The stomach of the rhesus monkey empties liquids in a fashion that varies with the character of the solutions. Physiological saline empties exponentially. Glucose solutions empty biphasically--rapidly for the first minutes, then slowly and proportionately to glucose concentration to deliver glucose calories through the pylorus at a regulated rate (0.4 kcal/min). This prolonged and regulated second phase of gastric emptying depends on intestinal inhibition of the stomach. Cholecystokinin (CCK), a hormone released by food in the intestine, is an inhibitor of gastric emptying. In vitro receptor autoradiography demonstrates CCK receptors to be clustered on the circular muscle of the pylorus. Exogenous CCK, in doses that inhibit gastric emptying, will reduce food intake only if combined with an infusion of saline in the stomach. These observations indicate how gastric distension can be a means for provoking satiety. The variably sustained distension produced by the stomach's slow, calorically regulated emptying could prolong intermeal intervals and thus permit high-calorie meals to inhibit further caloric intake over time. CCK, by directly inhibiting gastric emptying during a meal, could promote gastric distension and so restrict the duration and size of individual meals.

  4. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, Hanne; Johansen, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the feasibility and psychosocial impact of a hospital-based home care (HBHC) program for children with cancer. PROCEDURE: A HBHC program was carried out with 51 children (0-18 years) with cancer to assess its feasibility in terms of satisfaction, care preferences, safety...... children and 43 parents in the home care group, and 47 children and 66 parents receiving standard hospital care. RESULTS: All parents in the HBHC program were satisfied and preferred home care. There were no serious adverse events associated with HBHC, and costs did not increase. When adjusting for age......, gender, diagnosis and time since diagnosis, we found significant higher HRQOL scores in parent-reported physical health (P = 0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.2-19.5) and worry (P = 0.04; 95% CI: -0.4-20.6) in the home-care group indicating better physical health and less worry for children...

  5. Relatives' level of satisfaction with advanced cancer care in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustussen, Mikaela; Hounsgaard, Lise; Pedersen, Michael Lynge

    2017-01-01

    from health professionals. They experienced a lack of security, worries about the future and a lack of support at home. The study showed a substantial level of dissatisfaction among relatives of patients with advanced cancer. We strongly recommend a focus on psychosocial care, more access......Palliative cancer care in Greenland is provided by health professionals at local level, the national Queen Ingrid's Hospital and at Rigshospitalet in Denmark. To improve and develop care for relatives of patients with advanced cancer, we conducted a mixed method study examining relatives' level...... was supplemented by open-ended questions about relative's current main concerns and analyzed with a phenomenological hermeneutical approach. Greenlandic patients with advanced cancer who were previously participating in a prospective study were asked if their closest adult relative would participate in the study...

  6. Functional disorders of the stomach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, K. L.; Stern, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Gastroenterologists frequently encounter patients who report vague epigastric discomforts or sensations of fullness, bloating, and distention in the upper abdomen. The discomfort is neither burning in character nor severe in intensity; there is no nocturnal pain. The epigastric location of discomfort and lack of radiation may help to exclude biliary tract and pancreatic diseases. Nausea may be present, but there is little or no vomiting. After these patients ingest liquids or solid foods, the symptoms of easy filling or early satiety and increasing discomfort and nausea are almost always present. The patient may only report "indigestion," but a specific chief complaint, such as pain, discomfort, nausea, or bloating may be elicited with further inquiries. Solid foods usually provoke more symptoms than do liquids. Symptoms of early satiety, nausea, bloating, and abdominal discomfort may culminate in the vomiting of undigested food. These vague upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms have been termed "dyspepsia." When peptic diseases of the stomach are excluded, the symptom complex has been called "nonulcer" dyspepsia, a vague syndrome with symptoms attributed to stomach dysfunction. Nonulcer dyspepsia has been reviewed recently. Such symptoms, commonly attributed to a "functional" disorder, are very common in clinical practice, with an incidence of 30% of patients. In this review, we will discuss an approach to the evaluation and treatment of patients with symptoms of nausea, early satiety, bloating, and vague epigastric discomfort--dyspeptic symptoms associated with functional stomach disorders. We will review the anatomy and motility of the stomach and suggest potential neuromuscular malfunctions of the stomach that may result in epigastric symptoms. The potential role of stress and other brain-gut interactions, which may underlie these symptoms, will also be reviewed.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of celery seed extract induced apoptosis via s phase cell cycle arrest in the BGC-823 human stomach cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin-Lin; Feng, Lei; Yao, Shu-Tong; Jiao, Peng; Qin, Shu-Cun; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Ya-Bin; Li, Fu-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms of apoptosis in tumor cells is an important field of tumor therapy and cancer molecular biology. Loss of cell cycle control, leading to uncontrolled proliferation, is common in cancer. Therefore, the identification of potent and selective cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors is a priority for anti-cancer drug discovery. There are at least two major apoptotic pathways, initiated by caspase-8 and caspase-9, respectively, which can activate caspase cascades. Apoptosis triggered by activation of the mitochondrial-dependent caspase pathway represents the main programmed cell death mechanism. This is activated by various intracellular stresses that induce permeabilization of the mitochondrial membrane. Anti-tumor effects of celery seed extract (CSE) and related mechanisms regarding apoptosis were here investigated in human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells. CSE was produced by supercritical fluid extraction. Cell viability was analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)- 2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and apoptosis by flow cytometry using Annexin/PI staining and DAPI staining and a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM). Cell cycling was evaluated using PI staining with flow cytometry and expression of cell cycle and apoptosis-related proteins cyclin A, CDK2, bcl-2 and bax was assessed by immunohistochemical staining. CSE had an anti-proliferation effect on human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. After treatment, the apoptotic rate significantly increased, with morphological changes typical of apoptosis observed with LSCM by DAPI staining. Cell cycle and apoptosis related proteins, such as cyclin A, CDK2 and bcl-2 were all down-regulated, whereas bax was up-regulated. The molecular determinants of inhibition of cell proliferation as well as apoptosis of CSE may be associated with cycle arrest in the S phase.

  8. Self-assessment in cancer patients referred to palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömgren, Annette S; Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    the symptomatology of participating patients and examines differences in symptomatology between patients in three palliative care functions: inpatient, outpatient, and palliative home care. RESULTS: Of 267 eligible patients who were referred to a department of palliative medicine, initial self......-based study of symptomatology in consecutive cancer patients in palliative care, achieving rather complete data from the participants. The symptomatology in these patients was very pronounced. The questionnaires were able to detect clinically important differences between places of service....

  9. Analysis of local concentration in stomach fold pattern by using abdominal X-ray CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shigeto; Hasegawa, Jun-ichi; Mekada, Yoshito; Mori, Kensaku; Nawano, Shigeru

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents a method for analysis of stomach folds pattern in abdominal X-ray CT images. Many stomach cancers have local concentration of folds at cancer lesions. Therefore, in stomach diagnosis, it is very important to evaluate quantitatively such fold concentration. In this paper, a method for calculation of concentration index for line figure on a curved surface is proposed first. Then, using this method a processing procedure for detection of stomach cancer from an abdominal X-ray CT image is developed. In the experiment using practical X-ray CT images, it is shown that by the proposed procedure, higher values of concentration index are obtained at cancer area. (author)

  10. Carcinoma of the stomach in young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, In Sook; Kim, Bo Young; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song; Oh, Sung Soo

    1988-01-01

    Of patients examined during the 24 years from January 1963 to December 1986, we have reviewed 6116 cases of gastric cancer. We found 126 cases of gastric carcinoma in patients below 30 years of age among 6116 cases of gastric malignancy, which were confirmed by histopathological study at PMC in Chonju. In an attempt to identify further the natural history of carcinoma of the stomach in young adults, we reviewed 126 cases of stomach carcinoma in patients below 30 years of age at PMC. The results were as follows: 1.Among the gastric malignancies the incidence of gastric carcinoma in young adults was 2.1%. 2.The age ranged from 13 years to 29 years, and the peak incidence occurred in the 3rd decade. 3.Male to female ratio was 1:1.03. 4.Common symptoms included epigastric pain, indigestion, weight loss, and vomiting. The mean time interval between onset of symptoms and the 1st visit to a physician was 12 months. 5.Usually diagnostic aids were UGI series, endoscopic examination and biopsy. 6.In the endoscopic finding Borrmamn type III was predominant. 7.The majority of tumors occurred in the antrum and Pyloric portion. 8.Histologic diagnosis were adenocarcinoma, signet ring cell carcinoma, and mucinous cardinoma, in orders

  11. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, H; Schmiegelow, K

    2012-01-01

    , as it decreased the strain on the family and the ill child, maintained normality and an ordinary everyday life and fulfilled the need for safety and security. According to family members of children with cancer, hospital-based home care support enhanced their quality of life during the child's cancer trajectory......The study aims to describe the experiences of a hospital-based home care programme in the families of children with cancer. Fourteen parents, representing 10 families, were interviewed about their experiences of a hospital-based home care programme during a 4-month period in 2009 at a university...... hospital in Denmark. Five children participated in all or part of the interview. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings indicate that hospital-based home care enabled the families to remain intact throughout the course of treatment...

  12. Clarifying perspectives: Ethics case reflection sessions in childhood cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdson, Cecilia; Lützén, Kim; Blomgren, Klas; Pergert, Pernilla

    2016-06-01

    Childhood cancer care involves many ethical concerns. Deciding on treatment levels and providing care that infringes on the child's growing autonomy are known ethical concerns that involve the whole professional team around the child's care. The purpose of this study was to explore healthcare professionals' experiences of participating in ethics case reflection sessions in childhood cancer care. Data collection by observations, individual interviews, and individual encounters. Data analysis were conducted following grounded theory methodology. Healthcare professionals working at a publicly funded children's hospital in Sweden participated in ethics case reflection sessions in which ethical issues concerning clinical cases were reflected on. The children's and their parents' integrity was preserved through measures taken to protect patient identity during ethics case reflection sessions. The study was approved by a regional ethical review board. Consolidating care by clarifying perspectives emerged. Consolidating care entails striving for common care goals and creating a shared view of care and the ethical concern in the specific case. The inter-professional perspectives on the ethical aspects of care are clarified by the participants' articulated views on the case. Different approaches for deliberating ethics are used during the sessions including raising values and making sense, leading to unifying interactions. The findings indicate that ethical concerns could be eased by implementing ethics case reflection sessions. Conflicting perspectives can be turned into unifying interactions in the healthcare professional team with the common aim to achieve good pediatric care. Ethics case reflection sessions is valuable as it permits the discussion of values in healthcare-related issues in childhood cancer care. Clarifying perspectives, on the ethical concerns, enables healthcare professionals to reflect on the most reasonable and ethically defensible care for the child

  13. Lifetime risks, loss of life expectancy, and health care expenditures for 19 types of cancer in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu TY

    2018-05-01

    , pancreas, nasopharyngeal, lung, esophageal, leukemia, liver, gallbladder, extrahepatic bile ducts and biliary tract, ovary, and stomach in females. Cancers with lifetime health care expenditures exceeding US$50,000 to the National Health Insurance were as follows: leukemia, kidney, testis, renal pelvis and ureter in males, and renal pelvis and ureter, leukemia, breast, urinary bladder, kidney, ovary, and nasopharyngeal in females. All these impacts should be considered in health policy decisions. Conclusion: The impacts of cancer in Taiwan are very large. Future studies must consider both quality of life and the entire impact from societal perspectives. Keywords: health impacts, incidence rate, expected years of life lost, cancer prevention

  14. Site of childhood cancer care in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedijk, A M J; van der Heiden-van der Loo, M; Visser, O; Karim-Kos, H E; Lieverst, J A; de Ridder-Sluiter, J G; Coebergh, J W W; Kremer, L C; Pieters, R

    2017-12-01

    Due to the complexity of diagnosis and treatment, care for children and young adolescents with cancer preferably occurs in specialised paediatric oncology centres with potentially better cure rates and minimal late effects. This study assessed where children with cancer in the Netherlands were treated since 2004. All patients aged under 18 diagnosed with cancer between 2004 and 2013 were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) and linked with the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG) database. Associations between patient and tumour characteristics and site of care were tested statistically with logistic regression analyses. This population-based study of 6021 children diagnosed with cancer showed that 82% of them were treated in a paediatric oncology centre. Ninety-four percent of the patients under 10 years of age, 85% of the patients aged 10-14 and 48% of the patients aged 15-17 were treated in a paediatric oncology centre. All International Classification of Childhood Cancers (ICCC), 3rd edition, ICCC-3 categories, except embryonal tumours, were associated with a higher risk of treatment outside a paediatric oncology centre compared to leukaemia. Multivariable analyses by ICCC-3 category revealed that specific tumour types such as chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML), embryonal carcinomas, bone tumours other type than osteosarcoma, non-rhabdomyosarcomas, thyroid carcinomas, melanomas and skin carcinomas as well as lower-staged tumours were associated with treatment outside a paediatric oncology centre. The site of childhood cancer care in the Netherlands depends on the age of the cancer patient, type of tumour and stage at diagnosis. Collaboration between paediatric oncology centre(s), other academic units is needed to ensure most up-to-date paediatric cancer care for childhood cancer patients at the short and long term. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Stomach: ultrasonography evaluation and post mortem inspection in adult horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Chaves Pessoa da Veiga

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Veiga C.C.P., Cascon C.M., Souza B.G., Braga L.S.M., Souza V.C., Ferreira A.M.R. & Leite J.S. [Stomach: ultrasonography evaluation and post mortem inspection in adult horses.] Avaliação ultrassonográfica e anatomopatológica macroscópica do estômago de equinos destinados ao abate comercial. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 36(2:125-130, 2014. Instituto de Veterinária, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465, km 7, Seropédica, 23890-000, RJ, Brasil. E-mail: radiovet@ufrrj.br The equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS includes all symptomatic or asymptomatic cases of erosions, ulcers, gastritis, gastric emptying disorders, duodenitis, duodenal ulcers and complications of these disorders. Occupies a prominent place in the equine clinic where you can go for the death of the animal. Ultrasonography of the stomach is indicated when the animals showed clinical signs of gastric disease. The aim of this study was to describe the sonographic evaluation and macroscopic pathological findings of the stomach of adult horses intended for commercial slaughter. To this 39 intended for commercial slaughter horses were evaluated. Sonographic evaluation before slaughter transabdominal via the left side of abdomen for evaluation of the stomach was performed. After the slaughter of these animals their stomachs were collected, evaluated and photographed. The study concluded that ultrasonography identified the stomach in all animals evaluated, but did not allow a careful evaluation of the entire length of the viscera, especially the aglandular region and pleated border. All animals evaluated had injury to the gastric mucosa in different degrees. In animals evaluated, the stomach region was most affected by injuries glandular region, although the most severe lesions have been found in the ruffled border adjacent to aglandular region.

  16. Nursing care dependence in the experiences of advanced cancer inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piredda, Michela; Bartiromo, Chiara; Capuzzo, Maria Teresa; Matarese, Maria; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Increasing burden of cancer in Europe and socio-demographic trends imply that more cancer patients will face high levels of dependency. Care dependency is often perceived as a distressing experience by cancer patients who are concerned about becoming a burden to others. The experience of care dependence has been scarcely investigated in advanced cancer patients, especially in the hospital setting. This study aimed at describing advanced cancer patients' experiences of care dependence in hospital and of the factors perceived by them as contributing to decrease or increase this dependence. The study used a descriptive phenomenological approach based on Husserl's (1913) life world perspective. Data collection and analysis followed Giorgi's (1997) five basic methodological steps. Data were gathered by semi-structured interviews with thirteen advanced cancer adult inpatients of a teaching hospital. The interviews were audio-recorded and the recordings transcribed word for word. Three themes emerged: 'dependency discovers new meanings of life', 'active coping with dependency' and 'the care cures the dependent person'. The essential meaning of care dependency was the possibility to become aware of being a person as both an object and subject of care. Dependence appears as an experience with strong relational connotations, which enable patients to see differently their life, themselves, the world and others. Dependency is revealed as a natural experience, only partly in accordance with previous studies. Deeper insight into the meaning patients attach to care dependency can enable nurses to better meet the patient's needs, e.g. by improving caring relationships with patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Choosing Wisely: Opportunities for Improving Value in Cancer Care Delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocque, Gabrielle B; Williams, Courtney P; Jackson, Bradford E; Wallace, Audrey S; Halilova, Karina I; Kenzik, Kelly M; Partridge, Edward E; Pisu, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Patients, providers, and payers are striving to identify where value in cancer care can be increased. As part of the Choosing Wisely (CW) campaign, ASCO and the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology have recommended against specific, yet commonly performed, treatments and procedures. We conducted a retrospective analysis of Medicare claims data to examine concordance with CW recommendations across 12 cancer centers in the southeastern United States. Variability for each measure was evaluated on the basis of patient characteristics and site of care. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to examine differences in average costs per patient by concordance status. Potential cost savings were estimated on the basis of a potential 95% adherence rate and average cost difference. The analysis included 37,686 patients with cancer with Fee-for-Service Medicare insurance. Concordance varied by CW recommendation from 39% to 94%. Patient characteristics were similar for patients receiving concordant and nonconcordant care. Significant variability was noted across centers for all recommendations, with as much as an 89% difference. Nonconcordance was associated with higher costs for every measure. If concordance were to increase to 95% for all measures, we would estimate a $19 million difference in total cost of care per quarter. These results demonstrate ample room for reduction of low-value care and corresponding costs associated with the CW recommendations. Because variability in concordance was driven primarily by site of care, rather than by patient factors, continued education about these low-value services is needed to improve the value of cancer care.

  18. Clinical practice guidelines: 2004 standards, options and recommendations for the management of patient with adenocarcinoma of the stomach - radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ychou, M.; Duffour, J.; Lemanski, C.; Masson, B.; Gory-Delabaere, G.; Bosquet, L.; Blanc, P.; Giovannini, M.; Monge, G.; Guillemin, F.; Marchal, F.; Conroy, T.; Merrouche, Y.; Adenis, A.; Bosset, J.F.; Bouche, O.; Pezet, D.; Triboulet, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Context. - The 'Standards, Options and Recommendations' (SOR) project, started in 1993, is a collaboration between the Federation of French Cancer Centers (FNCLCC), the 20 French regional cancer centers, and specialists from French Public Universities, General Hospitals and Private Clinics. The main objective is the development of clinical practice guidelines to improve the quality of health care and the outcome of cancer patients. Objectives. - To elaborate clinical practice guidelines for patients with stomach adenocarcinoma. These recommendations cover the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of these tumors. Methods. - The methodology is based on a literature review and critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary group of experts, with feedback from specialists in cancer care delivery. The Standards, Options and Recommendations are thus based on the best available evidence and expert agreement. Results. - Adjuvant radiation therapy alone is not a standard treatment for patients with stomach adenocarcinoma. Adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy is not a standard treatment for patients with stage II or III stomach adenocarcinoma R0, with D1 or D2 lymphadenectomy who have undergone surgery. Following surgical resection, adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy should be proposed to patients without de-nutrition with a lymphadenectomy < D1 (fewer than 15 lymph nodes examined) and those with T3 and/or N+ tumours following the protocol used in the MacDonald trials (SWOG-9008) (Level of evidence B1). Adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy can be administered to patients without de-nutrition with D1 or D2 lymphadenectomy and with involvement of regional lymph nodes (N2 or N3). (authors)

  19. Assessment of nutritional status of the patient with cancer of the stomach by means of selected methods of anthropometric, biochemical and immunological

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Pierzak

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutritional status is a medical condition that results from the customary intake of food absorbed and the use of its component nutrients or non-nutrients. Malnutrition is a problem faced by therapeutic teams around the world. This condition affects approximately 20-50% of patients hospitalized au deepens 30-90% of patients during hospital treatment. Aim: Assessment of nutritional status of a patient with gastric cancer using selected methods of anthropometric, biochemical and immunological research. Material and methods: The patient admitted in the surgery ward elective 64 years, diagnosis of gastric cancer according to the TNM classification type T3N1MO for treatment. A patient with a history of three cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Taking into account the results of the questionnaire NRS-2002, interview, physical examination, symptoms, anthropometric measurements, biochemical and immunological studies can assess the nutritional status of the patient is not valid. The patient is malnourished. Taking into account the recommendation ESPEN (Europan Society for Paraenteral and enteral nutrition and nutritional status of the patient has become necessary to incorporate nutritional therapy. The patient was included in parenteral nutritional therapy. Conclusions: Malnutrition is a medical condition rarely recognized, in consequence of which comes to many dangerous health complications discouraging and even the life of the patient. There are several types of malnutrition. Often, patients with cancer, particularly cancer of the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in prolonged malnutrition, cachexia occurs. Cachexia is a syndrome due to systemic inflammatory response which is a response to the presence of the disease in the body. Recognized malnutrition should be treated. After identifying the patient at risk of malnutrition or who is in the disease state of malnutrition, are introduced nutritional therapy. Evaluation of nutrition

  20. Coordination of cancer care between family physicians and cancer specialists: Importance of communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C; Manca, Donna P; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Webster, Fiona; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-10-01

    To explore health care provider (HCP) perspectives on the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Canada. A total of 58 HCPs, comprising 21 FPs, 15 surgeons, 12 medical oncologists, 6 radiation oncologists, and 4 GPs in oncology. This qualitative study is nested within a larger mixed-methods program of research, CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum), focused on improving the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, telephone interviews were conducted with HCPs involved in cancer care. Invitations to participate were sent to a purposive sample of HCPs based on medical specialty, sex, province or territory, and geographic location (urban or rural). A coding schema was developed by 4 team members; subsequently, 1 team member coded the remaining transcripts. The resulting themes were reviewed by the entire team and a summary of results was mailed to participants for review. Communication challenges emerged as the most prominent theme. Five key related subthemes were identified around this core concept that occurred at both system and individual levels. System-level issues included delays in medical transcription, difficulties accessing patient information, and physicians not being copied on all reports. Individual-level issues included the lack of rapport between FPs and cancer specialists, and the lack of clearly defined and broadly communicated roles. Effective and timely communication of medical information, as well as clearly defined roles for each provider, are essential to good coordination of care along the cancer care trajectory, particularly during transitions of care between cancer specialist and FP care. Despite advances in technology, substantial communication challenges still exist. This can lead to serious consequences that affect clinical decision making

  1. Monitoring radiolabelled antacid preparations in the stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, H.A.; Wilson, C.G.; Hardy, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Radiolabelled antacid preparations have been monitored in the stomach using gamma scintigraphy. The stomach contents were labelled with technetium-99m and two antacid preparations with indium-113m. It has been shown that the antacid containing aluminium hydroxide and magnesium oxide mixed and emptied with the other stomach contents. An alginate containing preparation tended to float on the food and emptied only slowly from the stomach. (Auth.)

  2. Schwannoma of the stomach: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mi Suk; Lee, Jeong Min; Yun, Yeung Geum; Yang, Kee Hwa

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of exogastric schwannoma of the stomach in 41-years-old male patient with papable mass in left upper abdomen. Upper Gl series revealed extrinsic compression on the greater curvature of the stomach. CT scan showed a low density mass attached to greater curvature of the stomach with inhomogeneous contrast enhancement in the mass lesion. The mass was removed by surgery, and confirmed pathologically as schwannoma arising from the stomach

  3. Radiodiagnosis of general diseases of the stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Modern representations of X-ray diagnostics of the most wide-spread stomach diseases are shown. X-ray-anatomical-functional peculiarities of the stomach technique of its X-ray examination as well as X-ray diagnostics of diseases of the stomach are stated on the basis of data of special literature and own author experience. X-ray pattern of the operated stomach and its complications is described in detail

  4. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri G. Homan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02 and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003. The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy.

  5. Roentgenologic assessment of consequences of stomach ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oster, A.N.; Kaplun, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    Symptoms of roentgenologic study of postulcer changes in the stomach mucous membrane are presented. Roentgenologic study predominates in diagnosis of such changes as stenosis of the pylorus, stomach deformation according to the sand glass type or in the form of a snail, as well as in perigastritis. Differential diagnostic difficulties especially in stomach deformations caused by tumor are pointed out

  6. The possibilities of spiral computed tomography in evaluating of pathologic changes of the inner surface of the stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomakov, P.; Mlachkova, D.; Naraliev, V.; Lyutckanova, E.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The aim of the presentation is to determine the possibilities of spiral CT for evaluating pathologic changes, affecting predominantly the stomach mucosa. 20 patients with preliminary clinical diagnosis 'cancer of the stomach' were examined. The patients had different complaints. Gas CT with medical myorelaxation of the stomach was performed. The stomach cavity was inflated by swallowing of three effervescent tablets vitamin C 500 mg with a little water. After the native CT examination a contrast series was performed 20 min. after the beginning of injecting 100 ml nonionic contrast in the arterial phase. 16 patients had no pathologic changes in the stomach. In the rest were established: lymphoma of the stomach - in 1 patient, carcinoma stage I - 1, polyps - 1, erritemoerosive gastritis - 1. CT findings were compared with the histologic ones. Gas CT in arterial contrast phase has possibilities for evaluating changes, affecting predominantly the inner surface (mucosa) of the stomach

  7. Advance care planning within survivorship care plans for older cancer survivors: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Caoimh, Rónán; Cornally, Nicola; O'Sullivan, Ronan; Hally, Ruth; Weathers, Elizabeth; Lavan, Amanda H; Kearns, Tara; Coffey, Alice; McGlade, Ciara; Molloy, D William

    2017-11-01

    Advances in the medical treatment of cancer have increased the number of survivors, particularly among older adults, who now represent the majority of these. Survivorship care plans (SCPs) are documents that cancer patients receive summarising their care, usually at the end of treatment but preferably from initial diagnosis. These may increase patient satisfaction and represent an opportunity to initiate preventative strategies and address future care needs. Advance care planning (ACP), incorporating advance healthcare decision-making, including formal written directives, increases satisfaction and end-of-life care. This paper systematically reviews evaluations of ACP within SCPs among older (≥65 years) cancer survivors. No studies meeting the inclusion criteria were identified by search strategies conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE and the Cochrane databases. One paper examined cancer survivors' mainly positive views of ACP. Another discussed the use of a SCP supported by a 'distress inventory' that included an advance care directive (living will) as an issue, though no formal evaluation was reported. Although ACP is important for older adults, no study was found that evaluated its role within survivorship care planning. Despite the risk of recurrence and the potential for morbidity and mortality, especially among older cancer survivors, ACP is not yet a feature of SCPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. 64Cu DOTA-Trastuzumab PET/CT in Studying Patients With Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  9. [Pathogenic aspects of stomach ulcerogenesis in acute intestinal obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyukov, V E; Nguen, K K

    To identify the patterns and the correlation of morphological and functional changes in stomach wall with the dynamics of different types of acute intestinal obstruction. The study was performed on 33 adult mongrel dogs of both genders weighing 17-20 kg. All researches were conducted in accordance with the documents, such as the 'Guide for the Care and Use of laboratory animals of the National Institute of Health (National Institute of Health - NIH, Bethesda, USA)' and 'Rules of work with experimental animals'. The same methods were used to study the morphology of stomach wall in normal conditions and after intestinal obstruction simulation. We used H & E stain, Van Gieson's picrofuchsin staining combined with Mallory. The choice of histochemical methods was determined by the need to study metabolic processes in epithelial cells and gastric mucosa glands. Einarson method for detecting total nucleic acids was used. The last group of methods was statistical analysis. We determined the regularities of structural organization of microcirculation in various parts of the stomach, the correlation of morphological and functional changes in stomach wall with the dynamics of different types of acute intestinal obstruction. Our data indicate proximal-distal gradient of gastric perfusion: the most pronounced vascular network and maximum blood flow are observed in proximal stomach in both normal conditions and acute intestinal obstruction. More tenuous and reduced blood flow was revealed in the antrum, that is morphological basis of the most frequent localization of acute ulcers in this department.

  10. Primary care for young adult cancer survivors: an international perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Blake-Gumbs, Lyla; Miedema, Baujke

    2010-01-01

    health insurance in Denmark, The Netherlands, and Canada but not in the US. Once the YAC has completed acute treatment and follow-up care, they often return to the care of the FPs who may potentially be expected to deal with and take action upon any possible medical, mental health, and psychosocial...... issues the YA cancer patient may present with. The role of the FP in follow-up care seems to be very limited. CONCLUSIONS: YACs in the western world seem to have comparable medical and psychosocial problems. However, the nature of health insurance is such that it impacts differently on the care...... continuing medical education (CME) initiatives, and an enhanced cooperative effort between those delivering and coordinating cancer care....

  11. Integration of Massage Therapy in Outpatient Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Virginia S; Tafuto, Barbara

    2018-03-01

    Massage therapy can be helpful in alleviating cancer-related symptoms and cancer treatment-related symptoms. While surveys have noted that cancer patients seek out massage as a nonpharmacologic approach during cancer treatment, little is known about the integration of massage in outpatient cancer care. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which massage is being integrated into outpatient cancer care at NCI-designated Cancer Centers. This study used descriptive methods to analyze the integration of massage in NCI-designated Cancer Centers providing clinical services to patients (n = 62). Data were collected from 91.1% of the centers (n = 59) using content analysis and a telephone survey. A dataset was developed and coded for analysis. The integration of massage was assessed by an algorithm that was developed from a set of five variables: 1) acceptance of treatment as therapeutic, 2) institution offers treatment to patients, 3) clinical practice guidelines in place, 4) use of evidence-based resources to inform treatment, and 5) shared knowledge about treatment among health care team. All centers were scored against all five variables using a six-point scale, with all variables rated equally. The integration of massage ranged from not at all (0) to very high (5) with all five levels of integration evident. Only 11 centers (17.7% of total) rated a very high level of integration; nearly one-third of the centers (n = 22) were found to have no integration of massage at all-not even provision of information about massage to patients through the center website. The findings of this analysis suggest that research on massage is not being leveraged to integrate massage into outpatient cancer care.

  12. Integration of Massage Therapy in Outpatient Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Virginia S.; Tafuto, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    Background Massage therapy can be helpful in alleviating cancer-related symptoms and cancer treatment-related symptoms. While surveys have noted that cancer patients seek out massage as a nonpharmacologic approach during cancer treatment, little is known about the integration of massage in outpatient cancer care. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which massage is being integrated into outpatient cancer care at NCI-designated Cancer Centers. Setting This study used descriptive methods to analyze the integration of massage in NCI-designated Cancer Centers providing clinical services to patients (n = 62). Design Data were collected from 91.1% of the centers (n = 59) using content analysis and a telephone survey. A dataset was developed and coded for analysis. Main Outcome Measure The integration of massage was assessed by an algorithm that was developed from a set of five variables: 1) acceptance of treatment as therapeutic, 2) institution offers treatment to patients, 3) clinical practice guidelines in place, 4) use of evidence-based resources to inform treatment, and 5) shared knowledge about treatment among health care team. All centers were scored against all five variables using a six-point scale, with all variables rated equally. Results The integration of massage ranged from not at all (0) to very high (5) with all five levels of integration evident. Only 11 centers (17.7% of total) rated a very high level of integration; nearly one-third of the centers (n = 22) were found to have no integration of massage at all—not even provision of information about massage to patients through the center website. Conclusions The findings of this analysis suggest that research on massage is not being leveraged to integrate massage into outpatient cancer care. PMID:29593842

  13. Assessing Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care: Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Gaglio, Bridget; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Alexander, Gwen L.; Stark, Azadeh; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Walsh, Kathleen; Boggs, Jennifer; Lemay, Celeste A.; Firneno, Cassandra; Biggins, Colleen; Blosky, Mary Ann; Arora, Neeraj K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Patient-centered communication is critical to quality cancer care. Effective communication can help patients and family members cope with cancer, make informed decisions, and effectively manage their care; suboptimal communication can contribute to care breakdowns and undermine clinician-patient relationships. The study purpose was to explore stakeholders' views on the feasibility and acceptability of collecting self-reported patient and family perceptions of communication experiences while receiving cancer care. The results were intended to inform the design, development, and implementation of a structured and generalizable patient-level reporting system. Methods: This was a formative, qualitative study that used semistructured interviews with cancer patients, family members, clinicians, and leaders of health care organizations. The constant comparative method was used to identify major themes in the interview transcripts. Results: A total of 106 stakeholders were interviewed. Thematic saturation was achieved. All stakeholders recognized the importance of communication and endorsed efforts to improve communication during cancer care. Patients, clinicians, and leaders expressed concerns about the potential consequences of reports of suboptimal communication experiences, such as damage to the clinician-patient relationship, and the need for effective improvement strategies. Patients and family members would report good communication experiences in order to encourage such practices. Practical and logistic issues were identified. Conclusion: Patient reports of their communication experiences during cancer care could increase understanding of the communication process, stimulate improvements, inform interventions, and provide a basis for evaluating changes in communication practices. This qualitative study provides a foundation for the design and pilot testing of such a patient reporting system. PMID:23943884

  14. A study of the area of paraaortic lymph nodes dissection in gastric cancer based on lymphatic flow of the stomach using radioactive isotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasagawa, Tsuyoshi (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1992-04-01

    In gastric cancer patients, I subdivided paraaortic lymph nodes (No.16) into 4 zones. Using RI lymphography I analyzed the lymphatic flow from the cardiac and pyloric region to the No.16. Also, based on these results as well as studies of clinical lymph node metastasis, I elucidate the rational No.16 area in extended lymph node dissection. The lymphatic flows to the No.16 by RI lymphography showed the following routes. The route from the cardiac region was: (1) along the left gastric artery heading towards lymph node around the celiac artery and into the left/right No.16; (2) along the posterior gastric artery and splenic artery from lymph node around the splenic artery directly to the left No.16; (3) along the inferior phrenic artery from left cardiac lymph node and lymph node at the splenic hilus directly to the left upper No.16. The route from the pyloric region was: (1) along the common hepatic artery heading towards lymph node around the celiac artery to the left/right No.16; (2) from infrapyloric lymph node along the gastrocolic trunc flowing to lymph node at the root of the mesenterium and No.16. In upper gastric cancer, there was a high rate of metastasis to lymph node along the lesser curvature and right cardial lymph node, and lymph node along the left gastric artery and splenic artery. There were 3 cases in which metastasis was positive only to cardial lymph node and upper left No.16. In lower gastric cancer, there was a high rate of metastasis to infrapyloric lymph node, lymph node along the lesser curvature, lymph node along the left gastric artery and the common hepatic artery. In all cases which metastasized in group 4, the No.16 metastasis rate was significantly higher in the upper left No.16, being 84.8%. Given the above, the area of paraaortic lymph node dissection in extended lymph node dissection, irrespective of whether it is upper or lower gastric cancer, must be done in the 4 zones, and especially, the upper left No.16 is important. (author).

  15. Availability of stage at diagnosis, cancer treatment delay and compliance with cancer guidelines as cancer registry indicators for cancer care in Europe: Results of EUROCHIP-3 survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Kwast, A.; Gavin, A.; Baili, P.; Otter, R.

    2013-01-01

    EUROCHIP (European Cancer Health Indicators Project) focuses on understanding inequalities in the cancer burden, care and survival by the indicators “stage at diagnosis,” “cancer treatment delay” and “compliance with cancer guidelines” as the most important indicators. Our study aims at providing

  16. Primary care and communication in shared cancer care: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Yvonne; Street, Richard L.; Singh, Hardeep; Shada, Rachel; Naik, Aanand D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore perceptions of primary care physicians’ (PCPs) and oncologists’ roles, responsibilities, and patterns of communication related to shared cancer care in three integrated health systems that used electronic health records (EHRs). Study design Qualitative study. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with ten early stage colorectal cancer patients and fourteen oncologists and PCPs. Sample sizes were determined by thematic saturation. Dominant themes and codes were identified and subsequently applied to all transcripts. Results Physicians reported that EHRs improved communication within integrated systems, but communication with physicians outside their system was still difficult. PCPs expressed uncertainty about their role during cancer care, even though medical oncologists emphasized the importance of co-morbidity control during cancer treatment. Both patients and physicians described additional roles for PCPs, including psychological distress support and behavior modification. Conclusions Integrated systems that use EHRs likely facilitate shared cancer care through improved PCP-oncologist communication. However, strategies to facilitate a more active role for PCPs in managing co-morbidities, psychological distress and behavior modification, as well as to overcome communication challenges between physicians not practicing within the same integrated system, are still needed to improve shared cancer care. PMID:21615196

  17. Radiography of the equine stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dik, K.J.; Kalsbeek, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    To obtain radiographic information concerning the equine stomach, a gastrographic contrast examination is required. This study describes this procedure in detail. A powerful radiographic unit, the tubehead linked to an image intensifier and suspended by an electromechanical overhead gantry system, is required. To obtain accurately positioned radiographs during the fluoroscopic examination, a cassette holder with a stationary grid is mounted at the entrance window of the image intensifier. The examination is performed in the unsedated standing horse after 24 hours of starvation, using a combination of survey radiography and fluoroscopic viewing after the inflation of air, followed by the administration of barium sulphate suspension by stomach tube. The gastrographic contrast examination is performed in three experimental animals and 23 abnormal horses. Pneumogastrophy appeared to be valuable to diagnose gastric tumors, to differentiate between gastric tumors and other masses in the cranial abdomen, and to visualize gastric parasites, even in large horses. The use of barium sulphate suspension does not result in an adequate double contrast of the stomach, but it may aid to diagnose esophagogastric or pyloric stenosis and gastric or duodenal ulcers

  18. Radiography of the equine stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dik, K.J.; Kalsbeek, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    To obtain radiographic information concerning the equine stomach, a gastrographic contrast examination is required. This study describes this procedure in detail. A powerful radiographic unit, the tubehead linked to an image intensifier and suspended by an electromechanical overhead gantry system, is required. To obtain accurately positioned radiographs during the fluoroscopic examination, a cassette holder with a stationary grid is mounted at the entrance window of the image intensifier. The examination is performed in the unsedated standing horse after 24 hours of starvation, using a combination of survey radiography and fluoroscopic viewing after the inflation of air, followed by the administration of barium sulphate suspension by stomach tube. The gastrographic contrast examination is performed in three experimental animals and 23 abnormal horses. Pneumogastrophy appeared to be valuable to diagnose gastric tumors, to differentiate between gastric tumors and other masses in the cranial abdomen, and to visualize gastric parasites, even in large horses. The use of barium sulphate suspension does not result in an adequate double contrast of the stomach, but it may aid to diagnose esophagogastric or pyloric stenosis and gastric or duodenal ulcers

  19. [Development of Spiritual Care in Cancer Treatment in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazono, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    Spiritual care started worldwide in the late 1960s with the development of the hospice movement and death studies. Why did spiritual care start duringthis time in history ? In some Christian societies, of that time,"pastoral care" evolved into an interfaith "spiritual care" where in the caretaker was the main agent instead of the caregiver. On the other hand, the importance of palliative care for cancer patients was gradually acknowledged. In addition, this progress was accompanied by the academic development of "death studies" which is called "death and life studies" in Japan. The Japanese hospice care and death studies movement started in the late 1970s. In the precedingperiod, the spiritual quest of cancer patients facingdeath was already gaining public attention. A scholar of religious studies, Hideo Kishimoto of the University of Tokyo, was diagnosed with cancer in 1954; he survived many operations until his death in 1964. Duringthose years, he wrote about his personal experience of acceptinghis approachingdeath. Although he did not believe in any specific faith, he had studied various religious teachings. It is important to understand his perception of his own death. His book, On Facing Death, was published immediately after his death. Therefore, it provided a prominent discourse on copingwith spiritual pain of approachingdeath even before the growth of spiritual care in Japan.

  20. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  1. Young adult cancer survivors' follow-up care expectations of oncologists and primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugh-Yeun, Kiara; Kumar, Divjot; Moghaddamjou, Ali; Ruan, Jenny Y; Cheung, Winson Y

    2017-06-01

    Young adult cancer survivors face unique challenges associated with their illness. While both oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs) may be involved in the follow-up care of these cancer survivors, we hypothesized that there is a lack of clarity regarding each physician's roles and responsibilities. A self-administered survey was mailed to young adult cancer survivors in British Columbia, Canada, who were aged 20 to 39 years at the time of diagnosis and alive at 2 to 5 years following the diagnosis to capture their expectations of oncologists and PCPs in various important domains of cancer survivorship care. Multivariate logistic regression models that adjusted for confounders were constructed to examine for predictors of the different expectations. Of 722 young cancer survivors surveyed, 426 (59%) responded. Among them, the majority were White women with breast cancer. Oncologists were expected to follow the patient's most recent cancer and treatment-related side effects while PCPs were expected to manage ongoing and future cancer surveillance as well as general preventative care. Neither physician was perceived to be responsible for addressing the return to daily activities, reintegration to interpersonal relationships, or sexual function. Older survivors were significantly less likely to expect oncologists (p = 0.03) and PCPs (p = 0.01) to discuss family planning when compared to their younger counterparts. Those who were White were significantly more likely to expect PCPs to discuss comorbidities (p = 0.009) and preventative care (p = 0.001). Young adult cancer survivors have different expectations of oncologists and PCPs with respect to their follow-up care. Physicians need to better clarify their roles in order to further improve the survivorship phase of cancer care for young adults. Young adult cancer survivors have different expectations of their oncologists and PCPs. Clarification of the roles of each physician group during follow-up can

  2. The supportive care needs for prostate cancer patients in Sarawak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Whye Lian; Ling, Ngok Chuo; Chang, Kam Hock

    2016-02-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of unmet supportive care needs among prostate cancer patients. The cross-sectional study was conducted among all prostate cancer patients at the Sarawak General Hospital. Interview was done using the Supportive Care Needs Survey-Short Form (SCNS-SF) and the Health Service Utilization Questionnaires (HSUQ). Data were analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 20. A total of ninety-five patients participated, with majority were aged 65 and above and of primary educational level. The two most frequently reported unmet supportive care needs were "informed about cancer which is under control or diminishing" and "informed about things you can do to help yourself to get well" under the domain Health System and Information. Respondents who were older (65 years and above) had significant lower unmet needs in psychology (P<0.01), and sexuality compared to the younger group below 65 years (P<0.01). Except for physical and daily living, respondents with primary school level had significant lower unmet needs in all domains compared to secondary school level. Respondents with known stages of cancer had higher unmet needs in all domains compared to those who did not know. Healthcare providers should provide more responsive, emotionally sensitive and client-centered care to patients with prostate cancer, particularly in the area of Health System and Information, and psychological support.

  3. Experiences of ethical issues when caring for children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdson, Cecilia; Lützén, Kim; Blomgren, Klas; Pergert, Pernilla

    2015-01-01

    The treatment for pediatric cancer is often physically, socially, and psychologically demanding and often gives rise to ethical issues. The purpose of this study was to describe healthcare professionals' experiences of ethical issues and ways to deal with these when caring for children with cancer. A study-specific questionnaire was given to healthcare professionals at a pediatric hospital in Sweden. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze answers to open-ended questions. The data were sorted into 2 domains based on the objective of the study. In the next step, the data in each domain were inductively coded, generating categories and subcategories. The main ethical issues included concerns of (1) infringing on autonomy, (2) deciding on treatment levels, and (3) conflicting perspectives that constituted a challenge to collaboration. Professionals desired teamwork and reflection to deal with ethical concerns, and they needed resources for dealing with ethics. Interprofessional consideration needs to be improved. Forums and time for ethics reflections need to be offered to deal with ethical concerns in childhood cancer care. Experiences of ethical concerns and dealing with these in caring for children with cancer evoked strong feelings and moral perplexity among nursing staff. The study raises a challenging question: How can conflicting perspectives, lack of interprofessional consideration, and obstacles related to parents' involvement be "turned around," that is, contribute to a holistic perspective of ethics in cancer care of children?

  4. Translating basic research in cancer patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Maugeri-Saccà

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of molecular targeted therapies and the development of high-throughput biotechnologies, it has become evident that progress in cancer research is largely due to the creation of multidisciplinary teams able to plan clinical trials supported by appropriate molecular hypotheses. These efforts have culminated in the identification and validation of biomarkers predictive of response, as well as in the generation of more accurate prognostic tools. The identification of cancer stem cells has provided further insights into mechanisms of cancer, and many studies have tried to translate this biological notion into prognostic and predictive information. In this regard, new agents targeting key stemness-related pathways have entered the clinical development, and preliminary data suggested an encouraging antitumor activity.

  5. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Lori; Weaver, Meaghann Shaw; Bell, Cynthia J; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M

    2015-01-09

    Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential phases of training. This article reviews unique epidemiologic, developmental, and psychosocial factors that make the provision of palliative care especially challenging in AYAs. A conceptual framework is provided for AYA palliative care education. Critical instructional strategies including experiential learning, group didactic opportunity, shared learning among care disciplines, bereaved family members as educators, and online learning are reviewed. Educational issues for provider training are addressed from the perspective of the trainer, trainee, and AYA. Goals and objectives for an AYA palliative care cancer rotation are presented. Guidance is also provided on ways to support an AYA's quality of life as end of life nears.

  6. Racial Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    1 | P a g e Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0802 TITLE: " Racial Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer." PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Alfred I...CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0802 " Racial Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer." 5b. GRANT NUMBER PC094372 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...developed the tools/methods for working with SEER-Medicare. We plan to use analytic approaches and methods to explore racial disparities in the use of

  7. Role of Bhabhatron in rural cancer care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Manjit

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy, using cobalt-60 is the most cost-effective and the most relevant method of cancer treatment in India. However, there is acute shortage of radiotherapy machines in the country, due the high cost of imported machines. As most of the radiotherapy machines in the country are located in urban areas, patients from rural areas have to travel a long distance and stay there to get treatment. BARC has developed Bhabhatron to meet the demand for affordable telecobalt machines. Compared to any imported unit, the indigenous machine is cheaper, superior in features and more suitable for rural use. Bhabhatrons are installed in many cancer hospitals in the country. (author)

  8. Impact of managed care on cancer trial enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, C P; Krumholz, H M

    2005-06-01

    To determine the relationship between managed care market activity and cancer trial enrollment. Trial participant data were obtained from the National Cancer Institute. Participants in cooperative group trials of breast, colorectal, lung, or prostate cancer during the years 1996 through 2001 were assigned to counties based on their zip code of residence. Linear regression was used to determine the relationship between county enrollment rate and two measures of county managed care activity (penetration and index of competition [IOC]), adjusting for other county characteristics. In bivariate analysis, there was a strong inverse correlation between trial enrollment rate and IOC (r = -0.23; P penetration, proportion uninsured, and other county characteristics. Counties in the lowest quartile of managed care penetration tended to have lower enrollment rates than the remaining counties (r = -0.05; P = .048), while counties in the second, third, and fourth quartiles of penetration all had similar enrollment rates to one another. Cancer trial enrollment rates were suboptimal across all counties, and counties with higher levels of managed care competition had significantly lower enrollment rates. The relationship between managed care penetration and trial enrollment was less consistent. Future efforts to enhance trial participation should address the potential negative influence of market factors.

  9. Smarter palliative care for cancer: Use of smartphone applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Rani Jamwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones are technologically advanced mobile phone devices which use software similar to computer-based devices as a user-friendly interface. This review article is aimed to inform the palliative care professionals, cancer patients and their caregivers about the role of smartphone applications (apps in the delivery of palliative care services, through a brief review of existing literature on the development, feasibility, analysis, and effectiveness of such apps. There is a dearth need for sincere palliative care clinicians to work together with software professionals to develop the suitable smartphone apps in accordance with the family/caregivers' necessities and patients' biopsychosocial characteristics that influence the technology driven evidence informed palliative cancer care.

  10. Knowledge and Preferences of Primary Care Providers in Delivering Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Callie; Allen, Deborah H; Tenhover, Jennifer; Zullig, Leah L; Ragsdale, John; Fischer, Jonathan E; Pollak, Kathryn I; Koontz, Bridget F

    2017-07-14

    Long-term care for head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors is complex and requires coordination among multiple providers. Clinical practice guidelines highlight the role of primary care providers (PCPs) in screening for secondary cancer/recurrence, assessment of late/long-term side effects, and referrals for appropriate specialty management of toxicity. However, these responsibilities may be difficult to meet within the scope of primary care practice. We conducted this study to explore preferences, comfort, and knowledge of PCPs in the care of HNC survivors. We piloted a 40-item web-based survey developed with oncologist and PCP input targeted for family medicine and internal medicine providers. Responses were collected within a single university health system over 2 months. PCPs (n = 28; RR = 11.3%) were interested in learning about health promotion after cancer treatment (89%) and generally agree that their current practice patterns address healthy lifestyle behaviors (82%). However, only 32% of PCPs felt confident they could manage late/long-term side effects of chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery. Only 29% felt confident they could provide appropriate cancer screening. Looking at shared care responsibilities with oncology providers, PCPs perceived being responsible for 30% of care in the first year after treatment and 81% of care after 5 years. Seventy-one percent of PCPs agreed that oncologists provided them necessary information, yet 32% of PCPs found it difficult to coordinate with cancer providers. While these PCPs perceive increased care responsibility for long-term survivors, most are uncomfortable screening for recurrence and managing late/long-term side effects. Education and mutual coordination between PCPs and oncology providers may improve survivor care.

  11. Exploring aspects of physiotherapy care valued by breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidlyskyj, K; Roddam, H; Rawlinson, G; Selfe, J

    2014-06-01

    To explore the reported value of physiotherapy care received by patients who had accessed a Specialist Breast Care Physiotherapy Service. Exploratory qualitative study using in-depth interviews to explore aspects of physiotherapy care valued by breast cancer patients. Thematic network analysis was used to interpret the data and bring together the different experiences of the participants and identify common themes. Physiotherapy Department at a NHS Foundation Trust Teaching Hospital. Nineteen participants were recruited and three were selected to take part in the in-depth interviews. All participants had received physiotherapy care from a Specialist Breast Care Physiotherapy Service and had been discharged within the last six months. Participants valued a patient-centred holistic approach to care and access to a Specialist Service with an experienced clinician. In particular the importance of the therapeutic alliance and the value of psychological, emotional and educational support emerged, with the participants feeling empowered in their recovery. Participants reported an overall positive experience of their physiotherapy care. This study supports the need for service providers to evaluate their current physiotherapy provision and subsequently develop Specialised Services to meet the physiotherapy needs of breast cancer patients throughout all stages of their treatment pathway from the delivery of pre-operative care through to post-treatment follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Health care experiences among women diagnosed with gestational breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarberg, K; Sullivan, E; Javid, N; Duncombe, G; Halliday, L; Boyle, F; Saunders, C; Ives, A; Dickinson, J E; Fisher, J

    2018-03-01

    Gestational breast cancer (GBC) presents many challenges for women and the clinicians who care for them. The aim of this study was to explore the health care experiences of women diagnosed with GBC to inform and improve clinical care of women in this predicament. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 women who had been diagnosed with GBC in the previous 5 years. The overarching themes for perceived quality of care were "communication" and "comprehensive care." "Communication" had two sub themes: "interdisciplinary communication" (the way health professionals from different disciplines communicated with each other about the management of the woman's care) and "patient communication" (how they communicated this to the woman). The "comprehensive care" theme incorporated three sub themes: "the spirit" (psychological care); "the mind" (information provision); and "the body" (management of treatment side effects). Women's own accounts of positive and negative experiences of GBC care provide unique and specific insights which improve understanding of their concerns and needs. The findings can inform advances in quality and efficacy of clinical care; offer guidance for obstetricians, oncologists and allied health professionals about the needs of women diagnosed with GBC and how care can be optimised; and inform the development of resources to assist women and their families. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Cancer - the delivery of nursing care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, S.; Wark, E.

    1978-01-01

    This and the preceding article (Nursing Mirror, Sept. 1, 1978) form a slightly shortened version of Chap. 5 from Vol. 2 of the book 'Oncology for Nurses and Health Care Professionals', ed. R. Tiffany, (Allen and Unwin, Oct. 1978). Teletherapy was dealt with in part 1. Part 2 is concerned with radiotherapy using radioisotope implants and applicators and unsealed sources, and with surgery and chemotherapy, including side effects of anti-tumour drugs. The physical and psychological effects on the patient of these forms of treatment are discussed, and nursing care and radiological safety precautions for both patients and nursing staff are described. (author)

  14. Nutritional supportive care in children with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riha, P.; Smisek, P.

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate nutritional support is an important part of comprehensive oncology treatment. The aim is to decrease the incidence of malnutrition. Malnourished patients are in higher risk of infectious and toxic complications, experience worse quality of life. Systematic survey of nutritional status and early nutritional intervention can eventually lead to better results of oncology treatment. We review the definitions, etiology and epidemiology of malnutrition, practical approaches to nutritional support of children with cancer. (author)

  15. Assessing patients' experiences with communication across the cancer care continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Kathleen M; Street, Richard L; Sue, Valerie M; Williams, Andrew E; Rabin, Borsika A; Arora, Neeraj K

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the relevance, performance and potential usefulness of the Patient Assessment of cancer Communication Experiences (PACE) items. Items focusing on specific communication goals related to exchanging information, fostering healing relationships, responding to emotions, making decisions, enabling self-management, and managing uncertainty were tested via a retrospective, cross-sectional survey of adults who had been diagnosed with cancer. Analyses examined response frequencies, inter-item correlations, and coefficient alpha. A total of 366 adults were included in the analyses. Relatively few selected Does Not Apply, suggesting that items tap relevant communication experiences. Ratings of whether specific communication goals were achieved were strongly correlated with overall ratings of communication, suggesting item content reflects important aspects of communication. Coefficient alpha was ≥.90 for each item set, indicating excellent reliability. Variations in the percentage of respondents selecting the most positive response across items suggest results can identify strengths and weaknesses. The PACE items tap relevant, important aspects of communication during cancer care, and may be useful to cancer care teams desiring detailed feedback. The PACE is a new tool for eliciting patients' perspectives on communication during cancer care. It is freely available online for practitioners, researchers and others. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantifying the Cumulative Impact of Differences in Care on Prostate Cancer Outcomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fesinmeyer, Megan

    2007-01-01

    ... of the disparity in prostate cancer outcomes. This work involves first examining how care patterns are correlated throughout all phases of cancer care within racial groups in order to gain a fuller understanding of how racial differences across...

  17. Nutrition in Cancer Care (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrition in cancer care can be affected by the tumor or by treatment and result in weight loss, malnutrition, anorexia, cachexia, and sarcopenia. Get information about strategies to screen, assess, and treat nutritional problems, including through diet and supplements, in this clinician summary.

  18. The interaction between informal cancer caregivers and health care professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Line; Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: In order to meet the caregiving challenges, informal caregivers often need a substantial level of interaction with health care professionals (HCPs). This study investigated to which extent the cancer caregivers' needs regarding the interaction with HCPs are met and the associations betwe...

  19. Psychosocial Assessment as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazak, Anne E.; Abrams, Annah N.; Banks, Jaime; Christofferson, Jennifer; DiDonato, Stephen; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Kabour, Marianne; Madan-Swain, Avi; Patel, Sunita K.; Zadeh, Sima; Kupst, Mary Jo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the evidence for a standard of care for psychosocial assessment in pediatric cancer. An interdisciplinary group of investigators utilized EBSCO, PubMed, PsycINFO, Ovid, and Google Scholar search databases, focusing on five areas: youth/family psychosocial adjustment, family

  20. Finding the Right Care | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trained as a registered nurse and with a doctoral degree in public health, Jane D. is no stranger to the U.S. health care system. But, when she found herself facing a diagnosis of anal cancer in 2013, she felt adrift.

  1. Cancer patients, emergencies service and provision of palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Miranda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To describe the clinical and sociodemographic profile of cancer patients admitted to the Emergency Center for High Complexity Oncologic Assistance, observing the coverage of palliative and home care. Method: Cross sectional study including adult cancer patients admitted to the emergency service (September-December/2011 with a minimum length of hospital stay of two hours. Student’s t-test and Pearson chi-square test were used to compare the means. Results: 191 patients were enrolled, 47.6% elderly, 64.4% women, 75.4% from the city of Recife and greater area. The symptom prevalent at admission was pain (46.6%. 4.2% of patients were linked to palliative care and 2.1% to home care. The most prevalent cancers: cervix (18.3%, breast (13.6% and prostate (10.5%; 70.7% were in advanced stages (IV, 47.1%; 39.4% without any cancer therapy. Conclusion: Patients sought the emergency service on account of pain, probably due to the incipient coverage of palliative and home care. These actions should be included to oncologic therapy as soon as possible to minimize the suffering of the patient/family and integrate the skills of oncologists and emergency professionals.

  2. Oral care of the cancer patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzhausen, T [Medical Univ. of Southern Africa, Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Community Dentistry

    1982-07-01

    Radiation therapy is frequently being used for the patient with oral cancer. The survival rate is increasing, due to more effective treatment technique. The question of whether any teeth should be extracted, the mode of therapy and the side effects of radiation like Xerostomia, caries, stomatitis, trismus and osteo-radionecrosis and also post radiation care are discussed.

  3. Watermelon-stomach og sklerodermi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Rasmussen, Jens Møller

    2002-01-01

    We report here a 72-year-old man with severe, persistent, iron deficiency anaemia. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed red stripes radiating to the pylorus, characteristic of watermelon stomach (gastric antral vascular ectasia). The patient was found to have scleroderma with calcinosis......, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasias, but neither Raynaud's phenomenon nor oesophageal dysmotility. The patient was treated with endoscopic Argon laser therapy, repeated six times, but this did not control the bleeding. Altogether the patient received 62 units of blood transfusions. The patient died after 9...

  4. Optimisation of surgical care for rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borstlap, W.A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Optimisation of surgical care means weighing the risk of treatment related morbidity against the patients’ potential benefits of a surgical intervention. The first part of this thesis focusses on the anaemic patient undergoing colorectal surgery. Hypothesizing that a more profound haemoglobin

  5. Coordinating cancer care: patient and practice management processes among surgeons who treat breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Steven J; Hawley, Sarah T; Morrow, Monica; Griggs, Jennifer J; Jagsi, Reshma; Hamilton, Ann S; Graff, John J; Friese, Christopher R; Hofer, Timothy P

    2010-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine has called for more coordinated cancer care models that correspond to initiatives led by cancer providers and professional organizations. These initiatives parallel those underway to integrate the management of patients with chronic conditions. We developed 5 breast cancer patient and practice management process measures based on the Chronic Care Model. We then performed a survey to evaluate patterns and correlates of these measures among attending surgeons of a population-based sample of patients diagnosed with breast cancer between June 2005 and February 2007 in Los Angeles and Detroit (N = 312; response rate, 75.9%). Surgeon practice specialization varied markedly with about half of the surgeons devoting 15% or less of their total practice to breast cancer, whereas 16.2% of surgeons devoted 50% or more. There was also large variation in the extent of the use of patient and practice management processes with most surgeons reporting low use. Patient and practice management process measures were positively associated with greater levels of surgeon specialization and the presence of a teaching program. Cancer program status was weakly associated with patient and practice management processes. Low uptake of patient and practice management processes among surgeons who treat breast cancer patients may indicate that surgeons are not convinced that these processes matter, or that there are logistical and cost barriers to implementation. More research is needed to understand how large variations in patient and practice management processes might affect the quality of care for patients with breast cancer.

  6. Cervical cancer screening in primary health care setting in Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed; Aro, Arja R.; Rasch, Vibeke

    2012-01-01

    /119 (73.9%) were positive for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. VIA had higher sensitivity than Pap smear (74.2% versus 72.9%; P = 0.05) respectively. Out of 88 confirmed positive cases, 22 (25.0%) cases were invasive cervical cancer in stage 1, of which 19 versus three were detected by VIA and Pap......OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility of visual inspection with the use of acetic acid (VIA) as a screening method for cervical cancer, an alternative to the Pap smear used in primary health care setting in Sudan, and to compare sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values...... of this study showed that VIA has higher sensitivity and lower specificity compared to Pap smear, but a combination of both tests has greater sensitivity and specificity than each test independently. It indicates that VIA is useful for screening of cervical cancer in the primary health care setting in Sudan...

  7. Electronic health records (EHRs): supporting ASCO's vision of cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peter; Artz, David; Warner, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    ASCO's vision for cancer care in 2030 is built on the expanding importance of panomics and big data, and envisions enabling better health for patients with cancer by the rapid transformation of systems biology knowledge into cancer care advances. This vision will be heavily dependent on the use of health information technology for computational biology and clinical decision support systems (CDSS). Computational biology will allow us to construct models of cancer biology that encompass the complexity of cancer panomics data and provide us with better understanding of the mechanisms governing cancer behavior. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality promotes CDSS based on clinical practice guidelines, which are knowledge bases that grow too slowly to match the rate of panomic-derived knowledge. CDSS that are based on systems biology models will be more easily adaptable to rapid advancements and translational medicine. We describe the characteristics of health data representation, a model for representing molecular data that supports data extraction and use for panomic-based clinical research, and argue for CDSS that are based on systems biology and are algorithm-based.

  8. Survey of advanced radiation technologies used at designated cancer care hospitals in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Naoto; Tsujino, Kayoko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Ishikura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Our survey assessed the use of advanced radiotherapy technologies at the designated cancer care hospitals in Japan, and we identified several issues to be addressed. We collected the data of 397 designated cancer care hospitals, including information on staffing in the department of radiation oncology (e.g. radiation oncologists, medical physicists and radiation therapists), the number of linear accelerators and the implementation of advanced radiotherapy technologies from the Center for Cancer Control and Information Services of the National Cancer Center, Japan. Only 53% prefectural designated cancer care hospitals and 16% regional designated cancer care hospitals have implemented intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancers, and 62% prefectural designated cancer care hospitals and 23% regional designated cancer care hospitals use intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Seventy-four percent prefectural designated cancer care hospitals and 40% regional designated cancer care hospitals employ stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer. Our multivariate analysis of prefectural designated cancer care hospitals which satisfy the institute's qualifications for advanced technologies revealed the number of radiation oncologists (P=0.01) and that of radiation therapists (P=0.003) were significantly correlated with the implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and the number of radiation oncologists (P=0.02) was correlated with the implementation of stereotactic body radiotherapy. There was a trend to correlate the number of medical physicists with the implementation of stereotactic body radiotherapy (P=0.07). Only 175 (51%) regional designated cancer care hospitals satisfy the institute's qualification of stereotactic body radiotherapy and 76 (22%) satisfy that of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Seventeen percent prefectural designated cancer care hospitals and 13% regional designated cancer care hospitals

  9. Carcinoma of the stomach in the young adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. R.; Lee, Y. H.; Kim, K. W.

    1985-01-01

    Carcinoma of the stomach is usually considered a disease of middle aged or elderly patients and is rarely suspected in young adults. However carcinoma of the stomach in the young adults is an aggressive malignant disease with nonspecific symptoms and worse prognosis than older age group because of late diagnosis and increased incidence of undifferentiated form. In an attempt to identify further the natural history of carcinoma of the stomach in the young adults, we reviewed 68 cases of stomach cancers in patients 30 years of age and less at Severance hospital. The results were as follows: 1. The over-all male to female ratio in the young adult was 1:1.34 and in order age group was 2.44:1. 2. Common symptoms included epigastric pain, weight loss and vomiting. The mean time interval between onset of symptoms and the first visit to a physician was 3 months. 3. Usually diagnostic aids were UGI series and endoscopic examination. 38 patients underwent an exploratory laparatomy, and lesions were amenable to curative or palliative resection. 4. In the young age Bormann type III and IV were predominant, while in the older age group Bormann type II and III were common. 5. The majority of tumors occurred in the cardia, fundus and upper body. 6. Histologic diagnosis were poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, signet ring cell carcinoma and anaplastic carcinoma in orders. 7. A relatively high incidence of pregnancy and Krukenberg tumor in the young age were noted

  10. Tumor boards and the quality of cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Nancy L; Landrum, Mary Beth; Lamont, Elizabeth B; Bozeman, Samuel R; Shulman, Lawrence N; McNeil, Barbara J

    2013-01-16

    Despite the widespread use of tumor boards, few data on their effects on cancer care exist. We assessed whether the presence of a tumor board, either general or cancer specific, was associated with recommended cancer care, outcomes, or use in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health system. We surveyed 138 VA medical centers about the presence of tumor boards and linked cancer registry and administrative data to assess receipt of stage-specific recommended care, survival, or use for patients with colorectal, lung, prostate, hematologic, and breast cancers diagnosed in the period from 2001 to 2004 and followed through 2005. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess associations of tumor boards with the measures, adjusting for patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. All statistical tests were two-sided. Most facilities (75%) had at least one tumor board, and many had several cancer-specific tumor boards. Presence of a tumor board was associated with only seven of 27 measures assessed (all P < .05), and several associations were not in expected directions. Rates of some recommended care (eg, white blood cell growth factors with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) were lower in centers with hematologic-specialized tumor boards (39.4%) than in centers with general tumor boards (61.3%) or no tumor boards (56.4%; P = .002). Only one of 27 measures was statistically significantly associated with tumor boards after applying a Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. We observed little association of multidisciplinary tumor boards with measures of use, quality, or survival. This may reflect no effect or an effect that varies by structural and functional components and participants' expertise.

  11. Spirituality in cancer care at the end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Betty; Otis-Green, Shirley; Economou, Denice

    2013-01-01

    There is a compelling need to integrate spirituality into the provision of quality palliative care by oncology professionals. Patients and families report the importance of spiritual, existential, and religious concerns throughout the cancer trajectory. Leading palliative care organizations have developed guidelines that define spiritual care and offer recommendations to guide the delivery of spiritual services. There is growing recognition that all team members require the skills to provide generalist spiritual support. Attention to person-centered, family-focused oncology care requires the development of a health care environment that is prepared to support the religious, spiritual, and cultural practices preferred by patients and their families. These existential concerns become especially critical at end of life and following the death for family survivors. Oncology professionals require education to prepare them to appropriately screen, assess, refer, and/or intervene for spiritual distress.

  12. [Play as a care strategy for children with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Kálya Yasmine Nunes de; Santos, Viviane Euzébia Pereira

    2015-06-01

    To understand the influence of play in the care process as perceived by children with cancer. A descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study conducted in a children's cancer unit in Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Data were collected between October 2013 and January 2014 by means of photographic records and semi-structured interviews with eight children, and content analysis with emphasis on two categories: Auxiliary instruments during play; and The influence of play in the process of care. Recreational activities involve watching television, using computers, games and toys, drawing, the playroom and the clown, which provide fun, feelings of joy, distraction and interaction with other people. There are several activities at the hospital that are considered play-related and, for the children, they all benefit their care process.

  13. Play as a care strategy for children with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kálya Yasmine Nunes de Lima

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To understand the influence of play in the care process as perceived by children with cancer. METHOD: A descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study conducted in a children's cancer unit in Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Data were collected between October 2013 and January 2014 by means of photographic records and semi-structured interviews with eight children, and content analysis with emphasis on two categories: Auxiliary instruments during play; and The influence of play in the process of care. RESULTS: Recreational activities involve watching television, using computers, games and toys, drawing, the playroom and the clown, which provide fun, feelings of joy, distraction and interaction with other people. CONCLUSION: There are several activities at the hospital that are considered play-related and, for the children, they all benefit their care process.

  14. [Update of breast cancer in primary care (IV/V)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Hernández, C; Brusint, B; Vich, P; Díaz-García, N; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Hernández-García, M

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians must thoroughly understand this pathology in order to optimize the health care services and make the best use of available resources, for these patients. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. This fourth article deals with the treatment of the disease, the role of the primary care physician, and management of major complications. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to support their patients and care for them throughout their illness. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of Helicobacter pylori in stomach cancer after partial gastrectomy for benign ulcer disease Papel del Helicobacter pylori en el cáncer gástrico tras gastrectomía parcial por úlcera benigna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Seoane

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients having undergone gastrectomy for non-neoplastic disease who later developed gastric stump cancer. Material and methods: retrospective study of all patients with partial gastrectomy for non-malignant peptic disease who were submitted to an endoscopic exploration between 1995 and 2001. A comparison was made of major clinical and histological characteristics, and the presence of Helicobacter pylori among patients with and without gastric cancer in the stomach remnant. Results: a total of 73 patients were studied in this period. Fifteen patients (20.5% had remnant-stump gastric cancer. All but one were adenocarcinomas (71% intestinal and 29% diffuse, respectively. The average time between diagnosis of gastric cancer and previous gastrectomy was 32 (14-48 years. There was a higher detection rate of Helicobacter pylori in patients with cancer in the gastric remnant (100 vs. 81.5%, respectively, p Objetivo: determinar la prevalencia de la infección por Helicobacter pylori en pacientes gastrectomizados por enfermedad no neoplásica, y que han desarrollado posteriormente cáncer gástrico. Material y métodos: estudio retrospectivo con reclutamiento de todos los pacientes con gastrectomía parcial por enfermedad péptica benigna que han sido sometidos a una exploración endoscópica entre 1995-2001. Se ha realizado una comparación de las principales características clínicas e histológicas y de la presencia de Helicobacter pylori en los pacientes con y sin cáncer del remanente gástrico. Resultados: se han estudiado un total de 73 pacientes en este periodo. Se han encontrado 15 pacientes (20,5% con cáncer en el remanente gástrico, 14 adenocarcinomas (71% tipo intestinal y 29% tipo difuso y un linfoma. El tiempo transcurrido entre el diagnóstico de cáncer gástrico y la gastrectomía previa ha sido de 32 (14-48 años. Se ha detectado un alto porcentaje de infecci

  16. Palliative care in advanced cancer patients in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Bisht

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Advanced cancer, irrespective of the site of the cancer, is characterized by a number of associated symptoms that impair the quality of life of patients. The management of these symptoms guides palliative care. The present study aims to describe the symptoms and appropriate palliation provided in patients with advanced cancer in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand. Methods: This was an observational study. A total of 100 patients with advanced cancer were included in the study. The data obtained from the patients included symptoms reported by the patients, currently prescribed treatments and the site of cancer. Results: The average number of symptoms reported per patient was 5.33 ± 0.67 (mean ± SE. The most common symptoms were pain, weakness/fatigue, anorexia, insomnia, nausea/vomiting, dyspnea, constipation and cough. Polypharmacy was frequent. Patients consumed approximately 8.7 ± 0.38 (mean ± SE drugs on average during the 2-month period of follow-up. Conclusion: The result gives insight into the varied symptomatology of patients with advanced cancer. Polypharmacy was quite common in patients with advanced cancer, predisposing them to complicated drug interactions and adverse drug reactions.

  17. Barriers and facilitators to implementing cancer survivorship care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulko, Dorothy; Pace, Claire M; Dittus, Kim L; Sprague, Brian L; Pollack, Lori A; Hawkins, Nikki A; Geller, Berta M

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the process of survivorship care plan (SCP) completion and to survey oncology staff and primary care physicians (PCPs) regarding challenges of implementing SCPs. Descriptive pilot study. Two facilities in Vermont, an urban academic medical center and a rural community academic cancer center. 17 oncology clinical staff created SCPs, 39 PCPs completed surveys, and 58 patients (breast or colorectal cancer) participated in a telephone survey. Using Journey Forward tools, SCPs were created and presented to patients. PCPs received the SCP with a survey assessing its usefulness and barriers to delivery. Oncology staff were interviewed to assess perceived challenges and benefits of SCPs. Qualitative and quantitative data were used to identify challenges to the development and implementation process as well as patient perceptions of the SCP visit. SCP, healthcare provider perception of barriers to completion and implementation, and patient perception of SCP visit. Oncology staff cited the time required to obtain information for SCPs as a challenge. Completing SCPs 3-6 months after treatment ended was optimal. All participants felt advanced practice professionals should complete and review SCPs with patients. The most common challenge for PCPs to implement SCP recommendations was insufficient knowledge of cancer survivor issues. Most patients found the care plan visit very useful, particularly within six months of diagnosis. Creation time may be a barrier to widespread SCP implementation. Cancer survivors find SCPs useful, but PCPs feel insufficient knowledge of cancer survivor issues is a barrier to providing best follow-up care. Incorporating SCPs in electronic medical records may facilitate patient identification, appropriate staff scheduling, and timely SCP creation. Oncology nurse practitioners are well positioned to create and deliver SCPs, transitioning patients from oncology care to a PCP in a shared-care model of optimal wellness. Institution support for

  18. Nanotechnology Strategies To Advance Outcomes in Clinical Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshorn, Christopher M; Bradbury, Michelle S; Lanza, Gregory M; Nel, Andre E; Rao, Jianghong; Wang, Andrew Z; Wiesner, Ulrich B; Yang, Lily; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2018-01-23

    Ongoing research into the application of nanotechnology for cancer treatment and diagnosis has demonstrated its advantages within contemporary oncology as well as its intrinsic limitations. The National Cancer Institute publishes the Cancer Nanotechnology Plan every 5 years since 2005. The most recent iteration helped codify the ongoing basic and translational efforts of the field and displayed its breadth with several evolving areas. From merely a technological perspective, this field has seen tremendous growth and success. However, an incomplete understanding of human cancer biology persists relative to the application of nanoscale materials within contemporary oncology. As such, this review presents several evolving areas in cancer nanotechnology in order to identify key clinical and biological challenges that need to be addressed to improve patient outcomes. From this clinical perspective, a sampling of the nano-enabled solutions attempting to overcome barriers faced by traditional therapeutics and diagnostics in the clinical setting are discussed. Finally, a strategic outlook of the future is discussed to highlight the need for next-generation cancer nanotechnology tools designed to address critical gaps in clinical cancer care.

  19. Effect of hospital volume on processes of breast cancer care: A National Cancer Data Base study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Tina W F; Pezzin, Liliana E; Li, Jianing; Sparapani, Rodney; Laud, Purushuttom W; Nattinger, Ann B

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine variations in delivery of several breast cancer processes of care that are correlated with lower mortality and disease recurrence, and to determine the extent to which hospital volume explains this variation. Women who were diagnosed with stage I-III unilateral breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 were identified within the National Cancer Data Base. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to determine whether hospital volume was independently associated with each of 10 individual process of care measures addressing diagnosis and treatment, and 2 composite measures assessing appropriateness of systemic treatment (chemotherapy and hormonal therapy) and locoregional treatment (margin status and radiation therapy). Among 573,571 women treated at 1755 different hospitals, 38%, 51%, and 10% were treated at high-, medium-, and low-volume hospitals, respectively. On multivariate analysis controlling for patient sociodemographic characteristics, treatment year and geographic location, hospital volume was a significant predictor for cancer diagnosis by initial biopsy (medium volume: odds ratio [OR] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.25; high volume: OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.14-1.49), negative surgical margins (medium volume: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.06-1.24; high volume: OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.13-1.44), and appropriate locoregional treatment (medium volume: OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.07-1.17; high volume: OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.09-1.24). Diagnosis of breast cancer before initial surgery, negative surgical margins and appropriate use of radiation therapy may partially explain the volume-survival relationship. Dissemination of these processes of care to a broader group of hospitals could potentially improve the overall quality of care and outcomes of breast cancer survivors. Cancer 2017;123:957-66. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  20. Corruption in health-care systems and its effect on cancer care in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostert, Saskia; Njuguna, Festus; Olbara, Gilbert; Sindano, Solomon; Sitaresmi, Mei Neni; Supriyadi, Eddy; Kaspers, Gertjan

    2015-08-01

    At the government, hospital, and health-care provider level, corruption plays a major role in health-care systems in Africa. The returns on health investments of international financial institutions, health organisations, and donors might be very low when mismanagement and dysfunctional structures of health-care systems are not addressed. More funding might even aggravate corruption. We discuss corruption and its effects on cancer care within the African health-care system in a sociocultural context. The contribution of high-income countries in stimulating corruption is also described. Corrupt African governments cannot be expected to take the initiative to eradicate corruption. Therefore, international financial institutions, health organisations, and financial donors should use their power to demand policy reforms of health-care systems in Africa troubled by the issue of corruption. These modifications will ameliorate the access and quality of cancer care for patients across the continent, and ultimately improve the outcome of health care to all patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the impact of interdisciplinarity in cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Teamwork is a key component of the health care renewal strategy emphasized in Quebec, elsewhere in Canada and in other countries to enhance the quality of oncology services. While this innovation would appear beneficial in theory, empirical evidences of its impact are limited. Current efforts in Quebec to encourage the development of local interdisciplinary teams in all hospitals offer a unique opportunity to assess the anticipated benefits. These teams working in hospital outpatient clinics are responsible for treatment, follow-up and patient support. The study objective is to assess the impact of interdisciplinarity on cancer patients and health professionals. Methods/Design This is a quasi-experimental study with three comparison groups distinguished by intensity of interdisciplinarity: strong, moderate and weak. The study will use a random sample of 12 local teams in Quebec, stratified by intensity of interdisciplinarity. The instrument to measure the intensity of the interdisciplinarity, developed in collaboration with experts, encompasses five dimensions referring to aspects of team structure and process. Self-administered questionnaires will be used to measure the impact of interdisciplinarity on patients (health care utilization, continuity of care and cancer services responsiveness) and on professionals (professional well-being, assessment of teamwork and perception of teamwork climate). Approximately 100 health professionals working on the selected teams and 2000 patients will be recruited. Statistical analyses will include descriptive statistics and comparative analysis of the impact observed according to the strata of interdisciplinarity. Fixed and random multivariate statistical models (multilevel analyses) will also be used. Discussion This study will pinpoint to what extent interdisciplinarity is linked to quality of care and meets the complex and varied needs of cancer patients. It will ascertain to what extent interdisciplinary teamwork

  2. Financial Toxicity of Cancer Care: It's Time to Intervene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, S Yousuf

    2016-05-01

    Evidence suggests that a considerably large proportion of cancer patients are affected by treatment-related financial harm. As medical debt grows for some with cancer, the downstream effects can be catastrophic, with a recent study suggesting a link between extreme financial distress and worse mortality. At least three factors might explain the relationship between extreme financial distress and greater risk of mortality: 1) overall poorer well-being, 2) impaired health-related quality of life, and 3) sub-par quality of care. While research has described the financial harm associated with cancer treatment, little has been done to effectively intervene on the problem. Long-term solutions must focus on policy changes to reduce unsustainable drug prices and promote innovative insurance models. In the mean time, patients continue to struggle with high out-of-pocket costs. For more immediate solutions, we should look to the oncologist and patient. Oncologists should focus on the value of care delivered, encourage patient engagement on the topic of costs, and be better educated on financial resources available to patients. For their part, patients need improved cost-related health literacy so they are aware of potential costs and resources, and research should focus on how patients define high-value care. With a growing list of financial side effects induced by cancer treatment, the time has come to intervene on the "financial toxicity" of cancer care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Trace elemental analysis of carcinoma kidney and stomach by PIXE method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, S. Bhuloka; John Charles, M.; Naga Raju, G.J.; Vijayan, V.; Seetharami Reddy, B.; Ravi Kumar, M.; Sundareswar, B.

    2003-01-01

    Trace elemental analysis was carried out in the biological samples of carcinoma kidney and stomach using particle induced X-ray emission technique. A 2 MeV proton beam was employed to excite the samples. From the present results, the levels of elements K, Ca, Fe, Ni and Se are lower and those of the elements Ti, Co, Zn, As and Cd are higher in the cancer tissue of kidney than those observed in the normal tissue. In the case of stomach, the concentrations of elements Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu and Zn are lower while concentrations of elements Cr, Ni, As and Br are higher in the cancer tissue of stomach than those observed in the normal tissue. The observed deficiency or excess of certain elements is correlated to carcinogenesis of that organ. The present results of carcinoma stomach support the previous observations that nickel and chromium are carcinogenic agents. The low levels of selenium observed in the carcinoma tissue of kidney and the low levels of manganese observed in the carcinoma tissue of stomach support the view that selenium and manganese inhibit the growth of cancer in kidney and stomach respectively. The observed high levels of zinc in the cancer tissue of kidney suggest that zinc is involved in the tumor growth and development of neoplastic transformation in kidney while the observed low levels of zinc in the carcinoma tissue of stomach suggest that zinc inhibits the growth of cancer in this organ. For correctly assessing the role played by the trace elements in initiating, promoting or inhibiting cancer in various organs, there is a need for acquisition of more data by trace elemental analysis from several investigations of this type undertaken in different regions

  4. Colorectal cancer: complexities and challenges in managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkoff, Neil B

    2007-08-01

    Managed care weighs advances and associated costs to determine whether the combination of longer life at sometimes significantly increased cost represents value. The price of treatment is only 1 factor. To review treatment decision processes for oncologic agents in managed care environments. Price can be exceptionally high for individuals. But if the population size is low, the per-member-per-month (PMPM) impact can be almost negligible, unlike treatments that have moderate costs but are used ubiquitously. Cancer therapies have, for the most part, escaped managed care's notice. For 2007, the national Cancer Institute projects that antineoplastic agents will consume almost a quarter of the overall drug spend. The Medicare population is a unique concern with regard to cancer. Traditionally, Medicare reimbursement of chemotherapeutic agents was based on average wholesale price (AWP) discounting, not the oncologist's purchasing cost. This allowed oncologists to use reimbursement for infusions to support their medical practices. The proposed plan of the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to use average sales price (ASP) plus 6% to reimburse for drugs used in the office setting leads to significant problems. Pharmacy and therapeutics committees will also face challenges: fewer data are available for some agents because they have become available through the U.S. Food and drug administration's Fast Track, Priority review, or accelerated approval processes. Oncology disease management programs must reach out to patients and not necessarily deal with oncology issues directly, but address tangential issues that impact care, especially depression and pain management.

  5. A value framework in head and neck cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Jonas A; Seiwert, Tanguy Y

    2014-01-01

    The care of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has greatly evolved over the past 30 years. From single modality to a multidisciplinary care, there has also been a concurrent increase in treatment intensity, resulting, at many times, in more zealous regimens that patients must endure. In this article, we apply Porter's value model as a framework to balance survival, toxicities, cost, and trade-offs from a patient's perspective in head and neck cancer. This model defines value as the health outcome per dollar achieved. Domains and outcomes that are important to patients, including not only survival or short-term quality of life, but also functional outcomes, recovery, sustainability of recovery, and the lasting consequences of therapy are included in this framework. Other outcomes that are seldom measured in head and neck cancer, such as work disability and financial toxicities, are also included and further discussed. Within this value model and based on evidence, we further discuss de-escalation of care, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, newer surgical methods, and enhancements in the process of care as potential approaches to add value for patients. Finally, we argue that knowing the patient's preferences is essential in the value discussion, as the attribute that will ultimately provide the most value to the individual patient with head and neck cancer.

  6. Respiratory muscle strength of patients with esophagus and stomach neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Aline Boscolo Ruivo

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: In cancer patients, the reduced food intake causes weight loss and promotes protein-calorie malnutrition. This results in loss of lean body mass, which affects both skeletal muscles and respiratory muscles. Objective: Evaluate and compare the respiratory muscle strength of patients with esophageal and stomach neoplasia during the preoperative period. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study carried out with 24 patients of both genders hospitalized in a teaching hospital. They underwent a physical therapy evaluation composed of anthropometric data and measurement of respiratory muscle strength through manovacuometry. Paired and unpaired t-tests were used to compare the values obtained with the predicted equations. Results: Regarding the disease prevalence, 66.66%(16 of the individuals had stomach neoplasm and 33.33%(8 esophageal neoplasm. Of the patients with esophageal neoplasm, 100% were men with a mean age of 63 ± 9.16 years. Of those with stomach neoplasm, 68.75% were men with a mean age of 69.36 ± 10.92 years. Female patients with stomach neoplasm had significantly higher BMI (p = 0.01 than male patients, and they were classified as overweight. Both neoplasms had significantly lower real values (p ≤ 0.05 than predicted values at the maximal expiratory pressure. Conclusion: Patients with esophageal and stomach neoplasms in the preoperative period present reduction in the expiratory muscle strength. There were no statistically significant differences, when we compared the maximum respiratory pressures between the two types of neoplasms investigated.

  7. Primary care practice organization influences colorectal cancer screening performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Elizabeth M; Soban, Lynn M; Parkerton, Patricia H; Etzioni, David A

    2007-06-01

    To identify primary care practice characteristics associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) screening performance, controlling for patient-level factors. Primary care director survey (1999-2000) of 155 VA primary care clinics linked with 38,818 eligible patients' sociodemographics, utilization, and CRC screening experience using centralized administrative and chart-review data (2001). Practices were characterized by degrees of centralization (e.g., authority over operations, staffing, outside-practice influence); resources (e.g., sufficiency of nonphysician staffing, space, clinical support arrangements); and complexity (e.g., facility size, academic status, managed care penetration), adjusting for patient-level covariates and contextual factors. Chart-based evidence of CRC screening through direct colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, or consecutive fecal occult blood tests, eliminating cases with documented histories of CRC, polyps, or inflammatory bowel disease. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and health care utilization, patients were significantly more likely to be screened for CRC if their primary care practices had greater autonomy over the internal structure of care delivery (pmanagement and referral procedures are associated with significantly lower CRC screening performance. Competition with hospital resource demands may impinge on the degree of internal organization of their affiliated primary care practices.

  8. Shared Care of Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Telemedicine Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Aimee G; Nugent, Bethany D; Conover, Noelle; Moore, Amanda; Dempsey, Kathleen; Tersak, Jean M

    2017-12-01

    With an increasing number of childhood cancer survivors (CCSs), determining the best model of survivorship transition care is becoming a growing priority. Shared care between pediatric oncology and adult primary care is often necessary, making survivorship a time of transition, but effective standard models are lacking. We sought to provide a more integrated approach to transition using telemedicine. Recruited primary care provider/CCS dyads were instructed to log-in to a password-protected virtual meeting room using telemedicine equipment at the time or a regularly scheduled office visit. Dyads were joined by a pediatric survivorship clinic team member who conducted the telemedicine portion of the transition visit, which consisted of the review of an individualized treatment summary and care plan. Postquestionnaires were developed to evaluate key points such as fund of knowledge, satisfaction with the visit, and effectiveness of this electronic tool. There were 19 transition visits conducted, 13 of which used the telemedicine equipment as planned. Those that did not use the equipment were primarily unable to due to technical difficulties. Postquestionnaires were overall positive, confirming increased knowledge, comfort and abilities, and patient satisfaction in survivorship care. Negative comments were primarily related to equipment difficulties. A gap still remains in helping CCSs transition from oncology to primary care and this pilot study offered insights into how we might better bridge that gap through the use of telemedicine. Further research is needed to refine the transition process for CCSs, including evaluation and testing models for standard of care.

  9. Primary Patient-Derived Cancer Cells and Their Potential for Personalized Cancer Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P. Kodack

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Personalized cancer therapy is based on a patient’s tumor lineage, histopathology, expression analyses, and/or tumor DNA or RNA analysis. Here, we aim to develop an in vitro functional assay of a patient’s living cancer cells that could complement these approaches. We present methods for developing cell cultures from tumor biopsies and identify the types of samples and culture conditions associated with higher efficiency of model establishment. Toward the application of patient-derived cell cultures for personalized care, we established an immunofluorescence-based functional assay that quantifies cancer cell responses to targeted therapy in mixed cell cultures. Assaying patient-derived lung cancer cultures with this method showed promise in modeling patient response for diagnostic use. This platform should allow for the development of co-clinical trial studies to prospectively test the value of drug profiling on tumor-biopsy-derived cultures to direct patient care.

  10. Challenges faced by palliative care physicians when caring for doctors with advanced cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noble, S. I. R.; Nelson, A.; Finlay, I. G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: It is possible that patients with advanced cancer, who are from the medical profession, have different or additional care needs than other patients. Previous training, professional experiences and access to information and services may influence their needs and subsequent illness

  11. Masculinity and urogenital cancer: sensitive issues in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobis, Regina; Sand, Inger; Elofsson, Kristina

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this literature review was to analyse the approaches adopted by patients, health professionals, spouses and other care-givers towards sensitive issues related to male urogenital cancer, and to describe how these findings can be applied in health care practice. The findings revealed five identifiable domains, namely 'the barrier to talking', 'the barrier of sensitivity', 'the barrier of masculinity', 'the barrier to seeking health care' and 'the communicative barrier'. The conclusion was that the phenomenon of a barrier is strongly connected with hegemonic masculinity. The review of literature confirmed that, for many men, talking about genitally-related health problems is not easy and that health care professionals need to learn more about gender and masculinity in order to address urogenitally sensitive issues.

  12. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, D I

    2016-03-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects.

  13. Lymphatics of the cardia of stomach. Examination using RI lymphoscintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonemura, Yutaka; Katayama, Kanji; Sawa, Toshiharu

    1985-01-01

    The lymphatics of the cardia of stomach was examined using lymphoscintigraphy with technetium 99m colloid in 98 patients with gastric cancer and 4 patients with esophageal cancer. The colloidal Tc-99m was injected into the submucosa of stomach 12 hr before operation with the aid of endoscopy. Each lymph node dissected from the specimens was measured by scintillation counter. Lymph nodes located along the left gastric, splenic and left inferior phrenic arteries were mainly involved in the lymphatics of the cardia of stomach. There was strong relationship between the cardia and the node of number 16. The lymphatics was also present in the mediastinum. These results suggest the necessities of the complete removal of the gastropancreatic mesenteriolum including the left inferior phrenic artery and the extirpation of the regional lymph nodes around the aorta above and below the left renal artery, in addition to the removal of both pancreas and spleen in cases of cardia tumors. Furthermore, in cases of squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma metastasizing to the intraperitoneal lymph nodes, it seems necessary to extirpate the complete mediastinal lymph nodes. (Namekawa, K.).

  14. Outpatient treatment costs and their potential impact on cancer care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isshiki, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Cancer creates a tremendous financial burden. Cancer-related costs are categorized into direct, indirect, and psychosocial costs. Although there have been many reports on medical care costs, which are direct, those on other costs are extremely scarce. We estimated travel time and costs required for cancer patients to receive outpatient treatment. We studied 521 cancer patients receiving anti-cancer treatment between February 2009 and December 2012 at the Outpatient Chemotherapy Center of Teikyo University Chiba Medical Center. Address data were extracted from Data Warehouse electronic medical records, and travel distance and time required for outpatient treatment were calculated via MapInfo and ACT Distance Calculator Package. Transportation costs were estimated on the basis of ¥274 (=$3.00) per kilometer. The study design was approved by an ethics review board of Teikyo University (12-851). Average round-trip travel distance, time, and cost for all patients were 26.7 km, 72.5 min, and ¥7,303 ($79.99), respectively. Cancer patients incurred a travel cost of ¥4000–¥9000 ($40.00 to $100.00) for each outpatient treatment. With population aging, seniors living alone and senior households are increasing, and outpatient visits are becoming a common burden

  15. Spiritual issues and quality of life assessment in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficace, Fabio; Marrone, Robert

    2002-11-01

    Being diagnosed with cancer forces most human beings to face their own death. The comfortable sense of both invulnerability and immortality is shattered, making the patient thoroughly aware that life is finite and limited. Approaching death, cancer patients commonly embark on an inner journey involving a search for meaning as well as a reordering of priorities involving physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs. Although interest in the role of spirituality, relating to both adjustment to cancer and the overall quality of life of cancer patients, has increased in recent years, most of the commonly used quality of life (QOL) instruments in oncology typically do not include spiritual issues. In this article, it is argued that assessing QOL effectively should involve all aspects of the personality, including mind, body, and spirit as well. This article also reviews recent studies, which have shown that spiritual well-being, although a many-sided and difficult construct to define, is closely related to the QOL of cancer patients. It is also suggested that further research is needed to understand how the new focus on spirituality can contribute to a more comprehensive assessment of patient's QOL in cancer care.

  16. Qigong in Cancer Care: Theory, Evidence-Base, and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Klein

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this discussion is to explore the theory, evidence base, and practice of Qigong for individuals with cancer. Questions addressed are: What is qigong? How does it work? What evidence exists supporting its practice in integrative oncology? What barriers to wide-spread programming access exist? Methods: Sources for this discussion include a review of scholarly texts, the Internet, PubMed, field observations, and expert opinion. Results: Qigong is a gentle, mind/body exercise integral within Chinese medicine. Theoretical foundations include Chinese medicine energy theory, psychoneuroimmunology, the relaxation response, the meditation effect, and epigenetics. Research supports positive effects on quality of life (QOL, fatigue, immune function and cortisol levels, and cognition for individuals with cancer. There is indirect, scientific evidence suggesting that qigong practice may positively influence cancer prevention and survival. No one Qigong exercise regimen has been established as superior. Effective protocols do have common elements: slow mindful exercise, easy to learn, breath regulation, meditation, emphasis on relaxation, and energy cultivation including mental intent and self-massage. Conclusions: Regular practice of Qigong exercise therapy has the potential to improve cancer-related QOL and is indirectly linked to cancer prevention and survival. Wide-spread access to quality Qigong in cancer care programming may be challenged by the availability of existing programming and work force capacity.

  17. The operated stomach in double contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.

    1980-01-01

    Knowledge of common modifications of surgery facilitates the interpretation of changes in X-ray morphology. Vagotomy modifies the motor aspects of the stomach. Gastroenterostomy modifies discharge conditions with high incidence of gastric ulcers. Pyloroplasty causes typical pockets. X-ray findings after repeated surgical treatment of the stomach, total gastrectomy, and pancreatic surgery may be classified and distinguished from pathological findings. (orig.) [de

  18. [Update of breast cancer in Primary Care (II/V)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusint, B; Vich, P; Ávarez-Hernández, C; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Díaz-García, N; Redondo-Margüello, E

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family doctors need to thoroughly understand this disease in order to optimize the health care services for these patients, making the best use of available resources. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. The second one deals with population screening and its controversies, screening in high-risk women, and the current recommendations. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors, and helping them to be able to care for their patients for their benefit throughout their illness. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Cancer patients' use of family practice and secondary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokolowski, Ineta; Kjeldgaard, Anette Hvenegaard; Olesen, Frede

    Aims: We know that in Denmark some 90% of citizens have contact with family practice (FP) during a year and around 40% has contact with secondary care.  This demands efforts to create integrated and shared care. The aim of this study is to document the pattern of contacts with FP among patients...... population b) about 33,000 patients diagnosed with cancer in 2007, and c) about 220,000 patients living with a previous diagnosis of cancer.        Results: Data for the total population is known. The total number of contacts with FP in daytime is about 38.4 million, with out of hours service about 2...

  20. Lessons in Integrating Shared Decision-Making Into Cancer Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Vinter, Mette; Crüger, Dorthe

    2018-01-01

    The benefits of shared decision-making (SDM) in health care delivery are well documented, but implementing SDM at the institutional level is challenging, particularly when patients have complex illnesses and care needs, as in cancer. Denmark's Lillebaelt Hospital, in creating The Patient's Cancer...... championed. It organized multiple demonstration projects focused on use of decision aids, patient-reported outcome measures, and better communication tools and practices. It designed programs to train clinicians in the art of doctor-patient communication. It used research evidence to inform development...... of the decision aids that its clinicians use with their patients. And it rigorously measured SDM performance in an ongoing fashion so that progress could be tracked and refined to ensure continuous improvement. Initial data on the institution's SDM initiatives from the Danish national annual survey of patients...

  1. Patterns of Colorectal Cancer Care in Europe, Australia, and New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Chawla, Neetu; Butler, Eboneé N.; Lund, Jennifer; Warren, Joan L.; Harlan, Linda C.; Yabroff, K. Robin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in women and the third most common in men worldwide. In this study, we used MEDLINE to conduct a systematic review of existing literature published in English between 2000 and 2010 on patterns of colorectal cancer care. Specifically, this review examined 66 studies conducted in Europe, Australia, and New Zealand to assess patterns of initial care, post-diagnostic surveillance, and end-of-life care for colorectal cancer. The majority of studie...

  2. [Update of breast cancer in primary care (I/V)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vich, P; Brusint, B; Alvarez-Hernández, C; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Diaz-García, N; Redondo-Margüello, E

    2014-09-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of the patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians should have a thorough knowledge of this disease in order to optimize the health care services for these patients, and making the best use of available resources. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. The first article reviews the epidemiology, risk factors, and protective factors in this disease This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review on breast cancer, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to support the patients for their benefit throughout their illness. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiotherapy in Cancer Care: Facing the Global Challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Zubizarreta, Eduardo

    2017-06-01

    Cancer treatment is complex and calls for a diverse set of services. Radiotherapy is recognized as an essential tool in the cure and palliation of cancer. Currently, access to radiation treatment is limited in many countries and non-existent in some. This lack of radiotherapy resources exacerbates the burden of disease and underscores the continuing health care disparity among States. Closing this gap represents an essential measure in addressing this global health equity problem. This publication presents a comprehensive overview of the major topics and issues to be taken into consideration when planning a strategy to address this problem, in particular in low and middle income countries. With contributions from leaders in the field, it provides an introduction to the achievements and issues of radiation therapy as a cancer treatment modality around the world. Dedicated chapters focus on proton therapy, carbon ion radiotherapy, intraoperative radiotherapy, radiotherapy for children, HIV/AIDS related malignancies, and costing and quality management issues.

  4. Gallium-67 accumulation in the stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Masayoshi; Irie, Goro; Itoh, Kazuo; Furudate, Masayori

    1988-10-01

    Scintigraphy with Ga-67 citrate routinely performed which showed an uptake in the stomach was reviewed retrospectively. There were 24 cases correlated ; 7 cases with malignant lymphoma in the stomach, 4 with gastric carcinoma, 2 with gastritis, 1 with abscess after gastroenterostomy and 8 with no disease detected. The Ga-uptake in the stomach in those was patterned to 4 groups. Rod and wall patterns were unlikely in malignant diseases of the stomach. On the other hand, focal or irregular uptake was commonly seen in malignant diseases of the stomach. Those Ga-uptake patterns may be useful to interprete complicated distribution of the radiogallium in the G.I. tracts of the left upper abdomen.

  5. Patients' and parents' views regarding supportive care in childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenniglo, L J A; Loeffen, E A H; Kremer, L C M; Font-Gonzalez, A; Mulder, R L; Postma, A; Naafs-Wilstra, M C; Grootenhuis, M A; van de Wetering, M D; Tissing, W J E

    2017-10-01

    Intensive therapies in pediatric malignancies increased survival rates but also occurrence of treatment-related morbidities. Therefore, supportive care fulfills an increasingly important role. In planning development of guidelines with incorporation of shared decision making, we noticed that little is known about the needs and preferences of patients and their parents. Our goals were therefore to investigate (1) which supportive care topics patients and parents regard as most important and (2) the preferred role they wish to fulfill in decision making. This qualitative study consisted of three focus groups (two traditional, one online) with patients and parents of two Dutch pediatric oncology centers. Data were transcribed as simple verbatim and analyzed using thematic analysis. Eleven adolescent patients and 18 parents shared detailed views on various aspects of supportive care. Themes of major importance were communication between patient and physician (commitment, accessibility, proactive attitude of physicians), well-timed provision of information, and the suitability and accessibility of psychosocial care. In contrast to prioritized supportive care topics by medical professionals, somatic issues (e.g., febrile neutropenia) were infrequently addressed. Patients and parents preferred to be actively involved in decision making in selected topics, such as choice of analgesics and anti-emetics, but not in, e.g., choice of antibiotics. Children with cancer and parents were provided a valuable insight into their views regarding supportive care and shared decision making. These results have important implications towards improving supportive care, both in selecting topics for guideline development and incorporating preferences of patients and parents herein.

  6. Assessing Patients’ Experiences with Communication Across the Cancer Care Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Street, Richard L.; Sue, Valerie M.; Williams, Andrew E.; Rabin, Borsika A.; Arora, Neeraj K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relevance, performance and potential usefulness of the Patient Assessment of cancer Communication Experiences (PACE) items. Methods Items focusing on specific communication goals related to exchanging information, fostering healing relationships, responding to emotions, making decisions, enabling self-management, and managing uncertainty were tested via a retrospective, cross-sectional survey of adults who had been diagnosed with cancer. Analyses examined response frequencies, inter-item correlations, and coefficient alpha. Results A total of 366 adults were included in the analyses. Relatively few selected “Does Not Apply”, suggesting that items tap relevant communication experiences. Ratings of whether specific communication goals were achieved were strongly correlated with overall ratings of communication, suggesting item content reflects important aspects of communication. Coefficient alpha was ≥.90 for each item set, indicating excellent reliability. Variations in the percentage of respondents selecting the most positive response across items suggest results can identify strengths and weaknesses. Conclusion The PACE items tap relevant, important aspects of communication during cancer care, and may be useful to cancer care teams desiring detailed feedback. PMID:26979476

  7. Socioeconomic status and patterns of care in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, A.; Vinod, S.K.; Jalaludin, B.; Yuile, P.; Delaney, G.P.; Barton, M.

    2003-01-01

    This retrospective study aims to explore any associations between socioeconomic factors and lung cancer management and outcome in the Australian setting. The study population consisted of patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer in 1996 who were living in the Northern Sydney Area Health Service (NSAHS) or South Western Sydney Area Health Service (SWSAHS). These two Area Health Services differ in socioeconomic profiles based on socioeconomic indexes for areas (SEIFA), median income, education level and unemployment rate. Data on patient demographics, tumour characteristics, management details, recurrence and survival were collected, and the patterns of care were analysed. Socioeconomic status indicators of the two Area Health Services were imputed from the Australian Bureau of Statistics data. There were 270 and 256 new cases of lung cancer identified in NSAHS and SWSAHS respectively. Patients in NSAHS were slightly older (median age 73 versus 68 years) and there was less male predominance. The stage distributions and performance status of the two cohorts were similar. There were no significant differences in the utilisation rates of different treatment modalities between the two areas: radiotherapy (54% in NSAHS and 55% in SWSAHS), chemotherapy (34% and 25%), surgery (26% and 21%) and no treatment (22% and 25%). The 5-year overall survival was slightly in favour of NSAHS (10.5% and 7.4%), but did not reach statistical significance. Despite differences in socioeconomic profiles between the two area health services, patients with lung cancer had similar patterns of care and survival

  8. Helsinn: 20 years in primary cancer supportive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantoreggi, Sergio

    2016-11-01

    Sergio Cantoreggi speaks to Henry Ireland, Commissioning Editor: Sergio Cantoreggi, PhD, is the Chief Scientific Officer and Global Head of Research and Development of the Helsinn Group, a mid-sized pharmaceutical company headquartered in Lugano, Switzerland, and focused on providing cancer supportive care solutions to oncology patients worldwide. Dr Cantoreggi has overall responsibility for all R&D activities of the Helsinn Group and has contributed to six major regulatory approvals of cancer supportive care agents in the USA, Europe and Japan. Dr Cantoreggi joined Helsinn Healthcare in 2000 as drug development scientist and was appointed Head of R&D in 2005. In 2010, he was promoted to his current role. From 1994 to 2000 he worked as toxicologist and regulatory scientist for Du Pont, Sandoz and Novartis. Prior to joining industry, Dr Cantoreggi completed a postdoctoral fellowship and earned a Master of Science degree in chemistry and a Doctoral degree in natural sciences with a thesis on the mechanism of chemical carcinogenesis from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich, Switzerland. Sergio Cantoreggi discusses Helsinn's role in cancer supportive care, describing current treatment options for patients, the company's pipeline and Helsinn's work in supporting the field as a whole.

  9. Quality of care in cancer: An exploration of patient perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Mahapatra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient satisfaction is as important as is the care itself. When the patient has a disease like cancer it becomes even more important. A cancer patient not only suffers from the disease but also undergoes substantial mental trauma, agony, stress, uncertainty, and apprehension. There are limited studies in India eliciting patient's views on the quality of care being received by cancer patients. Methodology: A cross-sectional triangulation data transformation model mixed method design (Quant + Qual was used to conduct the study between March and May 2015 among patients attending specialty hospitals providing oncology services in Odisha, India. The quantitative data were collected using, Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire-18 to assess satisfaction. The qualitative data were obtained through in-depth interviews using open-ended questionnaire. Results: The results showed that general satisfaction among the patients was 60%. The maximum score was obtained for the communication of doctors. The qualitative findings revealed that travel for distant places for minor illness, waiting period, and lack of services at the primary care facilities were reasons for patient's dissatisfaction. Conclusion: The study found that the patients were generally satisfied with the quality of services. However, more studies should be conducted including perceptions of the patients as well as the caregiver.

  10. Perceptions of lung cancer and potential impacts on funding and patient care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Kim; Delicaet, Kendra; Tang, Theresa; Ashley, Leslie Beard; Morra, Dante; Abrams, Howard

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to explore health-care professionals', health administrators', and not-for-profit cancer organization representatives' perceptions of lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism and the perceived impacts on funding and patient care. This is a qualitative descriptive study using semi-structured interviews, which was conducted in Ontario, Canada. Seventy-four individuals from medical oncology, radiation oncology, thoracic surgery, respirology, pathology, radiology, primary care, palliative care, nursing, pharmacy, social work, genetics, health administration, and not-for-profit cancer organizations participated in this study. Participants described lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism and its negative impact on patients' psychological health, lung cancer funding, and patient care. The feeling of guilt and shame experienced by lung cancer patients as a result of the stigma associated with the disease was described. In terms of lung cancer funding, stigma was described as a reason lung cancer receives significantly less research funding compared to other cancers. In terms of patient care, lung cancer-related nihilism was credited with negatively impacting physician referral patterns with the belief that lung cancer patients were less likely to receive referrals for medical treatment. Health-care professionals, health administrators, and not-for-profit cancer organization representatives described lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism with far-reaching consequences. Further work is needed to increase education and awareness about lung cancer to reduce the stigma and nihilism associated with the disease.

  11. Differences in home-based palliative care service utilisation of people with cancer and non-cancer conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralik, Debbie; Anderson, Barbara

    2008-11-01

    To identify home-based palliative care service utilisation by people with cancer and non-cancer conditions. Palliative care knowledge and skill have been derived from working with people with cancer. People with chronic conditions are now referred for home-based palliative care; however, there has been few studies published that have explored the impact of service utilisation by people with end-stage chronic conditions. The Australia-modified Karnofsky Performance Status (AKPS) scale was calculated for each person upon referral for home-based palliative care services to determine the functional capacity of the individual at the point of referral. Clients were divided into those with cancer diagnosis and those with non-cancer diagnosis. Service utilisation of the individual client was determined until separation from the palliative care service. The study was undertaken in 2007. The majority of people with cancer (63%) and non-cancer (71%) were assessed as having an AKPS score between 50-60. Thirty-one cancer clients (18·7%) and three non-cancer clients (7·1%) had an AKPS score between 70-90. This suggests that people with cancer are referred to palliative care services earlier than people with non-cancer conditions. People with non-cancer conditions were substantially higher users of home-based palliative care services over a longer period of time. Home-based palliative care service utilisation was higher for people with non-cancer conditions. Cost analysis research is recommended to delineate the actual costs of home-based palliative care service provision between people with cancer and non-cancer conditions. There is growing awareness of the need for palliative care services for people with non-cancer conditions. However, these services are provided for longer periods of time for this client group. Implications for practice are that the palliative care needs of people with non-cancer conditions may not be met within current palliative care service provision

  12. Chemotherapy versus supportive care alone in pediatric palliative care for cancer: comparing the preferences of parents and health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Deborah; Bartels, Ute; Gammon, Janet; Hinds, Pamela S; Volpe, Jocelyne; Bouffet, Eric; Regier, Dean A; Baruchel, Sylvain; Greenberg, Mark; Barrera, Maru; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary; Sung, Lillian

    2011-11-22

    The choice between palliative chemotherapy (defined as the use of cytotoxic medications delivered intravenously for the purpose of our study) and supportive care alone is one of the most difficult decisions in pediatric oncology, yet little is known about the preferences of parents and health care professionals. We compared the strength of these preferences by considering children's quality of life and survival time as key attributes. In addition, we identified factors associated with the reported preferences. We included parents of children whose cancer had no reasonable chance of being cured and health care professionals in pediatric oncology as participants in our study. We administered separate interviews to parents and to health care professionals. Visual analogue scales were shown to respondents to illustrate the anticipated level of the child's quality of life, the expected duration of survival and the probability of cure (shown only to health care professionals). Respondents were then asked which treatment option they would favour given these baseline attributes. In addition, respondents reported what factors might affect such a decision and ranked all factors identified in order of importance. The primary measure was the desirability score for supportive care alone relative to palliative chemotherapy, as obtained using the threshold technique. A total of 77 parents and 128 health care professionals participated in our study. Important factors influencing the decision between therapeutic options were child quality-of-life and survival time among both parents and health care professionals. Hope was particularly important to parents. Parents significantly favoured chemotherapy (42/77, 54.5%) compared with health care professionals (20/128, 15.6%; p parents' desire for supportive care; for health care professionals, the opinions of parents and children were significant factors influencing this decision. Compared with health care professionals, parents more

  13. Racial disparities in cancer care in the Veterans Affairs health care system and the role of site of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Cleo A; Landrum, Mary Beth; McNeil, Barbara J; Bozeman, Samuel R; Williams, Christina D; Keating, Nancy L

    2014-09-01

    We assessed cancer care disparities within the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system and whether between-hospital differences explained disparities. We linked VA cancer registry data with VA and Medicare administrative data and examined 20 cancer-related quality measures among Black and White veterans diagnosed with colorectal (n = 12,897), lung (n = 25,608), or prostate (n = 38,202) cancer from 2001 to 2004. We used logistic regression to assess racial disparities for each measure and hospital fixed-effects models to determine whether disparities were attributable to between- or within-hospital differences. Compared with Whites, Blacks had lower rates of early-stage colon cancer diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.72, 0.90), curative surgery for stage I, II, or III rectal cancer (AOR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.41, 0.78), 3-year survival for colon cancer (AOR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.62, 0.89) and rectal cancer (AOR = 0.61; 95% CI = 0.42, 0.87), curative surgery for early-stage lung cancer (AOR = 0.50; 95% CI = 0.41, 0.60), 3-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated radiation (3-D CRT/IMRT; AOR = 0.53; 95% CI = 0.47, 0.59), and potent antiemetics for highly emetogenic chemotherapy (AOR = 0.87; 95% CI = 0.78, 0.98). Adjustment for hospital fixed-effects minimally influenced racial gaps except for 3-D CRT/IMRT (AOR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.65, 0.87) and potent antiemetics (AOR = 0.95; 95% CI = 0.82, 1.10). Disparities in VA cancer care were observed for 7 of 20 measures and were primarily attributable to within-hospital differences.

  14. Cost of Care for the Initial Management of Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercow, Alexandra S; Chen, Ling; Chatterjee, Sudeshna; Tergas, Ana I; Hou, June Y; Burke, William M; Ananth, Cande V; Neugut, Alfred I; Hershman, Dawn L; Wright, Jason D

    2017-12-01

    To examine the cost of care during the first year after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer, estimate the sources of cost, and explore the out-of-pocket costs. We performed a retrospective cohort study of women with ovarian cancer diagnosed from 2009 to 2012 who underwent both surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy using the Truven Health MarketScan database. This database is comprised of patients covered by commercial insurance sponsored by more than 100 employers in the United States. Medical expenditures, including physician reimbursement, for a 12-month period beginning on the date of surgery were estimated. All payments were examined, including out-of-pocket costs for patients. Payments were divided into expenditures for inpatient care, outpatient care (including chemotherapy), and outpatient drug costs. The 12-month treatment period was divided into three phases: surgery to 30 days (operative period), 1-6 months (adjuvant therapy), and 6-12 months after surgery. The primary outcome was the overall cost of care within the first year of diagnosis of ovarian cancer; secondary outcomes included assessment of factors associated with cost. A total of 26,548 women with ovarian cancer who underwent surgery were identified. After exclusion of patients with incomplete insurance enrollment or coverage, those who did not undergo chemotherapy, and those with capitated plans, our cohort consisted of 5,031 women. The median total medical expenditures per patient during the first year after the index procedure were $93,632 (interquartile range $62,319-140,140). Inpatient services accounted for $30,708 (interquartile range $20,102-51,107; 37.8%) in expenditures, outpatient services $52,700 (interquartile range $31,210-83,206; 58.3%), and outpatient drug costs $1,814 (interquartile range $603-4,402; 3.8%). The median out-of-pocket expense was $2,988 (interquartile range $1,649-5,088). This included $1,509 (interquartile range $705-2,878) for outpatient services, $589 (interquartile range

  15. Palliative care among heart failure patients in primary care: a comparison to cancer patients using English family practice data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Gadoud

    Full Text Available Patients with heart failure have a significant symptom burden and other palliative care needs often over a longer period than patients with cancer. It is acknowledged that this need may be unmet but by how much has not been quantified in primary care data at the population level.This was the first use of Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the world's largest primary care database to explore recognition of the need for palliative care. Heart failure and cancer patients who had died in 2009 aged 18 or over and had at least one year of primary care records were identified. A palliative approach to care among patients with heart failure was compared to that among patients with cancer using entry onto a palliative care register as a marker for a palliative approach to care.Among patients with heart failure, 7% (234/3 122 were entered on the palliative care register compared to 48% (3 669/7 608 of cancer patients. Of heart failure patients on the palliative care register, 29% (69/234 were entered onto the register within a week of their death.This confirms that the stark inequity in recognition of palliative care needs for people with heart failure in a large primary care dataset. We recommend a move away from prognosis based criteria for palliative care towards a patient centred approach, with assessment of and attention to palliative needs including advance care planning throughout the disease trajectory.

  16. Dedicated researcher brings cancer care to rural communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharan Bhuller

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As an ardent cancer researcher, Dr. Smita Asthana has a vision to create wider awareness on cancer and its prevention, and aims to work on translational research to benefit the general public through the implementation of evidence-based research. “I have been associated with the National Institute of Cancer Prevention and Research (NICPR and Institute of Cytology and Preventive Oncology (ICPO since November 2004 and have progressed over a period of time from being a staff scientist to the current role of a senior scientist,” says Dr. Asthana, who is presently with NICPR’s Biostatistics and Epidemiology division.“I have been working in various positions that deal with the design, execution, and evaluation of medical projects. Recently, we have concluded two major cervical cancer screening projects and conducted a screening of 10,000 women in rural areas,” she tells AMOR. One project, funded by the Indian Council of Medical Research, was carried out 100 km west of New Delhi in the rural town of Dadri “as part of an operational research to see the implementation of VIA (visual inspection with acetic acid and VILI (visual inspection with Lugol's iodine screenings with the help of existing healthcare infrastructure,” she explains.As a leading researcher in cervical cancer screening, she completed an Indo-US collaborative project on the clinical performance of a human papillomavirus (HPV test, used as a strategy for screening cervical cancer in rural communities, with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation via the international non-profit global health organization PATH. “The primary objective of the project was to observe the performance of careHPV, a new diagnostic kit, in a rural setup,” she says.CareHPV is a highly sensitive DNA test, which detects 14 different types of the human papillomavirus that cause cervical cancer, providing results more rapidly than other DNA tests and is designed especially for use in clinics

  17. Will patients benefit from regionalization of gynecologic cancer care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen F Brookfield

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Patient chances for cure and palliation for a variety of malignancies may be greatly affected by the care provided by a treating hospital. We sought to determine the effect of volume and teaching status on patient outcomes for five gynecologic malignancies: endometrial, cervical, ovarian and vulvar carcinoma and uterine sarcoma. METHODS: The Florida Cancer Data System dataset was queried for all patients undergoing treatment for gynecologic cancers from 1990-2000. RESULTS: Overall, 48,981 patients with gynecologic malignancies were identified. Endometrial tumors were the most common, representing 43.2% of the entire cohort, followed by ovarian cancer (30.9%, cervical cancer (20.8%, vulvar cancer (4.6%, and uterine sarcoma (0.5%. By univariate analysis, although patients treated at high volume centers (HVC were significantly younger, they benefited from an improved short-term (30-day and/or 90-day survival for cervical, ovarian and endometrial cancers. Multivariate analysis (MVA, however, failed to demonstrate significant survival benefit for gynecologic cancer patients treated at teaching facilities (TF or HVC. Significant prognostic factors at presentation by MVA were age over 65 (HR = 2.6, p<0.01, African-American race (HR = 1.36, p<0.01, and advanced stage (regional HR = 2.08, p<0.01; advanced HR = 3.82, p<0.01, respectively. Surgery and use of chemotherapy were each significantly associated with improved survival. CONCLUSION: No difference in patient survival was observed for any gynecologic malignancy based upon treating hospital teaching or volume status. Although instances of improved outcomes may occur, overall further regionalization would not appear to significantly improve patient survival.

  18. Aboriginal experiences of cancer and care coordination: Lessons from the Cancer Data and Aboriginal Disparities (CanDAD) narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Rachel; Micklem, Jasmine; Yerrell, Paul; Banham, David; Morey, Kim; Stajic, Janet; Eckert, Marion; Lawrence, Monica; Stewart, Harold B; Brown, Alex

    2018-04-24

    Aboriginal people with cancer experience worse outcomes than other Australians for a range of complex and interrelated reasons. A younger age at diagnosis, higher likelihood of more advanced cancer or cancer type with poorer prognosis, geographic isolation and cultural and language diversity mean that patient pathways are potentially more complex for Aboriginal people with cancer. In addition, variation in the quality and acceptability of care may influence cancer outcomes. This study sought to understand how care coordination influences Aboriginal people's experiences of cancer treatment. Interviews with 29 Aboriginal patients or cancer survivors, 11 carers and 22 service providers were carried out. Interviews were semi-structured and sought to elicit experiences of cancer and the health-care system. The manifest content of the cancer narratives was entered onto a cancer pathway mapping tool and underlying themes were identified inductively. The practice of cancer care coordination was found to address the needs of Aboriginal patients and their families/carers in 4 main areas: "navigating the health system"; "information and communication"; "things to manage at home"; and "cultural safety". The CanDAD findings indicate that, when the need for cancer care coordination is met, it facilitated continuity of care in a range of ways that may potentially improve cancer outcomes. However, the need remains unmet for many. Findings support the importance of dedicated care coordination to enable Aboriginal people to receive adequate and appropriate patient-centred care, so that the unacceptable disparity in cancer outcomes between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people can be addressed. © 2018 The Authors. Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Strategies for the quality assessment of the health care service providers in the treatment of Gastric Cancer in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamil, María Del Pilar; Barrera, David; Velasco, Nubia; Bernal, Oscar; Fajardo, Esteban; Urango, Carlos; Buitrago, Sebastian

    2017-09-15

    While, at its inception in 1993, the health care system in Colombia was publicized as a paradigm to be copied across the developing world, numerous problems in its implementation have led to, what is now, an inefficient and crisis-ridden health system. Furthermore, as a result of inappropriate tools to measure the quality of the health service providers, several corruption scandals have arisen in the country. This study attempts to tackle this situation by proposing a strategy for the quality assessment of the health service providers (Entidades Promotoras de Salud, EPS) in the Colombian health system. In particular, as a case study, the quality of the treatment of stomach cancer is analyzed. The study uses two complementary techniques to address the problem. These techniques are applied based on data of the treatment of gastric cancer collected on a nation-wide scale by the Colombian Ministry of Health and Welfare. First, Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and the Malmquist Index (MI) are used to establish the most efficient EPS's within the system, according to indicators such as opportunity indicators. Second, sequential clustering algorithm, related to process mining a field of data mining, is used to determine the medical history of all patients and to construct typical care pathways of the patients belonging to efficient and inefficient EPS's. Lastly, efforts are made to identify traits and differences between efficient and inefficient EPS's. Efficient and inefficient EPS were identified for the years 2010 and 2011. Additionally, a Malmquist Index was used to calculate the relative changes in the efficiency of the health providers. Using these efficiency rates, the typical treatment path of patients with gastric cancer was found for two EPSs: one efficient and another inefficient. Finally, the typical traits of the care pathways were established. Combining DEA and process mining proved to be a powerful approach understanding the problem and gaining valuable

  20. Utilization of health care services in cancer patients with elevated fear of cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Alexandra; Ivers, Hans; Savard, Josée

    2018-05-02

    Cancer patients commonly report experiencing fear of cancer recurrence (FCR), which may lead to several negative consequences. This study aimed at examining whether clinical levels of FCR are linked to a greater use of health care services. This is a secondary analysis of a longitudinal study of 962 cancer patients on the epidemiology of cancer-related insomnia. They completed the Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory-Short form (FCRI-SF) and reported information on their consultations (medical, psychosocial, and complementary and alternative medicine [CAM]) and medication usage (anxiolytics/hypnotics and antidepressants) at 6 time points over an 18-month period. Results indicated that clinical FCR at baseline was associated with greater consultation rates of medical and psychosocial professionals and a greater usage of anxiolytics/hypnotics and antidepressants. No significant association was found between the FCR level and use of CAM services. While consultation rates of medical and CAM professionals and usage of antidepressants generally increased over time, consultation rates of psychosocial professionals and usage of anxiolytics/hypnotics tended to decrease. Cancer patients with clinical levels of FCR are more likely to consult health care providers and to use psychotropic medications, which may translate into significant costs for society and the patients themselves. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Deploying Team Science Principles to Optimize Interdisciplinary Lung Cancer Care Delivery: Avoiding the Long and Winding Road to Optimal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Rodriguez, Hector P; Hicks, Danielle; Signore, Raymond S; Roark, Kristi; Kedia, Satish K; Ward, Kenneth D; Lathan, Christopher; Santarella, Scott; Gould, Michael K; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-11-01

    The complexity of lung cancer care mandates interaction between clinicians with different skill sets and practice cultures in the routine delivery of care. Using team science principles and a case-based approach, we exemplify the need for the development of real care teams for patients with lung cancer to foster coordination among the multiple specialists and staff engaged in routine care delivery. Achieving coordinated lung cancer care is a high-priority public health challenge because of the volume of patients, lethality of disease, and well-described disparities in quality and outcomes of care. Coordinating mechanisms need to be cultivated among different types of specialist physicians and care teams, with differing technical expertise and practice cultures, who have traditionally functioned more as coactively working groups than as real teams. Coordinating mechanisms, including shared mental models, high-quality communication, mutual trust, and mutual performance monitoring, highlight the challenge of achieving well-coordinated care and illustrate how team science principles can be used to improve quality and outcomes of lung cancer care. To develop the evidence base to support coordinated lung cancer care, research comparing the effectiveness of a diverse range of multidisciplinary care team approaches and interorganizational coordinating mechanisms should be promoted.

  2. Health care restructuring and family physician care for those who died of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Grace

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the 1990s, health care restructuring in Nova Scotia resulted in downsized hospitals, reduced inpatient length of stay, capped physician incomes and restricted practice locations. Concurrently, the provincial homecare program was redeveloped and out-of-hospital cancer deaths increased from 20% (1992 to 30% (1998. These factors all pointed to a transfer of end-of-life inpatient hospital care to more community-based care. The purpose of this study was to describe the trends in the provision of Family Physician (FP visits to advanced cancer patients in Nova Scotia (NS during the years of health care restructuring. Methods Design Secondary multivariate analysis of linked population-based datafiles including the Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre Oncology Patient Information System (NS Cancer Registry, Vital Statistics, the NS Hospital Admissions/Separations file and the Medical Services Insurance Physician Services database. Setting Nova Scotia, an eastern Canadian province (population: 950,000. Subjects: All patients who died of lung, colorectal, breast or prostate cancer between April 1992 and March 1998 (N = 7,212. Outcome Measures Inpatient and ambulatory FP visits, ambulatory visits by location (office, home, long-term care facility, emergency department, time of day (regular hours, after hours, total length of inpatient hospital stay and number of hospital admissions during the last six months of life. Results In total, 139,641 visits were provided by family physicians: 15% of visits in the office, 10% in the home, 5% in the emergency department (ED, 5% in a long-term-care centre and 64% to hospital inpatients. There was no change in the rate of FP visits received for office, home and long-term care despite the fact that there were 13% fewer hospital admissions, and length of hospital stay declined by 21%. Age-sex adjusted estimates using negative binomial regression indicate a decline in hospital inpatient FP

  3. Absorption of pentacaine from ulcerous rat stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomcikova, O.; Babulova, A.; Durisova, M.; Trnovec, T.; Benes, L.

    1985-01-01

    Pentacaine is a local anaesthetic which exhibited positive effects on healing of model ulcers in the rat stomach. The in situ disappearance of pentacaine from the ulcerous and intact rat stomach was studied. Gastric ulcers were produced by oral administration of phenylbutazone (200 mg/kg) 3.5 h before absorption experiment. Pentacaine exhibited a biexponential decrease from the lumen of the stomach, the rate of which was essentially the same in both groups. The total amount of pentacaine absorbed was small because of extremly low absorption rate. (author)

  4. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  5. Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  6. Cancer incidence and mortality in Mongolia - National Registry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandagdorj, Tuvshingerel; Sanjaajamts, Erdenechimeg; Tudev, Undarmaa; Oyunchimeg, Dondov; Ochir, Chimedsuren; Roder, David

    2010-01-01

    The National Cancer Registry of Mongolia began as a hospital-based registry in the early 1960s but then evolved to have a population-wide role. The Registry provides the only cancer data available from Mongolia for international comparison. The descriptive data presented in this report are the first to be submitted on cancer incidence in Mongolia to a peer-reviewed journal. The purpose was to describe cancer incidence and mortality for all invasive cancers collectively, individual primary sites, and particularly leading sites, and consider cancer control opportunities. This study includes data on new cancer cases registered in Mongolia in 2003-2007. Incidence and mortality rates were calculated as mean annual numbers per 100,000 residents. Age-standardized incidence (ASR) and age-standardized mortality (ASMR) rates were calculated from age-specific rates by weighting directly to the World Population standard. Between 2003 and 2007, 17,271 new cases of invasive cancer were recorded (52.2% in males, 47.7% in females). The five leading primary sites in males were liver, stomach, lung, esophagus, and colon/rectum; whereas in females they were liver, cervix, stomach, esophagus and breast. ASRs were lower in females than males for cancers of the liver at 63.0 and 99.1 per 100,000 respectively; cancers of the stomach at 19.1 and 42.1 per 100,000 respectively; and cancers of the lung at 8.3 and 33.2 per 100,000 respectively. Liver cancer was the most common cause of death in each gender, the ASMR being lower for females than males at 60.6 compared with 94.8 per 100,000. In females the next most common sites of cancer death were the stomach and esophagus, whereas in males, they were the stomach and lung. Available data indicate that ASRs of all cancers collectively have increased over the last 20 years. Rates are highest for liver cancer, at about four times the world average. The most common cancers are those with a primary site of liver, stomach and esophagus, for which

  7. Cancer survivorship: history, quality-of-life issues, and the evolving multidisciplinary approach to implementation of cancer survivorship care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Mary Ann

    2009-07-01

    To discuss the history of cancer survivorship, related quality-of-life issues, and cancer survivorship care plans (CSCPs). CINAHL, PubMed, published articles, and Web sites. A cancer survivor is an individual who has been diagnosed with cancer, regardless of when that diagnosis was received, who is still living. Cancer survivorship is complex and involves many aspects of care. Major areas of concern for survivors are recurrence, secondary malignancies, and long-term treatment sequelae that affect quality of life. Four essential components of survivorship care are prevention, surveillance, intervention, and coordination. A CSCP should address the survivor's long-term care, such as type of cancer, treatments received, potential side effects, and recommendations for follow-up. It should include preventive practices, how to maintain health and well-being, information on legal protections regarding employment and health insurance, and psychosocial services in the community. Survivorship care for patients with cancer requires a multidisciplinary effort and team approach. Enhanced knowledge of long-term complications of survivorship is needed for healthcare providers. Further research on evidence-based practice for cancer survivorship care also is necessary. Nurses can review CSCPs with patients, instruct them when to seek treatment, promote recommended surveillance protocols, and encourage behaviors that lead to cancer prevention and promote well-being for cancer survivors.

  8. Primary care colorectal cancer screening correlates with breast cancer screening: implications for colorectal cancer screening improvement interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jennifer M; Pandhi, Nancy; Kraft, Sally; Potvien, Aaron; Carayon, Pascale; Smith, Maureen A

    2018-04-25

    National colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates have plateaued. To optimize interventions targeting those unscreened, a better understanding is needed of how this preventive service fits in with multiple preventive and chronic care needs managed by primary care providers (PCPs). This study examines whether PCP practices of other preventive and chronic care needs correlate with CRC screening. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 90 PCPs and 33,137 CRC screening-eligible patients. Five PCP quality metrics (breast cancer screening, cervical cancer screening, HgbA1c and LDL testing, and blood pressure control) were measured. A baseline correlation test was performed between these metrics and PCP CRC screening rates. Multivariable logistic regression with clustering at the clinic-level estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for these PCP quality metrics, patient and PCP characteristics, and their relationship to CRC screening. PCP CRC screening rates have a strong correlation with breast cancer screening rates (r = 0.7414, p < 0.001) and a weak correlation with the other quality metrics. In the final adjusted model, the only PCP quality metric that significantly predicted CRC screening was breast cancer screening (OR 1.25; 95% CI 1.11-1.42; p < 0.001). PCP CRC screening rates are highly concordant with breast cancer screening. CRC screening is weakly concordant with cervical cancer screening and chronic disease management metrics. Efforts targeting PCPs to increase CRC screening rates could be bundled with breast cancer screening improvement interventions to increase their impact and success.

  9. Improving access to supportive cancer care through an eHealth application: a qualitative needs assessment among cancer survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubberding, S.; van Uden-Kraan, C.F.; te Velde, E.A.; Cuijpers, P.; Leemans, C.R.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives: To gain insight into cancer survivors' needs towards an eHealth application monitoring quality of life and targeting personalised access to supportive care. Background: Supportive care in cancer addresses survivors' concerns and needs. However, many survivors are not taking

  10. Awareness of Breast Cancer among Female Care Givers in Tertiary Cancer Hospital, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinegde, Negalign Getahun; Xuying, Li

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Breast cancer is a worldwide public health issue and most common cancer diagnosed among women including China, where advanced stages at diagnosis appears to be increasing and an ever-rising incidence twice as fast as global rates. The study was conducted to describe the awareness of breast cancer and associated factors among care giver women in tertiary Cancer Hospital, China. Methods: Institutional based cross-sectional study was conducted among 261 women selected by systematic random sampling. Information provided by the participants was converted into awareness scores for analysis using SPSS version 23. Awareness scores were dichotomized in to ‘good awareness and ‘poor awareness’ taking median score=11 as the cut-off point. Data analysis was performed using the binary logistic regression. A p-value of awareness. Breast lump was the most commonly known symptom of cancer by 61.7% of the respondents. Slightly more than half of the study participants acknowledged having a past history of breast cancer, drinking alcohol and having close relative with breast cancer as potential risk factors for breast cancer (63.6%, 58.6%, and 55.6% respectively). Nevertheless, a vast majority of the study participants were unable to appreciate modifiable risk factors of the disease. More than half of the participants had never/rarely checked their breasts and all of the participants wrongly answered breast cancer knowledge age related risk. Awareness level was significantly associated with entertainment preference (OR=3.57; 95%CI=1.71, 7.44) and residence setting areas (OR=2.4; 95%CI=1.04, 5.69). Conclusion: The study indicated suboptimal awareness while entertainment preference and residence setting were significantly associated with awareness level. Public awareness campaigns should be made by dissemination of information about breast cancer through health education and printed Medias with great emphases on women living in rural areas. PMID:28749635

  11. [Breast cancer update in primary care: (V/V)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz García, Noiva; Cuadrado Rouco, Carmen; Vich, Pilar; Alvarez-Hernandez, Cristina; Brusint, Begoña; Redondo Margüello, Esther

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians ought to know thoroughly this pathology to optimize the health care services for these patients making the best use of available resources. A series of five articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last ten years. In this final section, the social, psychological, occupational and family issues related to the disease will be reviewed, as well as presenting some special situations of breast cancer, including breast cancer in men, during pregnancy and last stages of life. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this disease, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to be by the patients for their benefit throughout their illness. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. [Update of breast cancer in Primary Care (III/V)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Hernández, C; Vich Pérez, P; Brusint, B; Cuadrado Rouco, C; Díaz García, N; Robles Díaz, L

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease with implications in all aspects of patientś life, therefore, family doctors must know this pathology in depth, in order to optimize the health care provided to these patients with the best available resources. This series of five articles on breast cancer is based on a review of the scientific literature of the last ten years. This third article will review the clinical context and the staging and prognostic factors of the disease. This summary report aims to provide a global, current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to be by the patients for their benefit throughout their illness. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Financial Burden of Cancer Care - Life After Cancer Summary Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  14. Microbiota in the stomach: new insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen Ming; Yang, Yun Sheng; Peng, Li Hua

    2014-02-01

    Bacteria are sparsely distributed in the stomach due to the gastric microbicidal barrier. Several innate defenses (low pH, migrating motor complex and the entero-salivary circulation of nitrate) as well as external factors (diet, Helicobacter pylori infection, proton pump inhibitors, antibiotics and stomach diseases) have been shown to influence significantly the microbiota composition in the stomach. In recent years new culture-independent technologies have allowed the investigation of the cross talk that occurs between hosts and stomach-associated microflora, which helps us to understand the role of gastric bacterial flora in the gastrointestinal microbiological system, both in physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we reviewed the literatures related to this topic and set the stage for future developments of the field. © 2013 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Manufacturing Of Novelty Leather From Cattle Stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umme Habiba Bodrun Naher

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of turning cattle stomach into novelty leather and then leather product which would add value to end of cattle. Four pieces of green buffalo stomachs were taken through soaking liming deliming pickling tanning neutralization retanning dyeing and fat liquoring operation. Then mechanical operations like drying and staking operations were also done. Some physical tensile strength stitch tear strength and colour rub fastness and chemical chromic oxide content fat content and pH tests were accomplished .The results of physical tests were poor compared to the grain leather as the composition of raw outer coverings of animals and their stomachs are different. The stomach leathers could be used for making coin purse key case bracelet wrist watch belt ear-ring necklace hair band iPod case etc. as novelty leather product item.

  16. Swordfish Stomach Content Data, 1989-2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stomach contents were tabulated for 734 swordfish (Xiphias gladius) from the central North Pacific from 1989 to 2000 (most from 1994-1998). The swordfish were...

  17. Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoui, Lamine; Bouassida, Mahdi; Kilani, Houda; Medhioub, Mouna; Chelbi, Emna

    2015-11-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the stomach is very rare. Its pathogenesis is unclear and the treatment strategy is controversial. We report an agressive primary squamous cell carcinoma of the stomach with liver and lung metastases in a 55-year-old man. The patient presented with a 1-month history of abdominal pain, vomiting and weight loss. Abdominal ultrasound revealed multiple liver metastases. Endoscopic examination showed two tumour masses on the fundus of the stomach. Biopsy of the lesions revealed squamous cell carcinoma of the stomach. Chest x-ray showed multiple large pulmonary nodules highly suggestive of pulmonary metastases. The patient died ten days after he was admitted because of progression of the tumour and before any therapeutic decision.

  18. Interpersonal complaints regarding cancer care through a gender lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Erik Masao

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate healthcare customer complaints concerning interpersonal matters in cancer care. Design/methodology/approach - Complaints from cancer patients and their relatives (n=116) that dealt with interpersonal matters registered between 2009 and 2011 at four local Patients' Advisory Committees in Western Sweden were sampled and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Findings - Complaints concerned lack of information and consideration from healthcare providers. Lack of empathy and civility also caused dissatisfaction, the latter particularly for women. Relatives complained that they did not feel included in the care process or were not offered proper support. Most complaints by relatives were filed by a female relative and concerned a male patient. Research limitations/implications - Information about patient demographics other than gender could not be investigated due to database limitations. Hence, factors such as age, country of birth, and geographical residence were not included for analysis. In addition, neither the type nor stage of cancer among the sampled patients was able to be addressed. Practical implications - Patient complaints should not only be viewed as a post-consumption judgment, but also as a service interaction activity. This may require healthcare providers to enhance their interpersonal skills, allowing patients and relatives to provide feedback during service interaction to satisfactorily address dissatisfaction. Visualizing gender disparities may help healthcare providers prevent stereotypical encounters. In addition, the provider should be invited to participate in the customer's value creating network, which may also include knowledge and skills from other sources, such as relatives. Originality/value - Value co-creation offers a different view on patient complaints. Incorporating social construction into value co-creation may reveal socially constructed disparities. The paper provides

  19. Cancer Supportive and Survivorship Care in Singapore: Current Challenges and Future Outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiley Wei-Jen Loh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite being a relatively young nation, Singapore has established itself as a leading multifaceted medical hub, both regionally and globally. Although Singapore continues to pursue excellence in oncology care, cancer supportive care and survivorship care remain in the infancy stage. In an effort to advance this important aspect of oncology care in Singapore, the first cancer supportive and survivorship care forum was held in December 2016, involving 74 oncology practitioners. The primary goals of this forum were to raise awareness of the importance of cancer supportive and survivorship care and to provide a platform for oncology practitioners of diverse backgrounds to converge and address the challenges associated with the delivery of cancer supportive and survivorship care in Singapore. Key challenges identified during this forum included, but were not limited to, care fragmentation in an oncologist-centric model of care, poor integration of allied health and rehabilitation services, passive engagement of community partners, lack of specialized skill sets and knowledge in supportive and survivorship care, and patient-related barriers such as poor health literacy. The survivorship care model commonly used in Singapore places an imbalanced emphasis on surveillance for cancer recurrence and second primary cancers, with little attention given to the supportive and survivorship needs of the survivors. In summary, these challenges set the stage for the development and use of a more survivor-centric model, one that focuses not only on cancer surveillance, but also on the broad and unique physical and psychosocial needs of survivors of cancer in Singapore.

  20. Diagnosing cancer in primary care: results from the National Cancer Diagnosis Audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Ruth; McPhail, Sean; Witt, Jana; Shand, Brian; Abel, Gary A; Hiom, Sara; Rashbass, Jem; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Rubin, Greg

    2018-01-01

    Background Continual improvements in diagnostic processes are needed to minimise the proportion of patients with cancer who experience diagnostic delays. Clinical audit is a means of achieving this. Aim To characterise key aspects of the diagnostic process for cancer and to generate baseline measures for future re-audit. Design and setting Clinical audit of cancer diagnosis in general practices in England. Method Information on patient and tumour characteristics held in the English National Cancer Registry was supplemented by information from GPs in participating practices. Data items included diagnostic timepoints, patient characteristics, and clinical management. Results Data were collected on 17 042 patients with a new diagnosis of cancer during 2014 from 439 practices. Participating practices were similar to non-participating ones, particularly regarding population age, urban/rural location, and practice-based patient experience measures. The median diagnostic interval for all patients was 40 days (interquartile range [IQR] 15–86 days). Most patients were referred promptly (median primary care interval 5 days [IQR 0–27 days]). Where GPs deemed diagnostic delays to have occurred (22% of cases), patient, clinician, or system factors were responsible in 26%, 28%, and 34% of instances, respectively. Safety netting was recorded for 44% of patients. At least one primary care-led investigation was carried out for 45% of patients. Most patients (76%) had at least one existing comorbid condition; 21% had three or more. Conclusion The findings identify avenues for quality improvement activity and provide a baseline for future audit of the impact of 2015 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance on management and referral of suspected cancer. PMID:29255111

  1. Diagnosing cancer in primary care: results from the National Cancer Diagnosis Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Ruth; McPhail, Sean; Witt, Jana; Shand, Brian; Abel, Gary A; Hiom, Sara; Rashbass, Jem; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Rubin, Greg

    2018-01-01

    Continual improvements in diagnostic processes are needed to minimise the proportion of patients with cancer who experience diagnostic delays. Clinical audit is a means of achieving this. To characterise key aspects of the diagnostic process for cancer and to generate baseline measures for future re-audit. Clinical audit of cancer diagnosis in general practices in England. Information on patient and tumour characteristics held in the English National Cancer Registry was supplemented by information from GPs in participating practices. Data items included diagnostic timepoints, patient characteristics, and clinical management. Data were collected on 17 042 patients with a new diagnosis of cancer during 2014 from 439 practices. Participating practices were similar to non-participating ones, particularly regarding population age, urban/rural location, and practice-based patient experience measures. The median diagnostic interval for all patients was 40 days (interquartile range [IQR] 15-86 days). Most patients were referred promptly (median primary care interval 5 days [IQR 0-27 days]). Where GPs deemed diagnostic delays to have occurred (22% of cases), patient, clinician, or system factors were responsible in 26%, 28%, and 34% of instances, respectively. Safety netting was recorded for 44% of patients. At least one primary care-led investigation was carried out for 45% of patients. Most patients (76%) had at least one existing comorbid condition; 21% had three or more. The findings identify avenues for quality improvement activity and provide a baseline for future audit of the impact of 2015 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance on management and referral of suspected cancer. © British Journal of General Practice 2018.

  2. Adherence of Primary Care Physicians to Evidence-Based Recommendations to Reduce Ovarian Cancer Mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Sherri L.; Townsend, Julie S.; Puckett, Mary C.; Rim, Sun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic cancer. Receipt of treatment from a gynecologic oncologist is an evidence-based recommendation to reduce mortality from the disease. We examined knowledge and application of this evidence-based recommendation in primary care physicians as part of CDC gynecologic cancer awareness campaign efforts and discussed results in the context of CDC National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP). We analyzed primary care physician responses to questions...

  3. Supportive care for head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenda, Sadamoto

    2015-01-01

    Recently (chemo-)radiotherapy has been widely used in head and neck cancer with definite evidence. As long survivor has increased, social problems associated with late toxicity have become more. Late toxicities induced by radiotherapy for head and neck lesion are often severe. Xerostomia is one of the severe late toxicities conventionally and dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy is a new topic. Some industrial development (ex. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy: IMRT) play a great role in toxicity management. Multidisciplinary approach (cooperation between not only physicians but also nurses and dentists) is necessary to control toxicities. The research of supportive care will be needed same as definitive treatment in the future. (author)

  4. Need for global partnership in cancer care: perceptions of cancer care researchers attending the 2010 australia and Asia pacific clinical oncology research development workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, H Kim; Abernethy, Amy P; Stockler, Martin R; Koczwara, Bogda; Aziz, Zeba; Nair, Reena; Seymour, Lesley

    2011-09-01

    To understand the diversity of issues and the breadth of growing clinical care, professional education, and clinical research needs of developing countries, not typically represented in Western or European surveys of cancer care and research. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of the attendees at the 2010 Australia and Asia Pacific Clinical Oncology Research Development workshop (Queensland, Australia) about the most important health care questions facing the participant's home countries, especially concerning cancer. Early-career oncologists and advanced oncology trainees from a region of the world containing significant low- and middle-income countries reported that cancer is an emerging health priority as a result of aging of the population, the impact of diet and lifestyle, and environmental pollution. There was concern about the capacity of health care workers and treatment facilities to provide cancer care and access to the latest cancer therapies and technologies. Although improving health care delivery was seen as a critical local agenda priority, focusing on improved cancer research activities in this select population was seen as the best way that others outside the country could improve outcomes for all. The burden of cancer will increase dramatically over the next 20 years, particularly in countries with developing and middle-income economies. Cancer research globally faces significant barriers, many of which are magnified in the developing country setting. Overcoming these barriers will require partnerships sensitive and responsive to both local and global needs.

  5. Young female cancer survivors' use of fertility care after completing cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jayeon; Mersereau, Jennifer E.; Su, H. Irene; Whitcomb, Brian W.; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Gorman, Jessica R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate factors associated with female young adult cancer survivors’ (YCS) use of fertility care (FC), including consultation or fertility treatment, after completing their cancer treatment. Methods In this cross-sectional study, females between that ages of 18 and 35 years who had been diagnosed with childhood, adolescent, or young adult cancers completed a 20-min web-based survey that included demographics, reproductive history, use of FC, fertility-related informational needs, and reproductive concerns. Results A total of 204 participants completed the survey. Participants’ mean age was 28.3±4.5 years. Thirty (15%) participants reported using FC after cancer treatment. The majority of participants recalled not receiving enough information about FP options at the time of cancer diagnosis (73%). In multivariable analysis, those with higher concerns about having children because of perceived risk to their personal health (P=0.003) were less likely to report use of FC after cancer treatment. Those who had used FC before cancer treatment (P=0.003) and who felt less fertile than age-matched women (P=0.02) were more likely to use FC after their cancer treatment. Conclusions While most YCS in this cohort believed that they did not receive enough information about fertility and most wanted to have children, the vast majority did not seek FC. The findings of this study offer further evidence of the need for improved education and emotional support regarding reproductive options after cancer treatment is completed. Targeted discussions with YCS about appropriate post-treatment FC options may improve providers’ capacity to help YCS meet their parenthood goals. PMID:26939923

  6. Induction of carcinomas in rat glandular stomach by direct X-irradiation of the stomach wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratenko, A.G.; Bykorez, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    To induce carcinoma in rat stomach the direct irradiation of the organ wall with X-rays in a dose of 16.22 Gy has been used. In the period from the 8-th to the 15-th month after irradiation in mucous membrane of stomach foci of atrophy, sections of regenerating hyperplasia of glands and methaplasia of stomach gland cells in the epithelium of the intestine type have been observed. Highly differentiated adenocarcinomas growing through all the walls of stomach are found in 18.5% rats [ru

  7. Quality of life among immigrant Latina breast cancer survivors: realities of culture and enhancing cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Class, Maria; Perret-Gentil, Monique; Kreling, Barbara; Caicedo, Larisa; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Graves, Kristi D

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Latinas. This study examined social, cultural, and health care system factors that impact the quality of life and survivorship experiences of Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors. We interviewed Latina breast cancer survivors (n = 19) and, based on the interview findings, conducted two focus groups (n = 9). Research staff translated transcripts from Spanish into English. Two trained raters reviewed the content and identified themes. Thematic content analysis was used to categorize and organize data. Participants were largely monolingual in Spanish, predominantly from Central and South America and most (68%) had lived in the U.S. for ten or more years. All women were diagnosed and treated in the U.S. and were an average of 3.1 years from diagnosis. Women's survivorship experiences appeared to be shaped by cultural beliefs and experiences as immigrants such as secrecy/shame about a breast cancer diagnosis, feelings of isolation, importance of family support (familism), challenges with developing social relationships in the U.S. (less personalismo), and, for some, their partner's difficulty with showing emotional support (machismo). Navigating the U.S. medical system and language barriers were additional challenges in the participants' health care interactions. Latina breast cancer survivors adhere to certain cultural values and face unique issues as immigrants, potentially influencing overall quality of life and doctor-patient communication. Efforts to improve Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors' quality of life could include increased assessment of psychosocial functioning and referral to social support services, culturally sensitive navigation programs, and consistent use of appropriately trained interpreters.

  8. Cancer incidence in eastern Morocco: cancer patterns and incidence trends, 2005-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elidrissi Errahhali, Manal; Elidrissi Errahhali, Mounia; Ouarzane, Meryem; Boulouiz, Redouane; Bellaoui, Mohammed

    2017-08-29

    Cancer is one of the major health problems worldwide. In this article, we present for the first time the cancer incidence trends, the distribution and the socioeconomic profile of incident cancer cases in Eastern Morocco over a period of eight years. Retrospective descriptive study of patients diagnosed with cancer at the Hassan II Regional Oncology Center (ROC) since it was created in October 2005 until December 2012. During the study period, the ROC was the only hospital specialized in cancer care in Eastern Morocco. A total of 7872 incident cases of cancer were registered in Eastern Morocco. Among these incident cases 5220 cases were women and 2652 were men, with a female to male ratio of 1.97. The mean age at diagnosis was 58 years for males and 52 for females and 94% of the patients aged over 30 years. For both sexes combined and for all cancer sites, breast cancer was the commonest followed by cervix uteri, colon-rectum, lung, nasopharynx, and stomach cancers. The most common cancer in women was breast cancer, followed respectively by cervix uteri cancer, colon-rectum cancer, ovary cancer, and stomach cancer. In men, the lung cancer ranked first, followed respectively by colon-rectum cancer, nasopharynx cancer, prostate cancer, and stomach cancer. For most cancers, crude incidence rates (CR) have increased significantly. The CR for all cancers combined has increased from 56.6 to 80.3 per 100,000 females and from 32.3 to 42.6 per 100,000 males during the study period. Patients profile analysis showed that 79% of cancer patients were from urban areas, 83% were unemployed and 85% had no health insurance. The distribution of cancers in Eastern Morocco is different from those observed in other regions of Morocco. Unlike most countries, women were much more affected with cancer than men in Eastern Morocco. More importantly, the rates of many cancers are rising. Therefore, our data justify the need to develop effective programs for cancer control and prevention in

  9. Cancer preventive services, socioeconomic status, and the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Gregory S; Kou, Tzuyung Doug; Dor, Avi; Koroukian, Siran M; Schluchter, Mark D

    2017-05-01

    Out-of-pocket expenditures are thought to be an important barrier to the receipt of cancer preventive services, especially for those of a lower socioeconomic status (SES). The Affordable Care Act (ACA) eliminated out-of-pocket expenditures for recommended services, including mammography and colonoscopy. The objective of this study was to determine changes in the uptake of mammography and colonoscopy among fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries before and after ACA implementation. Using Medicare claims data, this study identified women who were 70 years old or older and had not undergone mammography in the previous 2 years and men and women who were 70 years old or older, were at increased risk for colorectal cancer, and had not undergone colonoscopy in the past 5 years. The receipt of procedures in the 2-year period before the ACA's implementation (2009-2010) and after its implementation (2011 to September 2012) was also identified. Multivariate generalized estimating equation models were used to determine the independent association and county-level quartile of median income and education with the receipt of testing. For mammography, a lower SES quartile was associated with less uptake, but the post-ACA disparities were smaller than those in the pre-ACA period. In addition, mammography rates increased from the pre-ACA period to the post-ACA period in all SES quartiles. For colonoscopy, in both the pre- and post-ACA periods, there was an association between uptake and educational level and, to some extent, income. However, there were no appreciable changes in colonoscopy and SES after implementation of the ACA. The removal of out-of-pocket expenditures may overcome a barrier to the receipt of recommended preventive services, but for colonoscopy, other procedural factors may remain as deterrents. Cancer 2017;123:1585-1589. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  10. Health Care Coach Support in Reducing Acute Care Use and Cost in Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-12

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Brain Glioblastoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Head and Neck Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progressive Disease; Recurrent Carcinoma; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bone Sarcoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IVA Bone Sarcoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Bone Sarcoma; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  11. Supportive care organisation in France: an in depth study by the French speaking association for supportive care in cancer (AFSOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotté, F; Hervé, C; Oudard, S; Bugat, M E; Bugat, R; Farsi, F; Namer, M; Tourani, J M; Tournigand, C; Yazbek, G; Richard, S; Krakowski, I

    2013-03-01

    Supportive care in cancer (SCC) was further enhanced in the Second National Cancer Act decreed in December 2009. The aim of our study was to assess current SCC efficacy. The French speaking association for supportive care in cancer (AFSOS) conducted an observational study to evaluate practices, organisations and information given to patients. A specific 32 point questionnaire was sent to 1621 French physicians (MDs) caring for cancer patients. Three different organisations were evaluated: the individual MDs, the transversal team and its particular structure specialised in global patient care specifically developed at comprehensive cancer centres - CCC. During their disease, 68% of patients received SCC, which was more available during the palliative period (90%) than at the diagnosis (44%). Our results found that 71% of cancer departments had a specific interdisciplinary cross-team to provide SCC, particularly in CCC (62%; p=0.01) while 37% had specific inpatient units. A specific organisation dedicated to home care was greater in CCC than in public or private centres (69%, 45%, 20% respectively; p=0.01). Adverse event information was performed more by an oncologist than other specialists (p=0.01). Our results suggest that the specific SCC organisation could be a useful management tool to improve supportive care for cancer patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Rationale in diagnosis and screening of atrophic gastritis with stomach-specific plasma biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agréus, Lars; Kuipers, Ernst J; Kupcinskas, Limas; Malfertheiner, Peter; Di Mario, Francesco; Leja, Marcis; Mahachai, Varocha; Yaron, Niv; Van Oijen, Martijn; Perez, Guillermo Perez; Rugge, Massimo; Ronkainen, Jukka; Salaspuro, Mikko; Sipponen, Pentti; Sugano, Kentaro; Sung, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Atrophic gastritis (AG) results most often from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. AG is the most important single risk condition for gastric cancer that often leads to an acid-free or hypochlorhydric stomach. In the present paper, we suggest a rationale for noninvasive screening of AG with stomach-specific biomarkers. Methods The paper summarizes a set of data on application of the biomarkers and describes how the test results could be interpreted in practice. Results In AG of the gastric corpus and fundus, the plasma levels of pepsinogen I and/or the pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratio are always low. The fasting level of gastrin-17 is high in AG limited to the corpus and fundus, but low or non-elevated if the AG occurs in both antrum and corpus. A low fasting level of G-17 is a sign of antral AG or indicates high intragastric acidity. Differentiation between antral AG and high intragastric acidity can be done by assaying the plasma G-17 before and after protein stimulation, or before and after administration of the proton pump inhibitors (PPI). Amidated G-17 will rise if the antral mucosa is normal in structure. H. pylori antibodies are a reliable indicator of helicobacter infection, even in patients with AG and hypochlorhydria. Conclusions Stomach-specific biomarkers provide information about the stomach health and about the function of stomach mucosa and are a noninvasive tool for diagnosis and screening of AG and acid-free stomach. PMID:22242613

  13. Healing environments in cancer treatment and care. Relations of space and practice in hematological cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp

    2013-01-01

    of the individual patient ’ s needs, values and experiences is key to developing the environment to support the patient quality of life. The present study holds implications for practice to inform design of future hospital environments for cancer treatment. The study points to the importance for being attentive...... these concepts, the study demonstrates how the hospital environment is a fl ow of relations between space and practice that changes and challenges a structural idea of design and healing. Patients ’ sense of healing changes with the experience of progression in treatment and the capacity of the hospital space...... to incite an experience of homeliness and care. Furthermore, cancer patients continuously challenge the use and limits of space by individual objects and practices of privacy and home. Discussion. Healing environments are complex relations between practices, space and care, where recognition...

  14. Cancer care coordinators in stage III colon cancer: a cost-utility analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Tony; Collinson, Lucie; Kvizhinadze, Giorgi; Nair, Nisha; Foster, Rachel; Dennett, Elizabeth; Sarfati, Diana

    2015-08-05

    There is momentum internationally to improve coordination of complex care pathways. Robust evaluations of such interventions are scarce. This paper evaluates the cost-utility of cancer care coordinators for stage III colon cancer patients, who generally require surgery followed by chemotherapy. We compared a hospital-based nurse cancer care coordinator (CCC) with 'business-as-usual' (no dedicated coordination service) in stage III colon cancer patients in New Zealand. A discrete event microsimulation model was constructed to estimate quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and costs from a health system perspective. We used New Zealand data on colon cancer incidence, survival, and mortality as baseline input parameters for the model. We specified intervention input parameters using available literature and expert estimates. For example, that a CCC would improve the coverage of chemotherapy by 33% (ranging from 9 to 65%), reduce the time to surgery by 20% (3 to 48%), reduce the time to chemotherapy by 20% (3 to 48%), and reduce patient anxiety (reduction in disability weight of 33%, ranging from 0 to 55%). Much of the direct cost of a nurse CCC was balanced by savings in business-as-usual care coordination. Much of the health gain was through increased coverage of chemotherapy with a CCC (especially older patients), and reduced time to chemotherapy. Compared to 'business-as-usual', the cost per QALY of the CCC programme was $NZ 18,900 (≈ $US 15,600; 95% UI: $NZ 13,400 to 24,600). By age, the CCC intervention was more cost-effective for colon cancer patients costs, meaning the cost-effectiveness was roughly comparable between ethnic groups. Such a nurse-led CCC intervention in New Zealand has acceptable cost-effectiveness for stage III colon cancer, meaning it probably merits funding. Each CCC programme will differ in its likely health gains and costs, making generalisation from this evaluation to other CCC interventions difficult. However, this evaluation suggests

  15. Spiritual pain among patients with advanced cancer in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mako, Caterina; Galek, Kathleen; Poppito, Shannon R

    2006-10-01

    The large body of empirical research suggesting that patients' spiritual and existential experiences influence the disease process has raised the need for health care professionals to understand the complexity of patients' spiritual pain and distress. The current study explores the multidimensional nature of spiritual pain, in patients with end-stage cancer, in relation to physical pain, symptom severity, and emotional distress. The study combines a quantitative evaluation of participants' intensity of spiritual pain, physical pain, depression, and intensity of illness, with a qualitative focus on the nature of patients' spiritual pain and the kinds of interventions patients believed would ameliorate their spiritual pain. Fifty-seven patients with advanced stage cancer in a palliative care hospital were interviewed by chaplains. Overall, 96% of the patients reported experiencing spiritual pain, but they expressed it in different ways: (1) as an intrapsychic conflict, (2) as interpersonal loss or conflict, or (3) in relation to the divine. Intensity of spiritual pain was correlated with depression (r = 0.43, p spiritual pain did not vary by age, gender, disease course or religious affiliation. Given both the universality of spiritual pain and the multifaceted nature of pain, we propose that when patients report the experience of pain, more consideration be given to the complexity of the phenomena and that spiritual pain be considered a contributing factor. The authors maintain that spiritual pain left unaddressed both impedes recovery and contributes to the overall suffering of the patient.

  16. Improving outcomes in lung cancer: the value of the multidisciplinary health care team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denton E

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Eve Denton,1 Matthew Conron2 1Allergy, Immunology and Respiratory Department, Alfred Hospital, 2Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Lung cancer is a major worldwide health burden, with high disease-related morbidity and mortality. Unlike other major cancers, there has been little improvement in lung cancer outcomes over the past few decades, and survival remains disturbingly low. Multidisciplinary care is the cornerstone of lung cancer treatment in the developed world, despite a relative lack of evidence that this model of care improves outcomes. In this article, the available literature concerning the impact of multidisciplinary care on key measures of lung cancer outcomes is reviewed. This includes the limited observational data supporting improved survival with multidisciplinary care. The impact of multidisciplinary care on other benchmark measures of quality lung cancer treatment is also examined, including staging accuracy, access to diagnostic investigations, improvements in clinical decision making, better utilization of radiotherapy and palliative care services, and improved quality of life for patients. Health service research suggests that multidisciplinary care improves care coordination, leading to a better patient experience, and reduces variation in care, a problem in lung cancer management that has been identified worldwide. Furthermore, evidence suggests that the multidisciplinary model of care overcomes barriers to treatment, promotes standardized treatment through adherence to guidelines, and allows audit of clinical services and for these reasons is more likely to provide quality care for lung cancer patients. While there is strengthening evidence suggesting that the multidisciplinary model of care contributes to improvements in lung cancer outcomes, more quality studies are needed. Keywords: lung cancer, multidisciplinary care, mortality, tumor board

  17. Integrating complementary and alternative medicine into cancer care: Canadian oncology nurses′ perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy L Truant; Lynda G Balneaves; Margaret I Fitch

    2015-01-01

    The integration of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and conventional cancer care in Canada is in its nascent stages. While most patients use CAM during their cancer experience, the majority does not receive adequate support from their oncology health care professionals (HCPs) to integrate CAM safely and effectively into their treatment and care. A variety of factors influence this lack of integration in Canada, such as health care professional(HCP) education and attitudes about CA...

  18. Cancer Care Ontario and integrated cancer programs: portrait of a performance management system and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Siu Mee; Thompson, Leslee J

    2006-01-01

    A performance management system has been implemented by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO). This system allows for the monitoring and management of 11 integrated cancer programs (ICPs) across the Province of Ontario. The system comprises of four elements: reporting frequency, reporting requirements, review meetings and accountability and continuous improvement activities. CCO and the ICPs have recently completed quarterly performance review exercises for the last two quarters of the fiscal year 2004-2005. The purpose of this paper is to address some of the key lessons learned. The paper provides an outline of the CCO performance management system. These lessons included: data must be valid and reliable; performance management requires commitments from both parties in the performance review exercises; streamlining performance reporting is beneficial; technology infrastructure which allows for cohesive management of data is vital for a sustainable performance management system; performance indicators need to stand up to scrutiny by both parties; and providing comparative data across the province is valuable. Critical success factors which would help to ensure a successful performance management system include: corporate engagement from various parts of an organization in the review exercises; desire to focus on performance improvement and avoidance of blaming; and strong data management systems. The performance management system is a practical and sustainable system that allows for performance improvement of cancer care services. It can be a vital tool to enhance accountability within the health care system. The paper demonstrates that the performance management system supports accountability in the cancer care system for Ontario, and reflects the principles of the provincial governments commitment to continuous improvement of healthcare.

  19. Point-of-care rare cell cancer diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issadore, David

    2015-01-01

    The sparse cells that are shed from tumors into peripheral circulation are an increasingly promising resource for noninvasive monitoring of cancer progression, early diagnosis of disease, and serve as a tool for improving our understanding of cancer metastasis. However, the extremely sparse concentration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood (~1-100 CTC in 7.5 mL of blood) as well as their heterogeneous biomarker expression has limited their detection using conventional laboratory techniques. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a microfluidic chip-based micro-Hall detector (μHD), which can directly measure single, immunomagnetically tagged cells in whole blood. The μHD can detect individual cells even in the presence of vast numbers of blood cells and unbound reactants, and does not require any washing or purification steps. Furthermore, this cost-effective, single-cell analytical technique is well suited for miniaturization into a mobile platform for low-cost point-of-care use. In this chapter, we describe the methodology used to design, fabricate, and apply these chips to cancer diagnostics.

  20. Bayesian networks for clinical decision support in lung cancer care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Berkan Sesen

    Full Text Available Survival prediction and treatment selection in lung cancer care are characterised by high levels of uncertainty. Bayesian Networks (BNs, which naturally reason with uncertain domain knowledge, can be applied to aid lung cancer experts by providing personalised survival estimates and treatment selection recommendations. Based on the English Lung Cancer Database (LUCADA, we evaluate the feasibility of BNs for these two tasks, while comparing the performances of various causal discovery approaches to uncover the most feasible network structure from expert knowledge and data. We show first that the BN structure elicited from clinicians achieves a disappointing area under the ROC curve of 0.75 (± 0.03, whereas a structure learned by the CAMML hybrid causal discovery algorithm, which adheres with the temporal restrictions, achieves 0.81 (± 0.03. Second, our causal intervention results reveal that BN treatment recommendations, based on prescribing the treatment plan that maximises survival, can only predict the recorded treatment plan 29% of the time. However, this percentage rises to 76% when partial matches are included.