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Sample records for stoichiometry face kinetics

  1. Influence of thallium and salicylic acid impurities as well as of the solution stoichiometry on the growth kinetics of prismatic ADP crystal faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, A. P.; Babenko, G. N.; Puzikov, V. M.; Roshal, A. D.; Iurchenko, A. N.

    2015-04-01

    The absorption and photoluminescence spectra of the solutions and crystals of ADP in the presence of dopant molecules (pH 3.5) and/or anion (pH 5.2) of salicylic acid and Tl+ cation are studied. Dissociation of salicylic acid at the first stage is accompanied with the formation of salicylate complexes with thallium phototautomer. It is shown that the dopants are incorporated into the crystal, irrespectively of one another, in accordance with their distribution coefficients. The influence of the process of the impurity co-doping on the growth kinetics of the prismatic (100) ADP faces depends on the stoichiometry of the solution. The neutral H2Sal dopant monomers (pH 3.5) increase σd and diminish the growth rate. The HSal- dopant monoanions (pH 5.2) reduce the amount of σd and raise the growth rate. Tl+ ions in the solution increase σd and decrease the growth rate irrespectively of the pH. The influence of the HSal-/Tl+ co-dopant (pH 5.2) on σd is almost 1.5 times lower than the one of the H2Sal/Tl+ co-dopant (pH 3.5); both co-dopants reduce the growth rate. The crystal growth is realized via moving macrosteps.

  2. Calcite growth kinetics: Modeling the effect of solution stoichiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, M.; Nehrke, G.; Gustafsson, J.P.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently the influence of solution stoichiometry on calcite crystal growth kinetics has attracted little attention, despite the fact that in most aqueous environments calcite precipitates from non-stoichiometric solution. In order to account for the dependence of the calcite crystal growth

  3. Stoichiometry and kinetics of single and mixed substrate uptake in Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameiras, Francisca; Ras, Cor; Ten Pierick, Angela; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2018-02-01

    In its natural environment, the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger grows on decaying fruits and plant material, thereby enzymatically degrading the lignocellulosic constituents (lignin, cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin) into a mixture of mono- and oligosaccharides. To investigate the kinetics and stoichiometry of growth of this fungus on lignocellulosic sugars, we carried out batch cultivations on six representative monosaccharides (glucose, xylose, mannose, rhamnose, arabinose, and galacturonic acid) and a mixture of these. Growth on these substrates was characterized in terms of biomass yields, oxygen/biomass ratios, and specific conversion rates. Interestingly, in combination, some of the carbon sources were consumed simultaneously and some sequentially. With a previously developed protocol, a sequential chemostat cultivation experiment was performed on a feed mixture of the six substrates. We found that the uptake of glucose, xylose, and mannose could be described with a Michaelis-Menten-type kinetics; however, these carbon sources seem to be competing for the same transport systems, while the uptake of arabinose, galacturonic acid, and rhamnose appeared to be repressed by the presence of other substrates.

  4. A Study of the Patterns, Stoichiometry, and Kinetics of Microbial BTX Degradation Under Denitrifying Conditions by an Activated Sludge Consortium Receiving a Mixed Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Fettig, James Drew

    1998-01-01

    The patterns, stoichiometry, and kinetics of microbial benzene, toluene, p-xylene, m-xylene, and o-xylene degradation by a denitrifying activated sludge consortium was investigated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) receiving a mixed waste. After six months of acclimation, toluene and m-xylene were routinely degraded to below detection. Both toluene and m-xylene could serve as sole carbon and energy sources. The removal of o-xylene was also possible; however, its transformation was dependent...

  5. Nitrate denitrification with nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products: Stoichiometry, kinetics and dynamics of stable isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilin, V A; Rytov, S V

    2015-09-01

    A kinetic analysis of nitrate denitrification by a single or two species of denitrifying bacteria with glucose or ethanol as a carbon source and nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products was performed using experimental data published earlier (Menyailo and Hungate, 2006; Vidal-Gavilan et al., 2013). Modified Monod kinetics was used in the dynamic biological model. The special equations were added to the common dynamic biological model to describe how isotopic fractionation between N species changes. In contrast to the generally assumed first-order kinetics, in this paper, the traditional Rayleigh equation describing stable nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionation in nitrate was derived from the dynamic isotopic equations for any type of kinetics. In accordance with the model, in Vidal-Gavilan's experiments, the maximum specific rate of nitrate reduction was proved to be less for ethanol compared to glucose. Conversely, the maximum specific rate of nitrite reduction was proved to be much less for glucose compared to ethanol. Thus, the intermediate nitrite concentration was negligible for the ethanol experiment, while it was significant for the glucose experiment. In Menyailo's and Hungate's experiments, the low value of maximum specific rate of nitrous oxide reduction gives high intermediate value of nitrous oxide concentration. The model showed that the dynamics of nitrogen and oxygen isotope signatures are responding to the biological dynamics. Two microbial species instead of single denitrifying bacteria are proved to be more adequate to describe the total process of nitrate denitrification to dinitrogen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Decolorization of malachite green, decolorization kinetics and stoichiometry of ozone-malachite green and removal of antibacterial activity with ozonation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusvuran, Erdal; Gulnaz, Osman; Samil, Ali; Yildirim, Ozlem

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to identify degradation intermediates and to investigate the stoichiometry of decolorization and degradation, decolorization kinetics, and removal of antibacterial activity of malachite green (MG) using ozonization processes. The decolorization of MG was optimal at an acidic pH value of 3 based on molecular ozone attack on MG molecules. The stoichiometric ratio of decolorization between ozone and MG was calculated to be 7.0 with a regression coefficient of 0.995, whereas the ratio for degradation was calculated as 13.1 with a regression coefficient of 0.998. With MG concentrations in the range of 0.30-1.82 mM, the concentration of decolorized MG increased with higher initial concentrations of MG, whereas the ozonolytic decolorization rates of MG, decreased with increasing initial concentration. The pseudo-first-order degradation rate constants (k') decreased with the initial concentration and ranged from 0.769 to 0.223 min -1 . Twelve different intermediates were produced during the ozonation of MG with ozonation times between 5 min and 30 min and were identified by GC-MS. Although 86% of MG in the reaction mixture was removed by ozonation after 10 min, the decrease of antibacterial activity was very low (10%) for Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus epidermidis because the degradation intermediates, phenol and benzoic acid, also have antibacterial activity. The antibacterial activity of both MG and its intermediates were removed successfully with ozonation times above 26 min.

  7. Astrobiological stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Patrick A; Desch, Steven J; Anbar, Ariel D; Barnes, Rory; Hinkel, Natalie R; Kopparapu, Ravikumar; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Monga, Nikhil; Pagano, Michael D; Riner, Miriam A; Scannapieco, Evan; Shim, Sang-Heon; Truitt, Amanda

    2014-07-01

    Chemical composition affects virtually all aspects of astrobiology, from stellar astrophysics to molecular biology. We present a synopsis of the research results presented at the "Stellar Stoichiometry" Workshop Without Walls hosted at Arizona State University April 11-12, 2013, under the auspices of the NASA Astrobiology Institute. The results focus on the measurement of chemical abundances and the effects of composition on processes from stellar to planetary scales. Of particular interest were the scientific connections between processes in these normally disparate fields. Measuring the abundances of elements in stars and giant and terrestrial planets poses substantial difficulties in technique and interpretation. One of the motivations for this conference was the fact that determinations of the abundance of a given element in a single star by different groups can differ by more than their quoted errors. The problems affecting the reliability of abundance estimations and their inherent limitations are discussed. When these problems are taken into consideration, self-consistent surveys of stellar abundances show that there is still substantial variation (factors of ∼ 2) in the ratios of common elements (e.g., C, O, Na, Al, Mg, Si, Ca) important in rock-forming minerals, atmospheres, and biology. We consider how abundance variations arise through injection of supernova nucleosynthesis products into star-forming material and through photoevaporation of protoplanetary disks. The effects of composition on stellar evolution are substantial, and coupled with planetary atmosphere models can result in predicted habitable zone extents that vary by many tens of percent. Variations in the bulk composition of planets can affect rates of radiogenic heating and substantially change the mineralogy of planetary interiors, affecting properties such as convection and energy transport.

  8. Kinetics, stoichiometry, and anion selectivity of cAMP-stimulated Cl-HCO3 exchange in rabbit cortical collecting tubule (CCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, V.L.

    1986-01-01

    Cyclic AMP stimulates net HCO 3 secretion in rabbit CCT (Schuster, JCI 75:2056). Because cAMP induces Cl-independent (electrogenic) HCO 3 secretion in several epithelia, I studied the anion dependence of the CCT cAMP effect. Tubules were perfused in vitro with lumen amiloride; bath cAMP was continuously present to stimulate HCO 3 secretion. First, the dependence of HCO 3 secretion on lumen [Cl] was determined. With bath [Cl]=O mM, perfusate [Cl] was varied (2-150 mM, gluconate substitution). Mean lumen [Cl] was determined either by a silver electrode in the collected fluid (2-12 mM perfusate) or by 36 Cl (12-150 mM). Total bath-to-lumen HCO 3 flux, J/sup Ib//sub HCO3/, was measured (bath HCO 3 =25 mM, perfusate HCO 3 =O), Passive J/sub HCO3/ was estimated from the GHK equation using a previously-determined HCO 3 permeability = 1.9 x 10 -6 cm/s. Mediated J/sub HCO3/ vs. mean lumen [Cl] showed saturation kinetics, apparent K/sub m/ = 5.8 mM and V/sub max/ = 8.7 pmol/mm/min. Second, the stoichiometry was estimated. When bath HCO 3 was replaced by HEPES at various perfusate [Cl] (12-150 mM), ΔJ/sub HCO3/ varied linearly with ΔJ/sup Ib/sub Cl/ (slope = .85 +- .27). Third, in anion selectivity studies Br supported HCO 3 secretion (89% rate with Cl) but I - and SO 4 /sup =/ did not. In rabbit CCT, as opposed to several other HCO 3 -secreting epithelia, cAMP stimulates 1:1 Cl-HCO 3 exchange

  9. Faces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kristine Køhler; Brotherton, Chloe

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we investigate how a face is not a singular, invariable object, but may take on a variety of forms, and how new media has especially created new venues for the moldings of faces. We suggest that faces should be viewed in plural in order to emphasize the many different facial disp...

  10. High performance of nanoscaled Fe2O3 catalyzing UV-Fenton under neutral condition with a low stoichiometry of H2O2: Kinetic study and mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yong; Sun, Yunkai; Li, Weiguang

    2015-01-01

    utilization efficiency of larger than 1.0. Experiments of degradation under neutral condition with and without pH process control and analysis of several carboxylic acids were performed to find out the reason for treatment effectiveness under neutral condition. Kinetics study using the pseudo...... temperatures, Ea (activation energy), ΔH (enthalpy change) and ΔS (entropy change) were calculated to be 45.1(±6.3) kJ/mol, 42.6(±6.3) kJ/mol and -148.0(±20.8) J/K/mol, respectively. Radical identification experiments based on inhibition of methylene blue degradation under respective scavenger for HO (hydroxyl...

  11. Faces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kristine Køhler; Brotherton, Chloe

    2018-01-01

    for the face the be put into action. Based on an ethnographic study of Danish teenagers’ use of SnapChat we demonstrate how the face is used as a central medium for interaction with peers. Through the analysis of visual SnapChat messages we investigate how SnapChat requires the sender to put an ‘ugly’ face...... displays a single person make use of, and how this ‘pool of faces’ carries sociocultural meaning. While the past decades of swift technological development may seem to have diminished the role of face to face contact, the many new media has – on the contrary – established multiple new and innovative arenas...... forward. Especially the teenage girls engage in manipulating their faces into hideous expressions. However, this type of interaction is not random facial displays, but follow an ‘aesthetics of ugliness’. This aesthetics involve specific ways of looking ugly and is primarily performed by girls who have...

  12. Experiences Teaching Stoichiometry to Students in Grades 10 and 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Cynthia Denise

    Many students have problems learning stoichiometry, a complex mathematical chemistry concept used to determine how much product will be produced or formed from a given quantity of reactants. The problem addressed in this study was teachers' lack of understanding of how to teach stoichiometry in a Midwestern urban school district. The conceptual framework of the study was based upon constructivist theory. A qualitative narrative approach was used to obtain the perceptions of 5 high school chemistry instructors related to their experiences, successful or unsuccessful, in teaching stoichiometry to students in Grades 10 and 11. Data were gathered through face-to-face interviews, which were analyzed via an inductive approach to reveal 6 themes: a difficult subject to teach, presentation of stoichiometry, relevancy, students' reactions, barriers, and gender differences. Findings suggested the need for teachers to be knowledgeable, creative, and resourceful in their subject areas to help their students to learn stoichiometry. Findings also revealed the need for teachers to adapt their instructional strategies and modes of delivery to reflect their students' individual learning styles. Understanding how the participating teachers explained stoichiometry to their students might help other chemistry teachers to examine and adapt their own instructional styles and delivery methods of the concept. This understanding might, in term, help to improve student achievement in stoichiometry in particular and chemistry in general.

  13. Ecological Stoichiometry of Ocean Plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Allison R.; Martiny, Adam C.

    2018-01-01

    Marine plankton elemental stoichiometric ratios can deviate from the Redfield ratio (106C:16N:1P); here, we examine physiological and biogeochemical mechanisms that lead to the observed variation across lineages, regions, and seasons. Many models of ecological stoichiometry blend together acclimative and adaptive responses to environmental conditions. These two pathways can have unique molecular mechanisms and stoichiometric outcomes, and we attempt to disentangle the two processes. We find that interactions between environmental conditions and cellular growth are key to understanding stoichiometric regulation, but the growth rates of most marine plankton populations are poorly constrained. We propose that specific physiological mechanisms have a strong impact on plankton and community stoichiometry in nutrient-rich environments, whereas biogeochemical interactions are important for the stoichiometry of the oligotrophic gyres. Finally, we outline key areas with missing information that is needed to advance understanding of the present and future ecological stoichiometry of ocean plankton.

  14. Growth kinetics of the (001) face of TGS below the ferroelectric transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, D. A.; Kroes, R. L.; Anderson, E. E.

    1987-01-01

    The growth rates of the (001) face of triglycine sulfate (TGS) from aqueous solutions were measured at 33.55 C in an apparatus which produced a laminar flow of solution past the crystal. The data of growth rate as a function of relative supersaturation were compared with the results of two well-known models: the Burton-Cabrera-Frank (1951) surface diffusion model and the birth-and-spreading growth model. Both models produced good fits to the growth rate data. However, on the basis of the qualitative aspects of the experimentally-observed growth, it is suggested that the correct growth model for these crystals is the Burton-Cabrera-Frank model.

  15. Ordinary stoichiometry of extraordinary microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, M; Poret-Peterson, A T; Anbar, A D; Elser, J J

    2016-01-01

    All life on Earth seems to be made of the same chemical elements in relatively conserved proportions (stoichiometry). Whether this stoichiometry is conserved in settings that differ radically in physicochemical conditions (extreme environments) from those commonly encountered elsewhere on the planet provides insight into possible stoichiometries for putative life beyond Earth. Here, we report measurements of elemental stoichiometry for extremophile microbes from hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Phototrophic and chemotrophic microbes were collected in locations spanning large ranges of temperature (24 °C to boiling), pH (1.6-9.6), redox (0.1-7.2 mg L(-1) dissolved oxygen), and nutrient concentrations (0.01-0.25 mg L(-1) NO2-, 0.7-12.9 mg L(-1) NO3-, 0.01-42 mg L(-1) NH4 (+), 0.003-1.1 mg L(-1) P mostly as phosphate). Despite these extreme conditions, the microbial cells sampled had a major and trace element stoichiometry within the ranges commonly encountered for microbes living in the more moderate environments of lakes and surface oceans. The cells did have somewhat high C:P and N:P ratios that are consistent with phosphorus (P) limitation. Furthermore, chemotrophs and phototrophs had similar compositions with the exception of Mo content, which was enriched in cells derived from chemotrophic sites. Thus, despite the extraordinary physicochemical and biological diversity of YNP environments, life in these settings, in a stoichiometric sense, remains much the same as we know it elsewhere. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Biotite and chlorite weathering at 25 degrees C: the dependence of pH and (bi)carbonate on weathering kinetics, dissolution stoichiometry, and solubility; and the relation to redox conditions in granitic aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmstroem, M.; Banwart, S.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the kinetics and thermodynamics of biotite and chlorite weathering in the pH range 2 2 -10 2 year); and 2. the development of characteristic Fe(III) concentrations (10 -5 M in 10 - 1 years). The Fe(III)-bearing clay minerals formed during these experiments are similar to the fracture-filling-material observed at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Such clays can provide reducing capacity to a repository. They can help maintain anoxic conditions by consuming oxygen that enters the repository during the construction and operation phases thereby helping maintain the redox stability of the repository regarding canister corrosion. The half-life of oxygen trapped in the repository at the time of closure depends on the rate of oxygen uptake by Fe(II) minerals, sulfide minerals and organic carbon. Fe(II)-clay minerals are important to the redox stability of a repository, as well as providing a sorption barrier to radionuclide migration. 107 refs, 52 figs, 35 tabs

  17. A novel P700 redox kinetics probe for rapid, non-intrusive and whole-tissue determination of photosystem II functionality, and the stoichiometry of the two photosystems in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Husen; Dwyer, Simon A; Fan, Da-Yong; Han, Yaqin; Badger, Murray R; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Chow, Wah Soon

    2014-11-01

    We sought a rapid, non-intrusive, whole-tissue measure of the functional photosystem II (PS II) content in leaves. Summation of electrons, delivered by a single-turnover flash to P700(+) (oxidized PS I primary donor) in continuous background far-red light, gave a parameter S in absorbance units after taking into account an experimentally determined basal electron flux that affects P700 redox kinetics. S was linearly correlated with the functional PS II content measured by the O(2) yield per single-turnover repetitive flash in Arabidopsis thaliana expressing an antisense construct to the PsbO (manganese-stabilizing protein in PS II) proteins of PS II (PsbO mutants). The ratio of S to z(max) (total PS I content in absorbance units) was comparable to the PS II/PS I reaction-center ratio in wild-type A. thaliana and in control Spinacea oleracea. Both S and S/z(max) decreased in photoinhibited spinach leaf discs. The whole-tissue functional PS II content and the PS II/photosystem I (PS I) ratio can be non-intrusively monitored by S and S/z(max), respectively, using a quick P700 absorbance protocol compatible with modern P700 instruments. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  18. Acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinert, Brian Tate; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Moustafa, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification; however, little is known about the origin and regulation of most sites. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that acetylation...

  19. Plant fertilization interacts with life history: variation in stoichiometry and performance in nettle-feeding butterflies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Audusseau

    Full Text Available Variation in food stoichiometry affects individual performance and population dynamics, but it is also likely that species with different life histories should differ in their sensitivity to food stoichiometry. To address this question, we investigated the ability of the three nettle-feeding butterflies (Aglais urticae, Polygonia c-album, and Aglais io to respond adaptively to induced variation in plant stoichiometry in terms of larval performance. We hypothesized that variation in larval performance between plant fertilization treatments should be functionally linked to species differences in host plant specificity. We found species-specific differences in larval performance between plant fertilization treatments that could not be explained by nutrient limitation. We showed a clear evidence of a positive correlation between food stoichiometry and development time to pupal stage and pupal mass in A. urticae. The other two species showed a more complex response. Our results partly supported our prediction that host plant specificity affects larval sensitivity to food stoichiometry. However, we suggest that most of the differences observed may instead be explained by differences in voltinism (number of generations per year. We believe that the potential of some species to respond adaptively to variation in plant nutrient content needs further attention in the face of increased eutrophication due to nutrient leakage from human activities.

  20. Research Update: Stoichiometry controlled oxide thin film growth by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenen, Rik; Smit, Jasper; Orsel, Kasper; Vailionis, Arturas; Bastiaens, Bert; Huijben, Mark; Boller, Klaus; Rijnders, Guus; Koster, Gertjan, E-mail: g.koster@utwente.nl [Faculty of Science and Technology and MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2015-07-01

    The oxidation of species in the plasma plume during pulsed laser deposition controls both the stoichiometry as well as the growth kinetics of the deposited SrTiO{sub 3} thin films, instead of the commonly assumed mass distribution in the plasma plume and the kinetic energy of the arriving species. It was observed by X-ray diffraction that SrTiO{sub 3} stoichiometry depends on the composition of the background gas during deposition, where in a relative small pressure range between 10{sup −2} mbars and 10{sup −1} mbars oxygen partial pressure, the resulting film becomes fully stoichiometric. Furthermore, upon increasing the oxygen (partial) pressure, the growth mode changes from 3D island growth to a 2D layer-by-layer growth mode as observed by reflection high energy electron diffraction.

  1. Unifying elemental stoichiometry and metabolic theory in predicting species abundances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ott, David; Digel, Christoph; Rall, Björn Christian; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan; Brose, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    While metabolic theory predicts variance in population density within communities depending on population average body masses, the ecological stoichiometry concept relates density variation across communities to varying resource stoichiometry. Using a data set including biomass densities of 4959

  2. On the Role of Chemical Kinetics Modeling in the LES of Premixed Bluff Body and Backward-Facing Step Combustors

    KAUST Repository

    Chakroun, Nadim W.

    2017-01-05

    Recirculating flows in the wake of a bluff body, behind a sudden expansion or down-stream of a swirler, are pivotal for anchoring a flame and expanding the stability range. The size and structure of these recirculation zones and the accurate prediction of the length of these zones is a very important characteristic that computational simulations should have. Large eddy simulation (LES) techniques with an appropriate combustion model and reaction mechanism afford a balance between computational complexity and predictive accuracy. In this study, propane/air mixtures were simulated in a bluff-body stabilized combustor based on the Volvo test case and also in a backward-facing step combustor. The main goal is to investigate the role of the chemical mechanism and the accuracy of estimating the extinction strain rate on the prediction of important ow features such as recirculation zones. Two 2-step mechanisms were employed, one which gave reasonable extinction strain rates and another modi ed 2-step mechanism where it grossly over-predicted the values. This modified mechanism under-predicted recirculation zone lengths compared to the original mechanism and had worse agreement with experiments in both geometries. While the recirculation zone lengths predicted by both reduced mechanisms in the step combustor scale linearly with the extinction strain rate, the scaling curves do not match experimental results as none of the simpli ed mechanisms produce extinction strain rates that are consistent with those predicted by the comprehensive mechanisms. We conclude that it is very important that a chemical mechanism is able to correctly predict extinction strain rates if it is to be used in CFD simulations.

  3. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Slavov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs, some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function.

  4. untangling chemical kinetics through tangible and visual

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    Chemistry students assimilate material related to kinetics and equilibrium [8-20]. Yet, a gap exits in the application of tools that relate stoichiometry, the consumption of reactant, generation of product, and their representation using graphs, to aid in the comprehension of chemical kinetics. Figure 2: Typical generated.

  5. Biogeochemical Stoichiometry of the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, M. W.; Singh, A.; Baer, S. E.; Riebesell, U.; Martiny, A.

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have highlighted that macronutrient (carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P)) stoichiometry in the ocean is not static but rather has been hypothesized to vary with changes in phytoplankton community composition, which co-varies with changes in nutrient concentrations and supply. In the open ocean at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site, a 10-year time-series (2004 to present) shows a range in particle stoichiometric ratios nearly as large as that seen globally. On average, particle C:P and N:P ratios in the upper euphotic zone were twice the Redfield Ratio, 210:1 and 36:1 respectively. While no multi-year trend was apparent, substantial (4-fold) short term, shorter than seasonal, variability was observed perhaps associated with mesoscale physical features. The dissolved organic matter pools exhibited stoichiometric ratios much greater than in the corresponding ratios in particulate pools. This was particularly evident for the DOC:DOP ratio which was nearly an order of magnitude greater than the particulate C:P ratio, due to low DOP concentrations resulting from rapid biological uptake. The time-series of shallow (150m) particulate matter export shows a significant increase in P export fluxes that has decreased the N:P ratio of exported particulate matter from 80:1 to 40:1. During this period of increased P export, total phytoplankton carbon represents, on average, a greater fraction of total suspended carbon, driven primarily by relative increases in small eukaryotic phytoplankton. These changes are also co-occurring with increases in abundance of a wide range of zooplankton grazers. This analysis shows that macronutrient stoichiometry in the Sargasso Sea is not only static in time, but also is not the same ratio for different macronutrient pools. Furthermore, temporal changes in the stoichiometry of these different pools suggest changes in the ecosystem that may impact the strength of the biological carbon pump.

  6. Symbols and definitions of quantities and units in isotope stoichiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junghans, P.; Krumbiegel, P.; Faust, H.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of the International System of Units and recent recommendations of the IUPAC on 'Symbols and Terminology for Physicochemical Quantities and Units' a system is proposed of uniform and unambiguous symbols and definitions of quantities and units used in the isotope dilution technique. The close relationship between isotope stoichiometry and common stoichiometry is demonstrated. (author)

  7. Chemistry and stoichiometry of wood liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, H.G.; Kloden, D.J.; Schaleger, L.L.

    1981-06-01

    The approximate stoichiometry of liquefaction, from data of two PDU runs and a laboratory run is Wood (100 g) + CO (0.1 - 0.4 Mol) ..-->.. CO/sub 2/ (0.5 - 1.0 Mol) + H/sub 2/O (0.4 - 0.8 Mol) + Product (55 - 64 g). Product includes wood oil, water soluble organics and residues. Water is formed by decomposition, carbon dioxide by decomposition and reduction of wood oxygen by CO. Aqueous products include many carboxylic acids plus a roughly equal percentage of non-acids. The wood oil is divided into a neutral fraction and three phenolic fractions of varying molecular weight. Some specific compounds found in water and oil phases are listed.

  8. Stoichiometry of maltodextrin-binding sites in LamB, an outer membrane protein from Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Gehring, K; Cheng, C H; Nikaido, H; Jap, B K

    1991-01-01

    We have directly measured the stoichiometry of maltodextrin-binding sites in LamB. Scatchard plots and computer fitting of flow dialysis (rate-of-dialysis) experiments clearly establish three independent binding sites per LamB trimer, with a dissociation constant of approximately 60 microM for maltoheptaose. The current model for LamB's function as a specific pore is discussed with respect to the symmetry in LamB's kinetic properties and the implications of our results.

  9. Chemical stability and surface stoichiometry of vanadium oxide phases studied by reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Byoungseon; Ko, Changhyun; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2012-02-01

    Compositional stability of various vanadium oxides and oxide growth on vanadium surfaces have been studied using reactive molecular dynamics simulation methods. Vanadium dioxide (VO2), sesquioxide (V2O3), pentoxide (V2O5), and hexavanadium tridecaoxide (V6O13) are studied in bulk crystalline and thin film structures, investigating charge distribution and pair distribution functions of particle interactions. The stability is estimated to be pentoxide, hexavanadium tridecaoxide, sesquioxide, and dioxide respectively in decreasing order in thin film structures. We then analyze oxide growth kinetics on vanadium (100) and (110) surfaces. The oxidation rate, stoichiometry, charge distribution, and the effect of surface orientation on kinetic phenomena are noted. In the early stages of surface oxidation of our simulation configurations, sesquioxide is found to be the dominant component. The modeling and simulation results are compared with experiments where available.

  10. Face to Face

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 10. Turning a New Leaf H. Y. Mohan Ram talks to Sujata Varadarajan. H Y Mohan Ram Sujata Varadarajan. Face to Face Volume 14 Issue 10 October 2009 pp 1003-1017 ...

  11. Face to Face

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 3. Symmetry and Mathematics: Pioneering Insights into the Structure of Physics. Urjit A Yajnik. Face to Face Volume 20 Issue 3 March 2015 pp 264-276. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  12. Face to Face

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungfalk, Michael; Rossen, Svend

    2008-01-01

    Blended learning in education is the combination of face‐to‐face seminars and on‐line work based on the internet. We have investigated which factors that we found were important in designing and conducting face‐to‐face seminars in order to facilitate learning processes in the periods of on...

  13. Face to Face

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 1. Do We Learn to See? Torsten Wiesel Prasanna Venkhatesh Venkataramani. Face to Face Volume 16 Issue 1 January 2011 pp 88-99. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Face to Face

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 5. Science is Not a Zero-Sum Game. Devendra Mani. Face to Face Volume 19 Issue 5 May 2014 pp 471-477. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/019/05/0471-0477. Author Affiliations.

  15. Stoichiometry-Induced Roughness on Antimonide Growth Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bracker, A. S; Nosho, B. Z; Barvosa-Carter, W; Whitman, L. J; Bennett, B. R; Shanabrook, B. V; Culbertson, J. C

    2001-01-01

    Phase shifts in the intensity oscillation of reflection high-energy electron diffraction spots provide evidence for monolayer island formation on AlSb that is caused by sudden changes in surface stoichiometry...

  16. Carbon and nitrogen stoichiometry across stream ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wymore, A.; Kaushal, S.; McDowell, W. H.; Kortelainen, P.; Bernhardt, E. S.; Johnes, P.; Dodds, W. K.; Johnson, S.; Brookshire, J.; Spencer, R.; Rodriguez-Cardona, B.; Helton, A. M.; Barnes, R.; Argerich, A.; Haq, S.; Sullivan, P. L.; López-Lloreda, C.; Coble, A. A.; Daley, M.

    2017-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities are altering carbon and nitrogen concentrations in surface waters globally. The stoichiometry of carbon and nitrogen regulates important watershed biogeochemical cycles; however, controls on carbon and nitrogen ratios in aquatic environments are poorly understood. Here we use a multi-biome and global dataset (tropics to Arctic) of stream water chemistry to assess relationships between dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrate, ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), providing a new conceptual framework to consider interactions between DOC and the multiple forms of dissolved nitrogen. We found that across streams the total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) pool is comprised of very little ammonium and as DOC concentrations increase the TDN pool shifts from nitrate to DON dominated. This suggests that in high DOC systems, DON serves as the primary source of nitrogen. At the global scale, DOC and DON are positively correlated (r2 = 0.67) and the average C: N ratio of dissolved organic matter (molar ratio of DOC: DON) across our data set is approximately 31. At the biome and smaller regional scale the relationship between DOC and DON is highly variable (r2 = 0.07 - 0.56) with the strongest relationships found in streams draining the mixed temperate forests of the northeastern United States. DOC: DON relationships also display spatial and temporal variability including latitudinal and seasonal trends, and interactions with land-use. DOC: DON ratios correlated positively with gradients of energy versus nutrient limitation pointing to the ecological role (energy source versus nutrient source) that DON plays with stream ecosystems. Contrary to previous findings we found consistently weak relationships between DON and nitrate which may reflect DON's duality as an energy or nutrient source. Collectively these analyses demonstrate how gradients of DOC drive compositional changes in the TDN pool and reveal a high degree of variability in the C: N ratio

  17. Thermodynamic, kinetic and mechanistic investigations of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The kinetics of oxidation of piperazine by the copper complex, diperiodatocuprate(III) in alkaline medium was studied at 298 K, at an ionic strength of 2.0 x 10−2 mol dm−3. The reaction between piperazine and diperiodatocuprate(III) in aqueous alkaline medium exhibited 1:2 stoichiometry. The oxidation products.

  18. Consequences of Modification of Photosystem Stoichiometry and Amount in Cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermaas, Willem [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2016-12-13

    The proposed research seeks to address two interconnected, important questions that impact photosynthetic processes and that reflect key differences between the photosynthetic systems of cyanobacteria and plants or algae. The first question is what are the reasons and consequences of the high photosystem I / photosystem II (PS I/PS II) ratio in many cyanobacteria, vs. a ratio that is close to unity in many plants and algae. The corresponding hypothesis is that most of PS I functions in cyclic electron transport, and that reduction in PS I will result primarily in a shortage of ATP rather than reducing power. This hypothesis will be tested by reducing the amount of PS I by changing the promoter region of the psaAB operon in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and generating a range of mutants with different PS I content and thereby different PS I/PS II ratios, with some of the mutants having a PS II/PS I ratio closer to that in plants. The resulting mutants will be probed in terms of their growth rates, electron transfer rates, and P700 redox kinetics. A second question relates to a Mehler-type reaction catalyzed by two flavoproteins, Flv1 and Flv3, that accept electrons from PS I and that potentially function as an electron safety valve leading to no useful purpose of the photosynthesis-generated electrons. The hypothesis to be tested is that Flv1 and Flv3 use the electrons for useful purposes such as cyclic electron flow around PS I. This hypothesis will be tested by analysis of a mutant strain lacking flv3, the gene for one of the flavoproteins. This research is important for a more detailed understanding of the consequences of photosystem stoichiometry and amounts in a living system. Such an understanding is critical for not only insights in the regulatory systems of the organism but also to guide the development of biological or bio-hybrid systems for solar energy conversion into fuels.

  19. Evidence of different stoichiometries for the limiting carbonate complexes of lanthanides(3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippini, V.

    2007-12-01

    Two stoichiometries have been proposed by different laboratories to interpret measurements on the limiting carbonate complexes of An 3+ and Ln 3+ cations. The study of the solubility of double carbonates (AlkLn(CO 3 ) 2 ,xH 2 O) in concentrated carbonate solutions at room temperature and high ionic strengths has shown that on the one hand the lightest lanthanides (La and Nd) form Ln(CO 3 ) 4 5- whereas the heaviest (Eu and Dy) form Ln(CO 3 ) 3 3- in the studied chemical conditions, and on the other hand, that the kinetics of precipitation of double carbonates depends on the alkali metal and the lanthanide ions. The existence of two stoichiometries for the limiting carbonate complexes was confirmed by capillary electrophoresis hyphenated to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (CE-ICP-MS), used to extend the study to the whole series of lanthanides (except Ce, Pm and Yb). Two behaviours have been put forward comparing the electrophoretic mobilities: La to Tb form Ln(CO 3 ) 4 5- while Dy to Lu form Ln(CO 3 ) 3 3- . Measurements by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) on Eu(III) indicate small variations of the geometry of Eu(CO 3 ) 3 3- complex, specially with Cs + . Although analogies are currently used among the 4f-block trivalent elements, different aqueous speciations are evidenced in concentrated carbonate solutions across the lanthanide series. (author)

  20. Evolutionary optimization of metabolic pathways. Theoretical reconstruction of the stoichiometry of ATP and NADH producing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenhöh, O; Heinrich, R

    2001-01-01

    The structural design of ATP and NADH producing systems, such as glycolysis and the citric acid cycle (TCA), is analysed using optimization principles. It is assumed that these pathways combined with oxidative phosphorylation have reached, during their evolution, a high efficiency with respect to ATP production rates. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic principles, conclusions are derived concerning the optimal stoichiometry of such pathways. Extending previous investigations, both the concentrations of adenine nucleotides as well as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides are considered variable quantities. This implies the consideration of the interaction of an ATP and NADH producing system, an ATP consuming system, a system coupling NADH consumption with ATP production and a system consuming NADH decoupled from ATP production. It is examined in what respect real metabolic pathways can be considered optimal by studying a large number of alternative pathways. The kinetics of the individual reactions are described by linear or bilinear functions of reactant concentrations. In this manner, the steady-state ATP production rate can be calculated for any possible ATP and NADH producing pathway. It is shown that most of the possible pathways result in a very low ATP production rate and that the very efficient pathways share common structural properties. Optimization with respect to the ATP production rate is performed by an evolutionary algorithm. The following results of our analysis are in close correspondence to the real design of glycolysis and the TCA cycle. (1) In all efficient pathways the ATP consuming reactions are located near the beginning. (2) In all efficient pathways NADH producing reactions as well as ATP producing reactions are located near the end. (3) The number of NADH molecules produced by the consumption of one energy-rich molecule (glucose) amounts to four in all efficient pathways. A distance measure and a measure for the internal ordering of

  1. Growth control of oxygen stoichiometry in homoepitaxial SrTiO3 films by pulsed laser epitaxy in high vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Nyung; Ambrose Seo, Sung S; Choi, Woo Seok; Rouleau, Christopher M

    2016-01-29

    In many transition metal oxides, oxygen stoichiometry is one of the most critical parameters that plays a key role in determining the structural, physical, optical, and electrochemical properties of the material. However, controlling the growth to obtain high quality single crystal films having the right oxygen stoichiometry, especially in a high vacuum environment, has been viewed as a challenge. In this work, we show that, through proper control of the plume kinetic energy, stoichiometric crystalline films can be synthesized without generating oxygen defects even in high vacuum. We use a model homoepitaxial system of SrTiO3 (STO) thin films on single crystal STO substrates. Physical property measurements indicate that oxygen vacancy generation in high vacuum is strongly influenced by the energetics of the laser plume, and it can be controlled by proper laser beam delivery. Therefore, our finding not only provides essential insight into oxygen stoichiometry control in high vacuum for understanding the fundamental properties of STO-based thin films and heterostructures, but expands the utility of pulsed laser epitaxy of other materials as well.

  2. Stoichiometry control in oxide thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenen, R.

    2017-01-01

    A general challenge in the synthesis of complex oxide nanostructures and thin films is the control of the stoichiometry and herewith control of thin film properties. Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is widely known for its potential for growing near stoichiometric highly crystalline complex metal oxide

  3. Controlling the stoichiometry and doping of semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, David; Burst, James; Metzger, Wyatt; Duenow, Joel; Farrell, Stuart; Colegrove, Eric

    2016-08-16

    Methods for treating a semiconductor material are provided. According to an aspect of the invention, the method includes annealing the semiconductor material in the presence of a compound that includes a first element and a second element. The first element provides an overpressure to achieve a desired stoichiometry of the semiconductor material, and the second element provides a dopant to the semiconductor material.

  4. stoichiometry of pyrogallol/ammonium-nitrogen complex using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BARTH EKWUEME

    2010-04-22

    Apr 22, 2010 ... calculations and so that analytical procedures can be properly defined. Since the complex is coloured (pale- yellow), its stoichiometry can be established using visible spectrometry to measure the absorbance of solutions of known composition. One method widely applicable is Job's method of continuous ...

  5. Stoichiometry of pyrogallol/ammonium-nitrogen complex using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This complex, which we now refer to as P/NH4 +-N complex, can be the basis for the spectrophotometric determination of NH4 +-N in aqueous solution. Aqueous NH4 +-N is a very important pollution index. Therefore it is imperative that the stoichiometry of this complex be thoroughly understood. In this work, Job's method of ...

  6. Oxalate Synthesis and Pyrolysis: A Colorful Introduction to Stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannatta, Michael W.; Richards-Babb, Michelle; Sweeney, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Metal oxalate synthesis and pyrolysis provides an opportunity for students to (i) learn stoichiometry, (ii) experience the consequences of proper stoichiometric calculations and experimental techniques, and (iii) be introduced to the relevance of chemistry by highlighting oxalates in context, for example, usages and health effects. At our…

  7. Facing Challenges for Monte Carlo Analysis of Full PWR Cores : Towards Optimal Detail Level for Coupled Neutronics and Proper Diffusion Data for Nodal Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttin, A.; Capellan, N.; David, S.; Doligez, X.; El Mhari, C.; Méplan, O.

    2014-06-01

    Safety analysis of innovative reactor designs requires three dimensional modeling to ensure a sufficiently realistic description, starting from steady state. Actual Monte Carlo (MC) neutron transport codes are suitable candidates to simulate large complex geometries, with eventual innovative fuel. But if local values such as power densities over small regions are needed, reliable results get more difficult to obtain within an acceptable computation time. In this scope, NEA has proposed a performance test of full PWR core calculations based on Monte Carlo neutron transport, which we have used to define an optimal detail level for convergence of steady state coupled neutronics. Coupling between MCNP for neutronics and the subchannel code COBRA for thermal-hydraulics has been performed using the C++ tool MURE, developed for about ten years at LPSC and IPNO. In parallel with this study and within the same MURE framework, a simplified code of nodal kinetics based on two-group and few-point diffusion equations has been developed and validated on a typical CANDU LOCA. Methods for the computation of necessary diffusion data have been defined and applied to NU (Nat. U) and Th fuel CANDU after assembly evolutions by MURE. Simplicity of CANDU LOCA model has made possible a comparison of these two fuel behaviours during such a transient.

  8. Quantitative localization microscopy: effects of photophysics and labeling stoichiometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P J Nieuwenhuizen

    Full Text Available Quantification in localization microscopy with reversibly switchable fluorophores is severely hampered by the unknown number of switching cycles a fluorophore undergoes and the unknown stoichiometry of fluorophores on a marker such as an antibody. We overcome this problem by measuring the average number of localizations per fluorophore, or generally per fluorescently labeled site from the build-up of spatial image correlation during acquisition. To this end we employ a model for the interplay between the statistics of activation, bleaching, and labeling stoichiometry. We validated our method using single fluorophore labeled DNA oligomers and multiple-labeled neutravidin tetramers where we find a counting error of less than 17% without any calibration of transition rates. Furthermore, we demonstrated our quantification method on nanobody- and antibody-labeled biological specimens.

  9. It is elemental: soil nutrient stoichiometry drives bacterial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Reich, Peter B; Khachane, Amit N; Campbell, Colin D; Thomas, Nadine; Freitag, Thomas E; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Sørensen, Søren; Bardgett, Richard D; Singh, Brajesh K

    2017-03-01

    It is well established that resource quantity and elemental stoichiometry play major roles in shaping below and aboveground plant biodiversity, but their importance for shaping microbial diversity in soil remains unclear. Here, we used statistical modeling on a regional database covering 179 locations and six ecosystem types across Scotland to evaluate the roles of total carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availabilities and ratios, together with land use, climate and biotic and abiotic factors, in determining regional scale patterns of soil bacterial diversity. We found that bacterial diversity and composition were primarily driven by variation in soil resource stoichiometry (total C:N:P ratios), itself linked to different land uses, and secondarily driven by other important biodiversity drivers such as climate, soil spatial heterogeneity, soil pH, root influence (plant-soil microbe interactions) and microbial biomass (soil microbe-microbe interactions). In aggregate, these findings provide evidence that nutrient stoichiometry is a strong predictor of bacterial diversity and composition at a regional scale. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Flipped Classroom as an Alternative Strategy for Teaching Stoichiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norrie E. Gayeta

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of flipped classroom and traditional classroom instruction in measuring conceptual change and to determine if flipped classroom instruction would be an alternative method of teaching to traditional lecture method. This study covered the level of conceptual understanding of students on stoichiometry and the type of conceptual change before and after exposure to flipped and traditional classroom environment. Qualitative and quantitative research methods were used in the study. Respondents were two sections of third year Bachelor of Secondary Education, Biological Science. Frequency, percentage, ranking, mean, standard deviation, Hake factor test, and t-test were the statistical tools applied to answer specific questions. Results showed profound increase towards conceptual change representing a shift from intuitive understanding to correct incomplete understanding level. Thus, change for the better, in theoretical type was determined from pretest to posttest of students exposed to flipped and traditional classroom. Results also indicated that there is no significant difference on students’ conceptual change on stoichiometry exposed to flipped and traditional classroom environment thus, flipped classroom instruction can be used as an alternative teaching method to traditional lecture method in teaching stoichiometry

  11. Proton translocation stoichiometry of cytochrome oxidase: use of a fast-responding oxygen electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynafarje, B; Alexandre, A; Davies, P; Lehninger, A L

    1982-01-01

    The mechanistic stoichiometry of vectorial H+ ejection coupled to electron transport from added ferrocytochrome c to oxygen by the cytochrome oxidase (EC 1.9.3.1) of rat liver mitoplasts was determined from measurements of the initial rates of electron flow and H+ ejection in the presence of K+ (with valinomycin). Three different methods of measuring electron flow were used: (a) dual-wavelength spectrophotometry of ferrocytochrome c oxidation, (b) uptake of scalar H+ for the reduction of O2 in the presence of a protonophore, and (c) a fast-responding membraneless oxygen electrode. The reliability of the rate measurements was first established against the known stoichiometry of the scalar reaction of cytochrome oxidase (2ferrocytochrome c + 2H+ + 1/2O2 leads to 2ferricytochrome c + H2O) in the presence of excess protonophore. With all three methods the directly observed vectorial H+/O ejection ratios in the presence of K+ + valinomycin significantly exceeded 3.0. However, because the rate of backflow of the ejected H+ into the mitoplasts is very high and increases with the increasing delta pH generated across the membrane, there is a very rapid decline in the observed H+/O ratio from the beginning of the reaction. Kinetic analysis of ferrocytochrome c oxidation by the mitoplasts, carried out with a fast-responding membraneless oxygen electrode, showed the reaction to be first order in O2 and allowed accurate extrapolation of the rates of O2 uptake and H+ ejection to zero time. At this point, at which there is zero delta pH across the membrane, the H+/O ejection ratio of the cytochrome oxidase reaction, obtained from the rates at zero time, is close to 4.0. PMID:6296824

  12. Cu(II) mediates kinetically distinct, non-amyloidogenic aggregation of amyloid-β peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jeppe T.; Østergaard, Jesper; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    2011-01-01

    on (i) the aggregation kinetics/mechanism of Aβ, because three different kinetic scenarios were observed depending on the Cu(II):Aβ ratio, (ii) the metal:peptide stoichiometry in the aggregates, which increased to 1.4 at supra-equimolar Cu(II):Aβ ratio; and (iii) the morphology of the aggregates, which...

  13. Kinetics and Mechanism of Formation of S-Nitrosocysteine | Ly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kinetics and mechanism of the nitrosation of cysteine by nitrous acid has been studied in acidic medium. The stoichiometry of the reaction is strictly 1:1, with the formation of one mole of S-nitrosocysteine (CySNO) fromone mole of nitrous acid. Only two nitrosating agents were detected: nitrous acid itself and protonated ...

  14. Quantified Faces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette-Marie Zacher

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The article presents three contemporary art projects that, in various ways, thematise questions regarding numerical representation of the human face in relation to the identification of faces, for example through the use of biometric video analysis software, or DNA technology. The Dutch...... artist Marnix de Nijs' Physiognomic Scrutinizer is an interactive installation whereby the viewer's face is scanned and identified with historical figures. The American artist Zach Blas' project Fag Face Mask consists of three-dimensional portraits that blend biometric facial data from 30 gay men's faces...

  15. Transcriptional changes underlying elemental stoichiometry shifts in a marine heterotrophic bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leong-Keat eChan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine bacteria drive the biogeochemical processing of oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC, a 750-Tg C reservoir that is a critical component of the global C cycle. Catabolism of DOC is thought to be regulated by the biomass composition of heterotrophic bacteria, as cells maintain a C:N:P ratio of ~50:10:1 during DOC processing. Yet a complicating factor in stoichiometry-based analyses is that bacteria can change the C:N:P ratio of their biomass in response to resource composition. We investigated the physiological mechanisms of resource-driven shifts in biomass stoichiometry in continuous cultures of the marine heterotrophic bacterium Ruegeria pomeroyi (a member of the Roseobacter clade under four element limitation regimes (C, N, P, and S. Microarray analysis indicated that the bacterium scavenged for alternate sources of the scarce element when cells were C-, N-, or P-limited; reworked the ratios of biomolecules when C- and P- limited; and exerted tighter control over import/export and cytoplasmic pools when N-limited. Under S-limitation, a scenario not existing naturally for surface ocean microbes, stress responses dominated transcriptional changes. Resource-driven changes in C:N ratios of up to 2.5-fold and in C:P ratios of up to 6-fold were measured in R. pomeroyi biomass. These changes were best explained if the C and P content of the cells was flexible in the face of shifting resources but N content was not, achieved through the net balance of different transcriptional strategies. The cellular-level metabolic trade-offs that govern biomass stoichiometery in R. pomeroyi may have implications for global carbon cycling. Strong homeostatic responses to N limitation by heterotrophic marine bacteria would intensify competition with autotrophs. Modification of cellular inventories in C- and P-limited heterotrophs would vary the elemental ratio of particulate organic matter sequestered in the deep ocean.

  16. Plant–insect interactions: the role of ecological stoichiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Filipiak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The energy budget of organisms is a primary factor used to generate hypotheses in ecosystem ecology and evolutionary theory. Therefore, previous studies have focused on the energy costs and benefits of adaptations, the efficiency of energy acquisition and investment, and energy budget limitations. The maintenance of stoichiometric balance is equally important because inconsistency between the chemical composition of the consumer’s tissues and that of its food sources strongly affects the major life-history traits of the consumer and may influence the consumer’s fitness and shape plant–herbivore interactions. In this short review, the framework of ecological stoichiometry is introduced, focusing on plant–insect interactions in terrestrial ecosystems. The use of the trophic stoichiometric ratio (TSR index is presented as a useful tool for indicating the chemical elements that are scarce in food and have the potential to limit the growth and development of herbivores, thereby influencing plant – herbivorous insect interactions. As an example, the elemental composition and stoichiometry of a pollen consumer (mason bee Osmia bicornis and its preferred pollen are compared. The growth and development of O. bicornis may be colimited by the scarcity of K, Na, and N in pollen, whereas the development of the cocoon might be colimited by the scarcity of P, Mg, K, Na, Zn, Ca, and N. A literature review of the elemental composition of pollen shows high taxonomical variability in the concentrations of bee-limiting elements. The optimized collection of pollen species based on the elemental composition may represent a strategy used by bees to overcome stoichiometric mismatches, influencing their interactions with plants. It is concluded that the dependence of life-history traits on food stoichiometry should be considered when discussing life history evolution and plant–herbivore interactions. The TSR index may serve as a convenient and powerful tool

  17. About Face

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Type Search All Videos PTSD Basics PTSD Treatment What is AboutFace? Resources for Professionals Get Help Home ... All Videos Learn More PTSD Basics PTSD Treatment What is AboutFace? Resources for Professionals Get Help PTSD ...

  18. Biogas plasticization coupled anaerobic digestion: the anaerobic pump stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimel, Keith A

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the stoichiometry section of a bioenergetics investigation into the biogas plasticization of wastewater sludge using the Anaerobic Pump (TAP). Three residue samples, an input substrate and two residual products, were collected from two side by side operated AD systems, a conventional continuous flow and stirred reactor, and TAP, and submitted for elemental and calorimetric analyses. The elemental compositions of the residues were fitted to a heterotrophic metabolism model [1] for both systems. To facilitate balanced stoichiometric models, a simple "cell" correction computation separates measured residual composites into "real" residual composition and cell growth (C5H7NO2) components. The elemental data and model results show that the TAP stage II residual composition (C1H0.065O0.0027N0.036) was nearly devoid of hydrogen and oxygen, leaving only fixed carbon and cells grown as the composition of the remaining mass. This quantitative evidence supports prior measurements of very high methane yields from TAP stage II reactor during steady-state experiments [2]. All performance parameters derived from the stoichiometric model(s) showed good agreement with measured steady-state averaged values. These findings are strong evidence that plasticization-disruption (TAP) cycle is the mechanism responsible for the observed increases in methane yield. The accuracy achieved by the stoichiometry models qualifies them for thermodynamic analysis to obtain potentials and bioconversion efficiencies. How applied pressure causes matrix conformation changes triggered by a functional consequence (plasticization and disruption) is this study's essential focus.

  19. Ecological Stoichiometry beyond Redfield: An Ionomic Perspective on Elemental Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punidan D. Jeyasingh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Elemental homeostasis has been largely characterized using three important elements that were part of the Redfield ratio (i.e., carbon: nitrogen: phosphorus. These efforts have revealed substantial diversity in homeostasis among taxonomic groups and even within populations. Understanding the evolutionary basis, and ecological consequences of such diversity is a central challenge. Here, we propose that a more complete understanding of homeostasis necessitates the consideration of other elements beyond C, N, and P. Specifically, we posit that physiological complexity underlying maintenance of elemental homeostasis along a single elemental axis impacts processing of other elements, thus altering elemental homeostasis along other axes. Indeed, transcriptomic studies in a wide variety of organisms have found that individuals differentially express significant proportions of the genome in response to variability in supply stoichiometry in order to maintain varying levels of homeostasis. We review the literature from the emergent field of ionomics that has established the consequences of such physiological trade-offs on the content of the entire suite of elements in an individual. Further, we present experimental data on bacteria exhibiting divergent phosphorus homeostasis phenotypes demonstrating the fundamental interconnectedness among elemental quotas. These observations suggest that physiological adjustments can lead to unexpected patterns in biomass stoichiometry, such as correlated changes among suites of non-limiting microelements in response to limitation by macroelements. Including the entire suite of elements that comprise biomass will foster improved quantitative understanding of the links between chemical cycles and the physiology of organisms.

  20. Ecological Stoichiometry beyond Redfield: An Ionomic Perspective on Elemental Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyasingh, Punidan D; Goos, Jared M; Thompson, Seth K; Godwin, Casey M; Cotner, James B

    2017-01-01

    Elemental homeostasis has been largely characterized using three important elements that were part of the Redfield ratio (i.e., carbon: nitrogen: phosphorus). These efforts have revealed substantial diversity in homeostasis among taxonomic groups and even within populations. Understanding the evolutionary basis, and ecological consequences of such diversity is a central challenge. Here, we propose that a more complete understanding of homeostasis necessitates the consideration of other elements beyond C, N, and P. Specifically, we posit that physiological complexity underlying maintenance of elemental homeostasis along a single elemental axis impacts processing of other elements, thus altering elemental homeostasis along other axes. Indeed, transcriptomic studies in a wide variety of organisms have found that individuals differentially express significant proportions of the genome in response to variability in supply stoichiometry in order to maintain varying levels of homeostasis. We review the literature from the emergent field of ionomics that has established the consequences of such physiological trade-offs on the content of the entire suite of elements in an individual. Further, we present experimental data on bacteria exhibiting divergent phosphorus homeostasis phenotypes demonstrating the fundamental interconnectedness among elemental quotas. These observations suggest that physiological adjustments can lead to unexpected patterns in biomass stoichiometry, such as correlated changes among suites of non-limiting microelements in response to limitation by macroelements. Including the entire suite of elements that comprise biomass will foster improved quantitative understanding of the links between chemical cycles and the physiology of organisms.

  1. Across-phase biomass pyrolysis stoichiometry, energy balance, and product formation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predictive correlations between reactions occurring in the gas-, liquid- and solid-phases are necessary to economically utilize the thermochemical conversion of agricultural wastes impacting the food, water, and energy nexus. On the basis of an empirical mass balance (99.7%), this study established...

  2. Reading faces and Facing words

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robotham, Julia Emma; Lindegaard, Martin Weis; Delfi, Tzvetelina Shentova

    perception of faces and words is affected by unilateral posterior stroke. Two patients with lesions in their dominant hemisphere and two with lesions in their non-dominant hemisphere were tested on sensitive tests of face and word perception during the stable phase of recovery. Despite all patients having...... unilateral lesions, we found no patient with a selective deficit in either reading or face processing. Rather, the patients showing a deficit in processing either words or faces were also impaired with the other category. One patient performed within the normal range on all tasks. In addition, all patients...... performed within normal range on at least one test of visual categorisation, strongly suggesting that their abnormal performance with words and faces does not represent a generalised visuo-perceptual deficit. Our results suggest that posterior areas in both hemispheres may be critical for both reading...

  3. Stoichiometry of mitochondrial H+ translocation coupled to succinate oxidation at level flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, L E; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-04-25

    The mechanistic stoichiometry of vectorial H+ translocation coupled to succinate oxidation by rat liver mitochondria in the presence of a permeant cation has been determined under level flow conditions with a membraneless fast responding O2 electrode kinetically matched with a glass pH electrode. The reactions were initiated by rapid injection of O2 into the anaerobically preincubated test system under conditions in which interfering H+ backflow was minimized. The rates of O2 uptake and H+ ejection, obtained from computer-fitted regression lines, were monotonic and first order over 75% of the course of O2 consumption. Extrapolation of the observed rates to zero time, at which zero delta mu H+ and thus level flow prevails, yielded vectorial H+/O flow ratios above 7 and closely approaching 8. The mitochondria undergo no irreversible change and give identical H+/O ratios on repeated tests. In a further refinement, the lower and upper limits of the mechanistic H+/O ratio were determined to be 7.55 and 8.56, respectively, from plots of the rates of O2 uptake versus H+ ejection at increasing malonate and increasing valinomycin concentrations, respectively. It is therefore concluded that the mechanistic H+/O ratio for energy-conserving sites 2 + 3 is 8, in confirmation of earlier measurements. KCl concentration is critical for maximal observed H+/O ratios. Optimum conditions and possible errors in determination of mechanistic H+/O translocation ratios are discussed.

  4. About Face

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Topic Videos by Type Search All Videos Learn More PTSD Basics PTSD Treatment What is AboutFace? ... types of therapy that are proven to work. Learn more about Prolonged Exposure (PE) and Cognitive Processing ...

  5. About Face

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    Full Text Available Skip to Content Menu Closed (Tap to Open) Home Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search All ... What is AboutFace? Resources for Professionals Get Help Home Watch Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search ...

  6. Upper and lower limits of the proton stoichiometry of cytochrome c oxidation in rat liver mitoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynafarje, B; Costa, L E; Lehninger, A L

    1986-06-25

    The stoichiometry of vectorial H+ translocation coupled to oxidation of added ferrocytochrome c by O2 via cytochrome-c oxidase of rat liver mitoplasts was determined employing a fast-responding O2 electrode. Electron flow was initiated by addition of either ferrocytochrome c or O2. When the rates were extrapolated to level flow, the H+/O ratios in both cases were less than but closely approached 4; the directly observed H+/O ratios significantly exceeded 3.0. The mechanistic H+/O ratio was then more closely fixed by a kinetic approach that eliminates the necessity for measuring energy leaks and is independent of any particular model of the mechanism of energy transduction. From two sets of kinetic measurements, an overestimate and an underestimate and thus the upper and lower limits of the mechanistic H+/O ratio could be obtained. In the first set, the utilization of respiratory energy was systematically varied through changes in the concentrations of valinomycin or K+. From the slope of a plot of the initial rates of H+ ejection (JH) and O2 uptake (JO) obtained in such experiments, the upper limit of the H+/O ratio was in the range 4.12-4.19. In the second set of measurements, the rate of respiratory energy production was varied by inhibiting electron transport. From the slope of a plot of JH versus JO, the lower limit of the H+/O ratio, equivalent to that at level flow, was in the range 3.83-3.96. These data fix the mechanistic H+/O ratio for the cytochrome oxidase reaction of mitoplasts at 4.0, thus confirming our earlier measurements (Reynafarje, B., Alexandre, A., Davies, P., and Lehninger, A. L. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79, 7218-7222). Possible reasons for discrepancies in published reports on the H+/O ratio of cytochrome oxidase in various mitochondrial and reconstituted systems are discussed.

  7. Pelagic community production and carbon-nutrient stoichiometry under variable ocean acidification in an Arctic fjord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Silyakova

    2013-07-01

    clear that the pelagic ecosystem response to increasing CO2 is more complex than that represented in previous work, e.g. Bellerby et al. (2008. Carbon and nutrient uptake representation in models should, where possible, be more focused on individual plankton functional types as applying a single stoichiometry to a biogeochemical model with regard to the effect of increasing pCO2 may not always be optimal. The phase variability in NCP and stoichiometry may be better understood if CO2 sensitivities of the plankton's functional type biogeochemical uptake kinetics and trophic interactions are better constrained.

  8. Evolving Phytoplankton Stoichiometry Fueled Diversification of the Marine Biosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Quigg

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The availability of nutrients and the quantity and quality of food at the base of food webs have largely been ignored in discussions of the Phanerozoic record of biodiversity. We examine the role of nutrient availability and phytoplankton stoichiometry (the relative proportions of inorganic nutrients to carbon in the diversification of the marine biosphere. Nutrient availability and phytoplankton stoichiometry played a critical role in the initial diversification of the marine biosphere during the Neoproterozoic. Initial biosphere expansion during this time resulted in the massive sequestration of nutrients into biomass which, along with the geologically slow input of nutrients from land, set the stage for severe nutrient limitation and relatively constant marine biodiversity during the rest of the Paleozoic. Given the slow nutrient inputs from land and low recycling rates, the growth of early-to-middle Paleozoic metazoans remained limited by their having to expend energy to first “burn off” (respire excess carbon in food before the associated nutrients could be utilized for growth and reproduction; the relative equilibrium in marine biodiversity during the Paleozoic therefore appears to be real. Limited nutrient availability and the consequent nutrient imbalance may have delayed the appearance of more advanced carnivores until the Permo-Carboniferous, when widespread orogeny, falling sea level, the spread of forests, greater weathering rates, enhanced ocean circulation, oxygenation, and upwelling all combined to increase nutrient availability. During the Meso-Cenozoic, rising oxygen levels, the continued nutrient input from land, and, especially, increasing rates of bioturbation, enhanced nutrient availability, increasing the nutrient content of phytoplankton that fueled the diversification of the Modern Fauna.

  9. Environmental and organismal predictors of intraspecific variation in the stoichiometry of a neotropical freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sabaawi, Rana W; Kohler, Tyler J; Zandoná, Eugenia; Travis, Joseph; Marshall, Michael C; Thomas, Steven A; Reznick, David N; Walsh, Matthew; Gilliam, James F; Pringle, Catherine; Flecker, Alexander S

    2012-01-01

    The elemental composition of animals, or their organismal stoichiometry, is thought to constrain their contribution to nutrient recycling, their interactions with other animals, and their demographic rates. Factors that affect organismal stoichiometry are generally poorly understood, but likely reflect elemental investments in morphological features and life history traits, acting in concert with the environmental availability of elements. We assessed the relative contribution of organismal traits and environmental variability to the stoichiometry of an insectivorous Neotropical stream fish, Rivulus hartii. We characterized the influence of body size, life history phenotype, stage of maturity, and environmental variability on organismal stoichiometry in 6 streams that differ in a broad suite of environmental variables. The elemental composition of R. hartii was variable, and overlapped with the wide range of elemental composition documented across freshwater fish taxa. Average %P composition was ∼3.2%(±0.6), average %N∼10.7%(±0.9), and average %C∼41.7%(±3.1). Streams were the strongest predictor of organismal stoichiometry, and explained up to 18% of the overall variance. This effect appeared to be largely explained by variability in quality of basal resources such as epilithon N:P and benthic organic matter C:N, along with variability in invertebrate standing stocks, an important food source for R. hartii. Organismal traits were weak predictors of organismal stoichiometry in this species, explaining when combined up to 7% of the overall variance in stoichiometry. Body size was significantly and positively correlated with %P, and negatively with N:P, and C:P, and life history phenotype was significantly correlated with %C, %P, C:P and C:N. Our study suggests that spatial variability in elemental availability is more strongly correlated with organismal stoichiometry than organismal traits, and suggests that the stoichiometry of carnivores may not be

  10. Environmental and organismal predictors of intraspecific variation in the stoichiometry of a neotropical freshwater fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana W El-Sabaawi

    Full Text Available The elemental composition of animals, or their organismal stoichiometry, is thought to constrain their contribution to nutrient recycling, their interactions with other animals, and their demographic rates. Factors that affect organismal stoichiometry are generally poorly understood, but likely reflect elemental investments in morphological features and life history traits, acting in concert with the environmental availability of elements. We assessed the relative contribution of organismal traits and environmental variability to the stoichiometry of an insectivorous Neotropical stream fish, Rivulus hartii. We characterized the influence of body size, life history phenotype, stage of maturity, and environmental variability on organismal stoichiometry in 6 streams that differ in a broad suite of environmental variables. The elemental composition of R. hartii was variable, and overlapped with the wide range of elemental composition documented across freshwater fish taxa. Average %P composition was ∼3.2%(±0.6, average %N∼10.7%(±0.9, and average %C∼41.7%(±3.1. Streams were the strongest predictor of organismal stoichiometry, and explained up to 18% of the overall variance. This effect appeared to be largely explained by variability in quality of basal resources such as epilithon N:P and benthic organic matter C:N, along with variability in invertebrate standing stocks, an important food source for R. hartii. Organismal traits were weak predictors of organismal stoichiometry in this species, explaining when combined up to 7% of the overall variance in stoichiometry. Body size was significantly and positively correlated with %P, and negatively with N:P, and C:P, and life history phenotype was significantly correlated with %C, %P, C:P and C:N. Our study suggests that spatial variability in elemental availability is more strongly correlated with organismal stoichiometry than organismal traits, and suggests that the stoichiometry of carnivores

  11. About Face

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    Full Text Available ... What is AboutFace? Resources for Professionals Get Help PTSD We've been there. After a traumatic event — ... you're not feeling better, you may have PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder). Watch the intro This is ...

  12. About Face

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Content Menu Closed (Tap to Open) Home Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search All Videos PTSD Basics PTSD Treatment What is AboutFace? Resources for Professionals Get Help Home Watch Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search All Videos ...

  13. About Face

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at first. But if it's been months or years since the trauma and you're not feeling better, you may have PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder). Watch the intro This is AboutFace In these videos, Veterans, family members, ...

  14. About Face

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... traumatic event — like combat, an assault, or a disaster — it's normal to feel scared, keyed up, or sad at first. But if it's been months or years since the trauma and you're not feeling better, you may have PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder). Watch the intro This is AboutFace In ...

  15. Kinetic Typography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Djonov, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images....

  16. Kinetic Typography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Djonov, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images.......After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images....

  17. Planetary Stoichiometry, Mineral Ecology, and the Rise of Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, R. M.; Downs, R. T.; Golden, J.; Hystad, G.; Grew, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    The near-surface mineralogy of terrestrial planets and moons, and the corresponding evolution of habitable environments, is shaped by physical, chemical, and biological processes. Four factors contribute to a planet's mineral distribution and diversity: (1) planetary stoichiometry; (2) crystal chemical characteristics; (3) mineral stability ranges; and (4) the probability of occurrence for rare minerals. Measurements of stellar stoichiometry reveal that stars can differ significantly from the Sun in relative abundances of rock-forming elements, which implies that bulk compositions of some extrasolar Earth-like planets differ significantly from those of Earth, particularly if fractionation processes in evolving stellar nebulas and planetary differentiation are factored in. Comparison of Earth's upper continental crust and the Moon shows that differences in element ratios are reflected in ratios of mineral species containing these elements. More abundant elements generally have larger numbers of mineral species, though elements that mimic other more abundant elements are less likely to form their own species. Total mineral diversity for different elements is not appreciably influenced by the relative stabilities of individual phases, e.g., the broad pressure-temperature-composition stability range of zircon (ZrSiO4) does not significantly diminish the total number of observed Zr minerals. To the extent that origins and evolution of life depend on key mineral species, habitability is dependent on the emergence of a minimal mineral diversity. Evolving life has, in turn, exerted the largest single influence on mineral diversity. Notably, changes in near-surface redox conditions on Earth through the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis tripled the available "composition space" of Earth's near-surface environment, and resulted in a corresponding tripling of mineral diversity subsequent to atmospheric oxidation. Statistical analysis of mineral frequency distributions

  18. Fundamental study of ash formation and deposition: Effect of reducing stoichiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helble, J.J.; Bool, L.E.; Kang, S.G. [and others

    1995-11-01

    This project is designed to examine the effects of combustion stoichiometry on the fundamental aspects of ash formation and ash deposit initiation. Emphasis is being placed on reducing stoichiometries associated with low-NOx combustion, although a range of oxidant/fuel ratios are being considered. Previous work has demonstrated that ash formation depends strongly upon coal mineralogy, including mineral type, size, amount, and the presence of organically associated inorganic species. Combustion temperature and the oxidation state of iron also play a significant role. As these latter items will vary with changes in stoichiometry, research to determine the net effect on deposition is required.

  19. Multielement stoichiometry of submerged macrophytes across Yunnan plateau lakes (China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Wu, Haoping; Shi, Qiao; Hao, Beibei; Liu, Han; Wang, Zhixiu; Liu, Guihua

    2015-01-01

    Stoichiometric homeostasis of element composition is one of the central concepts of ecological stoichiometry. We analyzed concentrations of macroelements (C, N, P, Ca, K, Mg, S), microelements (Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Zn) and beneficial elements (Na, Se, Si) in submerged macrophytes, water and sediments across 20 Yunnan plateau lakes. We predicted that tissue element composition in submerged macrophytes is affected by lake trophic level and taxonomy, and submerged macrophytes have weak stoichiometric homeostasis for all above 16 elements. Canonical discriminant analyses successfully discriminated among trophic level groups and taxa groups. Of all the elements, C, N, P and S most effectively discriminated among trophic level groups across 20 lakes, revealing lake trophic level mostly affect tissue macroelement composition in submerged macrophytes; while Ca, K and Se most effectively discriminated among submerged macrophytes taxa groups, suggesting taxonomy mostly affect compositions of macroelements and beneficial elements in submerged macrophytes. In addition, the stoichiometric homeostatic coefficient of 1/HCa:C for all five taxa of submerged macrophytes were less than zero, suggesting submerged macrophytes in Yunnan plateau lakes have strong Ca stoichiometric homeostasis. Our findings, not only broaden the knowledge of multielement stoichiometric homeostasis, but also help to choose most appropriate lake management strategy. PMID:25970822

  20. Kinetic limitation in the formation of end-linked elastomer networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meissner, Bohumil; Matějka, Libor

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 24 (2005), s. 10618-10625 ISSN 0032-3861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/2252 Keywords : end-linked elastomer networks * effect of stoichiometry * kinetic limitations Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.849, year: 2005

  1. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of L-leucine by alkaline ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The kinetics of oxidation of L-leucine by diperiodatocuprate (III) (DPC) in aqueous alkaline medium at a constant ionic strength of 0.10mol dm-3 was studied spectrophotometrically. The reaction between L-leucine and DPC in alkaline medium exhibits 1:4 stoichiometry (L-leucine: DPC). The reaction is of first order in [DPC] ...

  2. Ferrate promoted oxidative cleavage of sulfonamides: Kinetics and product formation under acidic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulfonamide-based antibiotics are often detected in surface waters and secondary wastewater effluents and pose an eminent threat for the development of antibiotic resistance bacteria and genes in aquatic environment. This paper presents the kinetics and stoichiometry of the oxid...

  3. The effects of stoichiometry on the mechanical properties of icosahedral boron carbide under loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, DeCarlos E; McCauley, James W; Wright, T W

    2012-12-19

    The effects of stoichiometry on the atomic structure and the related mechanical properties of boron carbide (B(4)C) have been studied using density functional theory and quantum molecular dynamics simulations. Computational cells of boron carbide containing up to 960 atoms and spanning compositions ranging from 6.7% to 26.7% carbon were used to determine the effects of stoichiometry on the atomic structure, elastic properties, and stress-strain response as a function of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and shear loading paths. It was found that different stoichiometries, as well as variable atomic arrangements within a fixed stoichiometry, can have a significant impact on the yield stress of boron carbide when compressed uniaxially (by as much as 70% in some cases); the significantly reduced strength of boron carbide under shear loading is also demonstrated.

  4. Reprogramming factor stoichiometry influences the epigenetic state and biological properties of induced pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carey, B.W.; Markoulaki, S.; Hanna, J.H.; Faddah, D.A.; Buganim, Y.; Kim, J.; Ganz, K.; Steine, E.J.; Cassady, J.P.; Creyghton, M.P.; Welstead, G.G.; Gao, Q.; Jaenisch, R.

    2011-01-01

    We compared two genetically highly defined transgenic systems to identify parameters affecting reprogramming of somatic cells to a pluripotent state. Our results demonstrate that the level and stoichiometry of reprogramming factors during the reprogramming process strongly influence the resulting

  5. Is the stoichiometry of the europium nitrate complexes with neutral organophosphorus extractants be anticipated?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beudaert, Ph.; Lamare, V.; Wipff, G.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in water on europium nitrate complexes with three neutral organophosphorus extractants (TBP, TPPO and CMPO) in order to determine on what criteria it is possible to obtain by simulations the experimental 1:3 stoichiometry in organic solution. This stoichiometry was investigated by progressive saturation of the cation coordination sphere. When the nitrate counter-ions are bidentate, the 1:3 stoichiometry corresponds to the degree of saturation where the interaction energy between europium and water becomes repulsive. Beyond this stoichiometry, complexes with TPPO and CMPO are unstable, although a 1:4 complex with TBP may exist but its formation appears to be energetically unfavored. (author)

  6. How to master vanadium oxide stoichiometry and phase formation? Insights in the aqueous precursor chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Peys, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to obtain fundamental insights in the aqueous vanadium precursor chemistry and in their relation to the vanadium oxide stoichiometry=phase formation, obtained via a solution deposition route.

  7. Stoichiometry of excreta and excretion rates of a stream-dwelling plethodontid salamander

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Stoichiometry of excreta and excretion rates of a stream-dwelling plethodontid salamander in Cincinnati, OH, USA. This dataset is associated with the following...

  8. Kinetic sculpture

    OpenAIRE

    Joneta Witabora; Jonata Witabora

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic Sculpture was born from a long process of searching new approach in sculpture. The artists tried to escape from 'static' paradigm and tried to implement movement into their works: a sculpture that is mobile. Movement is always a fascinating phenomenon to eyes. Kinetic sculpture strength lies in its unique character in combining science and art. Kinetic Sculptures are really interesting pieces of art. It succeeds to fascinate human everytime. 

  9. Cell-Sediment Separation and Elemental Stoichiometries in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, M.; Poret-peterson, A. T.; Lee, Z. M.; Anbar, A. D.; Elser, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    counting by epifluorescence microscopy indicated a cell recovery yield between 6 and 40% in field-collected samples (95% for cultured E. coli). Aluminum, assumed to be non-biological in origin, was used to estimate the extent of mineral contamination of isolated cell communities. These results show that our method is successful at separating microbial cells from sediment collected in extreme environments and preserving them for analysis of a broad suite of elements. Photosynthetic sites yielded much more cell material than hotter, chemosynthetic sites (Cox et al., 2011). We are currently measuring cellular elemental abundances and ratios in samples from relatively low-temperature (25 to 65°C), photosynthetic areas, spanning a wide range of pH (2 to 9.5) and composition. These measurements will be compared to existing datasets on the bulk sediment stoichiometry of these ecosystems, and to previous observations of cellular elemental composition. References: Redfield, A.C. (1934) In Daniel, R.J. [Ed.], James Johnstone Memorial Volume, pp. 176-192, Univ. Press Liverpool. Sterner, R.W., Elser, J.J. (2002) Ecological Stoichiometry Princeton Univ. Press, 441p. Havig, J.R., et al. (2011) JGR 116, G01005. Amalfitano, S., Fazi, S. (2008) J. of Microbiol. Methods 75, 237-243. Cox, A., et al. (2011) Chem. Geol. 280, 344-351.

  10. Soil moisture and texture primarily control the soil nutrient stoichiometry across the Tibetan grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Liming; Zhao, Lin; Wu, Xiaodong; Fang, Hongbing; Zhao, Yonghua; Hu, Guojie; Yue, Guangyang; Sheng, Yu; Wu, Jichun; Chen, Ji; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Wangping; Zou, Defu; Ping, Chien-Lu; Shang, Wen; Zhao, Yuguo; Zhang, Ganlin

    2018-05-01

    Soil nutrient stoichiometry and its environmental controllers play vital roles in understanding soil-plant interaction and nutrient cycling under a changing environment, while they remain poorly understood in alpine grassland due to lack of systematic field investigations. We examined the patterns and controls of soil nutrients stoichiometry for the top 10cm soils across the Tibetan ecosystems. Soil nutrient stoichiometry varied substantially among vegetation types. Alpine swamp meadow had larger topsoil C:N, C:P, N:P, and C:K ratios compared to the alpine meadow, alpine steppe, and alpine desert. In addition, the presence or absence of permafrost did not significantly impact soil nutrient stoichiometry in Tibetan grassland. Moreover, clay and silt contents explained approximately 32.5% of the total variation in soil C:N ratio. Climate, topography, soil properties, and vegetation combined to explain 10.3-13.2% for the stoichiometry of soil C:P, N:P, and C:K. Furthermore, soil C and N were weakly related to P and K in alpine grassland. These results indicated that the nutrient limitation in alpine ecosystem might shifts from N-limited to P-limited or K-limited due to the increase of N deposition and decrease of soil P and K contents under the changing climate conditions and weathering stages. Finally, we suggested that soil moisture and mud content could be good predictors of topsoil nutrient stoichiometry in Tibetan grassland. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Iron Uptake in a Shelf Sea: Seasonality and Stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, C. J.; Poulton, A. J.; Moore, M. M.; Birchill, A.; Mayers, K.; Lohan, M. C.

    2016-02-01

    Primary production by phytoplankton in shelf seas represents a significant contribution to global carbon cycling. Trace metals, such as Iron (Fe), are essential micronutrients for phytoplankton growth, and may ultimately limit primary production. The uptake of iron within natural phytoplankton communities is poorly understood. Using carrier free 55Fe, we are able to obtain novel estimates of biological uptake of Fe using trace level Fe additions that do not perturb the system. Here we present results from a study measuring the uptake of carrier free Iron (55Fe), in parallel with measurements of Carbon (14C) and Phosphorus (33P) uptake; samples were collected from the Celtic sea in spring (April 2015) and summer (July 2015), on-shelf and off-shelf, and in 2 size fractions (Total, >2µm), thus producing a novel dataset of the seasonality of macronutrient and micronutrient uptake by phytoplankton within a shelf sea. Primary production ranged from 1.0 - 2.2 mmol C m-3 d-1 in April and 0.2 - 1.5 mmol C m-3 d-1 in July, with a corresponding higher biomass in April (0.7 - 3.24 mg Chl m-3) than July (0.3 - 1.6 mg Chl m-3). Significant rates of Fe uptake were measured in all samples (e.g. 21 nmol m-3 d-1, on-shelf, April), with variable stoichiometry (e.g. Fe/C of 16 µmol/mol, and Fe/P of 0.4 mmol/mol, on-shelf, April). The results will be presented and examined in the context of the available nutrient pools, the phytoplankton community structure and the impact on biogeochemical cycling.

  12. Autotrophic stoichiometry emerging from optimality and variable co-limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai W Wirtz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Autotrophic organisms reveal an astounding flexibility in their elemental stoichiometry, with potentially major implications on biogeochemical cycles and ecological functioning. Notwithstanding, stoichiometric regulation and co-limitation by multiple resources in autotrophs revt were in the past often described by heuristic formulations.In this study, we present a mechanistic model of autotroph growth, which features two major improvements over the existing schemes. First, we introduce the concept of metabolic network independence that defines the degree of phase-locking between accessory machines. Network independence is in particular suggested to be proportional to protein synthesis capability as quantified by variable intracellular N:C. Consequently, the degree of co-limitation becomes variable, contrasting with the dichotomous debate on the use of Liebig's law or the product rule, standing for constantly low and high co-limitation, respectively. Second, we resolve dynamic protein partitioning to light harvesting, carboxylation processes, and to an arbitrary number of nutrient acquisition machineries, as well as instantaneous activity regulation of nutrient uptake. For all regulatory processes we assume growth rate optimality, here extended by an explicit consideration of indirect feed-back effects.The combination of network independence and optimal regulation displays unprecedented skill in reproducing rich stoichiometric patterns collected from a large number of published chemostat experiments. This high skill indicates (1 that the current paradigm of fixed co-limitation is a critical short-coming of conventional models, and (2 that stoichiometric flexibility in autotrophs possibly reflects an optimality strategy. Numerical experiments furthermore show that regulatory mechanisms homogenize the effect of multiple stressors. Extended optimality alleviates the effect of the most limiting resource(s while down-regulating machineries for the

  13. Morphological Dependence of Element Stoichiometry in the H. americanus Exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergelsberg, S. T.; Ulrich, R. N.; Dove, P. M.

    2016-02-01

    The crustacean exoskeleton is a complex biocomposite of inorganic mineral and organic macromolecules that expresses highly divergent morphologies across different taxa. While the structures and compositions of the organic framework show complex links to environmental and developmental pressures, little is known about the mineral chemistry. Previous studies of the cuticle have assumed that magnesium, phosphorous, and other trace metals are largely contained in the inorganic mineral fraction. Due to analytical limitations of structural analyses and in situ spectroscopic methods, the stoichiometry of the organic and inorganic portions could not be resolved. For example, previous Raman and XRD studies conclude the higher concentrations of trace elements, such as P and Mg measured in reinforced structures, e.g. the claw and abdomen, are primarily determined by the mineral fraction. Using the American Lobster (Homarus americanus) as a model organism to establish relationships between body part function and cuticle composition, this study quantified the distributions of Mg and P in the mineral and organic fractions. The experiments were designed to dissolve the exoskeleton of 10 body parts using three types of solutions that were specific to extracting 1) the mineral phase, 2) protein, and 3) polysaccharide. Analysis of the solutions by ICP-OES shows the mineral phase contains magnesium and phosphorous at concentrations sufficient to support the formation of calcium-magnesium and phosphate minerals. The protein fraction of the body parts contains significantly more Mg and P than previously hypothesized, while the levels of P contained in the organic portion are fairly constant. The findings demonstrate the lobster cuticle contains a significant amount of non-mineralized P and Mg that is readily water-soluble in the protein component. However, for those body parts used for defense and food acquisition, such as the claw, the mineral component determines the overall

  14. Pollen Stoichiometry May Influence Detrital Terrestrial and Aquatic Food Webs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Filipiak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pollen rains may temporally mitigate nutritional limitations experienced by terrestrial and aquatic detritivores by supplying stoichiometrically balanced food during periods of detritivore growth and development (spring-summer. This may affect the functioning of food webs and thus influence fundamental processes, e.g., by enabling fungi to decompose nutritionally scarce litter. Nutritional limitation may be studied within the framework of ecological stoichiometry by comparing the stoichiometric mismatches experienced by organisms feeding on various foods. To this end, the elemental compositions of pine pollen, litter and detritivores (fungi, protozoans, worms, insects, mites, millipedes, isopods and slugs were compared, as were the stoichiometric mismatches experienced by the detritivores feeding on litter and pollen. Additionally, the contribution of pollen to the nutrient flow from the land to aquatic ecosystems was estimated through a literature review. Compared to litter, pine pollen is a stoichiometrically well-balanced food source in terms of its C:N:P ratio but also because of its high concentrations of K, S and Cu and its favorable Zn:Fe ratio. This characteristic is especially suitable to fungi, which may be responsible for the redistribution of pollen-derived nutrients in food webs, particularly aquatic ones. Pollen rains of various plant species act as temporal pulses of nutrients that are rapidly utilized and quickly introduced into the food web, so calculations of annual biomass input may be misleading. Pollen is an easily available, digestible and nutritious food for fungi, bacteria, protozoans and various groups of invertebrates, which suggests that pollen plays an important role in within- and cross-ecosystem nutrient cycling.

  15. Kinetic approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Collapse of a Bose gas: Kinetic approach ... Thermodynamical, statistical and static properties of condensates; Ultracold and trapped gases; matter waves. ... of a harmonically trapped attractively interacting Bose gas below the condensation point by introducing a kinetic approach within the Hartee-Fock approximation.

  16. Heparin kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swart, C.A.M. de.

    1983-01-01

    The author has studied the kinetics of heparin and heparin fractions after intravenous administration in humans and in this thesis the results of this study are reported. Basic knowledge about the physico-chemical properties of heparin and its interactions with proteins resulting in anticoagulant and lipolytic effects are discussed in a review (chapter II), which also comprises some clinical aspects of heparin therapy. In chapter III the kinetics of the anticoagulant effect are described after intravenous administration of five commercial heparin preparations. A mathematical model is presented that fits best to these kinetics. The kinetics of the anticoagulant and lipolytic effects after intravenous injection of various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions and their relationship with the disappearance of the radiolabel are described in chapter IV. Chapter V gives a description of the kinetics of two radiolabels after injection of in vitro formed complexes consisting of purified, 125 I-radiolabelled antithrombin III and various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions. (Auth.)

  17. The upper and lower limits of the mechanistic stoichiometry of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Stoichiometry of oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavis, A D; Lehninger, A L

    1986-07-15

    Determination of the intrinsic or mechanistic P/O ratio of oxidative phosphorylation is difficult because of the unknown magnitude of leak fluxes. Applying a new approach developed to overcome this problem (see our preceding paper in this journal), the relationships between the rate of O2 uptake [( Jo)3], the net rate of phosphorylation (Jp), the P/O ratio, and the respiratory control ratio (RCR) have been determined in rat liver mitochondria when the rate of phosphorylation was systematically varied by three specific means. (a) When phosphorylation is titrated with carboxyatractyloside, linear relationships are observed between Jp and (Jo)3. These data indicate that the upper limit of the mechanistic P/O ratio is 1.80 for succinate and 2.90 for 3-hydroxybutyrate oxidation. (b) Titration with malonate or antimycin yields linear relationships between Jp and (Jo)3. These data give the lower limit of the mechanistic P/O ratio of 1.63 for succinate and 2.66 for 3-hydroxybutyrate oxidation. (c) Titration with a protonophore yields linear relationships between Jp, (Jo)3, and (Jo)4 and between P/O and 1/RCR. Extrapolation of the P/O ratio to 1/RCR = 0 yields P/O ratios of 1.75 for succinate and 2.73 for 3-hydroxybutyrate oxidation which must be equal to or greater than the mechanistic stoichiometry. When published values for the H+/O and H+/ATP ejection ratios are taken into consideration, these measurements suggest that the mechanistic P/O ratio is 1.75 for succinate oxidation and 2.75 for NADH oxidation.

  18. Face-to-face: Perceived personal relevance amplifies face processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittig, Andre; Schupp, Harald T.; Alpers, Georg W.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The human face conveys emotional and social information, but it is not well understood how these two aspects influence face perception. In order to model a group situation, two faces displaying happy, neutral or angry expressions were presented. Importantly, faces were either facing the observer, or they were presented in profile view directed towards, or looking away from each other. In Experiment 1 (n = 64), face pairs were rated regarding perceived relevance, wish-to-interact, and displayed interactivity, as well as valence and arousal. All variables revealed main effects of facial expression (emotional > neutral), face orientation (facing observer > towards > away) and interactions showed that evaluation of emotional faces strongly varies with their orientation. Experiment 2 (n = 33) examined the temporal dynamics of perceptual-attentional processing of these face constellations with event-related potentials. Processing of emotional and neutral faces differed significantly in N170 amplitudes, early posterior negativity (EPN), and sustained positive potentials. Importantly, selective emotional face processing varied as a function of face orientation, indicating early emotion-specific (N170, EPN) and late threat-specific effects (LPP, sustained positivity). Taken together, perceived personal relevance to the observer—conveyed by facial expression and face direction—amplifies emotional face processing within triadic group situations. PMID:28158672

  19. Convergence of detrital stoichiometry predicts thresholds of nutrient-stimulated breakdown in streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, David W P; Rosemond, Amy D; Gulis, Vladislav; Benstead, Jonathan P; Kominoski, John S; Maerz, John C

    2016-09-01

    Nutrient enrichment of detritus-based streams increases detrital resource quality for consumers and stimulates breakdown rates of particulate organic carbon (C). The relative importance of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (N) vs. phosphorus (P) for detrital quality and their effects on microbial- vs. detritivore-mediated detrital breakdown are poorly understood. We tested effects of experimental N and P additions on detrital stoichiometry (C:N, C:P) and total and microbial breakdown (i.e., with and without detritivorous shredders, respectively) of five detritus types (four leaf litter species and wood) with different initial C : nutrient content. We enriched five headwater streams continuously for two years at different relative availabilities of N and P and compared breakdown rates and detrital stoichiometry to pretreatment conditions. Total breakdown rates increased with nutrient enrichment and were predicted by altered detrital stoichiometry. Streamwater N and P, fungal biomass, and their interactions affected stoichiometry of detritus. Streamwater N and P decreased detrital C:N, whereas streamwater P had stronger negative effects on detrital C:P. Nutrient addition and fungal biomass reduced C:N by 70% and C:P by 83% on average after conditioning, compared to only 26% for C:N and 10% for C:P under pretreatment conditions. Detritus with lowest initial nutrient content changed the most and had greatest increases in total breakdown rates. Detrital stoichiometry was reduced and differences among detritus types were homogenized by nutrient enrichment. With enrichment, detrital nutrient content approached detritivore nutritional requirements and stimulated greater detritivore vs. microbial litter breakdown. We used breakpoint regression to estimate values of detrital stoichiometry that can potentially be used to indicate elevated breakdown rates. Breakpoint ratios for total breakdown were 41 (C:N) and 1518 (C:P), coinciding with total breakdown rates that were ~1.9

  20. From Elements to Function: Toward Unifying Ecological Stoichiometry and Trait-Based Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric L. Meunier

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The theories developed in ecological stoichiometry (ES are fundamentally based on traits. Traits directly linked to cell/body stoichiometry, such as nutrient uptake and storage, as well as the associated trade-offs, have the potential to shape ecological interactions such as competition and predation within ecosystems. Further, traits that indirectly influence and are influenced by nutritional requirements, such as cell/body size and growth rate, are tightly linked to organismal stoichiometry. Despite their physiological and ecological relevance, traits are rarely explicitly integrated in the framework of ES and, currently, the major challenge is to more closely inter-connect ES with trait-based ecology (TBE. Here, we highlight four interconnected nutrient trait groups, i.e., acquisition, body stoichiometry, storage, and excretion, which alter interspecific competition in autotrophs and heterotrophs. We also identify key differences between producer-consumer interactions in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. For instance, our synthesis shows that, in contrast to aquatic ecosystems, traits directly influencing herbivore stoichiometry in forested ecosystems should play only a minor role in the cycling of nutrients. We furthermore describe how linking ES and TBE can help predict the ecosystem consequences of global change. The concepts we highlight here allow us to predict that increasing N:P ratios in ecosystems should shift trait dominances in communities toward species with higher optimal N:P ratios and higher P uptake affinity, while decreasing N retention and increasing P storage.

  1. Teaching Reaction Stoichiometry: Exploring and Acknowledging Nigerian Chemistry Teachers Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoade Ejiwale Okanlawon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a growing interest in studies of students’ problem-solving strategies and difficulties, and misconceptionsregarding stoichiometry, little is known about the way teachers understand and teach reaction stoichiometry. This articlepresents a case study of pedagogical content knowledge put into actions by chemistry teachers when teaching the topic ofstoichiometry to second year senior secondary school students. Fourteen chemistry teachers with teaching experience rangingfrom 5 to 20 years were involved in this study. Research data were obtained from classroom observations and videotapedrecordings of classroom practice. Analyses of the teachers’ teaching activities revealed their skillfulness, resourcefulness, andweaknesses in terms of pedagogical content knowledge displayed when teaching stoichiometry. The results of this exploratorystudy offer insight into the knowledge systems that need to be expanded, enriched, and elaborated for teaching stoichiometry.To better understand the findings of this study, the results obtained were presented under two separate sections: (1 resultsconcerning introducing reaction stoichiometry to students and (2 results concerning leading students to identify limitingreagents. Implications for instruction and teachers’ professional development are offered.

  2. The effect of resource quantity and resource stoichiometry on microbial carbon-use-efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiblinger, K.M.; Hall, E.K.; Wanek, W.; Szukics, U.; Hämmerle, I.; Ellersdorfer, G.; Böck, S.; Strauss, J.; Sterflinger, K.; Richter, A.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2010-01-01

    The carbon-use-efficiency (CUE) of microorganisms is an important parameter in determining ecosystem-level carbon (C) cycling; however, little is known about how variance in resources affects microbial CUE. To elucidate how resource quantity and resource stoichiometry affect microbial CUE, we cultured four microorganisms - two fungi (Aspergillus nidulans and Trichoderma harzianum) and two bacteria (Pectobacterium carotovorum and Verrucomicrobium spinosum) - under 12 unique C, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) ratios. Whereas the CUE of A. nidulans was strongly affected by C, bacterial CUE was more strongly affected by mineral nutrients (N and P). Specifically, CUE in P. carotovorum was positively correlated with P, while CUE of V. spinosum primarily depended on N. This resulted in a positive relationship between fungal CUE and resource C : nutrient stoichiometry and a negative relationship between bacterial CUE and resource C : nutrient stoichiometry. The difference in the direction of the relationship between CUE and C : nutrient for fungi vs. bacteria was consistent with differences in biomass stoichiometry and suggested that fungi have a higher C demand than bacteria. These results suggest that the links between biomass stoichiometry, resource demand and CUE may provide a mechanism for commonly observed temporal and spatial patterns in microbial community structure and function in natural habitats.

  3. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  4. Bridging food webs, ecosystem metabolism, and biogeochemistry using ecological stoichiometry theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welti, Nina; Striebel, Maren; Ulseth, Amber J.

    2017-01-01

    stoichiometry is important for both biogeochemical and ecological research. Nonetheless, assessments of ecological stoichiometry (ES) often focus on the elemental content of biota rather than taking a more holistic view by examining both elemental pools and fluxes (e. g., organismal stoichiometry and ecosystem...... process rates). ES theory holds the promise to be a unifying concept to link across hierarchical scales of patterns and processes in ecology, but this has not been fully achieved. Therefore, we propose connecting the expertise of aquatic ecologists and biogeochemists with ES theory as a common currency...... to connect food webs, ecosystem metabolism, and biogeochemistry, as they are inherently concatenated by the transfer of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous through biotic and abiotic nutrient transformation and fluxes. Several new studies exist that demonstrate the connections between food web ecology...

  5. Analysis of acetylation stoichiometry suggests that SIRT3 repairs nonenzymatic acetylation lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinert, Brian T; Moustafa, Tarek; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    or suppresses acetylation. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we measured acetylation stoichiometry in mouse liver tissue and found that SIRT3 suppressed acetylation to a very low stoichiometry at its target sites. By examining acetylation changes in the liver, heart, brain, and brown adipose tissue...... of fasted mice, we found that SIRT3-targeted sites were mostly unaffected by fasting, a dietary manipulation that is thought to regulate metabolism through SIRT3-dependent deacetylation. Globally increased mitochondrial acetylation in fasted liver tissue, higher stoichiometry at mitochondrial acetylation...... sites, and greater sensitivity of SIRT3-targeted sites to chemical acetylation in vitro and fasting-induced acetylation in vivo, suggest a nonenzymatic mechanism of acetylation. Our data indicate that most mitochondrial acetylation occurs as a low-level nonenzymatic protein lesion and that SIRT3...

  6. Kinetics and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous degradation of Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84 by potassium peroxydisulfate (K2S2O8 has been studied in laboratory scale experiments. The effect of the initial concentrations of potassium peroxydisulfate and RY84, pH and temperature on RY84 degradation were also examined. Experimental data were analyzed using first and second-order kinetics. The degradation kinetics of RY84 of the potassium peroxydisulfate process followed the second-order reaction kinetics. These rate constants have an extreme values similar to of 9.493 mM−1min−1 at a peroxydisulfate dose of 4 mmol/L. Thermodynamic parameters such as activation (Ea and Gibbs free energy (ΔG° were also evaluated. The negative value of ΔGo and Ea shows the spontaneous reaction natural conditions and exothermic nature.

  7. Kinetics of yttrium oxide carbochlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaviria, J.P., E-mail: gaviriaj@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Division Cinetica Quimica - Complejo Tecnologico Pilcaniyeu - Centro Atomico Bariloche - Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Bustillo km 9500 (8400), S.C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Fouga, G.G. [Division Cinetica Quimica - Complejo Tecnologico Pilcaniyeu - Centro Atomico Bariloche - Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Bustillo km 9500 (8400), S.C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Bohe, A.E. [Division Cinetica Quimica - Complejo Tecnologico Pilcaniyeu - Centro Atomico Bariloche - Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Bustillo km 9500 (8400), S.C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Centro Regional Universitario Bariloche - Universidad Nacional del Comahue (Argentina)

    2011-04-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Chlorination kinetics of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C system was studied by thermogravimetry. {yields} The influence of carbon content, flow rate, sample mass and pCl{sub 2} were evaluated. {yields} Reaction proceeds through three successive stages until the formation of YCl{sub 3}(l). {yields}STAGE I is the formation of YOCl(s) and is under chemical control for T < 700 {sup o}C. {yields}STAGE I follows a nucleation and growth model. Kinetics parameters were obtained. - Abstract: The chlorination kinetics of the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sucrose carbon system was studied by thermogravimetry. This work is a continuation of a previous one in which the reaction stages and the stoichiometry of each reaction have been determined. The influence of carbon content, total flow rate, sample initial mass and chlorine partial pressure was evaluated. The effect of carbon content on the reactive mixture was studied between 6.7 and 70% (carbon mass/total mass). The results showed that the reaction rate of each stage is strongly increased as the carbon content increases and the range of occurrence of the stages depends on the amount of carbon in the solid reactive mixture. The formation reaction of YOCl (STAGE I) is chemically controlled for temperatures lower than 700 {sup o}C with average effective activation energies of 165 {+-} 6 and 152 {+-} 7 kJ/mol for 8.7 and 16.7%C, respectively. The formation of the YOCl follows a nucleation and growth mechanism, with a combination of continuous nucleation and site saturation, and anisotropic growth controlled by diffusion. The kinetics of STAGE I can be expressed by the following global rate equation that includes the variables analyzed: (d{alpha})/(dt) =k{sub 0}Bexp(-(Ea)/(R{sub g}T) )pCl{sub 2}{l_brace}n(1-{alpha})[-ln(1-{alpha})]{r_brace}{sup (n-1)/n} where k{sub 0}B = 1.9 x 10{sup 4}, n = 1.20 for 8.7%C, and k{sub 0}B = 8.4 x 10{sup 3}, n = 1.14 for 16.7%C. STAGES II and III correspond to the YOCl carbochlorination to

  8. European cinema: face to face with Hollywood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsaesser, T.

    2005-01-01

    In the face of renewed competition from Hollywood since the early 1980s and the challenges posed to Europe's national cinemas by the fall of the Wall in 1989, independent filmmaking in Europe has begun to re-invent itself. European Cinema: Face to Face with Hollywood re-assesses the different

  9. Kinetic bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    This report on kinetic bridges is essentially a state-of-the-art study on two types of bridges whose location or physical characteristics are designed to be time dependent. The first type, called a "relocatable bridge", is essentially for use as a te...

  10. Plasma facing materials for fusion reactor applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez Arrabal, Raquel; Gordillo Garcia, Nuria; Rivera de Mena, Antonio; Alvarez Ruiz, Jesus; Garoz, D.; Perlado Martín, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The lack of plasma facing materials (PFM) able to withstand the severe magnetiicffusiion radiation conditions expected in fusion reactors is the actual bottle In both fusions approaches energy is released in the form of kinetic energy of neck for fusion to becomes a reality.

  11. Near Surface Stoichiometry in UO2: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of oxygen stoichiometry variation in UO2 at different temperature and oxygen partial pressure are important for understanding the dynamics of microstructure in these crystals. However, very limited experimental studies have been performed to understand the atomic structure of UO2 near surface and defect effects of near surface on stoichiometry in which the system can exchange atoms with the external reservoir. In this study, the near (110 surface relaxation and stoichiometry in UO2 have been studied with density functional theory (DFT calculations. On the basis of the point-defect model (PDM, a general expression for the near surface stoichiometric variation is derived by using DFT total-energy calculations and atomistic thermodynamics, in an attempt to pin down the mechanisms of oxygen exchange between the gas environment and defected UO2. By using the derived expression, it is observed that, under poor oxygen conditions, the stoichiometry of near surface is switched from hyperstoichiometric at 300 K with a depth around 3 nm to near-stoichiometric at 1000 K and hypostoichiometric at 2000 K. Furthermore, at very poor oxygen concentrations and high temperatures, our results also suggest that the bulk of the UO2 prefers to be hypostoichiometric, although the surface is near-stoichiometric.

  12. Oxygen non-stoichiometry determination of perovskite materials by a carbonation process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Nijmeijer, Arian; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.

    2012-01-01

    A new and easy method is developed to determine the oxygen non-stoichiometry of perovskite materials under equilibrium conditions. The method is based on the complete decomposition of the powder to stoichiometric metal oxides and/or metal carbonates by using CO2 as reacting gas. The oxygen

  13. Using Audience Response Systems during Interactive Lectures to Promote Active Learning and Conceptual Understanding of Stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotes, Sandra; Cotuá, José

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a method of instruction using an active learning strategy for teaching stoichiometry through a process of gradual knowledge building. Students identify their misconceptions and progress through a sequence of questions based on the same chemical equation. An infrared device and software registered as the TurningPoint Audience…

  14. Investigating the Effect of Complexity Factors in Stoichiometry Problems Using Logistic Regression and Eye Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui; Kirk, John; Pienta, Norbert J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper includes two experiments, one investigating complexity factors in stoichiometry word problems, and the other identifying students' problem-solving protocols by using eye-tracking technology. The word problems used in this study had five different complexity factors, which were randomly assigned by a Web-based tool that we developed. The…

  15. Global biodiversity, stoichiometry and ecosystem function responses to human-induced C-N-P imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicer, Jofre; Sardans, Jordi; Stefanescu, Constantí; Ubach, Andreu; Bartrons, Mireia; Asensio, Dolores; Peñuelas, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Global change analyses usually consider biodiversity as a global asset that needs to be preserved. Biodiversity is frequently analysed mainly as a response variable affected by diverse environmental drivers. However, recent studies highlight that gradients of biodiversity are associated with gradual changes in the distribution of key dominant functional groups characterized by distinctive traits and stoichiometry, which in turn often define the rates of ecosystem processes and nutrient cycling. Moreover, pervasive links have been reported between biodiversity, food web structure, ecosystem function and species stoichiometry. Here we review current global stoichiometric gradients and how future distributional shifts in key functional groups may in turn influence basic ecosystem functions (production, nutrient cycling, decomposition) and therefore could exert a feedback effect on stoichiometric gradients. The C-N-P stoichiometry of most primary producers (phytoplankton, algae, plants) has been linked to functional trait continua (i.e. to major axes of phenotypic variation observed in inter-specific analyses of multiple traits). In contrast, the C-N-P stoichiometry of higher-level consumers remains less precisely quantified in many taxonomic groups. We show that significant links are observed between trait continua across trophic levels. In spite of recent advances, the future reciprocal feedbacks between key functional groups, biodiversity and ecosystem functions remain largely uncertain. The reported evidence, however, highlights the key role of stoichiometric traits and suggests the need of a progressive shift towards an ecosystemic and stoichiometric perspective in global biodiversity analyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus stoichiometry and eutrophication in River Thames Tributaries, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary productivity in aquatic systems relies on the availability of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), with a preferred stoichiometric ratio of 106 C/16 N/1 P, known as the Redfield ratio. The intent of this paper is to present a methodology to visualize C/N/P stoichiometry and examine ...

  17. Mathematical review of the energy transduction stoichiometries of C4 leaf photosynthesis under limiting light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.; Struik, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    A generalized model for electron (e-) transport limited C4 photosynthesis of NAD–malic enzyme and NADP–malic enzyme subtypes is presented. The model is used to review the thylakoid stoichiometries in vivo under strictly limiting light conditions, using published data on photosynthetic quantum yield

  18. Mapping Teacher-Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Greg; Cook, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses Deleuze and Guattari's concept of faciality to analyse the teacher's face. According to Deleuze and Guattari, the teacher-face is a special type of face because it is an "overcoded" face produced in specific landscapes. This paper suggests four limit-faces for teacher faciality that actualise different mixes of significance and…

  19. Stoichiometry behavior of TaN, TaCN and TaC thin films produced by magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, M. [Centro de Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 2681, C.P. 22860, Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico); Castillo, H.A. [Centro de Enseñanza Técnica y Superior, CETYS Universidad, Campus Tijuana, Tijuana, B.C. (Mexico); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Medellín Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Manizales (Colombia); De La Cruz, W. [Centro de Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 2681, C.P. 22860, Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico)

    2013-08-15

    Thin films were synthesized in a magnetron sputtering system using a target of Ta with 99.99% purity and silicon substrates (1 1 1). The gases used for the film growth were (Ar + N{sub 2}), (Ar + CH{sub 4} + N{sub 2}) and (Ar + CH{sub 4}) mixtures for TaN, TaCN and TaC, respectively. The substrate temperature increased from room temperature to 500 °C. The chemical composition and bonding configuration were examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), revealing Ta-N, Ta-C-N, Ta-C and C-C bonds. Moreover, the crystallographic structure was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), indicating the presence of (1 1 1) and (2 0 0) planes belonging to a face-centered cubic structure. The stoichiometry variation dependence on the CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} flow was analyzed, and the influence of the substrate temperature on the coatings was investigated. Finally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine the evolution on the grain formation in the coatings as the substrate temperature increased.

  20. Physisorption kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    1986-01-01

    This monograph deals with the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of molecules physisorbed on solid surfaces. Although frequent and detailed reference is made to experiment, it is mainly concerned with the theory of the subject. In this, we have attempted to present a unified picture based on the master equation approach. Physisorption kinetics is by no means a closed and mature subject; rather, in writing this monograph we intended to survey a field very much in flux, to assess its achievements so far, and to give a reasonable basis from which further developments can take off. For this reason we have included many papers in the bibliography that are not referred to in the text but are of relevance to physisorption. To keep this monograph to a reasonable size, and also to allow for some unity in the presentation of the material, we had to omit a number of topics related to physisorption kinetics. We have not covered to any extent the equilibrium properties of physisorbed layers such as structures, phase tr...

  1. Looking inside the box: using Raman microspectroscopy to deconstruct microbial biomass stoichiometry one cell at a time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward K.; Singer, Gabriel A.; Pölzl, Marvin; Hämmerle, Ieda; Schwarz, Christian; Daims, Holger; Maixner, Frank; Battin, Tom J.

    2011-01-01

    Stoichiometry of microbial biomass is a key determinant of nutrient recycling in a wide variety of ecosystems. However, little is known about the underlying causes of variance in microbial biomass stoichiometry. This is primarily because of technological constraints limiting the analysis of macromolecular composition to large quantities of microbial biomass. Here, we use Raman microspectroscopy (MS), to analyze the macromolecular composition of single cells of two species of bacteria grown on minimal media over a wide range of resource stoichiometry. We show that macromolecular composition, determined from a subset of identified peaks within the Raman spectra, was consistent with macromolecular composition determined using traditional analytical methods. In addition, macromolecular composition determined by Raman MS correlated with total biomass stoichiometry, indicating that analysis with Raman MS included a large proportion of a cell's total macromolecular composition. Growth phase (logarithmic or stationary), resource stoichiometry and species identity each influenced each organism's macromolecular composition and thus biomass stoichiometry. Interestingly, the least variable peaks in the Raman spectra were those responsible for differentiation between species, suggesting a phylogenetically specific cellular architecture. As Raman MS has been previously shown to be applicable to cells sampled directly from complex environments, our results suggest Raman MS is an extremely useful application for evaluating the biomass stoichiometry of environmental microorganisms. This includes the ability to partition microbial biomass into its constituent macromolecules and increase our understanding of how microorganisms in the environment respond to resource heterogeneity.

  2. k-OptForce: integrating kinetics with flux balance analysis for strain design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Chowdhury

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Computational strain design protocols aim at the system-wide identification of intervention strategies for the enhanced production of biochemicals in microorganisms. Existing approaches relying solely on stoichiometry and rudimentary constraint-based regulation overlook the effects of metabolite concentrations and substrate-level enzyme regulation while identifying metabolic interventions. In this paper, we introduce k-OptForce, which integrates the available kinetic descriptions of metabolic steps with stoichiometric models to sharpen the prediction of intervention strategies for improving the bio-production of a chemical of interest. It enables identification of a minimal set of interventions comprised of both enzymatic parameter changes (for reactions with available kinetics and reaction flux changes (for reactions with only stoichiometric information. Application of k-OptForce to the overproduction of L-serine in E. coli and triacetic acid lactone (TAL in S. cerevisiae revealed that the identified interventions tend to cause less dramatic rearrangements of the flux distribution so as not to violate concentration bounds. In some cases the incorporation of kinetic information leads to the need for additional interventions as kinetic expressions render stoichiometry-only derived interventions infeasible by violating concentration bounds, whereas in other cases the kinetic expressions impart flux changes that favor the overproduction of the target product thereby requiring fewer direct interventions. A sensitivity analysis on metabolite concentrations shows that the required number of interventions can be significantly affected by changing the imposed bounds on metabolite concentrations. Furthermore, k-OptForce was capable of finding non-intuitive interventions aiming at alleviating the substrate-level inhibition of key enzymes in order to enhance the flux towards the product of interest, which cannot be captured by stoichiometry-alone analysis

  3. Morphogenesis of Kinetic Reciprocal Frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Sassone, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic structures in civil engineering and architecture gained considerable more attention in the very recent years as a practical solution to face time dependant performances. Realized projects are mostly bridges, retractable roofs, while in architecture the trend follows the category of intera......Kinetic structures in civil engineering and architecture gained considerable more attention in the very recent years as a practical solution to face time dependant performances. Realized projects are mostly bridges, retractable roofs, while in architecture the trend follows the category...... (RF) were studied in the past as a practical solution to span distances with shorter elements. Leonardo da Vinci discovered interesting RF patterns and studied three dimensional arch structures for bridges. RF are generally defined as structures that forms closed circuits of forces, and where elements...... joins in intermediate points. In the present paper we will describe a new subset of kinetic structures based on reciprocal frames topology and pin-slot constraint, a connection where a pin is constrained to move along a slot, and to rotate around its axis. The first step in obtaining a kinetic...

  4. Stochastic kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombino, A.; Mosiello, R.; Norelli, F.; Jorio, V.M.; Pacilio, N.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear system kinetics is formulated according to a stochastic approach. The detailed probability balance equations are written for the probability of finding the mixed population of neutrons and detected neutrons, i.e. detectrons, at a given level for a given instant of time. Equations are integrated in search of a probability profile: a series of cases is analyzed through a progressive criterium. It tends to take into account an increasing number of physical processes within the chosen model. The most important contribution is that solutions interpret analytically experimental conditions of equilibrium (moise analysis) and non equilibrium (pulsed neutron measurements, source drop technique, start up procedures)

  5. Familiar face + novel face = familiar face? Representational bias in the perception of morphed faces in chimpanzees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshi-Taka Matsuda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Highly social animals possess a well-developed ability to distinguish the faces of familiar from novel conspecifics to induce distinct behaviors for maintaining society. However, the behaviors of animals when they encounter ambiguous faces of familiar yet novel conspecifics, e.g., strangers with faces resembling known individuals, have not been well characterised. Using a morphing technique and preferential-looking paradigm, we address this question via the chimpanzee’s facial–recognition abilities. We presented eight subjects with three types of stimuli: (1 familiar faces, (2 novel faces and (3 intermediate morphed faces that were 50% familiar and 50% novel faces of conspecifics. We found that chimpanzees spent more time looking at novel faces and scanned novel faces more extensively than familiar or intermediate faces. Interestingly, chimpanzees looked at intermediate faces in a manner similar to familiar faces with regards to the fixation duration, fixation count, and saccade length for facial scanning, even though the participant was encountering the intermediate faces for the first time. We excluded the possibility that subjects merely detected and avoided traces of morphing in the intermediate faces. These findings suggest a bias for a feeling-of-familiarity that chimpanzees perceive familiarity with an intermediate face by detecting traces of a known individual, as 50% alternation is sufficient to perceive familiarity.

  6. Surface stoichiometry of zinc sulfide and its effect on the adsorption behaviors of xanthate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Meng

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, the surface stoichiometry, acid-base properties as well as the adsorption of xanthate at ZnS surfaces were studied by means of potentiometric titration, adsorption and solution speciation modeling. The surface proton binding site was determined by using Gran plot to evaluate the potentiometric titration data. Testing results implied that for stoichiometric surfaces of zinc sulfide, the proton and hydroxide determine the surface charge. For the nonstoichiometric surfaces, the surface charge is controlled by proton, hydroxide, zinc and sulfide ions depending on specific conditions. The xanthate adsorption decreases with increasing solution pH, which indicates an ion exchange reaction at the surfaces. Based on experimental results, the surface protonation, deprotonation, stoichiometry and xanthate adsorption mechanism were discussed.

  7. Effects of three global change drivers on terrestrial C:N:P stoichiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Kai; Fornara, Dario A; Yang, Wanqin

    2017-01-01

    Over the last few decades there has been an increasing number of controlled-manipulative experiments to investigate how plants and soils might respond to global change. These experiments typically examined the effects of each of three global change drivers (i.e. nitrogen (N) deposition, warming...... of plants, soils and soil microbial biomass might respond to individual vs. combined effects of the three global change drivers. Our results show that (1) individual effects of N addition and elevated CO2 on C:N:P stoichiometry are stronger than warming, (2) combined effects of pairs of global change...... drivers (e.g., N addition + elevated CO2 , warming + elevated CO2 ) on C:N:P stoichiometry were generally weaker than the individual effects of each of these drivers, (3) additive interactions (i.e. when combined effects are equal to or no significantly different from the sum of individual effects) were...

  8. An experimental study of LiH stoichiometry at elevated temperatures and pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwinskii, A.J.; Lilley, E.M.; Smith, G.S.

    1975-01-01

    The stoichiometry of LiH was studied at 500 to 900 0 K at hydrogen pressures between 2.5 and 6.0 GPa. Results and interpretation are complicated by the presence of ubiquitous intermetallic compounds from encapsulating materials, which are formed at pressures below 4.0 GPa. The most definitive results were produced in an assembly that consisted of a Ag--Pd inner capsule and tantalum outer capsule at a pressure of 5.0 GPa and 733 0 K. This run produced no change in LiH stoichiometry, nor any change in the NaCl-type crystal structure. It is concluded that up to a pressure of 6.0 GPa and a temperature of 803 0 K, no quenchable LiH/sub n/ with n greater than 1 can be produced. (U.S.)

  9. Stoichiometry and composition of an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex from rat liver.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, D L; Yang, D C

    1981-01-01

    The particulate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases of rat liver were copurified about 1000-fold with more than 20% yields for individual synthetase activities. Measurements of aminoacylation activities showed that lysyl-, arginyl-, leucyl-, isoleucyl-, and methionyl-tRNA synthetases in the purified complex cosedimented at 18 S. The molecular weight of the synthetase complex is about one million, as estimated by gel filtration. The stoichiometry of the synthetase in the complex was determined by activ...

  10. The Stoichiometry of Nutrient Release by Terrestrial Herbivores and Its Ecosystem Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Sitters

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that the release of nutrients by herbivores via their waste products strongly impacts nutrient availability for autotrophs. The ratios of nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P recycled through herbivore release (i.e., waste N:P are mainly determined by the stoichiometric composition of the herbivore's food (food N:P and its body nutrient content (body N:P. Waste N:P can in turn impact autotroph nutrient limitation and productivity. Herbivore-driven nutrient recycling based on stoichiometric principles is dominated by theoretical and experimental research in freshwater systems, in particular interactions between algae and invertebrate herbivores. In terrestrial ecosystems, the impact of herbivores on nutrient cycling and availability is often limited to studying carbon (C:N and C:P ratios, while the role of terrestrial herbivores in mediating N:P ratios is also likely to influence herbivore-driven nutrient recycling. In this review, we use rules and predictions on the stoichiometry of nutrient release originating from algal-based aquatic systems to identify the factors that determine the stoichiometry of nutrient release by herbivores. We then explore how these rules can be used to understand the stoichiometry of nutrient release by terrestrial herbivores, ranging from invertebrates to mammals, and its impact on plant nutrient limitation and productivity. Future studies should focus on measuring both N and P when investigating herbivore-driven nutrient recycling in terrestrial ecosystems, while also taking the form of waste product (urine or feces and other pathways by which herbivores change nutrients into account, to be able to quantify the impact of waste stoichiometry on plant communities.

  11. The stoichiometry of nutrient release by terrestrial herbivores and its ecosystem consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitters, Judith; Bakker, Elisabeth S.; Veldhuis, Michiel P.; Veen, G. F.; Olde Venterink, Harry; Vanni, Michael J.

    2017-04-01

    It is widely recognized that the release of nutrients by herbivores via their waste products strongly impacts nutrient availability for autotrophs. The ratios of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) recycled through herbivore release (i.e., waste N:P) are mainly determined by the stoichiometric composition of the herbivore’s food (food N:P) and its body nutrient content (body N:P). Waste N:P can in turn impact autotroph nutrient limitation and productivity. Herbivore-driven nutrient recycling based on stoichiometric principles is dominated by theoretical and experimental research in freshwater systems, in particular interactions between algae and invertebrate herbivores. In terrestrial ecosystems, the impact of herbivores on nutrient cycling and availability is often limited to studying carbon (C ):N and C:P ratios, while the role of terrestrial herbivores in mediating N:P ratios is also likely to influence herbivore-driven nutrient recycling. In this review, we use rules and predictions on the stoichiometry of nutrient release originating from algal-based aquatic systems to identify the factors that determine the stoichiometry of nutrient release by herbivores. We then explore how these rules can be used to understand the stoichiometry of nutrient release by terrestrial herbivores, ranging from invertebrates to mammals, and its impact on plant nutrient limitation and productivity. Future studies should focus on measuring both N and P when investigating herbivore-driven nutrient recycling in terrestrial ecosystems, while also taking the form of waste product (urine or feces) and other pathways by which herbivores change nutrients into account, to be able to quantify the impact of waste stoichiometry on plant communities.

  12. Ecological stoichiometry and density responses of plant-arthropod communities on cormorant nesting islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gundula S Kolb

    Full Text Available Seabirds deposit large amounts of nutrient rich guano on their nesting islands. The increased nutrient availability strongly affects plants and consumers. Consumer response differs among taxonomic groups, but mechanisms causing these differences are poorly understood. Ecological stoichiometry might provide tools to understand these mechanisms. ES suggests that nutrient rich taxa are more likely to be nutrient limited than nutrient poorer taxa and are more favored under nutrient enrichment. Here, we quantified differences in the elemental composition of soil, plants, and consumers between islands with and without nesting cormorant colonies and tested predictions made based on ES by relating the elemental composition and the eventual mismatch between consumer and resource stoichiometry to observed density differences among the island categories. We found that nesting cormorants radically changed the soil nutrient content and thereby indirectly plant nutrient content and resource quality to herbivores. In contrast, consumers showed only small differences in their elemental composition among the island categories. While we cannot evaluate the cause of the apparent homeostasis of invertebrates without additional data, we can conclude that from the perspective of the next trophic level, there is no difference in diet quality (in terms of N and P content between island categories. Thus, bottom-up effects seemed mainly be mediated via changes in resource quantity not quality. Despite a large potential trophic mismatch we were unable to observe any relation between the invertebrate stoichiometry and their density response to nesting cormorant colonies. We conclude that in our system stoichiometry is not a useful predictor of arthropod responses to variation in resource nutrient content. Furthermore, we found no strong evidence that resource quality was a prime determinant of invertebrate densities. Other factors like resource quantity, habitat structure

  13. Ecological stoichiometry and density responses of plant-arthropod communities on cormorant nesting islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Gundula S; Palmborg, Cecilia; Hambäck, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Seabirds deposit large amounts of nutrient rich guano on their nesting islands. The increased nutrient availability strongly affects plants and consumers. Consumer response differs among taxonomic groups, but mechanisms causing these differences are poorly understood. Ecological stoichiometry might provide tools to understand these mechanisms. ES suggests that nutrient rich taxa are more likely to be nutrient limited than nutrient poorer taxa and are more favored under nutrient enrichment. Here, we quantified differences in the elemental composition of soil, plants, and consumers between islands with and without nesting cormorant colonies and tested predictions made based on ES by relating the elemental composition and the eventual mismatch between consumer and resource stoichiometry to observed density differences among the island categories. We found that nesting cormorants radically changed the soil nutrient content and thereby indirectly plant nutrient content and resource quality to herbivores. In contrast, consumers showed only small differences in their elemental composition among the island categories. While we cannot evaluate the cause of the apparent homeostasis of invertebrates without additional data, we can conclude that from the perspective of the next trophic level, there is no difference in diet quality (in terms of N and P content) between island categories. Thus, bottom-up effects seemed mainly be mediated via changes in resource quantity not quality. Despite a large potential trophic mismatch we were unable to observe any relation between the invertebrate stoichiometry and their density response to nesting cormorant colonies. We conclude that in our system stoichiometry is not a useful predictor of arthropod responses to variation in resource nutrient content. Furthermore, we found no strong evidence that resource quality was a prime determinant of invertebrate densities. Other factors like resource quantity, habitat structure and species

  14. Stoichiometry in Context: Inquiry-Guided Problems of Chemistry for Encouraging Critical Thinking in Engineering Students

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Pinto; María Luisa Prolongo

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on examples of educational tools concerning the learning of chemistry for engineering students through different daily life cases. These tools were developed during the past few years for enhancing the active role of students. They refer to cases about mineral water, medicaments, dentifrices and informative panels about solar power, where an adequate quantitative treatment through stoichiometry calculations allows the interpretation of data and values announced by manufactu...

  15. Warming differentially influences the effects of drought on stoichiometry and metabolomics in shoots and roots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gargallo-Garriga, A.; Sardans, J.; Pérez-Trujillo, M.; Oravec, Michal; Urban, Otmar; Jentsch, A.; Kreyling, J.; Beierkuhnlein, C.; Parella, T.; Penuelas, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 207, č. 3 (2015), s. 591-603 ISSN 1469-8137 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA AV ČR(CZ) M200871201 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : climate change * drought * HPLC-MS * nitrogen * phosphorus (N : P) * nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) * stoichiometry * warming * abiotic stresses Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 6.545, year: 2013

  16. Buffering of Ocean Export Production by Flexible Elemental Stoichiometry of Particulate Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanioka, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Katsumi

    2017-10-01

    One of the most important factors that determine the ocean-atmosphere carbon partitioning is the sinking of particulate organic matter (POM) from the surface ocean to the deep ocean. The amount of carbon (C) removed from the surface ocean by this POM export production depends critically on the elemental ratio in POM of C to nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), two essential elements that limit productivity. Recent observations indicate that P:N:C in marine POM varies both spatially and temporally due to chemical, physical, and ecological dynamics. In a new approach to predicting a flexible P:C ratio, we developed a power law model with a stoichiometry sensitivity factor, which is able to relate P:C of POM to ambient phosphate concentration. The new factor is robust, measurable, and biogeochemically meaningful. Using the new stoichiometry sensitivity factor, we present a first-order estimate that P:C plasticity could buffer against a generally expected future reduction in global carbon export production by up to 5% under a future warming scenario compared to a fixed, Redfield P:C. Further, we demonstrate that our new stoichiometry model can be implemented successfully and easily in a global model to reproduce the large-scale P:N:C variability in the ocean.

  17. Stoichiometry for α-bungarotoxin block of α7 acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacosta, Corrie J. B.; Free, Chris R.; Sine, Steven M.

    2015-08-01

    α-Bungarotoxin (α-Btx) binds to the five agonist binding sites on the homopentameric α7-acetylcholine receptor, yet the number of bound α-Btx molecules required to prevent agonist-induced channel opening remains unknown. To determine the stoichiometry for α-Btx blockade, we generate receptors comprised of wild-type and α-Btx-resistant subunits, tag one of the subunit types with conductance mutations to report subunit stoichiometry, and following incubation with α-Btx, monitor opening of individual receptor channels with defined subunit stoichiometry. We find that a single α-Btx-sensitive subunit confers nearly maximal suppression of channel opening, despite four binding sites remaining unoccupied by α-Btx and accessible to the agonist. Given structural evidence that α-Btx locks the agonist binding site in an inactive conformation, we conclude that the dominant mechanism of antagonism is non-competitive, originating from conformational arrest of the binding sites, and that the five α7 subunits are interdependent and maintain conformational symmetry in the open channel state.

  18. Non-stoichiometry, Compensation and Disorder in Hybrid MBE-grown Alkaline Earth Stannate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianqi; Prakash, Abhinav; Nunn, William; Haugstad, Greg; Jalan, Bharat

    Alkaline earth stannate has recently been of significant interest for transparent conducting oxide and power electronic applications owing to its wide band gap and high conductivity. In this talk, we will present a novel hybrid molecular beam epitaxy approach utilizing elemental solid source for Ba and Sr, a chemical precursor source for Sn and a rf plasma source for oxygen, for the growth of BaSnO3 and SrSnO3 films on (001) SrTiO3 and (110) GdScO3 substrates. High-resolution x-ray diffraction and reflection high-energy electron diffraction revealed single phase, epitaxial films and a layer-by-layer growth mode, respectively. Films' cation stoichiometry was determined using high energy Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Using temperature dependent electronic transport measurements of films with varying cation stoichiometry, we will discuss how cation stoichiometry, charge compensation and structural disorder influence the metal-to-insulator transition, electron density, and mobility in La-doped BaSnO3 and SrSnO3 films. worked supported by NSF.

  19. Coexistence and community structure in a consumer resource model with implicit stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Paul A; Brown, Joel S; Wise, David H

    2012-09-01

    We combine stoichiometry theory and optimal foraging theory into the MacArthur consumer-resource model. This generates predictions for diet choice, coexistence, and community structure of heterotroph communities. Tradeoffs in consumer resource-garnering traits influence community outcomes. With scarce resources, consumers forage opportunistically for complementary resources and may coexist via tradeoffs in resource encounter rates. In contrast to single currency models, stoichiometry permits multiple equilibria. These alternative stable states occur when tradeoffs in resource encounter rates are stronger than tradeoffs in elemental conversion efficiencies. With abundant resources consumers exhibit partially selective diets for essential resources and may coexist via tradeoffs in elemental conversion efficiencies. These results differ from single currency models, where adaptive diet selection is either opportunistic or selective. Interestingly, communities composed of efficient consumers share many of the same properties as communities based on substitutable resources. However, communities composed of relatively inefficient consumers behave similarly to plant communities as characterized by Tilman's consumer resource theory. The results of our model indicate that the effects of stoichiometry theory on community ecology are dependent upon both consumer foraging behavior and the nature of resource garnering tradeoffs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fresh tar (from biomass gasification) destruction with downstream catalysts: comparison of their intrinsic activity with a realistic kinetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Narvaez, I.; Orio, A. [Complutense Univ. of Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-12-31

    A model for fresh tar destruction over catalysts placed downstream a biomass gasifier is presented. It includes the stoichio-metry and the calculation of the kinetic constants for the tar destruction. Catalysts studied include commercial Ni steam reforming catalysts and calcinated dolomites. Kinetic constants for tar destruction are calculated for several particle sizes, times- on-stream and temperatures of the catalyst and equivalence ratios in the gasifier. Such intrinsic kinetic constants allow a rigorous or scientific comparison of solids and conditions to be used in an advanced gasification process. (orig.) 4 refs.

  1. Resource stoichiometry and availability modulate species richness and biomass of tropical litter macro-invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, Malte; Barnes, Andrew D; Weigelt, Patrick; Ott, David; Rembold, Katja; Farajallah, Achmad; Brose, Ulrich

    2017-09-01

    High biodiversity and biomass of soil communities are crucial for litter decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems such as tropical forests. However, the leaf litter that these communities consume is of particularly poor quality as indicated by elemental stoichiometry. The impact of resource quantity, quality and other habitat parameters on species richness and biomass of consumer communities is often studied in isolation, although much can be learned from simultaneously studying both community characteristics. Using a dataset of 780 macro-invertebrate consumer species across 32 sites in tropical lowland rain forest and agricultural systems on Sumatra, Indonesia, we investigated the effects of basal resource stoichiometry (C:X ratios of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, S in local leaf litter), litter mass (basal resource quantity and habitat space), plant species richness (surrogate for litter habitat heterogeneity), and soil pH (acidity) on consumer species richness and biomass across different consumer groups (i.e. 3 feeding guilds and 10 selected taxonomic groups). In order to distinguish the most important predictors of consumer species richness and biomass, we applied a standardised model averaging approach investigating the effects of basal resource stoichiometry, litter mass, plant species richness and soil pH on both consumer community characteristics. This standardised approach enabled us to identify differences and similarities in the magnitude and importance of such effects on consumer species richness and biomass. Across consumer groups, we found litter mass to be the most important predictor of both species richness and biomass. Resource stoichiometry had a more pronounced impact on consumer species richness than on their biomass. As expected, taxonomic groups differed in which resource and habitat parameters (basal resource stoichiometry, litter mass, plant species richness and pH) were most important for modulating their community characteristics. The importance

  2. Kinetic buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibrandi, Giuseppe; Fabbrizzi, Luigi; Licchelli, Maurizio; Puglisi, Antonio

    2015-01-12

    This paper proposes a new type of molecular device that is able to act as an inverse proton sponge to slowly decrease the pH inside a reaction vessel. This makes the automatic monitoring of the concentration of pH-sensitive systems possible. The device is a composite formed of an alkyl chloride, which kinetically produces acidity, and a buffer that thermodynamically modulates the variation in pH value. Profiles of pH versus time (pH-t plots) have been generated under various experimental conditions by computer simulation, and the device has been tested by carrying out automatic spectrophotometric titrations, without using an autoburette. To underline the wide variety of possible applications, this new system has been used to realize and monitor HCl uptake by a di-copper(II) bistren complex in a single run, in a completely automatic experiment. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Head and face reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002980.htm Head and face reconstruction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Head and face reconstruction is surgery to repair or ...

  4. Face Detection and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jain, Anil K

    2004-01-01

    .... Specifically, the report addresses the problem of detecting faces in color images in the presence of various lighting conditions and complex backgrounds as well as recognizing faces under variations...

  5. Drug-Target Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Peter J

    2018-01-17

    The development of therapies for the treatment of neurological cancer faces a number of major challenges including the synthesis of small molecule agents that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Given the likelihood that in many cases drug exposure will be lower in the CNS than in systemic circulation, it follows that strategies should be employed that can sustain target engagement at low drug concentration. Time dependent target occupancy is a function of both the drug and target concentration as well as the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters that describe the binding reaction coordinate, and sustained target occupancy can be achieved through structural modifications that increase target (re)binding and/or that decrease the rate of drug dissociation. The discovery and deployment of compounds with optimized kinetic effects requires information on the structure-kinetic relationships that modulate the kinetics of binding, and the molecular factors that control the translation of drug-target kinetics to time-dependent drug activity in the disease state. This Review first introduces the potential benefits of drug-target kinetics, such as the ability to delineate both thermodynamic and kinetic selectivity, and then describes factors, such as target vulnerability, that impact the utility of kinetic selectivity. The Review concludes with a description of a mechanistic PK/PD model that integrates drug-target kinetics into predictions of drug activity.

  6. The Kinetics and Mechanism for the Oxidation of Nicotinic Acid by Peroxomonosulfate in Acidic Aqueous Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Anju; Sailani, Riya; Gupta, Beena; Khandelwal, C. L.; Sharma, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of nicotinic acid by peroxomonosulfate (PMS) has been studied in acetate buffers. Stoichiometry of the reaction corresponds to the reaction of one mole of the oxidant with a mole of nicotinic acid. N→O product has been confirmed both by UV visible and IR spectroscopy. The reaction is second order viz. first order with respect to each reactant. Activation parameters have also been evaluated. A plausible reaction mechanism is mentioned and the derived kinetic rate law accounts for experimental observations

  7. Compensation effect in H 2 permeation kinetics of PdAg membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Gaofeng

    2012-08-30

    Knowledge about the (inter)dependence of permeation kinetic parameters on the stoichiometry of H 2-selective alloys is still rudimentary, although uncovering the underlying systematic correlations will greatly facilitate current efforts into the design of novel high-performance H 2 separation membranes. Permeation measurements with carefully engineered, 2-7 μm thick supported Pd 100-xAg x membranes reveal that the activation energy and pre-exponential factor of H 2 permeation laws vary systematically with alloy composition, and both kinetic parameters are strongly correlated for x ≤ 50. We show that this permeation kinetic compensation effect corresponds well with similar correlations in the hydrogen solution thermodynamics and diffusion kinetics of PdAg alloys that govern H 2 permeation rates. This effect enables the consistent description of permeation characteristics over wide temperature and alloy stoichiometry ranges, whereas hydrogen solution thermodynamics may play a role, too, as a yet unrecognized source of kinetic compensation in, for example, H 2-involving reactions over metal catalysts or hydrogenation/ dehydrogenation of hydrogen storage materials. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  8. Ab initio and kinetic modeling studies of formic acid oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marshall, Paul; Glarborg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of formic acid (HOCHO) in flames has been developed, based on theoretical work and data from literature. Ab initio calculations were used to obtain rate coefficients for reactions of HOCHO with H, O, and HO2. Modeling predictions with the mechanism...... have been compared to the experimental results of de Wilde and van Tiggelen (1968) who measured the laminar burning velocities for HOCHO flames over a range of stoichiometries and dilution ratios. The modeling predictions are generally satisfactory. The governing reaction mechanisms are outlined based...... on calculations with the kinetic model. Formic acid is consumed mainly by reaction with OH, yielding OCHO, which dissociates rapidly to CO2 + H, and HOCO, which may dissociate to CO + OH or CO2 + H, or react with H, OH, or O2 to form more stable products. The branching fraction of the HOCHO + OH reaction, as well...

  9. Carbon:Nitrogen:Phosphorus Stoichiometry in Fungi: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Surveys of carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus ratios are available now for major groups of biota and for various aquatic and terrestrial biomes. However, while fungi play an important role in nutrient cycling in ecosystems, relatively little is known about their C:N:P stoichiometry and how it varies across taxonomic groups, functional guilds, and environmental conditions. Here we present the first systematic compilation of C:N:P data for fungi including four phyla (Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Glomeromycota, and Zygomycota. The C, N, and P contents (percent of dry mass of fungal biomass varied from 38 to 57%, 0.23 to 15%, and 0.040 to 5.5%, respectively. Median C:N:P stoichiometry for fungi was 250:16:1 (molar, remarkably similar to the canonical Redfield values. However, we found extremely broad variation in fungal C:N:P ratios around the central tendencies in C:N:P ratios. Lower C:P and N:P ratios were found in Ascomycota fungi than in Basidiomycota fungi while significantly lower C:N ratios (p < 0.05 and higher N:P ratios (p < 0.01 were found in ectomycorrhizal fungi than in saprotrophs. Furthermore, several fungal stoichiometric ratios were strongly correlated with geographic and abiotic environmental factors, especially latitude, precipitation, and temperature. The results have implications for understanding the roles that fungi play in function in symbioses and in soil nutrient cycling. Further work is needed on the effects of actual in situ growth conditions of fungal growth on stoichiometry in the mycelium.

  10. Stoichiometry as key to ferroelectricity in compressively strained SrTiO{sub 3} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haislmaier, R. C.; Engel-Herbert, R.; Gopalan, V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2016-07-18

    While strain is a powerful tuning parameter for inducing ferroelectricity in thin film oxides, the role of stoichiometry control is critical, but far less explored. A series of compressively strained SrTiO{sub 3} films on (001) (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(Sr{sub 2}AlTaO{sub 6}){sub 0.35} substrates were grown by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy where the Ti cation was supplied using a metal-organic titanium tetraisopropoxide molecule that helps systematically and precisely control Sr:Ti stoichiometry in the resulting films. A stoichiometric growth window is located through X-ray diffraction and in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements, which show a minimum out-of-plane lattice parameter as well as constant growth rate within the stoichiometric growth window range. Using temperature dependent optical second harmonic generation (SHG) characterization, a ferroelectric-to-paraelectric transition at T ∼ 180 K is observed for a stoichiometric SrTiO{sub 3} film, as well as a higher temperature structural transition at T ∼ 385 K. Using SHG polarimetry modeling, the polar point group symmetry is determined to be tetragonal 4mm with the polarization pointing out-of-plane of the film. The SHG coefficients, d{sub 31}/d{sub 15}=3 and d{sub 33}/d{sub 15}=21, were determined at 298 K. The ferroelectric transition disappears in films grown outside the growth window, thus proving the critical role of stoichiometry control in realizing strain-induced ferroelectricity.

  11. Impact of stoichiometry on the linear and nonlinear optical response of SnOx thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-guo; Liang, Ling-yan; Cao, Hong-tao; Song, Ying-lin

    2017-06-01

    SnO is a promising p-type oxide semiconductor materials for applications such as transparent electronics and solar cells. However, further improvement of its performance is hindered by its diverse stoichiometry. We investigated the nonlinear and saturable absorption characteristics of pristine SnO and O-rich SnOx films by femtosecond degenerate pump-probe measurements at 515 nm. UV-Vis absorption data indicate bandgap blueshift with increasing oxygen concentration. Pristine SnO film exhibit saturable absorption while nonlinear absorption is observed in O-rich SnOx films. Our results shed light on the utilization of SnO in future device applications.

  12. Report on a NASA astrobiology institute-funded workshop without walls: stellar stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Steven J; Young, Patrick A; Anbar, Ariel D; Hinkel, Natalie; Pagano, Michael; Truitt, Amanda; Turnbull, Margaret

    2014-04-01

    We report on the NASA Astrobiology Institute-funded Workshop Without Walls entitled "Stellar Stoichiometry," hosted by the "Follow the Elements" team at Arizona State University in April 2013. We describe several innovative practices we adopted that made effective use of the Workshop Without Walls videoconferencing format, including use of information technologies, assignment of scientific tasks before the workshop, and placement of graduate students in positions of authority. A companion article will describe the scientific results arising from the workshop. Our intention here is to suggest best practices for future Workshops Without Walls.

  13. The influence of additives in the stoichiometry of hybrid lead halide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgués-Ceballos, Ignasi; Savva, Achilleas; Georgiou, Efthymios; Kapnisis, Konstantinos; Papagiorgis, Paris; Mousikou, Androniki; Itskos, Grigorios; Othonos, Andreas; Choulis, Stelios A.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the employment of carefully selected solvent additives in the processing of a commercial perovskite precursor ink and analyze their impact on the performance of organometal trihalide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3-xClx) photovoltaic devices. We provide evidence that the use of benzaldehyde can be used as an effective method to preserve the stoichiometry of the perovskite precursors in solution. Benzaldehyde based additive engineering shows to improve perovskite solid state film morphology and device performance of CH3NH3PbI3-xClx based solar cells.

  14. New approach to develop ultra-high inhibitory drug using the power function of the stoichiometry of the targeted nanomachine or biocomplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Dan; Pi, Fengmei; Wang, Chi; Zhang, Peng; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-07-01

    To find methods for potent drug development by targeting to biocomplex with high copy number. Phi29 DNA packaging motor components with different stoichiometries were used as model to assay virion assembly with Yang Hui's Triangle [Formula: see text], where Z = stoichiometry, M = drugged subunits per biocomplex, p and q are the fraction of drugged and undrugged subunits in the population. Inhibition efficiency follows a power function. When number of drugged subunits to block the function of the complex K = 1, the uninhibited biocomplex equals q(z), demonstrating the multiplicative effect of stoichiometry on inhibition with stoichiometry 1000 > 6 > 1. Complete inhibition of virus replication was found when Z = 6. Drug inhibition potency depends on the stoichiometry of the targeted components of the biocomplex or nanomachine. The inhibition effect follows a power function of the stoichiometry of the target biocomplex.

  15. Oracle ADF Faces cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gawish, Amr

    2014-01-01

    This is a cookbook that covers more than 80 different recipes to teach you about different aspects of Oracle ADF Faces. It follows a practical approach and covers how to build your components for reuse in different applications. This book will also help you in tuning the performance of your ADF Faces application. If you are an ADF developer who wants to harness the power of Oracle ADF Faces to create exceptional user interfaces and reactive applications, this book will provide you with the recipes needed to do just that. You will not need to be familiar with Oracle ADF Faces, but you should be

  16. Face inversion increases attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Helmut; Goller, Juergen; Forster, Michael; Schlageter, Lena; Paul, Matthew A

    2017-07-01

    Assessing facial attractiveness is a ubiquitous, inherent, and hard-wired phenomenon in everyday interactions. As such, it has highly adapted to the default way that faces are typically processed: viewing faces in upright orientation. By inverting faces, we can disrupt this default mode, and study how facial attractiveness is assessed. Faces, rotated at 90 (tilting to either side) and 180°, were rated on attractiveness and distinctiveness scales. For both orientations, we found that faces were rated more attractive and less distinctive than upright faces. Importantly, these effects were more pronounced for faces rated low in upright orientation, and smaller for highly attractive faces. In other words, the less attractive a face was, the more it gained in attractiveness by inversion or rotation. Based on these findings, we argue that facial attractiveness assessments might not rely on the presence of attractive facial characteristics, but on the absence of distinctive, unattractive characteristics. These unattractive characteristics are potentially weighed against an individual, attractive prototype in assessing facial attractiveness. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Learning discriminant face descriptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhen; Pietikäinen, Matti; Li, Stan Z

    2014-02-01

    Local feature descriptor is an important module for face recognition and those like Gabor and local binary patterns (LBP) have proven effective face descriptors. Traditionally, the form of such local descriptors is predefined in a handcrafted way. In this paper, we propose a method to learn a discriminant face descriptor (DFD) in a data-driven way. The idea is to learn the most discriminant local features that minimize the difference of the features between images of the same person and maximize that between images from different people. In particular, we propose to enhance the discriminative ability of face representation in three aspects. First, the discriminant image filters are learned. Second, the optimal neighborhood sampling strategy is soft determined. Third, the dominant patterns are statistically constructed. Discriminative learning is incorporated to extract effective and robust features. We further apply the proposed method to the heterogeneous (cross-modality) face recognition problem and learn DFD in a coupled way (coupled DFD or C-DFD) to reduce the gap between features of heterogeneous face images to improve the performance of this challenging problem. Extensive experiments on FERET, CAS-PEAL-R1, LFW, and HFB face databases validate the effectiveness of the proposed DFD learning on both homogeneous and heterogeneous face recognition problems. The DFD improves POEM and LQP by about 4.5 percent on LFW database and the C-DFD enhances the heterogeneous face recognition performance of LBP by over 25 percent.

  18. The influence of microscopic and macroscopic non-stoichiometry on interfacial planarity during the solid-phase epitaxial growth of amorphized GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belay, K.B.; Ridgway, M.C.; Llewellyn, D.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The influence of microscopic and macroscopic non-stoichiometry on the Solid-Phase Epitaxial Growth of GaAs has been studied. Ion implantation has been employed to produce microscopic non-stoichiometry via Ga and As implants and macroscopic non-stoichiometry via Ga or As implants. In-situ Time Resolved Reflectivity and Transmission Electron Microscopy and ex-situ Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and Channeling have been used to investigate the regrowth of amorphized GaAs layers. As non-stoichiometry shifts from microscopic to macroscopic the interface loses its planar nature and subsequently gets rougher. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Findlay, Stuart G.; Follstad Shah, Jennifer J.; Hill, Brian H.; Kuehn, Kevin A.; Kuske, Cheryl; Litvak, Marcy E.; Martinez, Noelle G.; Moorhead, Daryl L.; Warnock, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimilation of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus by diverse aquatic and terrestrial microbial communities (1160 cases). Regression analyses were conducted by habitat (aquatic and terrestrial), enzyme class (hydrolases and oxidoreductases) and assay methodology (low affinity and high affinity substrates) to relate potential reaction rates to substrate availability. Across enzyme classes and habitats, the scaling relationships between apparent Vmax and apparent Km followed similar power laws with exponents of 0.44 to 0.67. These exponents, called elasticities, were not statistically distinct from a central value of 0.50, which occurs when the Km of an enzyme equals substrate concentration, a condition optimal for maintenance of steady state. We also conducted an ecosystem scale analysis of ten extracellular hydrolase activities in relation to soil and sediment organic carbon (2,000–5,000 cases/enzyme) that yielded elasticities near 1.0 (0.9 ± 0.2, n = 36). At the metabolomic scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions is the proportionality constant that connects the C:N:P stoichiometries of organic matter and ecoenzymatic activities. At the ecosystem scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions shows that organic matter ultimately limits effective enzyme binding sites. Our findings suggest that one mechanism by which microbial communities maintain homeostasis is regulating extracellular enzyme expression to optimize the short-term responsiveness of substrate acquisition. The analyses also show that, like elemental stoichiometry, the fundamental attributes of enzymatic reactions can be extrapolated from biochemical to community and ecosystem scales.

  20. Non-stoichiometry Defects and Radiation Hardness of Lead Tungstate Crystals PbWO4

    CERN Document Server

    Devitsin, E G; Kozlov, V A; Nefedov, L; Polyansky, E V; Potashov, S Yu; Terkulov, A R; Zadneprovski, B I

    2001-01-01

    It has been stated many times that the formation of radiation infringements in PbWO4 is to big extent stipulated by non-stoichiometry defects of the crystals, arising in the process of their growth and annealing. To refine the idea of characteristics of non-stoichiometry defects and their effect on the radiation hardness of PbWO4 the current study is aimed at the melt composition infringements during its evaporation and at optical transmission of crystals obtained in these conditions after their irradiation (137Cs source). In the optical transmission measurements along with traditional techniques a method "in situ" was used, which provided the measurements in fixed points of the spectrum (380, 470 and 535 nm) directly in the process of the irradiation. X-ray phase and fluorescence analysis of condensation products of vapours over PbWO4 melt has found PbWO4 phase in their content as well as compounds rich in lead, PbO, Pb2WO5, with overall ratio Pb/W = 3.2. Correspondingly the lack of lead and variations in th...

  1. Non-stoichiometry defects and radiation hardness of lead tungstate crystals PbWO sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Devitsin, E G; Potashov, S Yu; Terkulov, A R; Nefedov, V A; Polyansky, E V; Zadneprovski, B I; Kjellberg, P; Korbel, V

    2002-01-01

    It has been stated many times that the formation of radiation infringements in PbWO sub 4 is to a big extent stipulated by the non-stoichiometry defects of the crystals, arising in the process of their growth and annealing. To refine the idea of characteristics of the non-stoichiometry defects and their effect on the radiation hardness of PbWO sub 4 , the current study is aimed at the melt composition infringements during its evaporation and at optical transmission of crystals obtained in these conditions after their irradiation ( sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs source). In the optical transmission measurements along with traditional techniques a method 'in situ' was used, which provided the measurements in fixed points of the spectrum (380, 470 and 535 nm) directly in the process of the irradiation. X-ray phase and fluorescence analysis of condensation products of vapours over PbWO sub 4 melt has found PbWO sub 4 phase in their content as well as compounds rich in lead PbO, Pb sub 2 WO sub 5 with overall ratio Pb/W (3....

  2. Stoichiometry of Heteromeric BAFF and APRIL Cytokines Dictates Their Receptor Binding and Signaling Properties*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuepbach-Mallepell, Sonia; Das, Dolon; Willen, Laure; Vigolo, Michele; Tardivel, Aubry; Lebon, Luc; Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Nys, Josquin; Smulski, Cristian; Zheng, Timothy S.; Maskos, Klaus; Lammens, Alfred; Jiang, Xuliang; Hess, Henry; Tan, Seng-Lai; Schneider, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The closely related TNF family ligands B cell activation factor (BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) serve in the generation and maintenance of mature B-lymphocytes. Both BAFF and APRIL assemble as homotrimers that bind and activate several receptors that they partially share. However, heteromers of BAFF and APRIL that occur in patients with autoimmune diseases are incompletely characterized. The N and C termini of adjacent BAFF or APRIL monomers are spatially close and can be linked to create single-chain homo- or hetero-ligands of defined stoichiometry. Similar to APRIL, heteromers consisting of one BAFF and two APRILs (BAA) bind to the receptors B cell maturation antigen (BCMA), transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) but not to the BAFF receptor (BAFFR). Heteromers consisting of one APRIL and two BAFF (ABB) bind to TACI and BCMA and weakly to BAFFR in accordance with the analysis of the receptor interaction sites in the crystallographic structure of ABB. Receptor binding correlated with activity in reporter cell line assays specific for BAFFR, TACI, or BCMA. Single-chain BAFF (BBB) and to a lesser extent single-chain ABB, but not APRIL or single-chain BAA, rescued BAFFR-dependent B cell maturation in BAFF-deficient mice. In conclusion, BAFF-APRIL heteromers of different stoichiometries have distinct receptor-binding properties and activities. Based on the observation that heteromers are less active than BAFF, we speculate that their physiological role might be to down-regulate BAFF activity. PMID:25953898

  3. Synthesis, structure, morphology and stoichiometry characterization of cluster and nano magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, L. Herojit; Pati, S.S. [Institute of Physics, University of Brasilia, 70919-970, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Guimarães, Edi M. [Institute of Geoscience, University of Brasilia, 70910-900, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Rodrigues, P.A.M.; Oliveira, Aderbal C. [Institute of Physics, University of Brasilia, 70919-970, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Garg, V.K., E-mail: vijgarg@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, University of Brasilia, 70919-970, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the stoichiometry of magnetite nanoparticles using three spectroscopic techniques: Mössbauer, photoacoustic and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). By varying the weight ratio of the Fe precursor to the reducing agent (sodium acetate) and a post-synthesis annealing, we were able to synthesize samples with different amounts of Fe vacancies, from stoichiometric Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} to γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. By synthesizing magnetite in the presence of zeolite we obtained nanoparticles within the 3–10 nm diameter range. The spectroscopic results show that there is a correlation between the amount of Fe vacancies and (i) the optical absorption and (ii) the g-values from the Electron paramagnetic resonance EPR spectra of the nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Magnetite nanoparticles and cluster synthesized. • Photoacoustic spectroscopy is effective in determining the stoichiometry. • Particles with 9 nm size has 0 < δ < 0.14. • Less than 9 nm gives 0.14 < δ < 0.3 and size <3 nm have δ = 0.33 (i.e. γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}).

  4. Perovskite Hollow Fibers with Precisely Controlled Cation Stoichiometry via One-Step Thermal Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiawei; Zhang, Guangru; Liu, Gongping; Liu, Zhengkun; Jin, Wanqin; Xu, Nanping

    2017-05-01

    The practical applications of perovskite hollow fibers (HFs) are limited by challenges in producing these easily, cheaply, and reliably. Here, a one-step thermal processing approach is reported for the efficient production of high performance perovskite HFs, with precise control over their cation stoichiometry. In contrast to traditional production methods, this approach directly uses earth-abundant raw chemicals in a single thermal process. This approach can control cation stoichiometry by avoiding interactions between the perovskites and polar solvents/nonsolvents, optimizes sintering, and results in high performance HFs. Furthermore, this method saves much time and energy (≈ 50%), therefore pollutant emissions are greatly reduced. One successful example is Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ HFs, which are used in an oxygen-permeable membrane. This exhibits high oxygen permeation flux values that exceed desired commercial targets and compares favorably with previously reported oxygen-permeable membranes. Studies on other perovskites have produced similarly successful results. Overall, this approach could lead to energy efficient, solid-state devices for industrial application in energy and environmental fields. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Phosphorus Availability Alters the Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Periphyton Growth and Stoichiometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth C Norman

    Full Text Available Exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs may alter the structure and function of freshwater ecosystems. However, there remains a paucity of studies investigating the effects of AgNP exposure on freshwater communities in the natural environment where interactions with the ambient environment may modify AgNP toxicity. We used nutrient diffusing substrates to determine the interactive effects of AgNP exposure and phosphorus (P enrichment on natural assemblages of periphyton in three Canadian Shield lakes. The lakes were all phosphorus poor and spanned a gradient of dissolved organic carbon availability. Ag slowly accumulated in the exposed periphyton, which decreased periphyton carbon and chlorophyll a content and increased periphyton C:P and N:P in the carbon rich lakes. We found significant interactions between AgNP and P treatments on periphyton carbon, autotroph standing crop and periphyton stoichiometry in the carbon poor lake such that P enhanced the negative effects of AgNPs on chlorophyll a and lessened the impact of AgNP exposure on periphyton stoichiometry. Our results contrast with those of other studies demonstrating that P addition decreases metal toxicity for phytoplankton, suggesting that benthic and pelagic primary producers may react differently to AgNP exposure and highlighting the importance of in situ assays when assessing potential effects of AgNPs in fresh waters.

  6. Phosphorus Availability Alters the Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Periphyton Growth and Stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Beth C; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A; Braun, Daniel; Frost, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) may alter the structure and function of freshwater ecosystems. However, there remains a paucity of studies investigating the effects of AgNP exposure on freshwater communities in the natural environment where interactions with the ambient environment may modify AgNP toxicity. We used nutrient diffusing substrates to determine the interactive effects of AgNP exposure and phosphorus (P) enrichment on natural assemblages of periphyton in three Canadian Shield lakes. The lakes were all phosphorus poor and spanned a gradient of dissolved organic carbon availability. Ag slowly accumulated in the exposed periphyton, which decreased periphyton carbon and chlorophyll a content and increased periphyton C:P and N:P in the carbon rich lakes. We found significant interactions between AgNP and P treatments on periphyton carbon, autotroph standing crop and periphyton stoichiometry in the carbon poor lake such that P enhanced the negative effects of AgNPs on chlorophyll a and lessened the impact of AgNP exposure on periphyton stoichiometry. Our results contrast with those of other studies demonstrating that P addition decreases metal toxicity for phytoplankton, suggesting that benthic and pelagic primary producers may react differently to AgNP exposure and highlighting the importance of in situ assays when assessing potential effects of AgNPs in fresh waters.

  7. Effect of microbial enzyme allocation strategies on stoichiometry of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutzler, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    We explored different strategies of soil microbial community to invest resources into extracellular enzymes by conceptual modelling. Similar to the EEZY model by Moorhead et al. (2012), microbial community can invest into two separate pools of enzymes that depolymerize two different SOM pools. We show that with assuming that a fixed fraction of substrate uptake is allocated to enzymes, the microbial dynamics decouples from decomposition dynamics. We propose an alternative formulation where investment into enzymes is proportional to microbial biomass. Next, we show that the strategy of optimizing stoichiometry of decomposition flux according to microbial biomass stoichiometry yield less microbial growth than the strategy of optimizing revenue of the currently limiting element. However, both strategies result in better usage of the resources, i.e. less C overflow or N mineralization, than the strategy of equal allocation to both enzymes. Further, we discuss effects of those strategies on decomposition of SOM and priming at different time scales and discuss several abstractions from the detailed model dynamics for usage in larger scale models.

  8. Biogeographic bases for a shift in crop C : N : P stoichiometries during domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Reich, Peter B; García-Palacios, Pablo; Milla, Rubén

    2016-05-01

    We lack both a theoretical framework and solid empirical data to understand domestication impacts on plant chemistry. We hypothesised that domestication increased leaf N and P to support high plant production rates, but biogeographic and climate patterns further influenced the magnitude and direction of changes in specific aspects of chemistry and stoichiometry. To test these hypotheses, we used a data set of leaf C, N and P from 21 herbaceous crops and their wild progenitors. Domestication increased leaf N and/or P for 57% of the crops. Moreover, the latitude of the domestication sites (negatively related to temperature) modulated the domestication effects on P (+), C (-), N : P (-) and C : P (-) ratios. Further results from a litter decomposition assay showed that domestication effects on litter chemistry affected the availability of soil N and P. Our findings draw attention to evolutionary effects of domestication legacies on plant and soil stoichiometry and related ecosystem services (e.g. plant yield and soil fertility). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  9. Abstract: Stoichiometry, Vibrational Modes and Structures of Molten Nb2O5-K2S2O7 Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boghosian, S.; Borup, F.; Berg, Rolf W.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature Raman spectroscopy is used tostudy the vibrational modes and structures of the Nb205-K2S207(0 < X(Nb2O5)<0.22) molten salt mixtures at 450-700 oC under static equilibria conditions. Band assignments and Raman band intensity correlations with complex stoichiometry are performed in...... in order to characterise the complex(es) formed. The determination of stoichiometry is done following a general procedure which is based on a simple formalism correlating measurements of relative Raman band intensities with the stoichiometry of solutes in molten salt solvents.......High temperature Raman spectroscopy is used tostudy the vibrational modes and structures of the Nb205-K2S207(0 X(Nb2O5)

  10. The Effects of Mixing, Reaction Rates, and Stoichiometry on Yield for Mixing Sensitive Reactions—Part I: Model Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Imran A. Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are two classes of mixing sensitive reactions: competitive-consecutive and competitive-parallel. The yield of desired product from these coupled reactions depends on how fast the reactants are brought together. Recent experimental results have suggested that the mixing effect may depend strongly on the stoichiometry of the reactions. To investigate this, a 1D, dimensionless, reaction-diffusion model at the micromixing scale was developed. Assuming constant mass concentration and mass diffusivities, systems of PDE's were derived on a mass fraction basis for both types of reactions. Two dimensionless reaction rate ratios and a single general Damköhler number emerged from the analysis. The resulting dimensionless equations were used to investigate the effects of mixing, reaction rate ratio, and reaction stoichiometry. As expected, decreasing either the striation thickness or the dimensionless rate ratio maximizes yield, the reaction stoichiometry has a considerable effect on yield, and all three variables interact strongly.

  11. Morphing morphing faces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lier, R.J. van

    2009-01-01

    We have made cyclic morphing animations using two different faces. The morphing animations gradually evolved from one face to the other, and vice versa. When free viewing, the perceived changes were not very large, but the changes could easily be observed. Observers were asked to fixate on a dot

  12. Oxygen Stoichiometry in Cation Deficient (La,Sr)_{1-z}MnO_3 SOFC Cathode Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Jacobsen, Torben; Skaarup, Steen

    1997-01-01

    The variation of oxygen stoichiometry with oxygen partial pressure is determined for perovskites, ABO3, with the general composition: (La1-xSrx)_{1-z}MnO_{3+y}. The measurements are performed as linear sweep voltammetry on an oxygen pumping cell, where the oxygen partial pressure is controlled...... by the imposed potential.It is found that the oxygen stoichiometry and hence the defect chemistry is different whether A-site charge deficiency is established by Sr-doping or by A-site vacancies. Furthermore,A-site deficient lanthanum strontium manganates expel a secondary phase of manganese oxide when exposed...

  13. Exploration of stable stoichiometries, physical properties and hardness in the Rh–Si system: a first-principles study

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Hermann, Andreas; Kuang, Xiao-Yu; Jin, Yuan-Yuan; Lu, Cheng; Zhang, Chuan-Zhao; Ju, Meng; Si, Meng-Ting; Iitaka, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    To understand the structural stability, physical properties, and hardness of the Rh–Si system, we have performed systematic first-principles crystal structure searches for various stoichiometries of rhodium silicides, utilizing the particle swarm optimization method. A new stable stoichiometry, Rh4Si5 with space group P21/m, has been found at atmospheric pressure, complementing the three well-known rhodium silicides of Rh2Si (Pnma), Rh5Si3 (Pbam), and RhSi (Pnma). Our calculations of the stru...

  14. Bridging Food Webs, Ecosystem Metabolism, and Biogeochemistry Using Ecological Stoichiometry Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welti, Nina; Striebel, Maren; Ulseth, Amber J.; Cross, Wyatt F.; DeVilbiss, Stephen; Glibert, Patricia M.; Guo, Laodong; Hirst, Andrew G.; Hood, Jim; Kominoski, John S.; MacNeill, Keeley L.; Mehring, Andrew S.; Welter, Jill R.; Hillebrand, Helmut

    2017-01-01

    Although aquatic ecologists and biogeochemists are well aware of the crucial importance of ecosystem functions, i.e., how biota drive biogeochemical processes and vice-versa, linking these fields in conceptual models is still uncommon. Attempts to explain the variability in elemental cycling consequently miss an important biological component and thereby impede a comprehensive understanding of the underlying processes governing energy and matter flow and transformation. The fate of multiple chemical elements in ecosystems is strongly linked by biotic demand and uptake; thus, considering elemental stoichiometry is important for both biogeochemical and ecological research. Nonetheless, assessments of ecological stoichiometry (ES) often focus on the elemental content of biota rather than taking a more holistic view by examining both elemental pools and fluxes (e.g., organismal stoichiometry and ecosystem process rates). ES theory holds the promise to be a unifying concept to link across hierarchical scales of patterns and processes in ecology, but this has not been fully achieved. Therefore, we propose connecting the expertise of aquatic ecologists and biogeochemists with ES theory as a common currency to connect food webs, ecosystem metabolism, and biogeochemistry, as they are inherently concatenated by the transfer of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous through biotic and abiotic nutrient transformation and fluxes. Several new studies exist that demonstrate the connections between food web ecology, biogeochemistry, and ecosystem metabolism. In addition to a general introduction into the topic, this paper presents examples of how these fields can be combined with a focus on ES. In this review, a series of concepts have guided the discussion: (1) changing biogeochemistry affects trophic interactions and ecosystem processes by altering the elemental ratios of key species and assemblages; (2) changing trophic dynamics influences the transformation and fluxes of matter

  15. Springs as Model Systems for Aquatic Ecosystems Ecology: Stoichiometry, Metabolism and Nutrient Limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. J.; Nifong, R. L.; Kurz, M. J.; Martin, J. B.; Cropper, W. P.; Korhnak, L. V.

    2013-12-01

    Springs have been called nature's chemostats, where low variation in discharge, temperature and chemistry creates a natural laboratory in which to address basic questions about aquatic ecosystems. Ecological stoichiometry posits that patterns of metabolism, trophic energy transfer and community structure arise in response to coupled elemental cycles. In this work we synthesize several recent studies in Florida's iconic springs to explore the overarching hypothesis that stoichiometry can be used to indicate the nutrient limitation status of autotrophs and ecosystem metabolism. Of foremost importance is that the chemically stable conditions observed in springs ensures that autotroph tissue elemental composition, which is thought to vary with environmental supply, is near steady state. Moreover, the elemental ratios of discharging water vary dramatically across our study springs (for example, molar N:P ranges from 0.4:1 to 400:1), subjecting the communities of autotrophs, which are largely conserved across systems, to dramatically different nutrient supply. At the scale of whole ecosystem metabolism, we show that C:N:P ratios are strongly conserved across a wide gradient of environmental supplies, counter to the prediction of stoichiometric plasticity. Moreover, the absence of a relationship between gross primary production and nutrient concentrations or stoichiometry suggests that metabolic homeostasis may be a diagnostic symptom of nutrient saturation. At the scale of individual autotrophs, both submerged vascular plants and filamentous algae, this finding is strongly reinforced, with remarkable within-species tissue C:N:P homeostasis over large gradients, and no statistically significant evidence that gradients in nutrient supply affect autotroph composition. Expanding the suite of elements for which contemporaneous environment and tissue measurements are available to include 19 metals and micronutrients revealed that, while plants were homeostatic across large N

  16. Telehealth is Face-to-Face Service Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    CASON, JANA

    2017-01-01

    The Commentary contests the increasingly outdated and narrow use of the terminology ?face-to-face? (often abbreviated as F2F) to connote clinical interactions in which both the client and the practitioner are physically present in the same room or space. An expanded definition is necessary because when delivered synchronously via videoconferencing, telehealth also provides face-to-face services (i.e., the practitioner and the client view each other?s faces). Terminology that uses face-to-face...

  17. Face-Lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several weeks. Keeping your head elevated and applying cold compresses can help. Plan to have your surgery at least 6 weeks before any important social events. Changes in skin sensation. During a face-lift, the repositioning of your ...

  18. Face the Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... content Skip Navigation Department of Health and Human Services Your Browser does not support javascript, so the search function on this page is disabled 1-800-677-1116 Home > Resources > Factsheets > Face ...

  19. Face Detection and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jain, Anil K

    2004-01-01

    This report describes research efforts towards developing algorithms for a robust face recognition system to overcome many of the limitations found in existing two-dimensional facial recognition systems...

  20. An Operational Framework for the Advancement of a Molecule-to-Biosphere Stoichiometry Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Cherif

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological stoichiometry is an approach that focuses on the balance of elements in biological interactions. It is a theory that has the potential to causally link material processes at all biological levels—from molecules to the biosphere. But the lack of a coherent operational framework has so far restricted progress in this direction. Here, we provide a framework to help infer how a stoichiometric imbalance observed at one level impacts all other biological levels. Our framework enables us to highlight the areas of the theory in need of completion, development and integration at all biological levels. Our hope is that this framework will contribute to the building of a more predictive theory of elemental transfers within the biosphere, and thus, to a better understanding of human-induced perturbations to the global biogeochemical cycles.

  1. Relationship between stoichiometry and ecosystem services in organic crop production systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Fan

    were analyzed together with data from ten organic grass production systems. A significant positive linear correlation between the soil C:N stoichiometric ratio and non-marketable ES values was found in this study, but there was no relationship between the C:O and O:H ratios and the ES values...... to provide fundamental insights into ecological processes that may link individual organisms, communities, and ecosystems at different levels from the gene to the biosphere, and contribute to the understanding of the effects of anthropogenic activities on ES. The overall objective of this project...... is to explore the relationship between stoichiometry and ES values in organic crop production systems and explain the mechanisms behind this relationship. In order to achieve this objective, different organic crop production systems characterized by different stoichiometric ratios and ES values need...

  2. Elemental stoichiometry and compositions of weevil larvae and two acorn hosts under natural phosphorus variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Huawei; Du, Baoming; Liu, Chunjiang

    2017-04-01

    To understand how different trophic organisms in a parasite food chain adapt to the differences in soil nutrient conditions, we investigated stoichiometric variation and homeostasis of multiple elements in two acorn trees, Quercus variabilis and Quercus acutissima, and their parasite weevil larvae (Curculio davidi Fairmaire) at phosphorus (P)-deficient and P-rich sites in subtropical China where P-rich ores are scattered among dominant P-deficient soils. Results showed that elemental stoichiometry and compositions of both acorns and weevil larvae differed significantly between P-deficient and P-rich sites (p plants and animals to P loading, a worldwide issue from excess release of P into the environment.

  3. Stoichiometry in Context: Inquiry-Guided Problems of Chemistry for Encouraging Critical Thinking in Engineering Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Pinto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on examples of educational tools concerning the learning of chemistry for engineering students through different daily life cases. These tools were developed during the past few years for enhancing the active role of students. They refer to cases about mineral water, medicaments, dentifrices and informative panels about solar power, where an adequate quantitative treatment through stoichiometry calculations allows the interpretation of data and values announced by manufacturers. These cases were developed in the context of an inquiry-guided instruction model. By bringing tangible chemistry examples into the classroom we provide an opportunity for engineering students to apply this science to familiar products in hopes that they will appreciate chemistry more, will be motivated to study concepts in greater detail, and will connect the relevance of chemistry to everyday life.

  4. Action of DCCD on the H+/O stoichiometry of mitoplast cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehninger, A L; Reynafarje, B; Costa, L

    1985-01-01

    The mechanistic H+/O ejection stoichiometry of the cytochrome c oxidase reaction in rat liver mitoplasts is close to 4 at level flow when the reduced oxidase is pulsed with O2. Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) up to 30 nmol/mg protein fails to influence the rate of electron flow through the mitoplast oxidase, but inhibits H+ ejection. The inhibition of H+ ejection appears to be biphasic; ejection of 2-3 H+ per O is completely inhibited by very low DCCD, whereas inhibition of the remaining H+ ejection requires very much higher concentrations of DCCD. This effect suggests the occurrence of two types of H+ pumps in the native cytochrome oxidase of mitoplasts.

  5. Dry Etching of Copper Phthalocyanine Thin Films: Effects on Morphology and Surface Stoichiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Brett

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the evolution of copper phthalocyanine thin films as they are etched with argon plasma. Significant morphological changes occur as a result of the ion bombardment; a planar surface quickly becomes an array of nanopillars which are less than 20 nm in diameter. The changes in morphology are independent of plasma power, which controls the etch rate only. Analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that surface concentrations of copper and oxygen increase with etch time, while carbon and nitrogen are depleted. Despite these changes in surface stoichiometry, we observe no effect on the work function. The absorbance and X-ray diffraction spectra show no changes other than the peaks diminishing with etch time. These findings have important implications for organic photovoltaic devices which seek nanopillar thin films of metal phthalocyanine materials as an optimal structure.

  6. Study of Stoichiometry and Stability of some Fe(III)-Amino Acid Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, S.; Shirin, K.; Nisar, S.; Zahida, T. M.

    2005-01-01

    The complexation of ferric with three amino acids (Glycine, Glutamic acid and Aspartic acid) was studied spectrophotometrically and potentiometrically at pH 5.0 and in aqueous medium. The stoichiometry was calculated spectrophotometrically using mole ratio method and is found to be ML3 for Fe (III)-Glycine and ML2 for Fe (III)-Glutamate for Fe (III)-Glutamate and Aspartate complex. The stabilities of these complexes were calculated spectrophotometrically and potentiometrically. The experimental results of potentiometric titrations were treated by well known computer program B EST . The values were further refined till least sigma fit i.e. 0.03. The complexes were not formed under normal conditions. Each complex was studied at more than one wavelength and no kmax was obtained because Fe (III) solution and the complexes absorb in similar wavelength region. The formation constants of all these complexes are not very high shows weak complexation of Fe (III) with these amino acids. (author)

  7. Simultaneous shifts in elemental stoichiometry and fatty acids of Emiliania huxleyi in response to environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Rong; Ismar, Stefanie M. H.; Sommer, Ulrich; Zhao, Meixun

    2018-02-01

    Climate-driven changes in environmental conditions have significant and complex effects on marine ecosystems. Variability in phytoplankton elements and biochemicals can be important for global ocean biogeochemistry and ecological functions, while there is currently limited understanding on how elements and biochemicals respond to the changing environments in key coccolithophore species such as Emiliania huxleyi. We investigated responses of elemental stoichiometry and fatty acids (FAs) in a strain of E. huxleyi under three temperatures (12, 18 and 24 °C), three N : P supply ratios (molar ratios 10:1, 24:1 and 63:1) and two pCO2 levels (560 and 2400 µatm). Overall, C : N : P stoichiometry showed the most pronounced response to N : P supply ratios, with high ratios of particulate organic carbon vs. particulate organic nitrogen (POC : PON) and low ratios of PON vs. particulate organic phosphorus (PON : POP) in low-N media, and high POC : POP and PON : POP in low-P media. The ratio of particulate inorganic carbon vs. POC (PIC : POC) and polyunsaturated fatty acid proportions strongly responded to temperature and pCO2, both being lower under high pCO2 and higher with warming. We observed synergistic interactions between warming and nutrient deficiency (and high pCO2) on elemental cellular contents and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) proportion in most cases, indicating the enhanced effect of warming under nutrient deficiency (and high pCO2). Our results suggest differential sensitivity of elements and FAs to the changes in temperature, nutrient availability and pCO2 in E. huxleyi, which is to some extent unique compared to non-calcifying algal classes. Thus, simultaneous changes of elements and FAs should be considered when predicting future roles of E. huxleyi in the biotic-mediated connection between biogeochemical cycles, ecological functions and climate change.

  8. Stoichiometry of Heteromeric BAFF and APRIL Cytokines Dictates Their Receptor Binding and Signaling Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuepbach-Mallepell, Sonia; Das, Dolon; Willen, Laure; Vigolo, Michele; Tardivel, Aubry; Lebon, Luc; Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Nys, Josquin; Smulski, Cristian; Zheng, Timothy S; Maskos, Klaus; Lammens, Alfred; Jiang, Xuliang; Hess, Henry; Tan, Seng-Lai; Schneider, Pascal

    2015-06-26

    The closely related TNF family ligands B cell activation factor (BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) serve in the generation and maintenance of mature B-lymphocytes. Both BAFF and APRIL assemble as homotrimers that bind and activate several receptors that they partially share. However, heteromers of BAFF and APRIL that occur in patients with autoimmune diseases are incompletely characterized. The N and C termini of adjacent BAFF or APRIL monomers are spatially close and can be linked to create single-chain homo- or hetero-ligands of defined stoichiometry. Similar to APRIL, heteromers consisting of one BAFF and two APRILs (BAA) bind to the receptors B cell maturation antigen (BCMA), transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) but not to the BAFF receptor (BAFFR). Heteromers consisting of one APRIL and two BAFF (ABB) bind to TACI and BCMA and weakly to BAFFR in accordance with the analysis of the receptor interaction sites in the crystallographic structure of ABB. Receptor binding correlated with activity in reporter cell line assays specific for BAFFR, TACI, or BCMA. Single-chain BAFF (BBB) and to a lesser extent single-chain ABB, but not APRIL or single-chain BAA, rescued BAFFR-dependent B cell maturation in BAFF-deficient mice. In conclusion, BAFF-APRIL heteromers of different stoichiometries have distinct receptor-binding properties and activities. Based on the observation that heteromers are less active than BAFF, we speculate that their physiological role might be to down-regulate BAFF activity. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Use of stoichiometry to predict the abundance and functioning of root symbioses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, N. C.

    2012-04-01

    Plants form nutritional symbioses with fungi and bacteria and the importance of these partnerships varies with the mineral fertility of soil. There is strong evidence that plants acclimate and adapt to their local soil conditions through root symbioses; nitrogen limitation is ameliorated by symbiosis with diazotrophic prokaryotes and mycorrhizas ameliorate phosphorus limitation. Corollaries of ecological stoichiometry may be useful for predicting the abundance and functioning of mycorrhizas and N-fixation symbioses. A series of field experiments show that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses in grasslands in North America and in the African Serengeti are most beneficial to plant nutrition when plants are phosphorus limited and have sufficient nitrogen and carbon. A reciprocal inoculation experiment shows that locally adapted communities of AM fungi, associated soil organisms and plants arise such that mutualistic benefits are maximized; both AM fungi and plants grew best in their "home" soil-symbiont combination compared to "away" soil-symbiont combinations. Plants in their home combination acquired more limiting resource (either phosphorus or nitrogen) and consequently grew larger; similarly, AM fungi in their home combination formed more arbuscules and extraradical hyphae. Genetic analysis of the AM fungi inside plant roots indicate that these results correspond to variation in the community composition of AM fungi and also to variation in the symbiotic performance of local isolates of one particular species of AM fungus. The next step is to conduct landscape scale studies of root symbioses to test the hypothesis that plants cultivate microbial communities in and around their roots such that the species and ecotypes of microorganisms within these communities is customized for optimal nutrient acquisition under site-specific environmental conditions. If locally adapted communities of root and rhizosphere organisms are common, then plants may be optimizing their

  10. Evolution of nutrient uptake reveals a trade-off in the ecological stoichiometry of plant-herbivore interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branco, P.; Stomp, M.; Egas, M.; Huisman, J.

    2010-01-01

    Nutrient limitation determines the primary production and species composition of many ecosystems. Here we apply an adaptive dynamics approach to investigate evolution of the ecological stoichiometry of primary producers and its implications for plant‐herbivore interactions. The model predicts a

  11. The Effects of Mixing, Reaction Rates, and Stoichiometry on Yield for Mixing Sensitive Reactions—Part II: Design Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Imran A. Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Competitive-consecutive and competitive-parallel reactions are both mixing sensitive reactions where the yield of desired product depends on how fast the reactants are brought together. Recent experimental results have suggested that the magnitude of the mixing effect may depend strongly on the stoichiometry of the reactions. To investigate this, a 1D, dimensionless, reaction-diffusion model was developed at the micromixing scale, yielding a single general Damköhler number. Dimensionless reaction rate ratios were derived for both reaction schemes. A detailed investigation of the effects of initial mixing condition (striation thickness, dimensionless reaction rate ratio, and reaction stoichiometry on the yield of desired product showed that the stoichiometry has a considerable effect on yield. All three variables were found to interact strongly. Model results for 12 stoichiometries are used to determine the mixing scale and relative rate ratio needed to achieve a specified yield for each reaction scheme. The results show that all three variables need to be considered when specifying reactors for mixing sensitive reactions.

  12. On the chronicle of high-T.sub.c./sub. oxide superconductors.Interdisciplinary of thermochemistry, stoichiometry and thermodynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šesták, Jaroslav; Lipavský, Pavel

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 74, - (2003), s. 365-373 ISSN 1388-6150 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA401/02/0579; GA AV ČR IAA4010101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914; CEZ:MSM 230000009 Keywords : cuprates * stoichiometry * superconductivity Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.094, year: 2003

  13. Methods of nonlinear kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Gorban, A. N.; Karlin, I. V.

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear kinetic equations are reviewed for a wide audience of specialists and postgraduate students in physics, mathematical physics, material science, chemical engineering and interdisciplinary research. Contents: The Boltzmann equation, Phenomenology and Quasi-chemical representation of the Boltzmann equation, Kinetic models, Discrete velocity models, Direct simulation, Lattice Gas and Lattice Boltzmann models, Minimal Boltzmann models for flows at low Knudsen number, Other kinetic equati...

  14. Vertical vector face lift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoano, Brian; Chan, Joanna; Morganroth, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Facial rejuvenation using local anesthesia has evolved in the past decade as a safer option for patients seeking fewer complications and minimal downtime. Mini- and short-scar face lifts using more conservative incision lengths and extent of undermining can be effective in the younger patient with lower face laxity and minimal loose, elastotic neck skin. By incorporating both an anterior and posterior approach and using an incision length between the mini and more traditional face lift, the Vertical Vector Face Lift can achieve longer-lasting and natural results with lesser cost and risk. Submentoplasty and liposuction of the neck and jawline, fundamental components of the vertical vector face lift, act synergistically with superficial musculoaponeurotic system plication to reestablish a more youthful, sculpted cervicomental angle, even in patients with prominent jowls. Dramatic results can be achieved in the right patient by combining with other procedures such as injectable fillers, chin implants, laser resurfacing, or upper and lower blepharoplasties. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. How Well Do Computer-Generated Faces Tap Face Expertise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Crookes

    Full Text Available The use of computer-generated (CG stimuli in face processing research is proliferating due to the ease with which faces can be generated, standardised and manipulated. However there has been surprisingly little research into whether CG faces are processed in the same way as photographs of real faces. The present study assessed how well CG faces tap face identity expertise by investigating whether two indicators of face expertise are reduced for CG faces when compared to face photographs. These indicators were accuracy for identification of own-race faces and the other-race effect (ORE-the well-established finding that own-race faces are recognised more accurately than other-race faces. In Experiment 1 Caucasian and Asian participants completed a recognition memory task for own- and other-race real and CG faces. Overall accuracy for own-race faces was dramatically reduced for CG compared to real faces and the ORE was significantly and substantially attenuated for CG faces. Experiment 2 investigated perceptual discrimination for own- and other-race real and CG faces with Caucasian and Asian participants. Here again, accuracy for own-race faces was significantly reduced for CG compared to real faces. However the ORE was not affected by format. Together these results signal that CG faces of the type tested here do not fully tap face expertise. Technological advancement may, in the future, produce CG faces that are equivalent to real photographs. Until then caution is advised when interpreting results obtained using CG faces.

  16. A temporary face support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, V.I.; Bakhtin, V.N.; Tolkachev, N.I.

    1980-03-30

    A temporary face support is proposed. It includes a beam supported by hydraulic jacks on the housing of the cutter-loader with a working tool and rotary pressure regulator. It differs in that to decrease the volume of unsecured roofing in the face space between the leading edge of the beam and the cutting tool of the cutter-loader, the beam is hinged onto the housing of the rotary pressure regulator by a fastened connecting rod, and the hydraulic jacks are provided with additional powered elements with a mechanism that regulates the length of the cut-off plate of the hydraulic pump when the seam pressure changes.

  17. Reactive extraction of lactic acid using alamine 336 in MIBK: equilibria and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasewar, Kailas L; Heesink, A Bert M; Versteeg, Geert F; Pangarkar, Vishwas G

    2002-07-17

    Lactic acid is an important commercial product and extracting it out of aqueous solution is a growing requirement in fermentation based industries and recovery from waste streams. The design of an amine extraction process requires (i) equilibrium and (ii) kinetic data for the acid-amine (solvent) system used. Equilibria for lactic acid extraction by alamine 336 in methyl-iso-butyl-ketone (MIBK) as a diluent have been determined. The extent to which the organic phase (amine +MIBK) may be loaded with lactic acid is expressed as a loading ratio, z=[HL](o)/[B](i,o). Calculations based on the stoichiometry of the reactive extraction and the equilibria involved indicated that more lactic acid is transferred to the organic phase than would be expected from the (1:1) stoichiometry of the reaction. The extraction equilibrium was interpreted as a result of consecutive formation of two acid-amine species with stoichiometries of 1:1 and 2:1. Equilibrium complexation constant for (1:1) and (2:1) has been estimated. Kinetics of extraction of lactic acid by alamine 336 in MIBK has also been determined. In a first study of its kind, the theory of extraction accompanied by a chemical reaction has been used to obtain the kinetics of extraction of lactic acid by alamine 336 in MIBK. The reaction between lactic acid and alamine 336 in MIBK in a stirred cell falls in Regime 3, extraction accompanied by a fast chemical reaction occurring in the diffusion film. The reaction has been found to be zero order in alamine 336 and first order in lactic acid with a rate constant of 1.38 s(-1). These data will be useful in the design of extraction processes.

  18. [Kinetic model of enhanced biological phosphorus removal with mixed acetic and propionic acids as carbon sources. (I): Model constitution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Yin-Guang

    2013-03-01

    Based on activated sludge model No. 2 (ASM2), the anaerobic/aerobic kinetic model of phosphorus-accumulating organisms (PAO) was established with mixed short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) as the base substance in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process. The characteristic of the PAO model was that the anaerobic metabolism rates of glycogen degradation, poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoates synthesis and polyphosphate hydrolysis were expressed by SCFAs uptake equation, and the effects of anaerobic maintenance on kinetics and stoichiometry were considered. The PAO kinetic model was composed of 3 soluble components, 4 particulate components and a pH parameter, which constituted the matrix of stoichiometric coefficients. On the basis of PAO model, the GAO kinetic model was established, which included 7 processes, and phosphorus content influenced the aerobic metabolism only.

  19. PrimeFaces blueprints

    CERN Document Server

    Jonna, Sudheer

    2014-01-01

    If you are a Java developer with experience of frontend UI development, and want to take the plunge to develop stunning UI applications with the most popular JSF framework, PrimeFaces, then this book is for you. For those with entrepreneurial aspirations, this book will provide valuable insights into how to utilize successful business models.

  20. Face the voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønstrup, Ansa

    2014-01-01

    Belle, Neumark). Finally, the article will discuss the specific artistic combination and our auditory experience of mediated human voices and sculpturally projected faces in an art museum context under the general conditions of the societal panophonia of disembodied and mediated voices, as promoted by Steven...

  1. Problems facing developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Financing, above all political and technical considerations, remains the major obstacle faced by developing countries who wish to embark on a nuclear power programme. According to the IAEA, the support of the official lending agencies of the suppliers is essential. (author)

  2. Two Faces of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Conger, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the inconsistency between Japanese exploitation of world natural resources and gestures to provide leadership in ecologically innovative technology. Explores Japanese culture, power structure, population trends, environmental ethics, industrialism, and international business practices as they relate to the philosophical face of…

  3. The transparent face mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, E A; Strate, R G; Solem, L D

    1979-02-01

    Fabrication of an accurate transparent mask for total contact pressure to the healed burned face proved helpful in controlling scarring. Wearing the mask for 20 hours daily, secured by elastic straps giving 35-mmHG pressure to the scar, can prevent the original facial contours from being distorted by contracting scar tissue.

  4. Robust Statistical Face Frontalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagonas, Christos; Panagakis, Yannis; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Pantic, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that excellent results can be achieved in both facial landmark localization and pose-invariant face recognition. These breakthroughs are attributed to the efforts of the community to manually annotate facial images in many different poses and to collect 3D facial data. In

  5. Simultaneous shifts in elemental stoichiometry and fatty acids of Emiliania huxleyi in response to environmental changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Climate-driven changes in environmental conditions have significant and complex effects on marine ecosystems. Variability in phytoplankton elements and biochemicals can be important for global ocean biogeochemistry and ecological functions, while there is currently limited understanding on how elements and biochemicals respond to the changing environments in key coccolithophore species such as Emiliania huxleyi. We investigated responses of elemental stoichiometry and fatty acids (FAs in a strain of E. huxleyi under three temperatures (12, 18 and 24 °C, three N : P supply ratios (molar ratios 10:1, 24:1 and 63:1 and two pCO2 levels (560 and 2400 µatm. Overall, C : N : P stoichiometry showed the most pronounced response to N : P supply ratios, with high ratios of particulate organic carbon vs. particulate organic nitrogen (POC : PON and low ratios of PON vs. particulate organic phosphorus (PON : POP in low-N media, and high POC : POP and PON : POP in low-P media. The ratio of particulate inorganic carbon vs. POC (PIC : POC and polyunsaturated fatty acid proportions strongly responded to temperature and pCO2, both being lower under high pCO2 and higher with warming. We observed synergistic interactions between warming and nutrient deficiency (and high pCO2 on elemental cellular contents and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA proportion in most cases, indicating the enhanced effect of warming under nutrient deficiency (and high pCO2. Our results suggest differential sensitivity of elements and FAs to the changes in temperature, nutrient availability and pCO2 in E. huxleyi, which is to some extent unique compared to non-calcifying algal classes. Thus, simultaneous changes of elements and FAs should be considered when predicting future roles of E. huxleyi in the biotic-mediated connection between biogeochemical cycles, ecological functions and climate change.

  6. Nitrogen Addition Changes the Stoichiometry and Growth Rate of Different Organs in Pinus tabuliformis Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Jing

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nitrogen (N deposition could influence plant stoichiometry and growth rate and thus alter the structure and function of the ecosystem. However, the mechanism by which N deposition changes the stoichiometry and relative growth rate (RGR of plant organs, especially roots with different diameters, is unclear.Methods: We created a gradient of N availability (0–22.4 g N m-2 year-1 for Pinus tabuliformis seedlings for 3 years and examined changes in the carbon (C:N:phosphorus (P ratios and RGRs of the leaves, stems, and roots with four diameter classes (finest roots, <0.5 mm; finer roots, 0.5–1 mm; middle roots, 1–2 mm; and coarse roots, >2 mm.Results: (1 N addition significantly increased the C and N contents of the leaves and whole roots, the C content of the stems, the N:P ratios of the leaves and stems, and the C:P ratio of the whole roots. (2 In the root system, the C:N ratio of the finest roots and the C:P ratios of the finest and finer roots significantly changed with N addition. The N:P ratios of the finest, finer, and middle roots significantly increased with increasing amount of N added. The stoichiometric responses of the roots were more sensitive to N addition than those of the other organs (3 The RGR of all the organs significantly increased at low N addition levels (2.8–11.2 g N m-2 year-1 but decreased at high N addition levels (22.4 g N m-2 year-1. (4 The RGRs of the whole seedlings and leaves were not significantly correlated with their N:P ratios at low and high N addition levels. By contrast, the RGRs of the stems and roots showed a significantly positive correlation with their own N:P ratio only at low N addition level.Conclusion: Addition of N affected plant growth by altering the contents of C and N; the ratios of C, N, and P; and the RGRs of the organs. RGR is correlated with the N:P ratios of the stems and roots at low N addition level but not at high N addition level. This finding is inconsistent with the

  7. Neural synchronization during face-to-face communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Dai, Bohan; Peng, Danling; Zhu, Chaozhe; Liu, Li; Lu, Chunming

    2012-11-07

    Although the human brain may have evolutionarily adapted to face-to-face communication, other modes of communication, e.g., telephone and e-mail, increasingly dominate our modern daily life. This study examined the neural difference between face-to-face communication and other types of communication by simultaneously measuring two brains using a hyperscanning approach. The results showed a significant increase in the neural synchronization in the left inferior frontal cortex during a face-to-face dialog between partners but none during a back-to-back dialog, a face-to-face monologue, or a back-to-back monologue. Moreover, the neural synchronization between partners during the face-to-face dialog resulted primarily from the direct interactions between the partners, including multimodal sensory information integration and turn-taking behavior. The communicating behavior during the face-to-face dialog could be predicted accurately based on the neural synchronization level. These results suggest that face-to-face communication, particularly dialog, has special neural features that other types of communication do not have and that the neural synchronization between partners may underlie successful face-to-face communication.

  8. Voicing on Virtual and Face to Face Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamat, Hamidah

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses findings of a study conducted on pre-service teachers' experiences in virtual and face to face discussions. Technology has brought learning nowadays beyond the classroom context or time zone. The learning context and process no longer rely solely on face to face communications in the presence of a teacher.…

  9. The elemental stoichiometry (C, Si, N, P) of the Hebrides Shelf and its role in carbon export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Stuart C.; Hartman, Susan E.; Kivimäe, Caroline; Salt, Lesley A.; Clargo, Nicola M.; Daniels, Chris J.; Bozec, Yann; Daniels, Lucie; Allen, Stephanie; Hemsley, Victoria S.; Moschonas, Grigorios; Davidson, Keith

    2017-12-01

    A detailed analysis of the internal stoichiometry of a temperate latitude shelf sea system is presented which reveals strong vertical and horizontal gradients in dissolved nutrient and particulate concentrations and in the elemental stoichiometry of those pools. Such gradients have implications for carbon and nutrient export from coastal waters to the open ocean. The mixed layer inorganic nutrient stoichiometry shifted from balanced N:P in winter, to elevated N:P in spring and to depleted N:P in summer, relative to the Redfield ratio. This pattern suggests increased likelihood of P limitation of fast growing phytoplankton species in spring and of N limitation of slower growing species in summer. However, as only silicate concentrations were below potentially limiting concentrations during summer and autumn the stoichiometric shifts in inorganic nutrient N:P are considered due to phytoplankton nutrient preference patterns rather than nutrient exhaustion. Elevated particulate stoichiometries corroborate non-Redfield optima underlying organic matter synthesis and nutrient uptake. Seasonal variation in the stoichiometry of the inorganic and organic nutrient pools has the potential to influence the efficiency of nutrient export. In summer, when organic nutrient concentrations were at their highest and inorganic nutrient concentrations were at their lowest, the organic nutrient pool was comparatively C poor whilst the inorganic nutrient pool was comparatively C rich. The cross-shelf export of these pools at this time would be associated with different efficiencies regardless of the total magnitude of exchange. In autumn the elemental stoichiometries increased with depth in all pools revealing widespread carbon enrichment of shelf bottom waters with P more intensely recycled than N, N more intensely recycled than C, and Si weakly remineralized relative to C. Offshelf carbon fluxes were most efficient via the inorganic nutrient pool, intermediate for the organic nutrient

  10. Faceness-Net: Face Detection through Deep Facial Part Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuo; Luo, Ping; Loy, Chen Change; Tang, Xiaoou

    2017-08-11

    We propose a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) for face detection leveraging on facial attributes based supervision. We observe a phenomenon that part detectors emerge within CNN trained to classify attributes from uncropped face images, without any explicit part supervision. The observation motivates a new method for finding faces through scoring facial parts responses by their spatial structure and arrangement. The scoring mechanism is data-driven, and carefully formulated considering challenging cases where faces are only partially visible. This consideration allows our network to detect faces under severe occlusion and unconstrained pose variations. Our method achieves promising performance on popular benchmarks including FDDB, PASCAL Faces, AFW, and WIDER FACE.

  11. Real Time Face Quality Assessment for Face Log Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamal, Nasrollahi; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Summarizing a long surveillance video to just a few best quality face images of each subject, a face-log, is of great importance in surveillance systems. Face quality assessment is the back-bone for face log generation and improving the quality assessment makes the face logs more reliable....... Developing a real time face quality assessment system using the most important facial features and employing it for face logs generation are the concerns of this paper. Extensive tests using four databases are carried out to validate the usability of the system....

  12. Flashed face distortion effect: grotesque faces from relative spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangen, Jason M; Murphy, Sean C; Thompson, Matthew B

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel face distortion effect resulting from the fast-paced presentation of eye-aligned faces. When cycling through the faces on a computer screen, each face seems to become a caricature of itself and some faces appear highly deformed, even grotesque. The degree of distortion is greatest for faces that deviate from the others in the set on a particular dimension (eg if a person has a large forehead, it looks particularly large). This new method of image presentation, based on alignment and speed, could provide a useful tool for investigating contrastive distortion effects and face adaptation.

  13. Human faces are slower than chimpanzee faces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Burrows

    Full Text Available While humans (like other primates communicate with facial expressions, the evolution of speech added a new function to the facial muscles (facial expression muscles. The evolution of speech required the development of a coordinated action between visual (movement of the lips and auditory signals in a rhythmic fashion to produce "visemes" (visual movements of the lips that correspond to specific sounds. Visemes depend upon facial muscles to regulate shape of the lips, which themselves act as speech articulators. This movement necessitates a more controlled, sustained muscle contraction than that produced during spontaneous facial expressions which occur rapidly and last only a short period of time. Recently, it was found that human tongue musculature contains a higher proportion of slow-twitch myosin fibers than in rhesus macaques, which is related to the slower, more controlled movements of the human tongue in the production of speech. Are there similar unique, evolutionary physiologic biases found in human facial musculature related to the evolution of speech?Using myosin immunohistochemistry, we tested the hypothesis that human facial musculature has a higher percentage of slow-twitch myosin fibers relative to chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. We sampled the orbicularis oris and zygomaticus major muscles from three cadavers of each species and compared proportions of fiber-types. Results confirmed our hypothesis: humans had the highest proportion of slow-twitch myosin fibers while chimpanzees had the highest proportion of fast-twitch fibers.These findings demonstrate that the human face is slower than that of rhesus macaques and our closest living relative, the chimpanzee. They also support the assertion that human facial musculature and speech co-evolved. Further, these results suggest a unique set of evolutionary selective pressures on human facial musculature to slow down while the function of this muscle

  14. Face-to-Face Activities in Blended Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Annemette

    While blended learning combines online and face-to-face teaching, research on blended learning has primarily focused on the role of technology and the opportunities it creates for engaging students. Less focus has been put on face-to-face activities in blended learning. This paper argues...... that it is not only the online activities in blended learning that provide new opportunities for rethinking pedagogy in higher education, it is also imperative to reconsider the face-to-face activities when part of the learning is provided online. Based on a review of blended learning in business and management...... education, we identify what forms of teaching and learning are suggested to take place face-to-face when other activities are moved online. We draw from the Community of Inquiry framework to analyze how face-to-face activities contribute to a blended learning pedagogy and discuss the implications...

  15. Face recognition system and method using face pattern words and face pattern bytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yufeng

    2014-12-23

    The present invention provides a novel system and method for identifying individuals and for face recognition utilizing facial features for face identification. The system and method of the invention comprise creating facial features or face patterns called face pattern words and face pattern bytes for face identification. The invention also provides for pattern recognitions for identification other than face recognition. The invention further provides a means for identifying individuals based on visible and/or thermal images of those individuals by utilizing computer software implemented by instructions on a computer or computer system and a computer readable medium containing instructions on a computer system for face recognition and identification.

  16. Structural investigation of the β-cyclodextrin complexes with linalool and isopinocampheol - Influence of monoterpenes cyclicity on the host-guest stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceborska, Magdalena

    2016-05-01

    The crystal structures of the complexes of β-cyclodextrin with two chiral terpene alcohols are presented. (-)-Linalool forms the complex of a 2:2 host-guest stoichiometry, while the complex with (-)-isopinocampheol exhibits a 2:3 stoichiometry. The comparison of the crystal structures with the data for other complexes of β-cyclodextrin with chiral monoterpene alcohols obtained from Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) highlights the tendency of linear and monocyclic alcohols to form complexes of 2:2 stoichiometry whereas bicyclic alcohols prefer to form 2:3 host-guest inclusion complexes.

  17. The two Faces of Equipartition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Perton, M.; Rodriguez-Castellanos, A.; Campillo, M.; Weaver, R. L.; Rodriguez, M.; Prieto, G.; Luzon, F.; McGarr, A.

    2008-12-01

    Equipartition is good. Beyond its philosophical implications, in many instances of statistical physics it implies that the available kinetic and potential elastic energy, in phase space, is distributed in the same fixed proportions among the possible "states". There are at least two distinct and complementary descriptions of such states in a diffuse elastic wave field u(r,t). One asserts that u may be represented as an incoherent isotropic superposition of incident plane waves of different polarizations. Each type of wave has an appropriate share of the available energy. This definition introduced by Weaver is similar to the room acoustics notion of a diffuse field, and it suffices to permit prediction of field correlations. The other description assumes that the degrees of freedom of the system, in this case, the kinetic energy densities, are all incoherently excited with equal expected amplitude. This definition, introduced by Maxwell, is also familiar from room acoustics using the normal modes of vibration within an arbitrarily large body. Usually, to establish if an elastic field is diffuse and equipartitioned only the first description has been applied, which requires the separation of dilatational and shear waves using carefully designed experiments. When the medium is bounded by an interface, waves of other modes, for example Rayleigh waves, complicate the measurement of these energies. As a consequence, it can be advantageous to use the second description. Moreover, each spatial component of the energy densities is linked, when an elastic field is diffuse and equipartitioned, to the component of the imaginary part of the Green function at the source. Accordingly, one can use the second description to retrieve the Green function and obtain more information about the medium. The equivalence between the two descriptions of equipartition are given for an infinite space and extended to the case of a half-space. These two descriptiosn are equivalent thanks to the

  18. The Caledonian face test: A new test of face discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Andrew J; Wilkinson, Frances; Wilson, Hugh R; Gordon, Gael E; Loffler, Gunter

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to develop a clinical test of face perception which is applicable to a wide range of patients and can capture normal variability. The Caledonian face test utilises synthetic faces which combine simplicity with sufficient realism to permit individual identification. Face discrimination thresholds (i.e. minimum difference between faces required for accurate discrimination) were determined in an "odd-one-out" task. The difference between faces was controlled by an adaptive QUEST procedure. A broad range of face discrimination sensitivity was determined from a group (N=52) of young adults (mean 5.75%; SD 1.18; range 3.33-8.84%). The test is fast (3-4 min), repeatable (test-re-test r(2)=0.795) and demonstrates a significant inversion effect. The potential to identify impairments of face discrimination was evaluated by testing LM who reported a lifelong difficulty with face perception. While LM's impairment for two established face tests was close to the criterion for significance (Z-scores of -2.20 and -2.27) for the Caledonian face test, her Z-score was -7.26, implying a more than threefold higher sensitivity. The new face test provides a quantifiable and repeatable assessment of face discrimination ability. The enhanced sensitivity suggests that the Caledonian face test may be capable of detecting more subtle impairments of face perception than available tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of the stoichiometry and efficiency of CO2 fixation coupled to reduced sulfur oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Judith M.; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB) couple the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds to the production of biomass. Their role in the cycling of carbon, sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen is, however, difficult to quantify due to the complexity of sulfur oxidation pathways. We describe a generic theoretical framework for linking the stoichiometry and energy conservation efficiency of autotrophic sulfur oxidation while accounting for the partitioning of the reduced sulfur pool between the energy generating and energy conserving steps as well as between the main possible products (sulfate vs. zero-valent sulfur). Using this framework, we show that the energy conservation efficiency varies widely among SOB with no apparent relationship to their phylogeny. Aerobic SOB equipped with reverse dissimilatory sulfite reductase tend to have higher efficiency than those relying on the complete Sox pathway, whereas for anaerobic SOB the presence of membrane-bound, as opposed to periplasmic, nitrate reductase systems appears to be linked to higher efficiency. We employ the framework to also show how limited rate measurements can be used to estimate the primary productivity of SOB without the knowledge of the sulfate-to-zero-valent-sulfur production ratio. Finally, we discuss how the framework can help researchers gain new insights into the activity of SOB and their niches. PMID:26052315

  20. Assessment of the stoichiometry and efficiency of CO2 fixation coupled to reduced sulfur oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith M Klatt

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB couple the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds to the production of biomass. Their role in the cycling of carbon, sulfur, oxygen and nitrogen is, however, difficult to quantify due to the complexity of sulfur oxidation pathways. We describe a generic theoretical framework for linking the stoichiometry and energy conservation efficiency of autotrophic sulfur oxidation while accounting for the partitioning of the reduced sulfur pool between the energy generating and energy conserving steps as well as between the main possible products (sulfate versus elemental sulfur. Using this framework, we show that the energy conservation efficiency varies widely among SOB with no apparent relationship to their phylogeny. Aerobic SOB equipped with reverse dissimilatory sulfite reductase tend to have higher efficiency than those relying on the complete Sox pathway, whereas for anaerobic SOB the presence of membrane-bound, as opposed to periplasmic, nitrate reductase systems appears to be linked to higher efficiency. We employ the framework to also show how limited rate measurements can be used to estimate the primary productivity of SOB without the knowledge of the sulfate-to-elemental-sulfur production ratio. Finally, we discuss how the framework can help researchers gain new insights into the activity of SOB and their niches.

  1. Photosynthetic complex stoichiometry dynamics in higher plants: environmental acclimation and photosynthetic flux control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Aurel Schöttler

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The composition of the photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants is dynamically adjusted to long-term changes in environmental conditions such as growth light intensity and light quality, and to changing metabolic demands for ATP and NADPH imposed by stresses and leaf ageing. By changing photosynthetic complex stoichiometry, a long-term imbalance between the photosynthetic production of ATP and NADPH and their metabolic consumption is avoided, and cytotoxic side reactions are minimized. Otherwise, an excess capacity of the light reactions, relative to the demands of primary metabolism, could result in a disturbance of cellular redox homeostasis and an increased production of reactive oxygen species, leading to the destruction of the photosynthetic apparatus and the initiation of cell death programs. In this review, changes of the abundances of the different constituents of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to environmental conditions and during leaf ontogenesis are summarized. The contributions of the different photosynthetic complexes to photosynthetic flux control and the regulation of electron transport are discussed.

  2. Nitrogen addition alters elemental stoichiometry within soil aggregates in a temperate steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jinfei; Wang, Ruzhen; Liu, Heyong; Feng, Xue; Xu, Zhuwen; Jiang, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Ongoing increases in anthropogenic nitrogen (N) inputs have largely affected soil carbon (C) and nutrient cycling in most terrestrial ecosystems. Numerous studies have concerned the effects of elevated N inputs on soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic N (DIN), available phosphorus (AP), exchangeable calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), and available iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn). However, few have emphasized the stoichiometric traits of these soil parameters, especially within different soil aggregate fractions. In a semiarid grassland of Inner Mongolia, we studied the effect of N addition on the ratios of DOC : DIN, DOC : AP, DIN : AP, exchangeable Ca : Mg, available Fe : Mn within three soil aggregate classes of large macroaggregates (> 2000 µm), small macroaggregates (250-2000 µm), and microaggregates (soil aggregates. The soil DOC : AP ratio significantly decreased along with increasing N gradients within large macroaggregates and microaggregates. Nitrogen significantly decreased the ratio of exchangeable Ca : Mg within soil macroaggregates. The ratio of available Fe : Mn decreased with N addition within three soil aggregate classes. Alteration of elemental stoichiometry within soil fractions that are characterized by different nutrient retention capacity will influence the chemical composition of soil microorganisms and plant quality.

  3. Influence of PEG Stoichiometry on Structure-Tuned Formation of Self-Assembled Submicron Nickel Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingxue Pu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembled submicron nickel particles were successfully synthesized via the one-step surfactant-assisted solvothermal method. The impact of surfactant and reducing agent stoichiometry is investigated in this manuscript. Different morphologies and structures of Ni particles, including flower-like nanoflakes, hydrangea-like structures, chain structures, sphere-like structures, and hollow structures were prepared through different processing conditions with two parameters such as temperature and time. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM, the submicron nickel particles show good saturation magnetization and excellent thermal stabilities with a possible growth mechanism for the variety of the structure-tuned formation. Importantly, the microwave absorption properties of the submicron nickel particles were studied. The lowest reflection loss of Ni-P9/T200/H15 with a thin layer thickness of 1.7 mm can reach −42.6 dB at 17.3 GHz.

  4. Stoichiometry of H+ ejection during respiration-dependent accumulation of Ca2+ by rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, M D; Chen, C H; Lehninger, A L

    1976-02-25

    We have investigated the energy-dependent uptake of Ca2+ by rat liver mitochondria with succinate as respiratory substrate with rotenone added to block NAD-linked electron transport. In the presence of 3-hydroxybutyric or other permeant monocarboxylic acids Ca2+ was taken up to extents approaching those seen in the presence of phosphate. The quantitative relationship between cation and anion uptake was determined from the slope of a plot of 3-hydroxybutyrate uptake against Ca2+ uptake, a method which allowed determination of the stoichiometry without requiring ambiguous corrections for early nonenergized or nonstoichiometric binding events. This procedure showed that 2 molecules of 3-hydroxtbutyrate were accumulated with each Ca2+ ion. Under these conditions close to 2 Ca2+ ions and 4 molecules of 3-hydroxybutyrate were accumulated per pair of electrons per energy-conserving site of the respiratory chain. Since 3-hydroxybutyrate must be protonated to pass the membrane as the undissociated free acid, it is concluded that 4 protons were ejected (and subsequently reabsorbed) per pair of electrons per energy-conserving site, in contrast to the value 2.0 postulated by the chemiosmotic hypothesis.

  5. Prediction of Stable Ruthenium Silicides from First-Principles Calculations: Stoichiometries, Crystal Structures, and Physical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanzhao; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Jin, Yuanyuan; Lu, Cheng; Zhou, Dawei; Li, Peifang; Bao, Gang; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-12-09

    We present results of an unbiased structure search for stable ruthenium silicide compounds with various stoichiometries, using a recently developed technique that combines particle swarm optimization algorithms with first-principles calculations. Two experimentally observed structures of ruthenium silicides, RuSi (space group P2(1)3) and Ru2Si3 (space group Pbcn), are successfully reproduced under ambient pressure conditions. In addition, a stable RuSi2 compound with β-FeSi2 structure type (space group Cmca) was found. The calculations of the formation enthalpy, elastic constants, and phonon dispersions demonstrate the Cmca-RuSi2 compound is energetically, mechanically, and dynamically stable. The analysis of electronic band structures and densities of state reveals that the Cmca-RuSi2 phase is a semiconductor with a direct band gap of 0.480 eV and is stabilized by strong covalent bonding between Ru and neighboring Si atoms. On the basis of the Mulliken overlap population analysis, the Vickers hardness of the Cmca structure RuSi2 is estimated to be 28.0 GPa, indicating its ultra-incompressible nature.

  6. Reproducibility and off-stoichiometry issues in nickelate thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Preziosi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare-earth nickelates are strongly correlated oxides displaying a metal-to-insulator transition at a temperature tunable by the rare-earth ionic radius. In PrNiO3 and NdNiO3, the transition is very sharp and shows an hysteretic behavior akin to a first-order transition. Both the temperature at which the transition occurs and the associated resistivity change are extremely sensitive to doping and therefore to off-stoichiometry issues that may arise during thin film growth. Here we report that strong deviations in the transport properties of NdNiO3 films can arise in films grown consecutively under nominally identical conditions by pulsed laser deposition; some samples show a well-developed transition with a resistivity change of up to five orders of magnitude while others are metallic down to low temperatures. Through a detailed analysis of in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data, we relate this behavior to large levels of cationic off-stoichoimetry that also translate in changes in the Ni valence and bandwidth. Finally, we demonstrate that this lack of reproducibility can be remarkably alleviated by using single-phase NdNiO3 targets.

  7. Stoichiometry control of complex oxides by sequential pulsed-laser deposition from binary-oxide targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herklotz, A. [ORNL, Materials Science and Technology Division, Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6056 (United States); Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Institute for Physics, Von-Danckelmann-Platz 3, 06120 Halle (Germany); Dörr, K. [Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Institute for Physics, Von-Danckelmann-Platz 3, 06120 Halle (Germany); Ward, T. Z.; Eres, G. [ORNL, Materials Science and Technology Division, Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6056 (United States); Christen, H. M.; Biegalski, M. D. [ORNL, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6496 (United States)

    2015-03-30

    To have precise atomic layer control over interfaces, we examine the growth of complex oxides through the sequential deposition from binary targets by pulsed laser deposition. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used to control the growth and achieve films with excellent structural quality. The growth from binary oxide targets is fundamentally different from single target growth modes and shows more similarities to shuttered growth by molecular beam epitaxy. The RHEED intensity oscillations of non-stoichiometric growth are consistent with a model of island growth and accumulation of excess material on the surface that can be utilized to determine the correct stoichiometry for growth. Correct monolayer doses can be determined through an envelope frequency in the RHEED intensity oscillations. In order to demonstrate the ability of this growth technique to create complex heterostructures, the artificial n = 2 and 3 Sr{sub n+1}Ti{sub n}O{sub 3n+1} Ruddlesden-Popper phases are grown with good long-range order. This method enables the precise unit-cell level control over the structure of perovskite-type oxides, and thus the growth of complex materials with improved structural quality and electronic functionality.

  8. Effects of stoichiometry on the transport properties of crystalline phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wuttig, Matthias; Mazzarello, Riccardo

    2015-09-03

    It has recently been shown that a metal-insulator transition due to disorder occurs in the crystalline state of the GeSb2Te4 phase-change compound. The transition is triggered by the ordering of the vacancies upon thermal annealing. In this work, we investigate the localization properties of the electronic states in selected crystalline (GeTe)x-(Sb2Te3)y compounds with varying GeTe content by large-scale density functional theory simulations. In our models, we also include excess vacancies, which are needed to account for the large carrier concentrations determined experimentally. We show that the models containing a high concentration of stoichiometric vacancies possess states at the Fermi energy localized inside vacancy clusters, as occurs for GeSb2Te4. On the other hand, the GeTe-rich models display metallic behavior, which stems from two facts: a) the tail of localized states shrinks due to the low probability of having sizable vacancy clusters, b) the excess vacancies shift the Fermi energy to the region of extended states. Hence, a stoichiometry-controlled metal-insulator transition occurs. In addition, we show that the localization properties obtained by scalar-relativistic calculations with gradient-corrected functionals are unaffected by the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling or the use of hybrid functionals.

  9. Principles of chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    House, James E

    2007-01-01

    James House's revised Principles of Chemical Kinetics provides a clear and logical description of chemical kinetics in a manner unlike any other book of its kind. Clearly written with detailed derivations, the text allows students to move rapidly from theoretical concepts of rates of reaction to concrete applications. Unlike other texts, House presents a balanced treatment of kinetic reactions in gas, solution, and solid states. The entire text has been revised and includes many new sections and an additional chapter on applications of kinetics. The topics covered include quantitative rela

  10. Introduction to chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Soustelle, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This book is a progressive presentation of kinetics of the chemical reactions. It provides complete coverage of the domain of chemical kinetics, which is necessary for the various future users in the fields of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Materials Science, Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Chemistry and Combustion. It will help them to understand the most sophisticated knowledge of their future job area. Over 15 chapters, this book present the fundamentals of chemical kinetics, its relations with reaction mechanisms and kinetic properties. Two chapters are then devoted to experimental re

  11. 3D Microstructural Characterization of Uranium Oxide as a Surrogate Nuclear Fuel: Effect of Oxygen Stoichiometry on Grain Boundary Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudman, K. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Dickerson, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Byler, Darrin David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Peralta, P. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Lim, H. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); McDonald, R. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Dickerson, R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-06

    The initial microstructure of an oxide fuel can play a key role in its performance. At low burn-ups, the diffusion of fission products can depend strongly on grain size and grain boundary (GB) characteristics, which in turn depend on processing conditions and oxygen stoichiometry. Serial sectioning techniques using Focused Ion Beam were developed to obtain Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) data for depleted UO2 pellets that were processed to obtain 3 different oxygen stoichiometries. The EBSD data were used to create 3D microstructure reconstructions and to gather statistical information on the grain and GB crystallography, with emphasis on identifying the character (twist, tilt, mixed) for GBs that meet the Coincident Site Lattice (CSL) criterion as well as GBs with the most common misorientation angles. Data on dihedral angles at triple points were also collected. The results were compared across different samples to understand effects of oxygen content on microstructure evolution.

  12. Acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 1a/2a heteromers have a flexible 2:1/1:2 stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoi, Tudor; Augustinowski, Katrin; Polleichtner, Georg; Gründer, Stefan; Ulbrich, Maximilian H

    2014-06-03

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are widely expressed proton-gated Na(+) channels playing a role in tissue acidosis and pain. A trimeric composition of ASICs has been suggested by crystallization. Upon coexpression of ASIC1a and ASIC2a in Xenopus oocytes, we observed the formation of heteromers and their coexistence with homomers by electrophysiology, but could not determine whether heteromeric complexes have a fixed subunit stoichiometry or whether certain stoichiometries are preferred over others. We therefore imaged ASICs labeled with green and red fluorescent proteins on a single-molecule level, counted bleaching steps from GFP and colocalized them with red tandem tetrameric mCherry for many individual complexes. Combinatorial analysis suggests a model of random mixing of ASIC1a and ASIC2a subunits to yield both 2:1 and 1:2 ASIC1a:ASIC2a heteromers together with ASIC1a and ASIC2a homomers.

  13. The Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase Complex: A Proposed Hexamer of CESA Trimers in an Equimolar Stoichiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Joseph L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Hammudi, Mustafa B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Tien, Ming [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we show a 1:1:1 stoichiometry between the three Arabidopsis thaliana secondary cell wall isozymes: CESA4, CESA7, and CESA8. This ratio was determined utilizing a simple but elegant method of quantitative immunoblotting using isoform-specific antibodies and 35S-labeled protein standards for each CESA. Additionally, the observed equimolar stoichiometry was found to be fixed along the axis of the stem, which represents a developmental gradient. Our results complement recent spectroscopic analyses pointing toward an 18-chain cellulose microfibril. Taken together, we propose that the CSC is composed of a hexamer of catalytically active CESA trimers, with each CESA in equimolar amounts. This finding is a crucial advance in understanding how CESAs integrate to form higher order complexes, which is a key determinate of cellulose microfibril and cell wall properties.

  14. Mechanism and stoichiometry of interaction of DnaG primase with DnaB helicase of Escherichia coli in RNA primer synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitkova, Atanaska V; Khopde, Sujata M; Biswas, Subhasis B

    2003-12-26

    Initiation and synthesis of RNA primers in the lagging strand of the replication fork in Escherichia coli requires the replicative DnaB helicase and the DNA primase, the DnaG gene product. In addition, the physical interaction between these two replication enzymes appears to play a role in the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication. In vitro, DnaB helicase stimulates primase to synthesize primers on single-stranded (ss) oligonucleotide templates. Earlier studies hypothesized that multiple primase molecules interact with each DnaB hexamer and single-stranded DNA. We have examined this hypothesis and determined the exact stoichiometry of primase to DnaB hexamer. We have also demonstrated that ssDNA binding activity of the DnaB helicase is necessary for directing the primase to the initiator trinucleotide and synthesis of 11-20-nucleotide long primers. Although, association of these two enzymes determines the extent and rate of synthesis of the RNA primers in vitro, direct evidence of the formation of primase-DnaB complex has remained elusive in E. coli due to the transient nature of their interaction. Therefore, we stabilized this complex using a chemical cross-linker and carried out a stoichiometric analysis of this complex by gel filtration. This allowed us to demonstrate that the primase-helicase complex of E. coli is comprised of three molecules of primase bound to one DnaB hexamer. Fluorescence anisotropy studies of the interaction of DnaB with primase, labeled with the fluorescent probe Ru(bipy)3, and Scatchard analysis further supported this conclusion. The addition of DnaC protein, leading to the formation of the DnaB-DnaC complex, to the simple priming system resulted in the synthesis of shorter primers. Therefore, interactions of the DnaB-primase complex with other replication factors might be critical for determining the physiological length of the RNA primers in vivo and the overall kinetics of primer synthesis.

  15. Metaproteome analysis of the microbial community during leaf litter decomposition - the impact of stoichiometry and temperature perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiblinger, K. M.; Schneider, T.; Leitner, S.; Hämmerle, I.; Riedel, K.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2012-04-01

    Leaf litter decomposition is the breakdown of dead plant material, a terrestrial ecosystem process of paramount importance. Nutrients released during decomposition play a key role for microbial growth and plant productivity. These processes are controlled by abiotic factors, such as climate, and by biotic factors, such as litter nutrient concentration and stoichiometry (carbon:nutrient ratio) and activity of soil organisms. Future climate change scenarios predict temperature perturbations, therefore following changes of microbial community composition and possible feedbacks on ecosystem processes are of key interest; especially as our knowledge about the microbial regulation of these processes is still scarce. Our aim was to elucidate how temperature perturbations and leaf litter stoichiometry affect the composition of the microbial decomposer community. To this end a terrestrial microcosm experiment using beech (Fagus sylvatica) litter with different stoichiometry was conducted. In a semi-quantitative metaproteomics approach (1D-SDS PAGE combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; unique spectral counting) we used the intrinsic metabolic function of proteins to relate specific microbial activities to their phylogenetic origin in multispecies communities. Decomposer communities varied on litter with different stoichiometry so that microbial decomposers (fungi and bacteria) were favoured in litter with narrow C:nutrient ratios. The fungal community was dominated by Ascomycota (Eurotiomycetes, Sordariomycetes) and Basidiomycota (Agaricomycetes) and the bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. The extracellular enzymes we detected belonged mainly to classes of xylanases, pectinases, cellulases and proteases and were almost exclusively of fungal origin (particularly Ascomycota). Temperature stress (heat and frost) evoked strong changes in community composition, enzyme activities, dissolved organic

  16. Stoichiometry and Life-History Interact to Determine the Magnitude of Cross-Ecosystem Element and Biomass Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Luhring

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystems are linked through the transfer of materials and energy. Studies examining material fluxes across habitat boundaries frequently quantify unidirectional flows of nutrients and energy. However, material fluxes can be multidirectional, and we lack a conceptual framework to describe how their quantity and stoichiometry influence the net transfer of individual elements between ecosystems. Here we develop a zero net transfer isocline (ZNTI framework that integrates the relative mass and stoichiometry of fluxes into and out of an ecosystem. We then use case studies with amphibians and salmon to elucidate how life history, ontogenetic shifts in stoichiometry, and trophic interactions shape relative fluxes of nutrients between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Because they increase in both size and Ca content from ova to metamorphs, amphibian life histories strongly bias them toward net Ca export into the terrestrial environment. Because amphibian biomass, C, P, and Ca ZNTIs do not overlap, there is no value of survivorship where the net flux of biomass, C, P, and Ca are simultaneously balanced between terrestrial and aquatic habitats. The degree of iteroparity and semelparity in salmon strongly affects both the magnitude of net biomass and P flux between riverine and marine environments. While the net direction of biomass flux generally remains strongly biased toward import into the riverine system, net P flux can reach net export into the marine environment because of increasing adult breeding survival leading to reduced mass and %P of what they deposit in rivers (e.g., ova vs. whole carcasses. These examples highlight how ontogenetic shifts in body size and stoichiometry result in asymmetric fluxes of elements and biomass that can lead to simultaneous net imports and exports of different elements within the same system. Furthermore, they demonstrate how changes in life-history characteristics and stage-specific survivorship can lead to

  17. Foil Face Seal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, John

    2009-01-01

    In the seal literature you can find many attempts by various researchers to adapt film riding seals to the gas turbine engine. None have been successful, potential distortion of the sealing faces is the primary reason. There is a film riding device that does accommodate distortion and is in service in aircraft applications, namely the foil bearing. More specifically a foil thrust bearing. These are not intended to be seals, and they do not accommodate large axial movement between shaft & static structure. By combining the 2 a unique type of face seal has been created. It functions like a normal face seal. The foil thrust bearing replaces the normal primary sealing surface. The compliance of the foil bearing allows the foils to track distortion of the mating seal ring. The foil seal has several perceived advantages over existing hydrodynamic designs, enumerated in the chart. Materials and design methodology needed for this application already exist. Also the load capacity requirements for the foil bearing are low since it only needs to support itself and overcome friction forces at the antirotation keys.

  18. Telehealth is Face-to-Face Service Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Jana

    2017-01-01

    The Commentary contests the increasingly outdated and narrow use of the terminology 'face-to-face' (often abbreviated as F2F) to connote clinical interactions in which both the client and the practitioner are physically present in the same room or space. An expanded definition is necessary because when delivered synchronously via videoconferencing, telehealth also provides face-to-face services (i.e., the practitioner and the client view each other's faces). Terminology that uses face-to-face to connote only in-person care is limiting and perpetuates language that is out of line with progressive US regulatory language and broad interpretation within existing regulatory language. It is this author's hope that this commentary will raise awareness of the important policy implications associated with this seemingly minor distinction in terminology and impact the lingering misapplication of the term, face-to-face.

  19. Nutrient stoichiometry in Sphagnum along a nitrogen deposition gradient in highly polluted region of Central-East Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jirousek, Martin, E-mail: machozrut@mail.muni.c [Department of Botany and Zoology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic); Hajek, Michal [Department of Botany and Zoology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic); Bragazza, Luca [WSL Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, Site Lausanne, Station 2, Case Postale 96, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratory of Ecological Systems - ECOS, Batiment GR, Station 2, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Biology and Evolution, University of Ferrara, Corso Ercole I d' Este 32, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2011-02-15

    We investigated the variation of N:P and N:K ratio in ombrotrophic Sphagnum plants along a gradient of atmospheric N deposition from 1 to 2.5 g m{sup -2} year{sup -1} in Central-East Europe. The N:P and N:K ratio in Sphagnum capitula increased significantly along the N deposition gradient. Sphagnum species from the Cuspidata section were characterised by significantly lower ratios at low N deposition. When we compared the observed N:P ratios in Sphagnum plants with the values reported in a previous European-wide study, we found a correspondence in nutrient stoichiometry only for a few bogs: higher P concentration in Sphagnum capitula caused a lower N:P ratio in most of the study bogs so that Sphagnum plants still seem N-limited despite their N saturation. Interaction between summer water table decrease and aerial liming of surrounding forests is proposed as an explanation for this discrepancy. Local forestry practice interacting with climate thus alter N:P stoichiometry of Sphagnum along the N deposition gradient. - Research highlights: Despite high atmopsheric nitrogen deposition, Sphagnum mosses still have rather low N:P ratio. Regional climate and landscape management can enhance P and K availability in bogs. Sphagnum species of the Cuspidata section were characterised by lower N:P ratio. - Regional climate and local forestry practices are expected to alter nutrient stoichiometry in Sphagnum mosses at high atmospheric N deposition in Central-East Europe.

  20. Nutrient stoichiometry in Sphagnum along a nitrogen deposition gradient in highly polluted region of Central-East Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirousek, Martin; Hajek, Michal; Bragazza, Luca

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the variation of N:P and N:K ratio in ombrotrophic Sphagnum plants along a gradient of atmospheric N deposition from 1 to 2.5 g m -2 year -1 in Central-East Europe. The N:P and N:K ratio in Sphagnum capitula increased significantly along the N deposition gradient. Sphagnum species from the Cuspidata section were characterised by significantly lower ratios at low N deposition. When we compared the observed N:P ratios in Sphagnum plants with the values reported in a previous European-wide study, we found a correspondence in nutrient stoichiometry only for a few bogs: higher P concentration in Sphagnum capitula caused a lower N:P ratio in most of the study bogs so that Sphagnum plants still seem N-limited despite their N saturation. Interaction between summer water table decrease and aerial liming of surrounding forests is proposed as an explanation for this discrepancy. Local forestry practice interacting with climate thus alter N:P stoichiometry of Sphagnum along the N deposition gradient. - Research highlights: → Despite high atmopsheric nitrogen deposition, Sphagnum mosses still have rather low N:P ratio.→ Regional climate and landscape management can enhance P and K availability in bogs. → Sphagnum species of the Cuspidata section were characterised by lower N:P ratio. - Regional climate and local forestry practices are expected to alter nutrient stoichiometry in Sphagnum mosses at high atmospheric N deposition in Central-East Europe.

  1. Measuring Conceptual Change on Stoichiometry Using Mental Models and IllStructured Problems In a Flipped Classroom Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norrie E. Gayeta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to measure conceptual change on stoichiometry using mental models and ill-structured problems in flipped classroom environment. This study examined the level of conceptual understanding of students on stoichiometry before and after exposure to flipped and traditional lecture method. It also covered the type of conceptual change, and students’ description in flipped classroom environment. Qualitative and quantitative research methods were used in the study. Respondents were two sections of third year Bachelor of Secondary Education, Biological Science. Frequency, percentage, ranking, mean, standard deviation, Hake factor test, and t-test were the statistical tools applied to answer specific questions. Results showed profound increase towards conceptual change representing a shift from intuitive understanding to correct incomplete understanding level. Thus, change for the better, in theoretical type was determined from pretest to posttest of students exposed to flipped and traditional instruction. Results also indicated that there is no significant difference on students’ conceptual change on stoichiometry exposed to flipped and traditional lecture method. Furthermore, students strongly agreed that flipped classroom instruction helped them develop positive attitude towards chemistry and appropriate for learning college chemistry.

  2. Discovery of a new method for potent drug development using power function of stoichiometry of homomeric biocomplexes or biological nanomotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Fengmei; Vieweger, Mario; Zhao, Zhengyi; Wang, Shaoying; Guo, Peixuan

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance and the appearance of incurable diseases inspire the quest for potent therapeutics. We review a new methodology in designing potent drugs by targeting multi-subunit homomeric biological motors, machines or complexes with Z > 1 and K = 1, where Z is the stoichiometry of the target, and K is the number of drugged subunits required to block the function of the complex. The condition is similar to a series electrical circuit of Christmas decorations: failure of one light bulb causes the entire lighting system to lose power. In most multi-subunit, homomeric biological systems, a sequential coordination or cooperative action mechanism is utilized, thus K equals 1. Drug inhibition depends on the ratio of drugged to non-drugged complexes. When K = 1, and Z > 1, the inhibition effect follows a power law with respect to Z, leading to enhanced drug potency. The hypothesis that the potency of drug inhibition depends on the stoichiometry of the targeted biological complexes was recently quantified by Yang-Hui's Triangle (or binomial distribution), and proved using a highly sensitive in vitro phi29 viral DNA packaging system. Examples of targeting homomeric bio-complexes with high stoichiometry for potent drug discovery are discussed. Biomotors with multiple subunits are widespread in viruses, bacteria and cells, making this approach generally applicable in the development of inhibition drugs with high efficiency.

  3. Stoichiometry, Morphology, and Size-Controlled Electrochemical Fabrication of CuxO (x = 1, 2) at Underpotential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Cemile; Hanedar, Yeşim; Öznülüer, Tuba; Demir, Ümit

    2017-04-25

    A new one-step electrochemical approach has been developed for the morphology, size, and stoichiometry-controlled synthesis of Cu 2 O, CuO, and Cu 2 O/CuO composite structures at room temperature without using surfactants, capping agents, or any other additives. The electrochemical deposition of a Cu monolayer using underpotential deposition (UPD) and the flow rate of oxygen gas bubbled through the deposition solution used for oxidation of the Cu layer are the key parameters for controlling the stoichiometry of the Cu x O (x = 1, 2) structures. The morphologies, crystallinity, stoichiometries, optical properties, and photoelectrochemical properties of the as-electrodeposited Cu 2 O and CuO materials were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), UV-vis absorption, and photoelectrochemical (PEC) techniques. The results indicated that the Cu 2 O and CuO materials electrodeposited on both indium tin oxide coated (ITO) quartz and gold electrodes using this new electrochemical technique exhibit high-quality single crystalline structures and high photoactivity with rapid photoelectrical response to light irradiation.

  4. Kinetic equation solution by inverse kinetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, G.

    1983-01-01

    We propose a computer program (CAMU) which permits to solve the inverse kinetic equation. The CAMU code is written in HPL language for a HP 982 A microcomputer with a peripheral interface HP 9876 A ''thermal graphic printer''. The CAMU code solves the inverse kinetic equation by taking as data entry the output of the ionization chambers and integrating the equation with the help of the Simpson method. With this program we calculate the evolution of the reactivity in time for a given disturbance

  5. Evidence of different stoichiometries for the limiting carbonate complexes of lanthanides(3); Mise en evidence d'un changement de stoechiometrie du complexe carbonate limite au sein de la serie des lanthanides(3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippini, V

    2007-12-15

    Two stoichiometries have been proposed by different laboratories to interpret measurements on the limiting carbonate complexes of An{sup 3+} and Ln{sup 3+} cations. The study of the solubility of double carbonates (AlkLn(CO{sub 3}){sub 2},xH{sub 2}O) in concentrated carbonate solutions at room temperature and high ionic strengths has shown that on the one hand the lightest lanthanides (La and Nd) form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 5-} whereas the heaviest (Eu and Dy) form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} in the studied chemical conditions, and on the other hand, that the kinetics of precipitation of double carbonates depends on the alkali metal and the lanthanide ions. The existence of two stoichiometries for the limiting carbonate complexes was confirmed by capillary electrophoresis hyphenated to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (CE-ICP-MS), used to extend the study to the whole series of lanthanides (except Ce, Pm and Yb). Two behaviours have been put forward comparing the electrophoretic mobilities: La to Tb form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 5-} while Dy to Lu form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-}. Measurements by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) on Eu(III) indicate small variations of the geometry of Eu(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} complex, specially with Cs{sup +}. Although analogies are currently used among the 4f-block trivalent elements, different aqueous speciations are evidenced in concentrated carbonate solutions across the lanthanide series. (author)

  6. Decoding of faces and face components in face-sensitive human visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Nichols

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A great challenge to the field of visual neuroscience is to understand how faces are encoded and represented within the human brain. Here we show evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI for spatially distributed processing of the whole face and its components in face-sensitive human visual cortex. We used multi-class linear pattern classifiers constructed with a leave-one-scan-out verification procedure to discriminate brain activation patterns elicited by whole faces, the internal features alone, and the external head outline alone. Furthermore, our results suggest that whole faces are represented disproportionately in the fusiform cortex (FFA whereas the building blocks of faces are represented disproportionately in occipitotemporal cortex (OFA. Faces and face components may therefore be organized with functional clustering within both the FFA and OFA, but with specialization for face components in the OFA and the whole face in the FFA.

  7. Non-kinetic capabilities: complementing the kinetic prevalence to targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Ducheine, P.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting is used in military doctrine to describe a military operational way, using (military) means to influence a target (or addressee) in order to achieve designated political and/or military goals. The four factors italicized are used to analyse non-kinetic targeting, complementing our knowledge and understanding of the kinetic prevalence. Paradoxically, non-kinetic targeting is not recognized as a separate concept: kinetic and non-kinetic are intertwined facets of targeting. Kinetic tar...

  8. Impact of Temperature and Nutrients on Carbon: Nutrient Tissue Stoichiometry of Submerged Aquatic Plants: An Experiment and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velthuis, Mandy; van Deelen, Emma; van Donk, Ellen; Zhang, Peiyu; Bakker, Elisabeth S

    2017-01-01

    Human activity is currently changing our environment rapidly, with predicted temperature increases of 1-5°C over the coming century and increased nitrogen and phosphorus inputs in aquatic ecosystems. In the shallow parts of these ecosystems, submerged aquatic plants enhance water clarity by resource competition with phytoplankton, provide habitat, and serve as a food source for other organisms. The carbon:nutrient stoichiometry of submerged aquatic plants can be affected by changes in both temperature and nutrient availability. We hypothesized that elevated temperature leads to higher carbon:nutrient ratios through enhanced nutrient-use efficiency, while nutrient addition leads to lower carbon:nutrient ratios by the luxurious uptake of nutrients. We addressed these hypotheses with an experimental and a meta-analytical approach. We performed a full-factorial microcosm experiment with the freshwater plant Elodea nuttallii grown at 10, 15, 20, and 25°C on sediment consisting of pond soil/sand mixtures with 100, 50, 25, and 12.5% pond soil. To address the effect of climatic warming and nutrient addition on the carbon:nutrient stoichiometry of submerged freshwater and marine plants we performed a meta-analysis on experimental studies that elevated temperature and/or added nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus). In the microcosm experiment, C:N ratios of Elodea nuttallii decreased with increasing temperature, and this effect was most pronounced at intermediate nutrient availability. Furthermore, higher nutrient availability led to decreased aboveground C:P ratios. In the meta-analysis, nutrient addition led to a 25, 22, and 16% reduction in aboveground C:N and C:P ratios and belowground C:N ratios, accompanied with increased N content. No consistent effect of elevated temperature on plant stoichiometry could be observed, as very few studies were found on this topic and contrasting results were reported. We conclude that while nutrient addition consistently leads to

  9. Impact of Temperature and Nutrients on Carbon: Nutrient Tissue Stoichiometry of Submerged Aquatic Plants: An Experiment and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Velthuis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human activity is currently changing our environment rapidly, with predicted temperature increases of 1–5°C over the coming century and increased nitrogen and phosphorus inputs in aquatic ecosystems. In the shallow parts of these ecosystems, submerged aquatic plants enhance water clarity by resource competition with phytoplankton, provide habitat, and serve as a food source for other organisms. The carbon:nutrient stoichiometry of submerged aquatic plants can be affected by changes in both temperature and nutrient availability. We hypothesized that elevated temperature leads to higher carbon:nutrient ratios through enhanced nutrient-use efficiency, while nutrient addition leads to lower carbon:nutrient ratios by the luxurious uptake of nutrients. We addressed these hypotheses with an experimental and a meta-analytical approach. We performed a full-factorial microcosm experiment with the freshwater plant Elodea nuttallii grown at 10, 15, 20, and 25°C on sediment consisting of pond soil/sand mixtures with 100, 50, 25, and 12.5% pond soil. To address the effect of climatic warming and nutrient addition on the carbon:nutrient stoichiometry of submerged freshwater and marine plants we performed a meta-analysis on experimental studies that elevated temperature and/or added nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus. In the microcosm experiment, C:N ratios of Elodea nuttallii decreased with increasing temperature, and this effect was most pronounced at intermediate nutrient availability. Furthermore, higher nutrient availability led to decreased aboveground C:P ratios. In the meta-analysis, nutrient addition led to a 25, 22, and 16% reduction in aboveground C:N and C:P ratios and belowground C:N ratios, accompanied with increased N content. No consistent effect of elevated temperature on plant stoichiometry could be observed, as very few studies were found on this topic and contrasting results were reported. We conclude that while nutrient addition

  10. Atomic-scale understanding of non-stoichiometry effects on the electrochemical performance of Ni-rich cathode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fantai; Liang, Chaoping; Longo, Roberto C.; Zheng, Yongping; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2018-02-01

    As the next-generation high energy capacity cathode materials for Li-ion batteries, Ni-rich oxides face the problem of obtaining near-stoichiometric phases due to excessive Ni occupying Li sites. These extra-Ni-defects drastically affect the electrochemical performance. Despite of its importance, the fundamental correlation between such defects and the key electrochemical properties is still poorly understood. In this work, using density-functional-theory, we report a comprehensive study on the effects of non-stoichiometric phases on properties of Ni-rich layered oxides. For instance, extra-Ni-defects trigger charge disproportionation reaction within the system, alleviating the Jahn-Teller distortion of Ni3+ ions, which constitutes an important reason for their low formation energies. Kinetic studies of these defects reveal their immobile nature, creating a "pillar effect" that increases the structural stability. Ab initio molecular dynamics revealed Li depletion regions surrounding extra-Ni-defects, which are ultimate responsible for the arduous Li diffusion and re-intercalation, resulting in poor rate performance and initial capacity loss. Finally, the method with combination of high valence cation doping and ion-exchange synthesis is regarded as the most promising way to obtain stoichiometric oxides. Overall, this work not only deepens our understanding of non-stoichiometric Ni-rich layered oxides, but also enables further optimizations of high energy density cathode materials.

  11. Faced with a dilemma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Vinggaard; Christiansen, Anne Hjøllund; Petersson, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    's legal right to choose TOP and considerations about the foetus' right to live were suppressed. Midwives experienced a dilemma when faced with aborted foetuses that looked like newborns and when aborted foetuses showed signs of life after a termination. Furthermore, they were critical of how physicians...... counsel women/couples after prenatal diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: The midwives' practice in relation to late TOP was characterised by an acknowledgement of the growing ethical status of the foetus and the emotional reactions of the women/couples going through late TOP. Other professions as well as structural...

  12. Combining biophysical methods for the analysis of protein complex stoichiometry and affinity in SEDPHAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Huaying, E-mail: zhaoh3@mail.nih.gov; Schuck, Peter, E-mail: zhaoh3@mail.nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Global multi-method analysis for protein interactions (GMMA) can increase the precision and complexity of binding studies for the determination of the stoichiometry, affinity and cooperativity of multi-site interactions. The principles and recent developments of biophysical solution methods implemented for GMMA in the software SEDPHAT are reviewed, their complementarity in GMMA is described and a new GMMA simulation tool set in SEDPHAT is presented. Reversible macromolecular interactions are ubiquitous in signal transduction pathways, often forming dynamic multi-protein complexes with three or more components. Multivalent binding and cooperativity in these complexes are often key motifs of their biological mechanisms. Traditional solution biophysical techniques for characterizing the binding and cooperativity are very limited in the number of states that can be resolved. A global multi-method analysis (GMMA) approach has recently been introduced that can leverage the strengths and the different observables of different techniques to improve the accuracy of the resulting binding parameters and to facilitate the study of multi-component systems and multi-site interactions. Here, GMMA is described in the software SEDPHAT for the analysis of data from isothermal titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance or other biosensing, analytical ultracentrifugation, fluorescence anisotropy and various other spectroscopic and thermodynamic techniques. The basic principles of these techniques are reviewed and recent advances in view of their particular strengths in the context of GMMA are described. Furthermore, a new feature in SEDPHAT is introduced for the simulation of multi-method data. In combination with specific statistical tools for GMMA in SEDPHAT, simulations can be a valuable step in the experimental design.

  13. Nutrient Partitioning and Stoichiometry in Unburnt Sugarcane Ratoon at Varying Yield Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcos Leite

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Unraveling nutrient imbalances in contemporary agriculture is a research priority to improve whenever possible yield and nutrient use efficiency in sugarcane (Saccharum spp. systems while minimizing the costs of cultivation (e.g., use of fertilizers and environmental concerns. The main goal of this study was therefore to investigate biomass and nutrient [nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P, and potassium (K] content, partitioning, stoichiometry and internal efficiencies in sugarcane ratoon at varying yield levels. Three sites were established on highly weathered tropical soils located in the Southeast region of Brazil. At all sites, seasonal biomass and nutrient uptake patterns were synthesized from four sampling times taken throughout the sugarcane ratoon season. At all sites, in-season nutrient partitioning (in diverse plant components, internal efficiencies (yield to nutrient content ratio and nutrient ratios (N:P and N:K were determined at harvesting. Sugarcane exhibited three distinct phases of plant growth, as follows: lag, exponential-linear, and stationary. Across sites, nutrient requirement per unit of yield was 1.4 kg N, 0.24 kg P, and 2.7 kg K per Mg of stalk produced, but nutrient removal varied with soil nutrient status (based on soil plus fertilizer nutrient supply and crop demand (potential yield. Dry leaves had lower nutrient content (N, P, and K and broader N:P and N:K ratios when compared with tops and stalks plant fractions. Greater sugarcane yield and narrowed N:P ratio (6:1 were verified for tops of sugarcane when increasing both N and P content. High-yielding sugarcane systems were related to higher nutrient content and more balanced N:P (6:1 and N:K (0.5:1 ratios.

  14. A model for evolution of oxygen potential and stoichiometry deviation in irradiated UO 2 fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozrin, V. D.

    2011-12-01

    A model for radial redistribution of oxygen in irradiated UO 2 fuel under conditions of temperature and fission rate gradients has been developed. The oxygen transport in irradiated fuel is considered as a two-scale problem. On the local scale defined by the grain size, irradiated fuel is considered as a multi-phase system including solid solution of fission products in UO 2 matrix, solid precipitates (metal phase, grey phase of complex ternary compounds, the phase of condensed CsI) formed at the gas/solid interface and the gas phase in the intergranular bubbles. Intraganular transport of fission products is described by a set of diffusion equations which are supplemented by the condition of partial thermochemical equilibrium in the subsystem "precipitates & gas phase". The boundary conditions are formulated basing on thermochemical equilibrium on the interface of subsystems "solid solution" and "precipitates & gas phase". Calculation of the partial thermochemical equilibrium yields local values of the oxygen chemical potential and the deviation from fuel stoichiometry. On the global scale defined by the fuel pellet size, spatial variations of the oxygen potential caused by the temperature gradients or the presence of sources/sinks at the pellet boundary determine thermal diffusion fluxes resulting in redistribution of oxygen. The whole set of equations describing local equilibration and the transport in the local and global scales is solved in a self-consistent manner. The model results for radial distribution of oxygen potential of UO 2 calculated for typical reactor operating conditions and the fuel burnup up ˜100 MW d/kg HM are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data.

  15. Membrane protein stoichiometry studied in intact mammalian cells using liquid-phase electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE Jonge, N

    2018-02-01

    Receptor membrane proteins in the plasma membranes of cells respond to extracellular chemical signals by conformational changes, spatial redistribution, and (re-)assembly into protein complexes, for example, into homodimers (pairs of the same protein type). The functional state of the proteins can be determined from information about how subunits are assembled into protein complexes. Stoichiometric information about the protein complex subunits, however, is generally not obtained from intact cells but from pooled material extracted from many cells, resulting in a lack of fundamental knowledge about the functioning of membrane proteins. First, functional states may dramatically differ from cell to cell on account of cell heterogeneity. Second, extracting the membrane proteins from the plasma membrane may lead to many artefacts. Liquid-phase scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), in short liquid STEM, is a new technique capable of determining the locations of individual membrane proteins within the intact plasma membranes of cells in liquid. Many tens of whole cells can readily be imaged. It is possible to analyse the stoichiometry of membrane proteins in single cells while accounting for heterogenic cell populations. Liquid STEM was used to image epidermal growth factor receptors in whole COS7 cells. A study of the dimerisation of the HER2 protein in breast cancer cells revealed the presence of rare cancer cells in which HER2 was in a different functional state than in the bulk cells. Stoichiometric information about receptors is essential not only for basic science but also for biomedical application because they present many important pharmaceutical targets. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  16. H+ stoichiometry of sites 1 + 2 of the respiratory chain of normal and tumor mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalobo, A.; Alexandre, A.; Lehninger, A.L.

    1984-09-01

    The mechanistic stoichiometry for vectorial H+ ejection coupled to electron transport through energy-conserving segments 1 + 2 was determined on cyanide-inhibited mitochondria from rat liver, rat heart, and Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, and on rat liver mitoplasts with ferricyanide or ferricytochrome c as electron acceptors. K+ (+ valinomycin) and Ca2+ were employed as permeant cations. Three different methods were employed. In the first, known pulses of ferricyanide were added, and the total H+ ejected was determined with a glass electrode. Such measurements gave H+/2e-values exceeding 7.0 for both normal and tumor mitochondria with beta-hydroxybutyrate and other NAD-linked substrates; uptake of Ca2+ was also measured and gave the expected q+/2e-ratios. The second type of measurement was initiated by addition of ferricytochrome c to rat liver mitoplasts, with H+ ejection monitored with the glass electrode and ferricytochrome c reduction by dual-wavelength spectrophotometry; the H+/2e-ratios generally exceeded 7.0. In the third type of measurement, mixing and dilution artifacts were eliminated by oxidizing ferrocytochrome c in situ with a small amount of ferricyanide. H+/2e-ratios for rat liver mitoplasts oxidizing beta-hydroxybutyrate consistently approached or exceeded 7.5. Over 150 measurements made under a variety of conditions gave observed H+/2e-ejection ratios significantly exceeding 7.0, which correlated closely with H+/2e-measurements on sites 1 + 2 + 3, sites 2 + 3, and site 2. Factors leading to the deficit of the observed ratios from the integral value 8 for sites 1 + 2 were discussed.

  17. Combining biophysical methods for the analysis of protein complex stoichiometry and affinity in SEDPHAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Huaying; Schuck, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Global multi-method analysis for protein interactions (GMMA) can increase the precision and complexity of binding studies for the determination of the stoichiometry, affinity and cooperativity of multi-site interactions. The principles and recent developments of biophysical solution methods implemented for GMMA in the software SEDPHAT are reviewed, their complementarity in GMMA is described and a new GMMA simulation tool set in SEDPHAT is presented. Reversible macromolecular interactions are ubiquitous in signal transduction pathways, often forming dynamic multi-protein complexes with three or more components. Multivalent binding and cooperativity in these complexes are often key motifs of their biological mechanisms. Traditional solution biophysical techniques for characterizing the binding and cooperativity are very limited in the number of states that can be resolved. A global multi-method analysis (GMMA) approach has recently been introduced that can leverage the strengths and the different observables of different techniques to improve the accuracy of the resulting binding parameters and to facilitate the study of multi-component systems and multi-site interactions. Here, GMMA is described in the software SEDPHAT for the analysis of data from isothermal titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance or other biosensing, analytical ultracentrifugation, fluorescence anisotropy and various other spectroscopic and thermodynamic techniques. The basic principles of these techniques are reviewed and recent advances in view of their particular strengths in the context of GMMA are described. Furthermore, a new feature in SEDPHAT is introduced for the simulation of multi-method data. In combination with specific statistical tools for GMMA in SEDPHAT, simulations can be a valuable step in the experimental design

  18. Nutrient Stoichiometry Shapes Microbial Community Structure in an Evaporitic Shallow Pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarraz M.-P. Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient availability and ratios can play an important role in shaping microbial communities of freshwater ecosystems. The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB in Mexico is a desert oasis where, perhaps paradoxically, high microbial diversity coincides with extreme oligotrophy. To better understand the effects of nutrients on microbial communities in CCB, a mesocosm experiment was implemented in a stoichiometrically imbalanced pond, Lagunita, which has an average TN:TP ratio of 122 (atomic. The experiment had four treatments, each with five spatial replicates – unamended controls and three fertilization treatments with different nitrogen:phosphorus (N:P regimes (P only, N:P = 16 and N:P = 75 by atoms. In the water column, quantitative PCR of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that P enrichment alone favored proliferation of bacterial taxa with high rRNA gene copy number, consistent with a previously hypothesized but untested connection between rRNA gene copy number and P requirement. Bacterial and microbial eukaryotic community structure was investigated by pyrosequencing of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the planktonic and surficial sediment samples. Nutrient enrichment shifted the composition of the planktonic community in a treatment-specific manner and promoted the growth of previously rare bacterial taxa at the expense of the more abundant, potentially endemic, taxa. The eukaryotic community was highly enriched with phototrophic populations in the fertilized treatment. The sediment microbial community exhibited high beta diversity among replicates within treatments, which obscured any changes due to fertilization. Overall, these results showed that nutrient stoichiometry can be an important factor in shaping microbial community structure.

  19. New insights on resource stoichiometry: assessing availability of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus to bacterioplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana R. A.; Bergström, Ann-Kristin; Sponseller, Ryan A.; Moberg, Joanna M.; Giesler, Reiner; Kritzberg, Emma S.; Jansson, Mats; Berggren, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Boreal lake and river ecosystems receive large quantities of organic nutrients and carbon (C) from their catchments. How bacterioplankton respond to these inputs is not well understood, in part because we base our understanding and predictions on total pools, yet we know little about the stoichiometry of bioavailable elements within organic matter. We designed bioassays with the purpose of exhausting the pools of readily bioavailable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC), bioavailable dissolved nitrogen (BDN), and bioavailable dissolved phosphorus (BDP) as fast as possible. Applying the method in four boreal lakes at base-flow conditions yielded concentrations of bioavailable resources in the range 105-693 µg C L-1 for BDOC (2 % of initial total DOC), 24-288 µg N L-1 for BDN (31 % of initial total dissolved nitrogen), and 0.2-17 µg P L-1 for BDP (49 % of initial total dissolved phosphorus). Thus, relative bioavailability increased from carbon (C) to nitrogen (N) to phosphorus (P). We show that the main fraction of bioavailable nutrients is organic, representing 80 % of BDN and 61 % of BDP. In addition, we demonstrate that total C : N and C : P ratios are as much as 13-fold higher than C : N and C : P ratios for bioavailable resource fractions. Further, by applying additional bioavailability measurements to seven widely distributed rivers, we provide support for a general pattern of relatively high bioavailability of P and N in relation to C. Altogether, our findings underscore the poor availability of C for support of bacterial metabolism in boreal C-rich freshwaters, and suggest that these ecosystems are very sensitive to increased input of bioavailable DOC.

  20. Plant allometry, leaf nitrogen and phosphorus stoichiometry, and interspecific trends in annual growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, Karl J

    2006-02-01

    Life forms as diverse as unicellular algae, zooplankton, vascular plants, and mammals appear to obey quarter-power scaling rules. Among the most famous of these rules is Kleiber's (i.e. basal metabolic rates scale as the three-quarters power of body mass), which has a botanical analogue (i.e. annual plant growth rates scale as the three-quarters power of total body mass). Numerous theories have tried to explain why these rules exist, but each has been heavily criticized either on conceptual or empirical grounds. N,P-STOICHIOMETRY: Recent models predicting growth rates on the basis of how total cell, tissue, or organism nitrogen and phosphorus are allocated, respectively, to protein and rRNA contents may provide the answer, particularly in light of the observation that annual plant growth rates scale linearly with respect to standing leaf mass and that total leaf mass scales isometrically with respect to nitrogen but as the three-quarters power of leaf phosphorus. For example, when these relationships are juxtaposed with other allometric trends, a simple N,P-stoichiometric model successfully predicts the relative growth rates of 131 diverse C3 and C4 species. The melding of allometric and N,P-stoichiometric theoretical insights provides a robust modelling approach that conceptually links the subcellular 'machinery' of protein/ribosomal metabolism to observed growth rates of uni- and multicellular organisms. Because the operation of this 'machinery' is basic to the biology of all life forms, its allometry may provide a mechanistic explanation for the apparent ubiquity of quarter-power scaling rules.

  1. Assessing Students Perceptions on Intensive Face to Face in Open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, this study assessed students‟ perception on Intensive Face to Face sessions. The study specifically aimed at identifying students‟ perception on quality of interaction between tutors and students and between students on the other hand. It also explored the nature of challenges students meet in attending face to ...

  2. Face reconstruction from image sequences for forensic face comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, C.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    2016-01-01

    The authors explore the possibilities of a dense model-free three-dimensional (3D) face reconstruction method, based on image sequences from a single camera, to improve the current state of forensic face comparison. They propose a new model-free 3D reconstruction method for faces, based on the

  3. Facing scalability: Naming faces in an online social network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppe, Ronald Walter

    Automatically naming faces in online social networks enables us to search for photos and build user face models. We consider two common weakly supervised settings where: (1) users are linked to photos, not to faces and (2) photos are not labeled but part of a user's album. The focus is on algorithms

  4. Face-to-Face Interference in Typical and Atypical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Doherty-Sneddon, Gwyneth; Whittle, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Visual communication cues facilitate interpersonal communication. It is important that we look at faces to retrieve and subsequently process such cues. It is also important that we sometimes look away from faces as they increase cognitive load that may interfere with online processing. Indeed, when typically developing individuals hold face gaze…

  5. Thermal to visible face recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghyun; Hu, Shuowen; Young, S. Susan; Davis, Larry S.

    2012-06-01

    In low light conditions, visible light face identification is infeasible due to the lack of illumination. For nighttime surveillance, thermal imaging is commonly used because of the intrinsic emissivity of thermal radiation from the human body. However, matching thermal images of faces acquired at nighttime to the predominantly visible light face imagery in existing government databases and watch lists is a challenging task. The difficulty arises from the significant difference between the face's thermal signature and its visible signature (i.e. the modality gap). To match the thermal face to the visible face acquired by the two different modalities, we applied face recognition algorithms that reduce the modality gap in each step of face identification, from low-level analysis to machine learning techniques. Specifically, partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) based approaches were used to correlate the thermal face signatures to the visible face signatures, yielding a thermal-to-visible face identification rate of 49.9%. While this work makes progress for thermal-to-visible face recognition, more efforts need to be devoted to solving this difficult task. Successful development of a thermal-to-visible face recognition system would significantly enhance the Nation's nighttime surveillance capabilities.

  6. Compositional effects on the ignition of FACE gasolines

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2016-05-08

    As regulatory measures for improved fuel economy and decreased emissions are pushing gasoline engine combustion technologies towards extreme conditions (i.e., boosted and intercooled intake with exhaust gas recirculation), fuel ignition characteristics become increasingly important for enabling stable operation. This study explores the effects of chemical composition on the fundamental ignition behavior of gasoline fuels. Two well-characterized, high-octane, non-oxygenated FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasolines, FACE F and FACE G, having similar antiknock indices but different octane sensitivities and chemical compositions are studied. Ignition experiments were conducted in shock tubes and a rapid compression machine (RCM) at nominal pressures of 20 and 40. atm, equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 1.0, and temperatures ranging from 650 to 1270. K. Results at temperatures above 900. K indicate that ignition delay time is similar for these fuels. However, RCM measurements below 900. K demonstrate a stronger negative temperature coefficient behavior for FACE F gasoline having lower octane sensitivity. In addition, RCM pressure profiles under two-stage ignition conditions illustrate that the magnitude of low-temperature heat release (LTHR) increases with decreasing fuel octane sensitivity. However, intermediate-temperature heat release is shown to increase as fuel octane sensitivity increases. Various surrogate fuel mixtures were formulated to conduct chemical kinetic modeling, and complex multicomponent surrogate mixtures were shown to reproduce experimentally observed trends better than simpler two- and three-component mixtures composed of n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene. Measurements in a Cooperative Fuels Research (CFR) engine demonstrated that the multicomponent surrogates accurately captured the antiknock quality of the FACE gasolines. Simulations were performed using multicomponent surrogates for FACE F and G to reveal the underlying chemical

  7. ITER plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, T.; Vieider, G.; Akiba, M.

    1991-01-01

    This document summarizes results of the Conceptual Design Activities (1988-1990) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project, namely those that pertain to the plasma facing components of the reactor vessel, of which the main components are the first wall and the divertor plates. After an introduction and an executive summary, the principal functions of the plasma-facing components are delineated, i.e., (i) define the low-impurity region within which the plasma is produced, (ii) absorb the electromagnetic radiation and charged-particle flux from the plasma, and (iii) protect the blanket/shield components from the plasma. A list of critical design issues for the divertor plates and the first wall is given, followed by discussions of the divertor plate design (including the issues of material selection, erosion lifetime, design concepts, thermal and mechanical analysis, operating limits and overall lifetime, tritium inventory, baking and conditioning, safety analysis, manufacture and testing, and advanced divertor concepts) and the first wall design (armor material and design, erosion lifetime, overall design concepts, thermal and mechanical analysis, lifetime and operating limits, tritium inventory, baking and conditioning, safety analysis, manufacture and testing, an alternative first wall design, and the limiters used instead of the divertor plates during start-up). Refs, figs and tabs

  8. Irreversible processes kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Brush, Stephen G

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic Theory, Volume 2: Irreversible Processes deals with the kinetic theory of gases and the irreversible processes they undergo. It includes the two papers by James Clerk Maxwell and Ludwig Boltzmann in which the basic equations for transport processes in gases are formulated, together with the first derivation of Boltzmann's ""H-theorem"" and a discussion of this theorem, along with the problem of irreversibility.Comprised of 10 chapters, this volume begins with an introduction to the fundamental nature of heat and of gases, along with Boltzmann's work on the kinetic theory of gases and s

  9. Matching score based face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, B.J.; Beumer, G.M.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate face registration is of vital importance to the performance of a face recognition algorithm. We propose a new method: matching score based face registration, which searches for optimal alignment by maximizing the matching score output of a classifier as a function of the different

  10. Forensic Face Recognition: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Quaglia, Adamo; Epifano, Calogera M.

    2012-01-01

    The improvements of automatic face recognition during the last 2 decades have disclosed new applications like border control and camera surveillance. A new application field is forensic face recognition. Traditionally, face recognition by human experts has been used in forensics, but now there is a

  11. Enabling dynamics in face analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibeklioğlu, H.

    2014-01-01

    Most of the approaches in automatic face analysis rely solely on static appearance. However, temporal analysis of expressions reveals interesting patterns. For a better understanding of the human face, this thesis focuses on temporal changes in the face, and dynamic patterns of expressions. In

  12. Side-View Face Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santemiz, P.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2010-01-01

    Side-view face recognition is a challenging problem with many applications. Especially in real-life scenarios where the environment is uncontrolled, coping with pose variations up to side-view positions is an important task for face recognition. In this paper we discuss the use of side view face

  13. Facing evil: theological reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Brand

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article suggests some possible responses, drawn from the Judeo-Christian-
    Islamic tradition, to Theo de Wit’s analysis of evil, narrativity and reconciliation. It
    is argued, first, that the problem of evil is rightly seen, not as a question relating
    incidentally to faith, but as an existential challenge arising from the human condition,
    to which the Judeo-Christian-Islamic tradition has sought, from its inception, to
    provide answers. Secondly, that the theme of not downplaying evil, but facing it in its
    full reality, is central to this tradition, inter alia in the longing for, and expectation of,
    the resurrection of the dead as a way of approaching the unresolved problem of past
    evil. Some related theological concepts and questions are also brought to bear on the
    questions raised by De Wit.

  14. Facing the Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Kai

    2014-01-01

    China's rise signifies a gradual transformation of the international system from unipolarity to a non-unipolar world. ,4s an organization of small and middle powers, ASEAN faces strategic uncertainties brought about by the power transition in the system. Deepening economic interdependence between...... ASEAN and China has amplified the economic cost for the ASEAN states to use traditional military means to deal with China s rise. Applying institutional balancing theory, this paper examines how ASEAN has adopted various institutional instruments, such as the ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF), the East Asia...... Summit (EAS), the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP), and the ASEAN Community, to constrain and shape China's behaviour in the region in the post-Cold War era. It argues that due to globalization and economic interdependence, the power transition in the 21st century is different from...

  15. Thermal kinetic inductance detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Thomas; Gades, Lisa; Miceli, Antonio; Quaranta, Orlando

    2016-12-20

    A microcalorimeter for radiation detection that uses superconducting kinetic inductance resonators as the thermometers. The detector is frequency-multiplexed which enables detector systems with a large number of pixels.

  16. Face Attention Network: An Effective Face Detector for the Occluded Faces

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jianfeng; Yuan, Ye; Yu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The performance of face detection has been largely improved with the development of convolutional neural network. However, the occlusion issue due to mask and sunglasses, is still a challenging problem. The improvement on the recall of these occluded cases usually brings the risk of high false positives. In this paper, we present a novel face detector called Face Attention Network (FAN), which can significantly improve the recall of the face detection problem in the occluded case without comp...

  17. Integrated survey of elemental stoichiometry (C, N, P from the western to eastern Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pujo-Pay

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an extensive vertical and longitudinal description of the biogeochemistry along an East-West transect of 3000 km across the Mediterranean Sea during summer 2008 (BOUM cruise. During this period of strong stratification, the distribution of nutrients, particulate and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, nitrogen (DON and phosphorus (DOP were examined to produce a detailed spatial and vertically extended description of the elemental stoichiometry of the Mediterranean Sea. Surface waters were depleted in nutrients and the thickness of this depleted layer increased towards the East from about 10 m in the Gulf of Lion to more than 100 m in the Levantine basin, with the phosphacline deepening to a greater extent than that for corresponding nitracline and thermocline depths. We used the minimum oxygen concentration through the water column in combination with 2 fixed concentrations of dissolved oxygen to distinguish an intermediate layer (Mineralization Layer; ML from surface (Biogenic Layer; BL, and deep layers (DL. Whilst each layer was represented by different water masses, this approach allowed us to propose a schematic box-plot representation of the biogeochemical functioning of the two Mediterranean basins. Despite the increasing oligotrophic nature and the degree of P-depletion along the West to East gradient strong similarities were encountered between eastern and western ecosystems. Within the BL, the C:N:P ratios in all pools largely exceeded the Redfield ratios, but surprisingly, the nitrate vs. phosphate ratios in the ML and DL tended towards the canonical Redfield values in both basins. A change in particulate matter composition has been identified by a C increase relative to N and P along the whole water column in the western basin and between BL and ML in the eastern one. Our data showed a noticeable stability of the DOC:DON ratio (12–13 throughout the Mediterranean Sea. This is in good agreement with a P-limitation of

  18. Root Responses to Altered Ecosystem N/P Stoichiometry in a Mediterranean Tree-Grass Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Richard; Moreno, Gerado; Morris, Kendalynn; Schrumpf, Marion; Migliavacca, Mirco

    2017-04-01

    Biological components of the soil system (plant roots, fungi, microbes) may respond to biogeochemical drivers (e.g. nutrient status, water availability, C availability) in dissimilar ways due to differing scales, activities and access to resources. Understanding individual components and their phenology in the soil system is therefore critical to interpret overall fluxes. In seasonally dry systems, plants balance belowground investment with other growth and maintenance in life strategies where water limitations (in dry periods), nutrient limitations (in wet periods) and temperature/light limitations (in winter) interact, varying the need to invest in gaining these three resources throughout the year. Additionally, root growth may also be desynchronized with overall nutrient demand due to the ability to take up nutrients outside of seasonal periods of demand for storage and subsequent reallocation. We examined root responses to an ecosystem level stoichiometry (+N / +N+P) manipulation experiment at a highly instrumented site in a strongly seasonal semi-arid tree-grass ('dehesa') system (Majadas del Tietar, Spain). We are interested in whether root growth and phenology is affected by differing demand for nutrients/water both between sites and at tree and grass-dominated subsites. Many non-invasive, ecosystem-scale methods to measure changes in biogeochemical cycling focus only on integrated whole-system fluxes or above-ground change and it is difficult to extract a root signal. However, local soil respiration fluxes and root growth introduces a variety of method-dependent artefacts and drawbacks necessitating multiple approaches and careful interpretation. Therefore, in coordination with indirect measurements (subcanopy fluxes via eddy covariance, soil respiration chambers) we are using direct soil coring, ingrowth cores and repeatable measurements from custom-built minirhizotron systems to attempt to assess site-level variation in root biomass and phenology. In this

  19. Dancing on DNA : Kinetic Aspects of Search Processes on DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafvizi, Anahita; Mirny, Leonid A.; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2011-01-01

    Recognition and binding of specific sites on DNA by proteins is central for many cellular functions such as transcription, replication, and recombination. In the search for its target site, the DNA-associated protein is facing both thermodynamic and kinetic difficulties. The thermodynamic challenge

  20. Energy conservation using face detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deotale, Nilesh T.; Kalbande, Dhananjay R.; Mishra, Akassh A.

    2011-10-01

    Computerized Face Detection, is concerned with the difficult task of converting a video signal of a person to written text. It has several applications like face recognition, simultaneous multiple face processing, biometrics, security, video surveillance, human computer interface, image database management, digital cameras use face detection for autofocus, selecting regions of interest in photo slideshows that use a pan-and-scale and The Present Paper deals with energy conservation using face detection. Automating the process to a computer requires the use of various image processing techniques. There are various methods that can be used for Face Detection such as Contour tracking methods, Template matching, Controlled background, Model based, Motion based and color based. Basically, the video of the subject are converted into images are further selected manually for processing. However, several factors like poor illumination, movement of face, viewpoint-dependent Physical appearance, Acquisition geometry, Imaging conditions, Compression artifacts makes Face detection difficult. This paper reports an algorithm for conservation of energy using face detection for various devices. The present paper suggests Energy Conservation can be done by Detecting the Face and reducing the brightness of complete image and then adjusting the brightness of the particular area of an image where the face is located using histogram equalization.

  1. Effect of Wind on the Relation of Leaf N, P Stoichiometry with Leaf Morphology in Quercus Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Leaf nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P stoichiometry correlates closely to leaf morphology, which is strongly impacted by wind at multiple scales. However, it is not clear how leaf N, P stoichiometry and its relationship to leaf morphology changes with wind load. We determined the leaf N and P concentrations and leaf morphology—including specific leaf area (SLA and leaf dissection index (LDI—for eight Quercus species under a simulated wind load for seven months. Leaf N and P concentrations increased significantly under these conditions for Quercus acutissima, Quercus rubra, Quercus texana, and Quercus palustris—which have elliptic leaves—due to their higher N, P requirements and a resultant leaf biomass decrease, which is a tolerance strategy for Quercus species under a wind load. Leaf N:P was relatively stable under wind for all species, which supports stoichiometric homeostasis. Leaf N concentrations showed a positive correlation to SLA, leaf N and P concentrations showed positive correlations to LDI under each wind treatment, and the slope of correlations was not affected by wind, which indicates synchronous variations between leaf stoichiometry and leaf morphology under wind. However, the intercept of correlations was affected by wind, and leaf N and P use efficiency decreased under the wind load, which suggests that the Quercus species changes from “fast investment-return” in the control to “slow investment-return” under windy conditions. These results will be valuable to understanding functional strategies for plants under varying wind loads, especially synchronous variations in leaf traits along a wind gradient.

  2. Variation of crystallinity and stoichiometry in films of gallium oxide, gallium nitride and barium zirconate prepared by means of PLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendt, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is an ablation technique for thin film preparation of many materials. The film properties can be well controlled by the process parameters. Therefore, in many cases a given material can be deposited with different properties by changing one or more process parameters. In this thesis thin films of gallium oxide, gallium nitride and barium zirconate were deposited with a large variation in structure and stoichiometry by means of Pulsed Laser Deposition. The characterization of the film crystallinity, phase purity and short range structural order was completed by means of X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The stoichiometry was investigated using electron probe microanalysis. For analyzing the correlation between the structure and stoichiometry with the optical and electrical properties, optical absorption and electrical conductivity measurements were carried out. The investigation of all three material systems showed that very unique properties can be realized when combining an amorphous structure and a non-stoichiometric composition. For example, in amorphous and oxygen deficient gallium oxide an insulator-metal-transition can be induced by partial crystallization of the as prepared phase accomplished by annealing at about 400 C in argon atmosphere (as shown in literature). Furthermore, amorphous and highly non-stoichiometric barium zirconate has the ability to split water molecules to hydrogen and oxygen at room temperature. A detailed analysis of both phenomena has been performed by means of photoemission and transmission electron microscopy in the case of gallium oxide and via X-ray absorption spectroscopy and gas chromatography in the case of barium zirconate.

  3. Absolute rate constant, kinetic isotope effect, and mechanism of the reaction of ethylene oxide with oxygen(3P) atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogan, D.J.; Hand, C.W.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction of ethylene oxide with O( 3 P) atoms has been investigated in detail using a discharge flow system with mass spectrometric and photometric detection. Absolute measurements of the rate constant, kinetic isotope effect, and stoichiometry have been made. The overall stoichiometry is 3 +- 1 oxygen atoms consumed per ethylene oxide molecule. Arrhenius parameters for the reaction of C 2 H 4 O with O are A = 10/sup (9.28+-0.08)/ L mol -1 s -1 and E = 5250 +- 150 cal mol -1 over the temperature range 298 to 691 0 K, and Arrhenius parameters for the kinetic isotope effect are A/sub H//A/sub D/ = 0.9 +- 0.20 and E/sub D/--E/sub H/ = 1460 +- 230 cal mol -1 , over the temperature range 482 to 691 0 K. The magnitude of the preexponential factor and the temperature dependence of the isotope effect establish that hydrogen abstraction, rather than insertion to form a dioxetane intermediate, is the sole reactive channel for ethylene oxide plus O( 3 P). The Arrhenius parameters are discussed and compared to other hydrogen abstraction reactions of O( 3 P). Comparison is also made to the reactions of O( 3 P) with other strained three-membered ring compounds. The final products H 2 , H 2 O, HCHO, CO, and CO 2 were identified, and a mechanism is proposed to account for their formation from the radical products of the initial step

  4. Sequential nutrient uptake as a potential mechanism for phytoplankton to maintain high primary productivity and balanced nutrient stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kedong; Liu, Hao; Harrison, Paul J.

    2017-05-01

    We hypothesize that phytoplankton have the sequential nutrient uptake strategy to maintain nutrient stoichiometry and high primary productivity in the water column. According to this hypothesis, phytoplankton take up the most limiting nutrient first until depletion, continue to draw down non-limiting nutrients and then take up the most limiting nutrient rapidly when it is available. These processes would result in the variation of ambient nutrient ratios in the water column around the Redfield ratio. We used high-resolution continuous vertical profiles of nutrients, nutrient ratios and on-board ship incubation experiments to test this hypothesis in the Strait of Georgia. At the surface in summer, ambient NO3- was depleted with excess PO43- and SiO4- remaining, and as a result, both N : P and N : Si ratios were low. The two ratios increased to about 10 : 1 and 0. 45 : 1, respectively, at 20 m. Time series of vertical profiles showed that the leftover PO43- continued to be removed, resulting in additional phosphorus storage by phytoplankton. The N : P ratios at the nutricline in vertical profiles responded differently to mixing events. Field incubation of seawater samples also demonstrated the sequential uptake of NO3- (the most limiting nutrient) and then PO43- and SiO4- (the non-limiting nutrients). This sequential uptake strategy allows phytoplankton to acquire additional cellular phosphorus and silicon when they are available and wait for nitrogen to become available through frequent mixing of NO3- (or pulsed regenerated NH4). Thus, phytoplankton are able to maintain high productivity and balance nutrient stoichiometry by taking advantage of vigorous mixing regimes with the capacity of the stoichiometric plasticity. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show the in situ dynamics of continuous vertical profiles of N : P and N : Si ratios, which can provide insight into the in situ dynamics of nutrient stoichiometry in the water column and the inference of

  5. Fundamental study of ash formation and deposition: Effect of reducing stoichiometry. Final report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bool, L.E. III; Helble, J.J. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States); Shah, N. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The technical objectives of this project are: (1) To identify the partitioning of inorganic coal constituents among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash products generated during the combustion of pulverized coal under a variety of combustion conditions. Fuel lean and fuel rich combustion conditions are considered. (2) To identify and quantify the fundamental processes by which the transformations of minerals and organically-associated inorganic species occur. Emphasis is placed on identifying any changes that occur as a result of combustion under sub-stoichiometric combustion conditions. (3) To incorporate the effects of combustion stoichiometry into an Engineering Model for Ash Formation.

  6. A simple wet chemical method for the determination of cation stoichiometry of YBa2Cu3O7-d

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahasranaman, S.; Premila, M.; Sreedharan, O.M.

    1996-01-01

    A comprehensive wet chemical procedure for the rapid analysis of yttrium, barium and copper ions in dilute HNO 3 medium has been developed to facilitate a precise and accurate determination of cation non-stoichiometry in high temperature ceramic superconducting materials Y 1±x Ba 2±y Cu 3±z O 7-d . The ease of analysis for copper by electrogravimetry and of yttrium and barium by a complexometric titration of the same aliquot against complexone III using arsenazo I as the indicator under appropriate pH has been demonstrated with the help of individual standard solutions and with synthetic mixtures. (author)

  7. Energy storage and fecundity explain deviations from ecological stoichiometry predictions under global warming and size-selective predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Jansen, Mieke; De Meester, Luc; Stoks, Robby

    2016-11-01

    A key challenge for ecologists is to predict how single and joint effects of global warming and predation risk translate from the individual level up to ecosystem functions. Recently, stoichiometric theory linked these levels through changes in body stoichiometry, predicting that both higher temperatures and predation risk induce shifts in energy storage (increases in C-rich carbohydrates and reductions in N-rich proteins) and body stoichiometry (increases in C : N and C : P). This promising theory, however, is rarely tested and assumes that prey will divert energy away from reproduction under predation risk, while under size-selective predation, prey instead increase fecundity. We exposed the water flea Daphnia magna to 4 °C warming and fish predation risk to test whether C-rich carbohydrates increase and N-rich proteins decrease, and as a result, C : N and C : P increase under warming and predation risk. Unexpectedly, warming decreased body C : N, which was driven by reductions in C-rich fat and sugar contents while the protein content did not change. This reflected a trade-off where the accelerated intrinsic growth rate under warming occurred at the cost of a reduced energy storage. Warming reduced C : N less and only increased C : P and N : P in the fish-period Daphnia. These evolved stoichiometric responses to warming were largely driven by stronger warming-induced reductions in P than in C and N and could be explained by the better ability to deal with warming in the fish-period Daphnia. In contrast to theory predictions, body C : N decreased under predation risk due to a strong increase in the N-rich protein content that offsets the increase in C-rich fat content. The higher investment in fecundity (more N-rich eggs) under predation risk contributed to this stronger increase in protein content. Similarly, the lower body C : N of pre-fish Daphnia also matched their higher fecundity. Warming and predation risk independently shaped body

  8. Biocompatibility of a polymer based on Off-Stoichiometry Thiol-Enes + Epoxy (OSTE+) for neural implants

    OpenAIRE

    Ejserholm, Fredrik; Stegmayr, John; Bauer, Patrik; Johansson, Fredrik; Wallman, Lars; Bengtsson, Martin; Oredsson, Stina

    2015-01-01

    Background The flexibility of implantable neural probes has increased during the last 10 years, starting with stiff materials such as silicone to more flexible materials like polyimide. We have developed a novel polymer based on Off-Stoichiometry Thiol-Enes + Epoxy (OSTE+, consisting of a thiol, two allyls, an epoxy resin and two initiators), which is up to 100 times more flexible than polyimide. Since a flexible neural probe should be more biocompatible than a stiff probe, an OSTE+ probe sho...

  9. The construction FACE database - Codifying the NIOSH FACE reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiuwen Sue; Largay, Julie A; Wang, Xuanwen; Cain, Chris Trahan; Romano, Nancy

    2017-09-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has published reports detailing the results of investigations on selected work-related fatalities through the Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) program since 1982. Information from construction-related FACE reports was coded into the Construction FACE Database (CFD). Use of the CFD was illustrated by analyzing major CFD variables. A total of 768 construction fatalities were included in the CFD. Information on decedents, safety training, use of PPE, and FACE recommendations were coded. Analysis shows that one in five decedents in the CFD died within the first two months on the job; 75% and 43% of reports recommended having safety training or installing protection equipment, respectively. Comprehensive research using FACE reports may improve understanding of work-related fatalities and provide much-needed information on injury prevention. The CFD allows researchers to analyze the FACE reports quantitatively and efficiently. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and National Safety Council. All rights reserved.

  10. Face au risque

    CERN Document Server

    Grosse, Christian; November, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Ce volume collectif sur le risque inaugure la collection L'ÉQUINOXE. Ancré dans l'histoire pour mesurer les continuités et les ruptures, il illustre la manière dont les sciences humaines évaluent et mesurent les enjeux collectifs du risque sur les plans politiques, scientifiques, énergétiques, juridiques et éthiques. Puisse-t-il nourrir la réflexion sur la culture et la prévention du risque. Ses formes épidémiques, écologiques, sociales, terroristes et militaires nourrissent les peurs actuelles, structurent les projets sécuritaires et constituent - sans doute - les défis majeurs à notre modernité. Dans la foulée de la richesse scientifique d'Equinoxe, L'ÉQUINOXE hérite de son esprit en prenant à son tour le pari de contribuer - non sans risque - à enrichir en Suisse romande et ailleurs le champ éditorial des sciences humaines dont notre société a besoin pour forger ses repères. Après Face au risque suivra cet automne Du sens des Lumières. (MICHEL PORRET Professeur Ordinaire à la F...

  11. Many Faces of Migrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Antić Gaber

    2013-12-01

    We believe that in the present thematic issue we have succeeded in capturing an important part of the modern European research dynamic in the field of migration. In addition to well-known scholars in this field several young authors at the beginning their research careers have been shortlisted for the publication. We are glad of their success as it bodes a vibrancy of this research area in the future. At the same time, we were pleased to receive responses to the invitation from representatives of so many disciplines, and that the number of papers received significantly exceeded the maximum volume of the journal. Recognising and understanding of the many faces of migration are important steps towards the comprehensive knowledge needed to successfully meet the challenges of migration issues today and even more so in the future. It is therefore of utmost importance that researchers find ways of transferring their academic knowledge into practice – to all levels of education, the media, the wider public and, of course, the decision makers in local, national and international institutions. The call also applies to all authors in this issue of the journal.

  12. NET plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veieder, G.; Harrison, M.; Moons, F.

    1989-01-01

    The progress in the design and development of the first wall (FW) and divertor plates (DP) for the Next European Torus (NET) are summarized, highlighting the assumed main operating conditions, material choices, design options and their analysis as well as associated manufacturing studies and the ongoing testing programme. As plasma facing armor on both FW and DP, carbon based materials will be used at least during the initial physics phase due to their good performance in current tokamaks in respect to impurity control and disruption resistance. For the FW structure in water cooled austenitic steel, with radiation cooled armor adequate thermo-mechanical performance is predicted allowing peak heat fluxes of up to 0.8 MW/m 2 at 2 x 10 4 long duration burn pulses. For divertor concepts with the armor attached by brazing to a water cooled heatsink, the peak heat flux is about 10 MW/m 2 . However, the main critical issue for the DP is the lifetime which is critically limited by erosion. The demonstration of the basic feasibility of FW and DP design is in progress via manufacture and thermo-mechanical testing of prototypical mock-ups. (author). 26 refs.; 13 figs.; 2 tabs

  13. NET plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieider, G.; Harrison, M.; Moons, F.

    1989-01-01

    The progress in the design and development of the first wall (FW) and divertor plates (DP) for the Next European Torus (NET) are summarized, highlighting the assumed main operating conditions, material choices, design options and their analysis as well as associated manufacturing studies and the ongoing testing programme. As plasma facing armor on both FW and DP, carbon based materials will be used at least during the initial physics phase due to their good performance in current tokamaks in respect to impurity control and disruption resistance. For the FW structure in water cooled austenitic steel, with radiation cooled armor adequate thermo-mechanical performance is predicted allowing peak heat fluxes of up to 0.8 MW/m 2 at 2x10 4 long duration burn pulses. For divertor concepts with the armor attached by brazing to a water cooled heatsink, the peak heat flux is about 10 MW/m 2 . However, the main critical issue for the DP is the lifetime which is critically limited by erosion. The demonstation of the basic feasibility of FW and DP design is in progress via manufacture and thermo-mechanical testing of prototypical mock-ups. (orig.)

  14. Supporting traditional instructional methods with a constructivist approach to learning: Promoting conceputal change and understanding of stoichiometry using e-learning tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abayan, Kenneth Munoz

    Stoichiometry is a fundamental topic in chemistry that measures a quantifiable relationship between atoms, molecules, etc. Stoichiometry is usually taught using expository teaching methods. Students are passively given information, in the hopes they will retain the transmission of information to be able to solve stoichiometry problems masterfully. Cognitive science research has shown that this kind of instructional teaching method is not very effecting in meaningful learning practice. Instead, students must take ownership of their learning. The students need to actively construct their own knowledge by receiving, interpreting, integrating and reorganizing that information into their own mental schemas. In the absence of active learning practices, tools must be created in such a way to be able to scaffold difficult problems by encoding opportunities necessary to make the construction of knowledge memorable, thereby creating a usable knowledge base. Using an online e-learning tool and its potential to create a dynamic and interactive learning environment may facilitate the learning of stoichiometry. The study entailed requests from volunteer students, IRB consent form, a baseline questionnaire, random assignment of treatment, pre- and post-test assessment, and post assessment survey. These activities were given online. A stoichiometry-based assessment was given in a proctored examination at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) campus. The volunteer students who took part in these studies were at least 18 of age and were enrolled in General Chemistry 1441, at the University of Texas at Arlington. Each participant gave their informed consent to use their data in the following study. Students were randomly assigned to one of 4 treatments groups based on teaching methodology, (Dimensional Analysis, Operational Method, Ratios and Proportions) and a control group who just received instruction through lecture only. In this study, an e-learning tool was created to

  15. Neptunium dioxide precipitation kinetics in aqueous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Amanda Melia

    C experiment using an argon atmosphere experienced near complete loss of aqueous neptunium. All experiments demonstrated a ([H+] - [H+] i) to ([Np]i - [Np]) ratio of ˜0.5 approaching steady state, half that expected from previously proposed stoichiometries; the "adjusted" experiments showed initial hydrogen ion production delays, suggesting multiple reduction-precipitation mechanisms or intermediate neptunium solids. Precipitation experiment analyses with simple kinetic and surface models indicated that aqueous neptunium concentration strongly controls precipitation kinetics. Estimated effective activation energies for neptunium precipitation ranged between 103.5+/-2.0 and 177.8+/-4.5 kJ/mol.

  16. Learning to Discriminate Face Views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although visual feature leaning has been well studied, we still know little about the mechanisms of perceptual learning of complex object. Here, human perceptual learning in discrimination of in-depth orientation of face view was studied using psychophysics, EEG and fMRI. We trained subjects to discriminate face orientations around a face view (i.e. 30° over eight daily sessions, which resulted in a significant improvement in sensitivity to the face view orientation. This improved sensitivity was highly specific to the trained orientation and persisted up to six months. Different from perceptual learning of simple visual features, this orientation-specific learning effect could completely transfer across changes in face size, visual field and face identity. A complete transfer also occurred between two partial face images that were mutually exclusive but constituted a complete face. However, the transfer of the learning effect between upright and inverted faces and between a face and a paperclip object was very weak. Before and after training, we measured EEG and fMRI BOLD signals responding to both the trained and the untrained face views. Analyses of ERPs and induced gamma activity showed that face view discrimination training led to a larger reduction of N170 latency at the left occipital-temporal area and a concurrent larger decrease of induced gamma activity at the left frontal area with the trained face view, compared with the untrained ones. BOLD signal amplitude and MVPA analyses showed that, in face-selective cortical areas, training did not lead to a significant amplitude change, but induced a more reliable spatial pattern of neural activity in the left FFA. These results suggest that the visual system had learned how to compute face orientation from face configural information more accurately and that a large amount of plastic changes took place at a level of higher visual processing where size-, location-, and identity

  17. Face adaptation improves gender discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Jianhong; Chen, Juan; Fang, Fang

    2011-01-01

    Adaptation to a visual pattern can alter the sensitivities of neuronal populations encoding the pattern. However, the functional roles of adaptation, especially in high-level vision, are still equivocal. In the present study, we performed three experiments to investigate if face gender adaptation could affect gender discrimination. Experiments 1 and 2 revealed that adapting to a male/female face could selectively enhance discrimination for male/female faces. Experiment 3 showed that the discrimination enhancement induced by face adaptation could transfer across a substantial change in three-dimensional face viewpoint. These results provide further evidence suggesting that, similar to low-level vision, adaptation in high-level vision could calibrate the visual system to current inputs of complex shapes (i.e. face) and improve discrimination at the adapted characteristic. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Stoichiometry and local bond configuration of In2S3:Cl thin films by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juma, Albert O.

    2016-10-01

    In2S3 thin films deposited using chemical methods always contain residual elements from the precursors, which modify their properties. As buffer layers in solar cells, the residual elements in the In2S3 layer affect the performance of these devices. The stoichiometry of In2S3 thin films deposited by spray ion layer gas reaction (ILGAR) was studied as a function of the residual Cl from InCl3 precursor by varying the deposition parameters. The chemical formula was deduced from the elemental composition determined using Rutherford backscattering (RBS). Incomplete sulfurization of the precursor implies that residual Cl- remains bonded to the In3+ ions while some occupy interstitial and/or antisite positions in the In2S3 matrix. This results in thin films with different stoichiometry, described by the formula In4S6-xCl2x+2y. This changes the local bond configuration and geometry and underpins the influence of residual Cl on the physical properties of In2S3 thin films.

  20. Nutrient stoichiometry in Sphagnum along a nitrogen deposition gradient in highly polluted region of Central-East Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiroušek, Martin; Hájek, Michal; Bragazza, Luca

    2011-02-01

    We investigated the variation of N:P and N:K ratio in ombrotrophic Sphagnum plants along a gradient of atmospheric N deposition from 1 to 2.5 g m(-2) year(-1) in Central-East Europe. The N:P and N:K ratio in Sphagnum capitula increased significantly along the N deposition gradient. Sphagnum species from the Cuspidata section were characterised by significantly lower ratios at low N deposition. When we compared the observed N:P ratios in Sphagnum plants with the values reported in a previous European-wide study, we found a correspondence in nutrient stoichiometry only for a few bogs: higher P concentration in Sphagnum capitula caused a lower N:P ratio in most of the study bogs so that Sphagnum plants still seem N-limited despite their N saturation. Interaction between summer water table decrease and aerial liming of surrounding forests is proposed as an explanation for this discrepancy. Local forestry practice interacting with climate thus alter N:P stoichiometry of Sphagnum along the N deposition gradient. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Lund, O; Lund, O S

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes are coexpr......In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes...... are coexpressed. By the coexpression of Env glycoproteins that either can or cannot bind a neutralizing MAb in an env transcomplementation assay, virions were generated in which the proportion of MAb binding sites could be regulated. As the proportion of MAb binding sites in Env chimeric virus increased, MAb...... neutralization gradually increased. Virus neutralization by virion aggregation was minimal, as MAb binding to HIV-1 Env did not interfere with an AMLV Env-mediated infection by HIV-1(AMLV/HIV-1) pseudotypes of CD4(-) HEK293 cells. MAb neutralization of chimeric virions could be described as a third...

  2. The isotope method for the determination of stoichiometry between compounds forming the polypyrrole and glucose oxidase composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbaras, A; Mikoliunaite, L; Popov, A; Ramanaviciene, A; Remeikis, V; Ramanavicius, A

    2015-01-21

    Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry is a conventional method used in archaeology, and medical, environmental and paleoenvironmental reconstruction studies. However new insights and applicability of the equipment often open new research areas and improve our understanding of the ongoing processes. Therefore the stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry method was applied for the stoichiometry determination of the complex polypyrrole and glucose oxidase composite (PPy-GOx composite). The enzyme glucose oxidase and conducting polymer polypyrrole were reported to form a composite, which was evaluated in time using the dynamic light scattering method. The consistent enlargement of the PPy-GOx composite and the relative decrease of the spare enzyme molecules were observed in the polymerization solution. UV-VIS spectrometry was employed to follow the polymerization process. The isotope mixing model was applied for the evaluation of the constitution of the PPy-GOx composite. According to the obtained results the determination of the PPy-GOx composite stoichiometry could be more reliably determined using the nitrogen isotope ratio approach in comparison to the carbon approach. We expect that this novel work will widen the applications of stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry in research.

  3. Effect of streptomycin on the stoichiometry of GTP hydrolysis in a poly(U)-dependent cell-free translation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smailov, S K; Gavrilova, L P

    1985-11-11

    The technique of Sepharose-bound template translation has been used to estimate the stoichiometry of GTP hydrolysis during peptide elongation in the presence of streptomycin. The presence of streptomycin has been shown to have no great effect on the elongation rate and the stoichiometry of GTP hydrolysis during codon-specific peptide elongation in the poly(U)-directed translation system: the molar ratio of hydrolysed GTP to incorporated phenylalanine was about 2. At the same time streptomycin exerted a significant effect during misreading when a ribosome-bound peptide in the poly(U)-programmed system was elongated by leucine or isoleucine residues: the miselongation was stimulated and hence the ratio of hydrolysed GTP per peptide bond was strongly reduced, as compared with the excessive GTP hydrolysis which is characteristic of the misreading system in the absence of streptomycin [(1984) FEBS Lett. 178, 283-287]. The conclusion has been made that streptomycin blocks the stage of correction ('proof-reading') following GTP hydrolysis during EF-Tu-dependent aminoacyl-tRNA binding.

  4. Evolution of nutrient uptake reveals a trade-off in the ecological stoichiometry of plant-herbivore interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Pedro; Stomp, Maayke; Egas, Martijn; Huisman, Jef

    2010-12-01

    Nutrient limitation determines the primary production and species composition of many ecosystems. Here we apply an adaptive dynamics approach to investigate evolution of the ecological stoichiometry of primary producers and its implications for plant-herbivore interactions. The model predicts a trade-off between the competitive ability and grazing susceptibility of primary producers, driven by changes in their nutrient uptake rates. High nutrient uptake rates enhance the competitiveness of primary producers but also increase their nutritional quality for herbivores. This trade-off enables coexistence of nutrient exploiters and grazing avoiders. If herbivores are not selective, evolution favors runaway selection toward high nutrient uptake rates of the primary producers. However, if herbivores select nutritious food, the model predicts an evolutionarily stable strategy with lower nutrient uptake rates. When the model is parameterized for phytoplankton and zooplankton, the evolutionary dynamics result in plant-herbivore oscillations at ecological timescales, especially in environments with high nutrient availability and low selectivity of the herbivores. High herbivore selectivity stabilizes the community dynamics. These model predictions show that evolution permits nonequilibrium dynamics in plant-herbivore communities and shed new light on the evolutionary forces that shape the ecological stoichiometry of primary producers.

  5. Effects of soil C:N:P stoichiometry on biomass allocation in the alpine and arid steppe systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaodan; Ma, Xingxing; Yan, Yan

    2017-03-01

    Soil nutrients strongly influence biomass allocation. However, few studies have examined patterns induced by soil C:N:P stoichiometry in alpine and arid ecosystems. Samples were collected from 44 sites with similar elevation along the 220-km transect at spatial intervals of 5 km along the northern Tibetan Plateau. Aboveground biomass (AGB) levels were measured by cutting a sward in each plot. Belowground biomass (BGB) levels were collected from soil pits in a block of 1 m × 1 m in actual root depth. We observed significant decreases in AGB and BGB levels but increases in the BGB:AGB ratio with increases in latitude. Although soil is characterized by structural complexity and spatial heterogeneity, we observed remarkably consistent C:N:P ratios within the cryic aridisols. We observed significant nonlinear relationships between the soil N:P and BGB:AGB ratios. The critical N:P ratio in soils was measured at approximately 2.0, above which the probability of BGB:AGB response to nutrient availability is small. These findings serve as interesting contributions to the global data pool on arid plant stoichiometry, given the previously limited knowledge regarding high-altitude regions.

  6. Rapid top-down regulation of plant C:N:P stoichiometry by grasshoppers in an Inner Mongolia grassland ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangming; Han, Xingguo; Elser, James J

    2011-05-01

    Understanding how food web interactions alter the processing of limiting nutrient elements is an important goal of ecosystem ecology. An experiment manipulating densities of the grasshopper Oedaleus asiaticus was performed to assess top-down effects of grasshoppers on C:N:P stoichiometry of plants and soil in a grassland ecosystem in Inner Mongolia (China). With increased grasshopper feeding, plant biomass declined fourfold, litter abundance increased 30%, and the plant community became dominated by non-host plant taxa. Plant stoichiometric response depended on whether or not the plant was a grasshopper host food species: C:N and C:P ratios increased with increasing grasshopper density (GD) for host plants but decreased in non-host plants. These data suggest either a direct transfer of grasshopper-recycled nutrients from host to non-host plants or a release of non-host plants from nutrient competition with heavily grazed host plants. Litterfall C:N and C:P decreased across moderate levels of grasshopper density but no effects on C:N:P stoichiometry in the surface soil were observed, possibly due to the short experimental period. Our observations of divergent C:N:P stoichiometric response among plant species highlight the important role of grasshopper herbivory in regulating plant community structure and nutrient cycling in grassland ecosystems.

  7. Beyond PDMS: off-stoichiometry thiol-ene (OSTE) based soft lithography for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlborg, Carl Fredrik; Haraldsson, Tommy; Öberg, Kim; Malkoch, Michael; van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2011-09-21

    In this article we introduce a novel polymer platform based on off-stoichiometry thiol-enes (OSTEs), aiming to bridge the gap between research prototyping and commercial production of microfluidic devices. The polymers are based on the versatile UV-curable thiol-ene chemistry but takes advantage of off-stoichiometry ratios to enable important features for a prototyping system, such as one-step surface modifications, tuneable mechanical properties and leakage free sealing through direct UV-bonding. The platform exhibits many similarities with PDMS, such as rapid prototyping and uncomplicated processing but can at the same time mirror the mechanical and chemical properties of both PDMS as well as commercial grade thermoplastics. The OSTE-prepolymer can be cast using standard SU-8 on silicon masters and a table-top UV-lamp, the surface modifications are precisely grafted using a stencil mask and the bonding requires only a single UV-exposure. To illustrate the potential of the material we demonstrate key concepts important in microfluidic chip fabrication such as patterned surface modifications for hydrophobic stops, pneumatic valves using UV-lamination of stiff and rubbery materials as well as micromachining of chip-to-world connectors in the OSTE-materials. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  8. Influence of the reaction stoichiometry on the mechanical and thermal properties of SWCNT-modified epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashrafi, Behnam; Johnston, Andrew; Martinez-Rubi, Yadienka; Kingston, Christopher T; Simard, Benoit; Khoun, Lolei; Yourdkhani, Mostafa; Hubert, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a considerable influence on the curing behavior and crosslink density of epoxy resins. This invariably has an important effect on different thermal and mechanical properties of the epoxy network. This work focuses on the important role of the epoxy/hardener mixing ratio on the mechanical and thermal properties of a high temperature aerospace-grade epoxy (MY0510 Araldite as an epoxy and 4,4′-diaminodiphenylsulfone as an aromatic hardener) modified with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The effects of three different stoichiometries (stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric) on various mechanical and thermal properties (fracture toughness, tensile properties, glass transition temperature) of the epoxy resin and its SWCNT-modified composites were obtained. The results were also supported by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For the neat resin, it was found that an epoxy/hardener molar ratio of 1:0.8 provides the best overall properties. In contrast, the pattern in property changes with the reaction stoichiometry was considerably different for composites reinforced with unfunctionalized SWCNTs and reduced SWCNTs. A comparison among composites suggests that a 1:1 molar ratio considerably outperforms the other two ratios examined in this work (1:0.8 and 1:1.1). This composition at 0.2 wt% SWCNT loading provides the highest overall mechanical properties by improving fracture toughness, ultimate tensile strength and ultimate tensile strain of the epoxy resin by 40%, 34%, 54%, respectively. (paper)

  9. Emotion Words: Adding Face Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugate, Jennifer M B; Gendron, Maria; Nakashima, Satoshi F; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2017-06-12

    Despite a growing number of studies suggesting that emotion words affect perceptual judgments of emotional stimuli, little is known about how emotion words affect perceptual memory for emotional faces. In Experiments 1 and 2 we tested how emotion words (compared with control words) affected participants' abilities to select a target emotional face from among distractor faces. Participants were generally more likely to false alarm to distractor emotional faces when primed with an emotion word congruent with the face (compared with a control word). Moreover, participants showed both decreased sensitivity (d') to discriminate between target and distractor faces, as well as altered response biases (c; more likely to answer "yes") when primed with an emotion word (compared with a control word). In Experiment 3 we showed that emotion words had more of an effect on perceptual memory judgments when the structural information in the target face was limited, as well as when participants were only able to categorize the face with a partially congruent emotion word. The overall results are consistent with the idea that emotion words affect the encoding of emotional faces in perceptual memory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. The Kent Face Matching Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fysh, Matthew C; Bindemann, Markus

    2018-05-01

    This study presents the Kent Face Matching Test (KFMT), which comprises 200 same-identity and 20 different-identity pairs of unfamiliar faces. Each face pair consists of a photograph from a student ID card and a high-quality portrait that was taken at least three months later. The test is designed to complement existing resources for face-matching research, by providing a more ecologically valid stimulus set that captures the natural variability that can arise in a person's appearance over time. Two experiments are presented to demonstrate that the KFMT provides a challenging measure of face matching but correlates with established tests. Experiment 1 compares a short version of this test with the optimized Glasgow Face Matching Test (GFMT). In Experiment 2, a longer version of the KFMT, with infrequent identity mismatches, is correlated with performance on the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT) and the Cambridge Face Perception Test (CFPT). The KFMT is freely available for use in face-matching research. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Coordinating face-to-face meetings in mobile network societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jonas; Urry, John; Axhausen, Kay

    2008-01-01

    and conduct face-to-face meetings. We show striking changes in technologies and cultures of coordination - a shift from punctuality effected through clock time to a flexible and perpetual coordination effected through email and mobiles. This empirical research addresses specifically located embodied practices...

  12. Attention to internal face features in unfamiliar face matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Kingsley I; Butavicius, Marcus A; Lee, Michael D

    2008-08-01

    Accurate matching of unfamiliar faces is vital in security and forensic applications, yet previous research has suggested that humans often perform poorly when matching unfamiliar faces. Hairstyle and facial hair can strongly influence unfamiliar face matching but are potentially unreliable cues. This study investigated whether increased attention to the more stable internal face features of eyes, nose, and mouth was associated with more accurate face-matching performance. Forty-three first-year psychology students decided whether two simultaneously presented faces were of the same person or not. The faces were displayed for either 2 or 6 seconds, and had either similar or dissimilar hairstyles. The level of attention to internal features was measured by the proportion of fixation time spent on the internal face features and the sensitivity of discrimination to changes in external feature similarity. Increased attention to internal features was associated with increased discrimination in the 2-second display-time condition, but no significant relationship was found in the 6-second condition. Individual differences in eye-movements were highly stable across the experimental conditions.

  13. The acceleration of dissolved cobalt's ecological stoichiometry due to biological uptake, remineralization, and scavenging in the Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Saito

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The stoichiometry of biological components and their influence on dissolved distributions have long been of interest in the study of the oceans. Cobalt has the smallest oceanic inventory of inorganic micronutrients and hence is particularly vulnerable to influence by internal oceanic processes including euphotic zone uptake, remineralization, and scavenging. Here we observe not only large variations in dCo : P stoichiometry but also the acceleration of those dCo : P ratios in the upper water column in response to several environmental processes. The ecological stoichiometry of total dissolved cobalt (dCo was examined using data from a US North Atlantic GEOTRACES transect and from a zonal South Atlantic GEOTRACES-compliant transect (GA03/3_e and GAc01 by Redfieldian analysis of its statistical relationships with the macronutrient phosphate. Trends in the dissolved cobalt to phosphate (dCo : P stoichiometric relationships were evident in the basin-scale vertical structure of cobalt, with positive dCo : P slopes in the euphotic zone and negative slopes found in the ocean interior and in coastal environments. The euphotic positive slopes were often found to accelerate towards the surface and this was interpreted as being due to the combined influence of depleted phosphate, phosphorus-sparing (conserving mechanisms, increased alkaline phosphatase metalloenzyme production (a zinc or perhaps cobalt enzyme, and biochemical substitution of Co for depleted Zn. Consistent with this, dissolved Zn (dZn was found to be drawn down to only 2-fold more than dCo, despite being more than 18-fold more abundant in the ocean interior. Particulate cobalt concentrations increased in abundance from the base of the euphotic zone to become  ∼  10 % of the overall cobalt inventory in the upper euphotic zone with high stoichiometric values of  ∼  400 µmol Co mol−1 P. Metaproteomic results from the Bermuda Atlantic Time

  14. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  15. Finding Hope in the Face-to-Face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgoose, Jennifer Y C; Edgoose, Julian M

    2017-05-01

    What does it mean to look into the face of a patient who looks back? Face-to-face encounters are at the heart of the patient-clinician relationship but their singular significance is often lost amid the demands of today's high-tech, metric-driven health care systems. Using the framework provided by the philosopher and Holocaust survivor Emmanuel Levinas, the authors explore the unique responsibility and potential for hope found only in face-to-face encounters. Revisiting this most fundamental attribute of medicine is likely our greatest chance to reclaim who we are as clinicians and why we do what we do. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  16. Accurate quantification of site-specific acetylation stoichiometry reveals the impact of sirtuin deacetylase CobB on the E. coli acetylome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinert, Brian Tate; Satpathy, Shankha; Hansen, Bogi Karbech

    2017-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a protein posttranslational modification (PTM) that occurs on thousands of lysine residues in diverse organisms from bacteria to humans. Accurate measurement of acetylation stoichiometry on a proteome-wide scale remains challenging. Most methods employ a comparison of chemic......Lysine acetylation is a protein posttranslational modification (PTM) that occurs on thousands of lysine residues in diverse organisms from bacteria to humans. Accurate measurement of acetylation stoichiometry on a proteome-wide scale remains challenging. Most methods employ a comparison...... used quantitative proteomic methods. Here we show that serial dilution of SILAC-labeled peptides (SD-SILAC) can be used to identify accurately quantified peptides and to estimate the quantification error rate. We applied SD-SILAC to determine absolute acetylation stoichiometry in exponentially...

  17. Facing My Fears (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Glynn

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available I’m scared. I’m nervous. In a few short weeks the contractors and electricians will take over my library for several months. They will drill huge gouges in the concrete floor, hammer, saw, scrape,move, wire, etc. No doubt they may have to be asked to keep their voices down once or twice. Half of the print journal collection will be relocated to accommodate a new teaching lab that will also double as an information commons. The planning has been going on for many months. We have consulted with other libraries, reviewed the literature, identified the needs of our various user groups, measured space,tested technical possibilities, and met with architects and engineers. Up until now the new lab was an organic idea on paper, discussed over coffee and in meetings. That’s fairly easy to deal with. But just around the corner it becomes a reality and I’m a bag of nerves. Have we made the right decisions? Will it address all our needs? Is there anything I forgot to consider? What if our users don’t like it? What if it is a complete failure?!Theoretically, it should be ok. I’ve followed the right steps and worked with a creative, talented and dedicated team. This is different from trying out a new instructional technique or reorganizing the information desk. This is big. I talk the evidence based talk regularly, but now I am walking the walk in a bigger way than I had ever imagined. Change can be frightening. Moving out of comfort zones is not easy. Having said that, the challenge can be invigorating and the change, refreshing. I find myself welcoming the change as much as I dread it. I’ll face my fears and see it through to the implementation and evaluations and beyond. And hey, no matter what the outcome, it should make for a good paper. If anyone else out there is going through a similar process, I’d be interested in comparing notes. I invite you to try something new this year in your work environment or in your professional activities

  18. Quantum kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bonitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book presents quantum kinetic theory in a comprehensive way. The focus is on density operator methods and on non-equilibrium Green functions. The theory allows to rigorously treat nonequilibrium dynamics in quantum many-body systems. Of particular interest are ultrafast processes in plasmas, condensed matter and trapped atoms that are stimulated by rapidly developing experiments with short pulse lasers and free electron lasers. To describe these experiments theoretically, the most powerful approach is given by non-Markovian quantum kinetic equations that are discussed in detail, including computational aspects.

  19. Relativistic Kinetic Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchagin, Gregory V.; Aksenov, Alexey G.

    2017-02-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Acronyms and definitions; Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Foundations: 1. Basic concepts; 2. Kinetic equation; 3. Averaging; 4. Conservation laws and equilibrium; 5. Relativistic BBGKY hierarchy; 6. Basic parameters in gases and plasmas; Part II. Numerical Methods: 7. The basics of computational physics; 8. Direct integration of Boltzmann equations; 9. Multidimensional hydrodynamics; Part III. Applications: 10. Wave dispersion in relativistic plasma; 11. Thermalization in relativistic plasma; 12. Kinetics of particles in strong fields; 13. Compton scattering in astrophysics and cosmology; 14. Self-gravitating systems; 15. Neutrinos, gravitational collapse and supernovae; Appendices; Bibliography; Index.

  20. Posture and theophylline kinetics.

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, J B; Cuss, F; Barnes, P J

    1985-01-01

    The effect of posture on theophylline kinetics was examined in six healthy men who took 450 mg slow-release aminophylline orally at the same time of day on two separate occasions. On one day they remained standing and on the other supine throughout. Plasma theophylline was measured hourly for 6 h from ingestion. Mean theophylline levels were significantly higher in the standing position at all times (P less than 0.01). We conclude that diurnal variation in theophylline kinetics can be explain...

  1. Tebuconazole photocatalytic degradation kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Prestes, Thiago de Hermann; Gibbon, Danielle de Oliveira; Lansarin, Marla Azário; Moro, Celso Camilo

    2010-01-01

    The tebuconazole photocatalytic degradation kinetics was studied in a batch reactor using TiO2 (P25-Degussa) as catalyst and a high pressure mercury lamp. The photolysis, adsorption and irradiation effects in the reaction rate were evaluated. Afterward, the suspension catalyst concentration and initial pH to the maximum reaction rate was determined. It was observed that the reaction rate can be approached by a pseudo-first order, with a maximum kinetics constant at 260 mg L-1catalyst concentr...

  2. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET Correlates of Altered Subunit Stoichiometry in Cys-Loop Receptors, Exemplified by Nicotinic α4β2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis A. Dougherty

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We provide a theory for employing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET measurements to determine altered heteropentameric ion channel stoichiometries in intracellular compartments of living cells. We simulate FRET within nicotinic receptors (nAChRs whose α4 and β2 subunits contain acceptor and donor fluorescent protein moieties, respectively, within the cytoplasmic loops. We predict FRET and normalized FRET (NFRET for the two predominant stoichiometries, (α43(β22 vs. (α42(β23. Studying the ratio between FRET or NFRET for the two stoichiometries, minimizes distortions due to various photophysical uncertainties. Within a range of assumptions concerning the distance between fluorophores, deviations from plane pentameric geometry, and other asymmetries, the predicted FRET and NFRET for (α43(β22 exceeds that of (α42(β23. The simulations account for published data on transfected Neuro2a cells in which α4β2 stoichiometries were manipulated by varying fluorescent subunit cDNA ratios: NFRET decreased monotonically from (α43(β22 stoichiometry to mostly (α42(β23. The simulations also account for previous macroscopic and single-channel observations that pharmacological chaperoning by nicotine and cytisine increase the (α42(β23 and (α43(β22 populations, respectively. We also analyze sources of variability. NFRET-based monitoring of changes in subunit stoichiometry can contribute usefully to studies on Cys-loop receptors.

  3. PrimeFaces beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, K Siva Prasad

    2013-01-01

    A guide for beginner's with step-by-step instructions and an easy-to-follow approach.PrimeFaces Beginners Guide is a simple and effective guide for beginners, wanting to learn and implement PrimeFaces in their JSF-based applications. Some basic JSF and jQuery skills are required before you start working through the book.

  4. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Feature extraction is one of the important tasks in face recognition. Moments are widely used feature extractor due to their superior discriminatory power and geometrical invariance. Moments generally capture the global features of the image. This paper proposes Krawtchouk moment for feature extraction in face ...

  5. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Artificial Intelligence 17(1): 41–62. Hu M K 1962 Visual pattern recognition by moment invariants. IRE Trans. on Information Theory, IT-8,. 179–187. Huang F T, Zhou Z, Zhang H-J and Chen T 2000 Pose invariant face recognition, Proc. Fourth IEEE. International Conference on Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition, ...

  6. Side-View Face Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santemiz, P.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; van den Biggelaar, Olivier

    As a widely used biometrics, face recognition has many advantages such as being non-intrusive, natural and passive. On the other hand, in real-life scenarios with uncontrolled environment, pose variation up to side-view positions makes face recognition a challenging work. In this paper we discuss

  7. Forensic Face Recognition: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    2010-01-01

    Beside a few papers which focus on the forensic aspects of automatic face recognition, there is not much published about it in contrast to the literature on developing new techniques and methodologies for biometric face recognition. In this report, we review forensic facial identification which is

  8. Newborns' Mooney-Face Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Irene; Simion, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether newborns detect a face on the basis of a Gestalt representation based on first-order relational information (i.e., the basic arrangement of face features) by using Mooney stimuli. The incomplete 2-tone Mooney stimuli were used because they preclude focusing both on the local features (i.e., the fine…

  9. Engineering the microstructure and magnetism of La2CoMnO6−δ thin films by tailoring oxygen stoichiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galceran, R.; Frontera, C.; Balcells, Ll.; Cisneros-Fernández, J.; López-Mir, L.; Bozzo, B.; Pomar, A.; Sandiumenge, F.; Martínez, B.; Roqueta, J.; Santiso, J.; Bagués, N.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the magnetic and structural properties of ferromagnetic-insulating La 2 CoMnO 6−δ thin films grown on top of (001) SrTiO 3 substrates by means of RF sputtering technique. Careful structural analysis, by using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, allows identifying two different crystallographic orientations that are closely related to oxygen stoichiometry and to the features (coercive fields and remanence) of the hysteresis loops. Both Curie temperature and magnetic hysteresis turn out to be dependent on the oxygen stoichiometry. In situ annealing conditions allow tailoring the oxygen content of the films, therefore controlling their microstructure and magnetic properties

  10. Effective indexing for face recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochenkov, I.; Sochenkova, A.; Vokhmintsev, A.; Makovetskii, A.; Melnikov, A.

    2016-09-01

    Face recognition is one of the most important tasks in computer vision and pattern recognition. Face recognition is useful for security systems to provide safety. In some situations it is necessary to identify the person among many others. In this case this work presents new approach in data indexing, which provides fast retrieval in big image collections. Data indexing in this research consists of five steps. First, we detect the area containing face, second we align face, and then we detect areas containing eyes and eyebrows, nose, mouth. After that we find key points of each area using different descriptors and finally index these descriptors with help of quantization procedure. The experimental analysis of this method is performed. This paper shows that performing method has results at the level of state-of-the-art face recognition methods, but it is also gives results fast that is important for the systems that provide safety.

  11. Face-Lift Satisfaction Using the FACE-Q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, Sammy; Schwitzer, Jonathan; Anzai, Lavinia; Thorne, Charles H

    2015-08-01

    Face lifting is one of the most common operative procedures for facial aging and perhaps the procedure most synonymous with plastic surgery in the minds of the lay public, but no verifiable documentation of patient satisfaction exists in the literature. This study is the first to examine face-lift outcomes and patient satisfaction using a validated questionnaire. One hundred five patients undergoing a face lift performed by the senior author (C.H.T.) using a high, extended-superficial musculoaponeurotic system with submental platysma approximation technique were asked to complete anonymously the FACE-Q by e-mail. FACE-Q scores were assessed for each domain (range, 0 to 100), with higher scores indicating greater satisfaction with appearance or superior quality of life. Fifty-three patients completed the FACE-Q (50.5 percent response rate). Patients demonstrated high satisfaction with facial appearance (mean ± SD, 80.7 ± 22.3), and quality of life, including social confidence (90.4 ± 16.6), psychological well-being (92.8 ± 14.3), and early life impact (92.2 ± 16.4). Patients also reported extremely high satisfaction with their decision to undergo face lifting (90.5 ± 15.9). On average, patients felt they appeared 6.9 years younger than their actual age. Patients were most satisfied with the appearance of their nasolabial folds (86.2 ± 18.5), cheeks (86.1 ± 25.4), and lower face/jawline (86.0 ± 20.6), compared with their necks (78.1 ± 25.6) and area under the chin (67.9 ± 32.3). Patients who responded in this study were extremely satisfied with their decision to undergo face lifting and the outcomes and quality of life following the procedure.

  12. Modeling chemical kinetics graphically

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, A.

    2012-01-01

    In literature on chemistry education it has often been suggested that students, at high school level and beyond, can benefit in their studies of chemical kinetics from computer supported activities. Use of system dynamics modeling software is one of the suggested quantitative approaches that could

  13. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  14. Kinetic energy budget details

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper presents the detailed turbulent kinetic energy budget and higher order statistics of flow behind a surface-mounted rib with and without superimposed acoustic excitation. Pattern recognition technique is used to determine the large-scale structure magnitude. It is observed that most of the turbulence ...

  15. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  16. SHORT COMMUNICATION KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    gingili paste, oat slice, sleeve-fish silk food samples. The determined results were in agreement with those by atomic absorption spectrometry. KEY WORDS: KEY WORDS: Iron, Catalytic kinetic spectrophotometry, p–Acetylarsenazo, Potassium periodate. INTRODUCTION. Iron is an important component for the human body.

  17. Point kinetics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimpland, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    A normalized form of the point kinetics equations, a prompt jump approximation, and the Nordheim-Fuchs model are used to model nuclear systems. Reactivity feedback mechanisms considered include volumetric expansion, thermal neutron temperature effect, Doppler effect and void formation. A sample problem of an excursion occurring in a plutonium solution accidentally formed in a glovebox is presented

  18. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the property that in 0.12 M sulfuric acid medium titanium(IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of titanium is

  19. Analysis of longwall face-to-face transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, C.; Topuz, E.

    1992-01-01

    A non-producing longwall costs the mine owner from $45 to over $100 per minute in lost production time. Face-to-face equipment transfers, which involve disassembling longwall equipment in a panel, transporting, and then reassembling it in a new longwall panel, are second only to system availability as a source of longwall non-productive time. This, in addition to a move cost of over $100,000, makes reduction and control of face transfer times essential. This paper will report a segment of on-going VPI research to analyze and model longwall transfers through the use of operations research techniques. The purpose is to reduce overall transfer time and the variation of transfer times among U.S. longwall operations. This research is expected to contribute to the longwall mining industry by offering an objective approach that can be used in the prediction, planning, preparation, and implementation of longwall face equipment transfers

  20. Multithread Face Recognition in Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dakshina Ranjan Kisku

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Faces are highly challenging and dynamic objects that are employed as biometrics evidence in identity verification. Recently, biometrics systems have proven to be an essential security tools, in which bulk matching of enrolled people and watch lists is performed every day. To facilitate this process, organizations with large computing facilities need to maintain these facilities. To minimize the burden of maintaining these costly facilities for enrollment and recognition, multinational companies can transfer this responsibility to third-party vendors who can maintain cloud computing infrastructures for recognition. In this paper, we showcase cloud computing-enabled face recognition, which utilizes PCA-characterized face instances and reduces the number of invariant SIFT points that are extracted from each face. To achieve high interclass and low intraclass variances, a set of six PCA-characterized face instances is computed on columns of each face image by varying the number of principal components. Extracted SIFT keypoints are fused using sum and max fusion rules. A novel cohort selection technique is applied to increase the total performance. The proposed protomodel is tested on BioID and FEI face databases, and the efficacy of the system is proven based on the obtained results. We also compare the proposed method with other well-known methods.

  1. The Search Engine for Multi-Proteoform Complexes: An Online Tool for the Identification and Stoichiometry Determination of Protein Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Owen S; Schachner, Luis F; Kelleher, Neil L

    2016-12-08

    Recent advances in top-down mass spectrometry using native electrospray now enable the analysis of intact protein complexes with relatively small sample amounts in an untargeted mode. Here, we describe how to characterize both homo- and heteropolymeric complexes with high molecular specificity using input data produced by tandem mass spectrometry of whole protein assemblies. The tool described is a "search engine for multi-proteoform complexes," (SEMPC) and is available for free online. The output is a list of candidate multi-proteoform complexes and scoring metrics, which are used to define a distinct set of one or more unique protein subunits, their overall stoichiometry in the intact complex, and their pre- and post-translational modifications. Thus, we present an approach for the identification and characterization of intact protein complexes from native mass spectrometry data. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Lund, O; Lund, O S

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes...... neutralization gradually increased. Virus neutralization by virion aggregation was minimal, as MAb binding to HIV-1 Env did not interfere with an AMLV Env-mediated infection by HIV-1(AMLV/HIV-1) pseudotypes of CD4(-) HEK293 cells. MAb neutralization of chimeric virions could be described as a third...... neutralization of T-cell line-adapted HIV-1 is incremental rather than all or none and that each MAb binding an Env oligomer reduces the likelihood of infection....

  3. Variable nutrient stoichiometry (carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus) across trophic levels determines community and ecosystem properties in an oligotrophic mangrove system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharler, U M; Ulanowicz, R E; Fogel, M L; Wooller, M J; Jacobson-Meyers, M E; Lovelock, C E; Feller, I C; Frischer, M; Lee, R; McKee, K; Romero, I C; Schmit, J P; Shearer, C

    2015-11-01

    Our study investigated the carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus (C:N:P) stoichiometry of mangrove island of the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef (Twin Cays, Belize). The C:N:P of abiotic and biotic components of this oligotrophic ecosystem was measured and served to build networks of nutrient flows for three distinct mangrove forest zones (tall seaward fringing forest, inland dwarf forests and a transitional zone). Between forest zones, the stoichiometry of primary producers, heterotrophs and abiotic components did not change significantly, but there was a significant difference in C:N:P, and C, N, and P biomass, between the functional groups mangrove trees, other primary producers, heterotrophs, and abiotic components. C:N:P decreased with increasing trophic level. Nutrient recycling in the food webs was highest for P, and high transfer efficiencies between trophic levels of P and N also indicated an overall shortage of these nutrients when compared to C. Heterotrophs were sometimes, but not always, limited by the same nutrient as the primary producers. Mangrove trees and the primary tree consumers were P limited, whereas the invertebrates consuming leaf litter and detritus were N limited. Most compartments were limited by P or N (not by C), and the relative depletion rate of food sources was fastest for P. P transfers thus constituted a bottleneck of nutrient transfer on Twin Cays. This is the first comprehensive ecosystem study of nutrient transfers in a mangrove ecosystem, illustrating some mechanisms (e.g. recycling rates, transfer efficiencies) which oligotrophic systems use in order to build up biomass and food webs spanning various trophic levels.

  4. Variable nutrient stoichiometry (carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus) across trophic levels determines community and ecosystem properties in an oligotrophic mangrove system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharler, U.M.; Ulanowicz, Robert E.; Fogel, M.L.; Wooller, M.J.; Jacobson-Meyers, M.E.; Lovelock, C.E.; Feller, I.C.; Frischer, M.; Lee, R.; Mckee, Karen L.; Romero, I.C.; Schmit, J.P.; Shearer, C.

    2015-01-01

    Our study investigated the carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus (C:N:P) stoichiometry of mangrove island of the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef (Twin Cays, Belize). The C:N:P of abiotic and biotic components of this oligotrophic ecosystem was measured and served to build networks of nutrient flows for three distinct mangrove forest zones (tall seaward fringing forest, inland dwarf forests and a transitional zone). Between forest zones, the stoichiometry of primary producers, heterotrophs and abiotic components did not change significantly, but there was a significant difference in C:N:P, and C, N, and P biomass, between the functional groups mangrove trees, other primary producers, heterotrophs, and abiotic components. C:N:P decreased with increasing trophic level. Nutrient recycling in the food webs was highest for P, and high transfer efficiencies between trophic levels of P and N also indicated an overall shortage of these nutrients when compared to C. Heterotrophs were sometimes, but not always, limited by the same nutrient as the primary producers. Mangrove trees and the primary tree consumers were P limited, whereas the invertebrates consuming leaf litter and detritus were N limited. Most compartments were limited by P or N (not by C), and the relative depletion rate of food sources was fastest for P. P transfers thus constituted a bottleneck of nutrient transfer on Twin Cays. This is the first comprehensive ecosystem study of nutrient transfers in a mangrove ecosystem, illustrating some mechanisms (e.g. recycling rates, transfer efficiencies) which oligotrophic systems use in order to build up biomass and food webs spanning various trophic levels.

  5. Investigation of Content, Stoichiometry and Transfer of miRNA from Human Neural Stem Cell Line Derived Exosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Stevanato

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small (30-100 nm membrane vesicles secreted by a variety of cell types and only recently have emerged as a new avenue for cell-to-cell communication. They are natural shuttles of RNA and protein cargo, making them attractive as potential therapeutic delivery vehicles. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short non-coding RNAs which regulate biological processes and can be found in exosomes. Here we characterized the miRNA contents of exosomes derived from human neural stem cells (hNSCs. Our investigated hNSC line is a clonal, conditionally immortalized cell line, compliant with good manufacturing practice (GMP, and in clinical trials for stroke and critical limb ischemia in the UK (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01151124, NCT02117635, and NCT01916369. By using next generation sequencing (NGS technology we identified the presence of a variety of miRNAs in both exosomal and cellular preparations. Many of these miRNAs were enriched in exosomes indicating that cells specifically sort them for extracellular release. Although exosomes have been proven to contain miRNAs, the copy number quantification per exosome of a given miRNA remains unclear. Herein we quantified by real-time PCR a highly shuttled exosomal miRNA subtype (hsa-miR-1246 in order to assess its stoichiometry per exosome. Furthermore, we utilized an in vitro system to confirm its functional transfer by measuring the reduction in luciferase expression using a 3' untranslated region dual luciferase reporter assay. In summary, NGS analysis allowed the identification of a unique set of hNSC derived exosomal miRNAs. Stoichiometry and functional transfer analysis of one of the most abundant identified miRNA, hsa-miR-1246, were measured to support biological relevance of exosomal miRNA delivery.

  6. Marine ecosystem community carbon and nutrient uptake stoichiometry under varying ocean acidification during the PeECE III experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. J. Bellerby

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes to seawater inorganic carbon and nutrient concentrations in response to the deliberate CO2 perturbation of natural plankton assemblages were studied during the 2005 Pelagic Ecosystem CO2 Enrichment (PeECE III experiment. Inverse analysis of the temporal inorganic carbon dioxide system and nutrient variations was used to determine the net community stoichiometric uptake characteristics of a natural pelagic ecosystem perturbed over a range of pCO2 scenarios (350, 700 and 1050 μatm. Nutrient uptake showed no sensitivity to CO2 treatment. There was enhanced carbon production relative to nutrient consumption in the higher CO2 treatments which was positively correlated with the initial CO2 concentration. There was no significant calcification response to changing CO2 in Emiliania huxleyi by the peak of the bloom and all treatments exhibited low particulate inorganic carbon production (~15 μmol kg−1. With insignificant air-sea CO2 exchange across the treatments, the enhanced carbon uptake was due to increase organic carbon production. The inferred cumulative C:N:P stoichiometry of organic production increased with CO2 treatment from 1:6.3:121 to 1:7.1:144 to 1:8.25:168 at the height of the bloom. This study discusses how ocean acidification may incur modification to the stoichiometry of pelagic production and have consequences for ocean biogeochemical cycling.

  7. δ15N and nutrient stoichiometry of water, aquatic organisms and environmental implications in Taihu lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yu; Dan, Dai; Kun, Lei; Chengda, He; Haibing, Cong; Guo, Fu; Qiujin, Xu; Fuhong, Sun; Fengchang, Wu

    2018-06-01

    Nitrogen pollution has become a worldwide problem and the source identification is important for the development of pertinent control measures. In this study, isotope end members (rain, nitrogen fertilizer, untreated/treated sewage), and samples (river water discharging to Taihu lake, lake water, aquatic organisms of different trophic levels) were taken during 2010-2015 to examine their δ 15 N values and nutrient stoichiometry. Results indicated that phytoplankton (primary producers), which directly take up and incorporate N from the lake water, had a similar δ 15 N value (14.1‰ ± 3.2) to the end member of treated sewage (14.0‰ ± 7.5), and the most frequently observed δ 15 N value in the lake water was 8-12‰, both indicating the dominant impact of the sewage discharge. Relationship analysis between N isotope value of nitrate and nitrate concentration indicated that different N cycling existed between the algae-dominated northwest lake (NW) and the macrophyte-dominated southeast lake (SE), which is a result of both impacts of river inputs and denitrification. Our nutrient stoichiometry analysis showed that the lake water had a significantly higher N:P ratio than that of algae (p economic development in the watershed further confirmed that the rapid population increase and urbanization have resulted in a great change in the N loading and source proportion. We suggest that although P control is necessary in terms of eutrophication control, N pollution control is urgent for the water quality and ecological recovery for Taihu lake. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Elemental stoichiometry indicates predominant influence of potassium and phosphorus limitation on arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in acidic soil at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Haneef; Meghvansi, Mukesh K; Gupta, Rajeev; Veer, Vijay

    2015-09-15

    The functioning of high-altitude agro-ecosystems is constrained by the harsh environmental conditions, such as low temperatures, acidic soil, and low nutrient supply. It is therefore imperative to investigate the site-specific ecological stoichiometry with respect to AM symbiosis in order to maximize the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) benefits for the plants in such ecosystems. Here, we assess the elemental stoichiometry of four Capsicum genotypes grown on acidic soil at high altitude in Arunachal Pradesh, India. Further, we try to identify the predominant resource limitations influencing the symbioses of different Capsicum genotypes with the AM fungi. Foliar and soil elemental stoichiometric relations of Capsicum genotypes were evaluated with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization and occurrence under field conditions. AM fungal diversity in rhizosphere, was estimated through PCR-DGGE profiling. Results demonstrated that the symbiotic interaction of various Capsicum genotypes with the AM fungi in acidic soil was not prominent in the study site as evident from the low range of root colonization (21-43.67%). In addition, despite the rich availability of carbon in plant leaves as well as in soil, the carbon-for-phosphorus trade between AMF and plants appeared to be limited. Our results provide strong evidences of predominant influence of the potassium-limitation, in addition to phosphorus-limitation, on AM symbiosis with Capsicum in acidic soil at high altitude. We also conclude that the potassium should be considered in addition to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in further studies investigating the stoichiometric relationships with the AMF symbioses in high altitude agro-ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Stoichiometry controlled, single-crystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires for transport in the basal plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peranio, Nicola; Eibl, Oliver [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Leister, Eva; Toellner, William; Nielsch, Kornelius [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-01-11

    Thermoelectric Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} based bulk materials are widely used for solid-state refrigeration and power-generation at room temperature. For low-dimensional and nanostructured thermoelectric materials an increase of the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT is predicted due to quantum confinement and phonon scattering at interfaces. Therefore, the fabrication of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires, thin films, and nanostructured bulk materials has become an important and active field of research. Stoichiometric Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires with diameters of 50-80 nm and a length of 56 {mu}m are grown by a potential-pulsed electrochemical deposition in a nanostructured Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dark-field images together with electron diffraction reveal single-crystalline wires, no grain boundaries can be detected. The stoichiometry control of the wires by high-accuracy, quantitative energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) in the TEM instrument is of paramount importance for successfully implementing the growth technology. Combined electron diffraction and EDX spectroscopy in the TEM unambiguously prove the correct crystal structure and stoichiometry of the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires. X-ray and electron diffraction reveal growth along the [110] and [210] directions and the c axis of the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} structure lies perpendicular to the wire axis. For the first time single crystalline, stoichiometric Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires are grown that allow transport in the basal plane without being affected by grain boundaries. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Response diversity of free-floating plants to nutrient stoichiometry and temperature: growth and resting body formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Free-floating plants, like most groups of aquatic primary producers, can become nuisance vegetation under certain conditions. On the other hand, there is substantial optimism for the applied uses of free-floating plants, such as wastewater treatment, biofuel production, and aquaculture. Therefore, understanding the species-specific responses of floating plants to abiotic conditions will inform both management decisions and the beneficial applications of these plants. I measured the responses of three floating plant species common in the northeast United States (Lemna minor, Spirodela polyrhiza, and Wolffia brasiliensis) to nutrient stoichiometry (nitrogen and phosphorus) and temperature in the laboratory. I also used survey data to determine the pattern of species richness of floating plants in the field and its relationship with the dominance of this group. Floating plant species exhibited unique responses to nutrient stoichiometry and temperature in the laboratory, especially under low temperatures (18 °C) and low nutrient conditions (0.5 mg N L−1, 0.083 mg P L−1). The three species displayed an apparent tradeoff with different strategies of growth or dormancy. In the field, water bodies with three or more species of floating plants were not more frequently dominated by this group. The response diversity observed in the lab may not be associated with the dominance of this group in the field because it is masked by environmental variability, has a weak effect, or is only important during transient circumstances. Future research to develop applied uses of floating plants should examine response diversity across a greater range of species or clones and environmental conditions. PMID:26989619

  11. Shrub type dominates the vertical distribution of leaf C : N : P stoichiometry across an extensive altitudinal gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenqiang; Reich, Peter B.; Yu, Qiannan; Zhao, Ning; Yin, Chunying; Zhao, Chunzhang; Li, Dandan; Hu, Jun; Li, Ting; Yin, Huajun; Liu, Qing

    2018-04-01

    Understanding leaf stoichiometric patterns is crucial for improving predictions of plant responses to environmental changes. Leaf stoichiometry of terrestrial ecosystems has been widely investigated along latitudinal and longitudinal gradients. However, very little is known about the vertical distribution of leaf C : N : P and the relative effects of environmental parameters, especially for shrubs. Here, we analyzed the shrub leaf C, N and P patterns in 125 mountainous sites over an extensive altitudinal gradient (523-4685 m) on the Tibetan Plateau. Results showed that the shrub leaf C and C : N were 7.3-47.5 % higher than those of other regional and global flora, whereas the leaf N and N : P were 10.2-75.8 % lower. Leaf C increased with rising altitude and decreasing temperature, supporting the physiological acclimation mechanism that high leaf C (e.g., alpine or evergreen shrub) could balance the cell osmotic pressure and resist freezing. The largest leaf N and high leaf P occurred in valley region (altitude 1500 m), likely due to the large nutrient leaching from higher elevations, faster litter decomposition and nutrient resorption ability of deciduous broadleaf shrub. Leaf N : P ratio further indicated increasing N limitation at higher altitudes. Interestingly, drought severity was the only climatic factor positively correlated with leaf N and P, which was more appropriate for evaluating the impact of water status than precipitation. Among the shrub ecosystem and functional types (alpine, subalpine, montane, valley, evergreen, deciduous, broadleaf, and conifer), their leaf element contents and responses to environments were remarkably different. Shrub type was the largest contributor to the total variations in leaf stoichiometry, while climate indirectly affected the leaf C : N : P via its interactive effects on shrub type or soil. Collectively, the large heterogeneity in shrub type was the most important factor explaining the overall leaf C : N : P variations

  12. Urbanization and agriculture increase exports and differentially alter elemental stoichiometry of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from tropical catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gücker, Björn; Silva, Ricky C S; Graeber, Daniel; Monteiro, José A F; Boëchat, Iola G

    2016-04-15

    Many tropical biomes are threatened by rapid land-use change, but its catchment-wide biogeochemical effects are poorly understood. The few previous studies on DOM in tropical catchments suggest that deforestation and subsequent land use increase stream water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, but consistent effects on DOM elemental stoichiometry have not yet been reported. Here, we studied stream water DOC concentrations, catchment DOC exports, and DOM elemental stoichiometry in 20 tropical catchments at the Cerrado-Atlantic rainforest transition, dominated by natural vegetation, pasture, intensive agriculture, and urban land cover. Streams draining pasture could be distinguished from those draining natural catchments by their lower DOC concentrations, with lower DOM C:N and C:P ratios. Catchments with intensive agriculture had higher DOC exports and lower DOM C:P ratios than natural catchments. Finally, with the highest DOC concentrations and exports, as well as the highest DOM C:P and N:P ratios, but the lowest C:N ratios among all land-use types, urbanized catchments had the strongest effects on catchment DOM. Thus, urbanization may have alleviated N limitation of heterotrophic DOM decomposition, but increased P limitation. Land use-especially urbanization-also affected the seasonality of catchment biogeochemistry. While natural catchments exhibited high DOC exports and concentrations, with high DOM C:P ratios in the rainy season only, urbanized catchments had high values in these variables throughout the year. Our results suggest that urbanization and pastoral land use exerted the strongest impacts on DOM biogeochemistry in the investigated tropical catchments and should thus be important targets for management and mitigation efforts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of Analytical Thinking Ability and Attitudes towards Science Learning of Grade-11 Students through Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM Education) in the Study of Stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonkaew, Patcharee; Sukhummek, Boonnak; Faikhamta, Chatree

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the analytical thinking abilities and attitudes towards science learning of grade-11 students through science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education integrated with a problem-based learning in the study of stoichiometry. The research tools consisted of a pre- and post-analytical…

  14. Aging changes in the face

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Aging changes in the face URL of this page: // ...

  15. Similarity measures for face recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Vezzetti, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Face recognition has several applications, including security, such as (authentication and identification of device users and criminal suspects), and in medicine (corrective surgery and diagnosis). Facial recognition programs rely on algorithms that can compare and compute the similarity between two sets of images. This eBook explains some of the similarity measures used in facial recognition systems in a single volume. Readers will learn about various measures including Minkowski distances, Mahalanobis distances, Hansdorff distances, cosine-based distances, among other methods. The book also summarizes errors that may occur in face recognition methods. Computer scientists "facing face" and looking to select and test different methods of computing similarities will benefit from this book. The book is also useful tool for students undertaking computer vision courses.

  16. Face Recognition using Approximate Arithmetic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marso, Karol

    Face recognition is image processing technique which aims to identify human faces and found its use in various different fields for example in security. Throughout the years this field evolved and there are many approaches and many different algorithms which aim to make the face recognition as effective...... as possible. The use of different approaches such as neural networks and machine learning can lead to fast and efficient solutions however, these solutions are expensive in terms of hardware resources and power consumption. A possible solution to this problem can be use of approximate arithmetic. In many image...... processing applications the results do not need to be completely precise and use of the approximate arithmetic can lead to reduction in terms of delay, space and power consumption. In this paper we examine possible use of approximate arithmetic in face recognition using Eigenfaces algorithm....

  17. Bracing Zonohedra With Special Faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Gyula

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of simpler preliminary design gives useful input for more complicated three-dimensional building frame structure. A zonohedron, as a preliminary structure of design, is a convex polyhedron for which each face possesses central symmetry. We considered zonohedron as a special framework with the special assumption that the polygonal faces can be deformed in such a way that faces remain planar and centrally symmetric, moreover the length of all edges remains unchanged. Introducing some diagonal braces we got a new mechanism. This paper deals with the flexibility of this kind of mechanisms, and investigates the rigidity of the braced framework. The flexibility of the framework can be characterized by some vectors, which represent equivalence classes of the edges. A necessary and sufficient condition for the rigidity of the braced rhombic face zonohedra is posed. A real mechanical construction, based on two simple elements, provides a CAD prototype of these new mechanisms.

  18. Familiarity facilitates feature-based face processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Kelsey G.; Cipolli, Carlo; Gobbini, M. Ida

    2017-01-01

    Recognition of personally familiar faces is remarkably efficient, effortless and robust. We asked if feature-based face processing facilitates detection of familiar faces by testing the effect of face inversion on a visual search task for familiar and unfamiliar faces. Because face inversion disrupts configural and holistic face processing, we hypothesized that inversion would diminish the familiarity advantage to the extent that it is mediated by such processing. Subjects detected personally familiar and stranger target faces in arrays of two, four, or six face images. Subjects showed significant facilitation of personally familiar face detection for both upright and inverted faces. The effect of familiarity on target absent trials, which involved only rejection of unfamiliar face distractors, suggests that familiarity facilitates rejection of unfamiliar distractors as well as detection of familiar targets. The preserved familiarity effect for inverted faces suggests that facilitation of face detection afforded by familiarity reflects mostly feature-based processes. PMID:28582439

  19. Kinetic Damage from Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, W.; Brown, P.; Matney, M.

    2017-01-01

    Comparing the natural meteorite flux at the Earth's surface to that of space debris, re-entering debris is 2 orders of magnitude less of a kinetic hazard at all but the very largest (and therefore rarest) sizes compared to natural impactors. Debris re-entries over several metric tonnes are roughly as frequent as natural impactors, but the survival fraction is expected to be much higher. Kinetic hazards from meteorites are very small, with only one recorded (indirect) injury reported. We expect fatalities to be even more rare, on the order of one person killed per several millennia. That several reports exist of small fragments/sand hitting people during meteorite falls is consistent with our prediction that this should occur every decade or so.

  20. 3D Face Appearance Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Brian; Larsen, Rasmus; Åström, Kalle

    2006-01-01

    We build a 3d face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical jacobian of its resulting 2d rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations.}......We build a 3d face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical jacobian of its resulting 2d rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations.}...

  1. 3D Face Apperance Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Brian; Larsen, Rasmus; Astrom, K

    2006-01-01

    We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations......We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations...

  2. Kinetic energy absorbing pad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bricmont, R.J.; Hamilton, P.A.; Ming Long Ting, R.

    1981-01-01

    Reactors, fuel processing plants etc incorporate pipes and conduits for fluids under high pressure. Fractures, particularly adjacent to conduit elbows, produce a jet of liquid which whips the broken conduit at an extremely high velocity. An enormous impact load would be applied to any stationary object in the conduit's path. The design of cellular, corrugated metal impact pads to absorb the kinetic energy of the high velocity conduits is given. (U.K.)

  3. Kinetic transport in crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Marklof, Jens

    2009-01-01

    One of the central challenges in kinetic theory is the derivation of macroscopic evolution equations--describing, for example, the dynamics of an electron gas--from the underlying fundamental microscopic laws of classical or quantum mechanics. An iconic mathematical model in this research area is the Lorentz gas, which describes an ensemble of non-interacting point particles in an infinite array of spherical scatterers. In the case of a disordered scatterer configuration, the classical result...

  4. Calcite Dissolution Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berelson, W.; Subhas, A.; Dong, S.; Naviaux, J.; Adkins, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    A geological buffer for high atmospheric CO2 concentrations is neutralization via reaction with CaCO3. We have been studying the dissolution kinetics of carbonate minerals using labeled 13C calcite and Picarro-based measurements of 13C enrichments in solution DIC. This methodology has greatly facilitated our investigation of dissolution kinetics as a function of water carbonate chemistry, temperature and pressure. One can adjust the saturation state Omega by changing the ion activity product (e.g. adjusting carbonate ion concentration), or by changing the solubility product (e.g. adjusting temperature or pressure). The canonical formulation of dissolution rate vs. omega has been refined (Subhas et al. 2015) and shows distinct non-linear behavior near equilibrium and rates in sea water of 1-3 e-6 g/cm2day at omega = 0.8. Carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that catalyzes the hydration of dissolved CO2 to carbonic acid, was shown (in concentrations 500x. This result points to the importance of carbonic acid in enhancing dissolution at low degrees of undersaturation. CA activity and abundance in nature must be considered regarding the role it plays in catalyzing dissolution. We also have been investigating the role of temperature on dissolution kinetics. An increase of 16C yields an order of magnitude increase in dissolution rate. Temperature (and P) also change Omega critical, the saturation state where dissolution rates change substantially. Increasing pressure (achieved in a pressure reaction chamber we built) also shifts Omega critical closer to equilibrium and small pressure increases have large impact on dissolution kinetics. Dissolution rates are enhanced by an order of magnitude for a change in pressure of 1500 psi relative to the dissolution rate achieved by water chemistry effects alone for an omega of 0.8. We've shown that the thermodynamic determination of saturation state does not adequately describe the kinetics of dissolution. The interplay of mineral

  5. Face adaptation: Changing stable representations of familiar faces within minutes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus-Christian Carbon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Three experiments are reported showing that the perception and the assessment of veridicality of familiar faces are highly adaptive to new visual information. Subjects were asked to discriminate between real photographs and altered versions of celebrities. Exposing participants to extremely deviated versions changed the usually stable representations of the famous faces within a very short time. In Experiment 1, exposure to an extreme face version resulted in identity decisions shifted towards the exposed one. Experiment 2 revealed that the effects are not short lasting. In Experiment 3, we showed that the effect also generalizes to different pictures of the same famous person. Together the experiments seem to indicate that the brain permanently adapts to new perceptual information and integrates new data within already elaborated representations in a fast way.

  6. Ethnicity identification from face images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoguang; Jain, Anil K.

    2004-08-01

    Human facial images provide the demographic information, such as ethnicity and gender. Conversely, ethnicity and gender also play an important role in face-related applications. Image-based ethnicity identification problem is addressed in a machine learning framework. The Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) based scheme is presented for the two-class (Asian vs. non-Asian) ethnicity classification task. Multiscale analysis is applied to the input facial images. An ensemble framework, which integrates the LDA analysis for the input face images at different scales, is proposed to further improve the classification performance. The product rule is used as the combination strategy in the ensemble. Experimental results based on a face database containing 263 subjects (2,630 face images, with equal balance between the two classes) are promising, indicating that LDA and the proposed ensemble framework have sufficient discriminative power for the ethnicity classification problem. The normalized ethnicity classification scores can be helpful in the facial identity recognition. Useful as a "soft" biometric, face matching scores can be updated based on the output of ethnicity classification module. In other words, ethnicity classifier does not have to be perfect to be useful in practice.

  7. Reaction kinetics in open reactors and serial transfers between closed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokhuis, Alex; Lacoste, David; Gaspard, Pierre

    2018-04-01

    Kinetic theory and thermodynamics of reaction networks are extended to the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of continuous-flow stirred tank reactors (CSTR) and serial transfers. On the basis of their stoichiometry matrix, the conservation laws and the cycles of the network are determined for both dynamics. It is shown that the CSTR and serial transfer dynamics are equivalent in the limit where the time interval between the transfers tends to zero proportionally to the ratio of the fractions of fresh to transferred solutions. These results are illustrated with a finite cross-catalytic reaction network and an infinite reaction network describing mass exchange between polymers. Serial transfer dynamics is typically used in molecular evolution experiments in the context of research on the origins of life. The present study is shedding a new light on the role played by serial transfer parameters in these experiments.

  8. Kinetics of tetrataenite disordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos, E.; Gattacceca, J.; Rochette, P.; Fillion, G.; Scorzelli, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrataenite is a chemically ordered L1 0 -type Fe 50 Ni 50 alloy detected for the first time in 1977 by 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy studies in iron meteorites. The thermal history of meteorites, in particular short thermal events like those associated to hypervelocity impacts, can be constrained by tracing the presence of tetrataenite or its disordering into taenite. The knowledge of the disordering kinetics of tetrataenite, that is associated with changes in its magnetic properties, is still very fragmentary so that the time–temperature history of these meteorites cannot be constrained in details. Furthermore, knowledge of disordering kinetics is important due to potential technological application of tetrataenite as a rare-earth free strong magnet. Thus, this work provides the first time–temperature data for disordering reaction of tetrataenite. We have shown that disordering is not an instantaneous process but is a kinetic limited reaction. It was shown that disordering may take place at any temperature above the order–disorder transition for L 10 superstructure phase (∼320 °C) when the appropriate time-scale is considered. This result means that the apparent Curie point for tetrataenite is not an absolute property in the sense that any estimate of this parameter should be referred to a given time-scale. - Highlights: • The first time–temperature data for tetrataenite disordering reaction is provided. • Previous works does not give a complete picture of tetrataenite disordering. • Apparent Curie temperature of tetrataenite should be referred to a time-scale. • Tetrataenite can be used as a probe to detect thermal/shock events recorded in meteorites

  9. Kinetics of tetrataenite disordering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dos Santos, E., E-mail: edisanfi@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Gattacceca, J.; Rochette, P. [Centre Européen de Recherche et d’Enseignement des Géosciences de l’Environnement, UM34, CNRS/Aix-Marseille University, Aix-en-Provence (France); Fillion, G. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses (LNCMI), CNRS, UJF, 38042 Grenoble (France); Scorzelli, R.B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2015-02-01

    Tetrataenite is a chemically ordered L1{sub 0}-type Fe{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} alloy detected for the first time in 1977 by {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy studies in iron meteorites. The thermal history of meteorites, in particular short thermal events like those associated to hypervelocity impacts, can be constrained by tracing the presence of tetrataenite or its disordering into taenite. The knowledge of the disordering kinetics of tetrataenite, that is associated with changes in its magnetic properties, is still very fragmentary so that the time–temperature history of these meteorites cannot be constrained in details. Furthermore, knowledge of disordering kinetics is important due to potential technological application of tetrataenite as a rare-earth free strong magnet. Thus, this work provides the first time–temperature data for disordering reaction of tetrataenite. We have shown that disordering is not an instantaneous process but is a kinetic limited reaction. It was shown that disordering may take place at any temperature above the order–disorder transition for L{sub 10} superstructure phase (∼320 °C) when the appropriate time-scale is considered. This result means that the apparent Curie point for tetrataenite is not an absolute property in the sense that any estimate of this parameter should be referred to a given time-scale. - Highlights: • The first time–temperature data for tetrataenite disordering reaction is provided. • Previous works does not give a complete picture of tetrataenite disordering. • Apparent Curie temperature of tetrataenite should be referred to a time-scale. • Tetrataenite can be used as a probe to detect thermal/shock events recorded in meteorites.

  10. Kinetics of stress fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachowiak, Matthew R; O'Shaughnessy, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Stress fibers are contractile cytoskeletal structures, tensile actomyosin bundles which allow sensing and production of force, provide cells with adjustable rigidity and participate in various processes such as wound healing. The stress fiber is possibly the best characterized and most accessible multiprotein cellular contractile machine. Here we develop a quantitative model of the structure and relaxation kinetics of stress fibers. The principal experimentally known features are incorporated. The fiber has a periodic sarcomeric structure similar to muscle fibers with myosin motor proteins exerting contractile force by pulling on actin filaments. In addition the fiber contains the giant spring-like protein titin. Actin is continuously renewed by exchange with the cytosol leading to a turnover time of several minutes. In order that steady state be possible, turnover must be regulated. Our model invokes simple turnover and regulation mechanisms: actin association and dissociation occur at filament ends, while actin filament overlap above a certain threshold in the myosin-containing regions augments depolymerization rates. We use the model to study stress fiber relaxation kinetics after stimulation, as observed in a recent experimental study where some fiber regions were contractile and others expansive. We find that two distinct episodes ensue after stimulation: the turnover-overlap system relaxes rapidly in seconds, followed by the slow relaxation of sarcomere lengths in minutes. For parameter values as they have been characterized experimentally, we find the long time relaxation of sarcomere length is set by the rate at which actin filaments can grow or shrink in response to the forces exerted by the elastic and contractile elements. Consequently, the stress fiber relaxation time scales inversely with both titin spring constant and the intrinsic actin turnover rate. The model's predicted sarcomere velocities and contraction-expansion kinetics are in good

  11. Kinetics of stress fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, Matthew R; O' Shaughnessy, Ben [Department of Chemical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)], E-mail: bo8@columbia.edu

    2008-02-15

    Stress fibers are contractile cytoskeletal structures, tensile actomyosin bundles which allow sensing and production of force, provide cells with adjustable rigidity and participate in various processes such as wound healing. The stress fiber is possibly the best characterized and most accessible multiprotein cellular contractile machine. Here we develop a quantitative model of the structure and relaxation kinetics of stress fibers. The principal experimentally known features are incorporated. The fiber has a periodic sarcomeric structure similar to muscle fibers with myosin motor proteins exerting contractile force by pulling on actin filaments. In addition the fiber contains the giant spring-like protein titin. Actin is continuously renewed by exchange with the cytosol leading to a turnover time of several minutes. In order that steady state be possible, turnover must be regulated. Our model invokes simple turnover and regulation mechanisms: actin association and dissociation occur at filament ends, while actin filament overlap above a certain threshold in the myosin-containing regions augments depolymerization rates. We use the model to study stress fiber relaxation kinetics after stimulation, as observed in a recent experimental study where some fiber regions were contractile and others expansive. We find that two distinct episodes ensue after stimulation: the turnover-overlap system relaxes rapidly in seconds, followed by the slow relaxation of sarcomere lengths in minutes. For parameter values as they have been characterized experimentally, we find the long time relaxation of sarcomere length is set by the rate at which actin filaments can grow or shrink in response to the forces exerted by the elastic and contractile elements. Consequently, the stress fiber relaxation time scales inversely with both titin spring constant and the intrinsic actin turnover rate. The model's predicted sarcomere velocities and contraction-expansion kinetics are in good

  12. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Oxygen Surface Exchange on La0.6Sr0.4FeO3-delta Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Mosleh, Majid; Søgaard, Martin; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2009-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties as well as oxygen exchange kinetics were examined on mixed ionic and electronic conducting (La0.6Sr0.4)0.99FeO3− (LSF64) thin films deposited on MgO single crystals. It is found that thin films and bulk material have the same oxygen stoichiometry for a given temperature and oxygen partial pressure [i.e., the incorporation reaction has the same reaction enthalpy (H0=−105 KJ/mol) and entropy (S0=−75.5 J/mol/K) as found for bulk material]. The thin film shows smaller...

  13. Kinetic theory of photophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beresnev, S.A.; Chernyak, V.G.; Fomyagin, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The force acting on an aerosol particle in one-sided illumination is calculated on the basis of solving a linearized gas-kinetic equation. A closed system of integral-moment equations describing photophoresis with arbitrary values of the Knudsen number and an arbitrary ratio of the particle and gas thermal conductivities is constructed. The possibility of arbitrary accommodation of the momentum and energy with interaction between the gas molecules and the particle surface is taken into account. The distribution of heat sources inside the radiation-absorbing particle is described by Mie theory. The results obtained are compared with the known theoretical and experimental data

  14. Chemical kinetics modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  15. [Treatment goals in FACE philosophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Domingo; Maté, Amaia; Zabalegui, Paula; Valenzuela, Jaime

    2017-03-01

    The FACE philosophy is characterized by clearly defined treatment goals: facial esthetics, dental esthetics, periodontal health, functional occlusion, neuromuscular mechanism and joint function. The purpose is to establish ideal occlusion with good facial esthetics and an orthopedic stable joint position. The authors present all the concepts of FACE philosophy and illustrate them through one case report. Taking into account all the FACE philosophy concepts increases diagnostic ability and improves the quality and stability of treatment outcomes. The goal of this philosophy is to harmonize the facial profile, tooth alignment, periodontium, functional occlusion, neuromuscular mechanism and joint function. The evaluation and treatment approach to vertical problems are unique to the philosophy. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2017.

  16. Eye-tracking analysis of face observing and face recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Iskra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Images are one of the key elements of the content of the World Wide Web. One group of web images are also photos of people. When various institutions (universities, research organizations, companies, associations, etc. present their staff, they should include photos of people for the purpose of more informative presentation. The fact is, that there are many specifies how people see face images and how do they remember them. Several methods to investigate person’s behavior during use of web content can be performed and one of the most reliable method among them is eye tracking. It is very common technique, particularly when it comes to observing web images. Our research focused on behavior of observing face images in process of memorizing them. Test participants were presented with face images shown at different time scale. We focused on three main face elements: eyes, mouth and nose. The results of our analysis can help not only in web presentation, which are, in principle, not limited by time observation, but especially in public presentations (conferences, symposia, and meetings.

  17. Embedded Face Detection and Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göksel Günlü

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The need to increase security in open or public spaces has in turn given rise to the requirement to monitor these spaces and analyse those images on-site and on-time. At this point, the use of smart cameras – of which the popularity has been increasing – is one step ahead. With sensors and Digital Signal Processors (DSPs, smart cameras generate ad hoc results by analysing the numeric images transmitted from the sensor by means of a variety of image-processing algorithms. Since the images are not transmitted to a distance processing unit but rather are processed inside the camera, it does not necessitate high-bandwidth networks or high processor powered systems; it can instantaneously decide on the required access. Nonetheless, on account of restricted memory, processing power and overall power, image processing algorithms need to be developed and optimized for embedded processors. Among these algorithms, one of the most important is for face detection and recognition. A number of face detection and recognition methods have been proposed recently and many of these methods have been tested on general-purpose processors. In smart cameras – which are real-life applications of such methods – the widest use is on DSPs. In the present study, the Viola-Jones face detection method – which was reported to run faster on PCs – was optimized for DSPs; the face recognition method was combined with the developed sub-region and mask-based DCT (Discrete Cosine Transform. As the employed DSP is a fixed-point processor, the processes were performed with integers insofar as it was possible. To enable face recognition, the image was divided into sub-regions and from each sub-region the robust coefficients against disruptive elements – like face expression, illumination, etc. – were selected as the features. The discrimination of the selected features was enhanced via LDA (Linear Discriminant Analysis and then employed for recognition. Thanks to its

  18. Instant PrimeFaces starter

    CERN Document Server

    Hlavats, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. Instant Primefaces Starter is a fast-paced, introductory guide designed to give you all the information you need to start using Primfaces, instantly.Instant PrimeFaces Starter is great for developers looking to get started quickly with PrimeFaces. It's assumed that you have some JSF experience already, as well as familiarity with other Java technologies such as CDI and JPA and an understanding of MVC principles, object-relational mapping (ORM),

  19. Reduced response to IKr blockade and altered hERG1a/1b stoichiometry in human heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzem, Katherine M; Gomez, Juan F; Glukhov, Alexey V; Madden, Eli J; Koppel, Aaron C; Ewald, Gregory A; Trenor, Beatriz; Efimov, Igor R

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure (HF) claims 250,000 lives per year in the US, and nearly half of these deaths are sudden and presumably due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. QT interval and action potential (AP) prolongation are hallmark proarrhythmic changes in the failing myocardium, which potentially result from alterations in repolarizing potassium currents. Thus, we aimed to examine whether decreased expression of the rapid delayed rectifier potassium current, IKr, contributes to repolarization abnormalities in human HF. To map functional IKr expression across the left ventricle (LV), we optically imaged coronary-perfused LV free wall from donor and end-stage failing human hearts. The LV wedge preparation was used to examine transmural AP durations at 80% repolarization (APD80), and treatment with the IKr-blocking drug, E-4031, was utilized to interrogate functional expression. We assessed the percent change in APD80 post-IKr blockade relative to baseline APD80 (∆APD80) and found that ∆APD80s are reduced in failing versus donor hearts in each transmural region, with 0.35-, 0.43-, and 0.41-fold reductions in endo-, mid-, and epicardium, respectively (p=0.008, 0.037, and 0.022). We then assessed hERG1 isoform gene and protein expression levels using qPCR and Western blot. While we did not observe differences in hERG1a or hERG1b gene expression between donor and failing hearts, we found a shift in the hERG1a:hERG1b isoform stoichiometry at the protein level. Computer simulations were then conducted to assess IKr block under E-4031 influence in failing and nonfailing conditions. Our results confirmed the experimental observations and E-4031-induced relative APD80 prolongation was greater in normal conditions than in failing conditions, provided that the cellular model of HF included a significant downregulation of IKr. In human HF, the response to IKr blockade is reduced, suggesting decreased functional IKr expression. This attenuated functional response is associated with

  20. Shrub type dominates the vertical distribution of leaf C : N : P stoichiometry across an extensive altitudinal gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding leaf stoichiometric patterns is crucial for improving predictions of plant responses to environmental changes. Leaf stoichiometry of terrestrial ecosystems has been widely investigated along latitudinal and longitudinal gradients. However, very little is known about the vertical distribution of leaf C : N : P and the relative effects of environmental parameters, especially for shrubs. Here, we analyzed the shrub leaf C, N and P patterns in 125 mountainous sites over an extensive altitudinal gradient (523–4685 m on the Tibetan Plateau. Results showed that the shrub leaf C and C : N were 7.3–47.5 % higher than those of other regional and global flora, whereas the leaf N and N : P were 10.2–75.8 % lower. Leaf C increased with rising altitude and decreasing temperature, supporting the physiological acclimation mechanism that high leaf C (e.g., alpine or evergreen shrub could balance the cell osmotic pressure and resist freezing. The largest leaf N and high leaf P occurred in valley region (altitude 1500 m, likely due to the large nutrient leaching from higher elevations, faster litter decomposition and nutrient resorption ability of deciduous broadleaf shrub. Leaf N : P ratio further indicated increasing N limitation at higher altitudes. Interestingly, drought severity was the only climatic factor positively correlated with leaf N and P, which was more appropriate for evaluating the impact of water status than precipitation. Among the shrub ecosystem and functional types (alpine, subalpine, montane, valley, evergreen, deciduous, broadleaf, and conifer, their leaf element contents and responses to environments were remarkably different. Shrub type was the largest contributor to the total variations in leaf stoichiometry, while climate indirectly affected the leaf C : N : P via its interactive effects on shrub type or soil. Collectively, the large heterogeneity in shrub type was the most

  1. Encouraging Participation in Face-to-Face Lectures: The Index Card Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daws, Laura Beth

    2018-01-01

    Courses: This activity will work in any face-to-face communication lecture course. Objectives: By the end of the semester in a face-to-face lecture class, every student will have engaged in verbal discussion.

  2. Influence of cation off-stoichiometry on structural and transport properties of (Ba,La)SnO3 epitaxial thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Yusuke; Kan, Daisuke; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the influences of cation off-stoichiometry on structural and transport properties of 3% La-doped BaSnO3 (BLSO) epitaxial thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition. We show that cation off-stoichiometry, namely, Sn excess and Sn deficiency, is introduced by variations in either laser fluence or the cation composition of the target used for the film growth and that the cation off-stoichiometry influences the properties of the grown films. While all films investigated in this study undergo relaxations from the substrate-induced strain, the out-of-plane lattice constant decreases with the increase in the Sn content in the film. The electrical conductivity, carrier concentration, and mobility are strongly dependent on the type of the cation off-stoichiometry (Sn excess and Sn deficiency). The highest room-temperature mobility, 35 cm2/V-1s-1, is seen for a film grown by ablating the stoichiometric target with a fluence of 1.6 J/cm2, which keeps the cation ratio in the film close to the stoichiometric one. The conductivity and the carrier concentration of the Sn-excess films grown with the fluence smaller than 1.6 J/cm2 are as high as 2 × 103 S/cm and 5 × 1020 cm-3, respectively, while the mobility remains as low as 25 cm2/V-1s-1. The observed carrier concentration is slightly higher than that calculated from the stoichiometric composition of BLSO, implying that the excess Sn in the films provides additional carriers and also acts as scattering centers for the carriers. On the other hand, no measurable electrical conduction is observed in the Sn-deficient films grown with a fluence greater than 1.6 J/cm2, indicating that the carriers provided by the dopants are trapped by defects due to the Sn deficiency. We also show that cation off-stoichiometry influences the surface morphology of the films. Our results highlight that the cation stoichiometry of the BLSO films is an important factor influencing their properties.

  3. Chemical kinetics of gas reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kondrat'Ev, V N

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Kinetics of Gas Reactions explores the advances in gas kinetics and thermal, photochemical, electrical discharge, and radiation chemical reactions. This book is composed of 10 chapters, and begins with the presentation of general kinetic rules for simple and complex chemical reactions. The next chapters deal with the experimental methods for evaluating chemical reaction mechanisms and some theories of elementary chemical processes. These topics are followed by discussions on certain class of chemical reactions, including unimolecular, bimolecular, and termolecular reactions. The rema

  4. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. (United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (USA)); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA)); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (USA))

    1989-07-01

    This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

  5. Long-term kinetics of uranyl desorption from sediments under advective conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John

    2014-02-01

    Long-term (>4 months) column experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl (U(VI)) desorption in sediments collected from the Integrated Field Research Challenge site at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area. The experimental results were used to evaluate alternative multirate surface complexation reaction (MRSCR) approaches to describe the short and long-term kinetics of U(VI) desorption under flow conditions. The surface complexation reaction (SCR) stoichiometry and equilibrium constants and multirate parameters in the MRSCR models were independently characterized in batch and stirred flow-cell reactors. MRSCR models that were either additively constructed using the MRSCRs for individual size fractions, or composite in nature, could effectively describe short-term U(VI) desorption under flow conditions. The long-term desorption results, however, revealed that using the labile U concentration measured by carbonate extraction underestimated desorbable U(VI) and the long-term rate of U(VI) desorption. This study also found that the gravel size fraction (2-8 mm), which is typically treated as nonreactive in modeling U(VI) reactive transport because of low external surface area, can have an important effect on the U(VI) desorption in the sediment. This study demonstrates an approach to effectively extrapolate U(VI) desorption kinetics for field-scale application and identifies important parameters and uncertainties affecting model predictions.

  6. Sintering kinetics in (Th, 5%U)O2 in the initial stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraz, W.B.; Cardoso, P.E.; Lameiras, F.S.

    1990-01-01

    The initial sintering kinetics of (Th,5%U)O 2 pellets, in air and Ar-4%H 2 atmosphere in the temperature range 950-1175 0 C, was examined by dilatometric analysis. It was observed that the sintering in air occurs at a lower temperature. Based on Johnson's model, the volume diffusion and the grain boundary diffusion were assumed to cause the linear shrinkage. From the general equation of this model Δl/l=kt n the values n approx. 0,49 and n≥ 0,33, for sintering in air and Ar-4%H 2 atmosphere respectively, were observed. These results revealed that the initial sintering kinetics in air is controlled by volume diffusion and in Ar-4%H 2 atmosphere is weakly predominated by the grain boundary diffusion. The estimated volumetric diffusion coefficient for the sintering in air is about three orders of magnitude greater than in Ar-4%H 2 atmosphere, indicating a strong influence of the stoichiometrie on the sintering kinetics. The grain boundary diffusion coefficient appears to be independent of the sintering atmosphere. (author) [pt

  7. Adsorption analysis equilibria and kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Do, Duong D

    1998-01-01

    This book covers topics of equilibria and kinetics of adsorption in porous media. Fundamental equilibria and kinetics are dealt with for homogeneous as well as heterogeneous particles. Five chapters of the book deal with equilibria and eight chapters deal with kinetics. Single component as well as multicomponent systems are discussed. In kinetics analysis, we deal with the various mass transport processes and their interactions inside a porous particle. Conventional approaches as well as the new approach using Maxwell-Stefan equations are presented. Various methods to measure diffusivity, such

  8. Saving Face and Group Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor; Mao, Lei; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    2015-01-01

    their self- but also other group members' image. This behavior is frequent even in the absence of group identity. When group identity is more salient, individuals help regardless of whether the least performer is an in-group or an out-group. This suggests that saving others' face is a strong social norm....

  9. Markerless 3D Face Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walder, Christian; Breidt, Martin; Bulthoff, Heinrich

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for the markerless tracking of deforming surfaces such as faces. We acquire a sequence of 3D scans along with color images at 40Hz. The data is then represented by implicit surface and color functions, using a novel partition-of-unity type method of efficiently combin...

  10. Face recognition, a landmarks tale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Face recognition is a technology that appeals to the imagination of many people. This is particularly reflected in the popularity of science-fiction films and forensic detective series such as CSI, CSI New York, CSI Miami, Bones and NCIS. Although these series tend to be set in the present, their

  11. Managers facing the climatic risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This colloquium aimed to analyze the relations between the climatic changes and extreme meteorological events and on the associated risks. It provides information and knowledge on the state of the art concerning the today scientific knowledge, the prevention measures and the adaptation facing the risks and the difficult estimation of the climatic damages costs. (A.L.B.)

  12. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Feature extraction is one of the important tasks in face recognition. Moments are widely used feature extractor due to their superior discriminatory power and geometrical invariance. Moments generally capture the global features of the image. This paper proposes Krawtchouk moment for feature extraction ...

  13. Interpretative challenges in face analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Oliveira, Sandi Michele; Hernández-Flores, Nieves

    2015-01-01

    In current research on face analysis questions of who and what should be interpreted, as well as how, are of central interest. In English language research, this question has led to a debate on the concepts of P1 (laypersons, representing the “emic” perspective) and P2 (researchers, representing ...

  14. Towards automatic forensic face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology and experimental results for evidence evaluation in the context of forensic face recognition. In forensic applications, the matching score (hereafter referred to as similarity score) from a biometric system must be represented as a Likelihood Ratio (LR). In our

  15. Face Liveness Detection Using Defocus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooyeon Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop security systems for identity authentication, face recognition (FR technology has been applied. One of the main problems of applying FR technology is that the systems are especially vulnerable to attacks with spoofing faces (e.g., 2D pictures. To defend from these attacks and to enhance the reliability of FR systems, many anti-spoofing approaches have been recently developed. In this paper, we propose a method for face liveness detection using the effect of defocus. From two images sequentially taken at different focuses, three features, focus, power histogram and gradient location and orientation histogram (GLOH, are extracted. Afterwards, we detect forged faces through the feature-level fusion approach. For reliable performance verification, we develop two databases with a handheld digital camera and a webcam. The proposed method achieves a 3.29% half total error rate (HTER at a given depth of field (DoF and can be extended to camera-equipped devices, like smartphones.

  16. Developmental Changes in Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Communication: Birth to 3 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelli, Manuela; Fogel, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Investigated development of face-to-face communication in infants between 1 and 14 weeks old and their mothers. Found a curvilinear development of early face-to-face communication, with increases occurring between weeks 4 and 9. When placed on a sofa, infants' face-to-face communication was longer than when they were held. Girls spent a longer…

  17. A Blended Learning Approach to Teaching Basic Pharmacokinetics and the Significance of Face-to-Face Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess pharmacy students' attitudes towards a blended-learning pharmacokinetics course. Design Narrated visual presentations and animations that illustrated kinetic processes and guided students through the use of software programs used for calculations were created. Other learning techniques used included online self-assessment quizzes, practice problem sets, and weekly face-to-face problem-solving tutorials. Assessment A precourse questionnaire to assess students' level of enthusiasm towards the blended-learning course and to solicit any concerns they had was administered at the beginning of the course. A postcourse questionnaire that included the same 4 Likert-scale items from the precourse questionnaire and follow-up open-ended questions was administered. Individual changes in level of enthusiasm were compared for individuals who completed both the precourse and postcourse questionnaire. Students' concerns about the blended method of learning had decreased postcourse while their enthusiasm for the benefits of blended learning had increased. Conclusion Students' initial concerns about the blended learning experience were focused on their ability to communicate with the instructor about the online components, but shifted to their own time management skills at the end of the course. Face-to-face interactions with each other and with the instructor were more highly rated than online interactions in this course. PMID:20798797

  18. A blended learning approach to teaching basic pharmacokinetics and the significance of face-to-face interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edginton, Andrea; Holbrook, Jane

    2010-06-15

    To assess pharmacy students' attitudes towards a blended-learning pharmacokinetics course. Narrated visual presentations and animations that illustrated kinetic processes and guided students through the use of software programs used for calculations were created. Other learning techniques used included online self-assessment quizzes, practice problem sets, and weekly face-to-face problem-solving tutorials. A precourse questionnaire to assess students' level of enthusiasm towards the blended-learning course and to solicit any concerns they had was administered at the beginning of the course. A postcourse questionnaire that included the same 4 Likert-scale items from the precourse questionnaire and follow-up open-ended questions was administered. Individual changes in level of enthusiasm were compared for individuals who completed both the precourse and postcourse questionnaire. Students' concerns about the blended method of learning had decreased postcourse while their enthusiasm for the benefits of blended learning had increased. Students' initial concerns about the blended learning experience were focused on their ability to communicate with the instructor about the online components, but shifted to their own time management skills at the end of the course. Face-to-face interactions with each other and with the instructor were more highly rated than online interactions in this course.

  19. Social cognition in autism: Face tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Marina A; Guerreschi, Michele; Tagliavento, Lucia; Gitti, Filippo; Sokolov, Alexander N; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Fazzi, Elisa

    2017-05-26

    Faces convey valuable information for social cognition, effective interpersonal interaction, and non-verbal communication. Face perception is believed to be atypical in autism, but the origin of this deficit is controversial. Dominant featural face encoding is suggested to be responsible for face tuning scarcity. Here we used a recently developed Face-n-Food paradigm for studying face tuning in individuals with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD). The key benefit of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face processing. In a spontaneous recognition task, adolescents with autism and typically developing matched controls were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). The set of images was shown in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Thresholds for recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face in ASD individuals were substantially higher than in typically developing controls: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which controls easily recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This outcome not only lends support to atypical face tuning, but provides novel insights into the origin of face encoding deficits in autism.

  20. Protein adsorption/desorption and antibody binding stoichiometry on silicon interferometric biosensors examined with TOF-SIMS

    KAUST Repository

    Gajos, Katarzyna

    2018-03-05

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry has been employed to examine, with biomolecular discrimination, sensing arm areas (20 μm x 600 μm) of integrated onto silicon chips Mach-Zehnder interferometers aiming to optimize their biofunctionalization with regard to indirect immunochemical (competitive) detection of ochratoxin A. Sensing areas are examined after: modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, spotting of OTA-ovalbumin conjugate (probe) from solutions with different concentration, blocking with bovine serum albumin, reaction with OTA-specific mouse monoclonal antibody followed by goat anti-mouse IgG secondary antibody. Component mass loadings of all proteins involved in immunodetection are determined from TOF-SIMS micro-analysis combined with ellipsometry of planar surfaces. These data show that partial desorption of surface-bound probe and blocking protein takes place upon primary immunoreaction to a degree that depends on probe concentration in spotting solution. Taking into account this desorption, apparent binding stoichiometry of both antibodies in immune complexes formed onto chip surface is determined more accurately than the respective evaluation based on real-time sensor response. In addition, mass loadings for probe and secondary antibody is observed to saturate for optimum probe concentrations. Also, principal component analysis of TOF-SIMS data could resolve both immunoreactions and biofunctionalization and discriminate surfaces prepared with optimum probe concentrations from those prepared using suboptimum ones.

  1. Sustaining nutrient supply and carbon export in a seasonally-stratifying shelf sea through inconsistent production and remineralisation stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Matthew; Moore, Mark; Achterberg, Eric; Chowdhury, Mohammed; Griffiths, Alex; Hartman, Susan; Hopkins, Joanne; Hull, Tom; Kivimäe, Caroline; Sivyer, Dave; Smilenova, Angelina; Wihsgott, Juliane; Woodward, Malcolm

    2017-04-01

    Continental shelf seas support 15-20% of global primary productivity despite covering only about 5% of the Earth's ocean surface area. As a result, they may have a significant role in oceanic uptake and storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, through the 'continental shelf pump' mechanism. The northwest European continental shelf, in particular the Celtic Sea (50°N 8°W), was the target of extensive biogeochemical sampling from March 2014 to September 2015, as part of the UK Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry research programme (UK-SSB). Here, we use the UK-SSB carbonate chemistry and macronutrient measurements to investigate the biogeochemical seasonality in the temperate, seasonally-stratifying Celtic Sea. During the spring-summer, near-surface biological activity removed dissolved inorganic carbon and nutrients, some of which were then exported into the deeper layer. We calculated vertical inventories of these variables throughout 1.5 seasonal cycles and attempted to correct these for air-sea CO2 exchange, advection and denitrification, thus isolating the combined effect of net community production and remineralisation on the inorganic macronutrient inventories, and revealing fluctuating deviations from Redfield stoichiometry. Here, we discuss the capacity of these stoichiometric inconsistencies to sustain the Celtic Sea nutrient supply, and thus examine whether an effective continental shelf pump for CO2 could operate in this region.

  2. Land use change influences soil C, N, and P stoichiometry under 'Grain-to-Green Program' in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazhu, Zhao; Jiao, Sun; Chengjie, Ren; Di, Kang; Jian, Deng; Xinhui, Han; Gaihe, Yang; Yongzhong, Feng; Guangxin, Ren

    2015-05-19

    Changes in land use might affect the combined C, N and P stoichiometry in soil. The Grain-to-Green Program (GTGP), which converts low-yield croplands or abandoned lands into forest, shrub, and/or grassland, was the largest land reforestation project in China. This study collected the reported C, N and P contents of soil in GTGP zones to achieve the factors driving the changes in the C:N, C:P, and N:P values. The results showed that the annual average precipitation exerted significant effects on the C:P value, and on the N:P value became significant 20 years after the change in land use. The annual average temperature was the main factor affecting the C:N value during the first 10 years, while the annual average precipitation strongly affected this value afterwards. In addition, "Redfield-like" interactions between C, N, and P in the soil may exist. A linear regression revealed significant positive correlations between the C:N, C:P, and N:P values and the restoration age, temperature, and precipitation after a change in land use. Therefore large-scale changes in land use under the 'GTGP' program might significantly affect the C:N, C:P and N:P ratios in soil.

  3. Metabolic stoichiometry and the ecology of fear in Trinidadian guppies: consequences for life histories and stream ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Christopher M; Flecker, Alexander S

    2014-11-01

    Consumer-driven nutrient recycling, the release of chemicals as byproducts and excesses of consumer physiology, can alter ecosystems by changing the availability of limiting nutrients at the base of the food web. The mere presence of predators can alter consumer physiology by restricting food intake and inducing stress. Predation risk, then, can influence ecosystem function by modifying the role of prey as nutrient recyclers, yet there are few empirical tests of how predation risk alters nutrient recycling by prey. Here, we present the results of a test for the effects of predation risk on the C and N budgets of Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata). We reared female guppies for 7 weeks on diets of varying quality, and we compared control individuals to those exposed continuously to chemical cues emitted by a guppy predator, Crenicichla alta. We measured food consumption, growth rate, tissue elemental stoichiometry and N excretion by guppies on all treatments. Guppies strongly reduced food intake in the presence of predator cues; however, cue-exposed guppies assimilated nutrients more efficiently than controls. Specifically, cue-exposed guppies strongly increased N retention efficiency while only moderately increasing C efficiency. Consequently, guppies reared with predator cues excreted 39% less N than control guppies. We suggest that reduced foraging, enhanced nutrient efficiency, and decreased N excretion are adaptive responses to the extrinsic mortality threat posed by guppy predators. The resulting substantial reduction in N excretion by guppies may influence ecosystem function in natural streams by reducing the supply of a limiting nutrient.

  4. C and P in aquatic food chain: A review on C:P stoichiometry and PUFA regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikia S.K.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon (C and phosphorous (P regulation in aquatic food chains are transferred from lower to upper trophic levels primarily as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs and C:P stoichiometry. The majority of C is transferred through algal based pathway. Microbial loop, though optionally contributes to C transfer, highly constrained by P limitation and bacterial predator type. Lack of essential PUFAs in bacteria is also responsible for its low trophic transfer of C. The seston size and algal taxonomic variations directly affect herbivore through P-dependent food quality and de novo synthesis of PUFAs. Change in algal community over a gradient could therefore determine C transfer. Feeding nature (herbivorous or carnivorous and predator sizes also regulate transfer efficiency of C and P to upper trophic levels. As trophic levels move up, P-limitation becomes higher compared to autotrophs. For Daphnia, as mostly studied aquatic herbivore member, P limitation becomes critical at C:P > 300 indicating excess C is not always invited under P-deficient situations. However, as a part of homeostasis mechanism for trophic upgrading, conversion of algal-zooplankton interface from qualitative to quantitative could minimize such critical C:P regulation at higher trophic levels. Protists, in turn, with high clearance rate by zooplankton predator could also compensate qualitative effect.

  5. Ba3Fe2WO9-δ: Effect of oxygen non-stoichiometry on structural and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, S.A.; Eriksson, S.-G.; Tellgren, R.; Rundlof, H.; Nordblad, P.; Eriksen, J.

    2006-01-01

    The magnetic and structural properties of oxygen-deficient perovskites with composition Ba 3 Fe 2 WO 9-δ (BFWO) have been systematically studied for two different oxygen contents corresponding to δ=0.00 and 0.55 in the chemical formula in order to determine and correlate their chemical composition, structural and magnetic properties. The evolution of nuclear and magnetic structures with temperature has been investigated by neutron powder diffraction. It was shown that at room temperature the stoichiometric compound (δ=0.00) adopts a hexagonal 6H-perovskite structure (space group P6 3 /mmc). This phase, when heated at high temperature under a stream of Ar gas, transforms to an oxygen-deficient phase δ=0.55), which is an ordered cubic perovskite structure (space group Fm-3m). The crystallographic and magnetic properties of the obtained phases are compared, and it is clear that the magnetic properties are significantly affected by oxygen non-stoichiometry. These changes of magnetic properties for such a slight decrease in oxygen content are interpreted as a result of structural transformations. Together with the experimental results based on neutron powder diffraction data a discussion of some aspects of the structural transformation (P6 3 /mmc->Fm-3m) is presented

  6. The off-stoichiometry effect on the optical properties of water-soluble copper indium zinc sulfide quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanqiao; Chen, Ting; Hu, Xiaobo; Jiang, Wan; Wang, Lianjun; Jiang, Weihui; Liu, Jianmin

    2017-06-15

    CuInZnS quantum dots (CIZS QDs) were prepared via reflux method in aqueous solution using CuCl 2 ·2H 2 O, InCl 3 ·4H 2 O, Zn(OAc) 2 ·2H 2 O and Na 2 S·9H 2 O as raw materials, l-glutathione (GSH) and sodiumcitrate (SC) as stabilizing agents, respectively. The effects of off-stoichiometry (Cu/In and Zn/Cu ratios) on the crystal structure and morphology were systematically studied by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and the relative optical properties were also investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectra. The as-prepared water-dispersible CIZS QDs were around 3-4nm and possessed the tetragonal chalcopyrite crystal structure. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of QDs was significantly increased with decreasing the Cu/In ratio. Compared with the Cu/In ratio variation, changing Zn/Cu ratio was an effective strategy to realize a more uniform irradiation and a wide range of emission wavelength tunability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Controlling the stoichiometry and strand polarity of a tetramolecular G-quadruplex structure by using a DNA origami frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Arivazhagan; Endo, Masayuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Lan Thao Tran, Phong; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Guanine-rich oligonucleotides often show a strong tendency to form supramolecular architecture, the so-called G-quadruplex structure. Because of the biological significance, it is now considered to be one of the most important conformations of DNA. Here, we describe the direct visualization and single-molecule analysis of the formation of a tetramolecular G-quadruplex in KCl solution. The conformational changes were carried out by incorporating two duplex DNAs, with G–G mismatch repeats in the middle, inside a DNA origami frame and monitoring the topology change of the strands. In the absence of KCl, incorporated duplexes had no interaction and laid parallel to each other. Addition of KCl induced the formation of a G-quadruplex structure by stably binding the duplexes to each other in the middle. Such a quadruplex formation allowed the DNA synapsis without disturbing the duplex regions of the participating sequences, and resulted in an X-shaped structure that was monitored by atomic force microscopy. Further, the G-quadruplex formation in KCl solution and its disruption in KCl-free buffer were analyzed in real-time. The orientation of the G-quadruplex is often difficult to control and investigate using traditional biochemical methods. However, our method using DNA origami could successfully control the strand orientations, topology and stoichiometry of the G-quadruplex. PMID:23863846

  8. Face to Face : The Perception of Automotive Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhager, Sonja; Slice, Dennis E; Schaefer, Katrin; Oberzaucher, Elisabeth; Thorstensen, Truls; Grammer, Karl

    2008-12-01

    Over evolutionary time, humans have developed a selective sensitivity to features in the human face that convey information on sex, age, emotions, and intentions. This ability might not only be applied to our conspecifics nowadays, but also to other living objects (i.e., animals) and even to artificial structures, such as cars. To investigate this possibility, we asked people to report the characteristics, emotions, personality traits, and attitudes they attribute to car fronts, and we used geometric morphometrics (GM) and multivariate statistical methods to determine and visualize the corresponding shape information. Automotive features and proportions are found to covary with trait perception in a manner similar to that found with human faces. Emerging analogies are discussed. This study should have implications for both our understanding of our prehistoric psyche and its interrelation with the modern world.

  9. Face Detection and Face Recognition in Android Mobile Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian DOSPINESCU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the smartphone’s camera enables us to capture high quality pictures at a high resolution, so we can perform different types of recognition on these images. Face detection is one of these types of recognition that is very common in our society. We use it every day on Facebook to tag friends in our pictures. It is also used in video games alongside Kinect concept, or in security to allow the access to private places only to authorized persons. These are just some examples of using facial recognition, because in modern society, detection and facial recognition tend to surround us everywhere. The aim of this article is to create an appli-cation for smartphones that can recognize human faces. The main goal of this application is to grant access to certain areas or rooms only to certain authorized persons. For example, we can speak here of hospitals or educational institutions where there are rooms where only certain employees can enter. Of course, this type of application can cover a wide range of uses, such as helping people suffering from Alzheimer's to recognize the people they loved, to fill gaps persons who can’t remember the names of their relatives or for example to automatically capture the face of our own children when they smile.

  10. Engineering the microstructure and magnetism of La{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6−δ} thin films by tailoring oxygen stoichiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galceran, R.; Frontera, C.; Balcells, Ll.; Cisneros-Fernández, J.; López-Mir, L.; Bozzo, B.; Pomar, A.; Sandiumenge, F.; Martínez, B. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona-CSIC, Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Roqueta, J.; Santiso, J. [Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, ICN2-CSIC, Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Bagués, N. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona-CSIC, Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, ICN2-CSIC, Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    We report on the magnetic and structural properties of ferromagnetic-insulating La{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6−δ} thin films grown on top of (001) SrTiO{sub 3} substrates by means of RF sputtering technique. Careful structural analysis, by using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, allows identifying two different crystallographic orientations that are closely related to oxygen stoichiometry and to the features (coercive fields and remanence) of the hysteresis loops. Both Curie temperature and magnetic hysteresis turn out to be dependent on the oxygen stoichiometry. In situ annealing conditions allow tailoring the oxygen content of the films, therefore controlling their microstructure and magnetic properties.

  11. Transformation kinetics for surface and bulk nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, Elena, E-mail: elena.villa@unimi.it [University of Milan, Department of Mathematics, via Saldini 50, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rios, Paulo R., E-mail: prrios@metal.eeimvr.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Escola de Engenharia Industrial Metalurgica de Volta Redonda, Av. dos Trabalhadores 420, 27255-125 Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)] [RWTH Aachen University, Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    A rigorous mathematical approach based on the causal cone and stochastic geometry concepts is used to derive new exact expressions for transformation kinetics theory. General expressions for the mean volume density and the volume fraction are derived for both surface and bulk nucleation in a general Borel subset of R{sup 3}. In practice, probably any specimen shape of engineering interest is going to be a Borel set. An expression is also derived for the important case of polyhedral shape, in which surface nucleation may take place on the faces, edges and vertices of the polyhedron as well as within the bulk. Moreover, explicit expressions are given for surface and bulk nucleation for three specific shapes of engineering relevance: two parallel planes, an infinitely long cylinder and a sphere. Superposition is explained in detail and it permits the treatment of situations in which surface and bulk nucleation take place simultaneously. The new exact expressions presented here result in a significant increase in the number of exactly solvable cases available to formal kinetics.

  12. The Face-to-Face Light Detection Paradigm: A New Methodology for Investigating Visuospatial Attention Across Different Face Regions in Live Face-to-Face Communication Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Laura A; Malloy, Daniel M; Cone, John M; Hendrickson, David L

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a novel paradigm for studying the cognitive processes used by listeners within interactive settings. This paradigm places the talker and the listener in the same physical space, creating opportunities for investigations of attention and comprehension processes taking place during interactive discourse situations. An experiment was conducted to compare results from previous research using videotaped stimuli to those obtained within the live face-to-face task paradigm. A headworn apparatus is used to briefly display LEDs on the talker's face in four locations as the talker communicates with the participant. In addition to the primary task of comprehending speeches, participants make a secondary task light detection response. In the present experiment, the talker gave non-emotionally-expressive speeches that were used in past research with videotaped stimuli. Signal detection analysis was employed to determine which areas of the face received the greatest focus of attention. Results replicate previous findings using videotaped methods.

  13. Kinetics of Social Contagion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhongyuan; Iñiguez, Gerardo; Karsai, Márton; Kertész, János

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion of information, behavioral patterns or innovations follows diverse pathways depending on a number of conditions, including the structure of the underlying social network, the sensitivity to peer pressure and the influence of media. Here we study analytically and by simulations a general model that incorporates threshold mechanism capturing sensitivity to peer pressure, the effect of "immune" nodes who never adopt, and a perpetual flow of external information. While any constant, nonzero rate of dynamically introduced spontaneous adopters leads to global spreading, the kinetics by which the asymptotic state is approached shows rich behavior. In particular, we find that, as a function of the immune node density, there is a transition from fast to slow spreading governed by entirely different mechanisms. This transition happens below the percolation threshold of network fragmentation, and has its origin in the competition between cascading behavior induced by adopters and blocking due to immune nodes. This change is accompanied by a percolation transition of the induced clusters.

  14. Phase stability and oxygen non-stoichiometry of SrCo0.8Fe0.2O3-d measured by in-situ neutron diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McIntosh, Steven; McIntosh, S.; Vente, Jaap F.; Haije, Wim G.; Blank, David H.A.; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The phase stability, oxygen stoichiometry and expansion properties of SrCo0.8Fe0.2O3−δ (SCF) were determined by in situ neutron diffraction between 873 and 1173 K and oxygen partial pressures of 5×10−4 to 1 atm. At a pO2 of 1 atm, SCF adopts a cubic perovskite structure, space group Pm3¯m, across

  15. Structural investigation of the β-cyclodextrin complexes with chiral bicyclic monoterpenes - Influence of the functionality group on the host-guest stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceborska, Magdalena

    2017-10-01

    The crystal structures of the complexes of β-cyclodextrin with (+)- and (-)-camphors are presented. The comparison of the obtained crystal structures with available data for other complexes of β-cyclodextrin with chiral bicyclic monoterpenes (hydrocarbon (+)-fenchene and alcohols: (-)-isopinocampheol, and (+)-, and (-)-borneols) obtained from Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) shows the trend of alcohols to form dimeric complexes of 2:3 stoichiometry, while hydrocarbons and ketones prefer to form 2:2 host-guest inclusion complexes.

  16. Face and Mask: A Double History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saramifar, Y.

    2017-01-01

    How often have you read an article and then Googled the author to see him or her? How often have you swiped right or left just looking at the faces without reading the profile on Tinder? Seeking faces and trying to put faces to names happens every day but Hans Belting has brought together Face and

  17. Dimensional enhancement of kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleich, W.P.; Dahl, Jens Peder

    2002-01-01

    Simple thermodynamics considers kinetic energy to be an extensive variable which is proportional to the number N of particles. We present a quantum state of N noninteracting particles for which the kinetic energy increases quadratically with N. This enhancement effect is tied to the quantum...

  18. Evolution of Enzyme Kinetic Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusu, Nuriye Nuray

    2015-06-01

    This review paper discusses the reciprocal kinetic behaviours of enzymes and the evolution of structure-function dichotomy. Kinetic mechanisms have evolved in response to alterations in ecological and metabolic conditions. The kinetic mechanisms of single-substrate mono-substrate enzyme reactions are easier to understand and much simpler than those of bi-bi substrate enzyme reactions. The increasing complexities of kinetic mechanisms, as well as the increasing number of enzyme subunits, can be used to shed light on the evolution of kinetic mechanisms. Enzymes with heterogeneous kinetic mechanisms attempt to achieve specific products to subsist. In many organisms, kinetic mechanisms have evolved to aid survival in response to changing environmental factors. Enzyme promiscuity is defined as adaptation to changing environmental conditions, such as the introduction of a toxin or a new carbon source. Enzyme promiscuity is defined as adaptation to changing environmental conditions, such as the introduction of a toxin or a new carbon source. Enzymes with broad substrate specificity and promiscuous properties are believed to be more evolved than single-substrate enzymes. This group of enzymes can adapt to changing environmental substrate conditions and adjust catalysing mechanisms according to the substrate's properties, and their kinetic mechanisms have evolved in response to substrate variability.

  19. Calcium kinetics in parathyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymling, J.F.

    1964-01-01

    This paper reports a study of calcium kinetics in twelve cases of parathyroid disease. The data suggest that hyperparathyroidism usually causes increased bone turnover. The study of calcium kinetics may be a valuable tool in the differential diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism and in evaluating treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. The bone turnover in one case of hypoparathyroidism was extremely low. 1 fig., 1 tab

  20. Kernel learning algorithms for face recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun-Bao; Pan, Jeng-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    Kernel Learning Algorithms for Face Recognition covers the framework of kernel based face recognition. This book discusses the advanced kernel learning algorithms and its application on face recognition. This book also focuses on the theoretical deviation, the system framework and experiments involving kernel based face recognition. Included within are algorithms of kernel based face recognition, and also the feasibility of the kernel based face recognition method. This book provides researchers in pattern recognition and machine learning area with advanced face recognition methods and its new

  1. Selectivity and stoichiometry boosting of beta-cyclodextrin in cationic/anionic surfactant systems: when host-guest equilibrium meets biased aggregation equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingxiang; Yu, Caifang; Deng, Manli; Jin, Changwen; Wang, Yilin; Yan, Yun; Huang, Jianbin

    2010-02-18

    Cationic surfactant/anionic surfactant/beta-CD ternary aqueous systems provide a platform for the coexistence of the host-guest (beta-CD/surfactant) equilibrium and the biased aggregation (monomeric/aggregated surfactants) equilibrium. We report here that the interplay between the two equilibria dominates the systems as follows. (1) The biased aggregation equilibrium imposes an apparent selectivity on the host-guest equilibrium, namely, beta-CD has to always selectively bind the major surfactant (molar fraction > 0.5) even if binding constants of beta-CD to the pair of surfactants are quite similar. (2) In return, the host-guest equilibrium amplifies the bias of the aggregation equilibrium, that is, the selective binding partly removes the major surfactant from the aggregates and leaves the aggregate composition approaching the electroneutral mixing stoichiometry. (3) This composition variation enhances electrostatic attractions between oppositely charged surfactant head groups, thus resulting in less-curved aggregates. In particular, the present apparent host-guest selectivity is of remarkably high values, and the selectivity stems from the bias of the aggregation equilibrium rather than the difference in binding constants. Moreover, beta-CD is defined as a "stoichiometry booster" for the whole class of cationic/anionic surfactant systems, which provides an additional degree of freedom to directly adjust aggregate compositions of the systems. The stoichiometry boosting of the compositions can in turn affect or even determine microstructures and macroproperties of the systems.

  2. Kinetics of Bio-Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    . The models can be used in mass balances for design of processes under process conditions not yet studied experimentally. The value of the predictive kinetic model depends on the quality of the experimental data on which the model is based, and well-founded kinetic models for enzyme reactions have...... a considerable predictive power. This is also true for cell reaction models, when the model is used in its proper context. The chapter first discusses the kinetics for enzymatically catalyzed reactions (“enzyme reactions”). The kinetics can be derived from a mechanistic model. Then, the chapter derives empirical......his chapter predicts the specific rates of reaction by means of a mathematical expression, the kinetics of the reaction. This expression can be derived through a mechanistic interpretation of an enzymatically catalyzed reaction, but it is essentially of empirical nature for cell reactions...

  3. Prioritized Detection of Personally Familiar Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbini, Maria Ida; Gors, Jason D.; Halchenko, Yaroslav O.; Rogers, Courtney; Guntupalli, J. Swaroop; Hughes, Howard; Cipolli, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether personally familiar faces are preferentially processed in conditions of reduced attentional resources and in the absence of conscious awareness. In the first experiment, we used Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP) to test the susceptibility of familiar faces and faces of strangers to the attentional blink. In the second experiment, we used continuous flash interocular suppression to render stimuli invisible and measured face detection time for personally familiar faces as compared to faces of strangers. In both experiments we found an advantage for detection of personally familiar faces as compared to faces of strangers. Our data suggest that the identity of faces is processed with reduced attentional resources and even in the absence of awareness. Our results show that this facilitated processing of familiar faces cannot be attributed to detection of low-level visual features and that a learned unique configuration of facial features can influence preconscious perceptual processing. PMID:23805248

  4. The Philadelphia Face Perception Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Amy; Lawler, Kathy; Olson, Ingrid R; Aguirre, Geoffrey K

    2008-01-01

    The Philadelphia Face Perception Battery (PFPB) tests four aspects of face perception: discrimination of facial similarity, attractiveness, gender, and age. Calibration with 116 neurologically intact subjects yielded average performance of ~90%. Across subjects, there was a low correlation (perception. There were modest effects of subject demographic factors upon performance, and test-retest reliability scores (between 0.37 and 0.75) were comparable to other neuropsychological batteries. Modification of the stimuli to obscure internal facial features lowered performance on the age, gender, and attractiveness discrimination tests between 2 and 4 standard deviations. The clinical sensitivity of the battery was demonstrated by testing a patient with acquired prosopagnosia. She showed performance impairments of between 2 and 4 standard deviations on all sub-tests. The PFPB is freely available for non-commercial use. PMID:18082362

  5. The use of NH4+ rather than NO3- affects cell stoichiometry, C allocation, photosynthesis and growth in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp UTEX LB 2380, only when energy is limiting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ruan, Z.; Giordano, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 2 (2017), s. 227-236 ISSN 0140-7791 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : carbon allocation * cyanobacteria * elemental stoichiometry Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 6.173, year: 2016

  6. Is the stoichiometry of the europium nitrate complexes with neutral organophosphorus extractants be anticipated?; Peut-on prevoir la stoechiometrie des complexes du nitrate d'europium avec des extractants organophosphores neutres?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beudaert, Ph.; Lamare, V. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Wipff, G. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Lab. MSM, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    2001-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in water on europium nitrate complexes with three neutral organophosphorus extractants (TBP, TPPO and CMPO) in order to determine on what criteria it is possible to obtain by simulations the experimental 1:3 stoichiometry in organic solution. This stoichiometry was investigated by progressive saturation of the cation coordination sphere. When the nitrate counter-ions are bidentate, the 1:3 stoichiometry corresponds to the degree of saturation where the interaction energy between europium and water becomes repulsive. Beyond this stoichiometry, complexes with TPPO and CMPO are unstable, although a 1:4 complex with TBP may exist but its formation appears to be energetically unfavored. (author)

  7. Thermodynamic, kinetic and mechanistic investigations of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (III) in alkaline medium was studied at 298 K, at an ionic strength of 2.0*10-2 mol dm-3. The reaction between piperazine and diperiodatocuprate(III) in aqueous alkaline medium exhibited 1:2 stoichiometry. The oxidation products were ...

  8. The IMM Frontal Face Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Jens; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille

    2005-01-01

    This note describes a data set consisting of 120 annotated monocular images of 12 different frontal human faces. Points of correspondence are placed on each image so the data set can be readily used for building statistical models of shape. Format specifications and terms of use are also given in...... in this note. The data set is available in two versions: i) low resolution, given in the zip-file electronic version, ii) high, given in the publication link....

  9. Critical Routes: Women Facing Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Stela Nazareth Meneghel; Sandra Regina Martini Vial

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the Critical Routes International Seminar – Women Facing Violence , which took place in Porto Alegre in 2008. The seminar was promoted by the Graduate Program on Collective Health at Unisinos and by the Public Health School/RS and was supported by outstanding researchers working in the fields of collective health, and social and human sciences. Initially, we discuss some conceptual aspects about gender violence, its dimensions and its consequences for the health and ...

  10. Kinetic distance and kinetic maps from molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noé, Frank; Clementi, Cecilia

    2015-10-13

    Characterizing macromolecular kinetics from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations requires a distance metric that can distinguish slowly interconverting states. Here, we build upon diffusion map theory and define a kinetic distance metric for irreducible Markov processes that quantifies how slowly molecular conformations interconvert. The kinetic distance can be computed given a model that approximates the eigenvalues and eigenvectors (reaction coordinates) of the MD Markov operator. Here, we employ the time-lagged independent component analysis (TICA). The TICA components can be scaled to provide a kinetic map in which the Euclidean distance corresponds to the kinetic distance. As a result, the question of how many TICA dimensions should be kept in a dimensionality reduction approach becomes obsolete, and one parameter less needs to be specified in the kinetic model construction. We demonstrate the approach using TICA and Markov state model (MSM) analyses for illustrative models, protein conformation dynamics in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and protein-inhibitor association in trypsin and benzamidine. We find that the total kinetic variance (TKV) is an excellent indicator of model quality and can be used to rank different input feature sets.

  11. Series 'Facing Radiation'. 2 Facing radiation is facing residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanzawa, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    The series is to report how general people, who are not at all radiological experts, have faced and understood the problems and tasks of radiation given by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident (Mar. 2011). The section 2 is reported by an officer of Date City, which localizes at 60 km northern west of the Plant, borders on Iitate Village of Fukushima prefecture, and is indicated as the important area of contamination search (IACS), which the reporter has been conducted for as responsible personnel. In July 2011, the ambient dose was as high as 3.0-3.5 mc-Sv/h and the tentative storage place of contaminated materials was decided by own initiative of residents of a small community, from which the real decontamination started in the City. The target dose after decontamination was defined to be 1.0 mc-Sv/h: however, 28/32 IACS municipalities in the prefecture had not defined the target although they had worked for 2 years after the Accident for their areas exceeding the standard 0.23 mc-Sv/h. At the moment of decontamination of the reporter's own house, he noticed that resident's concerns had directed toward its work itself, not toward the target dose, and wondered if these figures had obstructed to correctly face the radiation. At present that about 2.5 years have passed since the Accident, all of Date citizens have personal accumulated glass dosimeters for seeing the effective external dose and it seems that their dose will not exceed 1 mSv/y if the ambient dose estimated is 0.3-5 mc-Sv/h. Media run to popularity not to face radiation, experts tend to hesitate to face media and residents, and radiation dose will be hardly reduced to zero, despite that correct understanding of radiation is a shorter way for residents' own ease: facing radiation is facing residents. (T.T.)

  12. Combustion Kinetic Studies of Gasolines and Surrogates

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour

    2016-11-01

    Future thrusts for gasoline engine development can be broadly summarized into two categories: (i) efficiency improvements in conventional spark ignition engines, and (ii) development of advance compression ignition (ACI) concepts. Efficiency improvements in conventional spark ignition engines requires downsizing (and turbocharging) which may be achieved by using high octane gasolines, whereas, low octane gasolines fuels are anticipated for ACI concepts. The current work provides the essential combustion kinetic data, targeting both thrusts, that is needed to develop high fidelity gasoline surrogate mechanisms and surrogate complexity guidelines. Ignition delay times of a wide range of certified gasolines and surrogates are reported here. These measurements were performed in shock tubes and rapid compression machines over a wide range of experimental conditions (650 – 1250 K, 10 – 40 bar) relevant to internal combustion engines. Using the measured the data and chemical kinetic analyses, the surrogate complexity requirements for these gasolines in homogeneous environments are specified. For the discussions presented here, gasolines are classified into three categories: (i)\\tLow octane gasolines including Saudi Aramco’s light naphtha fuel (anti-knock index, AKI = (RON + MON)/2 = 64; Sensitivity (S) = RON – MON = 1), certified FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasoline I and J (AKI ~ 70, S = 0.7 and 3 respectively), and their Primary Reference Fuels (PRF, mixtures of n-heptane and iso-octane) and multi-component surrogates. (ii)\\t Mid octane gasolines including FACE A and C (AKI ~ 84, S ~ 0 and 1 respectively) and their PRF surrogates. Laser absorption measurements of intermediate and product species formed during gasoline/surrogate oxidation are also reported. (iii)\\t A wide range of n-heptane/iso-octane/toluene (TPRF) blends to adequately represent the octane and sensitivity requirements of high octane gasolines including FACE gasoline F and G

  13. Face-to-face or not-to-face: A technology preference for communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Noor Ismawati; Darmawan, Bobby; Mohamed Ariffin, Mohd Yahya

    2014-11-01

    This study employed the Model of Technology Preference (MTP) to explain the relationship of the variables as the antecedents of behavioral intention to adopt a social networking site (SNS) for communication. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to SNS account users using paper-based and web-based surveys that led to 514 valid responses. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The results show that two out of three attributes of the attribute-based preference (ATRP) affect attitude-based preference (ATTP). The data support the hypotheses that perceived enjoyment and social presence are predictors of ATTP. In this study, the findings further indicated that ATTP has no relationship with the behavioral intention of using SNS, but it has a relationship with the attitude of using SNS. SNS development should provide features that ensure enjoyment and social presence for users to communicate instead of using the traditional face-to-face method of communication.

  14. Thermoelectric properties of in-situ plasma spray synthesized sub-stoichiometry TiO2-x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwasoo; Han, Su Jung; Chidambaram Seshadri, Ramachandran; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    The thermoelectric properties of sub-stoichiometric TiO2-x deposits produced by cascaded-plasma spray process are investigated from room-temperature to 750 K. Sub-stoichiometric TiO2-x deposits are formed through in-situ reaction of the TiO1.9 within the high temperature plasma flame and manipulated through introduction of varying amounts of hydrogen in the plasma. Although the TiO2-x particles experience reduction within plasma, it can also re-oxidize through interaction with the surrounding ambient atmosphere, resulting in a complex interplay between process conditions and stoichiometry. The deposits predominantly contain rutile phase with presence of Magneli phases especially under significantly reducing plasma conditions. The resultant deposits show sensitivity to thermoelectric properties and under certain optimal conditions repeatedly show Seebeck coefficients reaching values of -230 μV K-1 at temperatures of 750 K while providing an electrical conductivity of 5.48 × 103 S m-1, relatively low thermal conductivity in the range of 1.5 to 2 W m-1 K-1 resulting in power factor of 2.9 μW cm-1 K-2. The resultant maximum thermoelectric figure of merit value reached 0.132 under these optimal conditions. The results point to a potential pathway for a large-scale fabrication of low-cost oxide based thermoelectric with potential applicability at moderate to high temperatures.

  15. Linkages of plant stoichiometry to ecosystem production and carbon fluxes with increasing nitrogen inputs in an alpine steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yunfeng; Li, Fei; Zhou, Guoying; Fang, Kai; Zhang, Dianye; Li, Changbin; Yang, Guibiao; Wang, Guanqin; Wang, Jun; Yang, Yuanhe

    2017-12-01

    Unprecedented levels of nitrogen (N) have entered terrestrial ecosystems over the past century, which substantially influences the carbon (C) exchange between the atmosphere and biosphere. Temperature and moisture are generally regarded as the major controllers over the N effects on ecosystem C uptake and release. N-phosphorous (P) stoichiometry regulates the growth and metabolisms of plants and soil organisms, thereby affecting many ecosystem C processes. However, it remains unclear how the N-induced shift in the plant N:P ratio affects ecosystem production and C fluxes and its relative importance. We conducted a field manipulative experiment with eight N addition levels in a Tibetan alpine steppe and assessed the influences of N on aboveground net primary production (ANPP), gross ecosystem productivity (GEP), ecosystem respiration (ER), and net ecosystem exchange (NEE); we used linear mixed-effects models to further determine the relative contributions of various factors to the N-induced changes in these parameters. Our results showed that the ANPP, GEP, ER, and NEE all exhibited nonlinear responses to increasing N additions. Further analysis demonstrated that the plant N:P ratio played a dominate role in shaping these C exchange processes. There was a positive relationship between the N-induced changes in ANPP (ΔANPP) and the plant N:P ratio (ΔN:P), whereas the ΔGEP, ΔER, and ΔNEE exhibited quadratic correlations with the ΔN:P. In contrast, soil temperature and moisture were only secondary predictors for the changes in ecosystem production and C fluxes along the N addition gradient. These findings highlight the importance of plant N:P ratio in regulating ecosystem C exchange, which is crucial for improving our understanding of C cycles under the scenarios of global N enrichment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Stoichiometry of photosystem I, photosystem II, and phycobilisomes in the red alga Porphyridium cruentum as a function of growth irradiance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, F.X. Jr.; Mustardy, L.; Gantt, E. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (USA)); Dennenberg, R.J.; Jursinic, P.A. (Department of Agriculture, Peoria, IL (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Cells of the red alga Porphyridium cruentum (ATCC 50161) exposed to increasing growth irradiance exhibited up to a three-fold reduction in photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) and phycobilisomes but little change in the relative numbers of these components. Batch cultures of P. cruentum were grown under four photon flux densities of continuous white light; 6 (low light LL), 35 (medium light, ML), 180 (high light, HL), and 280 (very high light, VHL) microeinsteins per square meter per second and sampled in the exponential phase of growth. Ratios of PSII to PSI ranged between 0.43 and 0.54. About three PSII centers per phycobilisome were found, regardless of growth irradiance. The phycoerythrin content of phycobilisomes decreased by about 25% for HL and VHL compared to LL and ML cultures. The unit sizes of PSI (chlorophyll/P{sub 700}) and PSII (chlorophyll/Q{sub A}) decreased by about 20% with increase in photon flux density from 6 to 280 microeinsteins per square meter per second. A threefold reduction in cell content of chlorophyll at the higher photon flux densities was accompanied by a twofold reduction in {beta}-carotene, and a drastic reduction in thylakoid membrane area. Cell content of zeaxanthin, the major carotenoid in P. cruentum, did not vary with growth irradiance, suggesting a role other than light-harvesting. HL cultures had a growth rate twice that of ML, eight times that of LL, and slightly greater than that of VHL cultures. Cell volume increased threefold from LL to VHL, but volume of the single chloroplast did not change. From this study it is evident that a relatively fixed stoichiometry of PSI, PSII, and phycobilisomes is maintained in the photosynthetic apparatus of this red alga over a wide range of growth irradiance.

  17. Biogeographic patterns of structural traits and C:N:P stoichiometry of tree twigs in China's forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanyun Yao

    Full Text Available There have been a number of studies on biogeographic patterns of plant leaf functional traits; however, the variations in traits of other plant organs such as twigs are rarely investigated. In this study, we sampled current-year twigs of 335 tree species from 12 forest sites across a latitudinal span of 32 degrees in China, and measured twig specific density (TSD, twig dry matter content (TDMC, and carbon (C, nitrogen (N and phosphorous (P contents, to explore the latitudinal and environmental patterns of these twig traits. The overall mean of TSD and TDMC was 0.37 g cm(-3 and 41%, respectively; mean twig C, N and P was 472 mg g(-1, 9.8 mg g-1 and 1.15 mg g(-1, respectively, and mean N:P mass ratio was 10.6. TSD was positively correlated with TDMC which was positively associated with twig C but negatively with twig N and P. There were no significant differences in TSD between conifer, deciduous-broadleaf and evergreen-broadleaf plants, but evergreen-broadleaf plants had the lowest and conifers the highest TDMC. Conifer twigs were lowest in C, N, P and N:P, whereas deciduous-plant twigs were highest in N and P and evergreen-plant twigs were highest in C and N:P. As latitude increased or temperature/precipitation dropped, TDMC and P increased, but N:P ratio decreased. Our results also showed that the patterns of twig P and N:P stoichiometry were consistent with those reported for leaves, but no significant trends in twig N were observed along the gradient of latitude, climate and soils. This study provides the first large-scale patterns of the twig traits and will improve our understanding of the biogeochemistry of carbon and other key nutrients in forest ecosystems.

  18. Successional change in phosphorus stoichiometry explains the inverse relationship between herbivory and lupin density on Mount St. Helens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Apple

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The average nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio (NratioP of insect herbivores is less than that of leaves, suggesting that P may mediate plant-insect interactions more often than appreciated. We investigated whether succession-related heterogeneity in N and P stoichiometry influences herbivore performance on N-fixing lupin (Lupinus lepidus colonizing primary successional volcanic surfaces, where the abundances of several specialist lepidopteran herbivores are inversely related to lupin density and are known to alter lupin colonization dynamics. We examined larval performance in response to leaf nutritional characteristics using gelechiid and pyralid leaf-tiers, and a noctuid leaf-cutter.We conducted four studies. First, growth of larvae raised on wild-collected leaves responded positively to leaf %P and negatively to leaf carbon (%C, but there was no effect of %N or quinolizidine alkaloids (QAs. Noctuid survival was also positively related to %P. Second, we raised gelechiid larvae on greenhouse-grown lupins with factorial manipulation of competitors and soil N and P. In the presence of competition, larval mass was highest at intermediate leaf NratioP and high %P. Third, survival of gelechiid larvae placed on lupins in high-density patches was greater when plant competitors were removed than on controls. Fourth, surveys of field-collected leaves in 2000, 2002, and 2003 indicated that both %P and %N were generally greater in plants from low-density areas. QAs in plants from low-density areas were equal to or higher than QAs in high-density areas.Our results demonstrate that declines in lupin P content under competitive conditions are associated with decreased larval growth and survival sufficient to cause the observed negative relationship between herbivore abundance and host density. The results support the theoretical finding that declines in stoichiometric resource quality (caused here by succession have the potential to cause a decrease in consumer

  19. Crossing the “Uncanny Valley”: adaptation to cartoon faces can influence perception of human faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiwen; Russell, Richard; Nakayama, Ken; Livingstone, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation can shift what individuals identify to be a prototypical or attractive face. Past work suggests that low-level shape adaptation can affect high-level face processing but is position dependent. Adaptation to distorted images of faces can also affect face processing but only within sub-categories of faces, such as gender, age, and race/ethnicity. This study assesses whether there is a representation of face that is specific to faces (as opposed to all shapes) but general to all kinds of faces (as opposed to subcategories) by testing whether adaptation to one type of face can affect perception of another. Participants were shown cartoon videos containing faces with abnormally large eyes. Using animated videos allowed us to simulate naturalistic exposure and avoid positional shape adaptation. Results suggest that adaptation to cartoon faces with large eyes shifts preferences for human faces toward larger eyes, supporting the existence of general face representations. PMID:20465173

  20. Face feature processor on mobile service robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ho Seok; Park, Myoung Soo; Na, Jin Hee; Choi, Jin Young

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, many mobile service robots have been developed. These robots are different from industrial robots. Service robots were confronted to unexpected changes in the human environment. So many capabilities were needed to service mobile robot, for example, the capability to recognize people's face and voice, the capability to understand people's conversation, and the capability to express the robot's thinking etc. This research considered face detection, face tracking and face recognition from continuous camera image. For face detection module, it used CBCH algorithm using openCV library from Intel Corporation. For face tracking module, it used the fuzzy controller to control the pan-tilt camera movement smoothly with face detection result. A PCA-FX, which adds class information to PCA, was used for face recognition module. These three procedures were called face feature processor, which were implemented on mobile service robot OMR to verify.

  1. Familiar Face Detection in 180ms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconti di Oleggio Castello, Matteo; Gobbini, M. Ida

    2015-01-01

    The visual system is tuned for rapid detection of faces, with the fastest choice saccade to a face at 100ms. Familiar faces have a more robust representation than do unfamiliar faces, and are detected faster in the absence of awareness and with reduced attentional resources. Faces of family and close friends become familiar over a protracted period involving learning the unique visual appearance, including a view-invariant representation, as well as person knowledge. We investigated the effect of personal familiarity on the earliest stages of face processing by using a saccadic-choice task to measure how fast familiar face detection can happen. Subjects made correct and reliable saccades to familiar faces when unfamiliar faces were distractors at 180ms—very rapid saccades that are 30 to 70ms earlier than the earliest evoked potential modulated by familiarity. By contrast, accuracy of saccades to unfamiliar faces with familiar faces as distractors did not exceed chance. Saccades to faces with object distractors were even faster (110 to 120 ms) and equivalent for familiar and unfamiliar faces, indicating that familiarity does not affect ultra-rapid saccades. We propose that detectors of diagnostic facial features for familiar faces develop in visual cortices through learning and allow rapid detection that precedes explicit recognition of identity. PMID:26305788

  2. Kinetics of Levoglucosenone Isomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Siddarth H; Walker, Theodore W; Dumesic, James A; Huber, George W

    2017-01-10

    We studied the acid-catalyzed isomerization of levoglucosenone (LGO) to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and developed a reaction kinetics model that describes the experimental data across a range of conditions (100-150 °C, 50-100 mm H 2 SO 4 , 50-150 mm LGO). LGO and its hydrated derivative exist in equilibrium under these reaction conditions. Thermal and catalytic degradation of HMF are the major sources of carbon loss. Within the range of conditions studied, higher temperatures and shorter reaction times favor the production of HMF. The yields of HMF and levulinic acid decrease monotonically as tetrahydrofuran is added to the aqueous solvent system, indicating that water plays a role in the LGO isomerization reaction. Initial-rate analyses show that HMF is produced solely from LGO rather than from the hydrated derivative of LGO. The results of this study are consistent with a mechanism for LGO isomerization that proceeds through hydration of the anhydro bridge, followed by ring rearrangement analogous to the isomerization of glucose to fructose. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Kinetics of thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Mitsuo; Nishikawa, Mitsushige; Naito, Kimikazu; Ishii, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    1980-01-01

    Kinetics of thyroid hormones were outlined, and recent progress in metabolism of these hormones was also described. Recently, not only T 4 and T 3 but also rT 3 , 3,3'-T 2 , 3',5'-T 2 , and 3,5-T 2 can be measured by RIA. To clarify metabolic pathways of these hormones, metabolic clearance rate and production rate of these hormones were calculated. As single-compartment analysis was insufficient to clarify disappearance curves of thyroid hormones in blood such as T 3 and T 2 of which metabolic speed was so fast, multi-compartment analysis or non-compartment analysis were also performed. Thyroid hormones seemed to be measured more precisely by constant infusion method. At the first step of T 4 metabolism, T 3 was formed by 5'-monodeiodination of T 4 , and rT 3 was formed by 5-monodeiodination of T 4 . As metabolic pathways of T 3 and rT 3 , conversion of them to 3,3'-T 2 or to 3',5'-T 2 and 3,5-T 2 was supposed. This subject will be an interesting research theme in future. (Tsunoda, M.)

  4. Online or Face to Face? A Comparison of Two Methods of Training Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Kristin; Dworkin, Jodi; Gengler, Colleen; Olson, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Online courses offer benefits over face-to-face courses such as accessibility, affordability, and flexibility. Literature assessing the effectiveness of face-to-face and online courses is growing, but findings remain inconclusive. This study compared evaluations completed by professionals who had taken a research update short course either face to…

  5. On the relationships between Michaelis-Menten kinetics, reverse Michaelis-Menten kinetics, Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics and quadratic kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J. Y.

    2015-09-01

    The Michaelis-Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis-Menten kinetics are two popular mathematical formulations used in many land biogeochemical models to describe how microbes and plants would respond to changes in substrate abundance. However, the criteria of when to use which of the two are often ambiguous. Here I show that these two kinetics are special approximations to the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics, which is the first order approximation to the quadratic kinetics that solves the equation of enzyme-substrate complex exactly for a single enzyme single substrate biogeochemical reaction with the law of mass action and the assumption of quasi-steady-state for the enzyme-substrate complex and that the product genesis from enzyme-substrate complex is much slower than the equilibration between enzyme-substrate complexes, substrates and enzymes. In particular, I showed that the derivation of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the substrate, and the reverse Michaelis-Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the enzyme, whereas both of these constraints are taken into account in the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics. By benchmarking against predictions from the quadratic kinetics for a wide range of substrate and enzyme concentrations, the Michaelis-Menten kinetics was found to persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k2+ of the reaction velocity v with respect to the maximum product genesis rate k2+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k1+ of v with respect to the intrinsic substrate affinity k1+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [ E ]T of v with respect the total enzyme concentration [ E ]T and persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [ S ]T of v with respect to the total substrate concentration [ S ]T. Meanwhile, the reverse Michaelis

  6. CHALLENGES FACING THE ESP PRACTITIONER

    OpenAIRE

    SIMION MINODORA OTILIA

    2015-01-01

    The ESP teacher has to face certain challenges in his profession: One of the biggest challenges of the ESP teacher is the fact that he/she lacks the necessary knowledge of the subject to teach Business English, for instance, some researchers believing that such courses should be taught by subject teachers. The task of teaching ESP by ESL teachers is not an easy one. Dudley- Evans and St. John pointed out its complexity, identifying five key roles of the ESP practitioner: teacher, cou...

  7. The many faces of QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of the workshop is to bring together experts on QCD in order to face a variety of subjects, including: The QCD spectrum of hadrons, mesons, glueballs QCD Green's functions: Lattice studies, Schwinger-Dyson approach, Gribov copies and quantization of Yang-Mills theories QCD at finite temperature, local CP-violation in quark gluon plasma, influence of strong magnetic fields Holographic descriptions of QCD and quark-gluon plasma Topological aspects of QCD (De)confinement and/or chiral symmetry breaking Vacuum condensates, sum rules

  8. Face Recognition using Gabor Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad MOHSIN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An Elastic Bunch Graph Map (EBGM algorithm is being proposed in this research paper that successfully implements face recognition using Gabor filters. The proposed system applies 40 different Gabor filters on an image. As aresult of which 40 images with different angles and orientation are received. Next, maximum intensity points in each filtered image are calculated and mark them as Fiducial points. The system reduces these points in accordance to distance between them. The next step is calculating the distances between the reduced points using distance formula. At last, the distances are compared with database. If match occurs, it means that the image is recognized.

  9. Grand Challenges facing Storage Systems

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    In this talk, we will discuss the future of storage systems. In particular, we will focus on several big challenges which we are facing in storage, such as being able to build, manage and backup really massive storage systems, being able to find information of interest, being able to do long-term archival of data, and so on. We also present ideas and research being done to address these challenges, and provide a perspective on how we expect these challenges to be resolved as we go forward.

  10. The 100 faces of poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Vépy-Schlemmer, Éva

    2010-01-01

    Information about our world and society cannot be obtained through numbers only, even so because a significant segment of our current knowledge is conveyed through pictures and other visual signs. These are to complement our verbal codes and are capable of showing the human face of social reality, such as poverty, hidden beyond the maze of various charts and diagrams. The concept of “The poorest 100” was inspired by the top list of the 100 richest persons published every year; this unique...

  11. An Approach: Modality Reduction and Face-Sketch Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Pramanik, Sourav; Bhattacharjee, Dr. Debotosh

    2013-01-01

    To recognize face sketch through face photo database is a challenging task for todays researchers. Because face photo images in training set and face sketch images in testing set have different modality. Difference between two face photos of difference person is smaller than the difference between same person in a face photo and face sketched. In this paper, for reduction of the modality between face photo and face sketch we first bring face photo and face sketch images in a new dimension usi...

  12. Normal composite face effects in developmental prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotti, Federica; Wu, Esther; Yang, Hua; Jiahui, Guo; Duchaine, Bradley; Cook, Richard

    2017-10-01

    Upright face perception is thought to involve holistic processing, whereby local features are integrated into a unified whole. Consistent with this view, the top half of one face appears to fuse perceptually with the bottom half of another, when aligned spatially and presented upright. This 'composite face effect' reveals a tendency to integrate information from disparate regions when faces are presented canonically. In recent years, the relationship between susceptibility to the composite effect and face recognition ability has received extensive attention both in participants with normal face recognition and participants with developmental prosopagnosia. Previous results suggest that individuals with developmental prosopagnosia may show reduced susceptibility to the effect suggestive of diminished holistic face processing. Here we describe two studies that examine whether developmental prosopagnosia is associated with reduced composite face effects. Despite using independent samples of developmental prosopagnosics and different composite procedures, we find no evidence for reduced composite face effects. The experiments yielded similar results; highly significant composite effects in both prosopagnosic groups that were similar in magnitude to the effects found in participants with normal face processing. The composite face effects exhibited by both samples and the controls were greatly diminished when stimulus arrangements were inverted. Our finding that the whole-face binding process indexed by the composite effect is intact in developmental prosopagnosia indicates that other factors are responsible for developmental prosopagnosia. These results are also inconsistent with suggestions that susceptibility to the composite face effect and face recognition ability are tightly linked. While the holistic process revealed by the composite face effect may be necessary for typical face perception, it is not sufficient; individual differences in face recognition ability

  13. Automatic Door Access System Using Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hteik Htar Lwin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Most doors are controlled by persons with the use of keys security cards password or pattern to open the door. Theaim of this paper is to help users forimprovement of the door security of sensitive locations by using face detection and recognition. Face is a complex multidimensional structure and needs good computing techniques for detection and recognition. This paper is comprised mainly of three subsystems namely face detection face recognition and automatic door access control. Face detection is the process of detecting the region of face in an image. The face is detected by using the viola jones method and face recognition is implemented by using the Principal Component Analysis PCA. Face Recognition based on PCA is generally referred to as the use of Eigenfaces.If a face is recognized it is known else it is unknown. The door will open automatically for the known person due to the command of the microcontroller. On the other hand alarm will ring for the unknown person. Since PCA reduces the dimensions of face images without losing important features facial images for many persons can be stored in the database. Although many training images are used computational efficiency cannot be decreased significantly. Therefore face recognition using PCA can be more useful for door security system than other face recognition schemes.

  14. Gas Kinetics of Traffic Jam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    1997-04-01

    The kinetics of one-dimensional traffic flow is descibed in terms of Boltzmann-like gas kinetic equation. Paveri-Fontana's gas kinetic equation is modified to take into account the desired velocity depending on the car density. A discrete version of the gas kinetic equation is derived to numerically solve the equation. The velocity distributions are calculated by a numerical method. It is found that the traffic jam is formed in the congested traffic flow when the car density is higher than the critical value. The traffic jam propagates backward, its propagation velocity increases with the accerelation and the density within the jam decreases with increasing accerelation. It is shown that the velocity distributions change significantly before and after the traffic jam.

  15. Critical Routes: Women Facing Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Nazareth Meneghel

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the Critical Routes International Seminar – Women Facing Violence , which took place in Porto Alegre in 2008. The seminar was promoted by the Graduate Program on Collective Health at Unisinos and by the Public Health School/RS and was supported by outstanding researchers working in the fields of collective health, and social and human sciences. Initially, we discuss some conceptual aspects about gender violence, its dimensions and its consequences for the health and the life quality of the affected women. Our understanding is that violence is one of the most effective methods of controlling women in societies scarred with gender hierarchies. The structure of the seminar focused on three main discussion themes: breaking up with the violence, mechanisms for working with gender and hearing the services. These themes were chosen aiming at looking for ways to help the women and to explore efficient mechanisms to combat, reduce and, if possible, eliminate the violence perpetrated against women. At the end of the seminar, we reiterate the political commitment on the accomplishment of the public policies to face violence and the fight against all inequality, discrimination and violence forms based on gender.

  16. A Substructure Combination Strategy To Create Potent and Selective Transthyretin Kinetic Stabilizers That Prevent Amyloidogenesis and Cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sungwook; Reixach, Natlia; Connelly, Stephen; Johnson, Steven M.; Wilson, Ian A.; Kelly, Jeffery W. (Scripps)

    2010-08-13

    Transthyretin aggregation-associated proteotoxicity appears to cause several human amyloid diseases. Rate-limiting tetramer dissociation and monomer misfolding of transthyretin (TTR) occur before its aggregation into cross-{beta}-sheet amyloid fibrils. Small molecule binding to and preferential stabilization of the tetrameric state of TTR over the dissociative transition state raises the kinetic barrier for dissociation, imposing kinetic stabilization on TTR and preventing aggregation. This is an effective strategy to halt neurodegeneration associated with polyneuropathy, according to recent placebo-controlled clinical trial results. In three recent papers, we systematically ranked possibilities for the three substructures composing a typical TTR kinetic stabilizer, using fibril inhibition potency and plasma TTR binding selectivity data. Herein, we have successfully employed a substructure combination strategy to use these data to develop potent and selective TTR kinetic stabilizers that rescue cells from the cytotoxic effects of TTR amyloidogenesis. Of the 92 stilbene and dihydrostilbene analogues synthesized, nearly all potently inhibit TTR fibril formation. Seventeen of these exhibit a binding stoichiometry of >1.5 of a maximum of 2 to plasma TTR, while displaying minimal binding to the thyroid hormone receptor (<20%). Six analogues were definitively categorized as kinetic stabilizers by evaluating dissociation time-courses. High-resolution TTR-(kinetic stabilizer)2 crystal structures (1.31-1.70 {angstrom}) confirmed the anticipated binding orientation of the 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxyphenyl substructure and revealed a strong preference of the isosteric 3,5-dibromo-4-aminophenyl substructure to bind to the inner thyroxine binding pocket of TTR.

  17. Cell kinetics and therapeutic efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeff, M.; Abenhardt, W.; Gruner, B.; Stoffner, D.; Mainz Univ.

    1976-01-01

    The study shows that cell kinetics effects correlate with the effects of cytostatic drugs in the tumour model investigated here. It should, however, be noted that even genetically related tumour cell types may react differently to the same cytostatic drug, and that the cell kinetics effects, due to the changes in the cell cycle, cannot be predicted but should be followed with a very fast method, e.g. sequential flan fluorescence cytophotometry, for optimal therapeutic results. (orig./GSE) [de

  18. Investigating High-School Chemical Kinetics: The Greek Chemistry Textbook and Students' Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegios, Theodoros; Salta, Katerina; Koinis, Spyros

    2017-01-01

    In this study we present an analysis of how the structure and content of the Greek school textbook approaches the concepts of chemical kinetics, and an investigation of the difficulties that 11th grade Greek students face regarding these concepts. Based on the structure and content of the Greek textbook, a tool was developed and applied to…

  19. Neonatal face-to-face interactions promote later social behaviour in infant rhesus monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Dettmer, Amanda M.; Kaburu, Stefano S. K.; Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Paukner, Annika; Sclafani, Valentina; Byers, Kristen L.; Murphy, Ashley M.; Miller, Michelle; Marquez, Neal; Miller, Grace M.; Suomi, Stephen J.; Ferrari, Pier F.

    2016-01-01

    In primates, including humans, mothers engage in face-to-face interactions with their infants, with frequencies varying both within and across species. However, the impact of this variation in face-to-face interactions on infant social development is unclear. Here we report that infant monkeys (Macaca mulatta) who engaged in more neonatal face-to-face interactions with mothers have increased social interactions at 2 and 5 months. In a controlled experiment, we show that this effect is not due...

  20. Facing Diabetes: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Facing Diabetes: What You Need to Know Past Issues / Fall ... your loved ones. Photos: AP The Faces of Diabetes Diabetes strikes millions of Americans, young and old, ...

  1. Attractive faces temporally modulate visual attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koyo eNakamura

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Facial attractiveness is an important biological and social signal on social interaction. Recent research has demonstrated that an attractive face captures greater spatial attention than an unattractive face does. Little is known, however, about the temporal characteristics of visual attention for facial attractiveness. In this study, we investigated the temporal modulation of visual attention induced by facial attractiveness by using a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP. Fourteen male faces and two female faces were successively presented for 160 ms respectively, and participants were asked to identify two female faces embedded among a series of multiple male distractor faces. Identification of a second female target (T2 was impaired when a first target (T1 was attractive compared to neutral or unattractive faces, at 320 ms SOA; identification was improved when T1 was attractive compared to unattractive faces at 640 ms SOA. These findings suggest that the spontaneous appraisal of facial attractiveness modulates temporal attention.

  2. Structure and stoichiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Structural and stoichiometric variations and their role in superconducting properties of bulk cuprate ceramics are elucidated. Atomic structure and chemistry of defect microstructures, including vacancy and interstitial defects, weak-link problems, structural modulations and coherent intergrowths leading to new structures are studies and quantitatively interpreted. They are shown to play a critical role in controlling hole concentration, critical currents and flux pinning. These phenomena underpin the solid state chemistry which determines the physical properties of the nonstoichiometric oxide superconductors. In this paper technological implications, synthesis of related novel materials and recent developments are discussed

  3. Automatic face morphing for transferring facial animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui Huu Trung, B.H.T.; Bui, T.D.; Poel, Mannes; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Nijholt, Antinus; Hamza, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel method of automatically finding the training set of RBF networks for morphing a prototype face to represent a new face. This is done by automatically specifying and adjusting corresponding feature points on a target face. The RBF networks are then used to transfer

  4. Face identification in videos from mobile cameras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mu, Meiru; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2014-01-01

    It is still challenging to recognize faces reliably in videos from mobile camera, although mature automatic face recognition technology for still images has been available for quite some time. Suppose we want to be alerted when suspects appear in the recording of a police Body-Cam, even a good face

  5. Psychophysical thresholds of face visibility during infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelskov, Sofie; Kouider, Sid

    2010-01-01

    The ability to detect and focus on faces is a fundamental prerequisite for developing social skills. But how well can infants detect faces? Here, we address this question by studying the minimum duration at which faces must appear to trigger a behavioral response in infants. We used a preferentia...

  6. Implicit face prototype learning from geometric information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or, Charles C-F; Wilson, Hugh R

    2013-04-19

    There is evidence that humans implicitly learn an average or prototype of previously studied faces, as the unseen face prototype is falsely recognized as having been learned (Solso & McCarthy, 1981). Here we investigated the extent and nature of face prototype formation where observers' memory was tested after they studied synthetic faces defined purely in geometric terms in a multidimensional face space. We found a strong prototype effect: The basic results showed that the unseen prototype averaged from the studied faces was falsely identified as learned at a rate of 86.3%, whereas individual studied faces were identified correctly 66.3% of the time and the distractors were incorrectly identified as having been learned only 32.4% of the time. This prototype learning lasted at least 1 week. Face prototype learning occurred even when the studied faces were further from the unseen prototype than the median variation in the population. Prototype memory formation was evident in addition to memory formation of studied face exemplars as demonstrated in our models. Additional studies showed that the prototype effect can be generalized across viewpoints, and head shape and internal features separately contribute to prototype formation. Thus, implicit face prototype extraction in a multidimensional space is a very general aspect of geometric face learning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Face Verification for Mobile Personal Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, Q.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, we presented a detailed study of the face verification problem on the mobile device, covering every component of the system. The study includes face detection, registration, normalization, and verification. Furthermore, the information fusion problem is studied to verify face

  8. Unconscious evaluation of faces on social dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Lorna H; Ajina, Sara; Getov, Spas; Bahrami, Bahador; Todorov, Alexander; Rees, Geraint

    2012-11-01

    It has been proposed that two major axes, dominance and trustworthiness, characterize the social dimensions of face evaluation. Whether evaluation of faces on these social dimensions is restricted to conscious appraisal or happens at a preconscious level is unknown. Here we provide behavioral evidence that such preconscious evaluations exist and that they are likely to be interpretations arising from interactions between the face stimuli and observer-specific traits. Monocularly viewed faces that varied independently along two social dimensions of trust and dominance were rendered invisible by continuous flash suppression (CFS) when a flashing pattern was presented to the other eye. Participants pressed a button as soon as they saw the face emerge from suppression to indicate whether the previously hidden face was located slightly to the left or right of central fixation. Dominant and untrustworthy faces took significantly longer time to emerge (T2E) compared with neutral faces. A control experiment showed these findings could not reflect delayed motor responses to conscious faces. Finally, we showed that participants' self-reported propensity to trust was strongly predictive of untrust avoidance (i.e., difference in T2E for untrustworthy vs neutral faces) as well as dominance avoidance (i.e., difference in T2E for dominant vs neutral faces). Dominance avoidance was also correlated with submissive behavior. We suggest that such prolongation of suppression for threatening faces may result from a passive fear response, leading to slowed visual perception. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, H.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    2000-01-01

    Gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory is developed as an extension of the existing gyrokinetic theories. In essence, the formalism introduced here is a kinetic description of magnetized plasmas in the gyrocenter coordinates which is fully equivalent to the Vlasov-Maxwell system in the particle coordinates. In particular, provided the gyroradius is smaller than the scale-length of the magnetic field, it can treat high frequency range as well as the usual low frequency range normally associated with gyrokinetic approaches. A significant advantage of this formalism is that it enables the direct particle-in-cell simulations of compressional Alfven waves for MHD applications and of RF waves relevant to plasma heating in space and laboratory plasmas. The gyrocenter-gauge kinetic susceptibility for arbitrary wavelength and arbitrary frequency electromagnetic perturbations in a homogeneous magnetized plasma is shown to recover exactly the classical result obtained by integrating the Vlasov-Maxwell system in the particle coordinates. This demonstrates that all the waves supported by the Vlasov-Maxwell system can be studied using the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic model in the gyrocenter coordinates. This theoretical approach is so named to distinguish it from the existing gyrokinetic theory, which has been successfully developed and applied to many important low-frequency and long parallel wavelength problems, where the conventional meaning of gyrokinetic has been standardized. Besides the usual gyrokinetic distribution function, the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory emphasizes as well the gyrocenter-gauge distribution function, which sometimes contains all the physics of the problems being studied, and whose importance has not been realized previously. The gyrocenter-gauge distribution function enters Maxwell's equations through the pull-back transformation of the gyrocenter transformation, which depends on the perturbed fields. The efficacy of the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic approach is

  10. Mathematical treatment of isotopologue and isotopomer speciation and fractionation in biochemical kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Federico; Riley, William J.

    2010-03-01

    We present a mathematical treatment of the kinetic equations that describe isotopologue and isotopomer speciation and fractionation during enzyme-catalyzed biochemical reactions. These equations, presented here with the name GEBIK (general equations for biochemical isotope kinetics) and GEBIF (general equations for biochemical isotope fractionation), take into account microbial biomass and enzyme dynamics, reaction stoichiometry, isotope substitution number, and isotope location within each isotopologue and isotopomer. In addition to solving the complete GEBIK and GEBIF, we also present and discuss two approximations to the full solutions under the assumption of biomass-free and enzyme steady-state, and under the quasi-steady-state assumption as applied to the complexation rate. The complete and approximate approaches are applied to observations of biological denitrification in soils. Our analysis highlights that the full GEBIK and GEBIF provide a more accurate description of concentrations and isotopic compositions of substrates and products throughout the reaction than do the approximate forms. We demonstrate that the isotopic effects of a biochemical reaction depend, in the most general case, on substrate and complex concentrations and, therefore, the fractionation factor is a function of time. We also demonstrate that inverse isotopic effects can occur for values of the fractionation factor smaller than 1, and that reactions that do not discriminate isotopes do not necessarily imply a fractionation factor equal to 1.

  11. Responses of soil nutrient concentrations and stoichiometry to different human land uses in a subtropical tidal wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W; Sardans, J; Zeng, C; Zhong, C; Li, Y; Peñuelas, J

    2014-11-01

    natural wetland. Using overall data, soil C storage and respiration were correlated, indicating that soil respiration was correlated with plant productivity. In this wetland area the impacts of different human land-uses on soil stoichiometry and C-cycle can be very different depending on the activity. Further regeneration of natural communities can be determined by the previous type of land-use.

  12. Phosphate supply explains variation in nucleic acid allocation but not C : P stoichiometry in the western North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, A. E.; Martiny, A. C.; Lomas, M. W.; Allison, S. D.

    2014-03-01

    Marine microbial communities mediate many biogeochemical transformations in the ocean. Consequently, processes such as primary production and carbon (C) export are linked to nutrient regeneration and are influenced by the resource demand and elemental composition of marine microbial biomass. Laboratory studies have demonstrated that differential partitioning of element resources to various cellular components can directly influence overall cellular elemental ratios, especially with respect to growth machinery (i.e., ribosomal RNA) and phosphorus (P) allocation. To investigate whether allocation to RNA is related to biomass P content and overall C : P biomass composition in the open ocean, we characterized patterns of P allocation and C : P elemental ratios along an environmental gradient of phosphate supply in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre (NASG) from 35.67° N, 64.17° W to 22.676° N, 65.526° W. Because the NASG is characterized as a P-stressed ecosystem, we hypothesized that biochemical allocation would reflect sensitivity to bioavailable phosphate, such that greater phosphate supply would result in increased allocation toward P-rich RNA for growth. We predicted these changes in allocation would also result in lower C : P ratios with increased phosphate supply. However, bulk C : P ratios were decoupled from allocation to nucleic acids and did not appear to vary systematically across a phosphate supply gradient of 2.2-14.7 μmol m-2 d-1. Overall, we found that C : P ratios ranged from 188 to 306 along the transect, and RNA represented only 6-12% of total particulate P, whereas DNA represented 11-19%. We did find that allocation to RNA was positively correlated with phosphate supply rate, suggesting a consistent physiological response in biochemical allocation to resource supply within the whole community. These results suggest that community composition and/or nonnucleic acid P pools may influence ecosystem-scale variation in C : P stoichiometry more than

  13. Spatial variations in the stoichiometry and geochemistry of Miocene dolomite from Grand Cayman: Implications for the origin of island dolostone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Min; Jones, Brian

    2017-03-01

    diagenetic potential of dolostone is directly linked to its stoichiometry, the distribution of the LCD-HCD will influence the petrographic properties, geochemical signatures, and reservoir potential of the dolostones.

  14. Using bioprocess stoichiometry to build a plant-wide mass balance based steady-state WWTP model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekama, G A

    2009-05-01

    Steady-state models are useful for design of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) because they allow reactor sizes and interconnecting flows to be simply determined from explicit equations in terms of unit operation performance criteria. Once the overall WWTP scheme is established and the main system defining parameters of the individual unit operations estimated, dynamic models can be applied to the connected unit operations to refine their design and evaluate their performance under dynamic flow and load conditions. To model anaerobic digestion (AD) within plant-wide WWTP models, not only COD and nitrogen (N) but also carbon (C) fluxes entering the AD need to be defined. Current plant-wide models, like benchmark simulation model No 2 (BSM2), impose a C flux at the AD influent. In this paper, the COD and N mass balance steady-state models of activated sludge (AS) organics degradation, nitrification and denitrification (ND) and anaerobic (AD) and aerobic (AerD) digestion of wastewater sludge are extended and linked with bioprocess transformation stoichiometry to form C, H, O, N, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and charge mass balance based models so that also C (and H and O) can be tracked through the whole WWTP. By assigning a stoichiometric composition (x, y, z and a in C(x)H(y)O(z)N(a)) to each of the five main influent wastewater organic fractions and ammonia, these, and the products generated from them via the biological processes, are tracked through the WWTP. The model is applied to two theoretical case study WWTPs treating the same raw wastewater (WW) to the same final sludge residual biodegradable COD. It is demonstrated that much useful information can be generated with the relatively simple steady-state models to aid WWTP layout design and track the different products exiting the WWTP via the solid, liquid and gas streams, such as aerobic versus anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge, N loads in recycle streams, methane production for energy recovery

  15. Microbial C:P stoichiometry is shaped by redox conditions along an elevation gradient in humid tropical rainforests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Gross, A.; Silver, W. L.

    2017-12-01

    Elemental stoichiometry of microorganisms is intimately related to ecosystem carbon and nutrient fluxes and is ultimately controlled by the chemical (plant tissue, soil, redox) and physical (temperature, moisture, aeration) environment. Previous meta-analyses have shown that the C:P ratio of soil microbial biomass exhibits significant variations among and within biomes. Little is known about the underlying causes of this variability. We examined soil microbial C:P ratios along an elevation gradient in the Luquillo Experimental Forest in Puerto Rico. We analyzed soils from mixed forest paired with monodominant palm forest every 100 m from 300 m to 1000 m a.s.l.. Mean annual precipitation increased with increasing elevation, resulting in stronger reducing conditions and accumulation of soil Fe(II) at higher elevations. The mean value and variability of soil microbial C:P ratios generally increased with increasing elevation except at 1000 m. At high elevations (600-900 m), the average value of microbial C:P ratio (108±10:1) was significantly higher than the global average ( 55:1). We also found that soil organic P increased with increasing elevation, suggesting that an inhibition of organic P mineralization, not decreased soil P availability, may cause the high microbial C:P ratio. The soil microbial C:P ratio was positively correlated with soil HCl-extractable Fe(II), suggesting that reducing conditions may be responsible for the elevational changes observed. In a follow-up experiment, soils from mixed forests at four elevation levels (300, 500, 700, and 1000 m) were incubated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions for two weeks. We found that anaerobic incubation consistently increased the soil microbial C:P ratio relative to the aerobic incubation. Overall, our results indicate that redox conditions can shift the elemental composition of microbial biomass. The high microbial C:P ratios induced under anoxic conditions may reflect inhibition of microbial P

  16. Stoichiometry constrains microbial response to root exudation- insights from a model and a field experiment in a temperate forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, J. E.; Darby, B. A.; Giasson, M.-A.; Kramer, M. A.; Phillips, R. P.; Finzi, A. C.

    2013-02-01

    .e., mineralization). The quantity of N released from SOM in the model simulations was, under most circumstances, in excess of the N in the exudate pulse, suggesting that the exudation of N-containing compounds can be a viable strategy for plant-N acquisition via a priming effect. The experimental and modeling results were consistent with our hypothesis that N-containing compounds in root exudates affect rhizosphere processes by providing substrates for the synthesis of N-rich microbial biomass and exoenzymes. This study suggests that exudate stoichiometry is an important and underappreciated driver of microbial activity in rhizosphere soils.

  17. Stoichiometry constrains microbial response to root exudation- insights from a model and a field experiment in a temperate forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Drake

    2013-02-01

    from SOM (i.e., mineralization. The quantity of N released from SOM in the model simulations was, under most circumstances, in excess of the N in the exudate pulse, suggesting that the exudation of N-containing compounds can be a viable strategy for plant-N acquisition via a priming effect. The experimental and modeling results were consistent with our hypothesis that N-containing compounds in root exudates affect rhizosphere processes by providing substrates for the synthesis of N-rich microbial biomass and exoenzymes. This study suggests that exudate stoichiometry is an important and underappreciated driver of microbial activity in rhizosphere soils.

  18. Cafestol: a multi-faced compound kinetics and metabolic effects of cafestol in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruchten, van S.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Cafestol and kahweol are two diterpenes present in unfiltered coffees such as Scandinavian-style boiled coffee, French press coffee and espresso. The health effects of cafestol and kahweol can be positive but also potentially harmful. On the one hand cafestol shows chemo-preventive properties, which

  19. [Sports injuries of the face].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzavzez, G; Chrzavzez, J P; D'Erceville, T; Kharrat, N; Barbillon, C; Pilz, F

    1984-01-01

    Of 249 patients with facial injuries admitted to the Department of Stomatology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hôpital Bel Air, Thionville, France, between 1981 and 1982, 45 (18%) were cases of injury from sporting activities. The particular characteristics of the latter lesions were their predominance in males, their increased seasonal frequency in spring and early summer, the high incidence of damage to the nasal pyramid and maxillomalar complex, and the fact that the most implicated sport was football (71% of cases). Whereas most accidents resulted in relatively minor lesions, three cases--including two from riding--involved severe, complex injuries comparable to those seen in certain car accidents. Findings in this series confirm the natural "bumper" property of the face. Emphasis is placed on the importance of well-conducted training, and the need to eliminate consideration of sport as a means for expressing aggressiveness that is not always possible in daily life.

  20. kernenergie.de changes face

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geisler, Maja

    2009-01-01

    The portals of the Deutsches Atomforum e.V. (DAtF) and of the Informationskreis KernEnergie (IK) changed face effective June 24, 2009. On-line appearance was in need of modernization after the last relaunches and the additional new industry dialog portal, ''Zeit fuer Energieverantwortung.'' The starting page of the industry portal, which receives a high level of attention as indicated by 130,000 monthly hits, was streamlined in its structure. The design was modernized and made clearer. Depending on the depth of information wanted, users are guided by the new structure to the required level of detailed technical information. Up to 200,000 monthly hits are confirming the popularity and importance of this information portal. The main pages can be found under these Web addresses: www.kernenergie.de, www.kernfragen.de, www.kernenergie.de/energieverantwortung. (orig.)

  1. Reduced chemical kinetic model of detonation combustion of one- and multi-fuel gaseous mixtures with air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, P. A.

    2018-03-01

    Two-step approximate models of chemical kinetics of detonation combustion of (i) one hydrocarbon fuel CnHm (for example, methane, propane, cyclohexane etc.) and (ii) multi-fuel gaseous mixtures (∑aiCniHmi) (for example, mixture of methane and propane, synthesis gas, benzene and kerosene) are presented for the first time. The models can be used for any stoichiometry, including fuel/fuels-rich mixtures, when reaction products contain molecules of carbon. Owing to the simplicity and high accuracy, the models can be used in multi-dimensional numerical calculations of detonation waves in corresponding gaseous mixtures. The models are in consistent with the second law of thermodynamics and Le Chatelier's principle. Constants of the models have a clear physical meaning. The models can be used for calculation thermodynamic parameters of the mixture in a state of chemical equilibrium.

  2. The shape of the face template: geometric distortions of faces and their detection in natural scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongakkasira, Kaewmart; Bindemann, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Human face detection might be driven by skin-coloured face-shaped templates. To explore this idea, this study compared the detection of faces for which the natural height-to-width ratios were preserved with distorted faces that were stretched vertically or horizontally. The impact of stretching on detection performance was not obvious when faces were equated to their unstretched counterparts in terms of their height or width dimension (Experiment 1). However, stretching impaired detection when the original and distorted faces were matched for their surface area (Experiment 2), and this was found with both vertically and horizontally stretched faces (Experiment 3). This effect was evident in accuracy, response times, and also observers' eye movements to faces. These findings demonstrate that height-to-width ratios are an important component of the cognitive template for face detection. The results also highlight important differences between face detection and face recognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Is the C:N:P stoichiometry in soil and soil microbial biomass related to the landscape and land use in southern subtropical China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Wu, Jinshui; Liu, Shoulong; Shen, Jianlin; Huang, Daoyou; Su, Yirong; Wei, Wenxue; Syers, J. Keith

    2012-12-01

    Does the soil microbial biomass (SMB) in terrestrial ecosystems present well- constrained atomic carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus (C:N:P) ratios, analogous to the planktonic biomass in marine ecosystems? How do soil microbes respond to changes in the soil environment in terms of their elemental stoichiometry? Following up on the work of Cleveland and Liptzin (2007), we examined the stoichiometry of C, N and P in the soil and SMB and their relationships at both the landscape and land-use levels in subtropical terrestrial ecosystems. 1,069 soil samples were collected at a depth of 0-20 cm from three typical landscapes (a karst mountain, a low hill and a lowland) in southern subtropical China. The landscapes presented various land-use types (e.g., paddy field, upland, woodland, etc.) and intensities of anthropogenic activity. The samples were analyzed to determine soil organic C, total soil N and total soil P contents as well as SMB C, SMB N and SMB P. On average, atomic C:N:P ratios of 80:7.9:1 in the soil and 70.2:6:1 in the SMB were obtained for the region. A clear descending trend of the soil C:N:P ratios (not the SMB C:N:P ratios) was observed across the three landscapes in the order: karst mountain > low hill > lowland. Although significant variations primarily related to human activities were observed in the soil and SMB atomic C:N:P ratios across the landscapes and land-use types, a significant correlation (r = 0.56, p homeostasis of elemental stoichiometry in the SMB of the terrestrial ecosystems in southern subtropical China.

  4. The stoichiometry of the TMEM16A ion channel determined in intact plasma membranes of COS-7 cells using liquid-phase electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckys, Diana B; Stoerger, Christof; Latta, Lorenz; Wissenbach, Ulrich; Flockerzi, Veit; de Jonge, Niels

    2017-08-01

    TMEM16A is a membrane protein forming a calcium-activated chloride channel. A homodimeric stoichiometry of the TMEM16 family of proteins has been reported but an important question is whether the protein resides always in a dimeric configuration in the plasma membrane or whether monomers of the protein are also present in its native state within in the intact plasma membrane. We have determined the stoichiometry of the human (h)TMEM16A within whole COS-7 cells in liquid. For the purpose of detecting TMEM16A subunits, single proteins were tagged by the streptavidin-binding peptide within extracellular loops accessible by streptavidin coated quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles. The labeled proteins were then imaged using correlative light microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detection. The locations of 19,583 individual proteins were determined of which a statistical analysis using the pair correlation function revealed the presence of a dimeric conformation of the protein. The amounts of detected label pairs and single labels were compared between experiments in which the TMEM16A SBP-tag position was varied, and experiments in which tagged and non-tagged TMEM16A proteins were present. It followed that hTMEM16A resides in the plasma membrane as dimer only and is not present as monomer. This strategy may help to elucidate the stoichiometry of other membrane protein species within the context of the intact plasma membrane in future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. What’s in a face? How face gender and current affect influence perceived emotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Harris

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Faces drive our social interactions. A vast literature suggests an interaction between gender and emotional face perception, with studies using different methodologies demonstrating that the gender of a face can affect how emotions are processed. However, how different is our perception of affective male and female faces? Furthermore, how does our current affective state when viewing faces influence our perceptual biases? We presented participants with a series of faces morphed along an emotional continuum from happy to angry. Participants judged each face morph as either happy or angry. We determined each participant’s unique emotional ‘neutral’ point, defined as the face morph judged to be perceived equally happy and angry, separately for male and female faces. We also assessed how current state affect influenced these perceptual neutral points. Our results indicate that, for both male and female participants, the emotional neutral point for male faces is perceptually biased to be happier than for female faces. This bias suggests that more happiness is required to perceive a male face as emotionally neutral, i.e., we are biased to perceive a male face as more negative. Interestingly, we also find that perceptual biases in perceiving female faces are correlated with current mood, such that positive state affect correlates with perceiving female faces as happier, while we find no significant correlation between negative state affect and the perception of facial emotion. Furthermore, we find reaction time biases, with slower responses for angry male faces compared to angry female faces.

  6. Looking at My Own Face: Visual Processing Strategies in Self–Other Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anya Chakraborty

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We live in an age of ‘selfies.’ Yet, how we look at our own faces has seldom been systematically investigated. In this study we test if the visual processing of the highly familiar self-face is different from other faces, using psychophysics and eye-tracking. This paradigm also enabled us to test the association between the psychophysical properties of self-face representation and visual processing strategies involved in self-face recognition. Thirty-three adults performed a self-face recognition task from a series of self-other face morphs with simultaneous eye-tracking. Participants were found to look longer at the lower part of the face for self-face compared to other-face. Participants with a more distinct self-face representation, as indexed by a steeper slope of the psychometric response curve for self-face recognition, were found to look longer at upper part of the faces identified as ‘self’ vs. those identified as ‘other’. This result indicates that self-face representation can influence where we look when we process our own vs. others’ faces. We also investigated the association of autism-related traits with self-face processing metrics since autism has previously been associated with atypical self-processing. The study did not find any self-face specific association with autistic traits, suggesting that autism-related features may be related to self-processing in a domain specific manner.

  7. Comparing the Ecological Stoichiometry in Green and Brown Food Webs – A Review and Meta-analysis of Freshwater Food Webs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A. Evans-White

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The framework of ecological stoichiometry was developed primarily within the context of “green” autotroph-based food webs. While stoichiometric principles also apply in “brown” detritus-based systems, these systems have been historically understudied and differ from green ones in several important aspects including carbon (C quality and the nutrient [nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P] contents of food resources for consumers. In this paper, we review work over the last decade that has advanced the application of ecological stoichiometry from green to brown food webs, focusing on freshwater ecosystems. We first review three focal areas where green and brown food webs differ: (1 bottom–up controls by light and nutrient availability, (2 stoichiometric constraints on consumer growth and nutritional regulation, and (3 patterns in consumer-driven nutrient dynamics. Our review highlights the need for further study of how light and nutrient availability affect autotroph–heterotroph interactions on detritus and the subsequent effects on consumer feeding and growth. To complement this conceptual review, we formally quantified differences in stoichiometric principles between green and brown food webs using a meta-analysis across feeding studies of freshwater benthic invertebrates. From 257 datasets collated across 46 publications and several unpublished studies, we compared effect sizes (Pearson’s r of resource N:C and P:C on growth, consumption, excretion, and egestion between herbivorous and detritivorous consumers. The meta-analysis revealed that both herbivore and detritivore growth are limited by resource N:C and P:C contents, but effect sizes only among detritivores were significantly above zero. Consumption effect sizes were negative among herbivores but positive for detritivores in the case of both N:C and P:C, indicating distinct compensatory feeding responses across resource stoichiometry gradients. Herbivore P excretion rates responded

  8. The stoichiometry of synthetic alunite as a function of hydrothermal ageing investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grube, Elisabeth; Nielsen, U. G.

    2014-01-01

    The stoichiometry of a series of synthetic alunite (nominally KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6) samples prepared by hydrothermal methods as a function of reaction time (1 – 31 days) has been investigated by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as well as solid-state 1H and 27Al magic...... of potassium defects present, from 17.261(1) to 17.324(5) Å. Solid-state 27Al MAS NMR revealed a decrease in the defect concentration as a function of time and showed the presence of 7-10 % impurities in the samples....

  9. Production, partitioning and stoichiometry of organic matter under variable nutrient supply during mesocosm experiments in the tropical Pacific and Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. S. Franz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen-deficient waters in the ocean, generally referred to as oxygen minimum zones (OMZ, are expected to expand as a consequence of global climate change. Poor oxygenation is promoting microbial loss of inorganic nitrogen (N and increasing release of sediment-bound phosphate (P into the water column. These intermediate water masses, nutrient-loaded but with an N deficit relative to the canonical N:P Redfield ratio of 16:1, are transported via coastal upwelling into the euphotic zone. To test the impact of nutrient supply and nutrient stoichiometry on production, partitioning and elemental composition of dissolved (DOC, DON, DOP and particulate (POC, PON, POP organic matter, three nutrient enrichment experiments were conducted with natural microbial communities in shipboard mesocosms, during research cruises in the tropical waters of the southeast Pacific and the northeast Atlantic. Maximum accumulation of POC and PON was observed under high N supply conditions, indicating that primary production was controlled by N availability. The stoichiometry of microbial biomass was unaffected by nutrient N:P supply during exponential growth under nutrient saturation, while it was highly variable under conditions of nutrient limitation and closely correlated to the N:P supply ratio, although PON:POP of accumulated biomass generally exceeded the supply ratio. Microbial N:P composition was constrained by a general lower limit of 5:1. Channelling of assimilated P into DOP appears to be the mechanism responsible for the consistent offset of cellular stoichiometry relative to inorganic nutrient supply and nutrient drawdown, as DOP build-up was observed to intensify under decreasing N:P supply. Low nutrient N:P conditions in coastal upwelling areas overlying O2-deficient waters seem to represent a net source for DOP, which may stimulate growth of diazotrophic phytoplankton. These results demonstrate that microbial nutrient assimilation and

  10. The determination of the stoichiometry of the mixed complex of vanadium with hydrogen peroxide and with 4-(2-Pyridilazo Resorcinol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiwen He

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports details of the stoichiometric characterization of the mixed complex system, V(H2O2PAR, formed when vanadium adequately reacts with hydrogen peroxide and with 4-(2-PyridilazoResorcinol. Also the presence of polynuclear species was investigated in order to elucidate about unambiguous assignment of the molar absorptivity, stability constant and composition of the complex. Two mathematical treatments methods of the experimental results were employed. From the results it can be concluded that this system corresponds to a mononuclear complex with 1:1:1 stoichiometry.

  11. Prosopagnosia when all faces look the same

    CERN Document Server

    Rivolta, Davide

    2014-01-01

    This book provides readers with a simplified and comprehensive account of the cognitive and neural bases of face perception in humans. Faces are ubiquitous in our environment and we rely on them during social interactions. The human face processing system allows us to extract information about the identity, gender, age, mood, race, attractiveness and approachability of other people in about a fraction of a second, just by glancing at their faces.  By introducing readers to the most relevant research on face recognition, this book seeks to answer the questions: “Why are humans so fast at recognizing faces?”, “Why are humans so efficient at recognizing faces?”, “Do faces represent a particular category for the human visual system?”, What makes face perception in humans so special?, “Can our face recognition system fail”?  This book presents the author’s findings on face perception during his research studies on both normal subjects and subjects with prosopagnosia, a neurological disorder cha...

  12. Very low resolution face recognition problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wilman W W; Yuen, Pong C

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the very low resolution (VLR) problem in face recognition in which the resolution of the face image to be recognized is lower than 16 × 16. With the increasing demand of surveillance camera-based applications, the VLR problem happens in many face application systems. Existing face recognition algorithms are not able to give satisfactory performance on the VLR face image. While face super-resolution (SR) methods can be employed to enhance the resolution of the images, the existing learning-based face SR methods do not perform well on such a VLR face image. To overcome this problem, this paper proposes a novel approach to learn the relationship between the high-resolution image space and the VLR image space for face SR. Based on this new approach, two constraints, namely, new data and discriminative constraints, are designed for good visuality and face recognition applications under the VLR problem, respectively. Experimental results show that the proposed SR algorithm based on relationship learning outperforms the existing algorithms in public face databases.

  13. Kinetic calculation of plasma deposition in castellated tile gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejarnac, R.; Gunn, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    Plasma-facing divertors and limiters are armoured with castellated tiles to withstand intense heat fluxes. Recent experimental studies show that a non-negligible amount of deuterium is deposited in the gaps between tiles. We present here a numerical study of plasma deposition in this critical region. For this purpose we have developed a particle-in-cell code with realistic boundary conditions determined from kinetic calculations. We find a strong asymmetry of plasma deposition into the gaps. A significant fraction of the plasma influx is expelled from the gap to be deposited on the leading edge of the downstream tile

  14. Processing of emotional faces in social phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Kristjansen Rosenberg

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has found that individuals with social phobia differ from controls in their processing of emotional faces. For instance, people with social phobia show increased attention to briefly presented threatening faces. However, when exposure times are increased, the direction of this attentional bias is more unclear. Studies investigating eye movements have found both increased as well as decreased attention to threatening faces in socially anxious participants. The current study investigated eye movements to emotional faces in eight patients with social phobia and 34 controls. Three different tasks with different exposure durations were used, which allowed for an investigation of the time course of attention. At the early time interval, patients showed a complex pattern of both vigilance and avoidance of threatening faces. At the longest time interval, patients avoided the eyes of sad, disgust, and neutral faces more than controls, whereas there were no group differences for angry faces.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of interactions between energetic dust and plasma-facing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Guo-jian, E-mail: niugj@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Li, Xiao-chun; Xu, Qian; Yang, Zhong-shi [Hefei Center Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Luo, Guang-nan [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Hefei Center Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Hefei Science Center of CAS, Hefei (China)

    2015-11-15

    The interactions between dust and plasma-facing material (PFM) relate to the lifetime of PFM and impurity production. Series results have been obtained theoretically and experimentally but more detailed studies are needed. In present research, we investigate the evolution of kinetic, potential and total energy of plasma-facing material (PFM) in order to understand the dust/PFM interaction process. Three typical impacting energy are selected, i.e., 1, 10 and 100 keV/dust for low-, high- and hyper-energy impacting cases. For low impacting energy, dust particles stick on PFM surface without damaging it. Two typical time points exist and the temperature of PFM grows all the time but PFM structure experience a modifying process. Under high energy case, three typical points appear. The temperature curve fluctuates in the whole interaction process which indicates there are dust/PFM and kinetic/potential energy exchanges. In the hyper-energy case in present simulation, the violence dust/PFM interactions cause sputtering and crater investigating on energy evolution curves. We further propose the statistics of energy distribution. Results show that about half of impacting energy consumes on heating plasma-facing material meanwhile the other half on PFM structure deformation. Only a small proportion becomes kinetic energy of interstitial or sputtering atoms.

  16. Meta-analytic review of the development of face discrimination in infancy: Face race, face gender, infant age, and methodology moderate face discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, Nicole A; Marquis, Alexandra R

    2017-11-01

    Infants show facility for discriminating between individual faces within hours of birth. Over the first year of life, infants' face discrimination shows continued improvement with familiar face types, such as own-race faces, but not with unfamiliar face types, like other-race faces. The goal of this meta-analytic review is to provide an effect size for infants' face discrimination ability overall, with own-race faces, and with other-race faces within the first year of life, how this differs with age, and how it is influenced by task methodology. Inclusion criteria were (a) infant participants aged 0 to 12 months, (b) completing a human own- or other-race face discrimination task, (c) with discrimination being determined by infant looking. Our analysis included 30 works (165 samples, 1,926 participants participated in 2,623 tasks). The effect size for infants' face discrimination was small, 6.53% greater than chance (i.e., equal looking to the novel and familiar). There was a significant difference in discrimination by race, overall (own-race, 8.18%; other-race, 3.18%) and between ages (own-race: 0- to 4.5-month-olds, 7.32%; 5- to 7.5-month-olds, 9.17%; and 8- to 12-month-olds, 7.68%; other-race: 0- to 4.5-month-olds, 6.12%; 5- to 7.5-month-olds, 3.70%; and 8- to 12-month-olds, 2.79%). Multilevel linear (mixed-effects) models were used to predict face discrimination; infants' capacity to discriminate faces is sensitive to face characteristics including race, gender, and emotion as well as the methods used, including task timing, coding method, and visual angle. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Do Young Infants Prefer an Infant-Directed Face or a Happy Face?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hojin I.; Johnson, Scott P.

    2013-01-01

    Infants' visual preference for infant-directed (ID) faces over adult-directed (AD) faces was examined in two experiments that introduced controls for emotion. Infants' eye movements were recorded as they viewed a series of side-by-side dynamic faces. When emotion was held constant, 6-month-old infants showed no preference for ID faces over AD…

  18. An Investigation of Online and Face-to-Face Communication in General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Gabriela; Green, Kellie; Rahman, Aliyah; Epp, Erik

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated an online office hour and a face-to-face recitation for similarities and differences. The online office hour and face-to-face recitation were a part of general chemistry courses taught at different universities. The courses covered the same material at the same level. The results of the investigation revealed…

  19. Face to Face or E-Learning in Turkish EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Ekrem; Cakir, Recep

    2014-01-01

    This purpose of this study was to understand e-learners and face to face learners' views towards learning English through e-learning in vocational higher school context and to determine the role of academic achievement and gender in e-learning and face to face learning. This study was conducted at a state-run university in 2012-2013 academic year…

  20. The complex duration perception of emotional faces: effects of face direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliegl, Katrin M; Limbrecht-Ecklundt, Kerstin; Dürr, Lea; Traue, Harald C; Huckauf, Anke

    2015-01-01

    The perceived duration of emotional face stimuli strongly depends on the expressed emotion. But, emotional faces also differ regarding a number of other features like gaze, face direction, or sex. Usually, these features have been controlled by only using pictures of female models with straight gaze and face direction. Doi and Shinohara (2009) reported that an overestimation of angry faces could only be found when the model's gaze was oriented toward the observer. We aimed at replicating this effect for face direction. Moreover, we explored the effect of face direction on the duration perception sad faces. Controlling for the sex of the face model and the participant, female and male participants rated the duration of neutral, angry, and sad face stimuli of both sexes photographed from different perspectives in a bisection task. In line with current findings, we report a significant overestimation of angry compared to neutral face stimuli that was modulated by face direction. Moreover, the perceived duration of sad face stimuli did not differ from that of neutral faces and was not influenced by face direction. Furthermore, we found that faces of the opposite sex appeared to last longer than those of the same sex. This outcome is discussed with regards to stimulus parameters like the induced arousal, social relevance, and an evolutionary context.