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  1. Electroconvulsive stimulations normalizes stress-induced changes in the glucocorticoid receptor and behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hageman, Ida; Nielsen, Marianne; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2009-01-01

    Animal models of chronic stress, such as 21 days of 6h/daily restraint stress cause changes in neuronal morphology in the hippocampus and alter behaviour. These changes are partly mediated by the glucocorticoids. The objective of this study was threefold: (1) to study how this particular chronic...... stress paradigm influences expression of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor mRNA, (2) to study the effect of previous repeated restraint stress on the behaviours executed in the forced swim test (FST) (e.g. a novel inescapable stress situation) and (3) to investigate the modulating effect...... of electroconvulsive stimulations (ECS) on the neural and behavioural effects of the stress paradigm. The study shows that restraint stress lowered glucocorticoid receptor mRNA levels in all hippocampal regions, including the CA3 region which is the site of the characteristic dendritic reorganization seen...

  2. Transcranial Stimulation of the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Prevents Stress-Induced Working Memory Deficits.

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    Bogdanov, Mario; Schwabe, Lars

    2016-01-27

    Stress is known to impair working memory performance. This disruptive effect of stress on working memory has been linked to a decrease in the activity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). In the present experiment, we tested whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the dlPFC can prevent stress-induced working memory impairments. We tested 120 healthy participants in a 2 d, sham-controlled, double-blind between-subjects design. Participants completed a test of their individual baseline working memory capacity on day 1. On day 2, participants were exposed to either a stressor or a control manipulation before they performed a visuospatial and a verbal working memory task. While participants completed the tasks, anodal, cathodal, or sham tDCS was applied over the right dlPFC. Stress impaired working memory performance in both tasks, albeit to a lesser extent in the verbal compared with the visuospatial working memory task. This stress-induced working memory impairment was prevented by anodal, but not sham or cathodal, stimulation of the dlPFC. Compared with sham or cathodal stimulation, anodal tDCS led to significantly better working memory performance in both tasks after stress. Our findings indicate a causal role of the dlPFC in working memory impairments after acute stress and point to anodal tDCS as a promising tool to reduce cognitive deficits related to working memory in stress-related mental disorders, such as depression, schizophrenia, or post-traumatic stress disorder. Working memory deficits are prominent in stress-related mental disorders, such as depression, schizophrenia, or post-traumatic stress disorder. Similar working memory impairments have been observed in healthy individuals exposed to acute stress. So far, attempts to prevent such stress-induced working memory deficits focused mainly on pharmacological interventions. Here, we tested the idea that transcranial direct current stimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal

  3. Escitalopram and NHT normalized stress-induced anhedonia and molecular neuroadaptations in a mouse model of depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Or Burstein

    Full Text Available Anhedonia is defined as a diminished ability to obtain pleasure from otherwise positive stimuli. Anxiety and mood disorders have been previously associated with dysregulation of the reward system, with anhedonia as a core element of major depressive disorder (MDD. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether stress-induced anhedonia could be prevented by treatments with escitalopram or novel herbal treatment (NHT in an animal model of depression. Unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS was administered for 4 weeks on ICR outbred mice. Following stress exposure, animals were randomly assigned to pharmacological treatment groups (i.e., saline, escitalopram or NHT. Treatments were delivered for 3 weeks. Hedonic tone was examined via ethanol and sucrose preferences. Biological indices pertinent to MDD and anhedonia were assessed: namely, hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and striatal dopamine receptor D2 (Drd2 mRNA expression levels. The results indicate that the UCMS-induced reductions in ethanol or sucrose preferences were normalized by escitalopram or NHT. This implies a resemblance between sucrose and ethanol in their hedonic-eliciting property. On a neurobiological aspect, UCMS-induced reduction in hippocampal BDNF levels was normalized by escitalopram or NHT, while UCMS-induced reduction in striatal Drd2 mRNA levels was normalized solely by NHT. The results accentuate the association of stress and anhedonia, and pinpoint a distinct effect for NHT on striatal Drd2 expression.

  4. Argirein alleviates stress-induced and diabetic hypogonadism in rats via normalizing testis endothelin receptor A and connexin 43.

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    Xu, Ming; Hu, Chen; Khan, Hussein-hamed; Shi, Fang-hong; Cong, Xiao-dong; Li, Qing; Dai, Yin; Dai, De-zai

    2016-02-01

    Argirein (rhein-arginine) is a derivative of rhein isolated from Chinese rhubarb (Rheum Officinale Baill.) that exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study we investigated the effects of argirein on stress-induced (hypergonadotrophic) and diabetic (hypogonadotrophic) hypogonadism in male rats. Stress-induced and diabetic hypogonadism was induced in male rats via injection of isoproterenol (ISO) or streptozotocin (STZ). ISO-injected rats were treated with argirein (30 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), po) or testosterone replacement (0.5 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), sc) for 5 days, and STZ-injected rats were treated with argirein (40-120 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), po) or aminoguanidine (100 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), po) for 4 weeks. After the rats were euthanized, blood samples and testes were collected. Serum hormone levels were measured, and the expression of endothelin receptor A (ETA), connexin 43 (Cx43) and other proteins in testes was detected. For in vitro experiments, testis homogenate was prepared from normal male rats, and incubated with ISO (1 μmol/L) or high glucose (27 mmol/L). ISO injection induced hyper-gonadotrophic hypogonadism characterized by low testosterone and high FSH and LH levels in the serum, whereas STZ injection induced hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism as evidenced by low testosterone and low FSH and LH levels in the serum. In the testes of ISO- and STZ-injected rats, the expression of ETA, MMP-9, NADPH oxidase and pPKCε was significantly increased, and the expression of Cx43 was decreased. Administration of argirein attenuated both the abnormal serum hormone levels and the testis changes in ISO- and STZ-injected rats, and aminoguanidine produced similar actions in STZ-injected rats; testosterone replacement reversed the abnormal serum hormone levels, but did not affect the testis changes in ISO-injected rats. Argirein (0.3-3 μmol/L) exerted similar effects in testis homogenate incubated with ISO or high glucose in vitro. Two types of

  5. Nicotine increases stress-induced serotonin release by stimulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in rat striatum.

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    Takahashi, H; Takada, Y; Nagai, N; Urano, T; Takada, A

    1998-03-01

    We used a microdialysis technique to analyze the effects of footshock stress on the release of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine: 5-HT) in the striatum or prefrontal cortex (PFC) in rats that were pretreated with nicotine. Neither nicotine administration alone nor stress application alone changed 5-HT release. During stress application, however, both chronic nicotine administration and local infusion of nicotine to the striatum significantly increased 5-HT release in the striatum, though not in the PFC. These increases in 5-HT release were eradicated by a local infusion of mecamylamine. Release of 5-HT increased in the striatum during stress application when nicotine was injected to the striatum, while nicotinic injection to the dorsal raphe nucleus did not increase 5-HT release in the striatum. The present study demonstrates that nicotine induced a release of 5-HT upon stress application by stimulating presynaptic nicotinic receptors in the striatum.

  6. Mechanical-tactile stimulation (MTS) during neonatal stress prevents hyperinsulinemia despite stress-induced adiposity in weanling rat pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer-Mileur, Laurie J; Haley, Shannon; Gulliver, Kristina; Thomson, Anne; Slater, Hillarie; Barrett, Brett; Joss-Moore, Lisa A; Callaway, Christopher; McKnight, Robert A; Moore, Barry; Lane, Robert H

    2011-03-01

    Stress in early life negatively influences growth quality through perturbations in body composition including increased fat mass. At term (40 weeks) preterm infants have greater fat mass and abdominal visceral adipose tissue than term-born infants. Mechanical-tactile stimulation (MTS) attenuates the stress response in preterm infants and rodents. We tested the hypothesis that MTS, administered during an established model of neonatal stress, would decrease stress-driven adiposity and prevent associated metabolic imbalances in rat pups. Pups received one of three treatments from postnatal days 5 to P9: Neonatal Stress (Stress; n=20) = painful stimulus and hypoxic/hyperoxic challenge during 60 min of maternal separation; MTS (n=20) = neonatal stress+10 min of MTS; or Control (n=20). Body weight, DXA whole body fat mass (g), MRI subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue, and fasting adiponectin, leptin, glucose, insulin, and corticosterone were measured at weaning (P21). Stress and MTS weight gain (g/d) were accelerated following neonatal stress with greater fat mass, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue, serum adiponectin, leptin, and fasting glucose at weaning (P21). Male Stress and MTS pups had greater visceral adipose tissue depot. Male and female Stress pups were hyperinsulinemic. In summary, neonatal stress compromised body composition by increasing fat mass and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue depot, and in males, visceral adipose tissue depot. Importantly, MTS prevented hyperinsulinemia despite of stress-induced adiposity. We conclude that MTS during neonatal stress has the potential to minimize metabolic consequences associated with stress-driven perturbations in fat mass and abdominal adipose depots. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channel by iptakalim normalizes stress-induced HPA axis disorder and depressive behaviour by alleviating inflammation and oxidative stress in mouse hypothalamus.

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    Zhao, Xiao-Jie; Zhao, Zhan; Yang, Dan-Dan; Cao, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Ling; Ji, Juan; Gu, Jun; Huang, Ji-Ye; Sun, Xiu-Lan

    2017-04-01

    Stress-induced disturbance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is strongly implicated in incidence of mood disorders. A heightened neuroinflammatory response and oxidative stress play a fundamental role in the dysfunction of the HPA axis. We have previously demonstrated that iptakalim (Ipt), a new ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channel opener, could prevent oxidative injury and neuroinflammation against multiple stimuli-induced brain injury. The present study was to demonstrate the impacts of Ipt in stress-induced HPA axis disorder and depressive behavior. We employed 2 stress paradigms: 8 weeks of continuous restraint stress (chronic restraint stress, CRS) and 2h of restraint stress (acute restraint stress, ARS), to mimic both chronic stress and severe acute stress. Prolonged (4 weeks) and short-term (a single injection) Ipt treatment was administered 30min before each stress paradigm. We found that HPA axis was altered after stress, with different responses to CRS (lower ACTH and CORT, higher AVP, but normal CRH) and ARS (higher CRH, ACTH and CORT, but normal AVP). Both prolonged and short-term Ipt treatment normalized stress-induced HPA axis disorders and abnormal behaviors in mice. CRS and ARS up-regulated mRNA levels of inflammation-related molecules (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and TLR4) and oxidative stress molecules (gp91phox, iNOS and Nrf2) in the mouse hypothalamus. Double immunofluorescence showed CRS and ARS increased microglia activation (CD11b and TNFα) and oxidative stress in neurons (NeuN and gp91phox), which were alleviated by Ipt. Therefore, the present study reveals that Ipt could prevent against stress-induced HPA axis disorders and depressive behavior by alleviating inflammation and oxidative stress in the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Vibroacoustic stimulation in normal term human pregnancy.

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    D'Elia, A; Pighetti, M; Vanacore, F; Fabbrocini, G; Arpaia, L

    2005-05-01

    To examine the effects of vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) on fetal heart rate (FHR) in term human fetuses by computerized carditocography system. FHR was analyzed 20 min before and 30 min after vibroacoustic stimulation using the Oxford Sonicaid System 8002 for computerized FHR measurement. Recordings were made in 31 uncomplicated pregnancies at 36-42 weeks' gestation. Vibroacustic stimulation of the fetus evoked a significant increase in all the parameters evaluated (number of fetal movements, of accelerations above 10 and 15 bpm, in high- and low-variability episodes, and in short-term variations). Concerning the effect of behavioural states on the response to VAS, some changes (FHR, high-variability episodes) occurred independently of behavioural states, while other parameters (accelerations >10 and 15 bpm: short-term variation) underwent statistically significant changes only for behavioural states 1F and 2F. Our study supports the hypothesis of a significant fetal response in normal term pregnancy, as clearly shown by computerized cardiotocography. The immediate response occurred independently of behavioural states, although some differences were present (mainly for F1 and F2 states) if the evaluation was extended in time.

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced degradation of DNAJB12 stimulates BOK accumulation and primes cancer cells for apoptosis.

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    Sopha, Pattarawut; Ren, Hong Yu; Grove, Diane E; Cyr, Douglas M

    2017-07-14

    DNAJB12 (JB12) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated Hsp40 family protein that recruits Hsp70 to the ER surface to coordinate the function of ER-associated and cytosolic chaperone systems in protein quality control. Hsp70 is stress-inducible, but paradoxically, we report here that JB12 was degraded by the proteasome during severe ER stress. Destabilized JB12 was degraded by ER-associated degradation complexes that contained HERP, Sel1L, and gp78. JB12 was the only ER-associated chaperone that was destabilized by reductive stress. JB12 knockdown by siRNA led to the induction of caspase processing but not the unfolded protein response. ER stress-induced apoptosis is regulated by the highly labile and ER-associated BCL-2 family member BOK, which is controlled at the level of protein stability by ER-associated degradation components. We found that JB12 was required in human hepatoma cell line 7 (Huh-7) liver cancer cells to maintain BOK at low levels, and BOK was detected in complexes with JB12 and gp78. Depletion of JB12 during reductive stress or by shRNA from Huh-7 cells was associated with accumulation of BOK and activation of Caspase 3, 7, and 9. The absence of JB12 sensitized Huh-7 to death caused by proteotoxic agents and the proapoptotic chemotherapeutic LCL-161. In summary, JB12 is a stress-sensitive Hsp40 whose degradation during severe ER stress provides a mechanism to promote BOK accumulation and induction of apoptosis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. [Effect of moxa-burning heat stimulating Liangmen (ST 21) and Zusanli (ST 36) on proliferation and apoptosis signaling proteins in rats with stress-induced gastric ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li; Wang, Yadong; Chang, Xiaorong; Wu, Huangan; Liu, Mi; Wang, Hong; Chen, Jiaolong; Wang Chao; Quan, Renfu; Yang, Zongbao

    2016-06-01

    To observe the effect of moxa-burning heat stimulating acupoints of Liangmen (ST 21) and Zusanli (ST 36) on the proliferation and apoptosis signaling proteins in rats with stress-induced gastric ulcer. Forty rats were randomly divided into four groups: negative control (NC), ulcer control (UC), acupoints of stomach meridian (ASM), and acupoints control (AC). The acute gastric ulcer model was established by bound and water immersion. Rats in NC and UC groups didn't receive any moxa-burning heat stimulating treatment, while rats in ASM and AC groups were treated with buringmoxa heat stimulating the acupoints of Liangmen (ST 21) and Zusanli (ST 36) and their controlled points, respectively. Rats in all groups were sacrificed after 12 consecutive days treatment. The ulcer index was evaluated by using Guth's method. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), apoptotic protease activating facter-1 (Apaf-1), Caspase-3, p21 activated kinase 1 (PAK1), extracellular regulated protein kinases 2 (ERK2), phosphorylated ERK2 (pERK2), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and RAC-alpha serine/threonine-protein kinase (Akt) in gastric mucosa was detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compared with UC group, the ulcer index of ASM and AC groups decreased, and the injured gastric mucosa was improved, the expression of TNF-α, Apaf-1 and Caspase-3 in gastric mucosa was significantly reduced (P gastric mucosa was significantly increased (P gastric mucosal lesion probably by inhibiting cell apoptosis and promoting cell proliferation in stress-induced gastric ulcer.

  11. Stress-induced stimulation of choline transport in cultured choroid plexus epithelium exposed to low concentrations of cadmium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robin K.

    2013-01-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium forms the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and accumulates essential minerals and heavy metals. Choroid plexus is cited as being a “sink” for heavy metals and excess minerals, serving to minimize accumulation of these potentially toxic agents in the brain. An understanding of how low doses of contaminant metals might alter transport of other solutes in the choroid plexus is limited. Using primary cultures of epithelial cells isolated from neonatal rat choroid plexus, our objective was to characterize modulation of apical uptake of the model organic cation choline elicited by low concentrations of the contaminant metal cadmium (CdCl2). At 50–1,000 nM, cadmium did not directly decrease or increase 30-min apical uptake of 10 μM [3H]choline. However, extended exposure to 250–500 nM cadmium increased [3H]choline uptake by as much as 75% without marked cytotoxicity. In addition, cadmium induced heat shock protein 70 and heme oxygenase-1 protein expression and markedly induced metallothionein gene expression. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine attenuated stimulation of choline uptake and induction of stress proteins. Conversely, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis l-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) enhanced stimulation of choline uptake and induction of stress proteins. Cadmium also activated ERK1/2 MAP kinase. The MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 diminished ERK1/2 activation and attenuated stimulation of choline uptake. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 activation abated stimulation of choline uptake in cells exposed to cadmium with BSO. These data indicate that in the choroid plexus, exposure to low concentrations of cadmium may induce oxidative stress and consequently stimulate apical choline transport through activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase. PMID:24401988

  12. Mechanical-tactile stimulation (MTS) during neonatal stress prevents hyperinsulinemia despite stress-induced adiposity in weanling rat pups

    OpenAIRE

    Moyer-Mileur, Laurie J.; Haley, Shannon; Gulliver, Kristina; Thomson, Anne; Slater, Hillarie; Barrett, Brett; Joss-Moore, Lisa A; Callaway, Christopher; McKnight, Robert A.; Moore, Barry; Lane, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Stress in early life negatively influences growth quality through perturbations in body composition including increased fat mass. At term (40 weeks) preterm infants have greater fat mass and abdominal visceral adipose tissue than term-born infants. Mechanical-tactile stimulation (MTS) attenuates the stress response in preterm infants and rodents. We tested the hypothesis that MTS, administered during an established model of neonatal stress, would decrease stress-driven adiposity and prevent a...

  13. Effect of stress induced by electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus on the electrical stability of the heart in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashtanov, Sergei I; Mezentseva, Larisa V; Zvyagintseva, Marina A; Kosharskaja, Irina L; Sudakov, Konstantin V

    2004-09-01

    The influence of stress on cardiac electrical stability (CES) and chaotic dynamics of the electrical activity of the heart was studied in acute and chronic experiments in rabbits. Stress was caused by 2-3 h daily immobilization of the animals with electrical stimulation of emotiogenic centers of the hypothalamus through implanted electrodes. CES was estimated by the thresholds for ventricular arrhythmia: paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia, repeated ventricular extrasystoles and ventricular fibrillation (VF). The results showed: (i) CES in stressed rabbits was decreased significantly compared with controls; (ii) the level of chaos at the onset of VF in stressed rabbits was increased significantly compared with controls; (iii) heart rate of stressed rabbits was significantly greater than in controls; (iv) changes in CES parameters depended on whether stress was acute or chronic; (v) acute stress promoted transition of spontaneously reversible VF into spontaneously irreversible VF. Thus, stress increased the degree of disorganization of heart electrical activity and also decreased its electrical stability. The experiments indicate that stress is a destabilizing factor influencing the reversibility of heart rate disorders. The probability of such reversibility depends on whether stress is acute or chronic: acute stress is more likely to lead to irreversible spontaneous VF.

  14. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Torrey A; Lee, Vivien H; Bleck, Thomas P

    2015-03-01

    Reversible stress-induced cardiac dysfunction is frequently seen as a complication of a multitude of acute stress states, in particular neurologic injuries. This dysfunction may be difficult to distinguish between that caused by myocardial ischemia and may impact both the treatment strategies and prognosis of the underlying condition. Critical care practitioners should have an understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical characteristics, precipitating conditions, differential diagnosis, and proposed treatments for stress-induced cardiomyopathy. MEDLINE database search conducted from inception to August 2014, including the search terms "tako-tsubo," "stress-induced cardiomyopathy," "neurogenic cardiomyopathy," "neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy," and "transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome". In addition, references from pertinent articles were used for a secondary search. After review of peer-reviewed original scientific articles, guidelines, and reviews resulting from the literature search described above, we made final selections for included references and data based on relevance and author consensus. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy occurs most commonly in postmenopausal women. It can be precipitated by emotional stress, neurologic injury, and numerous other stress states. Patients may present with symptoms indistinguishable from acute coronary syndrome or with electrocardiogram changes and wall motion abnormalities on echocardiogram following neurologic injury. Nearly all patients will have an elevated cardiac troponin. The underlying etiology is likely related to release of catecholamines, both locally in the myocardium and in the circulation. Differential diagnosis includes myocardial infarction, myocarditis, neurogenic pulmonary edema, and nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Although the natural course of stress-induced cardiomyopathy is resolution, treatment strategies include sympathetic blockade and supportive care. Stress-induced

  15. Environmental stress induces trinucleotide repeat mutagenesis in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Santillan, Beatriz A.; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mutability of microsatellite repeats is implicated in the modification of gene function and disease phenotype. Studies of the enhanced instability of long trinucleotide repeats (TNRs)—the cause of multiple human diseases—have revealed a remarkable complexity of mutagenic mechanisms. Here, we show that cold, heat, hypoxic, and oxidative stresses induce mutagenesis of a long CAG repeat tract in human cells. We show that stress-response factors mediate the stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM) of CAG repeats. We show further that SIM of CAG repeats does not involve mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, or transcription, processes that are known to promote TNR mutagenesis in other pathways of instability. Instead, we find that these stresses stimulate DNA rereplication, increasing the proportion of cells with >4 C-value (C) DNA content. Knockdown of the replication origin-licensing factor CDT1 eliminates both stress-induced rereplication and CAG repeat mutagenesis. In addition, direct induction of rereplication in the absence of stress also increases the proportion of cells with >4C DNA content and promotes repeat mutagenesis. Thus, environmental stress triggers a unique pathway for TNR mutagenesis that likely is mediated by DNA rereplication. This pathway may impact normal cells as they encounter stresses in their environment or during development or abnormal cells as they evolve metastatic potential. PMID:25775519

  16. Are Prescription Stimulants "Smart Pills"? The Epidemiology and Cognitive Neuroscience of Prescription Stimulant Use by Normal Healthy Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. Elizabeth; Farah, Martha J.

    2011-01-01

    Use of prescription stimulants by normal healthy individuals to enhance cognition is said to be on the rise. Who is using these medications for cognitive enhancement, and how prevalent is this practice? Do prescription stimulants in fact enhance cognition for normal healthy people? We review the epidemiological and cognitive neuroscience…

  17. Enhanced endoplasmic reticulum SERCA activity by overexpression of hepatic stimulator substance gene prevents hepatic cells from ER stress-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Yuan; Jiang, Shujun; Yu, Hao; An, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Although the potential pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is unclear, increasing evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress may link free fatty acids to NAFLD. Since we previously reported that hepatic stimulator substance (HSS) could protect the liver from steatosis, this study is aimed to investigate whether HSS protection could be related with its inhibition on ER stress. The HSS gene was stably transfected into BEL-7402 hepatoma cells and effectively expressed in ER. The palmitic acid (PA)-induced heptocyte lipotoxicity was reproduced in the HSS-transfected cells, and HSS alleviation of the ER stress and apoptosis were subsequently examined. The results showed that PA treatment led to a heavy accumulation of fatty acids within the cells and a remarkable increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, in the HSS-expressing cells, production of ROS was inhibited and ER stress-related marker glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP-78), sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP), anti-phospho-PRK-1ike ER kinase (p-PERK), anti-phospho-eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), and anti-C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) were downregulated compared with the wild-type or mutant HSS-transfected cells. Furthermore, PA treatment severely impaired the activity of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA), leading to imbalanced calcium homeostasis during ER stress, which could be rescued in the HSS-trasfected cells. The protection provided by HSS to the SERCA is identical to that observed with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) and sodium dimercaptopropane sulfonate (Na-DMPS), which are two typical free radical scavengers. As a consequence, the rate of ER stress-mediated apoptosis in the HSS-expressing cells was significantly reduced. In conclusion, the protective effect of HSS against ER stress may be associated with the removal of ROS to restore the activity of the SERCA.

  18. Binaural hearing ability with mastoid applied bilateral bone conduction stimulation in normal hearing subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenfelt, Stefan; Zeitooni, Mehrnaz

    2013-07-01

    The ability to use binaural cues when stimulation was by bilaterally applied bone conduction (BC) transducers was investigated in 20 normal hearing participants. The results with BC stimulation were compared with normal air conduction (AC) stimulation through earphones. The binaural hearing ability was tested by spatial release from masking, binaural intelligibility level difference (BILD), binaural masking level difference (BMLD) using chirp stimulation, and test of the precedence effect. In all tests, the participants revealed a benefit of bilateral BC stimulation indicating use of binaural cues. In the speech based tests, the binaural benefit for BC stimulation was approximately half that with AC stimulation. For the BC BMLD test with chirp stimulation, there were indications of superposition of the ipsilateral and contralateral pathways at the cochlear level affecting the results. The precedence effect test indicated significantly worse results for BC stimulation than for AC stimulation with low-frequency stimulation while they were close for high-frequency stimulation; broad-band stimulation gave results that were slightly worse than the high-frequency results.

  19. Radiation synovectomy stimulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis by normal articular cartilage

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    Myers, S.L.; Slowman, S.D.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-07-01

    Radiation synovectomy has been considered a therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy. Whether intraarticular irradiation affects the composition or biochemistry, and therefore the biomechanical properties, of normal articular cartilage has not been established. In the present study, yttrium 90 silicate was injected into one knee of nine normal adult dogs, and three other dogs received nonradioactive yttrium silicate. When the animals were killed 4 to 13 weeks after the injection, synovium from the irradiated knees showed areas of necrosis and fibrosis. Up to 29% less hyaluronate was synthesized in vitro by the synovial intima from irradiated knees than by the intima from the contralateral knees (mean difference 18%). Morphologic abnormalities were not observed in articular cartilage from either the irradiated or control knees, nor did the water content or concentrations of uronic acid or DNA in cartilage from the irradiated knees differ from that in cartilage from the contralateral knees. However, net /sup 35/SO/sub 4/-labeled glycosaminoglycan synthesis in organ cultures of cartilage from irradiated knees was increased (mean difference 21%, p = 0.03) in comparison with that in cultures of contralateral knee cartilage.

  20. Pudendal nerve latency time in normal women via intravaginal stimulation

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    Geraldo A. Cavalcanti

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION & OBJECTIVES: Studies of motor conduction for the efferent functional assessment of the pudendal nerve in women with pelvic dysfunctions have been conducted through researching distal motor latency times. The transrectal approach has been the classic approach for this electrophysiological examination. The objective of the present study is to verify the viability of the transvaginal approach in performing the exam, to establish normal values for this method and to analyze the influence of age, stature and parity in the latency value of normal women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 23 volunteers without genitourinary pathologies participated in this study. In each, pudendal motor latency was investigated through the transvaginal approach, which was chosen due to patient’s higher tolerance levels. RESULTS: The motor response represented by registering the M-wave was obtained in all volunteers on the right side (100% and in 13 volunteers on the left side (56.5%. The mean motor latency obtained in the right and left was respectively: 1.99 ± 0.41 and 1.92 ± 0.48 milliseconds (ms. There was no difference between the sides (p = 0.66. Latency did not correlate with age, stature or obstetric history. The results obtained in the present study were in agreement with those found by other researchers using the transrectal approach. CONCLUSION: The vaginal approach represents an alternative for pudendal nerve distal motor latency time, with similar results to those achieved through the transrectal approach. Normative values obtained herein might serve as a comparative basis for subsequent physiopathological studies.

  1. Characterization of follicle stimulating hormone profiles in normal ovulating women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecochard, René; Guillerm, Agnes; Leiva, René; Bouchard, Thomas; Direito, Ana; Boehringer, Hans

    2014-07-01

    To describe FSH profile variants. Observational study. Multicenter collaborative study. A total of 107 women. Women collected daily first morning urine and underwent serial ovarian ultrasound. The individual FSH cyclic profiles demonstrated a significant departure from the currently accepted model. A decline in FSH levels at the end of the follicular phase was observed in only 42% of cycles. The absence of this decline was significantly associated with a shorter luteal phase and higher pregnanediol-3α-glucuronide, FSH, and LH levels at the time of ovulation. In 34% of the cycles, significant FSH variability was observed throughout the follicular phase; this variability was associated with higher body mass index and lower overall FSH and LH levels throughout the cycle. The FSH peak occurs on average 2 hours before ovulation. The FSH peak duration was shorter than the LH peak. These results suggest that average FSH profiles may not reflect the more complex dynamics of daily hormonal variations in the menstrual cycle. It is possible that discrepancies between the average normal FSH profile and the individual day-to-day variants can be used to detect abnormalities. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prácticas para estimular el parto normal Practices to stimulate normal childbirth

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    Flora Maria Barbosa da Silva

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo lleva a una reflexión sobre las prácticas del estímulo al parto normal, con la fundamentación teórica de cada una de ellas. Las prácticas incluidas en este estudio fueron el ayuno, enemas, spray y baños de inmersión, caminatas, movimientos pélvicos y masaje. En un contexto de revalorización del parto normal, ofrecer a la mujer durante el parto opciones de comodidad basadas en evidencias puede ser una forma de preservar el curso fisiológico del parto.This article leads to a reflection about the practices of encouraging normal childbirth, with the theoretical foundation for each one of them. The practices included in this study were fasting, enema, shower and immersion baths, walking, pelvic movements and massage. In a context of revaluation of normal birth, providing evidence-based comfort options for women during childbirth can be a way to preserve the physiological course of labour.

  3. Effect of Low-Level Laser Stimulation on EEG Power in Normal Subjects with Closed Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jih-Huah Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we found that the low-level laser (LLL stimulation at the palm with a frequency of 10 Hz was able to induce significant brain activation in normal subjects with opened eyes. However, the electroencephalography (EEG changes to LLL stimulation in subjects with closed eyes have not been studied. In the present study, the laser array stimulator was applied to deliver insensible laser stimulations to the palm of the tested subjects with closed eyes (the laser group. The EEG activities before, during, and after the laser stimulation were collected. The EEG amplitude powers of each EEG frequency band at 19 locations were calculated. These power data were then analyzed by SPSS software using repeated-measure ANOVAs and appropriate posthoc tests. We found a pronounced decrease in the EEG power in alpha-bandwidth during laser simulation and then less decrease in the EEG power in delta-bandwidth in normal subjects with laser stimulation. The EEG power in beta-bandwidth in the right occipital area also decreased significantly in the laser group. We suggest that LLL stimulation might be conducive to falling into sleep in patients with sleep problems.

  4. Responses to vibroacoustic stimulation in a fetus with an encephalocele compared to responses of normal fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heteren, C F; Boekkooi, P F; Jongsma, H W; Nijhuis, J G

    2000-01-01

    Observation of fetal movement and fetal heart rate (FHR) responses to repeated vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) might be useful as a measure to assess fetal well-being and to assess the integrity of the fetal central nervous system (CNS). We observed the movement and FHR responses to repeated VAS of a term fetus with a serious brain anomaly as compared to responses of normal term fetuses. In 37 normal term fetuses and in a term fetus with an encephalocele we studied movement and FHR response to repeated VAS. All normal fetuses responded within 1 s after stimulation with general body movement and FHR acceleration. At 36 gestational weeks, no movement or FHR responses were seen in the fetus with an encephalocele. Repetition of the test in this fetus after one week still showed no response to repeated VAS. Normal fetuses showed movement and FHR responses to external stimulation. The fetus with an encephalocele did not respond to repeated VAS with a movement or FHR acceleration. Case studies in fetuses with structural anomalies of the CNS are needed to gain insight into the spectrum of possible responses to VAS.

  5. Bone conduction hearing sensitivity in normal-hearing subjects: transcutaneous stimulation at BAHA vs BCI position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinfeldt, Sabine; Håkansson, Bo; Taghavi, Hamidreza; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2014-06-01

    Bone conduction (BC) stimulation closer to the cochlea has previously been shown to give higher cochlear promontory acceleration measured by laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). This study is investigating whether stimulation closer to the cochlea also gives improved hearing sensitivity. Furthermore, the study compares shifts in hearing sensitivity (BC thresholds) and ear-canal sound pressure (ECSP). BC hearing thresholds and ECSP have been measured for stimulation at two positions: the existing bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) position, and a new bone conduction implant (BCI) position that is located closer to the cochlea. The measurements were made on 20 normal-hearing subjects. Depending on frequency, the ipsilateral hearing threshold was 3-14 dB better, and the ipsilateral ECSP was 2-12 dB higher for the BCI than for the BAHA position, with no significant differences between threshold and ECSP shifts at group level for most frequencies, and individually only for some subjects. It was found that both the objective ECSP and the subjective hearing threshold measurements gave similar improvement as previous LDV measurements for stimulation closer to the cochlea. One exception was that the LDV measurements did not show the improved sensitivity for frequencies below 500 Hz found here.

  6. Endothelial cells stimulate growth of normal and cancerous breast epithelial cells in 3D culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Magnus K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial-stromal interaction provides regulatory signals that maintain correct histoarchitecture and homeostasis in the normal breast and facilitates tumor progression in breast cancer. However, research on the regulatory role of the endothelial component in the normal and malignant breast gland has largely been neglected. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of endothelial cells on growth and differentiation of human breast epithelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D co-culture assay. Methods Breast luminal and myoepithelial cells and endothelial cells were isolated from reduction mammoplasties. Primary cells and established normal and malignant breast cell lines were embedded in reconstituted basement membrane in direct co-culture with endothelial cells and by separation of Transwell filters. Morphogenic and phenotypic profiles of co-cultures was evaluated by phase contrast microscopy, immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Results In co-culture, endothelial cells stimulate proliferation of both luminal- and myoepithelial cells. Furthermore, endothelial cells induce a subpopulation of luminal epithelial cells to form large acini/ducts with a large and clear lumen. Endothelial cells also stimulate growth and cloning efficiency of normal and malignant breast epithelial cell lines. Transwell and gradient co-culture studies show that endothelial derived effects are mediated - at least partially - by soluble factors. Conclusion Breast endothelial cells - beside their role in transporting nutrients and oxygen to tissues - are vital component of the epithelial microenvironment in the breast and provide proliferative signals to the normal and malignant breast epithelium. These growth promoting effects of endothelial cells should be taken into consideration in breast cancer biology.

  7. Benoxaprofen stimulates proteoglycan synthesis in normal canine knee cartilage in vitro

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    Palmoski, M.J.; Brandt, K.D.

    1983-06-01

    Several nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs which are cyclooxygenase inhibitors (e.g., salicylates, fenoprofen, ibuprofen) have been shown to suppress proteoglycan synthesis by normal joint cartilage in vitro. We examined the effect of benoxaprofen, a long-acting proprionic acid derivative which inhibits lipoxygenase in addition to causing moderate cyclooxygenase inhibition. When added to the culture medium in concentrations comparable with those obtainable in serum of patients treated with the drug (e.g., 10 and 50 micrograms/ml), benoxaprofen increased proteoglycan synthesis in slices of normal canine knee cartilage to 126% and 135%, respectively, of control levels. These concentrations of the drug augmented net protein synthesis to 154% and 123%, respectively, of control levels. Incorporation of /sup 3/H glucosamine into 9-aminoacridine precipitable material was increased by benoxaprofen, showing that it stimulates net proteoglycan synthesis, and not merely sulfation. At concentrations of either 10 or 50 micrograms/ml, the drug had no effect on proteoglycan catabolism or on the ability of proteoglycans to interact with cartilage hyaluronic acid to form macromolecular aggregates. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid, a free radical scavenger which, like benoxaprofen, inhibits the lipoxygenase as well as cyclooxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism, also increased /sup 35/S glycosaminoglycan synthesis in cartilage slices. The stimulation of glycosaminoglycan and protein synthesis by benoxaprofen suggests that its action on the chondrocyte may be different from that of most other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.

  8. CD27-deficient mice show normal NK-cell differentiation but impaired function upon stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Colvenaer, Veerle; Taveirne, Sylvie; Delforche, Maarten; De Smedt, Magda; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Taghon, Tom; Boon, Louis; Plum, Jean; Leclercq, Georges

    2011-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the first line defense against tumors, parasites and virus-infected cells. Therefore, factors that control NK-cell numbers and their function are important. CD27 is constitutively expressed on NK cells and its expression correlates with sequential phases in NK-cell development, discriminating phenotypically and functionally different subsets within the NK-cell population. Although CD27 has been described to have an important regulatory role in effector and memory T and B lymphocytes, its role in NK-cell biology remains to be addressed. In this study, we used CD27(-/-) mice to investigate the role of CD27 in NK-cell development and function, both during the resting state and upon stimulation. The results show that NK-cell numbers are not impaired in CD27(-/-) mice. Moreover, CD27(-/-) NK cells reach full phenotypic maturity, evidenced by normal expression of CD49b, CD43 and CD11b. Expression of activating receptors is unaltered, whereas expression of several inhibitory receptors is increased. Cytotoxicity and interferon-γ production by NK cells from CD27(-/-) mice in the resting state are normal. However, upon in vivo anti-CD40- or poly-I:C-mediated activation, or in vitro interleukin-15 priming plus anti-NKp46 stimulation, the absence of CD27 results in decreased cytolytic activity and cytokine production by spleen and liver NK cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that CD27 is dispensable for the development of functional NK cells. However, upon stimulation of NK cells, CD27 displays an important role in their activation and functionality.

  9. Aldosterone-stimulating somatic gene mutations are common in normal adrenal glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Koshiro; Tomlins, Scott A; Kuick, Rork; Cani, Andi K; Giordano, Thomas J; Hovelson, Daniel H; Liu, Chia-Jen; Sanjanwala, Aalok R; Edwards, Michael A; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Nanba, Kazutaka; Rainey, William E

    2015-08-18

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) represents the most common cause of secondary hypertension, but little is known regarding its adrenal cellular origins. Recently, aldosterone-producing cell clusters (APCCs) with high expression of aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) were found in both normal and PA adrenal tissue. PA-causing aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) harbor mutations in genes encoding ion channels/pumps that alter intracellular calcium homeostasis and cause renin-independent aldosterone production through increased CYP11B2 expression. Herein, we hypothesized that APCCs have APA-related aldosterone-stimulating somatic gene mutations. APCCs were studied in 42 normal adrenals from kidney donors. To clarify APCC molecular characteristics, we used microarrays to compare the APCC transcriptome with conventional adrenocortical zones [zona glomerulosa (ZG), zona fasciculata, and zona reticularis]. The APCC transcriptome was most similar to ZG but with an enhanced capacity to produce aldosterone. To determine if APCCs harbored APA-related mutations, we performed targeted next generation sequencing of DNA from 23 APCCs and adjacent normal adrenal tissue isolated from both formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, and frozen tissues. Known aldosterone driver mutations were identified in 8 of 23 (35%) APCCs, including mutations in calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L-type, α1D-subunit (CACNA1D; 6 of 23 APCCs) and ATPase, Na(+)/(K+) transporting, α1-polypeptide (ATP1A1; 2 of 23 APCCs), which were not observed in the adjacent normal adrenal tissue. Overall, we show three major findings: (i) APCCs are common in normal adrenals, (ii) APCCs harbor somatic mutations known to cause excess aldosterone production, and (iii) the mutation spectrum of aldosterone-driving mutations is different in APCCs from that seen in APA. These results provide molecular support for APCC as a precursor of PA.

  10. Normalization of Intrinsic Neural Circuits Governing Tourette's Syndrome Using Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jianping; Weng, Shenhong; Wang, Pengwei; Long, Jun; Wang, Zhishun

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the normalization of the intrinsic functional activity and connectivity of TS adolescents before and after the cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) with alpha stim device. We performed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging on eight adolescents before and after CES with mean age of about nine-years old who had Tourette's syndrome with moderate to severe tics symptom. Independent component analysis (ICA) with hierarchical partner matching method was used to examine the functional connectivity between regions within cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuit. Granger causality was used to investigate effective connectivity among these regions detected by ICA. We then performed pattern classification on independent components with significant group differences that served as endophenotype markers to distinguish the adolescents between TS and the normalized ones after CES. Results showed that TS adolescents after CES treatment had stronger functional activity and connectivity in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), caudate and posterior cingulate cortex while had weaker activity in supplementary motor area within the motor pathway compared with TS before CES. The results suggest that the functional activity and connectivity in motor pathway was suppressed while activities in the control portions within CSTC loop including ACC and caudate were increased in TS adolescents after CES compared with adolescents before CES. The normalization of the balance between motor and control portions of the CSTC circuit may result in the recovery of TS adolescents.

  11. Magnetic Vestibular Stimulation (MVS) As a Technique for Understanding the Normal and Diseased Labyrinth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Bryan K; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Jareonsettasin, Prem; Schubert, Michael C; Roberts, Dale C; Zee, David S

    2017-01-01

    Humans often experience dizziness and vertigo around strong static magnetic fields such as those present in an MRI scanner. Recent evidence supports the idea that this effect is the result of inner ear vestibular stimulation and that the mechanism is a magnetohydrodynamic force (Lorentz force) that is generated by the interactions between normal ionic currents in the inner ear endolymph and the strong static magnetic field of MRI machines. While in the MRI, the Lorentz force displaces the cupula of the lateral and anterior semicircular canals, as if the head was rotating with a constant acceleration. If a human subject's eye movements are recorded when they are in darkness in an MRI machine (i.e., without fixation), there is a persistent nystagmus that diminishes but does not completely disappear over time. When the person exits the magnetic field, there is a transient aftereffect (nystagmus beating in the opposite direction) that reflects adaptation that occurred in the MRI. This magnetic vestibular stimulation (MVS) is a useful technique for exploring set-point adaptation, the process by which the brain adapts to a change in its environment, which in this case is vestibular imbalance. Here, we review the mechanism of MVS, how MVS produces a unique stimulus to the labyrinth that allows us to explore set-point adaptation, and how this technique might apply to the understanding and treatment of vestibular and other neurological disorders.

  12. Effect of melatonin on the basal and stimulated gonadotropin levels in normal men and postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fideleff, H; Aparicio, N J; Guitelman, A; Debeljuk, L; Mancini, A; Cramer, C

    1976-06-01

    The effect of melatonin on LH and FSH secretion in basal conditions and after stimulation with synthetic LHRH was studied in 3 volunteer normal men and 3 women two to five years after menopause. During the first three days of study, blood samples were obtained at 8 AM. On the second day, an iv injection of 50 mug LHRH was performed; on the third day, 2 ml of 0.9% saline were injected. In both cases, blood samples were obtained 30 and 60 minutes after the injection. On the fourth day, the subjects began melatonin (10 mg daily im for 13 days). Blood samples at 8 AM were obtained after 5, 11, and 13 days of administration of the drug. On days 5 and 11 of the treatment, iv injections of 50 mug LHRH were performed and on day 13 an iv injection of saline 0.9% was given. Blood samples were obtained 30 and 60 minutes after each injection. In each sample LH and FSH levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. Melatonin treatment did not cause any significant change in basal or post-stimulation LH and FSH levels either in men or in post-menopausal women. These results do not support previous findings of an insults do not support previous findings of an inhibitory effect of melatonin on gonadotropin secretion, even with the same dose as the one used in this study. Further studies with higher doses of melatonin are needed to clarify the action of this drug on gonadotropin secretion.

  13. Binaural Hearing Ability With Bilateral Bone Conduction Stimulation in Subjects With Normal Hearing: Implications for Bone Conduction Hearing Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitooni, Mehrnaz; Mäki-Torkko, Elina; Stenfelt, Stefan

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate binaural hearing ability in adults with normal hearing when bone conduction (BC) stimulation is bilaterally applied at the bone conduction hearing aid (BCHA) implant position as well as at the audiometric position on the mastoid. The results with BC stimulation are compared with bilateral air conduction (AC) stimulation through earphones. Binaural hearing ability is investigated with tests of spatial release from masking and binaural intelligibility level difference using sentence material, binaural masking level difference with tonal chirp stimulation, and precedence effect using noise stimulus. In all tests, results with bilateral BC stimulation at the BCHA position illustrate an ability to extract binaural cues similar to BC stimulation at the mastoid position. The binaural benefit is overall greater with AC stimulation than BC stimulation at both positions. The binaural benefit for BC stimulation at the mastoid and BCHA position is approximately half in terms of decibels compared with AC stimulation in the speech based tests (spatial release from masking and binaural intelligibility level difference). For binaural masking level difference, the binaural benefit for the two BC positions with chirp signal phase inversion is approximately twice the benefit with inverted phase of the noise. The precedence effect results with BC stimulation at the mastoid and BCHA position are similar for low frequency noise stimulation but differ with high-frequency noise stimulation. The results confirm that binaural hearing processing with bilateral BC stimulation at the mastoid position is also present at the BCHA implant position. This indicates the ability for binaural hearing in patients with good cochlear function when using bilateral BCHAs.

  14. LPS-Enhanced Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion Is Normalized by Resveratrol.

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    Mark K Nøhr

    Full Text Available Low-grade inflammation is seen with obesity and is suggested to be a mediator of insulin resistance. The eliciting factor of low-grade inflammation is unknown but increased permeability of gut bacteria-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS resulting in endotoxemia could be a candidate. Here we test the effect of LPS and the anti-inflammatory compound resveratrol on glucose homeostasis, insulin levels and inflammation. Mice were subcutaneously implanted with osmotic mini pumps infusing either low-dose LPS or saline for 28 days. Half of the mice were treated with resveratrol delivered through the diet. LPS caused increased inflammation of the liver and adipose tissue (epididymal and subcutaneous together with enlarged spleens and increased number of leukocytes in the blood. Resveratrol specifically reduced the inflammatory status in epididymal fat (reduced expression of TNFa and Il1b, whereas the increased macrophage infiltration was unaltered without affecting the other tissues investigated. By LC-MS, we were able to quantitate resveratrol metabolites in epididymal but not subcutaneous adipose tissue. LPS induced insulin resistance as the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion during an oral glucose tolerance test was increased despite similar plasma glucose level resulting in an increase in the insulinogenic index (IGI; delta0-15insulin/delta0-15glucose from 13.73 to 22.40 pmol/mmol (P < 0.001. This aberration in insulin and glucose homeostasis was normalized by resveratrol.Low-dose LPS enhanced the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion without affecting the blood glucose suggesting increased insulin resistance. Resveratrol restored LPS-induced alteration of the insulin secretion and demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects specifically in epididymal adipose tissue possibly due to preferential accumulation of resveratrol metabolites pointing towards a possible important involvement of this tissue for the effects on insulin resistance and insulin secretion.

  15. Cholinergic Modulation of Restraint Stress Induced Neurobehavioral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The involvement of the cholinergic system in restraint stress induced neurobehavioral alterations was investigated in rodents using the hole board, elevated plus maze, the open field and the light and dark box tests. Restraint stress (3h) reduced significantly (p<0.05) the number of entries and time spent in the open arm, ...

  16. Studies on Renin Stimulation in Normal Controls and in Patients with Essential Hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Chang Soon; Choe, Kang Won; Lee, Hong Kyu; Lee, Jung Sang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1978-03-15

    To find out a convenient and reliable method of detecting low renin status, we employed intravenous furosemide injection as a stimulatory maneuver. The results thus obtained were compared with those from the postural stimuli and basal plasma renin activity (PRA) in relation to sodium excretion. Intravenous furosemide test was performed in 66 control subjects and 44 patients with essential hypertension. The results were as follow; 1) Mean PRA in control subjects rose from 2.5+-1.95 ng/ml/hr (basal) to 4.5+-2.51, 5.2+-2.49 and 4.2+-2.44 ng/ml/hr at 1, 2 and 3 hrs after IV injection. One-hour response is more convenient in clinical practice. 2) Postural stimuli by assuming an upright posture for 3 hrs gave rise to considerable increase in PRA (4.0+-2.92 from 2.4+-1.85), but we found it less convenient than stimulation with furosemide. 3) The increase in PRA was much less marked in patients with essential hypertension as a whole (2.9+-2.75). Hyporesponsiveness to furosemide stimuli was found in 34.1%. Of these hyporesponders, a third had a normal basal PRA, indicating the need for this kind stimulatory procedure. 4) Younger age group showed greater renin responsiveness than older age group after furosemide stimuli. Likewise mean age of low renin patients (52.9+-5.38 years old) was significantly higher than that of high and normal renin patients (44.1+-13.78 years old).

  17. Hormone-sensing cells require Wip1 for paracrine stimulation in normal and premalignant mammary epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarulli, Gerard A; De Silva, Duvini; Ho, Victor; Kunasegaran, Kamini; Ghosh, Kakaly; Tan, Bryan C; Bulavin, Dmitry V; Pietersen, Alexandra M

    2013-01-31

    The molecular circuitry of different cell types dictates their normal function as well as their response to oncogene activation. For instance, mice lacking the Wip1 phosphatase (also known as PPM1D; protein phosphatase magnesium-dependent 1D) have a delay in HER2/neu (human epidermal growth factor 2), but not Wnt1-induced mammary tumor formation. This suggests a cell type-specific reliance on Wip1 for tumorigenesis, because alveolar progenitor cells are the likely target for transformation in the MMTV(mouse mammary tumor virus)-neu but not MMTV-wnt1 breast cancer model. In this study, we used the Wip1-knockout mouse to identify the cell types that are dependent on Wip1 expression and therefore may be involved in the early stages of HER2/neu-induced tumorigenesis. We found that alveolar development during pregnancy was reduced in Wip1-knockout mice; however, this was not attributable to changes in alveolar cells themselves. Unexpectedly, Wip1 allows steroid hormone-receptor-positive cells but not alveolar progenitors to activate STAT5 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 5) in the virgin state. In the absence of Wip1, hormone-receptor-positive cells have significantly reduced transcription of RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand) and IGF2 (insulin-like growth factor 2), paracrine stimulators of alveolar development. In the MMTV-neu model, HER2/neu activates STAT5 in alveolar progenitor cells independent of Wip1, but HER2/neu does not override the defect in STAT5 activation in Wip1-deficient hormone-sensing cells, and paracrine stimulation remains attenuated. Moreover, ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) activation by HER2/neu in hormone-sensing cells is also Wip1 dependent. We identified Wip1 as a potentiator of prolactin and HER2/neu signaling strictly in the molecular context of hormone-sensing cells. Furthermore, our findings highlight that hormone-sensing cells convert not only estrogen and progesterone but also

  18. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and leptin are associated with stress-induced interleukin-6 cytokine expression ex vivo in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Jung; Stewart, Jennifer K; Shibata, Yoshimi; Slusher, Aaron L; Acevedo, Edmund O

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is associated with enhanced inflammation and mental stress, but limited information has addressed the potential additive effect of psychological stress on obesity-associated inflammation. This study examined whether obese subjects would elicit a greater host immune response (IL-6 mRNA and cytokine) to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to mental stress. Blood samples for LPS-stimulated IL-6 mRNA and cytokine were collected prior to and following mental stress. Results showed that obese subjects elicited a greater LPS-induced IL-6 along with its mRNA expression following mental stress compared to normal-weight subjects. Stress-induced IL-6 cytokine response to LPS was correlated with the baseline levels of plasma LPS binding protein (LBP) and leptin. These findings are consistent with the idea that endogenous inflammatory agents (e.g., LBP and leptin), often elevated with obesity, enhance inflammatory responses to psychological stress. © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  19. Shear stress induced stimulation of mammalian cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintire, L. V.; Frangos, J. A.; Eskin, S. G.

    1988-01-01

    A flow apparatus was developed for the study of the metabolic response of anchorage dependent cells to a wide range of steady and pulsatile shear stresses under well controlled conditions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers were subjected to steady shear stresses of up to 24 dynes/sq cm, and the production of prostacyclin was determined. The onset of flow led to a burst in prostacyclin production which decayed to a long term steady state rate (SSR). The SSR of cells exposed to flow was greater than the basal release level, and increased linearly with increasing shear stress. It is demonstrated that shear stresses in certain ranges may not be detrimental to mammalian cell metabolism. In fact, throughout the range of shear stresses studied, metabolite production is maximized by maximizing shear stress.

  20. The Role of Stress-Induced Ligands in Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Seyda Seydel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells which are a component of the immune system are capable of killing tumor cells and virally infected cells. The activation of NK cells is regulated by the balance of activating and inhibitory surface receptors. NKG2D is one of the these activating receptors. The ligands of NKG2D are the human class I like molecules MICA and MICB which are encoded within the human MHC. MICA and MICB are not expressed on normal cells but up-regulated under condition of stress such as heat schock and viral infection. Therefore, NKG2D ligands are defined as stress-induced antigens. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2011; 20(1.000: 1-19

  1. Hochu-ekki-to Treatment Improves Reproductive and Immune Modulation in the Stress-Induced Rat Model of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunkuk Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The traditional herbal medicine, Hochu-ekki-to, has been shown to have preventive effects on viral infection and stress. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical effects of Hochu-ekki-to on two stress-related rat models of polycystic ovarian syndrome. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control and treatment groups, the latter of which were subjected to stress induced by exposure to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH or cold temperatures. After these stress inductions, rats were orally treated with dissolved Hochu-ekki-to once per day for 7 days. Rats subjected to the two different stressors exhibited upregulation of steroid hormone receptors (in ovaries and reproductive hormones (in blood, and consequent stimulation of abnormal follicle development accompanied by elevation of Hsp 90 expression (in ovaries. Treatment with Hochu-ekki-to for 7 days after stress induction increased immune functions, reduced the stress-induced activation of Hsp 90, and normalized the levels of the tested steroid hormone receptors and reproductive hormones. Our findings suggest that stress stimulations may promote the activation of Hsp 90 via the dysregulation of steroid hormone receptors and reproductive hormones, but that post-stress treatment with Hochu-ekki-to improves reproductive and immune functions in the ovaries of stressed rats.

  2. STRESS INDUCED OBESITY: LESSONS FROM RODENT MODELS OF STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Robert Patterson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Stress is defined as the behavioral and physiological responses generated in the face of, or in anticipation of, a perceived threat. The stress response involves activation of the sympathetic nervous system and recruitment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. When an organism encounters a stressor (social, physical, etc., these endogenous stress systems are stimulated in order to generate a fight-or-flight response, and manage the stressful situation. As such, an organism is forced to liberate energy resources in attempt to meet the energetic demands posed by the stressor. A change in the energy homeostatic balance is thus required to exploit an appropriate resource and deliver useable energy to the target muscles and tissues involved in the stress response. Acutely, this change in energy homeostasis and the liberation of energy is considered advantageous, as it is required for the survival of the organism. However, when an organism is subjected to a prolonged stressor, as is the case during chronic stress, a continuous irregularity in energy homeostasis is considered detrimental and may lead to the development of metabolic disturbances such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes mellitus and obesity. This concept has been studied extensively using animal models, and the neurobiological underpinnings of stress induced metabolic disorders are beginning to surface. However, different animal models of stress continue to produce divergent metabolic phenotypes wherein some animals become anorexic and loose body mass while others increase food intake and body mass and become vulnerable to the development of metabolic disturbances. It remains unclear exactly what factors associated with stress models can be used to predict the metabolic outcome of the organism. This review will explore a variety of rodent stress models and discuss the elements that influence the metabolic outcome in order to further our understanding of stress-induced

  3. Stress induced obesity: lessons from rodent models of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Zachary R; Abizaid, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Stress was once defined as the non-specific result of the body to any demand or challenge to homeostasis. A more current view of stress is the behavioral and physiological responses generated in the face of, or in anticipation of, a perceived threat. The stress response involves activation of the sympathetic nervous system and recruitment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. When an organism encounters a stressor (social, physical, etc.), these endogenous stress systems are stimulated in order to generate a fight-or-flight response, and manage the stressful situation. As such, an organism is forced to liberate energy resources in attempt to meet the energetic demands posed by the stressor. A change in the energy homeostatic balance is thus required to exploit an appropriate resource and deliver useable energy to the target muscles and tissues involved in the stress response. Acutely, this change in energy homeostasis and the liberation of energy is considered advantageous, as it is required for the survival of the organism. However, when an organism is subjected to a prolonged stressor, as is the case during chronic stress, a continuous irregularity in energy homeostasis is considered detrimental and may lead to the development of metabolic disturbances such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes mellitus and obesity. This concept has been studied extensively using animal models, and the neurobiological underpinnings of stress induced metabolic disorders are beginning to surface. However, different animal models of stress continue to produce divergent metabolic phenotypes wherein some animals become anorexic and lose body mass while others increase food intake and body mass and become vulnerable to the development of metabolic disturbances. It remains unclear exactly what factors associated with stress models can be used to predict the metabolic outcome of the organism. This review will explore a variety of rodent stress models and discuss the

  4. Frequency Matters: Beta Band Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Induces Parkinsonian-like Blink Abnormalities in Normal Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminer, Jaime; Thakur, Pratibha; Evinger, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The synchronized beta band oscillations in the basal ganglia-cortical networks in Parkinson's disease (PD) may be responsible for PD motor symptoms or an epiphenomenon of dopamine loss. We investigated the causal role of beta band activity in PD motor symptoms by testing the effects of beta frequency subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) on blink reflex excitability, amplitude, and plasticity in normal rats. Delivering 16 Hz STN DBS produced the same increase in blink reflex excitability and impairment in blink reflex plasticity in normal rats as occurs in rats with 6-OHDA lesions and PD patients. These deficits were not an artifact of STN DBS because when these normal rats received 130 Hz STN DBS, their blink characteristics were the same as without STN DBS. To demonstrate the blink reflex disturbances with 16 Hz STN DBS were frequency specific, we tested the same rats with 7 Hz STN DBS, a theta band frequency typical of dystonia. In contrast to beta stimulation, 7 Hz DBS exaggerated blink reflex plasticity as occurs in focal dystonia. Thus, without destroying dopamine neurons or blocking dopamine receptors, frequency specific STN DBS can be used to create PD- or dystonic-like symptoms in a normal rat. PMID:25146113

  5. Frequency matters: beta-band subthalamic nucleus deep-brain stimulation induces Parkinsonian-like blink abnormalities in normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminer, Jaime; Thakur, Pratibha; Evinger, Craig

    2014-10-01

    The synchronized beta-band oscillations in the basal ganglia-cortical networks in Parkinson's disease (PD) may be responsible for PD motor symptoms or an epiphenomenon of dopamine loss. We investigated the causal role of beta-band activity in PD motor symptoms by testing the effects of beta-frequency subthalamic nucleus deep-brain stimulation (STN DBS) on the blink reflex excitability, amplitude, and plasticity in normal rats. Delivering 16 Hz STN DBS produced the same increase in blink reflex excitability and impairment in blink reflex plasticity in normal rats as occurs in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine lesions and patients with PD. These deficits were not an artifact of STN DBS because, when these normal rats received 130 Hz STN DBS, their blink characteristics were the same as without STN DBS. To demonstrate that the blink reflex disturbances with 16 Hz STN DBS were frequency specific, we tested the same rats with 7 Hz STN DBS, a theta-band frequency typical of dystonia. In contrast to beta stimulation, 7 Hz STN DBS exaggerated the blink reflex plasticity as occurs in focal dystonia. Thus, without destroying dopamine neurons or blocking dopamine receptors, frequency-specific STN DBS can be used to create PD-like or dystonic-like symptoms in a normal rat. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Occipital Nerve Field Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Normalizes Imbalance Between Pain Detecting and Pain Inhibitory Pathways in Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2017-04-01

    Occipital nerve field (OCF) stimulation with subcutaneously implanted electrodes is used to treat headaches, more generalized pain, and even failed back surgery syndrome via unknown mechanisms. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can predict the efficacy of implanted electrodes. The purpose of this study is to unravel the neural mechanisms involved in global pain suppression, mediated by occipital nerve field stimulation, within the realm of fibromyalgia. Nineteen patients with fibromyalgia underwent a placebo-controlled OCF tDCS. Electroencephalograms were recorded at baseline after active and sham stimulation. In comparison with healthy controls, patients with fibromyalgia demonstrate increased dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, increased premotor/dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity, and an imbalance between pain-detecting dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and pain-suppressing pregenual anterior cingulate cortex activity, which is normalized after active tDCS but not sham stimulation associated with increased pregenual anterior cingulate cortex activation. The imbalance improvement between the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex is related to clinical changes. An imbalance assumes these areas communicate and, indeed, abnormal functional connectivity between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and pregenual anterior cingulate cortex is noted to be caused by a dysfunctional effective connectivity from the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex to the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, which improves and normalizes after real tDCS but not sham tDCS. In conclusion, OCF tDCS exerts its effect via activation of the descending pain inhibitory pathway and de-activation of the salience network, both of which are abnormal in fibromyalgia.

  7. Dynamic microglial alterations underlie stress-induced depressive-like behavior and suppressed neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreisel, T; Frank, M G; Licht, T; Reshef, R; Ben-Menachem-Zidon, O; Baratta, M V; Maier, S F; Yirmiya, R

    2014-06-01

    The limited success in understanding the pathophysiology of major depression may result from excessive focus on the dysfunctioning of neurons, as compared with other types of brain cells. Therefore, we examined the role of dynamic alterations in microglia activation status in the development of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS)-induced depressive-like condition in rodents. We report that following an initial period (2-3 days) of stress-induced microglial proliferation and activation, some microglia underwent apoptosis, leading to reductions in their numbers within the hippocampus, but not in other brain regions, following 5 weeks of CUS exposure. At that time, microglia displayed reduced expression of activation markers as well as dystrophic morphology. Blockade of the initial stress-induced microglial activation by minocycline or by transgenic interleukin-1 receptor antagonist overexpression rescued the subsequent microglial apoptosis and decline, as well as the CUS-induced depressive-like behavior and suppressed neurogenesis. Similarly, the antidepressant drug imipramine blocked the initial stress-induced microglial activation as well as the CUS-induced microglial decline and depressive-like behavior. Treatment of CUS-exposed mice with either endotoxin, macrophage colony-stimulating factor or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, all of which stimulated hippocampal microglial proliferation, partially or completely reversed the depressive-like behavior and dramatically increased hippocampal neurogenesis, whereas treatment with imipramine or minocycline had minimal or no anti-depressive effects, respectively, in these mice. These findings provide direct causal evidence that disturbances in microglial functioning has an etiological role in chronic stress-induced depression, suggesting that microglia stimulators could serve as fast-acting anti-depressants in some forms of depressive and stress-related conditions.

  8. STIMULATION BY HYDROCHLORIC ACID AND BY THE NORMAL ALIPHATIC ACIDS IN THE SUNFISH EUPOMOTIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, James B.

    1932-01-01

    1. The reaction of the sunfish, Eupomotis gibbosus, to different concentrations of hydrochloric acid and of the first six members of the N aliphatic acids has been studied. 2. The stimulating efficiency of hydrochloric acid may best be related to the concentration of hydrogen ions produced by that acid. 3. The stimulating efficiency of the N aliphatic acids may best be correlated with the non-polar nature of a portion of the molecule, but it is necessary to consider the higher potential of the polar group of formic acid to account satisfactorily for its position in the series. 4. When equally effective concentrations of the N aliphatic acids are compared, formic acid is more effective at lower concentrations than at higher. 5. Per cent variation in response appears to be independent of the chemical environment to which the animal responded. PMID:19872671

  9. The Impact of Simultaneously Applying Normal Stress and Vibrotactile Stimulation for Feedback of Exteroceptive Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza Motamedi, M; Otis, Martin; Duchaine, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    Commercially available prosthetic hands do not convey any tactile information, forcing amputees to rely solely on visual attention. A promising solution to this problem is haptics, which could lead to new prostheses in which tactile information is conveyed between the amputee and the artificial limb. However, the haptic feedback must be optimized so that amputees can use it effectively; and although several studies have examined how specific haptic feedback systems can transmit certain types of tactile information, there has not yet been much research on the effects of superposing two or more types of feedback at the same location, which might prove to be more effective than using a single type of feedback alone. This paper investigates how the simultaneous application of two different types of haptic feedback-vibration and normal stress-impacts the human sensory perception of each separate feedback type. These stimuli were applied to glabrous skin on the forearms of 14 participants. Our experiments tested whether participants experienced more accurate sensory perception, compared to vibration or normal stress alone, when vibration was applied at the same time as the normal stress, at either the same location, or at a different location 6 cm away. Results indicate that although participants' perception of the normal stress diminished when vibration was applied at the same location, the same combination improved their perception of the vibration. Apparently, vibration has a negative impact upon the ability to perceive normal stress, whether applied at the same or a different location; whereas the opposite is true for the effect of normal stress upon the perception of vibration.

  10. Effect of tone-based sound stimulation on balance performance of normal subjects: preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnacco, Guido; Klotzek, Adam S; Carrick, Frederick R; Wright, Cameron H G; Oggero, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Sound is known to affect the human brain, hence sound or music therapy is sometimes used to improve a subject's physicaland mental health. In this study, the effects sound stimulation has on balance were investigated by means of computerizeddynamic posturography tests performed with eyes closed on an unstable surface using a CAPS® system, exceeding theInternational Society for Posture and Gait Research (ISPGR) recommended metrological performance standards. Subjectswere tested without listening to any music (baseline), listening to “pure music”, and listening to the same music with differenttones embedded into it (one for each key). We found that different subjects react differently to different tones. Music alonedid not have a statistically significant effect on balance compared to the baseline, but the “best” tone significantly improvedbalance compared to the baseline or the “pure music” conditions. Furthermore, the “worst” tone reduced the balancecompared to “pure music”, but the reduction was not statistically significant relative to the baseline. The results thereforeindicate that, at least relative to balance performance, the tone-based sound stimulation we investigated is effective andinherently safe, but that tone selection depends on the individual subject.

  11. Growth Hormone Is Secreted by Normal Breast Epithelium upon Progesterone Stimulation and Increases Proliferation of Stem/Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Lombardi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using in vitro and in vivo experimental systems and in situ analysis, we show that growth hormone (GH is secreted locally by normal human mammary epithelial cells upon progesterone stimulation. GH increases proliferation of a subset of cells that express growth hormone receptor (GHR and have functional properties of stem and early progenitor cells. In 72% of ductal carcinoma in situ lesions, an expansion of the cell population that expresses GHR was observed, suggesting that GH signaling may contribute to breast cancer development.

  12. Ghrelin stimulates gastric emptying and hunger in normal-weight humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, F; Edholm, T; Schmidt, P T

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: Ghrelin is produced primarily by enteroendocrine cells in the gastric mucosa and increases gastric emptying in patients with gastroparesis. MAIN OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of ghrelin on gastric emptying, appetite, and postprandial hormone secretion...... in normal volunteers. DESIGN: This was a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. SUBJECTS: Subjects included normal human volunteers and patients with GH deficiency. INTERVENTION: Intervention included saline or ghrelin (10 pmol/kg.min) infusion for 180 min after intake of a radioactively labeled...... omelette (310 kcal) or GH substitution in GH-deficient patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Measures consisted of gastric empty-ing parameters and postprandial plasma levels of ghrelin, cholecystokinin, glucagon-like peptide-1, peptide YY, and motilin. RESULTS: The emptying rate was significantly faster...

  13. Normal retina releases a diffusible factor stimulating cone survival in the retinal degeneration mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohand-Said, Saddek; Deudon-Combe, Alain; Hicks, David; Simonutti, Manuel; Forster, Valérie; Fintz, Anne-Claire; Léveillard, Thierry; Dreyfus, Henri; Sahel, José-Alain

    1998-01-01

    The role of cellular interactions in the mechanism of secondary cone photoreceptor degeneration in inherited retinal degenerations in which the mutation specifically affects rod photoreceptors was studied. We developed an organ culture model of whole retinas from 5-week-old mice carrying the retinal degeneration mutation, which at this age contain few remaining rods and numerous surviving cones cocultured with primary cultures of mixed cells from postnatal day 8 normal-sighted mice (C57BL/6) retinas or retinal explants from normal (C57BL/6) or dystrophic (C3H/He) 5-week-old mice. After 7 days, the numbers of residual cone photoreceptors were quantified after specific peanut lectin or anti-arrestin antibody labeling by using an unbiased stereological approach. Examination of organ cultured retinas revealed significantly greater numbers of surviving cones (15–20%) if cultured in the presence of retinas containing normal rods as compared with controls or cocultures with rod-deprived retinas. These data indicate the existence of a diffusible trophic factor released from retinas containing rod cells and acting on retinas in which only cones are present. Because cones are responsible for high acuity and color vision, such data could have important implications not only for eventual therapeutic approaches to human retinal degenerations but also to define interactions between retinal photoreceptor types. PMID:9653191

  14. Mechanisms for greater insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in normal and insulin-resistant skeletal muscle after acute exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced skeletal muscle and whole body insulin sensitivity can persist for up to 24–48 h after one exercise session. This review focuses on potential mechanisms for greater postexercise and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU) by muscle in individuals with normal or reduced insulin sensitivity. A model is proposed for the processes underlying this improvement; i.e., triggers initiate events that activate subsequent memory elements, which store information that is relayed to mediators, which translate memory into action by controlling an end effector that directly executes increased insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Several candidates are potential triggers or memory elements, but none have been conclusively verified. Regarding potential mediators in both normal and insulin-resistant individuals, elevated postexercise ISGU with a physiological insulin dose coincides with greater Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) phosphorylation without improved proximal insulin signaling at steps from insulin receptor binding to Akt activity. Causality remains to be established between greater AS160 phosphorylation and improved ISGU. The end effector for normal individuals is increased GLUT4 translocation, but this remains untested for insulin-resistant individuals postexercise. Following exercise, insulin-resistant individuals can attain ISGU values similar to nonexercising healthy controls, but after a comparable exercise protocol performed by both groups, ISGU for the insulin-resistant group has been consistently reported to be below postexercise values for the healthy group. Further research is required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the improved postexercise ISGU in individuals with normal or subnormal insulin sensitivity and to explain the disparity between these groups after similar exercise. PMID:26487009

  15. Applications of calcium electroporation to effective apoptosis induction in fibrosarcoma cells and stimulation of normal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielichowska, Anna; Daczewska, Małgorzata; Saczko, Jolanta; Michel, Olga; Kulbacka, Julita

    2016-06-01

    The electroporation (EP) supports various types of anticancer therapies by the selective transport of cytostatics. Increase in intracellular calcium level by EP may be a new approach to fibrosarcoma treatment. Calcium is one of the most important factors of cell proliferation, differentiation and cell death (apoptosis or necrosis). Calcium level balanced by electroporation can cause different effects on normal and pathological cells. The efficiency and safety of electroporation combined with Ca(2+) ions were examined in our study. The two muscle cell lines were used: normal rat skeletal muscle cells - L6 and cancer muscle cells - Wehi-164 (fibrosarcoma). Two CaCl2 concentrations were tested: 0.5 mM and 5 mM combined with EP parameters: 1000 V/cm, 1200 V/cm, and 1500 V/cm. The results show that EP supported by Ca(2+) is cytotoxic for Wehi-164 cells and simultaneously safe for normal muscle cells. The main type of cell death - apoptosis - was confirmed by Tunnel and Annexin V/PI assay. Additionally, sPLA2 pro-tumorigenic influence was proved by immunocytochemistry. Moreover, EP with 0.5 mM of Ca(2+) slightly stimulates the normal muscle cells - L6 to increase proliferation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Stress-induced enhancement of mouse amygdalar synaptic plasticity depends on glucocorticoid and ß-adrenergic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Angela Sarabdjitsingh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucocorticoid hormones, in interaction with noradrenaline, enable the consolidation of emotionally arousing and stressful experiences in rodents and humans. Such interaction is thought to occur at least partly in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA which is crucially involved in emotional memory formation. Extensive evidence points to long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP as a mechanism contributing to memory formation. Here we determined in adolescent C57/Bl6 mice the effects of stress on LTP in the LA-BLA pathway and the specific roles of corticosteroid and β-adrenergic receptor activation in this process. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exposure to 20 min of restraint stress (compared to control treatment prior to slice preparation enhanced subsequent LTP induction in vitro, without affecting baseline fEPSP responses. The role of glucocorticoid receptors, mineralocorticoid receptors and β2-adrenoceptors in the effects of stress was studied by treating mice with the antagonists mifepristone, spironolactone or propranolol respectively (or the corresponding vehicles prior to stress or control treatment. In undisturbed controls, mifepristone and propranolol administration in vivo did not influence LTP induced in vitro. By contrast, spironolactone caused a gradually attenuating form of LTP, both in unstressed and stressed mice. Mifepristone treatment prior to stress strongly reduced the ability to induce LTP in vitro. Propranolol normalized the stress-induced enhancement of LTP to control levels during the first 10 min after high frequency stimulation, after which synaptic responses further declined. CONCLUSIONS: Acute stress changes BLA electrical properties such that subsequent LTP induction is facilitated. Both β-adrenergic and glucocorticoid receptors are involved in the development of these changes. Mineralocorticoid receptors are important for the maintenance of LTP in the BLA, irrespective of stress-induced changes in the

  17. Elevation of extracellular adenosine enhances haemopoiesis-stimulating effects of G-CSF in normal and gamma-irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, M.; Pospisil, M.; Netikiva, J.; Hola, J. [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Czech Republic)

    1997-03-01

    Effects of combined treatment with drugs elevating extracellular adenosine (dipyridamole /DP/, inhibiting the extracellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate /AMP/, an adenosine pro-drug), and G-CSF (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) on haemopoiesis of normal and gamma-irradiated mice were ascertained. The agents were administered alone or in combination in a 4-day regimen. In normal, unirradiated animals, the haematological endpoints were determined 24 hours after the completion of the treatment. It was shown that the effects of G-CSF, i.e., increases in peripheral blood neutrophils, granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and morphologically recognizable granulocyte cells in femoral marrow and a decrease in the marrow erythroid cells, can be enhanced by the combination of DP plus AMP administrated 30 minutes before G-CSF. Furthermore, it was found that the stimulatory action of DP plus AMP was expressed particularly at lower doses of G-CSF (1.5, 3, and 4.5 {mu}g/d). In experiments with irradiated mice, when the 4-day therapeutic regimen was applied on days 3 to 6 following irradiation with the dose of 4 Gy, analogical stimulation of granulopoiesis was observed in the recovery phase on days 14 and 18 after irradiation. As example, see Fig. 1 for counts of granulocyte cells in femoral bone marrow. (authors)

  18. INTRARENAL GHRELIN INFUSION STIMULATES DISTAL NEPHRON-DEPENDENT SODIUM REABSORPTION IN NORMAL RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, Brandon A.; Howell, Nancy L.; Gray, Jasmine T.; Keller, Susanna R.; Nass, Ralf M.; Padia, Shetal H.

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide hormone that exerts powerful orexigenic effects. Ghrelin receptor expression has been reported in the kidney, but ghrelin’s role in the kidney is unknown. The present studies confirmed ghrelin receptor mRNA expression in the kidneys of normal Sprague-Dawley rats (N=6) using RT-PCR and sequencing of the 588-bp PCR product. To test intrarenal ghrelin action, uninephrectomized rats received 3 cumulative 1 h renal interstitial (RI) infusions of 5% dextrose in wa...

  19. Posturography with virtual reality stimulations in normal young adults with no balance complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiringhelli, Rosângela; Ganança, Cristina Freitas

    2011-09-01

    To analyze the findings of posturography with virtual reality stimuli carried out in young healthy adults with no otoneurological complaints, based on the parameters center of pressure, limit of stability and sway speed for different visual stimuli, and regarding differences between female and male genders. Participants were 50 healthy individuals of both genders (50% female and 50% male) with ages ranging from 18 to 25 years (mean age 21.30 years), with no complaints regarding body balance, and with vestibular outcomes assessed through digital vectonistagmography within normal limits. Posturography was composed of 11 visual stimuli and determined the limit of stability area (LOS), the ellipse area, and the sway speed in ten sensorial conditions. Results were calculated for the studied age range and analyzed according to the values for each stimulus, with the aim to obtain normality parameters. The average values obtained in posturography regarding limit of stability, ellipse area and sway speed for stimuli with viso-vestibular interaction presented significant differences between genders, and, in all cases, women obtained lower values than men. The findings of posturography with virtual reality stimuli in healthy young adults evidence that the parameters center of pressure, limit of stability and sway speed present differences between genders and, therefore, must be considered separately.

  20. Intrarenal ghrelin infusion stimulates distal nephron-dependent sodium reabsorption in normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Brandon A; Howell, Nancy L; Gray, Jasmine T; Keller, Susanna R; Nass, Ralf M; Padia, Shetal H

    2011-03-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide hormone that exerts powerful orexigenic effects. Ghrelin receptor expression has been reported in the kidney, but the role of ghrelin in the kidney is unknown. The present studies confirmed ghrelin receptor mRNA expression in the kidneys of normal Sprague Dawley rats (n=6) using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of the 588-bp PCR product. To test intrarenal ghrelin action, uninephrectomized rats received 3 cumulative 1-hour renal interstitial (RI) infusions of 5% dextrose in water (vehicle, n=21), ghrelin (n=10), ghrelin plus specific ghrelin receptor antagonist [D-Lys-3]-GHRP-6 (n=24), or [D-Lys-3]-GHRP-6 alone (n=32). Mean arterial pressure (MAP), urine sodium excretion rate (U(Na)V), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), fractional excretion of sodium (FE(Na)), and fractional excretion of lithium (FE(Li)) were calculated for each period. RI ghrelin infusion significantly decreased U(Na)V to 86 ± 4.9% (PGhrelin also significantly decreased FE(Na) to 68 ± 11% (Pghrelin infusions in the presence of [D-Lys-3]-GHRP-6 failed to permit reductions in U(Na)V or FE(Na). Following [D-Lys-3]-GHRP-6 infusion alone, U(Na)V increased from 0.06 ± 0.01 to 0.18 ± 0.03 μmol/min (Pghrelin-ghrelin receptor system, which, on activation, significantly increases Na(+) reabsorption at the level of the distal nephron.

  1. Colchicine-induced modulation of collagenase in human skin fibroblast cultures. I. Stimulation of enzyme synthesis in normal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, E A; Valle, K J

    1982-12-01

    Microtubule-active agents affect the secretion of a variety of proteins, including collagenase. To gain insight into the mechanisms involved in this process, we examined the effects of colchicine on the synthesis, secretion, and activity of human skin collagenase. When added to monolayer cultures of human skin fibroblasts, 10(-6) M colchicine produced a mean 3-fold increase in trypsin-activatable collagenase in the culture medium. Stimulation was not observed with lumicolchicine. The enhanced accumulation of collagenase was dose-dependent with 10(-9), 10(-8), 10(-7), and 10(-6) M colchicine giving collagenase activities/mg protein that were 100 +/- 6%, 165 +/- 20%, 186 +/- 34%, and 297 +/- 62% of control, respectively. Although the effect on collagenase was seen under conditions independent of cellular growth (i.e., in serum-free medium), maximum stimulation occurred in subconfluent cultures. The colchicine-induced increase in activity was paralleled by an increase in immunoreactive enzyme protein, suggesting stimulation of enzyme synthesis. The catalytic efficiency of the enzyme (activity per unit immunoreactive protein) was unchanged, however, indicating that a structurally normal enzyme was being synthesized. To examine the process in more detail, the biosynthesis of 3H-labeled collagenase was quantitated in these cultures by specific immunoprecipitation. Although 10(-6) M colchicine produced no increase in total protein synthesis, an increased rate of collagenase synthesis was seen after only 1.5 hr. These data suggest that colchicine has a specific effect on the synthesis of collagenase and may be a useful probe for studying its regulation.

  2. Recombinant human ligand for MPL, megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF), stimulates thrombopoiesis in vivo in normal and myelosuppressed baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R G; Winkler, A; Myerson, D; Briddell, R A; Knitter, G H; McNiece, I K; Hunt, P

    1996-11-01

    Megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF) is a ligand for c-mpl and a member of the hematopoietic growth factor superfamily. Recombinant murine MGDF specifically stimulates thrombopoiesis in mice. Recombinant human (rHu) MGDF stimulates megakaryocytic differentiation of baboon CD34+ marrow cells in vitro. Therefore, we determined the in vivo biological effects of rHuMGDF administered to normal baboons in the absence and presence of myelosuppression with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). rHuMGDF was administered to normal baboons as a single s.c. injection at doses of 1, 10, 25 and 50 micrograms/kg/day for 10 days and, as a control, heat-inactivated MGDF was administered at a dose of 10 micrograms/kg/day. Platelet counts were markedly increased in all animals administered native rHuMGDF but not in animals given heat-inactivated rHuMGDF. Platelet counts began to increase between three and six days after starting rHuMGDF administration and the maximum average increases were 1.7-, 3.4-, 5.1- and 4.0-fold above baseline in animals administered 1, 10, 25 and 50 micrograms/kg/day, respectively. Maximum platelet counts were reached between 7 and 10 days after starting rHuMGDF and maintained for four days after the last dose. Thereafter, platelet counts decreased, reaching stable pretreatment values between 11 and 14 days after the last dose of rHuMGDF. No changes in red cell mass, peripheral blood white blood cell counts or differentials were observed during rHuMGDF treatment. For animals administered 10, 25 and 50 micrograms/kg/day of rHuMGDF, megakaryocytes increased more than threefold in marrow, were markedly enlarged, and had increased numbers of lobes. Overall marrow cellularity remained unchanged, as did red cell and white cell morphology. No marrow fibrosis was detected. Progenitor cells were not increased in marrow but did increase modestly in the peripheral blood, associated with increased numbers of CD34+ cells in the circulation. Following a single dose of 5-FU

  3. Modified Aloe Polysaccharide Restores Chronic Stress-Induced Immunosuppression in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjoo; Im, Sun-A; Kim, Jiyeon; Lee, Sungwon; Kwon, Junghak; Lee, Heetae; Kong, Hyunseok; Song, Youngcheon; Shin, Eunju; Do, Seon-Gil; Lee, Chong-Kil; Kim, Kyungjae

    2016-09-30

    Chronic stress generally experienced in our daily lives; is known to augment disease vulnerability by suppressing the host immune system. In the present study; the effect of modified Aloe polysaccharide (MAP) on chronic stress-induced immunosuppression was studied; this Aloe compound was characterized in our earlier study. Mice were orally administered with MAP for 24 days and exposed to electric foot shock (EFS; duration; 3 min; interval; 10 s; intensity; 2 mA) for 17 days. The stress-related immunosuppression and restorative effect of MAP were then analyzed by measuring various immunological parameters. MAP treatment alleviated lymphoid atrophy and body weight loss. The numbers of lymphocyte subsets were significantly normalized in MAP-treated mice. Oral administration of MAP also restored the proliferative activities of lymphocytes; ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell proliferation; antibody production; and the cell killing activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In summary; oral administration of MAP ameliorated chronic EFS stress-induced immunosuppression.

  4. The burden of normality: from 'chronically ill' to 'symptom free'. New ethical challenges for deep brain stimulation postoperative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Frederic

    2012-07-01

    Although an invasive medical intervention, Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) has been regarded as an efficient and safe treatment of Parkinson's disease for the last 20 years. In terms of clinical ethics, it is worth asking whether the use of DBS may have unanticipated negative effects similar to those associated with other types of psychosurgery. Clinical studies of epileptic patients who have undergone an anterior temporal lobectomy have identified a range of side effects and complications in a number of domains: psychological, behavioural, affective and social. In many cases, patients express difficulty adjusting from being chronically ill to their new status as 'treated' or 'seizure free'. This postoperative response adjustment has been described in the literature on epilepsy as the 'Burden of Normality' (BoN) syndrome. Most of the discussion about DBS postoperative changes to self is focused on abnormal side effects caused by the intervention (ie, hypersexuality, hypomania, etc). By contrast, relatively little attention is paid to the idea that successfully 'treated' individuals might experience difficulties in adjusting to becoming 'normal'. The purpose of this paper is (1) to articulate the postoperative DBS psychosocial adjustment process in terms of the BoN syndrome, (2) to address whether the BoN syndrome illustrates that DBS treatment poses a threat to the patient's identity, and (3) to examine whether the current framework for rehabilitation after DBS procedures should be updated and take into account the BoN syndrome as a postoperative self-change response.

  5. Stress-induced enhancement of leukocyte trafficking into sites of surgery or immune activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Kavitha; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.

    2005-04-01

    Effective immunoprotection requires rapid recruitment of leukocytes into sites of surgery, wounding, infection, or vaccination. In contrast to immunosuppressive chronic stressors, short-term acute stressors have immunoenhancing effects. Here, we quantify leukocyte infiltration within a surgical sponge to elucidate the kinetics, magnitude, subpopulation, and chemoattractant specificity of an acute stress-induced increase in leukocyte trafficking to a site of immune activation. Mice acutely stressed before sponge implantation showed 200-300% higher neutrophil, macrophage, natural killer cell, and T cell infiltration than did nonstressed animals. We also quantified the effects of acute stress on lymphotactin- (LTN; a predominantly lymphocyte-specific chemokine), and TNF-- (a proinflammatory cytokine) stimulated leukocyte infiltration. An additional stress-induced increase in infiltration was observed for neutrophils, in response to TNF-, macrophages, in response to TNF- and LTN, and natural killer cells and T cells in response to LTN. These results show that acute stress initially increases trafficking of all major leukocyte subpopulations to a site of immune activation. Tissue damage-, antigen-, or pathogen-driven chemoattractants subsequently determine which subpopulations are recruited more vigorously. Such stress-induced increases in leukocyte trafficking may enhance immunoprotection during surgery, vaccination, or infection, but may also exacerbate immunopathology during inflammatory (cardiovascular disease or gingivitis) or autoimmune (psoriasis, arthritis, or multiple sclerosis) diseases. chemokine | psychophysiological stress | surgical sponge | wound healing | lymphotactin

  6. Possible Biomarkers of Chronic Stress Induced Exhaustion - A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallensten, Johanna; Åsberg, Marie; Nygren, Åke; Szulkin, Robert; Wallén, Håkan; Mobarrez, Fariborz; Nager, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) have previously been suggested to be potential biomarkers for chronic stress induced exhaustion. The knowledge about VEGF has increased during the last decades and supports the contention that VEGF plays an important role in stress and depression. There is scarce knowledge on the possible relationship of EGF and MCP-1 in chronic stress and depression. This study further examines the role of VEGF, EGF and MCP-1 in women with chronic stress induced exhaustion and healthy women during a follow-up period of two years. Blood samples were collected from 105 women with chronic stress induced exhaustion on at least 50% sick leave for at least three months, at inclusion (T0), after 12 months (T12) and after 24 months (T24). Blood samples were collected at inclusion (T0) in 116 physically and psychiatrically healthy women. The plasma levels of VEGF, EGF and MCP-1 were analyzed using Biochip Array Technology. Women with chronic stress induced exhaustion had significantly higher plasma levels of VEGF and EGF compared to healthy women at baseline, T12 and at T24. There was no significant difference in plasma levels of MCP-1. Plasma levels of VEGF and EGF decreased significantly in women with chronic stress induced exhaustion during the two years follow-up. The replicated findings of elevated levels of VEGF and EGF in women with chronic stress induced exhaustion and decreasing plasma levels of VEGF and EGF during the two years follow-up add important knowledge to the pathophysiology of chronic stress induced exhaustion.

  7. Alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists and stress-induced analgesia in rats: influence of stressors and methods of analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kock, M; Meert, T F

    1997-09-01

    The present experiments were designed to investigate the role of housing and handling conditions during testing, as well as data analysis, on the outcome of antinociceptive testing of alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists, fentanyl, and a high dose of chlordiazepoxide in the tail withdrawal reaction test (TWR test) in rats. Dose-response curve data were obtained with fentanyl, clonidine, xylazine, dexmedetomidine, and 40.00 mg/kg chlordiazepoxide and were compared under normal TWR test conditions and during immobilization or immobilization with continuous painful stimulation. Data were analyzed in terms of all-or-none criteria as well as percentage maximum possible effect (%MPE) analysis over the total measurement period or at any specific time point during testing. The results indicate that stress, induced by immobilization and immobilization with long-term-applied paw pressure, unmasked possible antinociceptive properties of the various alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists and potentiated the effects of fentanyl. Stress also unmasked the positive effects of benzodiazepines. The manner of data analysis was shown to significantly affect the outcome measured in stress and nonstress conditions. The MPE analysis, particularly at one time point, appeared much more sensitive than the all-or-none criteria. The data indicate that the housing and handling conditions of animals during testing, together with data analysis, may affect the outcome of different classes of compounds in the TWR test, and this knowledge may help control for false positive results.

  8. Near-normal gait pattern with peroneal electrical stimulation as a neuroprosthesis in the chronic phase of stroke: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swigchem, R. van; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Duijnhoven, H.J. van; Boer, J. den; Beems, T.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the use of functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the peroneal nerve has increased as an alternative for an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) to treat stroke-related drop foot. We present a chronic stroke patient demonstrating an almost normal gait pattern with peroneal FES as a

  9. Experimentally cross-wired lingual taste nerves can restore normal unconditioned gaping behavior in response to quinine stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Camille T; Garcea, Mircea; Stolzenberg, Danielle S; Spector, Alan C

    2008-03-01

    Studies examining the effects of transection and regeneration of the glossopharyngeal (GL) and chorda tympani (CT) nerves on various taste-elicited behaviors in rats have demonstrated that the GL (but not the CT) nerve is essential for the maintenance of both an unconditioned protective reflex (gaping) and the neural activity observed in central gustatory structures in response to lingual application of a bitter substance. An unresolved issue, however, is whether recovery depends more on the taste nerve and the central circuits that it supplies and/or on the tongue receptor cell field being innervated. To address this question, we experimentally cross-wired these taste nerves, which, remarkably, can regenerate into parts of the tongue they normally do not innervate. We report that quinine-stimulated gaping behavior was fully restored, and neuronal activity, as assessed by Fos immunohistochemistry in the nucleus of the solitary tract and the parabrachial nucleus, was partially restored only if the posterior tongue (PT) taste receptor cell field was reinnervated; the particular taste nerve supplying the input was inconsequential to the recovery of function. Thus, PT taste receptor cells appear to play a privileged role in triggering unconditioned gaping to bitter tasting stimuli, regardless of which lingual gustatory nerve innervates them. Our findings demonstrate that even when a lingual gustatory nerve (the CT) forms connections with taste cells in a non-native receptor field (the PT), unconditioned taste rejection reflexes to quinine can be maintained. These findings underscore the extraordinary ability of the gustatory system to adapt to peripherally reorganized input for particular behaviors.

  10. Protective properties of artichoke (Cynara scolymus) against oxidative stress induced in cultured endothelial cells and monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapolska-Downar, Danuta; Zapolski-Downar, Andrzej; Naruszewicz, Marek; Siennicka, Aldona; Krasnodebska, Barbara; Kołdziej, Blanka

    2002-11-01

    It is currently believed that oxidative stress and inflammation play a significant role in atherogenesis. Artichoke extract exhibits hypolipemic properties and contains numerous active substances with antioxidant properties in vitro. We have studied the influence of aqueous and ethanolic extracts from artichoke on intracellular oxidative stress stimulated by inflammatory mediators (TNFalpha and LPS) and ox-LDL in endothelial cells and monocytes. Oxidative stress which reflects the intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was followed by measuring the oxidation of 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) to 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF). Agueous and ethanolic extracts from artichoke were found to inhibit basal and stimulated ROS production in endothelial cells and monocytes in dose dependent manner. In endothelial cells, the ethanolic extract (50 microg/ml) reduced ox-LDL-induced intracellular ROS production by 60% (partichoke extracts have marked protective properties against oxidative stress induced by inflammatory mediators and ox-LDL in cultured endothelial cells and monocytes.

  11. Potential role of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in mediating chromosomal rearrangements in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sang-Nee; Sim, Sai-Peng; Khoo, Alan S B

    2016-01-01

    Genetic aberrations have been identified in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), however, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. There are increasing evidences that the apoptotic nuclease caspase-activated deoxyribonuclease (CAD) is one of the players leading to translocation in leukemia. Oxidative stress, which has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis, is a potent apoptotic inducer. Most of the NPC etiological factors are known to induce oxidative stress. Although apoptosis is a cell death process, cells possess the potential to survive apoptosis upon DNA repair. Eventually, the surviving cells may carry rearranged chromosomes. We hypothesized that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis may cause chromosomal breaks mediated by CAD. Upon erroneous DNA repair, cells that survive apoptosis may harbor chromosomal rearrangements contributing to NPC pathogenesis. This study focused on the AF9 gene at 9p22, a common deletion region in NPC. We aimed to propose a possible model for molecular mechanism underlying the chromosomal rearrangements in NPC. In the present study, we showed that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced apoptosis in NPC (HK1) and normal nasopharyngeal epithelial (NP69) cells, as evaluated by flow cytometric analyses. Activity of caspases 3/7 was detected in H2O2-treated cells. This activity was inhibited by caspase inhibitor (CI). By nested inverse polymerase chain reaction (IPCR), we demonstrated that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in HK1 and NP69 cells resulted in cleavages within the breakpoint cluster region (BCR) of the AF9 gene. The gene cleavage frequency detected in the H2O2-treated cells was found to be significantly higher than untreated control. We further found that treatment with CI, which indirectly inhibits CAD, significantly reduced the chromosomal breaks in H2O2-cotreated cells. Intriguingly, a few breakpoints were mapped within the AF9 region that was previously reported to translocate with the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene in

  12. Water stress induced changes in antioxidant enzymes, membrane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... Water stress induced changes in antioxidant enzymes membrane stablity index and seed protein profiling of four different wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) accessions (011251, 011417, 011320 and 011393) were determined in a pot study under natural condition during the wheat-growing season 2005 and.

  13. Serotonergic involvement in stress-induced vasopressin and oxytocin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjaer, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT) receptors in mediation of stress-induced arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) secretion in male rats. DESIGN: Experiments on laboratory rats with control groups. METHODS: Different stress paradigms were...

  14. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by alcoholic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by alcoholic extract and oil of Lepidium Sativum seeds in human liver cell line HepG2. ... The results show that LSA and LSO reduced cell viability, and altered the cellular morphology in dose dependent manner. Concentrations (100 to 1000 μg/ml) of LSA and LSO were ...

  15. Stress-induced senescence and plant tolerance to abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Nir; Del Mar Rubio-Wilhelmi, María; Umnajkitikorn, Kamolchanok; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2017-07-26

    Senescence is an age-dependent process, ultimately leading to plant death, that in annual crop plants overlaps with the reproductive stage of development. Research on the molecular and biochemical mechanisms of leaf senescence has revealed a multi-layered regulatory network operating to control age-dependent processes. Abiotic stress-induced senescence challenges source-sink relationships and results in significant reduction in crop yields. Although processes associated with plant senescence are well studied, the mechanisms regulating stress-induced senescence are not well known. Here, we discuss the effects of abiotic stress on crop productivity, mechanisms associated with stress-induced senescence, and the possible use of these mechanisms for the generation of plant stress tolerance. We emphasize the involvement of source strength and stability of the photosynthetic apparatus in this process, and suggest a possible role of a perennial plant life strategy for the amelioration of stress-induced senescence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Serotonergic involvement in stress-induced vasopressin and oxytocin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjaer, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT) receptors in mediation of stress-induced arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) secretion in male rats. DESIGN: Experiments on laboratory rats with control groups. METHODS: Different stress paradigms were ap...

  17. Implication of Snail in Metabolic Stress-Induced Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Min Kyung; Moon, Ji Young; Park, Hye Gyeong; Yoo, Mi-Ae; Choi, Byung Tae; Yook, Jong In; Lim, Sung-Chul; Han, Song Iy; Kang, Ho Sung

    2011-01-01

    Background Necrosis, a type of cell death accompanied by the rupture of the plasma membrane, promotes tumor progression and aggressiveness by releasing the pro-inflammatory and angiogenic cytokine high mobility group box 1. It is commonly found in the core region of solid tumors due to hypoxia and glucose depletion (GD) resulting from insufficient vascularization. Thus, metabolic stress-induced necrosis has important clinical implications for tumor development; however, its regulatory mechanisms have been poorly investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we show that the transcription factor Snail, a key regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is induced in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent manner in both two-dimensional culture of cancer cells, including A549, HepG2, and MDA-MB-231, in response to GD and the inner regions of a multicellular tumor spheroid system, an in vitro model of solid tumors and of human tumors. Snail short hairpin (sh) RNA inhibited metabolic stress-induced necrosis in two-dimensional cell culture and in multicellular tumor spheroid system. Snail shRNA-mediated necrosis inhibition appeared to be linked to its ability to suppress metabolic stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial permeability transition, which are the primary events that trigger necrosis. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Snail is implicated in metabolic stress-induced necrosis, providing a new function for Snail in tumor progression. PMID:21448462

  18. Severity of Stress Induced Factors Among Students in Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... stress induced factors were ranked as highly experienced-while physical and health, personal psychological, administrative, future Concerns and moral and religious stressors were ranked as lowly experienced. It was therefore suggested that counselling centers be established in Nigerian institutions of higher learning to ...

  19. Effect of stress-induced grain growth during room temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Effect of stress-induced grain growth during room temperature tensile deformation on ductility in nanocrystalline metals. WEICHANG XU, PINQIANG DAI* and XIAOLEI WU. †. College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108, China. †. State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute ...

  20. Effect of stress-induced grain growth during room temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -induced grain ... The TEM observations reveal that stress-induced grain growth during tensile deformation is significantly suppressed for the nc Ni–Co alloys rich in Co in sharp contrast to those poor in Co. We believe that sufficient solutes ...

  1. Autophagy modulates endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death in podocytes: a protective role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Chi; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Chien-An; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress occurs in a variety of patho-physiological mechanisms and there has been great interest in managing this pathway for the treatment of clinical diseases. Autophagy is closely interconnected with endoplasmic reticulum stress to counteract the possible injurious effects related with the impairment of protein folding. Studies have shown that glomerular podocytes exhibit high rate of autophagy to maintain as terminally differentiated cells. In this study, podocytes were exposed to tunicamycin and thapsigargin to induce endoplasmic reticulum stress. Thapsigargin/tunicamycin treatment induced a significant increase in endoplasmic reticulum stress and of cell death, represented by higher GADD153 and GRP78 expression and propidium iodide flow cytometry, respectively. However, thapsigargin/tunicamycin stimulation also enhanced autophagy development, demonstrated by monodansylcadaverine assay and LC3 conversion. To evaluate the regulatory effects of autophagy on endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death, rapamycin (Rap) or 3-methyladenine (3-MA) was added to enhance or inhibit autophagosome formation. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death was decreased at 6 h, but was not reduced at 24 h after Rap+TG or Rap+TM treatment. In contrast, endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death increased at 6 and 24 h after 3-MA+TG or 3-MA+TM treatment. Our study demonstrated that thapsigargin/tunicamycin treatment induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which resulted in podocytes death. Autophagy, which counteracted the induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, was simultaneously enhanced. The salvational role of autophagy was supported by adding Rap/3-MA to mechanistically regulate the expression of autophagy and autophagosome formation. In summary, autophagy helps the podocytes from cell death and may contribute to sustain the longevity as a highly differentiated cell lineage. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  2. Selective Inhibition of Orexin-2 Receptors Prevents Stress-Induced ACTH Release in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Yun

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Orexins peptides exert a prominent role in arousal-related processes including stress responding, by activating orexin-1 (OX1R and orexin-2 (OX2R receptors located widely throughout the brain. Stress or orexin administration stimulates hyperarousal, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH and corticosterone release, and selective OX1R blockade can attenuate several stress-induced behavioral and cardiovascular responses but not the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activation. As opposed to OX1R, OX2R are preferentially expressed in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus which is involved in the HPA axis regulation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a psychological stress elicited by cage exchange (CE on ACTH release in two murine models (genetic and pharmacological of selective OX2R inhibition. CE-induced stress produced a significant increase in ACTH serum levels. Mice lacking the OX2R exhibited a blunted stress response. Stress-induced ACTH release was absent in mice pre-treated with the selective OX2R antagonist JNJ-42847922 (30 mg/kg po, whereas pre-treatment with the dual OX1/2R antagonist SB-649868 (30 mg/kg po only partially attenuated the increase of ACTH. To assess whether the intrinsic and distinct sleep-promoting properties of each antagonist could account for the differential stress response, a separate group of mice implanted with electrodes for standard sleep recording were orally dosed with JNJ-42847922 or SB-649868 during the light phase. While both compounds reduced the latency to non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep without affecting its duration, a prevalent REM-sleep promoting effect was observed only in mice treated with the dual OX1/2R antagonist. These data indicate that in a psychological stress model, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of OX2R markedly attenuated stress-induced ACTH secretion, as a separately mediated effect from the NREM sleep induction of OX2R antagonism.

  3. Stress-induced premature senescence or stress-induced senescence-like phenotype: one in vivo reality, two possible definitions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Olivier; Dumont, Patrick; Remacle, José; Dierick, Jean-François; Pascal, Thierry; Frippiat, Christophe; Magalhaes, Joao Pedro; Zdanov, Stéphanie; Chainiaux, Florence

    2002-01-29

    No consensus exists so far on the definition of cellular senescence. The narrowest definition of senescence is irreversible growth arrest triggered by telomere shortening counting cell generations (definition 1). Other authors gave an enlarged functional definition encompassing any kind of irreversible arrest of proliferative cell types induced by damaging agents or cell cycle deregulations after overexpression of proto-oncogenes (definition 2). As stress increases, the proportion of cells in "stress-induced premature senescence-like phenotype" according to definition 1 or "stress-induced premature senescence," according to definition 2, should increase when a culture reaches growth arrest, and the proportion of cells that reached telomere-dependent replicative senescence due to the end-replication problem should decrease. Stress-induced premature senescence-like phenotype and telomere-dependent replicatively senescent cells share basic similarities such as irreversible growth arrest and resistance to apoptosis, which may appear through different pathways. Irreversible growth arrest after exposure to oxidative stress and generation of DNA damage could be as efficient in avoiding immortalisation as "telomere-dependent" replicative senescence. Probabilities are higher that the senescent cells (according to definition 2) appearing in vivo are in stress-induced premature senescence rather than in telomere-dependent replicative senescence. Examples are given suggesting these cells affect in vivo tissue (patho)physiology and aging.

  4. Shear stress induces cell apoptosis via a c-Src-phospholipase D-mTOR signaling pathway in cultured podocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chunfa, E-mail: chunfa.huang@case.edu [Louis Stokes Cleveland Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University (United States); Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University (United States); Rammelkamp Center for Research and Education, MetroHealth System Campus, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Bruggeman, Leslie A. [Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University (United States); Rammelkamp Center for Research and Education, MetroHealth System Campus, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Hydo, Lindsey M. [Louis Stokes Cleveland Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University (United States); Miller, R. Tyler [Louis Stokes Cleveland Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University (United States); Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University (United States); Rammelkamp Center for Research and Education, MetroHealth System Campus, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2012-06-10

    The glomerular capillary wall, composed of endothelial cells, the glomerular basement membrane and the podocytes, is continually subjected to hemodynamic force arising from tractional stress due to blood pressure and shear stress due to blood flow. Exposure of glomeruli to abnormal hemodynamic force such as hyperfiltration is associated with glomerular injury and progressive renal disease, and the conversion of mechanical stimuli to chemical signals in the regulation of the process is poorly understood in podocytes. By examining DNA fragmentation, apoptotic nuclear changes and cytochrome c release, we found that shear stress induced cell apoptosis in cultured podocytes. Meanwhile, podocytes exposed to shear stress also stimulated c-Src phosphorylation, phospholipase D (PLD) activation and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Using the antibodies against c-Src, PLD{sub 1}, and PLD{sub 2} to perform reciprocal co-immunoprecipitations and in vitro PLD activity assay, our data indicated that c-Src interacted with and activated PLD{sub 1} but not PLD{sub 2}. The inhibition of shear stress-induced c-Src phosphorylation by PP{sub 2} (a specific inhibitor of c-Src kinase) resulted in reduced PLD activity. Phosphatidic acid, produced by shear stress-induced PLD activation, stimulated mTOR signaling, and caused podocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis.

  5. Nitric Oxide Plays a Central Role in Water Stress-Induced Tanshinone Production in Salvia miltiorrhiza Hairy Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuhong Du

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO, a well-known signaling molecule plays an important role in abiotic and biotic stress-induced production of plant secondary metabolites. In this study, roles of NO in water stress-induced tanshinone production in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots were investigated. The results showed that accumulations of four tanshinone compounds in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots were significantly stimulated by sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a NO donor at 100 μM. Effects of SNP were just partially arrested by the mevalonate (MVA pathway inhibitor (mevinolin, but were completely inhibited by the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway (MEP inhibitor (fosmidomycin. The increase of tanshinone accumulation and the up-regulation of HMGR and DXR expression by PEG and ABA treatments were partially inhibited by an inhibitor of NO biosynthesis (Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME and a NO scavenger (2-(4-Carboxyphenyl- 4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO. Simultaneously, NO generation in the hairy roots was triggered by PEG and ABA, and the effects were also arrested by c-PTIO and L-NAME. These results indicated that NO signaling probably plays a central role in water stress-induced tanshinone production in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots. SNP mainly stimulated the MEP pathway to increase tanshinone accumulation.

  6. Stress-induced alteration of left ventricular eccentricity: An additional marker of multivessel CAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimelli, Alessia; Liga, Riccardo; Giorgetti, Assuero; Casagranda, Mirta; Marzullo, Paolo

    2017-03-28

    Abnormal left ventricular (LV) eccentricity index (EI) is a marker of adverse cardiac remodeling. However, the interaction between stress-induced alterations of EI and major cardiac parameters has not been explored. We sought to evaluate the relationship between LV EI and coronary artery disease (CAD) burden in patients submitted to myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Three-hundred and forty-three patients underwent MPI and coronary angiography. LV ejection fraction (EF) and EI were computed from gated stress images as measures of stress-induced functional impairment. One-hundred and thirty-six (40%), 122 (35%), and 85 (25%) patients had normal coronary arteries, single-vessel CAD, and multivessel CAD, respectively. Post-stress EI was lower in patients with multivessel CAD than in those with normal coronary arteries and single-vessel CAD (P = 0.001). This relationship was confirmed only in patients undergoing exercise stress test, where a lower post-stress EI predicted the presence of multivessel CAD (P = 0.039). Post-stress alterations of LV EI on MPI may unmask the presence of multivessel CAD.

  7. Water deficit stress-induced changes in carbon and nitrogen partitioning in Chenopodium quinoa Willd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascuñán-Godoy, Luisa; Reguera, Maria; Abdel-Tawab, Yasser M; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Water deficit stress followed by re-watering during grain filling resulted in the induction of the ornithine pathway and in changes in Quinoa grain quality. The genetic diversity of Chenopodium quinoa Willd. (Quinoa) is accompanied by an outstanding environmental adaptability and high nutritional properties of the grains. However, little is known about the biochemical and physiological mechanisms associated with the abiotic stress tolerance of Quinoa. Here, we characterized carbon and nitrogen metabolic changes in Quinoa leaves and grains in response to water deficit stress analyzing their impact on the grain quality of two lowland ecotypes (Faro and BO78). Differences in the stress recovery response were found between genotypes including changes in the activity of nitrogen assimilation-associated enzymes that resulted in differences in grain quality. Both genotypes showed a common strategy to overcome water stress including the stress-induced synthesis of reactive oxygen species scavengers and osmolytes. Particularly, water deficit stress induced the stimulation of the ornithine and raffinose pathways. Our results would suggest that the regulation of C- and N partitioning in Quinoa during grain filling could be used for the improvement of the grain quality without altering grain yields.

  8. ZNF32 protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by modulating C1QBP transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Gao, Bo; Li, Jun; Chen, Haining; Li, Yanyan; Wei, Yuyan; Gong, Di; Gao, Junping; Zhang, Jie; Tan, Weiwei; Wen, Tianfu; Zhang, Le; Huang, Lugang; Xiang, Rong; Lin, Ping; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-11-10

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven oxidative stress has been recognized as a critical inducer of cancer cell death in response to therapeutic agents. Our previous studies have demonstrated that zinc finger protein (ZNF)32 is key to cell survival upon oxidant stimulation. However, the mechanisms by which ZNF32 mediates cell death remain unclear. Here, we show that at moderate levels of ROS, Sp1 directly binds to two GC boxes within the ZNF32 promoter to activate ZNF32 transcription. Alternatively, at cytotoxic ROS concentrations, ZNF32 expression is repressed due to decreased binding activity of Sp1. ZNF32 overexpression maintains mitochondrial membrane potential and enhances the antioxidant capacity of cells to detoxify ROS, and these effects promote cell survival upon pro-oxidant agent treatment. Alternatively, ZNF32-deficient cells are more sensitive and vulnerable to oxidative stress-induced cell injury. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that complement 1q-binding protein (C1QBP) is a direct target gene of ZNF32 that inactivates the p38 MAPK pathway, thereby exerting the protective effects of ZNF32 on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings indicate a novel mechanism by which the Sp1-ZNF32-C1QBP axis protects against oxidative stress and implicate a promising strategy that ZNF32 inhibition combined with pro-oxidant anticancer agents for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment.

  9. ZNF32 protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by modulating C1QBP transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Wei, Yuyan; Gong, Di; Gao, Junping; Zhang, Jie; Tan, Weiwei; Wen, Tianfu; Zhang, Le; Huang, Lugang; Xiang, Rong; Lin, Ping; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven oxidative stress has been recognized as a critical inducer of cancer cell death in response to therapeutic agents. Our previous studies have demonstrated that zinc finger protein (ZNF)32 is key to cell survival upon oxidant stimulation. However, the mechanisms by which ZNF32 mediates cell death remain unclear. Here, we show that at moderate levels of ROS, Sp1 directly binds to two GC boxes within the ZNF32 promoter to activate ZNF32 transcription. Alternatively, at cytotoxic ROS concentrations, ZNF32 expression is repressed due to decreased binding activity of Sp1. ZNF32 overexpression maintains mitochondrial membrane potential and enhances the antioxidant capacity of cells to detoxify ROS, and these effects promote cell survival upon pro-oxidant agent treatment. Alternatively, ZNF32-deficient cells are more sensitive and vulnerable to oxidative stress-induced cell injury. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that complement 1q-binding protein (C1QBP) is a direct target gene of ZNF32 that inactivates the p38 MAPK pathway, thereby exerting the protective effects of ZNF32 on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings indicate a novel mechanism by which the Sp1-ZNF32-C1QBP axis protects against oxidative stress and implicate a promising strategy that ZNF32 inhibition combined with pro-oxidant anticancer agents for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment. PMID:26497555

  10. Deletion of Dock10 in B Cells Results in Normal Development but a Mild Deficiency upon In Vivo and In Vitro Stimulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Severinson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We sought to identify genes necessary to induce cytoskeletal change in B cells. Using gene expression microarray, we compared B cells stimulated with interleukin-4 (IL-4 and anti-CD40 antibodies that induce B cell spreading, cell motility, tight aggregates, and extensive microvilli with B cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide that lack these cytoskeletal changes. We identified 84 genes with 10-fold or greater expression in anti-CD40 + IL-4 stimulated B cells, one of these encoded the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF dedicator of cytokinesis 10 (Dock10. IL-4 selectively induced Dock10 expression in B cells. Using lacZ expression to monitor Dock10 promoter activity, we found that Dock10 was expressed at all stages during B cell development. However, specific deletion of Dock10 in B cells was associated with a mild phenotype with normal B cell development and normal B cell spreading, polarization, motility, chemotaxis, aggregation, and Ig class switching. Dock10-deficient B cells showed lower proliferation in response to anti-CD40 and IL-4 stimulation. Moreover, the IgG response to soluble antigen in vivo was lower when Dock10 was specifically deleted in B cells. Together, we found that most B cell responses were intact in the absence of Dock10. However, specific deletion of Dock10 in B cells was associated with a mild reduction in B cell activation in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Intrathecal Clonidine Pump Failure Causing Acute Withdrawal Syndrome With 'Stress-Induced' Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwee Min D; Ruggoo, Varuna; Graudins, Andis

    2016-03-01

    Clonidine is a central alpha(2)-agonist antihypertensive used widely for opioid/alcohol withdrawal, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and chronic pain management. We describe a case of clonidine withdrawal causing life-threatening hypertensive crisis and stress-induced cardiomyopathy. A 47-year-old man with chronic back pain, treated with clonidine for many years via intrathecal pump (550 mcg/24 h), presented following a collapse and complaining of sudden worsening of back pain, severe headache, diaphoresis, nausea and vomiting. A few hours prior to presentation, his subcutaneous pump malfunctioned. On presentation, vital signs included pulse 100 bpm, BP 176/103 mmHg, temperature 37.8 °C and O2 saturation 100 % (room air). Acute clonidine withdrawal with hypertensive crisis was suspected. Intravenous clonidine loading dose and a 50 mcg/h infusion were commenced. Five hours later, severe chest pain, dyspnoea, tachycardia, hypoxia, with BP 180/120 mmHg and pulmonary edema ensued. ECG showed sinus tachycardia with no ST elevation. Repeated intravenous clonidine doses were given (25 mcg every 5-10 min), with ongoing clonidine infusion to control blood pressure. Glyceryl trinitrate infusion, positive pressure ventilation and intravenous benzodiazepines were added. Bedside echocardiogram showed stress-induced cardiomyopathy pattern. Serum troponin-I was markedly elevated. His coronary angiography showed minor irregularities in the major vessels. Over the next 3 days in the ICU, drug infusions were weaned. Discharge was 12 days later on oral clonidine, metoprolol, perindopril, aspirin and oxycodone-SR. Two months later, his echocardiogram was normal. The intrathecal pump was removed. We report a case of stress-induced cardiomyopathy resulting from the sudden cessation of long-term intrathecal clonidine. This was managed by re-institution of clonidine and targeted organ-specific therapies.

  12. Loudness functions with air and bone conduction stimulation in normal-hearing subjects using a categorical loudness scaling procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Stenfelt, Stefan; Zeitooni, Mehrnaz

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study (Stenfelt and Håkansson, 2002) a loudness balance test between bone conducted (BC) sound and air conducted (AC) sound was performed at frequencies between 0.25 and 4 kHz and at levels corresponding to 30–80 dB HL. The main outcome of that study was that for maintaining equal loudness, the level increase of sound with BC stimulation was less than that of AC stimulation with a ratio between 0.8 and 0.93 dB/dB. However, because it was shown that AC and BC tone cancellation wa...

  13. Salubrious effects of oxytocin on social stress-induced deficits

    OpenAIRE

    Adam S. Smith; Wang, Zuoxin

    2011-01-01

    Social relationships are a fundamental aspect of life, affecting social, psychological, physiological, and behavioral functions. While social interactions can attenuate stress and promote health, disruption, confrontations, isolation, or neglect in the social environment can each be major stressors. Social stress can impair the basal function and stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, impairing function of multiple biological systems and posing a risk to m...

  14. Salubrious effects of oxytocin on social stress-induced deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam S; Wang, Zuoxin

    2012-03-01

    Social relationships are a fundamental aspect of life, affecting social, psychological, physiological, and behavioral functions. While positive social interactions can attenuate stress and promote health, the social environment can also be a major source of stress when it includes social disruption, confrontation, isolation, or neglect. Social stress can impair the basal function and stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, impairing function of multiple biological systems and posing a risk to mental and physical health. In contrast, social support can ameliorate stress-induced physiological and immunological deficits, reducing the risk of subsequent psychological distress and improving an individual's overall well-being. For better clinical treatment of these physiological and mental pathologies, it is necessary to understand the regulatory mechanisms of stress-induced pathologies as well as determine the underlying biological mechanisms that regulate social buffering of the stress system. A number of ethologically relevant animal models of social stress and species that form strong adult social bonds have been utilized to study the etiology, treatment, and prevention of stress-related disorders. While undoubtedly a number of biological pathways contribute to the social buffering of the stress response, the convergence of evidence denotes the regulatory effects of oxytocin in facilitating social bond-promoting behaviors and their effect on the stress response. Thus, oxytocin may be perceived as a common regulatory element of the social environment, stress response, and stress-induced risks on mental and physical health. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin, Vasopressin, and Social Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98% on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility.

  16. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg-1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility.

  17. The normalization of co-authorship networks in the bibliometric evaluation: the government stimulation programs of China and Korea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, H.W.; Yoon, J.; Leydesdorff, L.

    2016-01-01

    Using co-authored publications between China and Korea in Web of Science (WoS) during the one-year period of 2014, we evaluate the government stimulation program for collaboration between China and Korea. In particular, we apply dual approaches, full integer versus fractional counting, to

  18. The largely normal response to Toll-like receptor 7 and 9 stimulation and the enhanced expression of SIGIRR by B cells in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Yan Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Altered Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. The present study was undertaken to characterize responses of B cells from SLE patients to TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation and to explore the potential role of single immunoglobulin interleukin-1 receptor related molecule (SIGIRR in the regulation of TLR-mediated responses of SLE B cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were isolated from 64 patients with SLE and 37 healthy donors. CD19+ B cells purified using microbeads were cultured with TLR7 or TLR9 agonists. Cell proliferation was measured by thymine incorporation and the frequency of antibody-secreting cells was determined by ELISPOT assay. SIGIRR expression in PBMCs and B cells was analyzed using flow cytometry analysis. In contrast to the enhanced proliferation following B cell receptor (BCR engagement, B cells from SLE patients exhibited a virtually normal proliferative response to TLR7 or TLR9 stimulation. Moreover, B cells from SLE patients and healthy donors were almost equally competent to differentiate into antibody-secreting cells upon TLR engagement except for a reduction in the generation of IgG-secreting cells by TLR9-stimulated lupus B cells. In line with these somehow unexpected observations, SLE B cells were found to express a significantly higher level of SIGIRR than normal B cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Despite the reported upregulation of TLR7 and TLR9 expression in B cell from SLE patients, their responses to TLR stimulation were largely normal. The increased expression of the negative regulator SIGIRR may be partly responsible for the "balance of terror".

  19. Shear stress-induced collagen XII expression is associated with atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xin; Iwasa, Satoshi; Okada, Kyoko; Ooi, Akishi; Mitsui, Kazuhiro; Mitsumata, Masako

    2003-08-15

    Fluid shear stress has been shown to modulate various endothelial functions. We selected a shear stress-specific clone, identified as collagen XII, from a bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) cDNA library. We confirmed that shear stress induces collagen XII expression at both the mRNA and protein levels in cultured BAECs and human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) by stimulating transcription. When HUVECs were exposed to shear stress, they secreted collagen XII protein and it was deposited underneath them. Strong expression of collagen XII was found in the intima of human aortic wall lacking atherosclerotic lesions, whereas weak expression was seen in the intima of atherosclerotic plagues. Furthermore, the downstream portion of atherosclerotic plaques showed apparently weak collagen XII expression compared with the upstream portion. These results suggest that collagen XII expression induced by fluid shear stress may play a role in stabilizing the vascular structure and preventing the formation of atherosclerotic lesions.

  20. Stress-induced eating in women with binge-eating disorder and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatzkin, Rebecca R; Gaffney, Sierra; Cyrus, Kathryn; Bigus, Elizabeth; Brownley, Kimberly A

    2016-11-09

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate stress-induced eating in women with binge-eating disorder (BED) and obesity. Three groups of women [obese with BED (n=9); obese non-BED (n=11); and normal weight (NW) non-BED (n=12)], rated their levels of hunger and psychological distress before and after completing the Trier Social Stress Test, followed by food anticipation and then consumption of their preferred snack food. We differentiated between the motivational and hedonic components of eating by measuring the amount of food participants poured into a serving bowl compared to the amount consumed. Stress did not affect poured and consumed calories differently between groups. Across all subjects, calories poured and consumed were positively correlated with post-stress hunger, but calories poured was positively correlated with post-stress anxiety and negative affect. These results indicate that stress-related psychological factors may be more strongly associated with the motivational drive to eat (i.e. amount poured) rather than the hedonic aspects of eating (i.e. amount consumed) for women in general. Exploratory correlation analyses per subgroup suggest that post-stress hunger was positively associated with calories poured and consumed in both non-BED groups. In the obese BED group, calories consumed was negatively associated with dietary restraint and, although not significantly, positively associated with stress-induced changes in anxiety.These findings suggest that stress-induced snacking in obese BED women may be influenced by psychological factors more so than homeostatic hunger mechanisms. After controlling for dietary restraint and negative affect, the NW non-BED women ate a greater percentage of the food they poured than both obese groups, suggesting that obesity may be associated with a heightened motivational drive to eat coupled with a reduction in hedonic pleasure from eating post-stress. Further studies that incorporate novel approaches to

  1. Evaluation of the ovarian reserve in young low responders with normal basal levels of follicle-stimulating hormone using three-dimensional ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, A; Ardiles, G; Neuspiller, F; Remohí, J; Simón, C; Bonilla-Musoles, F

    1998-10-01

    To assess the ovarian content of selectable (2-5 mm) follicles using three-dimensional ultrasonography in low responders to ovarian stimulation for IVF. Prospective case-control study. IVF program at the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad. Ten low responders or =2 mm in each ovary were recorded and compared between the groups. Low-responder women had significantly higher serum FSH levels than controls despite having FSH values within the normal range. The number of selectable follicles and the total number of follicles with an antrum were significantly decreased in low responders as compared with normal responders. Ovarian volume did not differ between the groups. This study introduces three-dimensional ultrasound as a novel method for the evaluation of low responders. The results show that the most plausible explanation for low response in young women with normal serum FSH is diminished ovarian reserve.

  2. Fed-state clamp stimulates cellular mechanisms of muscle protein anabolism and modulates glucose disposal in normal men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Olasunkanmi A J; Chevalier, Stéphanie; Morais, José A; Gougeon, Réjeanne; Kimball, Scot R; Jefferson, Leonard S; Wing, Simon S; Marliss, Errol B

    2009-01-01

    Since maximum anabolism occurs postprandially, we developed a simulated fed state with clamped hyperinsulinemia, physiological hyperglycemia, and hyperaminoacidemia (Hyper-3) and explored muscle cellular mechanisms. Whole body [1-(13)C]leucine and [3-(3)H]glucose kinetics in healthy men were compared between hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic, isoaminoacidemic (Hyper-1, n = 10) and Hyper-3 (n = 9) clamps. In Hyper-3 vs. Hyper-1, nonoxidative leucine R(d) [rate of disappearance (synthesis)] was stimulated more (45 +/- 4 vs. 24 +/- 4 micromol/min, P anabolism, and muscle protein translation initiation pathways and decreases protein ubiquitination. The main contribution of hyperaminoacidemia is stimulation of synthesis rather than inhibition of proteolysis, and it attenuates the expected increment of glucose disposal.

  3. Romo1 expression contributes to oxidative stress-induced death of lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jung Ar [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-270 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Sil [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang-Ho [Department of Pathology, Pochon CHA University, College of Medicine, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Jung, E-mail: khj57@yuhs.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-270 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young Do, E-mail: ydy1130@korea.ac.kr [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Romo1 mediates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production. •Romo1 induction by oxidative stress plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. •Romo1 overexpression correlates with epithelial cell death in patients with IPF. -- Abstract: Oxidant-mediated death of lung epithelial cells due to cigarette smoking plays an important role in pathogenesis in lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the exact mechanism by which oxidants induce epithelial cell death is not fully understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator 1 (Romo1) is localized in the mitochondria and mediates mitochondrial ROS production through complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we show that Romo1 mediates mitochondrial ROS production and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) treatment increased Romo1 expression, and Romo1 knockdown suppressed the cellular ROS levels and cell death triggered by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. In immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues from patients with IPF, Romo1 was mainly localized in hyperplastic alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Romo1 overexpression was detected in 14 of 18 patients with IPF. TUNEL-positive alveolar epithelial cells were also detected in most patients with IPF but not in normal controls. These findings suggest that Romo1 mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells.

  4. Immunohistochemical localization of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in the submandibular gland of mice under normal conditions and when stimulated by isoproterenol or carbachol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoungseabyoun, Wipawee; Tachow, Apussara; Pakkarato, Sawetree; Rawangwong, Atsara; Krongyut, Suthankamon; Sakaew, Waraporn; Kondo, Hisatake; Hipkaeo, Wiphawi

    2017-09-01

    We wished to investigate the subcellular localization of CB1, a receptor for the endocannabinoids in mouse submandibular glands (SMGs) under normal conditions and when stimulated by adrenergic or cholinergic agonists. SMGs of both male and female adult mice were utilized for immunoblotting and immuno-light and -electron microscopic analyses. Isoproterenol and carbachol were used as adrenergic and cholinergic stimulants, respectively. SMGs were examined at 15, 30, 60 and 120min after intraperitoneal injection of these agents. Selective localization of intense immunoreactivity for CB1 in the granular convoluted ductal cells was confirmed by immunoblotting and the antigen absorption test. In SMGs of control male mice, CB1-immunoreactivity was evident on the basolateral plasma membranes, including the basal infoldings, but was absent on the apical membranes in the ductal cells. Localization and intensity of CB1-immunoreactivity were essentially the same in SMGs of female mice. The immunoreactivity was transiently localized in the apical plasmalemma of some acinar and granular ductal cells of male SMGs shortly after stimulation by isoproterenol, but not by carbachol. The present finding suggests that CB1 functions primarily in the basolateral membranes of the granular convoluted ductal cells of SMGs under normal conditions, and that the CB1 can function additionally in the apical membrane of acinar and granular ductal cells for modulation of the saliva secretory condition via adrenoceptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Stress-induced changes in functional activity of the neuro-endocrine system: modulatory action of derinat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomicheva, E E; Filatenkova, T A; Shanin, S N; Rybakina, E G

    2009-03-01

    Changes in functional activity of HPA and HPG axes under stress influences of different intensity, and possible ways for their correction by native DNA preparation: derinat, possessing immune modulator effects, were studied. It was shown that the vector of changes in hormone's reactions of both axes did not depend on the intensity of stress influences: different models of stress increased corticosterone level and decreased testosterone level in rats' blood. Intraperitoneal injection of 10 and 50 mg/kg BW doses of Derinat to rats enhanced HPA and HPG axes activity, reversed stress-induced decrease of testosterone concentration in blood, that may indicate a stress-protective effect of derinat. Injection of derinat caused normalizing of stress-induced changes in immunomodulatory cytokines production within Lymphocyte Activating Factors, which regulate not only the immune system functions but also the functions of HPA and HPG axes.

  6. Near-normal gait pattern with peroneal electrical stimulation as a neuroprosthesis in the chronic phase of stroke: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Swigchem, Roos; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; van Duijnhoven, Hanneke J; den Boer, Jasper; Beems, Tjemme; Geurts, Alexander C

    2011-02-01

    In recent years, the use of functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the peroneal nerve has increased as an alternative for an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) to treat stroke-related drop foot. We present a chronic stroke patient demonstrating an almost normal gait pattern with peroneal FES as a neuroprosthesis. A 60-year-old survivor of a right hemisphere infarction 21 months ago, who regularly used a polypropylene AFO, was provided with a surface-based peroneal FES device for severe drop foot. In a second instance, he received an implanted FES system because of skin problems with the surface stimulator. With both FES devices, the patient achieved an adequate foot elevation. Moreover, his hip and knee flexion angles during walking increased to normal values and his ankle push-off power increased. His gait pattern became almost symmetrical and less variable than with the AFO. Furthermore, his ability to avoid a sudden obstacle improved to normal values with FES. Our patient showed benefits from peroneal FES beyond what can be attributed to improved foot lift alone. With regard to the potential working mechanisms underlying this response to FES, biomechanical benefits related to improved ankle push-off are suggested as the main mechanism. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Stress-Induced Chronic Visceral Pain of Gastrointestinal Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley Greenwood-Van Meerveld

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Visceral pain is generally poorly localized and characterized by hypersensitivity to a stimulus such as organ distension. In concert with chronic visceral pain, there is a high comorbidity with stress-related psychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression. The mechanisms linking visceral pain with these overlapping comorbidities remain to be elucidated. Evidence suggests that long term stress facilitates pain perception and sensitizes pain pathways, leading to a feed-forward cycle promoting chronic visceral pain disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. Early life stress (ELS is a risk-factor for the development of IBS, however the mechanisms responsible for the persistent effects of ELS on visceral perception in adulthood remain incompletely understood. In rodent models, stress in adult animals induced by restraint and water avoidance has been employed to investigate the mechanisms of stress-induce pain. ELS models such as maternal separation, limited nesting, or odor-shock conditioning, which attempt to model early childhood experiences such as neglect, poverty, or an abusive caregiver, can produce chronic, sexually dimorphic increases in visceral sensitivity in adulthood. Chronic visceral pain is a classic example of gene × environment interaction which results from maladaptive changes in neuronal circuitry leading to neuroplasticity and aberrant neuronal activity-induced signaling. One potential mechanism underlying the persistent effects of stress on visceral sensitivity could be epigenetic modulation of gene expression. While there are relatively few studies examining epigenetically mediated mechanisms involved in visceral nociception, stress-induced visceral pain has been linked to alterations in DNA methylation and histone acetylation patterns within the brain, leading to increased expression of pro-nociceptive neurotransmitters. This review will discuss the potential neuronal pathways and mechanisms responsible for

  8. Stress-Induced Chronic Visceral Pain of Gastrointestinal Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Johnson, Anthony C.

    2017-01-01

    Visceral pain is generally poorly localized and characterized by hypersensitivity to a stimulus such as organ distension. In concert with chronic visceral pain, there is a high comorbidity with stress-related psychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression. The mechanisms linking visceral pain with these overlapping comorbidities remain to be elucidated. Evidence suggests that long term stress facilitates pain perception and sensitizes pain pathways, leading to a feed-forward cycle promoting chronic visceral pain disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Early life stress (ELS) is a risk-factor for the development of IBS, however the mechanisms responsible for the persistent effects of ELS on visceral perception in adulthood remain incompletely understood. In rodent models, stress in adult animals induced by restraint and water avoidance has been employed to investigate the mechanisms of stress-induce pain. ELS models such as maternal separation, limited nesting, or odor-shock conditioning, which attempt to model early childhood experiences such as neglect, poverty, or an abusive caregiver, can produce chronic, sexually dimorphic increases in visceral sensitivity in adulthood. Chronic visceral pain is a classic example of gene × environment interaction which results from maladaptive changes in neuronal circuitry leading to neuroplasticity and aberrant neuronal activity-induced signaling. One potential mechanism underlying the persistent effects of stress on visceral sensitivity could be epigenetic modulation of gene expression. While there are relatively few studies examining epigenetically mediated mechanisms involved in visceral nociception, stress-induced visceral pain has been linked to alterations in DNA methylation and histone acetylation patterns within the brain, leading to increased expression of pro-nociceptive neurotransmitters. This review will discuss the potential neuronal pathways and mechanisms responsible for stress-induced

  9. Acceleration of normal-tissue damage expression by early stimulation of cell proliferation in rat spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, C.; Andratschke, N. [Technical Univ., Munich (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar; Price, R.E. [The Univ. of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery; Kian-Ang, K. [The Univ. of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To examine experimental strategies for prevention of radiation-induced late spinal cord damage. Material and Methods: The effects of treatment with high, proliferation-stimulating doses of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) administered at various times after radiotherapy of rat spinal cord, and aiming at increased tissue regeneration, were studied in an established model. Animals were followed and monitored for expression of radiation myelopathy (RM), which was confirmed by histopathologic diagnosis. Results: High doses of PDGF given 8 weeks after radiotherapy significantly accelerated the development of RM compared to control animals (Figure 1). Such effects were observed also for concomitant treatment, but not for PDGF administration after 12 or 15 weeks (Figure 2). On the microscopic level, the spinal cord showed more pronounced vascular damage with vessel necroses and hemorrhages (Figure 3). Conclusion: These data suggest that the vascular system plays an important role during development of RM and that early stimulation of cell proliferation negatively influences the time course of spinal cord damage. Further experiments should address different concepts of tissue regeneration or damage prevention. (orig.)

  10. Serotonergic involvement in stress-induced vasopressin and oxytocin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjaer, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT) receptors in mediation of stress-induced arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) secretion in male rats. DESIGN: Experiments on laboratory rats with control groups. METHODS: Different stress paradigms were...... applied after pretreatment with intracerebroventricular infusion of saline or different 5-HT antagonists. RESULTS: Restraint stress (5 min), hypotensive hemorrhage or dehydration for 24 h increased AVP secretion fivefold and OT secretion threefold. Swim stress for 3 min had no effect on AVP secretion...

  11. Ghrelin stimulates appetite, imagination of food, GH, ACTH, and cortisol, but does not affect leptin in normal controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Dagmar A; Held, Katja; Ising, Marcus; Uhr, Manfred; Weikel, Jutta C; Steiger, Axel

    2005-06-01

    Ghrelin, a growth hormone (GH) secretagogue receptor ligand was isolated from the stomach and hypothalamus of rats and humans. In rodents, ghrelin exerts distinct orexigenic action, probably as counterpart of the anorexigenic leptin. In humans, ghrelin infusion enhances appetite. It is unknown whether single intravenous (i.v.) injections of ghrelin affect human eating behavior. Therefore, we investigated the influence of a single i.v. bolus injection of 100 microg ghrelin on appetite, ideas about food, hormone levels, and glucose concentration in young control subjects. In order to test gender differences, we included five women and four men. After ghrelin administration, appetite was enhanced in eight of nine subjects. Seven probands reported a vivid, plastic image of their preferred meal. Furthermore, ghrelin stimulated an immediate increase in plasma levels of GH (area under the curve, mean+/-SEM 35+/-16 ng/ml x min after placebo [P] to 2808+/-533 ng/ml x min after ghrelin [G]; p<0.001), cortisol (5908+/-984 ng/ml x min [P] to 10179+/-1293 ng/ml x min [G]; p<0.001), and ACTH (922+/-103 pg/ml x min [P] to 3030+/-763 pg/ml x min [G]; p<0.02), whereas leptin levels remained unchanged. Contrary to placebo, glucose concentration did not decrease markedly after administration of ghrelin. Our data suggest that i.v. ghrelin stimulates appetite and images of food in young women and men. Obviously, leptin is not involved in these effects.

  12. (+)-Catechin protects dermal fibroblasts against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress has been suggested as a mechanism underlying skin aging, as it triggers apoptosis in various cell types, including fibroblasts, which play important roles in the preservation of healthy, youthful skin. Catechins, which are antioxidants contained in green tea, exert various actions such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer actions. In this study, we investigated the effect of (+)-catechin on apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in fibroblasts. Methods Fibroblasts (NIH3T3) under oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (0.1 mM) were treated with either vehicle or (+)-catechin (0–100 μM). The effect of (+)-catechin on cell viability, apoptosis, phosphorylation of c-Jun terminal kinases (JNK) and p38, and activation of caspase-3 in fibroblasts under oxidative stress were evaluated. Results Hydrogen peroxide induced apoptotic cell death in fibroblasts, accompanied by induction of phosphorylation of JNK and p38 and activation of caspase-3. Pretreatment of the fibroblasts with (+)-catechin inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and reduced phosphorylation of JNK and p38 and activation of caspase-3. Conclusion (+)-Catechin protects against oxidative stress-induced cell death in fibroblasts, possibly by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 and JNK. These results suggest that (+)-catechin has potential as a therapeutic agent for the prevention of skin aging. PMID:24712558

  13. Neuromodulator and Emotion Biomarker for Stress Induced Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeng Gu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Affective disorders are a leading cause of disabilities worldwide, and the etiology of these many affective disorders such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder is due to hormone changes, which includes hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in the peripheral nervous system and neuromodulators in the central nervous system. Consistent with pharmacological studies indicating that medical treatment acts by increasing the concentration of catecholamine, the locus coeruleus (LC/norepinephrine (NE system is regarded as a critical part of the central “stress circuitry,” whose major function is to induce “fight or flight” behavior and fear and anger emotion. Despite the intensive studies, there is still controversy about NE with fear and anger. For example, the rats with LC ablation were more reluctant to leave a familiar place and took longer to consume the food pellets in an unfamiliar place (neophobia, i.e., fear in response to novelty. The reason for this discrepancy might be that NE is not only for flight (fear, but also for fight (anger. Here, we try to review recent literatures about NE with stress induced emotions and their relations with mental disorders. We propose that stress induced NE release can induce both fear and anger. “Adrenaline rush or norepinephrine rush” and fear and anger emotion might act as biomarkers for mental disorders.

  14. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre, Sophie [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); ED515 UPMC, 4 place Jussieu 75005 Paris (France); Sliwa, Dominika [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Rustin, Pierre [Inserm, U676, Physiopathology and Therapy of Mitochondrial Disease Laboratory, 75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris-Diderot, Faculte de Medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France); Camadro, Jean-Michel [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Santos, Renata, E-mail: santos.renata@ijm.univ-paris-diderot.fr [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  15. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (Takotsubo – broken heart and mind?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redfors B

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Björn Redfors, Yangzhen Shao, Elmir Omerovic Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Abstract: Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC, also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is characterized by severe but potentially reversible regional left ventricular wall motion abnormalities, ie, akinesia, in the absence of explanatory angiographic evidence of a coronary occlusion. The typical pattern is that of an akinetic apex with preserved contractions in the base, but other variants are also common, including basal or midmyocardial akinesia with preserved apical function. The pathophysiology of SIC remains largely unknown but catecholamines are believed to play a pivotal role. The diverse array of triggering events that have been linked to SIC are arbitrarily categorized as either emotional or somatic stressors. These categories can be considered as different elements of a continuous spectrum, linked through the interface of neurology and psychiatry. This paper reviews our current knowledge of SIC, with focus on the intimate relationship between the brain and the heart. Keywords: stress-induced cardiomyopathy, takotsubo cardiomyopathy, catecholamine, cerebral injury, emotional stress, somatic stress

  16. Influence of autonomic stimulation on the genesis of atrial fibrillation in remodeled canine atria not the same as in normal atria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Toshiyuki; Hirao, Kenzo; Horikawa-Tanami, Tomoe; Hachiya, Hitoshi; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2009-03-01

    The role of autonomic effects in the occurrence and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF) has undergone little investigation in the remodeling heart. In the present study, 2 groups were studied: those with complete atrioventricular block (AVB) produced by radiofrequency current application (AVB dogs, n=17) and those not undergoing AVB (sham dogs, n=5). Eight weeks after creation of AVB, electrophysiologic study, including pulmonary vein (PV) pacing for AF induction, was performed under vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) and sympathetic stimulation (SS) in both groups. After 8 weeks, atrial dimensions and the percentage of fibrosis in the atria were significantly greater in the AVB dogs. In AVB dogs, atrial and PV effective refractory periods were shorter (P<0.01), and atrial conduction velocity increased (P=0.01) during SS, but not during VNS. Inducibility of AF increased only during SS in the AVB dogs (sustained AF: control 7%, SS 60%; P=0.005), whereas it increased only during VNS in the sham dogs. In the remodeled atria, sympathetic stimulation was crucial for the genesis of AF, which is completely different from the condition in normal atria.

  17. Differential effects of nicotine against stress-induced changes in dopaminergic system in rat striatum and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, R; Takada, Y; Takahashi, H; Urano, T; Ihara, H; Nagai, N; Takada, A

    2000-01-10

    A number of studies have shown an increase in nicotine self-administration among smokers when exposed to stress. Since it is well known that nicotine or stress alter the dopaminergic system, we examined the effect of chronic nicotine administration on the dopamine level and its metabolism in the striatum and the hippocampus during stressful conditions in rats. Nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, i.p. for 14 days) increased the dopamine level in the striatum (Pstress sharply elevated the dopamine level (PNicotine pretreatment attenuated some of these changes in a region- and time-dependent manner. However, stress induced a decrease in dopamine turnover in the hippocampus (Pnicotine failed to prevent this effect. Stress-induced alterations gradually returned toward normal during the 48-h observation period, and in some cases this was facilitated by nicotine. Thus, we demonstrated differential, region- and time-dependent protective effects of chronic nicotine administration against stress-induced changes in dopamine levels and release in brain regions critically affected by stress.

  18. Saliva composition in three selected groups with normal stimulated salivary flow rates, but yet major differences in caries experience and dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardow, Allan; Lykkeaa, Joan; Qvist, Vibeke; Ekstrand, Kim; Twetman, Svante; Fiehn, Niels-Erik

    2014-08-01

    It was hypothesized that, by comparing matched subjects with major differences in these dental diseases, but yet normal saliva flow rates, it would be possible to obtain data on the effect of saliva composition on dental disease isolated from the effect of the flow rate. Thus, the aim of the study was to compare the major physicochemical characteristics of stimulated whole saliva in three groups of 85 subjects, each with normal saliva flow rates and at least 24 remaining teeth. A group with very little dental disease (healthy), a group with dental erosion (erosion) and a group with very high caries experience (caries) were chosen. Furthermore, the aim was to determine whether differences among groups could also be found on an individual level. Although it was not possible to retrieve three groups whose members were completely identical, the present study points in the direction that, on a group level, subjects with very little dental disease seemed to have a more favorable physicochemical saliva composition with respect to higher calcium, phosphate, bicarbonate, pH, degree of saturation with respect to hydroxyapatite and a lower critical pH (p < 0.05 or less). However, on an individual level the explanatory power for the saliva composition was only 10% for caries experience and only 11% for dental erosion (p < 0.001). The compositional analyses performed in this study on stimulated whole saliva, including major physicochemical characteristics of saliva, will most likely have little predictive value for future dental caries and erosion in single individuals.

  19. Hepcidin is an antibacterial, stress-inducible peptide of the biliary system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Strnad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Hepcidin (gene name HAMP, an IL-6-inducible acute phase peptide with antimicrobial properties, is the key negative regulator of iron metabolism. Liver is the primary source of HAMP synthesis, but it is also produced by other tissues such as kidney or heart and is found in body fluids such as urine or cerebrospinal fluid. While the role of hepcidin in biliary system is unknown, a recent study demonstrated that conditional gp130-knockout mice display diminished hepcidin levels and increased rate of biliary infections. METHODS: Expression and localization of HAMP in biliary system was analyzed by real time RT-PCR, in-situ hybridization, immunostaining and -blotting, while prohepcidin levels in human bile were determined by ELISA. RESULTS: Hepcidin was detected in mouse/human gallbladder and bile duct epithelia. Biliary HAMP is stress-inducible, in that it is increased in biliary cell lines upon IL-6 stimulation and in gallbladder mucosa of patients with acute cholecystitis. Hepcidin is also present in the bile and elevated prohepcidin levels were observed in bile of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC patients with concurrent bacterial cholangitis compared to PSC subjects without bacterial infection (median values 22.3 vs. 8.9; p = 0.03. In PSC-cholangitis subjects, bile prohepcidin levels positively correlated with C-reactive protein and bilirubin levels (r = 0.48 and r = 0.71, respectively. In vitro, hepcidin enhanced the antimicrobial capacity of human bile (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Hepcidin is a stress-inducible peptide of the biliary epithelia and a potential marker of biliary stress. In the bile, hepcidin may serve local functions such as protection from bacterial infections.

  20. TRH and TRH receptor system in the basolateral amygdala mediate stress-induced depression-like behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Juli; Kim, Ji-eun; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Park, Jin-Young; Lee, Jung-Eun; Kim, Hannah; Lee, Eun-Hwa; Han, Pyung-Lim

    2015-10-01

    Chronic stress is a potent risk factor for depression, but the mechanism by which stress causes depression is not fully understood. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying stress-induced depression, C57BL/6 inbred mice were treated with repeated restraint to induce lasting depressive behavioral changes. Behavioral states of individual animals were evaluated using the forced swim test, which measures psychomotor withdrawals, and the U-field test, which measures sociability. From these behavioral analyses, individual mice that showed depression-like behaviors in both psychomotor withdrawal and sociability tests, and individuals that showed a resiliency to stress-induced depression in both tests were selected. Among the neuropeptides expressed in the amygdala, thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) was identified as being persistently up-regulated in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in individuals exhibiting severe depressive behaviors in the two behavior tests, but not in individuals displaying a stress resiliency. Activation of TRH receptors by local injection of TRH in the BLA in normal mice produced depressive behaviors, mimicking chronic stress effects, whereas siRNA-mediated suppression of either TRH or TRHR1 in the BLA completely blocked stress-induced depressive symptoms. The TRHR1 agonist, taltirelin, injection in the BLA increased the level of p-ERK, which mimicked the increased p-ERK level in the BLA that was induced by treatment with repeated stress. Stereotaxic injection of U0126, a potent inhibitor of the ERK pathway, within the BLA blocked stress-induced behavioral depression. These results suggest that repeated stress produces lasting depression-like behaviors via the up-regulation of TRH and TRH receptors in the BLA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lipoxin A4 stimulates calcium-activated chloride currents and increases airway surface liquid height in normal and cystic fibrosis airway epithelia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterised by a deficit in epithelial Cl(-) secretion which in the lung leads to airway dehydration and a reduced Airway Surface Liquid (ASL) height. The endogenous lipoxin LXA(4) is a member of the newly identified eicosanoids playing a key role in ending the inflammatory process. Levels of LXA(4) are reported to be decreased in the airways of patients with CF. We have previously shown that in normal human bronchial epithelial cells, LXA(4) produced a rapid and transient increase in intracellular Ca(2+). We have investigated, the effect of LXA(4) on Cl(-) secretion and the functional consequences on ASL generation in bronchial epithelial cells obtained from CF and non-CF patient biopsies and in bronchial epithelial cell lines. We found that LXA(4) stimulated a rapid intracellular Ca(2+) increase in all of the different CF bronchial epithelial cells tested. In non-CF and CF bronchial epithelia, LXA(4) stimulated whole-cell Cl(-) currents which were inhibited by NPPB (calcium-activated Cl(-) channel inhibitor), BAPTA-AM (chelator of intracellular Ca(2+)) but not by CFTRinh-172 (CFTR inhibitor). We found, using confocal imaging, that LXA(4) increased the ASL height in non-CF and in CF airway bronchial epithelia. The LXA(4) effect on ASL height was sensitive to bumetanide, an inhibitor of transepithelial Cl(-) secretion. The LXA(4) stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+), whole-cell Cl(-) currents, conductances and ASL height were inhibited by Boc-2, a specific antagonist of the ALX\\/FPR2 receptor. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence for a novel role of LXA(4) in the stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) signalling leading to Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) secretion and enhanced ASL height in non-CF and CF bronchial epithelia.

  2. Ganzfeld stimulation or sleep enhance long term motor memory consolidation compared to normal viewing in saccadic adaptation paradigm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Voges

    Full Text Available Adaptation of saccade amplitude in response to intra-saccadic target displacement is a type of implicit motor learning which is required to compensate for physiological changes in saccade performance. Once established trials without intra-saccadic target displacement lead to de-adaptation or extinction, which has been attributed either to extra-retinal mechanisms of spatial constancy or to the influence of the stable visual surroundings. Therefore we investigated whether visual deprivation ("Ganzfeld"-stimulation or sleep can partially maintain this motor learning compared to free viewing of the natural surroundings. Thirty-five healthy volunteers performed two adaptation blocks of 100 inward adaptation trials - interspersed by an extinction block - which were followed by a two-hour break with or without visual deprivation (VD. Using additional adaptation and extinction blocks short and long (4 weeks term memory of this implicit motor learning were tested. In the short term, motor memory tested immediately after free viewing was superior to adaptation performance after VD. In the long run, however, effects were opposite: motor memory and relearning of adaptation was superior in the VD conditions. This could imply independent mechanisms that underlie the short-term ability of retrieving learned saccadic gain and its long term consolidation. We suggest that subjects mainly rely on visual cues (i.e., retinal error in the free viewing condition which makes them prone to changes of the visual stimulus in the extinction block. This indicates the role of a stable visual array for resetting adapted saccade amplitudes. In contrast, visual deprivation (GS and sleep, might train subjects to rely on extra-retinal cues, e.g., efference copy or prediction to remap their internal representations of saccade targets, thus leading to better consolidation of saccadic adaptation.

  3. Physical and Cognitive Stimulation Using an Exergame in Subjects with Normal Aging, Mild and Moderate Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Sadoun, Grégory; Sacco, Guillaume; Manera, Valeria; Bourgeois, Jérémy; König, Alexandra; Foulon, Pierre; Fosty, Baptiste; Bremond, François; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne; Robert, Philippe

    2016-06-30

    The use of Serious exerGames (SeG) as enriched environments (EE), which promotes cognitive simulation with physical activity in a positive emotional context, has been proposed to represent a powerful method to slow down the decline due to neurodegenerative diseases (ND), such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, so far, no SeG targeting EE has been tested in ND subjects. This study aimed at evaluating the usability and short-term training effects of X-Torp, an action SeG designed for elderly ND subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD. X-Torp is a SeG played using the Microsoft® Kinect™. 10 ND subjects and 8 healthy elderly controls (HEC) were enrolled in a 1-month program with three training sessions per week. Usability was evaluated through game time, game performance, the aerobic intensity level reached, perceived emotions, and perceived usability. All participants successfully completed the training program. ND subjects played less and had a lower game performance compared to HEC. During the sessions, ND subjects maintained a light intensity of aerobic activity, while HEC maintained a moderate intensity. Both groups experienced only positive emotions, and reported a 'moderate' to 'high' perceived competence, a 'moderate' game difficulty, and a 'high' interest in the game. Usability results suggest that X-Torp represents a usable EE for healthy subjects and persons with MCI and AD. However, in order to reach moderate or high intensity of aerobic activity, X-Torp control modes should be adapted to become more physically stimulating.

  4. Estrogen prevents norepinephrine alpha-2a receptor reversal of stress-induced working memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shansky, Rebecca M; Bender, Genevieve; Arnsten, A F T

    2009-09-01

    Understanding effects of estrogen on the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) may help to elucidate the increased prevalence of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in women of ovarian cycling age. Estrogen replacement in ovariectomized (OVX) young rats amplifies the detrimental effects of stress on working memory (a PFC-mediated task), but the mechanisms by which this occurs have yet to be identified. In male rats, stimulation of norepinephrine alpha-2 adrenoceptors protects working memory from stress-induced impairments. However, this effect has not been studied in females, and has not been examined for sensitivity to estrogen. The current study asked whether OVX females with estrogen replacement (OVX+Est) and without replacement (OVX+Veh) responded differently to stimulation of alpha-2 adrenoceptors after administration of the benzodiazepine inverse agonist FG7142, a pharmacological stressor. The alpha-2 agonist, guanfacine, protected working memory from the impairing effects of FG7142 in OVX+Veh, but not in OVX+Est rats. Western Blot analysis for alpha-2 receptors was performed on PFC tissue from each group, but no changes in expression were found, indicating that the behavioral effects observed were likely not due to changes in receptor expression. These findings point to possible mechanisms by which estrogen may enhance the stress response, and hold implications for the gender discrepancy in the prevalence of stress-related mental illness.

  5. Identification of 30 protein species involved in replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierick, Jean François; Kalume, Dário E; Wenders, Frédéric

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of human proliferative cells to subcytotoxic stress triggers stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) which is characterized by many biomarkers of replicative senescence. Proteomic comparison of replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence indicates that, at the level...... of protein expression, stress-induced premature senescence and replicative senescence are different phenotypes sharing however similarities. In this study, we identified 30 proteins showing changes of expression level specific or common to replicative senescence and/or stress-induced premature senescence....... These changes affect different cell functions, including energy metabolism, defense systems, maintenance of the redox potential, cell morphology and transduction pathways....

  6. Cell stress induces upregulation of osteopontin via the ERK pathway in type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Kato

    Full Text Available Osteopontin (OPN is a multifunctional protein that plays important roles in cell growth, differentiation, migration and tissue fibrosis. In human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and murine bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis, OPN is upregulated in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II. However, the mechanism of OPN induction in AEC II is not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate the molecular mechanism of OPN induction in AEC II and elucidate the functions of OPN in AEC II and lung fibroblasts. Human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 and mouse alveolar epithelial cells (MLE12, used as type II alveolar epithelial cell lines for in vitro assays, and human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (HPAEpiC were treated with either bleomycin, doxorubicin or tunicamycin. The mechanism of OPN induction in these cells and its function as a pro-fibrotic cytokine on A549 and lung fibroblasts were analyzed. The DNA damaging reagents bleomycin and doxorubicin were found to induce OPN expression in A549, MLE12 and HPAEpiC. OPN expression was induced via activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK-dependent signaling pathway in A549 and MLE12. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-inducing reagent tunicamycin induced OPN mRNA expression in A549, MLE12 and HPAEpiC, and OPN mRNA expression was induced via activation of the ERK-dependent signaling pathway in A549 and MLE12. Another ER stress-inducing reagent thapsigargin induced the expression of OPN mRNA as well as the subsequent production of OPN in A549 and MLE12. Furthermore, OPN promoted the proliferation of A549 and the migration of normal human lung fibroblasts. Inhibition of OPN by small interference RNA or neutralizing antibody suppressed both of these responses. The results of this study suggest that cell stress induces the upregulation of OPN in AEC II by signaling through the ERK pathway, and that upregulated OPN may play a role in fibrogenesis of the lung.

  7. Can the benefits of cannabinoid receptor stimulation on neuroinflammation, neurogenesis and memory during normal aging be useful in AD prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchalant, Yannick; Baranger, Kevin; Wenk, Gary L; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Rivera, Santiago

    2012-01-16

    Alzheimer's disease has become a growing socio-economical concern in developing countries where increased life expectancy is leading to large aged populations. While curing Alzheimer's disease or stopping its progression does not appear within reach in a foreseeable future, new therapies capable of delaying the pathogenesis would represent major breakthroughs. The growing number of medical benefits of cannabinoids, such as their ability to regulate age-related processes like neuroinflammation, neurogenesis and memory, raise the question of their potential role as a preventive treatment of AD. To test this hypothesis, epidemiological studies on long term, chronic cannabinoid users could enlighten us on the potential benefits of these compounds in normal and pathological ageing processes. Systematic pharmacological (and thus more mechanistic) investigations using animal models of Alzheimer's disease that have been developed would also allow a thorough investigation of the benefits of cannabinoid pharmacotherapy in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The chronic administration of non-selective cannabinoids may delay the onset of cognitive deficits in AD patients; this will dramatically reduce the socio-economic burden of AD and improve the quality of life of the patients and their families.

  8. Can the benefits of cannabinoid receptor stimulation on neuroinflammation, neurogenesis and memory during normal aging be useful in AD prevention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchalant Yannick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease has become a growing socio-economical concern in developing countries where increased life expectancy is leading to large aged populations. While curing Alzheimer's disease or stopping its progression does not appear within reach in a foreseeable future, new therapies capable of delaying the pathogenesis would represent major breakthroughs. Presentation of the hypothesis The growing number of medical benefits of cannabinoids, such as their ability to regulate age-related processes like neuroinflammation, neurogenesis and memory, raise the question of their potential role as a preventive treatment of AD. Testing the hypothesis To test this hypothesis, epidemiological studies on long term, chronic cannabinoid users could enlighten us on the potential benefits of these compounds in normal and pathological ageing processes. Systematic pharmacological (and thus more mechanistic investigations using animal models of Alzheimer's disease that have been developed would also allow a thorough investigation of the benefits of cannabinoid pharmacotherapy in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Implications of the hypothesis The chronic administration of non-selective cannabinoids may delay the onset of cognitive deficits in AD patients; this will dramatically reduce the socio-economic burden of AD and improve the quality of life of the patients and their families.

  9. Antioxidant therapy for management of oxidative stress induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Khalil Ali; Yuan Yuan, Dai; Nawaz, Waqas; Ze, Hong; Zhuo, Chen Xue; Talal, Bashar; Taleb, Abdoh; Mais, Enos; Qilong, Ding

    2017-04-01

    Hypertension is considered as the most common risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, also is regarded as a leading cause of the mortality and morbidity worldwide. The mechanisms underlying the pathological process of hypertension are not completely explained. However, there is growing evidence that increased oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of hypertension. Several preclinical studies and clinical trials have indicated that antioxidant therapy is important for management of hypertension, using antioxidants compounds such as alpha tocopherol (Vit E) and ascorbic acid (Vit C), polyphenols with others and some antihypertensive drugs that are now in clinical use (e.g. ACEIs, ARBs, novel B-blockers, dihydropyridine CCBs) which have antioxidative pleiotropic effects. The purpose of this review is to highlight the importance of antioxidant therapy for management of oxidative stress induced hypertension. Furthermore, we review the current knowledge in the oxidative stress and its significance in hypertension.

  10. Developmental Axon Stretch Stimulates Neuron Growth While Maintaining Normal Electrical Activity, Intracellular Calcium Flux, and Somatic Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Loverde

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Elongation of nerve fibers intuitively occurs throughout mammalian development, and is synchronized with expansion of the growing body. While most tissue systems enlarge through mitosis and differentiation, elongation of nerve fibers is remarkably unique. The emerging paradigm suggests that axons undergo stretch as contiguous tissues enlarge between the proximal and distal segments of spanning nerve fibers. While stretch is distinct from growth, tension is a known stimulus which regulates the growth of axons. Here, we hypothesized that the axon stretch-growth process may be a natural form of injury, whereby regenerative processes fortify elongating axons in order to prevent disconnection. Harnessing the live imaging capability of our axon stretch-growth bioreactors, we assessed neurons both during and following stretch for biomarkers associated with injury. Utilizing whole-cell patch clamp recording, we found no evidence of changes in spontaneous action potential activity or degradation of elicited action potentials during real-time axon stretch at strains of up to 18 % applied over 5 minutes. Unlike traumatic axonal injury, functional calcium imaging of the soma revealed no shifts in free intracellular calcium during axon stretch. Finally, the cross-sectional areas of nuclei and cytoplasms were normal, with no evidence of chromatolysis following week-long stretch-growth limited to the lower of 25 % strain or 3 mm total daily stretch. The neuronal growth cascade coupled to stretch was concluded to be independent of the changes in membrane potential, action potential generation, or calcium flux associated with traumatic injury. While axon stretch-growth is likely to share overlap with regenerative processes, we conclude that developmental stretch is a distinct stimulus from traumatic axon injury.

  11. Developmental axon stretch stimulates neuron growth while maintaining normal electrical activity, intracellular calcium flux, and somatic morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loverde, Joseph R; Pfister, Bryan J

    2015-01-01

    Elongation of nerve fibers intuitively occurs throughout mammalian development, and is synchronized with expansion of the growing body. While most tissue systems enlarge through mitosis and differentiation, elongation of nerve fibers is remarkably unique. The emerging paradigm suggests that axons undergo stretch as contiguous tissues enlarge between the proximal and distal segments of spanning nerve fibers. While stretch is distinct from growth, tension is a known stimulus which regulates the growth of axons. Here, we hypothesized that the axon stretch-growth process may be a natural form of injury, whereby regenerative processes fortify elongating axons in order to prevent disconnection. Harnessing the live imaging capability of our axon stretch-growth bioreactors, we assessed neurons both during and following stretch for biomarkers associated with injury. Utilizing whole-cell patch clamp recording, we found no evidence of changes in spontaneous action potential activity or degradation of elicited action potentials during real-time axon stretch at strains of up to 18% applied over 5 min. Unlike traumatic axonal injury, functional calcium imaging of the soma revealed no shifts in free intracellular calcium during axon stretch. Finally, the cross-sectional areas of nuclei and cytoplasms were normal, with no evidence of chromatolysis following week-long stretch-growth limited to the lower of 25% strain or 3 mm total daily stretch. The neuronal growth cascade coupled to stretch was concluded to be independent of the changes in membrane potential, action potential generation, or calcium flux associated with traumatic injury. While axon stretch-growth is likely to share overlap with regenerative processes, we conclude that developmental stretch is a distinct stimulus from traumatic axon injury.

  12. Sweet food improves chronic stress-induced irritable bowel syndrome-like symptoms in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Sang-Gyun; Kim, Yong Sung; Choi, Suck Chei; Lee, Moon Young

    2014-03-07

    To investigate whether palatable sweet foods have a beneficial effect on chronic stress-induced colonic motility and inflammatory cytokines. Adult male rats were divided into 3 groups: control (CON, n = 5), chronic variable stress with chow (CVS-A, n = 6), and chronic variable stress with chow and sweet food (CVS-B, n = 6). The rats were fed standard rodent chow as the chow food and/or AIN-76A as the sweet food. A food preference test for AIN-76A was performed in another group of normal rats (n = 10) for twelve days. Fecal pellet output (FPO) was measured for 6 wk during water bedding stress in the CVS groups. The weight of the adrenal glands, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone levels in plasma were measured. The expression levels of transforming growth factor-β, interleukin (IL)-2, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) were measured in the distal part of colonic tissues and plasma using Western blot analysis. In sweet preference test, all rats initially preferred sweet food to chow food. However, the consumption rate of sweet food gradually decreased and reduced to below 50% of total intake eight days after sweet food feeding. Accumulated FPO was higher in the CVS-A group compared with the CVS-B group over time. All stress groups showed significant increases in the adrenal to body weight ratio (CVS-A, 0.14 ± 0.01; CVS-B, 0.14 ± 0.01) compared with the control group (0.12 ± 0.01, P food ingestion during CVS might have an effect on the reduction of stress-induced colonic hyper-motility and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in rats.

  13. Effects of cathodal trans-spinal direct current stimulation on lower urinary tract function in normal and spinal cord injury mice with overactive bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zaghloul

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction is a monumental problem affecting quality of life following neurotrauma, such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Proper function of the bladder and its associated structures depends on coordinated activity of the neuronal circuitry in the spinal cord and brain. Disconnection between the spinal and brain centers controlling the LUT causes fundamental changes in the mechanisms involved in the micturition and storage reflexes. We investigated the effects of cathodal trans-spinal direct current stimulation (c-tsDCS) of the lumbosacral spine on bladder and external urinary sphincter (EUS) functions. Approach. We used cystometry and electromyography (EMG), in mice with and without SCI. Main results. c-tsDCS caused initiation of the micturition reflex in urethane-anesthetized normal mice with depressed micturition reflexes. This effect was associated with normalized EUS-EMG activity. Moreover, in urethane-anesthetized normal mice with expressed micturition reflexes, c-tsDCS increased the firing frequency, amplitude, and duration of EUS-EMG activity. These effects were associated with increased maximum intravesical pressure (P max) and intercontraction interval (ICI). In conscious normal animals, c-tsDCS caused significant increases in P max, ICI, threshold pressure (P thres), baseline pressure (P base), and number and amplitude of non-voiding contractions (NVCnumb and P im, respectively). In conscious mice with severe contusive SCI and overactive bladder, c-tsDCS increased P max, ICI, and P thres, but decreased P base, NVCnumb, and P im. c-tsDCS reduced the detrusor-overactivity/cystometry ratio, which is a measure of bladder overactivity associated with renal deterioration. Significance. These results indicate that c-tsDCS induces robust modulation of the lumbosacral spinal-cord circuitry that controls the LUT.

  14. Expression and localization of estrogen receptor-alpha protein in normal and abnormal term placentae and stimulation of trophoblast differentiation by estradiol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henley Donald C

    2003-02-01

    compared to cultures in PhR+ medium. These data indicate that the considerable increase in estrogen production during pregnancy may play a role, via the ER-alpha, in the stimulation of CT differentiation and promote function in normal placentae. This mechanism, however, may not operate in abnormal placentae, which show a lack of ER-alpha expression.

  15. Stress-induced variation in evolution: from behavioural plasticity to genetic assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badyaev, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    Extreme environments are closely associated with phenotypic evolution, yet the mechanisms behind this relationship are poorly understood. Several themes and approaches in recent studies significantly further our understanding of the importance that stress-induced variation plays in evolution. First, stressful environments modify (and often reduce) the integration of neuroendocrinological, morphological and behavioural regulatory systems. Second, such reduced integration and subsequent accommodation of stress-induced variation by developmental systems enables organismal ‘memory’ of a stressful event as well as phenotypic and genetic assimilation of the response to a stressor. Third, in complex functional systems, a stress-induced increase in phenotypic and genetic variance is often directional, channelled by existing ontogenetic pathways. This accounts for similarity among individuals in stress-induced changes and thus significantly facilitates the rate of adaptive evolution. Fourth, accumulation of phenotypically neutral genetic variation might be a common property of locally adapted and complex organismal systems, and extreme environments facilitate the phenotypic expression of this variance. Finally, stress-induced effects and stress-resistance strategies often persist for several generations through maternal, ecological and cultural inheritance. These transgenerational effects, along with both the complexity of developmental systems and stressor recurrence, might facilitate genetic assimilation of stress-induced effects. Accumulation of phenotypically neutral genetic variance by developmental systems and phenotypic accommodation of stress-induced effects, together with the inheritance of stress-induced modifications, ensure the evolutionary persistence of stress–response strategies and provide a link between individual adaptability and evolutionary adaptation. PMID:16024341

  16. Role of relaxin-3/RXFP3 system in stress-induced binge-like eating in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvez, Juliane; de Ávila, Camila; Matte, Louis-Olivier; Guèvremont, Geneviève; Gundlach, Andrew L; Timofeeva, Elena

    2016-03-01

    Binge eating is frequently stimulated by stress. The neuropeptide relaxin-3 (RLN3) and its native receptor RXFP3 are implicated in stress and appetitive behaviors. We investigated the dynamics of the central RLN3/RXFP3 system in a newly established model of stress-induced binge eating. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to unpredictable intermittent 1-h access to 10% sucrose. When sucrose intake stabilized, rats were assessed for consistency of higher or lower sucrose intake in response to three unpredictable episodes of foot-shock stress; and assigned as binge-like eating prone (BEP) or binge-like eating resistant (BER). BEP rats displayed elevated consumption of sucrose under non-stressful conditions (30% > BER) and an additional marked increase in sucrose intake (60% > BER) in response to stress. Conversely, sucrose intake in BER rats was unaltered by stress. Chow intake was similar in both phenotypes on 'non-stress' days, but was significantly reduced by stress in BER, but not BEP, rats. After stress, BEP, but not BER, rats displayed a significant increase in RLN3 mRNA levels in the nucleus incertus. In addition, in response to stress, BEP, but not BER, rats had increased RXFP3 mRNA levels in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus. Intracerebroventricular administration of a selective RXFP3 antagonist, R3(B1-22)R, blocked the stress-induced increase in sucrose intake in BEP rats and had no effect on sucrose intake in BER rats. These results provide important evidence for a role of the central RLN3/RXFP3 system in the regulation of stress-induced binge eating in rats, and have therapeutic implications for eating disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Optogenetic inhibition of dorsal medial prefrontal cortex attenuates stress-induced reinstatement of palatable food seeking in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calu, Donna J; Kawa, Alex B; Marchant, Nathan J; Navarre, Brittany M; Henderson, Mark J; Chen, Billy; Yau, Hau-Jie; Bossert, Jennifer M; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey; Deisseroth, Karl; Harvey, Brandon K; Hope, Bruce T; Shaham, Yavin

    2013-01-02

    Relapse to maladaptive eating habits during dieting is often provoked by stress. Recently, we identified a role of dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neurons in stress-induced reinstatement of palatable food seeking in male rats. It is unknown whether endogenous neural activity in dorsal mPFC drives stress-induced reinstatement in female rats. Here, we used an optogenetic approach, in which female rats received bilateral dorsal mPFC microinjections of viral constructs coding light-sensitive eNpHR3.0-eYFP or control eYFP protein and intracranial fiber optic implants. Rats were food restricted and trained to lever press for palatable food pellets. Subsequently, pellets were removed, and lever pressing was extinguished; then the effect of bilateral dorsal mPFC light delivery on reinstatement of food seeking was assessed after injections of the pharmacological stressor yohimbine (an α-2 andrenoceptor antagonist) or pellet priming, a manipulation known to provoke food seeking in hungry rats. Dorsal mPFC light delivery attenuated yohimbine-induced reinstatement of food seeking in eNpHR3.0-injected but not eYFP-injected rats. This optical manipulation had no effect on pellet-priming-induced reinstatement or ongoing food-reinforced responding. Dorsal mPFC light delivery attenuated yohimbine-induced Fos immunoreactivity and disrupted neural activity during in vivo electrophysiological recording in awake rats. Optical stimulation caused significant outward currents and blocked electrically evoked action potentials in eNpHR3.0-injected but not eYFP-injected mPFC hemispheres. Light delivery alone caused no significant inflammatory response in mPFC. These findings indicate that intracranial light delivery in eNpHR3.0 rats disrupts endogenous dorsal mPFC neural activity that plays a role in stress-induced relapse to food seeking in female rats.

  18. Hypothalamic-pituitary axis and peripheral tissue responses to TRH stimulation and liothyronine suppression tests in normal subjects evaluated by current methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Gustavo Leopoldo Rodrigues; de Castro, Margaret; Maciel, Lea Maria Zanini

    2008-04-01

    To reevaluate the responses of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulation test in baseline condition as well as after the administration of graded supraphysiological doses of liothyronine (L-T(3)) in normal subjects. To assess various parameters related to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and peripheral tissue responses to L-T(3) in 22 normal individuals (median age: 30.5 years). Subjects were submitted to an intravenous TRH test at baseline condition and also to the oral administration of sequential and graded doses of L-T(3) (50, 100, and 200 microg/day), each given over 3 days, at an outpatient clinic. Blood samples were obtained for thyrotropin (TSH) and prolactin (PRL) at basal and then 15, 30, and 60 minutes after the TRH injection. Effects of L-T(3) administration on cholesterol, creatine kinase, retinol, ferritin, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were also measured at basal and after the oral administration of L-T(3). TRH administration resulted in an increase of 4- to 14-fold rise in serum TSH (8.3 +/- 2.5-fold), and in a slight rise in serum PRL concentrations (3.8 +/- 1.5-fold). Administration of graded doses of triiodothyronine (T(3)) resulted in a dose-dependent suppression of TSH and PRL. Basal thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) and cholesterol levels decreased, and ferritin and SHBG increased after L-T(3) administration, while creatine kinase and retinol did not change throughout the study. There was a positive correlation between basal TSH and TSH peak response to TRH at basal condition and after each sequential L-T(3) doses. On the other hand, TSH peak response to the TRH test did not predict cholesterol, TBG, ferritin, or SHBG values. Using the current methods on hormone and biochemical analysis, we standardized the response of many parameters to TRH stimulation test after sequential and graded T(3) suppression test in normal subjects. Our data suggest that the evaluation of the responses of the hypothalamus-pituitary axis to TRH test as

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Induced Synthesis of a Novel Viral Factor Mediates Efficient Replication of Genotype-1 Hepatitis E Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya P Nair

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV causes acute hepatitis in many parts of the world including Asia, Africa and Latin America. Though self-limiting in normal individuals, it results in ~30% mortality in infected pregnant women. It has also been reported to cause acute and chronic hepatitis in organ transplant patients. Of the seven viral genotypes, genotype-1 virus infects humans and is a major public health concern in South Asian countries. Sporadic cases of genotype-3 and 4 infection in human and animals such as pigs, deer, mongeese have been reported primarily from industrialized countries. Genotype-5, 6 and 7 viruses are known to infect animals such as wild boar and camel, respectively. Genotype-3 and 4 viruses have been successfully propagated in the laboratory in mammalian cell culture. However, genotype-1 virus replicates poorly in mammalian cell culture and no other efficient model exists to study its life cycle. Here, we report that endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress promotes genotype-1 HEV replication by inducing cap-independent, internal initiation mediated translation of a novel viral protein (named ORF4. Importantly, ORF4 expression and stimulatory effect of ER stress inducers on viral replication is specific to genotype-1. ORF4 protein sequence is mostly conserved among genotype-1 HEV isolates and ORF4 specific antibodies were detected in genotype-1 HEV patient serum. ORF4 interacted with multiple viral and host proteins and assembled a protein complex consisting of viral helicase, RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, X, host eEF1α1 (eukaryotic elongation factor 1 isoform-1 and tubulinβ. In association with eEF1α1, ORF4 stimulated viral RdRp activity. Furthermore, human hepatoma cells that stably express ORF4 or engineered proteasome resistant ORF4 mutant genome permitted enhanced viral replication. These findings reveal a positive role of ER stress in promoting genotype-1 HEV replication and pave the way towards development of an efficient

  20. Demonstration in vitro of inhibition in normal rat tissues yet stimulation in Jensen sarcoma cells of 5-fluorouracil anabolism by purine nucleosides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltz, R.E.; Haddad-Zackrison, L.

    1986-05-01

    It has been shown previously that the ability of tumor cells to anabolize 5-fluorouracil (FUra) to nucleotides can often be enhanced by exposing the cells to various purine nucleosides. Increases in FUra cytotoxicity have been observed to accompany this enhancement. In the present study the effects of purine nucleosides on FUra anabolism in rat tumor cells and in normal rat tissues sensitive to FUra were compared. Pieces of small intestine (SI), bone marrow suspensions (BM) and Jensen tumor cells were incubated in culture medium at 37/sup 0/ for 1 hr in the presence (or absence) of a selected purine nucleoside, then (2-/sup 14/C)FUra was added and the incubation was continued for another hr. Incorporation of radioactivity into the trichloroacetic acid-insoluble fraction in each case was determined as a measure of FUra anabolism. Inosine, adenosine and N/sup 6/-methyl-adenosine, 1 mM, stimulated FUra incorporation into the acid-insoluble fraction 2-3 fold in the tumor cells but inhibited this incorporation 59-70% in SI and 31-70% in BM. Attempts to further suppress FUra anabolism in the normal tissues resulted in a maximal inhibition of 92% in SI, using 1 mM alloxanthine, and a maximal inhibition of 84% in BM, employing combined 1 mM alloxanthine and 1 mM 5-aminoimidazole-4-carbox-amide ribonucleoside. These data suggest ways of selectively altering FUra anabolism in normal tissue and in tumor tissue of the tumor-bearing rat to improve the therapeutic index of FUra.

  1. BDNF protects against stress-induced impairments in spatial learning and memory and LTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radecki, Daniel T; Brown, Laurie M; Martinez, James; Teyler, Timothy J

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated whether infusion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) could ameliorate stress-induced impairments in spatial learning and memory as well as hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) of rats. Chronic immobilization stress (2 h/day x 7 days) significantly impaired spatial performance in the Morris water maze, elevated plasma corticosterone, and attenuated LTP in hippocampal slices from these animals as compared with normal control subjects. BDNF was infused into the left hippocampus (0.5 mul/h) for 14 days, beginning 7 days before the stress exposure. The BDNF group was protected from the deleterious effects of stress and performed at a level indistinguishable from normal control animals despite the presence of elevated corticosterone. BDNF alone and sham infusions had no effect on performance or LTP. These results demonstrate that spatial learning and memory, and LTP, a candidate neural substrate of learning and memory, are compromised during chronic stress, and may be protected by BDNF administration. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. The diagnosis and treatment of stress-induced anovulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berga, S L; Loucks, T L

    2005-02-01

    Behaviors that activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis or suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroidal (HPT) axis can disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in women and men. Individuals with functional hypothalamic hypogonadism typically engage in a combination of behaviors that serve as psychogenic stressors and present metabolic challenges. Complete recovery of gonadal function depends upon restoration of the HPA and HPT axes. Hormone replacement strategies have limited benefit because they do not promote recovery from these allostatic endocrine adjustments in the HPA and HPT axes. Indeed, the rationale for the use of sex steroid replacement is based on the erroneous assumption that functional forms of hypothalamic hypogonadism represent only an alteration in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis. Further, use of sex hormones masks deficits that accrue from altered HPA and HPT function. Long-term deleterious consequences of stress-induced anovulation may include an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, depression, other psychiatric conditions, and dementia. Although fertility can be restored with exogenous administration of gonadotropins or pulsatile GnRH, fertility management alone will not permit recovery of the HPA and HPT axes. Failure to reverse the hormonal milieu induced by stress may increase the likelihood of poor obstetrical, fetal, or neonatal outcomes. In contrast, behavioral and psychological interventions that address problematic behaviors and attitudes have the potential to permit resumption of ovarian function along with recovery of the HPT and HPA axes. Full endocrine recovery offers better individual, maternal, and child health.

  3. The stress-induced surface wave velocity variations in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvier, Agustin; Bittner, James; Evani, Sai Kalyan; Popovics, John S.

    2017-02-01

    This investigation studies the behavior of surface wave velocity in concrete specimens subjected to low levels of compressive and tensile stress in beams from applied flexural loads. Beam specimen is loaded in a 4-point-load bending configuration, generating uniaxial compression and tension stress fields at the top and bottom surfaces of the beam, respectively. Surface waves are generated through contactless air-coupled transducers and received through contact accelerometers. Results show a clear distinction in responses from compression and tension zones, where velocity increases in the former and decreases in the latter, with increasing load levels. These trends agree with existing acoustoelastic literature. Surface wave velocity tends to decrease more under tension than it tends to increase under compression, for equal load levels. It is observed that even at low stress levels, surface wave velocity is affected by acoustoelastic effects, coupled with plastic effects (stress-induced damage). The acoustoelastic effect is isolated by means of considering the Kaiser effect and by experimentally mitigating the viscoelastic effects of concrete. Results of this ongoing investigation contribute to the overall knowledge of the acoustoelastic behavior of concrete. Applications of this knowledge may include structural health monitoring of members under flexural loads, improved high order modelling of materials, and validation of results seen in dynamic acoustoelasticity testing.

  4. Effects of Kombucha on oxidative stress induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Ola Ali

    2009-11-27

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) may induce oxidative stress which generates free radicals and alters antioxidants or oxygen-free radical scavenging enzymes. Twenty male albino rats were divided into four groups: (1) the control group treated with vehicle, (2) Kombucha (KT)-treated group, (3) TCE-treated group and (4) KT/TCE-treated group. Kidney lipid peroxidation, glutathione content, nitric oxide (NO) and total blood free radical concentrations were evaluated. Serum urea, creatinine level, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were also measured. TCE administration increased the malondiahyde (MDA) and NO contents in kidney, urea and creatinine concentrations in serum, total free radical level in blood and GGT and LDH activities in serum, whereas it decreased the glutathione (GSH) level in kidney homogenate. KT administration significantly improved lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress induced by TCE. The present study indicates that Kombucha may repair damage caused by environmental pollutants such as TCE and may be beneficial to patient suffering from renal impairment.

  5. Effects of Kombucha on oxidative stress induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharib Ola

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trichloroethylene (TCE may induce oxidative stress which generates free radicals and alters antioxidants or oxygen-free radical scavenging enzymes. Methods Twenty male albino rats were divided into four groups: (1 the control group treated with vehicle, (2 Kombucha (KT-treated group, (3 TCE-treated group and (4 KT/TCE-treated group. Kidney lipid peroxidation, glutathione content, nitric oxide (NO and total blood free radical concentrations were evaluated. Serum urea, creatinine level, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activities were also measured. Results TCE administration increased the malondiahyde (MDA and NO contents in kidney, urea and creatinine concentrations in serum, total free radical level in blood and GGT and LDH activities in serum, whereas it decreased the glutathione (GSH level in kidney homogenate. KT administration significantly improved lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress induced by TCE. Conclusion The present study indicates that Kombucha may repair damage caused by environmental pollutants such as TCE and may be beneficial to patient suffering from renal impairment.

  6. Programming stress-induced altruistic death in engineered bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanouchi, Yu; Pai, Anand; Buchler, Nicolas E; You, Lingchong

    2012-01-01

    Programmed death is often associated with a bacterial stress response. This behavior appears paradoxical, as it offers no benefit to the individual. This paradox can be explained if the death is ‘altruistic': the killing of some cells can benefit the survivors through release of ‘public goods'. However, the conditions where bacterial programmed death becomes advantageous have not been unambiguously demonstrated experimentally. Here, we determined such conditions by engineering tunable, stress-induced altruistic death in the bacterium Escherichia coli. Using a mathematical model, we predicted the existence of an optimal programmed death rate that maximizes population growth under stress. We further predicted that altruistic death could generate the ‘Eagle effect', a counter-intuitive phenomenon where bacteria appear to grow better when treated with higher antibiotic concentrations. In support of these modeling insights, we experimentally demonstrated both the optimality in programmed death rate and the Eagle effect using our engineered system. Our findings fill a critical conceptual gap in the analysis of the evolution of bacterial programmed death, and have implications for a design of antibiotic treatment. PMID:23169002

  7. Stress-induced Ageing of Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Marcel; Sennhauser, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are well established for use in portable consumer products and are increasingly used in high power electro-mobility and photovoltaic storage applications. In hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles degradation and useful lifetime at standard operation conditions are critical parameters in addition to performance and safety. Here stress-induced ageing of commercially available high power battery cells of the type A123 AHR32113M1 Ultra-B, consisting of a LiFePO(4) cathode and a graphite anode have been investigated. A usually accepted capacity loss for electric vehicles of 20% was reached after 8560 stress profiles corresponding to a driving distance of almost 200'000 km. Cycling with a stress profile applying constant power corresponding to the average power and energy of a full stress profile and starting at 60% state of charge showed a much faster capacity loss. Electric impedance measurements show the dependence of the capacity loss and constant phase element at low frequency, indicating Li-ion diffusion blocking in the cathode. Microscopic analysis of anode, separator, and cathode, shows defect formation in bulk material and at interfaces.

  8. Predicting Stress-induced Anisotropy around a Borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X.; Fehler, M.; Zhu, Z.; Toksoz, M. N.; Earth Resources Laboratory

    2010-12-01

    The knowledge of the in situ stress state around a borehole is of primary importance for investigating the stability of the borehole, when estimating the likely orientations of open fractures, and for designing hydraulic fracture operations. Two major steps may be used to estimate the in situ stress: first, we measure the near-wellbore anisotropy from acoustic logs, which can be done using a relatively well-developed technique; second, we use some inversion scheme to estimate the in situ stress state by assuming that all near-wellbore anisotropy is caused by the anisotropic near-wellbore stress field that has been altered by the presence of the borehole. In order to develop an accurate and efficient inversion scheme, the relation between the stress and formation anisotropy needs to be quantitatively determined. Because the stress field near the wellbore is strongly influenced by the presence of the borehole, in this paper, we propose an iterative numerical approach to estimate the stress-induced anisotropy around a borehole for any given stress state by applying Mavko’s model (1995) and a finite-element method. The accuracy of our approach is validated through laboratory measurements of the stress-strain relation of Berea sandstone under uniaxial loading. Our numerical studies show that this approach can be applied to calculate the formation anisotropy around a borehole for a wide stress range. This approach could potentially provide a good forward model for the in situ stress inversion.

  9. Alarm pheromone that aggravates stress-induced hyperthermia is soluble in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Kikusui, Takefumi; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2005-07-01

    We previously reported that stressed male Wistar rats released alarm pheromone from the perianal region, which aggravated stress-induced hyperthermia and increased Fos expression in the mitral/tufted cell layer of the accessory olfactory bulb in recipient rats. In this study, we attempted to obtain this pheromone in water using these responses as bioassay parameters. Water droplets were collected from the ceiling of a box in which no animal was placed, or from a box in which an anesthetized donor rat was given electrical stimulation to either the neck or perianal regions in order to induce neck odor or alarm pheromone release, respectively. Then we placed one of the three kinds of water-containing filter papers on the wall of a recipient's home cage and observed heart rate, body temperature and behavioral responses, as well as Fos expression in the main and accessory olfactory bulbs of the recipient. The water collected from the box containing the alarm pheromone was found to generate a reproduction of all of the responses seen in the animal that had been directly exposed to alarm pheromone in our previous studies. These results suggest that the alarm pheromone is soluble in water.

  10. Perivascular Mast Cells Govern Shear Stress-Induced Arteriogenesis by Orchestrating Leukocyte Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omary Chillo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The body has the capacity to compensate for an occluded artery by creating a natural bypass upon increased fluid shear stress. How this mechanical force is translated into collateral artery growth (arteriogenesis is unresolved. We show that extravasation of neutrophils mediated by the platelet receptor GPIbα and uPA results in Nox2-derived reactive oxygen radicals, which activate perivascular mast cells. These c-kit+/CXCR-4+ cells stimulate arteriogenesis by recruiting additional neutrophils as well as growth-promoting monocytes and T cells. Additionally, mast cells may directly contribute to vascular remodeling and vascular cell proliferation through increased MMP activity and by supplying growth-promoting factors. Boosting mast cell recruitment and activation effectively promotes arteriogenesis, thereby protecting tissue from severe ischemic damage. We thus find that perivascular mast cells are central regulators of shear stress-induced arteriogenesis by orchestrating leukocyte function and growth factor/cytokine release, thus providing a therapeutic target for treatment of vascular occlusive diseases.

  11. Shear stress induced by an interstitial level of slow flow increases the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells through TAZ activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Min Kim

    Full Text Available Shear stress activates cellular signaling involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and migration. However, the mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation under interstitial flow are not fully understood. Here, we show the increased osteogenic differentiation of MSCs under exposure to constant, extremely low shear stress created by osmotic pressure-induced flow in a microfluidic chip. The interstitial level of shear stress in the proposed microfluidic system stimulated nuclear localization of TAZ (transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif, a transcriptional modulator of MSCs, activated TAZ target genes such as CTGF and Cyr61, and induced osteogenic differentiation. TAZ-depleted cells showed defects in shear stress-induced osteogenic differentiation. In shear stress induced cellular signaling, Rho signaling pathway was important forthe nuclear localization of TAZ. Taken together, these results suggest that TAZ is an important mediator of interstitial flow-driven shear stress signaling in osteoblast differentiation of MSCs.

  12. Attenuation of stress-induced anorexia in brown trout (Salmo trutta) by pre-treatment with dietary l-tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, Erik; Sørensen, Christina; Bakke, Marit Jørgensen; Nilsson, Göran E; Overli, Oyvind

    2007-04-01

    The general consensus is that brain serotonin (5-HT) inhibits feed intake in teleost fishes and other vertebrates. Dietary manipulations with the 5-HT precursor tryptophan (TRP) have, however, yielded contradictory effects on feed intake, while studies of the endocrine response to stress indicate that the effects of TRP-enriched feed are context dependent. A characteristic behavioural response to stress is a reduction in feed intake, and in the present study we investigated whether pre-treatment with TRP-enriched feed affected stress-induced changes in feeding behaviour in brown trout (Salmo trutta). After acclimatisation in observation aquaria, isolated fish were fed control or TRP-supplemented feed for 7 d, whereupon they were transferred to a novel environment, in which all fish were fed control feed. Transfer to a new environment resulted in decreased feeding in both the TRP pre-treated and the control-treated group. However, this decrease was more pronounced in the control-treated group. Previous experiments have concluded that stimulation of brain 5-HT systems by TRP enhancement does not affect feed intake in salmonid fishes, but in these studies food intake was observed in unstressed animals only. The present study suggests that pre-treatment with dietary TRP attenuates stress-induced anorexia. Hence, it appears that the effect of dietary manipulations of TRP on feeding behaviour is dependent on the stress levels experienced by experimental animals. These behavioural data are discussed in the context of the involvement of 5-HT in appetite regulation.

  13. Selective attenuation of norepinephrine release and stress-induced heart rate increase by partial adenosine A1 agonism.

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    Lorenz Bott-Flügel

    Full Text Available The release of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE is modulated by presynaptic adenosine receptors. In the present study we investigated the effect of a partial activation of this feedback mechanism. We hypothesized that partial agonism would have differential effects on NE release in isolated hearts as well as on heart rate in vivo depending on the genetic background and baseline sympathetic activity. In isolated perfused hearts of Wistar and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR, NE release was induced by electrical stimulation under control conditions (S1, and with capadenoson 6 · 10(-8 M (30 µg/l, 6 · 10(-7 M (300 µg/l or 2-chloro-N(6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA 10(-6 M (S2. Under control conditions (S1, NE release was significantly higher in SHR hearts compared to Wistar (766+/-87 pmol/g vs. 173+/-18 pmol/g, p<0.01. Capadenoson led to a concentration-dependent decrease of the stimulation-induced NE release in SHR (S2/S1  =  0.90 ± 0.08 with capadenoson 6 · 10(-8 M, 0.54 ± 0.02 with 6 · 10(-7 M, but not in Wistar hearts (S2/S1  =  1.05 ± 0.12 with 6 · 10(-8 M, 1.03 ± 0.09 with 6 · 10(-7 M. CCPA reduced NE release to a similar degree in hearts from both strains. In vivo capadenoson did not alter resting heart rate in Wistar rats or SHR. Restraint stress induced a significantly greater increase of heart rate in SHR than in Wistar rats. Capadenoson blunted this stress-induced tachycardia by 45% in SHR, but not in Wistar rats. Using a [(35S]GTPγS assay we demonstrated that capadenoson is a partial agonist compared to the full agonist CCPA (74+/-2% A(1-receptor stimulation. These results suggest that partial adenosine A(1-agonism dampens stress-induced tachycardia selectively in rats susceptible to strong increases in sympathetic activity, most likely due to a presynaptic attenuation of NE release.

  14. Effects of Gladiolus dalenii on the Stress-Induced Behavioral, Neurochemical, and Reproductive Changes in Rats

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    David Fotsing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gladiolus dalenii is a plant commonly used in many regions of Cameroon as a cure for various diseases like headaches, epilepsy, schizophrenia, and mood disorders. Recent studies have revealed that the aqueous extract of G. dalenii (AEGD exhibited antidepressant-like properties in rats. Therefore, we hypothesized that the AEGD could protect from the stress-induced behavioral, neurochemical, and reproductive changes in rats. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the effect of the AEGD on behavioral, neurochemical, and reproductive characteristics, using female rats subjected to chronic immobilization stress. The chronic immobilization stress (3 h per day for 28 days was applied to induce female reproductive and behavioral impairments in rats. The immobilization stress was provoked in rats by putting them separately inside cylindrical restrainers with ventilated doors at ambient temperature. The plant extract was given to rats orally everyday during 28 days, 5 min before induction of stress. On a daily basis, a vaginal smear was made to assess the duration of the different phases of the estrous cycle and at the end of the 28 days of chronic immobilization stress, the rat’s behavior was assessed in the elevated plus maze. They were sacrificed by cervical disruption. The organs were weighed, the ovary histology done, and the biochemical parameters assessed. The findings of this research revealed that G. dalenii increased the entries and the time of open arm exploration in the elevated plus maze. Evaluation of the biochemical parameters levels indicated that there was a significant reduction in the corticosterone, progesterone, and prolactin levels in the G. dalenii aqueous extract treated rats compared to stressed rats whereas the levels of serotonin, triglycerides, adrenaline, cholesterol, glucose estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone were significantly increased in the stressed rats treated with, G. dalenii

  15. Electroconvulsive stimulations prevent stress-induced morphological changes in the hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hageman, I; Nielsen, M; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2008-01-01

    pathophysiological events contribute to the shrinkage phenomenon. Animal studies have shown that various stress paradigms can induce dendritic retraction in the CA3 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. Since electroconvulsive treatment is the most effective treatment in humans with major depression, we investigated...

  16. Metformin attenuates ER stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun; Thompson, Jeremy; Hu, Ying; Das, Anindita; Lesnefsky, Edward J

    2017-12-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, a disturbance of the ER function, contributes to cardiac injury. ER and mitochondria are closely connected organelles within cells. ER stress contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction, which is a key factor to increase cardiac injury. Metformin, a traditional anti-diabetic drug, decreases cardiac injury during ischemia-reperfusion. Metformin also inhibits ER stress in cultured cells. We hypothesized that metformin can attenuate the ER stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent cardiac injury. Thapsigargin (THAP, 3 mg/kg) was used to induce ER stress in C57BL/6 mice. Cell injury and mitochondrial function were evaluated in the mouse heart 48 hours after 1-time THAP treatment. Metformin was dissolved in drinking water (0.5 g/250 ml) and fed to mice for 7 days before THAP injection. Metformin feeding continued after THAP treatment. THAP treatment increased apoptosis in mouse myocardium compared to control. THAP also led to decreased oxidative phosphorylation in heart mitochondria-oxidizing complex I substrates. THAP decreased the calcium retention capacity, indicating that ER stress sensitizes mitochondria to mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. The cytosolic C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) content was markedly increased in THAP-treated hearts compared to control, particularly in the nucleus. Metformin prevented the THAP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced CHOP content in cytosol and nucleus. Thus, metformin reduces cardiac injury during ER stress through the protection of cardiac mitochondria and attenuation of CHOP expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chest Pain and Mental Stress Induced Myocardial Ischemia: Sex Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimple, Pratik; Hammadah, Muhammad; Wilmot, Kobina; Ramadan, Ronnie; Mheid, Ibhar Al; Levantsevych, Oleksiy; Sullivan, Samaah; Garcia, Ernest V; Nye, Jonathon; Shah, Amit J; Ward, Laura; Mehta, Puja; Raggi, Paolo; Bremner, J Douglas; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Vaccarino, Viola

    2017-12-07

    Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) is a frequent phenomenon in patients with coronary artery disease. Women with coronary artery disease tend to have more MSIMI and more chest pain/anginal symptoms than men, but whether the association between MSIMI and angina burden differs in women and men, is unknown. This was a cross-sectional study with experimental manipulation of 950 individuals with stable coronary artery disease. Chest pain/angina frequency in the previous 4 weeks was assessed with the Seattle Angina Questionnaire's angina-frequency subscale. MSIMI was assessed with myocardial perfusion imaging during mental stress (standardized public speaking task). Presence of MSIMI was based on expert readers and established criteria. A conventional (exercise or pharmacological) stress test was used as a control condition. Overall, 338 individuals (37%) reported angina; 112 (12%) developed MSIMI, and 256 (29%) developed conventional stress ischemia. Women who reported angina had almost double the probability to develop MSIMI (19% vs. 10%), adjusted prevalence rate ratio (PRR)= 1.90, 95% CI: 1.04-3.46), while there was no such difference in men (11% vs. 11%, adjusted PRR= 1.09, 95% CI: 0.66-1.82). No association was found between angina symptoms and conventional stress ischemia for either women or men. Results for ischemia as a continuous variable were similar. In women, but not in men, anginal symptoms may be a marker of vulnerability towards ischemia induced by psychological stress. These results highlight the psychosocial origins of angina in women, and may have important implications for the management and prognosis of women with angina. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Stress induced premature senescence : a new culprit in ovarian tumorigenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorantla Venkata Raghuram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress induced premature senescence (SIPS is a relative extension to the concept of exogenous cellular insult. Besides persistent double strand (ds DNA breaks and increased β-galactosidase activity, biological significance of telomeric attrition in conjunction with senescence associated secretory phenotype (SASP has been highlighted in SIPS. To gain insight on the potential role of this unique phenomenon invoked upon environmental stress, we sequentially validated the molecular repercussions of this event in ovarian epithelial cells after exposure to methyl isocyanate, an elegant regulator of cellular biotransformation. Persistent accumulation of DNA damage response factors phospho-ATM/γ-H2AX, morphological changes with increased cell size and early yet incremental β-gal staining, imply the inception of premature senescence. Advent of SASP is attributed by prolonged secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines along with untimely but significant G1/S cell cycle arrest. Telomeric dysfunction associated with premature senescence is indicative of early loss of TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2 protein and resultant multiple translocations. Induction of senescence-associated heterochromatic foci formation showcases the chromatin alterations in form of trimethylated H3K9me3 in conjunction with H4 hypoacetylation and altered miRNA expression. Anchorage-independent neoplastic growth observed in treated cells reaffirms the oncogenic transformation following the exposure. Collectively, we infer the possible role of SIPS, as a central phenomenon, to perturbed genomic integrity in ovarian surface epithelium, orchestrated through SASP and chromatin level alterations, a hitherto unknown molecular paradigm. Although translational utility of SIPS as a biomarker for estimating ovarian cancer risk seems evident, further investigations will be imperative to provide a tangible way for its precise validation in clinical settings.

  19. Gene × cognition interaction on stress-induced eating: effect of rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Robbie; Markus, C Rob

    2015-04-01

    People often crave for high-caloric sweet foods when facing stress and this 'emotional eating' is a most important cause for weight gain and obesity. Eating under stress contrasts with the normally expected response of a loss of appetite, yet in spite of intensive research from neurobiological and cognitive disciplines we still do not know why stress or negative affect triggers overeating in so many of us. Since the prevalence of overweight and obesity still rises, the discovery of crucial risk factors is a most desirable goal of today's research on sub-optimal eating habits. This paper summarizes the most relevant current knowledge from the (human) literature regarding cognitive and biological vulnerabilities for stress-induced emotional eating. A (non-systematic) review of the most relevant studies reveals that most studies contemplate a rather one-directional way of focusing on either cognitive or biological factors, showing inconsistent results. The current paper elaborates and/or integrates these findings into a biological-cognitive interaction model in which a specific combination of genetic and cognitive vulnerabilities are thought to increase our bio-behavioral response to stress, critically increasing the rewarding value of pleasant foods and, hence, emotional eating. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. RSK4 inhibition results in bypass of stress-induced and oncogene-induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vicente, Laura; Pons, Berta; Coch, Laura; Teixidó, Cristina; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Armengol, Gemma; Ramon Y Cajal, Santiago

    2011-04-01

    p90 Ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) 4 is a serine-threonine kinase that belongs to the p90RSK family. RSK4 has been proposed as a tumor suppressor gene, related with anti-invasive activity, inhibition of the RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and induction of senescence. Despite the related findings, little is known about RSK4 effectors. In human tumors, RSK4 is downregulated even in some benign lesions, such as colon adenomas and breast papillomas, indicating that RSK4 inhibition could be an early event in cellular transformation. For cells to achieve immortality and transformation, it is believed that they must override senescence. In the present study, we found that when RSK4 is inhibited in vitro using short hairpin RNA technology, cells can bypass stress-induced senescence and oncogene-induced senescence: normal human fibroblasts grew following oxidative stress, induction of DNA damage and KRAS(V12) or BRAF(E600) overexpression. To investigate the RSK4 effectors, we used short hairpin RNA or inhibitor molecules against major senescence mediators. We found that RSK4-induced senescence is mediated through p21, but is independent of p16, p38MAPKs and induction of reactive oxygen species, delimiting RSK4 signaling. These data support the importance of RSK4 for regulating senescence and indicate that downregulation of this kinase could be an important element in facilitating cell transformation.

  1. Autoantibodies against stress-induced phosphoprotein-1 as a novel biomarker candidate for ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghoon; Cho, Hanbyoul; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Young Tae; Park, Yong Won; Kim, Bo Wook; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2010-07-01

    Detection of autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens (TAA) has recently been shown to be a powerful tool for early detection of various cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using autoantibodies against TAA as novel biomarkers by a proteomics-based approach in patients with ovarian cancer. We used two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis analysis of immuno-precipitated tumor antigens (2D-DITA) to compare the levels of autoantibodies in pretreatment and posttreatment sera of patients with ovarian cancers. The identified autoantibodies were validated by SYBR Green real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). We further evaluated the level of autoantibody in sera of 68 ovarian cancer patients by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The autoantibody directed against stress-induced phosphoprotein-1 (STIP-1) emerged as a novel biomarker candidate for ovarian cancer. SYBR Green PCR and IHC confirmed that the STIP-1 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly up-regulated in ovarian cancers compared with normal and benign tumors (P = 0.003 and P ovarian cancer patients compared with healthy controls (P = 0.03). The results suggest that 2D-DITA is a useful tool to detect autoantibodies and that STIP-1 is a potential biomarker candidate for ovarian cancers. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Kappa opioid receptors regulate stress-induced cocaine seeking and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziane, Nicholas M; Polter, Abigail M; Briand, Lisa A; Pierce, R Christopher; Kauer, Julie A

    2013-03-06

    Stress facilitates reinstatement of addictive drug seeking in animals and promotes relapse in humans. Acute stress has marked and long-lasting effects on plasticity at both inhibitory and excitatory synapses on dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a key region necessary for drug reinforcement. Stress blocks long-term potentiation at GABAergic synapses on dopamine neurons in the VTA (LTPGABA), potentially removing a normal brake on activity. Here we show that blocking kappa opioid receptors (KORs) prior to forced-swim stress rescues LTPGABA. In contrast, blocking KORs does not prevent stress-induced potentiation of excitatory synapses nor morphine-induced block of LTPGABA. Using a kappa receptor antagonist as a selective tool to test the role of LTPGABA in vivo, we find that blocking KORs within the VTA prior to forced-swim stress prevents reinstatement of cocaine seeking. These results suggest that KORs may represent a useful therapeutic target for treatment of stress-triggered relapse in substance abuse. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and matrix loss of chondrocytes is inhibited by eicosapentaenoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Shuhei; Hayashi, Shinya; Fujishiro, Takaaki; Kawakita, Kohei; Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Hashimoto, Shingo; Iwasa, Kenjiro; Chinzei, Nobuaki; Kihara, Shinsuke; Haneda, Masahiko; Ueha, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Takayuki; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is an antioxidant and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid that reduces the production of inflammatory cytokines. We evaluated the role of EPA in chondrocyte apoptosis and degeneration. Normal human chondrocytes were treated with EPA and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Expression of metalloproteinases (MMPs) was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and that of apoptosis-related proteins was detected by western blotting. Chondrocyte apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. C57BL/6J mice were used for the detection of MMP expression by immunohistochemistry and for investigation of chondrocyte apoptosis. EPA inhibited SNP-induced chondrocyte apoptosis, caspase 3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and p53, and expression of MMP3 and MMP13. Intra-articular injection of EPA prevented the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) by inhibiting MMP13 expression and chondrocyte apoptosis. EPA treatment can control oxidative stress-induced OA progression, and thus may be a new approach for OA therapy. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Ancient genes establish stress-induced mutation as a hallmark of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Luis; Bussey, Kimberly J; Orr, Adam J; Miočević, Milica; Lineweaver, Charles H; Davies, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is sometimes depicted as a reversion to single cell behavior in cells adapted to live in a multicellular assembly. If this is the case, one would expect that mutation in cancer disrupts functional mechanisms that suppress cell-level traits detrimental to multicellularity. Such mechanisms should have evolved with or after the emergence of multicellularity. This leads to two related, but distinct hypotheses: 1) Somatic mutations in cancer will occur in genes that are younger than the emergence of multicellularity (1000 million years [MY]); and 2) genes that are frequently mutated in cancer and whose mutations are functionally important for the emergence of the cancer phenotype evolved within the past 1000 million years, and thus would exhibit an age distribution that is skewed to younger genes. In order to investigate these hypotheses we estimated the evolutionary ages of all human genes and then studied the probability of mutation and their biological function in relation to their age and genomic location for both normal germline and cancer contexts. We observed that under a model of uniform random mutation across the genome, controlled for gene size, genes less than 500 MY were more frequently mutated in both cases. Paradoxically, causal genes, defined in the COSMIC Cancer Gene Census, were depleted in this age group. When we used functional enrichment analysis to explain this unexpected result we discovered that COSMIC genes with recessive disease phenotypes were enriched for DNA repair and cell cycle control. The non-mutated genes in these pathways are orthologous to those underlying stress-induced mutation in bacteria, which results in the clustering of single nucleotide variations. COSMIC genes were less common in regions where the probability of observing mutational clusters is high, although they are approximately 2-fold more likely to harbor mutational clusters compared to other human genes. Our results suggest this ancient mutational response to

  5. Levels of troponin release can aid in the early exclusion of stress-induced (takotsubo) cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaraj, Radhakrishnan; Sorrell, Vincent L; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2009-01-01

    Stress-induced cardiomyopathy is usually associated with an increased level of cardiac enzymes, leading to difficulties in differentiating this condition from acute coronary syndrome. The final diagnosis is usually made based on angiographic findings revealing normal coronary arteries. It was hypothesized that maximal cardiac enzyme elevation in these patients should have an upper limit. In the present study, reported cases of stress cardiomyopathy were compared with documented cardiac enzyme levels to evaluate the upper cut-off point of troponin in this population. All of the articles published in PubMed and MEDLINE from November 2007 to July 2008, on takotsubo or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, were identified. Only the cases that reported the absolute or mean level of cardiac enzymes were included. The level of various enzymes were correlated with cardiac function, and the upper limit of enzyme elevation was calculated in these patients. A total of 114 patients (mean [+/- SD] age 63.5+/-14.5 years) were included in the study. Seventy-one per cent of the patients were older than 50 years of age and 86% were female. Mean values for troponin I, troponin T, creatine kinase (CK) and CK-MB were 6.5 ng/mL, 3.6 ng/mL, 556 U/L and 32.9 U/L, respectively. All of the patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy had a troponin T level of 6 ng/mL or less and troponin I level of 15 ng/mL or less. Troponin T showed a significant inverse correlation with initial ejection fraction (R(2)=0.6), which was not seen with the levels of troponin I, CK and CK-MB. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy was classified as classic (66.7%), mid-cavitary (10%), reverse (23.3%) or local (0%). Among patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, troponin T level correlated with initial ejection fraction. Furthermore, the diagnosis of takotsubo cardiomyopathy appears to be unlikely in patients with troponin T greater than 6 ng/mL or troponin I greater than 15 ng/mL.

  6. Ancient genes establish stress-induced mutation as a hallmark of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Cisneros

    Full Text Available Cancer is sometimes depicted as a reversion to single cell behavior in cells adapted to live in a multicellular assembly. If this is the case, one would expect that mutation in cancer disrupts functional mechanisms that suppress cell-level traits detrimental to multicellularity. Such mechanisms should have evolved with or after the emergence of multicellularity. This leads to two related, but distinct hypotheses: 1 Somatic mutations in cancer will occur in genes that are younger than the emergence of multicellularity (1000 million years [MY]; and 2 genes that are frequently mutated in cancer and whose mutations are functionally important for the emergence of the cancer phenotype evolved within the past 1000 million years, and thus would exhibit an age distribution that is skewed to younger genes. In order to investigate these hypotheses we estimated the evolutionary ages of all human genes and then studied the probability of mutation and their biological function in relation to their age and genomic location for both normal germline and cancer contexts. We observed that under a model of uniform random mutation across the genome, controlled for gene size, genes less than 500 MY were more frequently mutated in both cases. Paradoxically, causal genes, defined in the COSMIC Cancer Gene Census, were depleted in this age group. When we used functional enrichment analysis to explain this unexpected result we discovered that COSMIC genes with recessive disease phenotypes were enriched for DNA repair and cell cycle control. The non-mutated genes in these pathways are orthologous to those underlying stress-induced mutation in bacteria, which results in the clustering of single nucleotide variations. COSMIC genes were less common in regions where the probability of observing mutational clusters is high, although they are approximately 2-fold more likely to harbor mutational clusters compared to other human genes. Our results suggest this ancient mutational

  7. A role for mitochondrial oxidants in stress-induced premature senescence of human vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogita Mistry

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are a major source of cellular oxidants and have been implicated in aging and associated pathologies, notably cardiovascular diseases. Vascular cell senescence is observed in experimental and human cardiovascular pathologies. Our previous data highlighted a role for angiotensin II in the induction of telomere-dependent and -independent premature senescence of human vascular smooth muscle cells and suggested this was due to production of superoxide by NADPH oxidase. However, since a role for mitochondrial oxidants was not ruled out we hypothesise that angiotensin II mediates senescence by mitochondrial superoxide generation and suggest that inhibition of superoxide may prevent vascular smooth muscle cell aging in vitro. Cellular senescence was induced using a stress-induced premature senescence protocol consisting of three successive once-daily exposure of cells to 1×10−8 mol/L angiotensin II and was dependent upon the type-1 angiotensin II receptor. Angiotensin stimulated NADPH-dependent superoxide production as estimated using lucigenin chemiluminescence in cell lysates and this was attenuated by the mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitor, rotenone. Angiotensin also resulted in an increase in mitoSOX fluorescence indicating stimulation of mitochondrial superoxide. Significantly, the induction of senescence by angiotensin II was abrogated by rotenone and by the mitochondria-targeted superoxide dismutase mimetic, mitoTEMPO. These data suggest that mitochondrial superoxide is necessary for the induction of stress-induced premature senescence by angiotensin II and taken together with other data suggest that mitochondrial cross-talk with NADPH oxidases, via as yet unidentified signalling pathways, is likely to play a key role.

  8. Evaluation of Cassia tora Linn. against oxidative stress-induced DNA and cell membrane damage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    R Kumar; Ramesh Narasingappa; Chandrashekar Joshi; Talakatta Girish; Ummiti Prasada Rao; Ananda Danagoudar

    2017-01-01

    .... against oxidative stress-induced DNA and cell membrane damage. Materials and Methods: The total and profiles of flavonoids were identified and quantified through reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography...

  9. Physiological correlates of stress-induced decrements in human perceptual performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Stress-induced changes in human performance have been thought to result from alterations in the "multidimensional arousal state" of the individual, as indexed by alterations in the physiological and psychological mechanisms controlling performance. I...

  10. Catalase activity as a biomarker for mild-stress-induced robustness in Bacillus weihenstephanensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besten, den H.M.W.; Effraimidou, S.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to survive and grow in changing environments by activating stress adaptation mechanisms which may enhance bacterial robustness. Stress-induced enhanced robustness complicates the predictability of microbial inactivation. Using psychrotolerant Bacillus weihenstephanensis

  11. Fluid shear stress induces the phosphorylation of small heat shock proteins in vascular endothelial cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, S; Piotrowicz, R S; Levin, E G; Shyy, Y J; Chien, S

    1996-01-01

    .... In bovine aortic endothelial cells stably transfected with the wild-type human HSP27 gene, shear stress induced the phosphorylation of both the exogenous human HSP27 and the endogenous bovine HSP25...

  12. stress-induced release of prolactin in cycling and anoestrous ewes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STRESS-INDUCED RELEASE OF PROLACTIN IN CYCLING AND ANOESTROUS EWES,. AND IN WETHERS. OPSOMMING: VRYSTELLING VAN PROLAKTIEN ONDER SPANNINGSTOESTANDE BY OOIE IN VERSKILLENDE STADIUMS VAN. REPRODUKSIE, EN BY HAMELS. Aangesien dit bekend is dat spanning die ...

  13. The profile of lysosomal exoglycosidases in replicative and stress-induced senescence in early passage human fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Knaś

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the profiles of the exoglycosidases: N-acetyl-β-hexosoaminidase, β glucuronidase and β galactosidase, α mannosidase and α fucosidase in fibroblast culture undergoing replicative and stress-induced senescence. Half of the cell culture was grown in normal conditions, without the stressor, and the other half of the cell was treated with 0.15 mM tert-butylhydroperoxide. The activities of total N-acetyl-β-hexosoaminidase as well as β glucuronidase in the cell lysate were determined in duplicates using the method of Marciniak et al. The activities of β galactosidase, α mannosidase and α fucosidase in the cell lysate were determined in duplicates using the method of Chatteriee et al. with the modification by Zwierz et al. The activities of the exoglycosidases examined, with the exception of β glucuronidase, showed a significant increase between individual days of the experiment in both non-stressed and stressed fibroblast cell culture. On each day of the experiment, in the cell lysate of stressed fibroblasts, the activities of exoglycosidases were significantly higher compared to the non-stressed cells. There were very strong correlations between SA-β-GAL staining and b galactosidase activity on individual days of the experiment in both non-stressed and stressed fibroblast cell culture. Replicative and stress-induced senescence results in significant changes to the level of lysosomal exoglycosidases, and results in enhanced lysosomal degradative capacity.

  14. The profile of lysosomal exoglycosidases in replicative and stress-induced senescence in early passage human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaś, Małgorzata; Zalewska, Anna; Krętowski, Rafał; Niczyporuk, Marek; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Cechowska-Pasko, Marzanna; Waszkiel, Danuta; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2012-07-05

    The aim of the present study was to assess the profiles of the exoglycosidases: N-acetyl-β-hexosoaminidase, β glucuronidase and β galactosidase, α mannosidase and α fucosidase in fibroblast culture undergoing replicative and stress-induced senescence. Half of the cell culture was grown in normal conditions, without the stressor, and the other half of the cell was treated with 0.15 mM tert-butylhydroperoxide. The activities of total N-acetyl-β-hexosoaminidase as well as β glucuronidase in the cell lysate were determined in duplicates using the method of Marciniak et al. The activities of β galactosidase, α mannosidase and α fucosidase in the cell lysate were determined in duplicates using the method of Chatteriee et al. with the modification by Zwierz et al. The activities of the exoglycosidases examined, with the exception of β glucuronidase, showed a significant increase between individual days of the experiment in both non-stressed and stressed fibroblast cell culture. On each day of the experiment, in the cell lysate of stressed fibroblasts, the activities of exoglycosidases were significantly higher compared to the non-stressed cells. There were very strong correlations between SA-β-GAL staining and b galactosidase activity on individual days of the experiment in both non-stressed and stressed fibroblast cell culture. Replicative and stress-induced senescence results in significant changes to the level of lysosomal exoglycosidases, and results in enhanced lysosomal degradative capacity.

  15. Stress-Induced Reinstatement of Drug Seeking: 20 Years of Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantsch, John R; Baker, David A; Funk, Douglas; Lê, Anh D; Shaham, Yavin

    2016-01-01

    In human addicts, drug relapse and craving are often provoked by stress. Since 1995, this clinical scenario has been studied using a rat model of stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking. Here, we first discuss the generality of stress-induced reinstatement to different drugs of abuse, different stressors, and different behavioral procedures. We also discuss neuropharmacological mechanisms, and brain areas and circuits controlling stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking. We conclude by discussing results from translational human laboratory studies and clinical trials that were inspired by results from rat studies on stress-induced reinstatement. Our main conclusions are (1) The phenomenon of stress-induced reinstatement, first shown with an intermittent footshock stressor in rats trained to self-administer heroin, generalizes to other abused drugs, including cocaine, methamphetamine, nicotine, and alcohol, and is also observed in the conditioned place preference model in rats and mice. This phenomenon, however, is stressor specific and not all stressors induce reinstatement of drug seeking. (2) Neuropharmacological studies indicate the involvement of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), noradrenaline, dopamine, glutamate, kappa/dynorphin, and several other peptide and neurotransmitter systems in stress-induced reinstatement. Neuropharmacology and circuitry studies indicate the involvement of CRF and noradrenaline transmission in bed nucleus of stria terminalis and central amygdala, and dopamine, CRF, kappa/dynorphin, and glutamate transmission in other components of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system (ventral tegmental area, medial prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and nucleus accumbens). (3) Translational human laboratory studies and a recent clinical trial study show the efficacy of alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists in decreasing stress-induced drug craving and stress-induced initial heroin lapse.

  16. Necrosis, and then stress induced necrosis-like cell death, but not apoptosis, should be the preferred cell death mode for chemotherapy: clearance of a few misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ju; Lou, Xiaomin; Jin, Longyu; Zhou, Rongjia; Liu, Siqi; Xu, Ningzhi; Liao, D Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Cell death overarches carcinogenesis and is a center of cancer researches, especially therapy studies. There have been many nomenclatures on cell death, but only three cell death modes are genuine, i.e. apoptosis, necrosis and stress-induced cell death (SICD). Like apoptosis, SICD is programmed. Like necrosis, SICD is a pathological event and may trigger regeneration and scar formation. Therefore, SICD has subtypes of stress-induced apoptosis-like cell death (SIaLCD) and stress-induced necrosis-like cell death (SInLCD). Whereas apoptosis removes redundant but healthy cells, SICD removes useful but ill or damaged cells. Many studies on cell death involve cancer tissues that resemble parasites in the host patients, which is a complicated system as it involves immune clearance of the alien cancer cells by the host. Cancer resembles an evolutionarily lower-level organism having a weaker apoptosis potential and poorer DNA repair mechanisms. Hence, targeting apoptosis for cancer therapy, i.e. killing via SIaLCD, will be less efficacious and more toxic. On the other hand, necrosis of cancer cells releases cellular debris and components to stimulate immune function, thus counteracting therapy-caused immune suppression and making necrosis better than SIaLCD for chemo drug development.

  17. Oxidative stress induced pulmonary endothelial cell proliferation is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cellular hyper-proliferation, endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress are hallmarks of the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension. Indeed, pulmonary endothelial cells proliferation is susceptible to redox state modulation. Some studies suggest that superoxide stimulates endothelial cell proliferation while others have ...

  18. Oxidative stress induces idiopathic infertility in Egyptian males

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-19

    Jan 19, 2012 ... herpes or else with imbalance in levels of gonadal steroids and trophic hormones [example, testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, follicle stimulating hormone, leutinizing hormone, and androgen receptor]. However, in nearly 25% cases of male infertility no organic cause is identified (idiopathic infertility) ...

  19. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) alleviates the oxidative stress induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-03

    Apr 3, 2012 ... and antioxidant properties of domesticated and 3 wild ecotype forms of raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.). J. Food Sci. 76: 585-593. Hao G, Du X, Zho F, Shi R, Wang J (2009). Role of nitric oxide in UV-B- induced activation of PAL and stimulation of flavonoid biosynthesis in. Ginkgo biloba callus. Plant Cell Tiss.

  20. Inhibition of telomerase causes vulnerability to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Toru; Nakatsu, Kanako; Shimamoto, Akira; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-08-26

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we investigated the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced cell death. ER stress-induced cell death was ameliorated in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) over-expressing MCF7 cells (MCF7-TERT cell). Telomerase specific inhibitor, BIBR1532, reversed the inhibitory effect of TERT on ER stress-induced cell death in MCF7-TERT cells. These findings suggest that BIBR1532 may specifically inhibit telomerase activity, thereby inducing cell death in ER stress-exposed cells. TERT was expressed in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. To analyze the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced neuronal cell death, we treated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with BIBR1532 and analyzed ER stress-induced cell death. We found that BIBR1532 significantly enhanced the ER stress-induced neuronal cell death. These findings suggest that inhibition of telomerase activity may enhance vulnerability to neuronal cell death caused by ER stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stress-inducible expression of an F-box gene TaFBA1 from wheat enhanced the drought tolerance in transgenic tobacco plants without impacting growth and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangzhu Kong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available E3 ligase plays an important role in the response to many environment stresses in plants. In our previous study, constitutive overexpression of an F-box protein gene TaFBA1 driven by 35S promoter improved the drought tolerance in transgenic tobacco plants, but the growth and development in transgenic plants was altered in normal conditions. In this study, we used stress-inducible promoter RD29A instead of 35S promoter, as a results, the stress-inducible transgenic tobacco plants exhibit a similar phenotype with WT plants. However, the drought tolerance of the transgenic plants with stress-inducible expressed TaFBA1 was enhanced. The improved drought tolerance of transgenic plants was indicated by their higher seed germination rate and survival rate, greater biomass and photosynthesis than those of WT under water stress, which may be related to their greater water retention capability and osmotic adjustment. Moreover, the transgenic plants accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS, kept lower MDA content and membrane leakage under water stress, which may be related to their higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activity and upregulated gene expression of some antioxidant enzymes. These results suggest that stress induced expression of TaFBA1 confers drought tolerance via the improved water retention and antioxidative compete abilibty. Meanwhile, this stress-inducible expression strategy by RD29A promoter can minimize the unexpectable effects by 35S constitutive promoter on phenotypes of the transgenic plants.

  2. Tumor stress-induced phosphoprotein1 (STIP1 as a prognostic biomarker in ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Chao

    Full Text Available Stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 (STIP1 has been recently identified as a released biomarker in human ovarian cancer. In addition, STIP1 secreted by human ovarian cancer cells has been shown to promote tumor cell proliferation by binding to ALK2 (activin A receptor, type II-like kinase 2 and activating the SMAD-ID3 signaling pathways. In this study, a total of 330 ovarian cancer tumor samples were evaluated for STIP1 expression by immunohistochemistry and analyzed for a possible correlation with patient characteristics and survival. The quantification of immunoreactivity was accomplished by applying an immunohistochemical scoring system (histoscore. Patients with high-level STIP1 expression (histoscore ≥169 had a significantly worse survival (high STIP1, mean survival time = 76 months; low STIP1, mean survival time = 112 months; P<0.0001. Moreover, STIP1 histoscores were significantly higher in high-grade tumors (grade 3 than in low-grade (grade 1-2 malignancies (P<0.0001, suggesting that STIP1 may be a proxy for tumor aggressiveness. The results of multivariable analysis revealed that high STIP1 histoscores, advanced stages, histologic types, and the presence of residual disease (≥2 cm were independent predictors of poor prognosis. The addition of STIP1 histoscores improved the prediction of overall and progression-free survival rates in the multivariable Cox proportional hazard model. The treatment of ovarian cancer cells with recombinant STIP1 stimulated cell proliferation and migration, but co-treatment with anti-STIP1 antibodies abrogated this effect. Our findings suggest that STIP1 expression may be related to prognosis and that the STIP1 pathway may represent a novel therapeutic target for human ovarian cancer.

  3. Academic stress-induced changes in Th1- and Th2-cytokine response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areej M. Assaf

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Psychological stress stimulates physiological responses releasing catecholamines and corticoids, which act via corresponding receptors on immune cells, producing a shift in the cytokine balance. These responses are variable depending on the nature of stressors. The effect of the academic stress on the production of the Th1-cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8 and Th2-cytokines (IL-1ra, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 on 35 medical/health sciences students after completing their questionnaires was investigated. Blood samples were taken at three stages; baseline stage at the beginning, midterm and final academic examination stages. Plasma cortisol and cytokines were measured during the three stages. The last two stages were compared with the baseline non-stress period. Results of the stress induced during the final examination stage were the highest with a significant increase in cortisol release, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-1ra release with a shift in Th1:Th2 cytokines balance towards Th2. Whereby, the midterm stage did not show significant reduction in Th1-cytokines except for TNF-α, with an increase in IFN-γ level that was reduced in the third stage. Th2 cytokine, IL-1ra, had positive correlations with Th1 cytokines; IL-2 and IFN-γ in the second stage and IL-6 cytokine in the third stage. Cortisol was positively correlated with IL-8 in the last stage and heart rates had negative correlation with IL-10 in the first and last stages. Findings of this study indicate that exam stress down-regulates Th1 with a selective up-regulation of Th2-cytokines. In conclusion, Cortisol might have a role in suppressing the release of Th1- mediated cellular immune response which could increase the vulnerability among the students to infectious diseases.

  4. Academic stress-induced changes in Th1- and Th2-cytokine response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Areej M; Al-Abbassi, Reem; Al-Binni, Maysaa

    2017-12-01

    Psychological stress stimulates physiological responses releasing catecholamines and corticoids, which act via corresponding receptors on immune cells, producing a shift in the cytokine balance. These responses are variable depending on the nature of stressors. The effect of the academic stress on the production of the Th1-cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8) and Th2-cytokines (IL-1ra, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10) on 35 medical/health sciences students after completing their questionnaires was investigated. Blood samples were taken at three stages; baseline stage at the beginning, midterm and final academic examination stages. Plasma cortisol and cytokines were measured during the three stages. The last two stages were compared with the baseline non-stress period. Results of the stress induced during the final examination stage were the highest with a significant increase in cortisol release, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-1ra release with a shift in Th1:Th2 cytokines balance towards Th2. Whereby, the midterm stage did not show significant reduction in Th1-cytokines except for TNF-α, with an increase in IFN-γ level that was reduced in the third stage. Th2 cytokine, IL-1ra, had positive correlations with Th1 cytokines; IL-2 and IFN-γ in the second stage and IL-6 cytokine in the third stage. Cortisol was positively correlated with IL-8 in the last stage and heart rates had negative correlation with IL-10 in the first and last stages. Findings of this study indicate that exam stress down-regulates Th1 with a selective up-regulation of Th2-cytokines. In conclusion, Cortisol might have a role in suppressing the release of Th1- mediated cellular immune response which could increase the vulnerability among the students to infectious diseases.

  5. Thyroid hormone stimulated glucose uptake in human mononuclear blood cells from normal persons and from patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, J; Matzen, L

    1989-01-01

    of stimulation of cells from control subjects and patients with NIDDM revealed an identical oxygen consumption, whereas the thyroid hormone-induced glucose uptake was significantly increased in cells from patients with NIDDM. T4 (5 mumol/l) stimulation in controls: 1.34 +/- 0.23 mmol.l-1 (mg DNA)-1.h-1, in NIDDM...

  6. Heat stress induced, ligand-independent MET and EGFR signalling in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Scott M; Jondal, Danielle E; Butters, Kim A; Knudsen, Bruce E; Anderson, Jill L; Stokes, Matthew P; Jia, Xiaoying; Grande, Joseph P; Roberts, Lewis R; Callstrom, Matthew R; Woodrum, David A

    2017-11-06

    The aims of the present study were 2-fold: first, to test the hypothesis that heat stress induces MET and EGFR signalling in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and inhibition of this signalling decreases HCC clonogenic survival; and second, to identify signalling pathways associated with heat stress induced MET signalling. MET(+) and EGFR(+) HCC cells were pre-treated with inhibitors to MET, EGFR, PI3K/mTOR or vehicle and subjected to heat stress or control ± HGF or EGF growth factors and assessed by colony formation assay, Western blotting and/or quantitative mass spectrometry. IACUC approved partial laser thermal or sham ablation was performed on orthotopic N1S1 and AS30D HCC tumours and liver/tumour assessed for phospho-MET and phospho-EGFR immunostaining. Heat-stress induced rapid MET and EGFR phosphorylation that is distinct from HGF or EGF in HCC cells and thermal ablation induced MET but not EGFR phosphorylation at the HCC tumour ablation margin. Inhibition of the MET and EGFR blocked both heat stress and growth factor induced MET and EGFR phosphorylation and inhibition of MET decreased HCC clonogenic survival following heat stress. Pathway analysis of quantitative phosphoproteomic data identified downstream pathways associated with heat stress induced MET signalling including AKT, ERK, Stat3 and JNK. However, inhibition of heat stress induced MET signalling did not block AKT signalling. Heat-stress induced MET and EGFR signalling is distinct from growth factor mediated signalling in HCC cells and MET inhibition enhances heat stress induced HCC cell killing via a PI3K/AKT/mTOR-independent mechanism.

  7. Effects of needle stimulation of acupuncture loci Nei-Kuan (EH-6), Tsu-San-Li (St-36), San-Yin-Chiao (Sp-6) and Chu-Chih (LI-11) on cutaneous temperature and pain threshold in normal adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M T; Chandra, A; Chen-Yen, S M

    1981-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of acupuncture loci Nei-Kuan (EH-6), Tsu-San-Li (St-36), San-Yin-Chiao (Sp-6) and Chu-Chih (LI-11) on cutaneous circulation and/or pain threshold were assessed in eight normal adults. Stimulation of acupuncture locus San-Yin-Chiao (located in the right leg) produced vasoconstriction in the right leg skin temperature (Tright leg) and in the left leg skin temperature (Tleft leg). There was no change in either right arm skin temperature (Tright arm), left arm skin temperature (Tleft arm), metabolic rate, or respiratory evaporative heat loss. Stimulation of Nei-Kuan (located in the right arm) produced vasoconstriction only in both Tright arm and Tleft arm without changes in Tright leg or Tleft leg. Stimulation of acupuncture locus Tsu-San-Li (located in the left leg) produced vasoconstriction in both Tleft leg and Tright leg without changes in either Tright arm or Tleft arm. Stimulation of acupuncture locus Chu-Chih (located in the left arm) produced vasodilatation in both Tleft arm and Tright arm without changes in either Tright leg or Tleft leg. On the other hand, stimulation of acupuncture locus San-Yin-Chiao (right side) produced analgesia only in the right foot sole, while stimulation of acupuncture locus Chu-Chih (left side) produced analgesia only in the left hand palm. Thus, the data indicate that each acupuncture locus may have its own topographical representation with special reference to both cutaneous circulation and pain threshold in normal adults.

  8. Effect of Scoparia dulcis on noise stress induced adaptive immunity and cytokine response in immunized Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loganathan Sundareswaran

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: S. dulcis (SD has normalized and prevented the noise induced changes in cell-mediated and humoral immunity and it could be the presence of anti-stressor and immuno stimulant activity of the plant.

  9. Effects of helium on inflammatory and oxidative stress-induced endothelial cell damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Kirsten F; Kerindongo, Raphaela P; Böing, Anita; Nieuwland, Rienk; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt; Weber, Nina C

    2015-09-10

    Helium induces preconditioning in human endothelium protecting against postischemic endothelial dysfunction. Circulating endothelial microparticles are markers of endothelial dysfunction derived in response to injury. Another noble gas, xenon, protected human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) against inflammatory stress in vitro. We hypothesised that helium protects the endothelium in vitro against inflammatory and oxidative stress. HUVEC were isolated from fresh umbilical cords and grown upon confluence. Cells were subjected to starving medium for 12h before the experiment and treated for either 3 × 5 min or 1 × 30 min with helium (5% CO2, 25% O2, 70% He) or control gas (5% CO2, 25% O2, 70% N2) in a specialised gas chamber. Subsequently, cells were stimulated with TNF-α (40 ng/ml for 24h or 10 ng/ml for 2h) or H2O2 (500 μM for 2h) or left untreated. Adhesion molecule expression was analysed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Caspase-3 expression and viability of the cells was measured by flowcytometry. Microparticles were investigated by nanoparticle tracking analysis. Helium had no effect on adhesion molecule expression after TNF-α stimulation but in combination with oxidative stress decreased cell viability (68.9 ± 1.3% and 58 ± 1.9%) compared to control. Helium further increased TNF-α induced release of caspase-3 containing particles compared to TNF-α alone (6.4 × 10(6) ± 1.1 × 10(6) and 2.9 × 10(6) ± 0.7 × 10(6), respectively). Prolonged exposure of helium increased microparticle formation (2.4 × 10(9) ± 0.5 × 10(9)) compared to control (1.7 × 10(9) ± 0.2 × 10(9)). Summarized, helium increases inflammatory and oxidative stress-induced endothelial damage and is thus not biologically inert. A possible noxious effects on the cellular level causing alterations in microparticle formation both in number and content should be acknowledged. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. CHIP has a protective role against oxidative stress-induced cell death through specific regulation of Endonuclease G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J S; Seo, T W; Yi, J H; Shin, K S; Yoo, S J

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in carcinogenesis, aging, and neurodegenerative diseases. The E3 ligase C terminus of Hsc-70 interacting protein (CHIP) has a protective role against various stresses by targeting damaged proteins for proteasomal degradation, and thus maintains protein quality control. However, the detailed mechanism by which CHIP protects cells from oxidative stress has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that depletion of CHIP led to elevated Endonuclease G (EndoG) levels and enhanced cell death upon oxidative stress. In contrast, CHIP overexpression reduced EndoG levels, and resulted in reduced or no oxidative stress-induced cell death in cancer cells and primary rat cortical neurons. Under normal conditions Hsp70 mediated the interaction between EndoG and CHIP, downregulating EndoG levels in a Hsp70/proteasome-dependent manner. However, under oxidative stress Hsp70 no longer interacted with EndoG, and the stabilized EndoG translocated to the nucleus and degraded chromosomal DNA. Our data suggest that regulation of the level of EndoG by CHIP in normal conditions may determine the sensitivity to cell death upon oxidative stress. Indeed, injection of H2O2 into the rat brain markedly increased cell death in aged mice compared with young mice, which correlated with elevated levels of EndoG and concurrent downregulation of CHIP in aged mice. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a novel protective mechanism of CHIP against oxidative stress through regulation of EndoG, and provide an opportunity to modulate oxidative stress-induced cell death in cancer and aging. PMID:23764847

  11. Efeito de giberelina (GA3 e do bioestimulante 'Stimulate' na indução floral e produtividade do maracujazeiro-amarelo em condições de safra normal Effect of gibereline (GA3 and biostimulant 'Stimulate' in floral induction and yield of yellow passion fruit in conditions of normal growing season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elma Machado Ataíde

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos de GA3, nas concentrações de 100; 200 e 300mg L-1 e do bioestimulante Stimulate®, em doses de 2,08; 4,17 e 6,25mL L-1, em duas aplicações via foliar, acrescidas de espalhante adesivo Silwett® a 0,05% e a exposição dos ramos à luminosidade, na indução floral e produtividade do maracujazeiro-amarelo, em condições de safra normal, em Araguari-MG. Aos 30 dias após a primeira aplicação dos tratamentos, iniciaram-se as avaliações do número de flores, com contagens diárias, nos dois lados da espaldeira, nos meses de setembro de 2002 a março de 2003. As colheitas dos frutos foram realizadas semanalmente, no período de novembro de 2002 a abril de 2003, observando-se a produção. O GA3 e o Stimulate não proporcionaram efeito significativo no número de flores, nas sete épocas, assim como no número total de flores. Não houve efeito dos tratamentos para a produtividade e produção total de frutos. Os ramos sob luminosidade pela tarde apresentaram maior número de flores, nos meses de setembro, dezembro, fevereiro e março. A interação entre os tratamentos e a exposição dos ramos à luminosidade não foi significativa para o número de flores, nas épocas avaliadas.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of GA3 , in concentrations of 100, 200 and 300mg L-1 and biostimulant StimulateTM, in doses of 2,08, 4,17 and 6,25 mL L-1, in two leaf applications, added with the adhesive spreader SilwettTM at 0,05% and branch exposure to brightness, on passion fruit in floral induction and yield, in conditions of normal growing season, in Araguari-MG. At 30 days after the first treatment application, the evaluation of flower number started, with daily counts, in both sides of the plants, from September 2002 to March 2003. Fruit harvest was realized weekly from November 2002 to April 2003, being observed the yield. GA3 and Stimulate did not provide significant effect on flower

  12. Sympathetic nerve activity in normal and cystic follicles from isolated bovine ovary: local effect of beta-adrenergic stimulation on steroid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Alfonso H; Salvetti, Natalia R; Diaz, Ariel E; Dallard, Bibiana E; Ortega, Hugo H; Lara, Hernan E

    2011-05-16

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is an important cause of abnormal estrous behavior and infertility in dairy cows. COD is mainly observed in high-yielding dairy cows during the first months post-partum, a period of high stress. We have previously reported that, in lower mammals, stress induces a cystic condition similar to the polycystic ovary syndrome in humans and that stress is a definitive component in the human pathology. To know if COD in cows is also associated with high sympathetic activity, we studied isolated small antral (5 mm), preovulatory (10 mm) and cystic follicles (25 mm). Cystic follicles which present an area 600 fold greater compared with preovulatory follicles has only 10 times less concentration of NE as compared with small antral and preovulatory follicles but they had 10 times more NE in follicular fluid, suggesting a high efflux of neurotransmitter from the cyst wall. This suggestion was reinforced by the high basal release of recently taken-up 3H-NE found in cystic follicles. While lower levels of beta-adrenergic receptor were found in cystic follicles, there was a heightened response to the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and to hCG, as measured by testosterone secretion. There was however an unexpected capacity of the ovary in vitro to produce cortisol and to secrete it in response to hCG but not to isoproterenol. These data suggest that, during COD, the bovine ovary is under high sympathetic nerve activity that in addition to an increased response to hCG in cortisol secretion could participate in COD development.

  13. The Batten disease gene CLN3 confers resistance to endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by tunicamycin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Dan, E-mail: danw@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Medical Genetics, Peking University Health Science Center, No 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian district, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu, Jing; Wu, Baiyan [Department of Medical Genetics, Peking University Health Science Center, No 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian district, Beijing 100191 (China); Tu, Bo; Zhu, Weiguo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Peking University Health Science Center, No 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian district, Beijing 100191 (China); Luo, Jianyuan, E-mail: jluo@som.umaryland.edu [Department of Medical Genetics, Peking University Health Science Center, No 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian district, Beijing 100191 (China); Department of Medical and Research Technology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore 21201 (United States)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • The work reveals a protective properties of CLN3 towards TM-induced apoptosis. • CLN3 regulates expression of the GRP78 and the CHOP in response to the ER stress. • CLN3 plays a specific role in the ERS response. - Abstract: Mutations in CLN3 gene cause juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL or Batten disease), an early-onset neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by the accumulation of ceroid lipofuscin within lysosomes. The function of the CLN3 protein remains unclear and is presumed to be related to Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. To investigate the function of CLN3 in the ER stress signaling pathway, we measured proliferation and apoptosis in cells transfected with normal and mutant CLN3 after treatment with the ER stress inducer tunicamycin (TM). We found that overexpression of CLN3 was sufficient in conferring increased resistance to ER stress. Wild-type CLN3 protected cells from TM-induced apoptosis and increased cell proliferation. Overexpression of wild-type CLN3 enhanced expression of the ER chaperone protein, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), and reduced expression of the proapoptotic protein CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). In contrast, overexpression of mutant CLN3 or siRNA knockdown of CLN3 produced the opposite effect. Together, our data suggest that the lack of CLN3 function in cells leads to a failure of management in the response to ER stress and this may be the key deficit in JNCL that causes neuronal degeneration.

  14. Post-training reward partially restores chronic stress induced effects in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Dalm

    Full Text Available Reduced responsiveness to positive stimuli is a core symptom of depression, known as anhedonia. In the present study, we assessed the expression of anhedonia in our chronic stress mouse model using a subset of read-out parameters. In line with this, we investigated in how far chronic stress would affect the facilitating effect of post-training self-administration of sugar, as we previously observed in naïve mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were repeatedly and at unpredictable times exposed to rats (no physical contact over the course of two weeks. Following novelty exploration, (non- spatial learning and memory processes with and without post-training sugar acting as reinforcer, emotionality, reward sensitivity and corticosterone levels were determined. We found that (1 the effects of chronic stress persisted beyond the period of the actual rat exposure. (2 Post-training self-administration of sugar as reinforcer improved spatial performance in naïve mice, whereas (3 in stressed mice sugar partially "normalized" the impaired performance to the level of controls without sugar. Chronic stress (4 increased behavioral inhibition in response to novelty; (5 induced dynamic changes in the pattern of circadian corticosterone secretion during the first week after rat stress and (6 increased the intake of sucrose and water. (7 Chronic stress and sugar consumed during spatial training facilitated the memory for the location of the sucrose bottle weeks later. Concluding, our chronic stress paradigm induces the expression of anhedonia in mice, at different levels of behavior. The behavioral inhibition appears to be long lasting in stressed mice. Interestingly, sugar consumed in close context with spatial learning partially rescued the stress-induced emotional and cognitive impairments. This suggests that reward can ameliorate part of the negative consequences of chronic stress on memory.

  15. Stress-inducible alternative translation initiation of human cytomegalovirus latency protein pUL138.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, Lora; Cicchini, Louis; Rak, Michael; Petrucelli, Alex; Fitzgerald, Kerry D; Semler, Bert L; Goodrum, Felicia

    2010-09-01

    We have previously characterized a 21-kDa protein encoded by UL138 (pUL138) as a viral factor inherent to low-passage strains of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) that is required for latent infection in vitro. pUL138 is encoded on 3.6-, 2.7-, and 1.4-kb 3' coterminal transcripts that are produced during productive and latent infections. pUL138 is encoded at the 3' end of each transcript and is preceded by an extensive 5' sequence (approximately 0.5 to 2.5 kb) containing several putative open reading frames (ORFs). We determined that three putative ORFs upstream of UL138 (UL133, UL135, and UL136) encode proteins. The UL138 transcripts are polycistronic, such that each transcript expresses pUL138 in addition to the most-5' ORF. The upstream coding sequences (CDS) present a significant challenge for the translation of pUL138 in mammalian cells. We hypothesized that sequences 5' of UL138 mediate translation initiation of pUL138 by alternative strategies. Accordingly, a 663-nucloetide (nt) sequence overlapping the UL136 CDS supported expression of a downstream cistron in a bicistronic reporter system. We did not detect cryptic promoter activity or RNA splicing events that could account for downstream cistron expression. These data are consistent with the sequence element functioning as an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Interestingly, pUL138 expression from the 3.6- and 2.7-kb transcripts was induced by serum stress, which concomitantly inhibited normal cap-dependent translation. Our work suggests that an alternative and stress-inducible strategy of translation initiation ensures expression of pUL138 under a variety of cellular contexts. The UL138 polycistronic transcripts serve to coordinate the expression of multiple proteins, including a viral determinant of HCMV latency.

  16. The role of microbiota and probiotics in stress-induced gastro-intestinal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutgendorff, Femke; Akkermans, Louis M A; Söderholm, Johan D

    2008-06-01

    Stress has a major impact on gut physiology and may affect the clinical course of gastro-intestinal diseases. In this review, we focus on the interaction between commensal gut microbiota and intestinal mucosa during stress and discuss the possibilities to counteract the deleterious effects of stress with probiotics. Normally, commensal microbes and their hosts benefit from a symbiotic relationship. Stress does, however, reduce the number of Lactobacilli, while on the contrary, an increased growth, epithelial adherence and mucosal uptake of gram-negative pathogens, e.g. E. coli and Pseudomonas, are seen. Moreover, intestinal bacteria have the ability to sense a stressed host and up-regulate their virulence factors when opportunity knocks. Probiotics are "live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host", and mainly represented by Lactic Acid Bacteria. Probiotics can counteract stress-induced changes in intestinal barrier function, visceral sensitivity and gut motility. These effects are strain specific and mediated by direct bacterial-host cell interaction and/or via soluble factors. Mechanisms of action include competition with pathogens for essential nutrients, induction of epithelial heat-shock proteins, restoring of tight junction protein structure, up-regulation of mucin genes, secretion of defensins, and regulation of the NFkappaB signalling pathway. In addition, the reduction of intestinal pain perception was shown to be mediated via cannabinoid receptors. Based on the studies reviewed here there is clearly a rationale for probiotic treatment in patients with stress-related intestinal disorders. We are however far from being able to choose the precise combination of strains or bacterial components for each clinical setting.

  17. Environmental Stress Induces Trinucleotide Repeat Mutagenesis in Human Cells by Alt-Nonhomologous End Joining Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H

    2016-07-31

    Multiple pathways modulate the dynamic mutability of trinucleotide repeats (TNRs), which are implicated in neurodegenerative disease and evolution. Recently, we reported that environmental stresses induce TNR mutagenesis via stress responses and rereplication, with more than 50% of mutants carrying deletions or insertions-molecular signatures of DNA double-strand break repair. We now show that knockdown of alt-nonhomologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) components-XRCC1, LIG3, and PARP1-suppresses stress-induced TNR mutagenesis, in contrast to the components of homologous recombination and NHEJ, which have no effect. Thus, alt-NHEJ, which contributes to genetic mutability in cancer cells, also plays a novel role in environmental stress-induced TNR mutagenesis. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Efeitos da estimulação ventricular convencional em pacientes com função ventricular normal Efectos de la estimulación ventricular convencional en pacientes con función ventricular normal Conventional ventricular stimulation effects on patients with normal ventricular function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Batista de Sá

    2009-08-01

    (CF, test de marcha, dosificación de BNP, ecocardiograma (convencional y parámetros de desincronía intraventricular y prueba de calidad de vida (SF36. Esas mediciones se hicieron con 10 días(d (t1, 120d(t2 y 240 d(t3. Los datos se compararon a lo largo del tiempo según el método ANOVA. Comparaciones múltiples de promedios se efectuaron utilizándose el método de Tukey. RESULTADOS: Desde los datos evaluados, los siguientes no presentaron variación estadística significante (p>0,05: clase funcional, dosificación de BNP, parámetros ecocardiográficos convencionales, desincronía intraventricular (Doppler tisular. Presentaron empeoramiento (pBACKGROUND: The stimulation of the right ventricle (RV may be deleterious in patients with ventricular dysfunction; however there is little evidence about the impact of this stimulation in patients with normal ventricular function. OBJECTIVES: To assess the clinical and laboratory evolution of patients with normal ventricular function submitted to implant of artificial cardiac pacemaker (PM. METHODS: 16 patients enrolled according to the following inclusion criteria: normal ventricular function defined by echocardiogram and presence of upper ventricular stimulation > 90% (generator telemetry assessment submitted to a PM implant were prospectively studied. The following parameters were assessed: Functional Class (FC, walk test, BNP levels, echocardiography evaluation (conventional and intraventricular dyssynchrony and quality of life test (SF36. The patients were assessed after 10 (t1, 120 (t2 and 240 days (t3. Data was compared throughout time according to ANOVA. Multiple comparisons of means were performed through Tukey's test. RESULTS: Among the assessed data, the following did not present significant statistic variation (p> 0.05: functional class, BNP levels, conventional echocardiographic parameters, intraventricular dyssynchrony (tissue Doppler. The walk test (between t2 and t3 and the time between septal contraction

  19. Cardioprotective effect of amlodipine in oxidative stress induced by experimental myocardial infarction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhira Begum

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether the administration of amlodipine ameliorates oxidative stress induced by experimental myocardial infarction in rats. Adrenaline was administered and myocardial damage was evaluated biochemically [significantly increased serum aspertate aminotransferase (AST, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and malondialdehyde (MDA levels of myocardial tissue] and histologically (morphological changes of myocardium. Amlodipine was administered as pretreatment for 14 days in adrenaline treated rats. Statistically significant amelioration in all the biochemical parameters supported by significantly improved myocardial morphology was observed in amlodipine pretreatment. It was concluded that amlodipine afforded cardioprotection by reducing oxidative stress induced in experimental myocardial infarction of catecholamine assault.

  20. Antioxidant effect of phycocyanin on oxidative stress induced with monosodium glutamate in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Elita Bertolin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the antioxidant effect of phycocyanin on the oxidative stress induced by monosodium glutamate in the rats. The tests were performed with 32 rats of Wistar breed, divided into four groups, which were administered saline solution of phycocyanin, monosodium glutamate and monosodium glutamate plus phycocyanin. Sulfhydryl groups and the secondary substances derived from lipid oxidation were determined through the level of TBA. The evaluation of these values and the level of sulfhydryl showed that the administration of phycocyanin presented significant antioxidant effect (p < 0.05 reducing the oxidative stress induced by the monosodium glutamate in vivo.

  1. Combination of Neurofeedback Technique with Music Therapy for Effective Correction of Stress-Induced Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Fedotchev A.I.; Oh S.J.; Semikin G.I.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to evaluate the applicability and efficacy of music presentations controlled by feedback signals from the narrow-band electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillators of a patient to correct functional stress-induced disturbances. Materials and Methods. We revealed dominant narrow-band (0.4–0.6 Hz) oscillators in the theta (4–8 Hz) and alpha (8–13 Hz) EEG bands in 18 volunteers suffering from stress-induced disorders. During two examinations the subjects were pre...

  2. Proteome oxidative carbonylation during oxidative stress-induced premature senescence of WI-38 human fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Boulch, Marine; Ahmed, Emad K; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidatively damaged proteins is a hallmark of cellular and organismal ageing, and is also a phenotypic feature shared by both replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence of human fibroblasts. Moreover, proteins that are building up as oxidized (i.e. the "Oxi......-proteome") during ageing and age-related diseases represent a restricted set of cellular proteins, indicating that certain proteins are more prone to oxidative carbonylation and subsequent intracellular accumulation. The occurrence of specific carbonylated proteins upon oxidative stress induced premature senescence...... to belong to functional interaction networks pointing to signalling pathways that have been implicated in the oxidative stress response and subsequent premature senescence....

  3. Vitiligo: How do oxidative stress-induced autoantigens trigger autoimmunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Heng; Zhou, Fubo; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Guannan; Li, Qiang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentation disorder characterized by a loss of functional melanocytes and melanin from epidermis, in which the autoantigens and subsequent autoimmunity caused by oxidative stress play significant roles according to hypotheses. Various factors lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in the melanocytes of vitiligo: the exogenous and endogenous stimuli that cause ROS production, low levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, disturbed antioxidant pathways and polymorphisms of ROS-associated genes. These factors synergistically contribute to the accumulation of ROS in melanocytes, finally leading to melanocyte damage and the production of autoantigens through the following ways: apoptosis, accumulation of misfolded peptides and cytokines induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as the sustained unfolded protein response, and an 'eat me' signal for phagocytic cells triggered by calreticulin. Subsequently, autoantigens presentation and dendritic cells maturation occurred mediated by the release of antigen-containing exosomes, adenosine triphosphate and melanosomal autophagy. With the involvement of inducible heat shock protein 70, cellular immunity targeting autoantigens takes the essential place in the destruction of melanocytes, which eventually results in vitiligo. Several treatments, such as narrow band ultraviolet, quercetin and α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, are reported to be able to lower ROS thereby achieving repigmentation in vitiligo. In therapies targeting autoimmunity, restore of regulatory T cells is absorbing attention, in which narrow band ultraviolet also plays a role. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxidative stress induces overgrowth of the Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Valerie J; Jarrett, Helen E; Gowers, Kate; Chalak, Salma; Briggs, Laura; Robinson, Iain M; Sweeney, Sean T

    2011-10-18

    Synaptic terminals are known to expand and contract throughout an animal's life. The physiological constraints and demands that regulate appropriate synaptic growth and connectivity are currently poorly understood. In previous work, we identified a Drosophila model of lysosomal storage disease (LSD), spinster (spin), with larval neuromuscular synapse overgrowth. Here we identify a reactive oxygen species (ROS) burden in spin that may be attributable to previously identified lipofuscin deposition and lysosomal dysfunction, a cellular hallmark of LSD. Reducing ROS in spin mutants rescues synaptic overgrowth and electrophysiological deficits. Synapse overgrowth was also observed in mutants defective for protection from ROS and animals subjected to excessive ROS. ROS are known to stimulate JNK and fos signaling. Furthermore, JNK and fos in turn are known potent activators of synapse growth and function. Inhibiting JNK and fos activity in spin rescues synapse overgrowth and electrophysiological deficits. Similarly, inhibiting JNK, fos, and jun activity in animals with excessive oxidative stress rescues the overgrowth phenotype. These data suggest that ROS, via activation of the JNK signaling pathway, are a major regulator of synapse overgrowth. In LSD, increased autophagy contributes to lysosomal storage and, presumably, elevated levels of oxidative stress. In support of this suggestion, we report here that impaired autophagy function reverses synaptic overgrowth in spin. Our data describe a previously unexplored link between oxidative stress and synapse overgrowth via the JNK signaling pathway.

  5. Molecular cloning and expression of a transformation-sensitive human protein containing the TPR motif and sharing identity to the stress-inducible yeast protein STI1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Leffers, H; Madsen, Peder

    1992-01-01

    in families of fungal proteins required for mitosis and RNA synthesis. In particular, the protein has 42% amino acid sequence identity to STI1, a stress-inducible mediator of the heat shock response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Northern blot analysis indicated that the 3521 mRNA is up-regulated in several...... transformed cells. Immunofluorescence studies using a polyclonal antibody raised against the purified protein revealed that the antigen is present mainly in the nucleus of SV40 transformed MRC-5 fibroblasts, while it localizes to the Golgi apparatus and small vesicles in their normal counterparts...

  6. Partial agonist, but not pure antiestrogens stimulate doming, a marker of normal differentiation, in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, W Barkley; D'Amico, Stephen C; Glassford, William J; Wu, Weizhen

    2012-12-01

    Abstract Background: The mechanisms by which tamoxifen inhibits breast tumor growth are not completely understood. Partial agonist antiestrogens such as tamoxifen may cause the estrogen receptor (ER) to interact with genes different from those activated by ER bound to estradiol. Doming is a property often associated with, and considered a marker of, differentiation in mammary epithelial cells in culture. This study compared the ability of pure and partial agonist antiestrogens to stimulate doming. MCF-7 cells grown in medium with 10% calf serum were treated with antiestrogens. Domes were counted in three rows (width of the 4× field) across the flask. Three partial agonist antiestrogens [4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT), H1285 and RU 39,411] caused dome formation. None of the pure antiestrogens tested (ICI 164,384, ICI 182,780 and RU 58,668) caused doming. Doming was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner starting at 1 nM OHT with maximum stimulation at 10-100 nM. Estradiol did not stimulate doming, but blocked doming at 1%-10% of the OHT concentration. Trichostatin A (TSA) reduced the level of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and adding it 24 h before adding OHT prevented dome formation. OHT and the other partial agonist antiestrogens appear to act through the ER to stimulate doming. The ability of tamoxifen to induce a marker of differentiation may play a role in its inhibition of breast tumors. If so, then the fact that other partial agonist antiestrogens share this ability, but that pure antiestrogens lack it, may be an important consideration in developing new antiestrogens for breast cancer therapy.

  7. Stress, stress-induced cortisol responses, and eyewitness identification performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerland, Melanie; Raymaekers, Linsey H C; Otgaar, Henry; Memon, Amina; Waltjen, Thijs T; Nivo, Maud; Slegers, Chiel; Broers, Nick J; Smeets, Tom

    2016-07-01

    In the eyewitness identification literature, stress and arousal at the time of encoding are considered to adversely influence identification performance. This assumption is in contrast with findings from the neurobiology field of learning and memory, showing that stress and stress hormones are critically involved in forming enduring memories. This discrepancy may be related to methodological differences between the two fields of research, such as the tendency for immediate testing or the use of very short (1-2 hours) retention intervals in eyewitness research, while neurobiology studies insert at least 24 hours. Other differences refer to the extent to which stress-responsive systems (i.e., the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) are stimulated effectively under laboratory conditions. The aim of the current study was to conduct an experiment that accounts for the contemporary state of knowledge in both fields. In all, 123 participants witnessed a live staged theft while being exposed to a laboratory stressor that reliably elicits autonomic and glucocorticoid stress responses or while performing a control task. Salivary cortisol levels were measured to control for the effectiveness of the stress induction. One week later, participants attempted to identify the thief from target-present and target-absent line-ups. According to regression and receiver operating characteristic analyses, stress did not have robust detrimental effects on identification performance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 The Authors Behavioral Sciences & the Law Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors Behavioral Sciences & the Law Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Dopamine D1 receptors are responsible for stress-induced emotional memory deficit in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongfu; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Bi; Li, Chaocui; Cai, Jing-Xia

    2012-03-01

    It is established that stress impairs spatial learning and memory via the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis response. Dopamine D1 receptors were also shown to be responsible for a stress-induced deficit of working memory. However, whether stress affects the subsequent emotional learning and memory is not elucidated yet. Here, we employed the well-established one-trial step-through task to study the effect of an acute psychological stress (induced by tail hanging for 5, 10, or 20 min) on emotional learning and memory, and the possible mechanisms as well. We demonstrated that tail hanging induced an obvious stress response. Either an acute tail-hanging stress or a single dose of intraperitoneally injected dopamine D1 receptor antagonist (SCH23390) significantly decreased the step-through latency in the one-trial step-through task. However, SCH23390 prevented the acute tail-hanging stress-induced decrease in the step-through latency. In addition, the effects of tail-hanging stress and/or SCH23390 on the changes in step-through latency were not through non-memory factors such as nociceptive perception and motor function. Our data indicate that the hyperactivation of dopamine D1 receptors mediated the stress-induced deficit of emotional learning and memory. This study may have clinical significance given that psychological stress is considered to play a role in susceptibility to some mental diseases such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

  9. Inflammatory cytokines protect retinal pigment epithelial cells from oxidative stress-induced death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Helene B; Faber, Carsten; Svendsen, Signe Goul

    2013-01-01

    -cultured with activated T cells, or treated with cytokines showed increased expression of anti-oxidative genes, with upregulation of superoxide dismutase 2 protein following PCM treatment. CONCLUSION: Oxidative stress-induced cell death was reduced by concomitant inflammatory stress. This is likely due to the cytokine...

  10. Muscle mitochondrial stress-induced metabolic adaptations do not require FGF21 action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van Evert; Ost, Mario; Stelt, van der Inge; Klaus, Susanne; Keijer, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a key metabolic regulator which was recently discovered as stress-induced myokine and common denominator of muscle mitochondrial disease. However, its precise function and pathophysiological relevance remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that white adipose

  11. Estrogen protects SGC7901 cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis by the Akt pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    FU, ZHENGQI; ZOU, FENG; DENG, HAO; ZHOU, HONGYAN; LIU, LIJIANG

    2014-01-01

    Several previous studies have demonstrated that estrogen may protect cancer cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. In the present study, human gastric adenocarcinoma SGC7901 cells were treated with tunicamycin (TM) to induce endoplasmic reticulum stress. This was demonstrated by increased glucose-regulated protein 78 expression and enhanced phosphorylation of protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induced caspase-3-mediated apoptosis with the inhibition of Akt; the latter of which was measured by the activity-dependent phosphorylation at Ser473 of Akt. Simultaneous treatment of 10−9 M 17β-estradiol (E2) with TM may protect SGC7901 cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis by counteracting the inhibitory effect of TM on Akt, causing an increase in the phosphorylation of Ser473-Akt. It was concluded that low concentrations of E2 may counteract endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced inactivation of Akt to block caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. PMID:24396487

  12. Individual differences in the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system: Relevance to stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Christopher S; Valentino, Rita J; Wood, Susan K

    2017-04-01

    Repeated exposure to psychosocial stress is a robust sympathomimetic stressor and as such has adverse effects on cardiovascular health. While the neurocircuitry involved remains unclear, the physiological and anatomical characteristics of the locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system suggest that it is poised to contribute to stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability. A major theme throughout is to review studies that shed light on the role that the LC may play in individual differences in vulnerability to social stress-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. Recent findings are discussed that support a unique plasticity in afferent regulation of the LC, resulting in either excitatory or inhibitory input to the LC during establishment of different stress coping strategies. This contrasting regulation of the LC by either afferent regulation, or distinct differences in stress-induced neuroinflammation would translate to differences in cardiovascular regulation and may serve as the basis for individual differences in the cardiopathological consequences of social stress. The goal of this review is to highlight recent developments in the interplay between the LC-NE and cardiovascular systems during repeated stress in an effort to advance therapeutic treatments for the development of stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Susceptibility to hyperosmotic stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure increases during red blood cell storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Cluitmans, J.C.A.; Groenen, Y.A.; Werre, J.M.; Willekens, F.L.A.; Novotny, V.M.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During storage of red blood cell (RBCs) before transfusion, RBCs undergo a series of structural and functional changes that include the exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS), a potent removal signal. It was postulated that, during blood bank storage, the susceptibility to stress-induced PS

  14. Susceptibility to stress induced visceral hypersensitivity in maternally separated rats is transferred across generations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wijngaard, R. M.; Stanisor, O. I.; van Diest, S. A.; Welting, O.; Wouters, M. M.; Cailotto, C.; de Jonge, W. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2013-01-01

    In irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), familial clustering and transfer across generations may largely depend on environmental factors but this is difficult to establish in the human setting. Therefore, we aimed to set up a relevant animal model. We investigated whether susceptibility to stress induced

  15. GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex ligands and stress-induced hyperthermia in singly housed mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, B.; Bouwknecht, J.A.; Pattij, T.; Leahy, C.; Oorschot, R. van; Zethof, T.J.

    2002-01-01

    Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) in singly housed mice, in which the rectal temperature of a mouse is measured twice with a 10-min interval, enables to study the effects of a drug on the basal (T(1)) and on the stress-enhanced temperature (T(2)), 10 min later, using the rectal procedure as

  16. The ER stress inducer DMC enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis in glioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roosmalen, Ingrid A. M.; Dos Reis, Carlos R; Setroikromo, Rita; Yuvaraj, Saravanan; Joseph, Justin V.; Tepper, Pieter G.; Kruyt, Frank A. E.; Quax, Wim J.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive malignant brain tumour in humans and is highly resistant to current treatment modalities. We have explored the combined treatment of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducing agent 2,5-dimethyl-celecoxib (DMC) and TNF-related

  17. Red wine extract protects against oxidative-stress-induced endothelial senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.P.G. Botden (Ilse); H. Oeseburg (Hisko); M. Durik (Matej); F.P.J. Leijten (Frank); L.C. van Vark-van der Zee (Leonie); U. Musterd-Bhaggoe (Usha); I.M. Garrelds (Ingrid); A.L.B. Seynhaeve (Ann); J.G. Langendonk (Janneke); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); A.H.J. Danser (Jan); A.J.M. Roks (Anton)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractRed wine polyphenols may preserve endothelial function during aging. Endothelial cell senescence enhances age-related endothelial dysfunction. We investigated whether RWE (red wine extract) prevents oxidative-stress-induced senescence in HUVECs (human umbilical-vein endothelial cells).

  18. Stress-induced activation of brown adipose tissue prevents obesity in conditions of low adaptive thermogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Razzoli

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that thermogenesis and BAT function are determinant of the resilience or vulnerability to stress-induced obesity. Our data support a model in which adrenergic and purinergic pathways exert complementary/synergistic functions in BAT, thus suggesting an alternative to βARs agonists for the activation of human BAT.

  19. Role of CRF and other neuropeptides in stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Uri; Erb, Suzanne; Shaham, Yavin

    2010-02-16

    A central problem in the treatment of drug addiction is high rates of relapse to drug use after periods of forced or self-imposed abstinence. This relapse is often provoked by exposure to stress. Stress-induced relapse to drug seeking can be modeled in laboratory animals using a reinstatement procedure. In this procedure, drug-taking behaviors are extinguished and then reinstated by acute exposure to stressors like intermittent unpredictable footshock, restraint, food deprivation, and systemic injections of yohimbine, an alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist that induces stress-like responses in humans and nonhumans. For this special issue entitled "The role of neuropeptides in stress and addiction", we review results from studies on the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and several other peptides in stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking in laboratory animals. The results of the studies reviewed indicate that extrahypothalamic CRF plays a critical role in stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking; this role is largely independent of drug class, experimental procedure, and type of stressor. There is also limited evidence for the role of dynorphins, hypocretins (orexins), nociceptin (orphanin FQ), and leptin in stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Active Mastication on Chronic Stress-Induced Bone Loss in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Kagaku; Furuzawa, Manabu; Fujiwara, Shu; Yamada, Kumiko; Kubo, Kin-ya

    2015-01-01

    Chronic psychologic stress increases corticosterone levels, which decreases bone density. Active mastication or chewing attenuates stress-induced increases in corticosterone. We evaluated whether active mastication attenuates chronic stress-induced bone loss in mice. Male C57BL/6 (B6) mice were randomly divided into control, stress, and stress/chewing groups. Stress was induced by placing mice in a ventilated restraint tube (60 min, 2x/day, 4 weeks). The stress/chewing group was given a wooden stick to chew during the experimental period. Quantitative micro-computed tomography, histologic analysis, and biochemical markers were used to evaluate the bone response. The stress/chewing group exhibited significantly attenuated stress-induced increases in serum corticosterone levels, suppressed bone formation, enhanced bone resorption, and decreased trabecular bone mass in the vertebrae and distal femurs, compared with mice in the stress group. Active mastication during exposure to chronic stress alleviated chronic stress-induced bone density loss in B6 mice. Active mastication during chronic psychologic stress may thus be an effective strategy to prevent and/or treat chronic stress-related osteopenia.

  1. Overexpression of an abiotic-stress inducible plant protein in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-17

    Sep 17, 2008 ... The aim of our work was the overexpression of the abiotic stress-inducible dehydrin protein, namely. RAB16A, from rice in the BL21 ... various abiotic stress like water deficit, high salinity and low temperature or .... tomato Adh2 gene and Adh2 pseudogenes, and a study of Adh2 gene expression in fruit.

  2. Ghrelin mediates stress-induced food-reward behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Perello, Mario; Sakata, Ichiro; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Savitt, Joseph M; Lutter, Michael; Zigman, Jeffrey M

    2011-07-01

    The popular media and personal anecdotes are rich with examples of stress-induced eating of calorically dense "comfort foods." Such behavioral reactions likely contribute to the increased prevalence of obesity in humans experiencing chronic stress or atypical depression. However, the molecular substrates and neurocircuits controlling the complex behaviors responsible for stress-based eating remain mostly unknown, and few animal models have been described for probing the mechanisms orchestrating this response. Here, we describe a system in which food-reward behavior, assessed using a conditioned place preference (CPP) task, is monitored in mice after exposure to chronic social defeat stress (CSDS), a model of prolonged psychosocial stress, featuring aspects of major depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Under this regime, CSDS increased both CPP for and intake of high-fat diet, and stress-induced food-reward behavior was dependent on signaling by the peptide hormone ghrelin. Also, signaling specifically in catecholaminergic neurons mediated not only ghrelin's orexigenic, antidepressant-like, and food-reward behavioral effects, but also was sufficient to mediate stress-induced food-reward behavior. Thus, this mouse model has allowed us to ascribe a role for ghrelin-engaged catecholaminergic neurons in stress-induced eating.

  3. The relation of aggression, hostility, and anger to lipopolysaccharide-stimulated tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by blood monocytes from normal men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Edward C; Lewis, James G; Kuhn, Cynthia

    2002-12-01

    Aggression, hostility, and anger significantly predict morbidity and mortality from atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). ACVD is believed to be an inflammatory disease characterized by increased expression of a number of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. This study examined the relation of aggression, hostility, and anger to monocyte-associated TNF-alpha expression following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Participants were 62 healthy, non-smoking men (aged 18-45 years). Hostility, anger, verbal, and physical aggression were assessed using the Buss-Perry aggression questionnaire (BPAQ). LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha expression was determined using dual-color flow cytometry gating for CD14(+) cells. After controlling for age, race, education, and alcohol use, scores on the hostility (p=.013), physical aggression (p=.010), and verbal aggression (p=.034) subscales, and the total score (p=.007) on the BPAQ were positively associated with LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha expression. The results suggest that hostility and aggression are associated with an increased expression of TNF-alpha, a cytokine implicated in ACVD.

  4. The Effect of Exercise on Learning and Spatial Memory Following Stress-Induced Sleep Deprivation (Sleep REM) in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Darkhah; Zarghami,; Shetab Bushehri; Fatemi

    2016-01-01

    Background Stress induced by sleep deprivation can cause degradation of learning in the acquisition phase, and low-intensity exercise can prevent the negative effects of stress. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the moderating role of aerobic exercise on spatial memory and learning following stress-induced insomnia (sleep REM) in animal models. Materials and Methods ...

  5. Reversal of stress-induced social interaction deficits by buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Caroline A; Falcon, Edgardo; Robinson, Shivon A; Berton, Olivier; Lucki, Irwin

    2017-08-31

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) frequently report persistent problems with social interactions, emerging after a traumatic experience. Chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) is a widely used rodent model of stress that produces robust and sustained social avoidance behavior. The avoidance of other rodents can be reversed by 28 days of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the only pharmaceutical class approved by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration for treating PTSD. In this study, the sensitivity of social interaction deficits evoked by 10 days of CSDS to prospective treatments for PTSD was examined. The effects of acute and repeated treatment with a low dose of buprenorphine (0.25 mg/kg/day) on social interaction deficits in male C57BL/6 mice by CSDS were studied. Another cohort of mice was used to determine the effects of the SSRI fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day), the NMDA antagonist ketamine (10 mg/kg/day) and the selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist CERC-501 (1 mg/kg/day). Changes in mRNA expression of Oprm1 and Oprk1 were assessed in a separate cohort. Buprenorphine significantly reversed social interaction deficits produced by CSDS following 7 days of administration, but not after acute injection. Treatment with fluoxetine for 7 days, but not 24 h, also reinstated social interaction behavior in CSDS-stressed mice. In contrast, CERC-501 and ketamine failed to reverse social avoidance. Gene expression analysis identified reductions in Oprm1 and Oprk1 mRNA expression in the amygdala and hippocampus and increased expression in the frontal cortex in susceptible mice associated with social interaction deficits. Short-term treatment with buprenorphine and fluoxetine normalized social interaction after CSDS. In concert with the changes in opioid receptor expression produced by CSDS, we speculate that buprenorphine's efficacy in this model of PTSD may be associated with the ability of this compound to engage multiple

  6. Assessment of Platelet in Case of Stress-induced Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantskava M.M.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea is a independent pathology and a powerful stress for the organism. Apnea is a cause of stress and strengthens the body under stress. We studied 30 men aged 34 to 57 years: 22 patients with obstructive sleep apnea and 8 patients with central sleep apnea. We explored a drop of blood in HUMACOUNT, mod. HUMACOUNT (Firm Human GmbH, Germany, bought of grant budget RF/420/7-270/12. We investigated parameters of platelet: PLT, MPV, PDWс and PCT. The analysis of the data was performed using statistical programs “Origin 4.1’’ (Microsoft. Software, Inc and Microsoft Excel, evaluated Student and criteria Pearson. Protocol of research was adequate Helsinki Declaration. Our results in patients with obstructive apnea: PLT=109x109±40x109l; MPV =7,7±3,0fl; PCT=0,08x10-2±0,02x10-2%; PDWС =33,4±3,6%; in patients with central apnea - PLT=142x109±50x109l; MPV=6,4±2,0fl; PCT=0,09x10-2±0,03x10-2%; PDWС=32,7±3,0; in control - PLT=250x109±40x109l; MPV=11,0±4,0fl; PCT=0,25x10-2±0,05x10-2%; PDWС=36,2±4,0%. Interrupted we analyzed the number of platelets and platelet indices for determining homeostasis in stress disease. Stress body reduces the number of platelets. But if apnea is a disease of the fourth rank stress, platelet factors fluctuate within normal limits. Our data have practical significance for biomedicine. We propose a new marker for apnea: platelet composes.

  7. Stress-induced traveltime variations at SAFOD revealed by continuous cross-well active source monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Niu, F.; Daley, T. M.; Taira, T.

    2016-12-01

    The time-varying stress/strain field at seismogenic depths is arguable the single most important property controlling the sequencing and nucleation of seismic events. The measurement of stress, however, is notoriously difficult, particularly at seismogenic depths. Seismic imaging, in principle, has the capability to provide this critical depth component. Numerous laboratory studies over the last few decades have shown that the elastic properties of crustal rocks clearly exhibit stress dependence. Such dependence is attributed to the opening/closing of fluid-filled cracks in response to changes in the stress normal to the crack surface. Temporal changes in stress are thus, in principle, measurable through seismic imaging of changes in elastic properties, such as seismic velocity field. We have been conducting continuous cross-well active source experiments utilizing the SAFOD (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) pilot and main holes to develop a seismic stress meter to monitor the subsurface stress field by exploring the velocity-stress sensitivity. In a two-month period in 2005-2006, we found a 0.3% change in the average S-wave velocity, which shows a good correlation with barometric pressure, corresponding to a stress sensitivity of 2.4x10-7Pa-1. We also observed two large excursions in the delay time measurement, corresponding to 0.55% and 0.15% decreases of seismic velocity, that are coincident with two earthquakes that are among those predicted to produce the largest coseismic stress changes. The two excursions started approximately 10 and 2 hours before the events, respectively, suggesting that they may be related to pre-rupture stress induced changes in crack properties, as observed in early laboratory studies. We repeated the experiment in early 2010 with a slightly different experiment configuration, and collected 40-days data. The new data confirmed the negative correlation between traveltime and barometric pressure. The estimated stress sensitivity is

  8. Pituitary gonadotrophic hormone synthesis, secretion, subunit gene expression and cell structure in normal and follicle-stimulating hormone β knockout, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor knockout, luteinising hormone receptor knockout, hypogonadal and ovariectomised female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, M H; Widen, A; Wang, X; Huhtaniemi, I; Pakarinen, P; Kumar, T R; Christian, H C

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between gonadotroph function and ultrastructure, we have compared, in parallel in female mice, the effects of several different mutations that perturb the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Specifically, serum and pituitary gonadotrophin concentrations, gonadotrophin gene expression, gonadotroph structure and number were measured. Follicle-stimulating hormone β knockout (FSHβKO), follicle-stimulating hormone receptor knockout (FSHRKO), luteinising hormone receptor knockout (LuRKO), hypogonadal (hpg) and ovariectomised mice were compared with control wild-type or heterozygote female mice. Serum levels of LH were elevated in FSHβKO and FSHRKO compared to heterozygote females, reflecting the likely decreased oestrogen production in KO females, as demonstrated by the threadlike uteri and acyclicity. As expected, there was no detectable FSH in the serum or pituitary and an absence of expression of the FSHβ subunit gene in FSHβKO mice. However, there was a significant increase in expression of the FSHβ and LHβ subunit genes in FSHRKO female mice. The morphology of FSHβKO and FSHRKO gonadotrophs was not significantly different from the control, except that secretory granules in FSHRKO gonadotrophs were larger in diameter. In LuRKO and ovariectomised mice, stimulation of LHβ and FSHβ mRNA, as well as serum protein concentrations, were reflected in subcellular changes in gonadotroph morphology, including more dilated rough endoplasmic reticula and fewer, larger secretory granules. In the gonadotophin-releasing hormone deficient hpg mouse, gonadotrophin mRNA and protein levels were significantly lower than in control mice and gonadotrophs were correspondingly smaller with less abundant endoplasmic reticula and reduced numbers of secretory granules. In summary, major differences in pituitary content and serum concentrations of the gonadotrophins LH and FSH were found between control and mutant female mice. These changes were

  9. Infertility despite surgery for cryptorchidism in childhood can be classified by patients with normal or elevated follicle-stimulating hormone and identified at orchidopexy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, D; Thorup, J; Lindenberg, S

    2003-01-01

    FSH value. CONCLUSION: Despite surgery for cryptorchidism, infertility was probable in a third (44 of 135) of the patients. We expected high FSH values in these patients, but in 45% (20/44) the FSH values were normal. These patients may have relative FSH deficiency. At orchidopexy these patients were...

  10. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter in Drosophila transfers calcium between the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria in oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sekyu; Quan, Xianglan; Bang, Sunhoe; Yoo, Heesuk; Kim, Jiyoung; Park, Jiwon; Park, Kyu-Sang; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2017-09-01

    Mitochondrial calcium plays critical roles in diverse cellular processes ranging from energy metabolism to cell death. Previous studies have demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium uptake is mainly mediated by the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) complex. However, the roles of the MCU complex in calcium transport, signaling, and dysregulation by oxidative stress still remain unclear. Here, we confirmed that Drosophila MCU contains evolutionarily conserved structures and requires essential MCU regulator (EMRE) for its calcium channel activities. We generated Drosophila MCU loss-of-function mutants, which lacked mitochondrial calcium uptake in response to caffeine stimulation. Basal metabolic activities were not significantly affected in these MCU mutants, as observed in examinations of body weight, food intake, body sugar level, and starvation-induced autophagy. However, oxidative stress-induced increases in mitochondrial calcium, mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization, and cell death were prevented in these mutants. We also found that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor genetically interacts with Drosophila MCU and effectively modulates mitochondrial calcium uptake upon oxidative stress. Taken together, these results support the idea that Drosophila MCU is responsible for endoplasmic reticulum-to-mitochondrial calcium transfer and for cell death due to mitochondrial dysfunction under oxidative stress. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Attenuation of stress induced memory deficits by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in rats: Role of antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emad, Shaista; Qadeer, Sara; Sadaf, Sana; Batool, Zehra; Haider, Saida; Perveen, Tahira

    2017-04-01

    Repeated stress paradigms have been shown to cause devastating alterations on memory functions. Stress is linked with inflammation. Psychological and certain physical stressors could lead to neuroinflammation. Inflammatory process may occur by release of mediators and stimulate the production of prostaglandins through cyclooxygenase (COX). Treatment with COX inhibitors, which restrain prostaglandin production, has enhanced memory in a number of neuroinflammatory states showing a potential function for raised prostaglandins in these memory shortfalls. In the present study, potential therapeutic effects of indomethacin and diclofenac sodium on memory in both unrestraint and restraint rats were observed. Two components, long term memory and short term memory were examined by Morris water maze (MWM) and elevated plus maze (EPM) respectively. The present study also demonstrated the effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on lipid peroxidation (LPO) and activities of antioxidant enzymes along with the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Results of MWM and EPM showed significant effects of drugs in both unrestraint and restraint rats as escape latency and transfer latency, in respective behavioral models were decreased as compared to that of control. This study also showed NSAIDs administration decreased LPO and increased antioxidant enzymes activity and decreased AChE activity in rats exposed to repeated stress. In conclusion this study suggests a therapeutic potential of indomethacin and diclofenac against repeated stress-induced memory deficits. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  12. BDNF Overexpression in the Ventral Tegmental Area Prolongs Social Defeat Stress-induced Cross-Sensitization to Amphetamine and Increases ΔFosB Expression in Mesocorticolimbic Regions of Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Junshi; Fanous, Sanya; Terwilliger, Ernest F.; Bass, Caroline E.; Hammer, Ronald P; Nikulina, Ella M

    2013-01-01

    Social defeat stress induces persistent cross-sensitization to psychostimulants, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of cross-sensitization remain unclear. One candidate is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The present research examined whether ventral tegmental area (VTA) BDNF overexpression would prolong the time course of cross-sensitization after a single social defeat stress, which normally produces transient cross-sensitization lasting

  13. The neuronal insulin sensitizer dicholine succinate reduces stress-induced depressive traits and memory deficit: possible role of insulin-like growth factor 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cline Brandon H

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of epidemiological studies have established a link between insulin resistance and the prevalence of depression. The occurrence of depression was found to precede the onset of diabetes and was hypothesized to be associated with inherited inter-related insufficiency of the peripheral and central insulin receptors. Recently, dicholine succinate, a sensitizer of the neuronal insulin receptor, was shown to stimulate insulin-dependent H2O2 production of the mitochondrial respiratory chain leading to an enhancement of insulin receptor autophosphorylation in neurons. As such, this mechanism can be a novel target for the elevation of insulin signaling. Results Administration of DS (25 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneal in CD1 mice for 7 days prior to the onset of stress procedure, diminished manifestations of anhedonia defined in a sucrose test and behavioral despair in the forced swim test. Treatment with dicholine succinate reduced the anxiety scores of stressed mice in the dark/light box paradigm, precluded stress-induced decreases of long-term contextual memory in the step-down avoidance test and hippocampal gene expression of IGF2. Conclusions Our data suggest that dicholine succinate has an antidepressant-like effect, which might be mediated via the up-regulation of hippocampal expression of IGF2, and implicate the neuronal insulin receptor in the pathogenesis of stress-induced depressive syndrome.

  14. Possible Involvement of µ Opioid Receptor in the Antidepressant-Like Effect of Shuyu Formula in Restraint Stress-Induced Depression-Like Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-rong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently μ opioid receptor (MOR has been shown to be closely associated with depression. Here we investigated the action of Shuyu, a Chinese herbal prescription, on repeated restraint stress induced depression-like rats, with specific attention to the role of MOR and the related signal cascade. Our results showed that repeated restraint stress caused significant depressive-like behaviors, as evidenced by reduced body weight gain, prolonged duration of immobility in forced swimming test, and decreased number of square-crossings and rearings in open field test. The stress-induced depression-like behaviors were relieved by Shuyu, which was accompanied by decreased expression of MOR in hippocampus. Furthermore, Shuyu upregulated BDNF protein expression, restored the activity of CREB, and stimulated MEK and ERK phosphorylation in hippocampus of stressed rats. More importantly, MOR is involved in the effects of Shuyu on these depression-related signals, as they can be strengthened by MOR antagonist CTAP. Collectively, these data indicated that the antidepressant-like properties of Shuyu are associated with MOR and the corresponding CREB, BDNF, MEK, and ERK signal pathway. Our study supports clinical use of Shuyu as an effective treatment of depression and also suggests that MOR might be a target for treatment of depression and developing novel antidepressants.

  15. Heat stress-induced disruption of endothelial barrier function is via PAR1 signaling and suppressed by Xuebijing injection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiulin Xu

    Full Text Available Increased vascular permeability leading to acute lung injury (ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is central to the pathogenesis of heatstroke. Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1, the receptor for thrombin, plays a key role in disruption of endothelial barrier function in response to extracellular stimuli. However, the role of PAR1 in heat stress-induced endothelial hyper-permeability is unknown. In this study, we measured PAR1 protein expression in heat-stressed human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs, investigated the influences of PAR1 on endothelial permeability, F-actin rearrangement, and moesin phosphorylation by inhibiting PAR1 with its siRNA, neutralizing antibody (anti-PAR1, specific inhibitor(RWJ56110, and Xuebijing injection (XBJ, a traditional Chinese medicine used for sepsis treatment, and evaluated the role of PAR1 in heatstroke-related ALI/ARDS in mice by suppressing PAR1 with RWJ56110, anti-PAR1and XBJ. We found that heat stress induced PAR1 protein expression 2h after heat stress in endothelial cells, caused the release of endothelial matrix metalloprotease 1, an activator of PAR1, after 60 or 120 min of heat stimulation, as well as promoted endothelial hyper-permeability and F-actin rearrangement, which were inhibited by suppressing PAR1 with RWJ56110, anti-PAR1 and siRNA. PAR1 mediated moesin phosphorylation, which caused F-actin rearrangement and disruption of endothelial barrier function. To corroborate findings from in vitro experiments, we found that RWJ56110 and the anti-PAR1 significantly decreased lung edema, pulmonary microvascular permeability, protein exudation, and leukocytes infiltrations in heatstroke mice. Additionally, XBJ was found to suppress PAR1-moesin signal pathway and confer protective effects on maintaining endothelial barrier function both in vitro and in vivo heat-stressed model, similar to those observed above with the inhibition of PAR1. These results suggest that PAR1 is a

  16. PARM-1 is an endoplasmic reticulum molecule involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in rat cardiac myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Isodono

    Full Text Available To identify novel transmembrane and secretory molecules expressed in cardiac myocytes, signal sequence trap screening was performed in rat neonatal cardiac myocytes. One of the molecules identified was a transmembrane protein, prostatic androgen repressed message-1 (PARM-1. While PARM-1 has been identified as a gene induced in prostate in response to castration, its function is largely unknown. Our expression analysis revealed that PARM-1 was specifically expressed in hearts and skeletal muscles, and in the heart, cardiac myocytes, but not non-myocytes expressed PARM-1. Immunofluorescent staining showed that PARM-1 was predominantly localized in endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In Dahl salt-sensitive rats, high-salt diet resulted in hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and subsequent heart failure, and significantly stimulated PARM-1 expression in the hearts, with a concomitant increase in ER stress markers such as GRP78 and CHOP. In cultured cardiac myocytes, PARM-1 expression was stimulated by proinflammatory cytokines, but not by hypertrophic stimuli. A marked increase in PARM-1 expression was observed in response to ER stress inducers such as thapsigargin and tunicamycin, which also induced apoptotic cell death. Silencing PARM-1 expression by siRNAs enhanced apoptotic response in cardiac myocytes to ER stresses. PARM-1 silencing also repressed expression of PERK and ATF6, and augmented expression of CHOP without affecting IRE-1 expression and JNK and Caspase-12 activation. Thus, PARM-1 expression is induced by ER stress, which plays a protective role in cardiac myocytes through regulating PERK, ATF6 and CHOP expression. These results suggested that PARM-1 is a novel ER transmembrane molecule involved in cardiac remodeling in hypertensive heart disease.

  17. Xiaoyaosan Decoction, a Traditional Chinese Medicine, Inhibits Oxidative-Stress-Induced Hippocampus Neuron Apoptosis In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-zhi Meng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoyaosan (XYS decoction is a famous prescription for the treatment of mental disorders in China. In this experiment, we explored the way in which XYS decoction-reverse hippocampus neuron apoptosis in vitro. We used XYS decoction-containing serum to treat oxidative-stress-induced hippocampus neuron apoptosis and used immunofluorescence to determine the concentration of free calcium, mitochondrial membrane potential, and apoptotic rate of neuron. Results showed that 3-hour oxidative stress decrease mitochondrial membrane potential, increase the concentration of free calcium and apoptotic rate of neuron via triggering pathological changes of nucleus such as karyorrhexis, karyopyknosis. Low, medium, high dose of XYS-decoction-containing serum could reverse these phenomenon, and the effect of low-dose XYS-decoction-containing serum was significant in improving mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptotic rate of neuron. These findings suggest that XYS decoction may be helpful in reducing oxidative-stress-induced hippocampus neuron apoptosis.

  18. A study on anti-stress property of Nardostachys jatamamsi on stress induced Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpashree R.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a feeling that’s created when we react to particular events. It s the body’s way of rising to a challenge and preparing to meet a tough situation with focus, strength, stamina, and heightened alertness. As a result of the stress immune system can be suppressed by chronic stress opening to increased infections and increasing the risk of autoimmune diseases. So one has to learn away to overcome stress. Here is an attempt made to overcome the stress induced in Drosophila melanogaster a model organism, in this study. Methotrexate is used to induce the stress at different concentration taking different group of flies and a Nardostachys jatamamsi plant extract having antistress property is used to relieve the stress induced. This stress relieve measured by the various stress related enzymes like catalase and Superoxide dismutase by this antistress property of the plant Nardostachys jatamamsi was shown.

  19. Adrenal-dependent and -independent stress-induced Per1 mRNA in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and prefrontal cortex of male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Lauren E; Christensen, Jenny; Woodruff, Elizabeth R; Morton, Sarah J; Hinds, Laura R; Spencer, Robert L

    2018-01-01

    Oscillating clock gene expression gives rise to a molecular clock that is present not only in the body's master circadian pacemaker, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), but also in extra-SCN brain regions. These extra-SCN molecular clocks depend on the SCN for entrainment to a light:dark cycle. The SCN has limited neural efferents, so it may entrain extra-SCN molecular clocks through its well-established circadian control of glucocorticoid hormone secretion. Glucocorticoids can regulate the normal rhythmic expression of clock genes in some extra-SCN tissues. Untimely stress-induced glucocorticoid secretion may compromise extra-SCN molecular clock function. We examined whether acute restraint stress during the rat's inactive phase can rapidly (within 30 min) alter clock gene (Per1, Per2, Bmal1) and cFos mRNA (in situ hybridization) in the SCN, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of male and female rats (6 rats per treatment group). Restraint stress increased Per1 and cFos mRNA in the PVN and PFC of both sexes. Stress also increased cFos mRNA in the SCN of male rats, but not when subsequently tested during their active phase. We also examined in male rats whether endogenous glucocorticoids are necessary for stress-induced Per1 mRNA (6-7 rats per treatment group). Adrenalectomy attenuated stress-induced Per1 mRNA in the PVN and ventral orbital cortex, but not in the medial PFC. These data indicate that increased Per1 mRNA may be a means by which extra-SCN molecular clocks adapt to environmental stimuli (e.g. stress), and in the PFC this effect is largely independent of glucocorticoids.

  20. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade prevents stress-induced modulation of multiple memory systems in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Lars; Tegenthoff, Martin; Höffken, Oliver; Wolf, Oliver T

    2013-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that stress may orchestrate the engagement of multiple memory systems in the brain. In particular, stress is thought to favor dorsal striatum-dependent procedural over hippocampus-dependent declarative memory. However, the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying these modulatory effects of stress remain elusive, especially in humans. Here, we targeted the role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the stress-induced modulation of dorsal striatal and hippocampal memory systems in the human brain using a combination of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and pharmacologic blockade of the MR. Eighty healthy participants received the MR antagonist spironolactone (300 mg) or a placebo and underwent a stressor or control manipulation before they performed, in the scanner, a classification task that can be supported by the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum. Stress after placebo did not affect learning performance but reduced explicit task knowledge and led to a relative increase in the use of more procedural learning strategies. At the neural level, stress promoted striatum-based learning at the expense of hippocampus-based learning. Functional connectivity analyses showed that this shift was associated with altered coupling of the amygdala with the hippocampus and dorsal striatum. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade before stress prevented the stress-induced shift toward dorsal striatal procedural learning, same as the stress-induced alterations of amygdala connectivity with hippocampus and dorsal striatum, but resulted in significantly impaired performance. Our findings indicate that the stress-induced shift from hippocampal to dorsal striatal memory systems is mediated by the amygdala, required to preserve performance after stress, and dependent on the MR. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  1. Oxidative stress-induced epigenetic changes associated with malignant transformation of human kidney epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingaiah, Prathap Kumar S; Ponnusamy, Logeswari; Singh, Kamaleshwar P

    2017-02-14

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) in humans is positively influenced by oxidative stress status in kidneys. We recently reported that adaptive response to low level of chronic oxidative stress induces malignant transformation of immortalized human renal tubular epithelial cells. Epigenetic alterations in human RCC are well documented, but its role in oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation of kidney cells is not known. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the potential role of epigenetic changes in chronic oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation of HK-2, human renal tubular epithelial cells. The results revealed aberrant expression of epigenetic regulatory genes involved in DNA methylation (DNMT1, DNMT3a and MBD4) and histone modifications (HDAC1, HMT1 and HAT1) in HK-2 cells malignantly transformed by chronic oxidative stress. Additionally, both in vitro soft agar assay and in vivo nude mice study showing decreased tumorigenic potential of malignantly transformed HK-2 cells following treatment with DNA de-methylating agent 5-aza 2' dC further confirmed the crucial role of DNA hypermethyaltion in oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation. Changes observed in global histone H3 acetylation (H3K9, H3K18, H3K27 and H3K14) and decrease in phospho-H2AX (Ser139) also suggest potential role of histone modifications in increased survival and malignant transformation of HK-2 cells by oxidative stress. In summary, the results of this study suggest that epigenetic reprogramming induced by low levels of oxidative stress act as driver for malignant transformation of kidney epithelial cells. Findings of this study are highly relevant in potential clinical application of epigenetic-based therapeutics for treatments of kidney cancers.

  2. The interplay between neuroendocrine activity and psychological stress-induced exacerbation of allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Tomomitsu; Dobashi-Okuyama, Kaori; Takahashi, Tomoko; Takayanagi, Motoaki; Ohno, Isao

    2018-01-01

    Psychological stress is recognized as a key factor in the exacerbation of allergic asthma, whereby brain responses to stress act as immunomodulators for asthma. In particular, stress-induced enhanced type 2 T-helper (Th2)-type lung inflammation is strongly associated with asthma pathogenesis. Psychological stress leads to eosinophilic airway inflammation through activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal pathway and autonomic nervous system. This is followed by the secretion of stress hormones into the blood, including glucocorticoids, epinephrine, and norepinephrine, which enhance Th2 and type 17 T-helper (Th17)-type asthma profiles in humans and rodents. Recent evidence has shown that a defect of the μ-opioid receptor in the brain along with a defect of the peripheral glucocorticoid receptor signaling completely disrupted stress-induced airway inflammation in mice. This suggests that the stress response facilitates events in the central nervous and endocrine systems, thus exacerbating asthma. In this review, we outline the recent findings on the interplay between stress and neuroendocrine activities followed by stress-induced enhanced Th2 and Th17 immune responses and attenuated regulatory T (Treg) cell responses that are closely linked with asthma exacerbation. We will place a special focus on our own data that has emphasized the continuity from central sensing of psychological stress to enhanced eosinophilic airway inflammation. The mechanism that modulates psychological stress-induced exacerbation of allergic asthma through neuroendocrine activities is thought to involve a series of consecutive pathological events from the brain to the lung, which implies there to be a "neuropsychiatry phenotype" in asthma. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Alcoholic beverages and gastric epithelial cell viability: effect on oxidative stress-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loguercio, C; Tuccillo, C; Federico, A; Fogliano, V; Del Vecchio Blanco, C; Romano, M

    2009-12-01

    Alcohol is known to cause damage to the gastric epithelium independently of gastric acid secretion. Different alcoholic beverages exert different damaging effects in the stomach. However, this has not been systematically evaluated. Moreover, it is not known whether the non-alcoholic components of alcoholic beverages also play a role in the pathogenesis of gastric epithelial cell damage. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate whether different alcoholic beverages, at a similar ethanol concentration, exerted different damaging effect in gastric epithelial cells in vitro. Moreover, we evaluated whether pre-treatment of gastric epithelial cells with alcoholic beverages prevented oxidative stress-induced damage to gastric cells. Cell damage was assessed, in MKN-28 gastric epithelial cells, by MTT assay. Oxidative stress was induced by incubating cells with xanthine and xanthine oxidase. Gastric cell viability was assessed following 30, 60, and 120 minutes incubation with ethanol 17.5-125 mg/ml(-1) or different alcoholic beverages (i.e., beer, white wine, red wine, spirits) at comparable ethanol concentration. Finally, we assessed whether pre-incubation with red wine (with or without ethanol) prevented oxidative stress-induced cell damage. Red wine caused less damage to gastric epithelial cells in vitro compared with other alcoholic beverages at comparable ethanol concentration. Pre-treatment with red wine, but not with dealcoholate red wine, significantly and time-dependently prevented oxidative stress-induced cell damage. 1) red wine is less harmful to gastric epithelial cells than other alcoholic beverages; 2) this seems related to the non-alcoholic components of red wine, because other alcoholic beverages with comparable ethanol concentration exerted more damage than red wine; 3) red wine prevents oxidative stress-induced cell damage and this seems to be related to its ethanol content.

  4. Antioxidant effect of phycocyanin on oxidative stress induced with monosodium glutamate in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Bertolin,Telma Elita; Farias, Daniele; Guarienti, Cíntia; Petry, Fernanda Tais Souza; Colla,Luciane Maria; Costa,Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the antioxidant effect of phycocyanin on the oxidative stress induced by monosodium glutamate in the rats. The tests were performed with 32 rats of Wistar breed, divided into four groups, which were administered saline solution of phycocyanin, monosodium glutamate and monosodium glutamate plus phycocyanin. Sulfhydryl groups and the secondary substances derived from lipid oxidation were determined through the level of TBA. The evaluation of these values ...

  5. Stress-induced alterations in estradiol sensitivity increase risk for obesity in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michopoulos, Vasiliki

    2016-11-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States continues to rise, increasing individual vulnerability to an array of adverse health outcomes. One factor that has been implicated causally in the increased accumulation of fat and excess food intake is the activity of the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (LHPA) axis in the face of relentless stressor exposure. However, translational and clinical research continues to understudy the effects sex and gonadal hormones and LHPA axis dysfunction in the etiology of obesity even though women continue to be at greater risk than men for stress-induced disorders, including depression, emotional feeding and obesity. The current review will emphasize the need for sex-specific evaluation of the relationship between stress exposure and LHPA axis activity on individual risk for obesity by summarizing data generated by animal models currently being leveraged to determine the etiology of stress-induced alterations in feeding behavior and metabolism. There exists a clear lack of translational models that have been used to study female-specific risk. One translational model of psychosocial stress exposure that has proven fruitful in elucidating potential mechanisms by which females are at increased risk for stress-induced adverse health outcomes is that of social subordination in socially housed female macaque monkeys. Data from subordinate female monkeys suggest that increased risk for emotional eating and the development of obesity in females may be due to LHPA axis-induced changes in the behavioral and physiological sensitivity of estradiol. The lack in understanding of the mechanisms underlying these alterations necessitate the need to account for the effects of sex and gonadal hormones in the rationale, design, implementation, analysis and interpretation of results in our studies of stress axis function in obesity. Doing so may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets with which to combat stress-induced obesity

  6. Psychological and physical stress induce differential effects on human colonic motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S S; Hatfield, R A; Suls, J M; Chamberlain, M J

    1998-06-01

    Stress modulates gut function, but whether the type of stressor influences colonic motor activity is unclear. The motor patterns and regional variations are also poorly understood. Our aim was to determine the effects of psychological and physical stress on colonic motility. Ambulatory colonic manometry was performed by placing a six-sensor probe up to the mid-transverse colon, without sedation, in 12 healthy subjects. Five hours later, a dichotomous listening test (psychological stress) was performed, which was preceded by listening to a narrative passage (control); recovery entailed listening to relaxing music (1 h each). Subsequently, intermittent hand immersion in cold (4 degrees C) water (physical stress) was performed, preceded by hand immersion in warm (37 degrees C) water (1/2-h each). Colonic pressure activity and cardiovascular responses were measured throughout the study. When compared with the control period, both stressors induced a greater number of pressure waves (p physical stress increased (p rate and blood pressure. There were no regional differences in colonic motility. During recovery, the motor activity returned to baseline after physical stress, but remained high after psychological stress. Psychological stress induced more (p physical stress induced more (p activity, but psychological stress induced a prolonged response with propagated activity and without appreciable autonomic response. Thus, colonic motor responses may vary depending on the stressor.

  7. Stress Induced Mechano-electrical Writing-Reading of Polymer Film Powered by Contact Electrification Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sumita; Nandy, Suman; Calmeiro, Tomás R.; Igreja, Rui; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Mechano-electrical writing and reading in polyaniline (PANI) thin film are demonstrated via metal-polymer contact electrification mechanism (CEM). An innovative conception for a non-destructive self-powered writable-readable data sheet is presented which can pave the way towards new type of stress induced current harvesting devices. A localized forced deformation of the interface has been enacted by pressing the atomic force microscopic probe against the polymer surface, allowing charge transfer between materials interfaces. The process yields a well-defined charge pattern by transmuting mechanical stress in to readable information. The average of output current increment has been influenced from 0.5 nA to 15 nA for the applied force of 2 nN to 14 nN instead of electrical bias. These results underscore the importance of stress-induced current harvesting mechanism and could be scaled up for charge patterning of polymer surface to writable-readable data sheet. Time evolutional current distribution (TECD) study of the stress-induced patterned PANI surface shows the response of readability of the recorded data with time.

  8. Quantification of stress-induced damage and post-fire response of 5083 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y., E-mail: yanyun@vt.edu [Department of Engineering Science & Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Puplampu, S.B. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Summers, P.T.; Lattimer, B.Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Penumadu, D. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Case, S.W. [Department of Engineering Science & Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2015-08-12

    One of the major concerns regarding the use of lightweight materials in ship construction is the response of those materials to fire scenarios, including the residual structural performance after a fire event. This paper presents a study on creep damage evolution in 5083 marine-grade aluminum alloy and its impact on residual mechanical behavior. Tests conducted at 400 °C and pre-selected tensile stress levels were interrupted at target amplitudes of accumulated engineering creep strains to investigate the stress-induced damage using ex-situ characterization. Two-dimensional optical and electron microscopy and three-dimensional X-ray tomography were utilized on samples extracted from these test specimens to characterize the external and internal creep damage. The stress-induced damage is primarily manifested as cavitation and dynamic microstructural evolution. Cavitation morphology, orientation and grain structure evolution were investigated on three perpendicular sample surfaces. A 3D examination of the damage state provided consistent damage information to that obtained from the 2D analysis. The post-fire mechanical properties were also evaluated and linked to the microstructural change. The competing processes of cavitation and grain structure evolution were investigated to develop an understanding of the stress-induced damage associated with high temperature creep.

  9. (-)Epigallocatechin-3-gallate decreases the stress-induced impairment of learning and memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soung, Hung-Sheng; Wang, Mao-Hsien; Tseng, Hsiang-Chien; Fang, Hsu-Wei; Chang, Kuo-Chi

    2015-08-18

    Stress induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) and causes alterations in brain cytoarchitecture and cognition. Green tea has potent antioxidative properties especially the tea catechin (-) epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). These powerful antioxidative properties are able to protect against various oxidative damages. In this study we investigated the impact of stress on rats' locomotor activity, learning and memory. Many tea catechins, including EGCG, were examined for their possible therapeutic effects in treating stress-induced impairment. Our results indicated that locomotor activity was decreased, and the learning and memory were impaired in stressed rats (SRs). EGCG treatment was able to prevent the decreased locomotor activity as well as improve the learning and memory in SRs. EGCG treatment was also able to reduce the increased oxidative status in SRs' hippocampi. The above results suggest a therapeutic effect of EGCG in treating stress-induced impairment of learning and memory, most likely by means of its powerful antioxidative properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Stress Induces a Shift Towards Striatum-Dependent Stimulus-Response Learning via the Mineralocorticoid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Susanne; Klumpers, Floris; Schröder, Tobias Navarro; Oplaat, Krista T; Krugers, Harm J; Oitzl, Melly S; Joëls, Marian; Doeller, Christian F; Fernández, Guillén

    2017-05-01

    Stress is assumed to cause a shift from flexible 'cognitive' memory to more rigid 'habit' memory. In the spatial memory domain, stress impairs place learning depending on the hippocampus whereas stimulus-response learning based on the striatum appears to be improved. While the neural basis of this shift is still unclear, previous evidence in rodents points towards cortisol interacting with the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) to affect amygdala functioning. The amygdala is in turn assumed to orchestrate the stress-induced shift in memory processing. However, an integrative study testing these mechanisms in humans is lacking. Therefore, we combined functional neuroimaging of a spatial memory task, stress-induction, and administration of an MR-antagonist in a full-factorial, randomized, placebo-controlled between-subjects design in 101 healthy males. We demonstrate that stress-induced increases in cortisol lead to enhanced stimulus-response learning, accompanied by increased amygdala activity and connectivity to the striatum. Importantly, this shift was prevented by an acute administration of the MR-antagonist spironolactone. Our findings support a model in which the MR and the amygdala play an important role in the stress-induced shift towards habit memory systems, revealing a fundamental mechanism of adaptively allocating neural resources that may have implications for stress-related mental disorders.

  11. Ascorbic acid and beta-carotene reduce stress-induced oxidative organ damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrefoglu, M; Akinci, A; Taslidere, E; Elbe, H; Cetin, A; Ates, B

    2016-10-01

    Antioxidants are potential therapeutic agents for reducing stress-induced organ damage. We investigated the effects of ascorbic acid and β-carotene on oxidative stress-induced cerebral, cerebellar, cardiac and hepatic damage using microscopy and biochemistry. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups: untreated control, stressed, stressed + saline, stressed + ascorbic acid and stressed + β-carotene. The rats in the stressed groups were subjected to starvation, immobilization and cold. The histopathological damage scores for the stressed and stressed + saline groups were higher than those of the control group for all organs examined. The histopathological damage scores and mean tissue malondialdehyde levels for the groups treated with antioxidants were lower than those for the stressed and stressed + saline groups. Mean tissue superoxide dismutase activities for groups that received antioxidants were higher than those for the stressed + saline group for most organs evaluated. Ascorbic acid and β-carotene can reduce stress-induced organ damage by both inhibiting lipid oxidation and supporting the cellular antioxidant defense system.

  12. Oxidative Stress Induces Endothelial Cell Senescence via Downregulation of Sirt6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has shown that diabetes accelerates aging and endothelial cell senescence is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, including diabetic retinopathy. Oxidative stress is recognized as a key factor in the induction of endothelial senescence and diabetic retinopathy. However, specific mechanisms involved in oxidative stress-induced endothelial senescence have not been elucidated. We hypothesized that Sirt6, which is a nuclear, chromatin-bound protein critically involved in many pathophysiologic processes such as aging and inflammation, may have a role in oxidative stress-induced vascular cell senescence. Measurement of Sirt6 expression in human endothelial cells revealed that H2O2 treatment significantly reduced Sirt6 protein. The loss of Sirt6 was associated with an induction of a senescence phenotype in endothelial cells, including decreased cell growth, proliferation and angiogenic ability, and increased expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Additionally, H2O2 treatment reduced eNOS expression, enhanced p21 expression, and dephosphorylated (activated retinoblastoma (Rb protein. All of these alternations were attenuated by overexpression of Sirt6, while partial knockdown of Sirt6 expression by siRNA mimicked the effect of H2O2. In conclusion, these results suggest that Sirt6 is a critical regulator of endothelial senescence and oxidative stress-induced downregulation of Sirt6 is likely involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy.

  13. Stress-induced alterations of left-right electrodermal activity coupling indexed by pointwise transinformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Světlák, M; Bob, P; Roman, R; Ježek, S; Damborská, A; Chládek, J; Shaw, D J; Kukleta, M

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that experimental stress induces a specific change of left-right electrodermal activity (EDA) coupling pattern, as indexed by pointwise transinformation (PTI). Further, we hypothesized that this change is associated with scores on psychometric measures of the chronic stress-related psychopathology. Ninety-nine university students underwent bilateral measurement of EDA during rest and stress-inducing Stroop test and completed a battery of self-report measures of chronic stress-related psychopathology. A significant decrease in the mean PTI value was the prevalent response to the stress conditions. No association between chronic stress and PTI was found. Raw scores of psychometric measures of stress-related psychopathology had no effect on either the resting levels of PTI or the amount of stress-induced PTI change. In summary, acute stress alters the level of coupling pattern of cortico-autonomic influences on the left and right sympathetic pathways to the palmar sweat glands. Different results obtained using the PTI, EDA laterality coefficient, and skin conductance level also show that the PTI algorithm represents a new analytical approach to EDA asymmetry description.

  14. Stress-induced changes in spatial memory are sexually differentiated and vary across the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, R E

    2005-08-01

    Stress exposure, depending on intensity and duration, elicits adaptive or maladaptive physiological changes. The same general pattern of advantageous versus deleterious stress effects appears to exist for some cognitive functions, particularly spatial learning and memory performance. This article reviews sex differences in response to stress on a variety of spatial tasks. In general, females are more resistant than males to stress-induced impairments on spatial tasks, including the radial arm maze and object placement. In young adulthood, chronic stress (restraint, 6 h per day for 21 days) impairs male performance on both tasks but leads to behavioural enhancements in females. Furthermore, these sex-dependent stress effects are influenced by both organisational and activational oestrogenic effects. Additionally, sex-specific stress responses vary depending on developmental age at the time of stress exposure. Male behavioural stress responses appear fixed across the lifespan (i.e. stress-induced cognitive impairments) whereas female stress responses appear more variable (i.e. stress-induced enhancements observed in young adulthood are different in response to prenatal stress and diminished following stress exposure at old age). These findings underscore the point that many effects obtained in males cannot be generalised to females and highlight the need to investigate the stress response at different ages and in both sexes.

  15. Acute stress impairs recognition for positive words--association with stress-induced cortisol secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domes, Gregor; Heinrichs, Markus; Rimmele, Ulrike; Reichwald, Ursula; Hautzinger, Martin

    2004-09-01

    Some studies suggest that stress-induced effects of cortisol on memory are modulated by the valence of the stimuli to be learned and retrieved. The present study investigated the effect of acute stress-induced cortisol secretion on acquisition and retrieval of pleasant, unpleasant and neutral words. Sixty healthy men were randomly assigned to one of the three experimental groups. Participants were either exposed to a standardized laboratory stressor (the Trier Social Stress Test) before learning a wordlist, or before retrieval, or were not stressed. Free recall and recognition were tested 24 h later. Free recall was not affected by stress exposure. For recognition, there was no main effect of the stressor, but a main effect of valence and a valence by group interaction emerged: recognition for positive words was significantly impaired when subjects were stressed before retrieval. In addition, a positive correlation between the cortisol response and errors of commission was found. The results suggest that acute stress impairs memory for positive stimuli and that stress-induced cortisol secretion interferes with accuracy of memory retrieval, i.e. the ability to discriminate true memories from false ones.

  16. The Common Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor (FSHR Promoter Polymorphism FSHR −29G > A Affects Androgen Production in Normal Human Small Antral Follicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanni Borgbo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Follicle-stimulating hormone receptors (FSHRs are almost exclusively expressed on granulosa cells, and FSH action is probably most clearly reflected in intrafollicular hormone milieu of antral follicles. Little is known about the possible effects of the common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP FSHR −29G > A (rs1394205 on hormonal conditions in humsan small antral follicles (hSAFs obtained from women in the natural menstrual cycle. This study investigated the follicle fluid (FF concentrations of anti-Müllerian hormone, estradiol, progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone in hSAF in relation to the different genotypes of FSHR −29G > A. FF from 362 follicles was collected in 95 women undergoing fertility preservation, who did not suffer from a disease that directly affected ovarian function. The testosterone levels of the minor A/A genotype were significantly increased compared to the A/G and the G/G genotype. Furthermore, significantly reduced androstenedione levels were observed for the G/G genotype, as compared to the A/G genotype, while the other hormones did not show statistical significant differences. In conclusion, the androgen levels of hSAF were significantly elevated in the minor SNP genotype in the FSHR promoter polymorphism FSHR −29G > A.

  17. Calmodulin protects cells from death under normal growth conditions and mitogenic starvation but plays a mediating role in cell death upon B-cell receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmalzigaug, R; Ye, Q; Berchtold, M W

    2001-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is the main intracellular Ca2+ sensor protein responsible for mediating Ca2+ triggered processes. Chicken DT40 lymphoma B cells express CaM from the two genes, CaMI and CaMII. Here we report the phenotypes of DT40 cells with the CaMII gene knocked out. The disruption of the Ca......MII gene causes the intracellular CaM level to decrease by 60%. CaMII-/- cells grow more slowly and die more frequently as compared to wild type (wt) cells but do not exhibit significant differences in their cell cycle profile. Both phenotypes are more pronounced at reduced serum concentrations. Upon...... stimulation of the B-cell receptor (BCR), the resting Ca2+ levels remain elevated after the initial transient in CaMII-/- cells. Despite higher Ca2+ resting levels, the CaMII-/- cells are partially protected from BCR induced apoptosis indicating that CaM plays a dual role in apoptotic processes....

  18. Manual Acupuncture at PC6 Ameliorates Acute Restraint Stress-Induced Anxiety in Rats by Normalizing Amygdaloid Noradrenergic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, ZhengLin; Kim, Sang Chan; Liu, HongFeng; Zhang, Jie; Wang, YuHua; Cho, Il Je; Lee, Bong Hyo; Song, Chang Hyun; Lee, Chul Won; Yang, Chae Ha; Zhao, RongJie; Wu, YiYan

    2017-01-01

    Acupuncture improves ethanol withdrawal-induced anxiety in rats in an acupoint-dependent manner. Thus, the present study investigated the effects of acupuncture on acute restraint stress- (ARS-) induced anxiety. Male rats were exposed to ARS for 3 h followed by acupuncture at either PC6 (Neiguan), HT7 (Shenmen), or a nonacupoint (tail) once a day for three consecutive days. Five minutes after the third acupuncture treatment, anxiety-like behavior was evaluated in an elevated plus maze (EPM). Additionally, plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay and the concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol (MHPG) in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Acupuncture at PC6, but not HT7 or a nonacupoint, attenuated anxiety-like behavior, but this attenuation was abolished by a postacupunctural intra-CeA infusion of NE. Acupuncture at PC6 also reduced the oversecretion of plasma CORT and inhibited increases in amygdaloid NE and MHPG induced by ARS. Further, Western blot analyses and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays revealed that acupuncture at PC6 prevented ARS-induced enhancements in the protein and mRNA expressions of tyrosine hydroxylase in the CeA. These results suggest that acupuncture performed specifically at acupoint PC6 reduces ARS-induced anxiety-like behavior by dampening amygdaloid noradrenergic responses.

  19. Manual Acupuncture at PC6 Ameliorates Acute Restraint Stress-Induced Anxiety in Rats by Normalizing Amygdaloid Noradrenergic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZhengLin Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture improves ethanol withdrawal-induced anxiety in rats in an acupoint-dependent manner. Thus, the present study investigated the effects of acupuncture on acute restraint stress- (ARS- induced anxiety. Male rats were exposed to ARS for 3 h followed by acupuncture at either PC6 (Neiguan, HT7 (Shenmen, or a nonacupoint (tail once a day for three consecutive days. Five minutes after the third acupuncture treatment, anxiety-like behavior was evaluated in an elevated plus maze (EPM. Additionally, plasma corticosterone (CORT levels were measured by radioimmunoassay and the concentrations of norepinephrine (NE and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol (MHPG in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Acupuncture at PC6, but not HT7 or a nonacupoint, attenuated anxiety-like behavior, but this attenuation was abolished by a postacupunctural intra-CeA infusion of NE. Acupuncture at PC6 also reduced the oversecretion of plasma CORT and inhibited increases in amygdaloid NE and MHPG induced by ARS. Further, Western blot analyses and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays revealed that acupuncture at PC6 prevented ARS-induced enhancements in the protein and mRNA expressions of tyrosine hydroxylase in the CeA. These results suggest that acupuncture performed specifically at acupoint PC6 reduces ARS-induced anxiety-like behavior by dampening amygdaloid noradrenergic responses.

  20. A Placebo-Controlled Trial of Prazosin vs. Paroxetine in Combat Stress-Induced PTSD Nightmares and Sleep Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    vs. Paroxetine in Combat Stress-Induced PTSD Nightmares and Sleep Disturbance PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Murray Raskind, M.D. Elaine...CONTRACT NUMBER A Placebo-Controlled Trial of Prazosin vs. Paroxetine in Combat Stress-Induced PTSD Nightmares and Sleep Disturbance 5b. GRANT NUMBER...the SSRI paroxetine on behavioral symptoms and overall function in this population. Specific hypotheses (described below) will be tested in a three

  1. Involvement of Rho-kinase and tyrosine kinase in hypotonic stress-induced ATP release in bovine aortic endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Tetsuya; Oike, Masahiro; Ito, Yushi

    2001-01-01

    Hypotonic stress induces ATP release followed by Ca2+ oscillations in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). We have investigated the cellular mechanism of the hypotonic stress-induced ATP release. Hypotonic stress induced tyrosine phosphorylation of at least two proteins, of 110 and 150 kDa. Inhibition of tyrosine kinase by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors herbimycin A and tyrphostin 46 prevented ATP release and ATP-mediated Ca2+ oscillations induced by hypotonic stress. ATP release was also inhibited by the pretreatment of the cells with botulinum toxin C3, and augmented by lysophosphatidic acid. Furthermore, pre-treating the cells with Y-27632, a selective inhibitor of Rho-kinase, also suppressed the hypotonic stress-induced ATP release and Ca2+ oscillations, indicating that Rho-mediated activation of Rho-kinase may be involved in the hypotonic ATP release. Hypotonic stress also induced a transient rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, which was suppressed by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors Y-27632 and cytochalasin B. However, pretreatment of the cell with cytochalasin B inhibited neither the hypotonic stress-induced ATP release nor the Ca2+ oscillations. These results indicate that tyrosine kinase and the Rho-Rho-kinase pathways are involved in hypotonic stress-induced ATP release and actin rearrangement, but actin polymerization is not required for ATP release in BAECs. PMID:11313444

  2. Secretin-stimulated MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP): visualization of the normal pancreatic duct in comparison with ERCP; Sekretinstimulierte Magnetresonanzcholangiopankreatikographie: Darstellung des normalen Pankreasgangs im Vergleich zur ERCP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heverhagen, J.T.; Battmann, A.; Kirsch, M.; Klose, K.J.; Wagner, H.J. [Klinik fuer Strahlendiagnostik, Medizinisches Zentrum fuer Radiologie, Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany); Eissele, R. [Klinik fuer Gastroenterologie, Medizinisches Zentrum fuer Innere Medizin, Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany)

    2002-09-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the application of secretin improves the depiction of the normal pancreatic duct and to document the time course of any possible improved visualisation. Patients and Methods: Twenty-eight patients with a normal pancreatic ductal system, proved by ERCP, were prospectively enrolled in our study. MRCP was carried out in a 1.0 Tesla unit using a thick slab single-shot turbo-echo sequence (TR: {infinity}, TE: 1100 ms, FA: 150 , slab thickness: 65 mm). Following acquisition of a non-enhanced image, 1 clinical unit/kg bodyweight of secretin was injected intravenously. During the subsequent ten minutes the MR measurement was repeated every 30 seconds. The images were independently evaluated by two investigators. Results: The improvement in quality after administration of secretin was statistically significant for both investigators (p < 0.05), but no significant difference was found between both investigators concerning the quality of the images (p = 0.49). Prior to the secretin application, the entire ductal system only be evaluated in ten cases (35.7%) by both investigators, afterwards in 26 cases (92.9%). Improvement was achieved after a mean time of 1.5 minutes and lasted until the ninth minute. Conclusion: Intravenous application of secretin improves image quality of MRCP also in patients with no pancreatic pathology. Improvement begins after 1.5 minutes and lasts for about seven minutes. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Wir wollten pruefen, ob die Visualisierung des gesunden Pankreasgangsystems durch die Applikation von Sekretin verbessert wird und ueber welchen Zeitraum sich eine moegliche Verbesserung dokumentieren laesst. Patienten und Methoden: 28 Patienten mit gesundem Pankreasgangsystem, nachgewiesen durch ERCP, wurden prospektiv in die Studie eingeschlossen. Die MRCP wurde in einem 1,0 Tesla Scanner mit einer single-shot Turbo-Spin-Echo Sequenz (TR: {infinity}, TE: 1100 ms, FA: 150 , Slabdicke: 65 mm) durchgefuehrt. Nach der Akquisition von

  3. The effects of kratom on restraint-stress-induced analgesia and its mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez López, José Luis; Schild, Lorenz; Günther, Thomas; Schulz, Stefan; Neurath, Hartmud; Becker, Axel

    2017-06-09

    Mitragyna speciosa and its extracts are called kratom (dried leaves, extract). They contain several alkaloids with an affinity for different opioid receptors. They are used in traditional medicine for the treatment of different diseases, as a substitute by opiate addicts, and to mitigate opioid withdrawal symptoms. Apart from their medical properties, they are used to enhance physical endurance and as a means of overcoming stress. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms underlying the effects of kratom on restraint-stress-induced analgesia which occurs during or following exposure to a stressful or fearful stimulus. To gain further insights into the action of kratom on stress, we conducted experiments using restraint stress as a test system and stress-induced analgesia as a test parameter. Using transgenic mu opioid-receptor (MOR) deficient mice, we studied the involvement of this receptor type. We used nor-binaltorphimine (BNT), an antagonist at kappa opioid receptors (KOR), to study functions of this type of receptor. Membrane potential assay was also employed to measure the intrinsic activity of kratom in comparison to U50,488, a highly selective kappa agonist. Treatment with kratom diminished stress-induced analgesia in wildtype and MOR knockout animals. Pretreatment of MOR deficient mice with BNT resulted in similar effects. In comparison to U50,488, kratom exhibited negligible intrinsic activity at KOR alone. The results suggest that the use of kratom as a pharmacological tool to mitigate withdrawal symptoms is related to its action on KOR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. GAD65 haplodeficiency conveys resilience in animal models of stress-induced psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris eMüller

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic mechanisms are critically involved in the control of fear and anxiety, but their role in the development of stress-induced psychopathologies, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and mood disorders is not sufficiently understood. We studied these functions in two established mouse models of risk factors for stress-induced psychopathologies employing variable juvenile stress and/or social isolation. A battery of emotional tests in adulthood revealed the induction of contextually generalized fear, anxiety, hyperarousal and depression-like symptoms in these paradigms. These reflect the multitude and complexity of stress effects in human PTSD patients. With factor analysis we were able to identify parameters that reflect these different behavioral domains in stressed animals and thus provide a basis for an integrated scoring of affectedness more closely resembling the clinical situation than isolated parameters. To test the applicability of these models to genetic approaches we further tested the role of GABA using heterozygous mice with targeted mutation of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD65 (GAD65+/- mice, which show a delayed postnatal increase in tissue GABA content in limbic and cortical brain areas. Unexpectedly, GAD65(+/- mice did not show changes in exploratory activity regardless of the stressor type and were after the variable juvenile stress procedure protected from the development of contextual generalization in an auditory fear conditioning experiment. Our data demonstrate the complex nature of behavioral alterations in rodent models of stress-related psychopathologies and suggest that GAD65 haplodeficiency, likely through its effect on the postnatal maturation of GABAergic transmission, conveys resilience to some of these stress-induced effects.

  5. Overlapping mechanisms of stress-induced relapse to opioid use disorder and chronic pain: Clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udi E Ghitza

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, a steeply growing number of persons with chronic non-cancer pain have been using opioid analgesics chronically to treat it, accompanied by a markedly increased prevalence of individuals with opioid-related misuse, opioid use disorders, emergency department visits, hospitalizations, admissions to drug treatment programs, and drug overdose deaths. This opioid misuse and overdose epidemic calls for well-designed randomized-controlled clinical trials into more skillful and appropriate pain management and for developing effective analgesics which have lower abuse liability and are protective against stress induced by chronic non-cancer pain. However, incomplete knowledge regarding effective approaches to treat various types of pain has been worsened by an under-appreciation of overlapping neurobiological mechanisms of stress, stress-induced relapse to opioid use, and chronic non-cancer pain in patients presenting for care for these conditions. This insufficient knowledge base has unfortunately encouraged common prescription of conveniently-available opioid pain-relieving drugs with abuse liability, as opposed to treating underlying problems using team-based multidisciplinary, patient-centered, collaborative-care approaches for addressing pain and co-occurring stress and risk for opioid use disorder. This paper reviews recent neurobiological findings regarding overlapping mechanisms of stress-induced relapse to opioid misuse and chronic non-cancer pain, and then discusses these in the context of key outstanding evidence gaps and clinical-treatment research directions which may be pursued to fill these gaps. Such research directions, if conducted through well-designed randomized controlled trials, may substantively inform clinical practice in general medical settings on how to effectively care for patients presenting with pain-related distress and these common co-occurring conditions.

  6. Suppression of soluble adenylyl cyclase protects smooth muscle cells against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Appukuttan, Avinash; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Hahn, Stephan; Peter Reusch, H; Ladilov, Yury

    2014-07-01

    Apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) significantly contributes to the instability of advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Oxygen radicals are an important cause for VSMC death. However, the precise mechanism of oxidative stress-induced VSMC apoptosis is still poorly understood. Here, we aimed to analyse the role of soluble adenylyl cylclase (sAC). VSMC derived from rat aorta were treated with either H2O2 (300 µmol/L) or DMNQ (30 µmol/L) for 6 h. Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis was prevented either by treatment with 30 µmol/L KH7 (a specific inhibitor of sAC) or by stable sAC-knockdown (shRNA-transfection). A similar effect was found after inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA). Suppression of the sAC/PKA-axis led to a significant increase in phosphorylation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase under oxidative stress accompanied by a p38-dependent phosphorylation/inactivation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-family protein Bad. Pharmacological inhibition of p38 reversed these effects of sAC knockdown on apoptosis and Bad phosphorylation, suggesting p38 as a link between sAC and apoptosis. Analysis of the protein phosphatases 1 and 2A activities revealed an activation of phosphatase 1, but not phosphatase 2A, under oxidative stress in a sAC/PKA-dependent manner and its role in controlling the p38 phosphorylation. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 1, but not 2A, prevented the pro-apoptotic effect of oxidative stress. In conclusion, sAC/PKA-signaling plays a key role in the oxidative stress-induced apoptosis of VSMC. The cellular mechanism consists of the sAC-promoted and protein phosphatase 1-mediated suppression of p38 phosphorylation resulting to activation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis.

  7. Effect of the CRF1-receptor antagonist pexacerfont on stress-induced eating and food craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, David H; Kennedy, Ashley P; Furnari, Melody; Heilig, Markus; Shaham, Yavin; Phillips, Karran A; Preston, Kenzie L

    2016-12-01

    In rodents, antagonism of receptors for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) blocks stress-induced reinstatement of drug or palatable food seeking. To test anticraving properties of the CRF1 antagonist pexacerfont in humans. We studied stress-induced eating in people scoring high on dietary restraint (food preoccupation and chronic unsuccessful dieting) with body-mass index (BMI) >22. In a double-blind, between-groups trial, 31 "restrained" eaters were stabilized on either pexacerfont (300 mg/day for 7 days, then 100 mg/day for 21 days) or placebo. On day 15, they underwent a math-test stressor; during three subsequent visits, they heard personalized craving-induction scripts. In each session, stress-induced food consumption and craving were assessed in a bogus taste test and on visual analog scales. We used digital video to monitor daily ingestion of study capsules and nightly rating of food problems/preoccupation on the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS). The study was stopped early due to an administrative interpretation of US federal law, unrelated to safety or outcome. The bogus taste tests suggested some protective effect of pexacerfont against eating after a laboratory stressor (r effect = 0.30, 95 % CL = -0.12, 0.63, Bayes factor 11.30). Similarly, nightly YFAS ratings were lower with pexacerfont than placebo (r effect = 0.39, CI 0.03, 0.66), but this effect should be interpreted with caution because it was present from the first night of pill ingestion, despite pexacerfont's slow pharmacokinetics. The findings may support further investigation of the anticraving properties of CRF1 antagonists, especially for food.

  8. Angiotensin II receptor blocker ameliorates stress-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoharu Hayashi

    Full Text Available A strong causal link exists between psychological stress and insulin resistance as well with hypertension. Meanwhile, stress-related responses play critical roles in glucose metabolism in hypertensive patients. As clinical trials suggest that angiotensin-receptor blocker delays the onset of diabetes in hypertensive patients, we investigated the effects of irbesartan on stress-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to 2-week intermittent restraint stress and orally treated with vehicle, 3 and 10 mg/kg/day irbesartan. The plasma concentrations of lipid and proinflammatory cytokines [Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6] were assessed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Monocyte/macrophage accumulation in inguinal white adipose tissue (WAT was observed with CD11b-positive cell counts and mRNA expressions of CD68 and F4/80 using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR methods respectively. The mRNA levels of angiotensinogen, proinflammatory cytokines shown above, and adiponectin in WAT were also assessed with RT-PCR method. Glucose metabolism was assessed by glucose tolerance tests (GTTs and insulin tolerance tests, and mRNA expression of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 in WAT. Restraint stress increased monocyte accumulation, plasma free fatty acids, expression of angiotensinogen and proinflammatory cytokines including MCP-1, and reduced adiponectin. Irbesartan reduced stress-induced monocyte accumulation in WAT in a dose dependent manner. Irbesartan treatment also suppressed induction of adipose angiotensinogen and proinflammatory cytokines in WAT and blood, and reversed changes in adiponectin expression. Notably, irbesartan suppressed stress-induced reduction in adipose tissue weight and free fatty acid release, and improved insulin tolerance with restoration of IRS-1 and GLUT4 mRNA expressions in WAT. The results

  9. Thermal stress induced dislocation distribution in directional solidification of Si for PV application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiptner, Karolin; Gao, Bing; Harada, Hirofumi; Miyamura, Yoshiji; Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Kakimoto, Koichi; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the limitation of the cast technique for silicon growth and the obstacle to reduce the dislocation density below 103 cm-2. The thermal stress induced dislocation density, independent of other dislocation sources, is determined and the result suggests that local dislocation densities as high as 104 cm-2 are readily introduced alone in the cooling period of the crystal growth. Areas of high residual strain and dislocation densities are identified and presented. The experimental results are correlated with numerical simulation based on a three-dimensional Haasen-Alexander-Sumino (HAS) model. The dislocation introduction is caused by an activation of different slip systems in different ingot areas.

  10. Renal and endocrine changes in rats with inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension (ISIAH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amstislavsky, Sergej; Welker, Pia; Frühauf, Jan-Henning

    2006-01-01

    levels were in part reduced. Juxtaglomerular NO synthase type 1, cyclooxygenase type 2, and renin expression were significantly reduced, whereas tubular gene products related to sodium transport (bumetanide-sensitive Na, K, 2Cl cotransporter type 2; thiazide-sensitive Na, Cl cotransporter; epithelial Na......Hypertensive inbred rats (ISIAH; inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension) present with baseline hypertension (>170 mmHg in adult rats), but attain substantially higher values upon mild emotional stress. We aimed to characterize key parameters related to hypertension in ISIAH. Kidneys...

  11. Technical solutions to prevent heat stress induced crop growth reduction for three climatic regions in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Ooster, van 't, A.; Heuvelink, E.; Loaiza Mejia, V.M.; Henten, van, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    In the last 15 years a significant increase in greenhouse area has occurred in Mexico, from a modest 50 hectares in 1990 to over 2,000 hectares in 2004. The rapid increase in greenhouse area is a result of an attractive export market, USA. Mexican summer midday temperatures are well above crop optimum and cooling is needed if heat stress induced crop growth reduction is to be prevented. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness and feasibility of greenhouse cooling system...

  12. A high normal thyroid-stimulating hormone is associated with arterial stiffness, central systolic blood pressure, and 24-hour systolic blood pressure in males with treatment-naïve hypertension and euthyroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Beom-June; Roh, Ji-Woong; Lee, Su-Hyun; Lim, Sung-Min; Park, Chan-Seok; Kim, Dong-Bin; Jang, Sung-Won; Chang, Kiyuk; Kim, Hee-Yeol; Ihm, Sang-Hyun

    2014-12-20

    We compared the results of laboratory examinations, echocardiography, arterial stiffness, central blood pressure (BP) and ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) between treatment-naïve patients with low normal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and those with high normal TSH levels. A total of 285 consecutively-eligible patients with both treatment-naïve hypertension and euthyroid were divided into two groups: those with low-normal TSH (0.40-1.99 μIU/mL, group 1) and high-normal TSH (2.00-4.50 μIU/mL, group 2) and compared according to group and gender. Males were divided into group 1 (n = 113, 68.9%) and group 2 (n = 51, 31.1%) and females were divided into group 1 (n = 71, 58.7%) and group 2 (n = 50, 41.3%). Multivariate analyses revealed that the augmentation index (71.0 [adjusted mean] ± 1.7 [standard error] vs. 78.8 ± 2.5%, P = 0.045), central systolic BP (SBP) (143.3 ± 2.1 vs. 153.0 ± 3.2 mmHg, P = 0.013), systemic vascular resistance (SVR, 21.4 ± 0.6 vs. 23.9 ± 0.9 mmHg/L/min, P = 0.027), SBP during daytime (144.1 ± 1.4 vs. 151.6 ± 2.1 mmHg, P=0.004) and nighttime (130.4 ± 1.6 vs. 138.5 ± 2.5 mmHg, P=0.008), and nighttime pulse pressure (PP, 47.2 ± 0.9 vs. 51.7 ± 1.4 mmHg, P = 0.010) were significantly higher while cardiac output (5.4 ± 0.1 vs. 4.8 ± 0.2L/min, P = 0.043) and PP amplification (1.02 ± 0.02 vs. 0.94 ± 0.03, P = 0.039) were significantly lower in the male group 2 than in the male group 1. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in females. Treatment-naïve hypertensive males with high normal TSH and euthyroid showed higher arterial stiffness, central SBP, SVR, and SBP in ABPM and lower cardiac output and PP amplification as compared to the the low normal TSH group, but not females. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Stress-induced rise in body temperature is repeatable in free-ranging Eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careau, Vincent; Réale, Denis; Garant, Dany; Speakman, John R; Humphries, Murray M

    2012-04-01

    In response to handling or other acute stressors, most mammals, including humans, experience a temporary rise in body temperature (T(b)). Although this stress-induced rise in T(b) has been extensively studied on model organisms under controlled environments, individual variation in this interesting phenomenon has not been examined in the field. We investigated the stress-induced rise in T(b) in free-ranging eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) to determine first if it is repeatable. We predicted that the stress-induced rise in T(b) should be positively correlated to factors affecting heat production and heat dissipation, including ambient temperature (T(a)), body mass (M(b)), and field metabolic rate (FMR). Over two summers, we recorded both T(b) within the first minute of handling time (T(b1)) and after 5 min of handling time (T(b5)) 294 times on 140 individuals. The mean ∆T(b) (T(b5) - T(b1)) during this short interval was 0.30 ± 0.02°C, confirming that the stress-induced rise in T(b) occurs in chipmunks. Consistent differences among individuals accounted for 40% of the total variation in ∆T(b) (i.e. the stress-induced rise in T(b) is significantly repeatable). We also found that the stress-induced rise in T(b) was positively correlated to T(a), M(b), and mass-adjusted FMR. These results confirm that individuals consistently differ in their expression of the stress-induced rise in T(b) and that the extent of its expression is affected by factors related to heat production and dissipation. We highlight some research constraints and opportunities related to the integration of this laboratory paradigm into physiological and evolutionary ecology.

  14. Thermal Stress-Induced Depolarization Loss in Conventional and Panda-Shaped Photonic Crystal Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyedeh Laleh; Sabaeian, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    We report on the modeling of the depolarization loss in the conventional and panda-shaped photonic crystal fiber lasers (PCFLs) due to the self-heating of the fiber, which we call it thermal stress-induced depolarization loss (TSIDL). We first calculated the temperature distribution over the fiber cross sections and then calculated the thermal stresses/strains as a function of heat load per meter. Thermal stress-induced birefringence (TSIB), which is defined as | n x - n y |, in the core and cladding regions was calculated. Finally, TSIDL was calculated for the conventional and panda-shaped PCFLs as a function of fiber length and, respectively, saturated values of 22 and 25 % were obtained which were independent of heat load per meter. For panda-shaped PCFLs, prior to being saturated, an oscillating and damping behavior against the fiber length was seen where in some lengths reached 35 %. The results are close to an experimental value of 30 % reported for a pulsed PCFL (Limpert et al., Opt Express 12:1313-1319, 2004) where the authors reported a degree of polarization of 70 % (i.e., a depolarization of 30 %). The most important result of this work is a saturation behavior of TSIDL at long-enough lengths of the fiber laser which is independent of heat load per meter. To our knowledge, this the first report of TSIBL for PCFLs.

  15. Thermodynamics of stress-induced ferroelastic transitions: Influence of anisotropy and disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloveras, Pol; Castán, Teresa; Porta, Marcel; Planes, Antoni; Saxena, Avadh

    2010-06-01

    Stress-induced stress-strain constitutive behavior has been studied in detail in ferroelastic martensites. It has been found that the weights of the long-range anisotropic interactions and of the disorder are important to determine the fine structure of the stress-strain curves. As experiments show, a wide variety of behaviors has been observed. A decrease of anisotropy and/or increase in the disorder results in changes in the temperature range where pseudoplastic and superelastic regimes are observed. Also, a smoothing of the stress-induced ferroelastic transition, accompanied with a decrease in the transition stress and the hysteresis area, is found. However, Clausius-Clapeyron slope has been observed not to depend on the specific values of anisotropy and disorder. This is in general agreement with experimental results in different alloy families, although some particular features differ from those in experiments. Elastocaloric effect has been studied as well. Varying the anisotropy slightly modifies the shape of the entropy change-temperature curve but the magnitude of the entropy change remains essentially constant.

  16. Increased number of orexin/hypocretin neurons with high and prolonged external stress-induced depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalewa, Jaishree; Wong-Lin, KongFatt; McGinnity, T Martin; Prasad, Girijesh; Hölscher, Christian

    2014-10-01

    It has been found that dysregulation in the orexin/hypocretin (Ox/HCRT) neuropeptide system in the lateral hypothalamus (LHA) is known to affect sleep disorder, depression and motor activities. However, to date there is no common agreement regarding the resulting specific changes induced in the Ox system. In this study, we inject corticosterone to produce stress-induced depressed mice and investigate the Ox neuronal and corresponding behavioural changes. Different doses (10, 20, 50mg/kgbw) of corticosterone were injected in adult mice, and then were tested in the open field test, forced swim test, tail suspension test, elevated plus maze test and motor activity measurements to validate the depressed animal model. Significant dose-dependent behavioural changes were observed in correlation with the doses of corticosterone. The effect is most significant and robust in the high 50mg/kgbw dose group five weeks after injection. Interestingly, we found on average a reduction in motor activity during the 12-hour dark phase (awake) of the depressed mice and no significant change during the light phase (asleep). Finally, using confocal microscopy, immunofluorescence (IF) analysis shows a significant increase (∼20%) in the number of Ox neurons in the LHA of the depressed mice as compared to the age-matched controls. This study suggests that an increase in Ox neuronal signaling may be functionally linked to high and prolonged external stress-induced depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of Cassia tora Linn. against oxidative stress-induced DNA and cell membrane damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sunil Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aims to evaluate antioxidants and protective role of Cassia tora Linn. against oxidative stress-induced DNA and cell membrane damage. Materials and Methods: The total and profiles of flavonoids were identified and quantified through reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. In vitro antioxidant activity was determined using standard antioxidant assays. The protective role of C. tora extracts against oxidative stress-induced DNA and cell membrane damage was examined by electrophoretic and scanning electron microscopic studies, respectively. Results: The total flavonoid content of CtEA was 106.8 ± 2.8 mg/g d.w.QE, CtME was 72.4 ± 1.12 mg/g d.w.QE, and CtWE was 30.4 ± 0.8 mg/g d.w.QE. The concentration of flavonoids present in CtEA in decreasing order: quercetin >kaempferol >epicatechin; in CtME: quercetin >rutin >kaempferol; whereas, in CtWE: quercetin >rutin >kaempferol. The CtEA inhibited free radical-induced red blood cell hemolysis and cell membrane morphology better than CtME as confirmed by a scanning electron micrograph. CtEA also showed better protection than CtME and CtWE against free radical-induced DNA damage as confirmed by electrophoresis. Conclusion: C. tora contains flavonoids and inhibits oxidative stress and can be used for many health benefits and pharmacotherapy.

  18. Stress-Induced Fracturing of Reservoir Rocks: Acoustic Monitoring and μCT Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Srutarshi; Stroisz, Anna M.; Fjær, Erling; Stenebråten, Jørn F.; Lund, Hans K.; Sønstebø, Eyvind F.

    2015-11-01

    Stress-induced fracturing in reservoir rocks is an important issue for the petroleum industry. While productivity can be enhanced by a controlled fracturing operation, it can trigger borehole instability problems by reactivating existing fractures/faults in a reservoir. However, safe fracturing can improve the quality of operations during CO2 storage, geothermal installation and gas production at and from the reservoir rocks. Therefore, understanding the fracturing behavior of different types of reservoir rocks is a basic need for planning field operations toward these activities. In our study, stress-induced fracturing of rock samples has been monitored by acoustic emission (AE) and post-experiment computer tomography (CT) scans. We have used hollow cylinder cores of sandstones and chalks, which are representatives of reservoir rocks. The fracture-triggering stress has been measured for different rocks and compared with theoretical estimates. The population of AE events shows the location of main fracture arms which is in a good agreement with post-test CT image analysis, and the fracture patterns inside the samples are visualized through 3D image reconstructions. The amplitudes and energies of acoustic events clearly indicate initiation and propagation of the main fractures. Time evolution of the radial strain measured in the fracturing tests will later be compared to model predictions of fracture size.

  19. A new murine model of stress-induced complex atherosclerotic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir H. Najafi

    2013-03-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ApoE−/− mice, when subjected to chronic stress, exhibit lesions characteristic of human vulnerable plaque and, if so, to determine the time course of such changes. We found that the lesions were remarkably similar to human vulnerable plaque, and that the time course of lesion progression raised interesting insights into the process of plaque development. Lard-fed mixed-background ApoE−/− mice exposed to chronic stress develop lesions with large necrotic core, thin fibrous cap and a high degree of inflammation. Neovascularization and intraplaque hemorrhage are observed in over 80% of stressed animals at 20 weeks of age. Previously described models report a prevalence of only 13% for neovascularization observed at a much later time point, between 36 and 60 weeks of age. Thus, our new stress-induced model of advanced atherosclerotic plaque provides an improvement over what is currently available. This model offers a tool to further investigate progression of plaque phenotype to a more vulnerable phenotype in humans. Our findings also suggest a possible use of this stress-induced model to determine whether therapeutic interventions have effects not only on plaque burden, but also, and importantly, on plaque vulnerability.

  20. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsing, Alexandra N.; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K.; Bergman, Heidi A.; Himanen, Samu V.; Kallio, Marko J.; Roos-Mattjus, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis. PMID:25202032

  1. Using multi-spectral imagery to detect and map stress induced by Russian wheat aphid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backoulou, Georges Ferdinand

    Scope and Method of Study. The rationale of this study was to assess the stress in wheat field induced by the Russian wheat aphid using multispectral imagery. The study was conducted to (a) determine the relationship between RWA and edaphic and topographic factors; (b) identify and quantify the spatial pattern of RWA infestation within wheat fields; (c) differentiate the stress induced by RWA from other stress causing factors. Data used for the analysis included RWA population density from the wheat field in, Texas, Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska, Digital Elevation Model from the Unites States Geological Survey (USGS), soil data from the Soil Survey Geographic database (SSURGO), and multispectral imagery acquired in the panhandle of Oklahoma. Findings and Conclusions. The study revealed that the population density of the Russian wheat aphid was related to topographic and edaphic factors. Slope and sand were predictor variables that were positively related to the density of RWA at the field level. The study has also demonstrated that stress induced by the RWA has a specific spatial pattern that can be distinguished from other stress causing factors using a combination of landscape metrics and topographic and edaphic characteristics of wheat fields. Further field-based studies using multispectral imagery and spatial pattern analysis are suggested. The suggestions require acquiring biweekly multispectral imagery and collecting RWA, topographic and edaphic data at the sampling points during the phonological growth development of wheat plants. This is an approach that may pretend to have great potential for site specific technique for the integrated pest management.

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy determines the susceptibility of melanoma cells to dabrafenib

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    Ji C

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chao Ji,1,2 Ziping Zhang,1,2 Lihong Chen,1,2 Kunli Zhou,1,2 Dongjun Li,1,2 Ping Wang,1,2 Shuying Huang,1,2 Ting Gong,2 Bo Cheng1,2 1Department of Dermatology, the 1st Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 2Fujian Institute of Dermatology and Venereology, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Melanoma is one of the deadliest skin cancers and accounts for most skin-related deaths due to strong resistance to chemotherapy drugs. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of dabrafenib-induced drug resistance in human melanoma cell lines A375 and MEL624. Our studies support that both endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and autophagy were induced in the melanoma cells after the treatment with dabrafenib. In addition, ER stress-induced autophagy protects melanoma cells from the toxicity of dabrafenib. Moreover, inhibition of both ER stress and autophagy promote the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. Taken together, the data suggest that ER stress-induced autophagy determines the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. These results provide us with promising evidence that the inhibition of autophagy and ER stress could serve a therapeutic effect for the conventional dabrafenib chemotherapy. Keywords: melanoma, dabrafenib, ER stress, autophagy, apoptosis

  3. Vaccinium myrtillus ameliorates unpredictable chronic mild stress induced depression: possible involvement of nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Baldeep; Arora, Vipin; Kuhad, Anurag; Chopra, Kanwaljit

    2012-04-01

    Chronic unpredictable stressors can produce a situation similar to clinical depression and such animal models can be used for the preclinical evaluation of antidepressants. Nitric oxide, a secondary messenger molecule, has been implicated in neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, learning, aggression and depression. Vaccinium myrtillus (bilberry) extract is a potent inhibitor of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and cytokine production. The present study investigated the role of nitric oxide in the antidepressant action of Vaccinium myrtillus in unpredictable chronic mild stress-induced depression in mice. Animals were subjected to different stress paradigms daily for a period of 21 days to induce depressive-like behavior. Pretreatment with L-arginine significantly reversed the protective effect of bilberry (500 mg/kg) on chronic stress-induced behavioral (immobility period, sucrose preference) and biochemical (lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels; endogenous antioxidant activities) in stressed mice. Furthermore, L-NAME (10 mg/kg) pretreatment with a sub-effective dose of bilberry (250 mg/kg) significantly potentiated the protective effect of bilberry extract. The study revealed that modulation of the nitric oxide pathway might be involved in antidepressant-like effects of Vaccinium myrtillus in stressed mice. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Transgenerational inheritance or resetting of stress-induced epigenetic modifications: two sides of the same coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricker, Penny J

    2015-01-01

    The transgenerational inheritance of stress-induced epigenetic modifications is still controversial. Despite several examples of defense "priming" and induced genetic rearrangements, the involvement and persistence of transgenerational epigenetic modifications is not known to be general. Here I argue that non-transmission of epigenetic marks through meiosis may be regarded as an epigenetic modification in itself, and that we should understand the implications for plant evolution in the context of both selection for and selection against transgenerational epigenetic memory. Recent data suggest that both epigenetic inheritance and resetting are mechanistically directed and targeted. Stress-induced epigenetic modifications may buffer against DNA sequence-based evolution to maintain plasticity, or may form part of plasticity's adaptive potential. To date we have tended to concentrate on the question of whether and for how long epigenetic memory persists. I argue that we should now re-direct our question to investigate the differences between where it persists and where it does not, to understand the higher order evolutionary methods in play and their contribution.

  5. Susceptibility to stress-induced visceral sensitivity: a bad legacy for next generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théodorou, V

    2013-12-01

    Despite high prevalence, the precise irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) pathophysiology remains poorly understood likely due to the heterogeneity of IBS populations and the multifactorial etiology of this disorder. Among risk factors, genetic predisposition and early life trauma have been reported. In this context, the debate on genetic or environmental influences in the IBS pathogenesis is still open. The study by van der Wijngaard et al., reporting for the first time that susceptibility to stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity in maternally separated rats can be transferred to the next generation without any further exposure of F2 individuals to maternal separation, supports the importance of environmental influence in the IBS phenotype. Epigenetic mechanisms such as hypermethylation in the promoter region of the glucocorticoid receptor gene mediating the long-term and transgenerational behavioral effects of maternal care on the development have been shown in some but not in all studies. Van der Wijngaard et al. incriminated maternal care in the transmitted susceptibility to stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity, but not changes in glucocorticoid receptor protein expression in the brain. This finding opens a broad field of future directions aimed at evaluating the mechanisms involved in the transmission across generations of the digestive features of IBS, including, for example, on the role of gut microbiota changes in vertical transmission or epigenetic modifications of intestinal mast cells and the junctional region of intestinal epithelial cells in vertical transfer. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Control of stress-induced persistent anxiety by an extra-amygdala septohypothalamic circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Todd E; Dee, Nick; Bernard, Amy; Lerchner, Walter; Heintz, Nathaniel; Anderson, David J

    2014-01-30

    The extended amygdala has dominated research on the neural circuitry of fear and anxiety, but the septohippocampal axis also plays an important role. The lateral septum (LS) is thought to suppress fear and anxiety through its outputs to the hypothalamus. However, this structure has not yet been dissected using modern tools. The type 2 CRF receptor (Crfr2) marks a subset of LS neurons whose functional connectivity we have investigated using optogenetics. Crfr2(+) cells include GABAergic projection neurons that connect with the anterior hypothalamus. Surprisingly, we find that these LS outputs enhance stress-induced behavioral measures of anxiety. Furthermore, transient activation of Crfr2(+) neurons promotes, while inhibition suppresses, persistent anxious behaviors. LS Crfr2(+) outputs also positively regulate circulating corticosteroid levels. These data identify a subset of LS projection neurons that promote, rather than suppress, stress-induced behavioral and endocrinological dimensions of persistent anxiety states and provide a cellular point of entry to LS circuitry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. UHPLC-MS/MS based target profiling of stress-induced phytohormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floková, Kristýna; Tarkowská, Danuše; Miersch, Otto; Strnad, Miroslav; Wasternack, Claus; Novák, Ondřej

    2014-09-01

    Stress-induced changes in phytohormone metabolite profiles have rapid effects on plant metabolic activity and growth. The jasmonates (JAs) are a group of fatty acid-derived stress response regulators with roles in numerous developmental processes. To elucidate their dual regulatory effects, which overlap with those of other important defence-signalling plant hormones such as salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), we have developed a highly efficient single-step clean-up procedure for their enrichment from complex plant matrices that enables their sensitive quantitative analysis using hyphenated mass spectrometry technique. The rapid extraction of minute quantities of plant material (less than 20mg fresh weight, FW) into cold 10% methanol followed by one-step reversed-phase polymer-based solid phase extraction significantly reduced matrix effects and increased the recovery of labile JA analytes. This extraction and purification protocol was paired with a highly sensitive and validated ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method and used to simultaneously profile sixteen stress-induced phytohormones in minute plant material samples, including endogenous JA, several of its biosynthetic precursors and derivatives, as well as SA, ABA and IAA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Protein Phosphatase 2A Mediates Oxidative Stress Induced Apoptosis in Osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chong-xin; Lv, Bo; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common bone diseases, which is characterized by a systemic impairment of bone mass and fragility fractures. Age-related oxidative stress is highly associated with impaired osteoblastic dysfunctions and subsequent osteoporosis. In osteoblasts (bone formation cells), reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated and further cause lipid peroxidation, protein damage, and DNA lesions, leading to osteoblastic dysfunctions, dysdifferentiations, and apoptosis. Although much progress has been made, the mechanism responsible for oxidative stress induced cellular alternations and osteoblastic toxicity is still not fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major protein phosphatase in mammalian cells, mediates oxidative stress induced apoptosis in osteoblasts. Our results showed that lipid peroxidation products (4-HNE) may induce dramatic oxidative stress, inflammatory reactions, and apoptosis in osteoblasts. These oxidative stress responses may ectopically activate PP2A phosphatase activity, which may be mediated by inactivation of AKT/mTOR pathway. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A activity by okadaic acid might partly prevent osteoblastic apoptosis under oxidative conditions. These findings may reveal a novel mechanism to clarify the role of oxidative stress for osteoblastic apoptosis and provide new possibilities for the treatment of related bone diseases, such as osteoporosis.

  9. Melissa Officinalis L. Extracts Protect Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeung, In Cheul; Jee, Donghyun; Rho, Chang-Rae; Kang, Seungbum

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the protective effect of ALS-L1023, an extract of Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae; lemon balm) against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 cells). ARPE-19 cells were incubated with ALS-L1023 for 24 h and then treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by flow cytometry. Caspase-3/7 activation and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) were measured to investigate the protective role of ALS-L1023 against apoptosis. The protective effect of ALS-L1023 against oxidative stress through activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) was evaluated by Western blot analysis. ALS-L1023 clearly reduced H2O2-induced cell apoptosis and intracellular production of ROS. H2O2-induced oxidative stress increased caspase-3/7 activity and apoptotic PARP cleavage, which were significantly inhibited by ALS-L1023. Activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway was associated with the protective effect of ALS-L1023 on ARPE-19 cells. ALS-L1023 protected human RPE cells against oxidative damage. This suggests that ALS-L1023 has therapeutic potential for the prevention of dry age-related macular degeneration.

  10. Oxidative Stress Induces Mouse Follicular Granulosa Cells Apoptosis via JNK/FoxO1 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Qiannan; Liu, Zequn; Li, Bojiang; Liu, Kaiqing; Wu, Wangjun; Liu, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) plays an important role in the regulation of cell apoptosis. Forkhead box O (FoxO) transcription factors are involved in diverse biological processes, including cellular metabolism, cell apoptosis, and cell cycle. However, the JNK/FoxO1 pathway involved in the process of apoptosis induced by oxidative stress remains to be elucidated. Here, we demonstrated that the JNK activity significantly increased in response to oxidative stress in mouse follicular granulosa cells (MGCs). SP600125, a selective JNK inhibitor, attenuated the oxidative stress-induced MGCs apoptosis. Oxidative stress enhanced the FoxO1 nuclear translocation by activating the JNK activity. Moreover, JNK mediated the dissociation of FoxO1 from 14-3-3 proteins in MGCs after the treatment with H2O2. Finally, oxidative stress up-regulated the expression of FoxO1 via JNK mediation of FoxO1 self-regulation in MGCs. Taken together, our findings suggest that JNK/FoxO1 is involved in the regulation of oxidative stress-induced cell apoptosis in MGCs.

  11. [Potential role of gut peptides in stress-induced colonic motor disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, X; Pan, G; Ke, M

    1997-01-01

    To explore the potential role of gut peptide in stress-induced colonic motor disorder. In 9 conscious Wistar rats pre-equipped with strain-gauge transducers on ascending and descending colon, colonic motility was recorded before, during and after stress. And colonic transit was evaluated by instilling Cr into the cecum through chronically implanted cannula in each group of 16 rats with or without stress, and then calculating the geometric center (GC) of radioactivity. The contents of VIP, SP, NT, SST, MOT and Leu-ENK in plasma, colonic mucosa and muscle layer were assessed in 16 stressed and 16 control rats. Exogenous peptides (VIP, SP, SST, NT) were intravenously administered in 9 rats to determine the colonic motor response. Also, the effects of peptides on colonic circular muscle strips were investigated. Motor activity was increased after stress, whereas colonic transit was delayed. In the stressed rats, plasma levels of VIP and Leu-ENK were higher than those in controls. The content of Leu-ENK in muscle tissue decreased. Both in vivo and in vitro studies showed that SP and NT excited, whereas VIP and SST inhibited colonic motor activity. Release of certain peptides is altered by stress. Increased release of ENK and VIP may be involved in stress-induced colonic motor disorder and in the regulation of "stress hormone" release.

  12. Stress induced polarization currents and electromagnetic emission from rocks and ionic crystals, accompanying their deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Hadjicontis

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A crucial question of the scientific community nowadays, concerns the existence of electric signals preceding earthquakes. In order to give a plausible answer to this question, we carried out two kinds of laboratory experiments of uniaxial deformation of ionic crystals and rock samples: a In the first kind, stress induced polarization currents are detected and recorded. Our experimental results showed not only the existence of stress induced polarization currents before the fracture of the samples, but the possibility of the propagation of these signals, as well, through conductive channels, for distances much longer than the source dimensions. b In the second, acoustic and electromagnetic signals are detected and recorded in the frequency range from 1KHz to some MHz. The mechanism of generation of these signals is shown to be different for those emitted from piezoelectric and from non-piezoelectric materials. A plausible model is also suggested, on the compatibility of our laboratory results with the processes occurring in the earth during the earthquake preparatory stage.

  13. Implications of stress-induced genetic variation for minimizing multidrug resistance in bacteria

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    Obolski Uri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic resistance in bacterial infections is a growing threat to public health. Recent evidence shows that when exposed to stressful conditions, some bacteria perform higher rates of horizontal gene transfer and mutation, and thus acquire antibiotic resistance more rapidly. Methods We incorporate this new notion into a mathematical model for the emergence of antibiotic multi-resistance in a hospital setting. Results We show that when stress has a considerable effect on genetic variation, the emergence of antibiotic resistance is dramatically affected. A strategy in which patients receive a combination of antibiotics (combining is expected to facilitate the emergence of multi-resistant bacteria when genetic variation is stress-induced. The preference between a strategy in which one of two effective drugs is assigned randomly to each patient (mixing, and a strategy where only one drug is administered for a specific period of time (cycling is determined by the resistance acquisition mechanisms. We discuss several features of the mechanisms by which stress affects variation and predict the conditions for success of different antibiotic treatment strategies. Conclusions These findings should encourage research on the mechanisms of stress-induced genetic variation and establish the importance of incorporating data about these mechanisms when considering antibiotic treatment strategies.

  14. Transgenerational inheritance or resetting of stress-induced epigenetic modifications: two sides of the same coin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny J Tricker

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The transgenerational inheritance of stress-induced epigenetic modifications is still controversial. Despite several examples of defence ‘priming’ and induced genetic rearrangements, the involvement and persistence of transgenerational epigenetic modifications is not known to be general. Here I argue that non-transmission of epigenetic marks through meiosis may be regarded as an epigenetic modification in itself, and that we should understand the implications for plant evolution in the context of both selection for and selection against transgenerational epigenetic memory. Recent data suggest that both epigenetic inheritance and resetting are mechanistically directed and targeted. Stress-induced epigenetic modifications may buffer against DNA sequence-based evolution to maintain plasticity, or may form part of plasticity’s adaptive potential. To date we have tended to concentrate on the question of whether and for how long epigenetic memory persists. I argue that we should now re-direct our question to investigate the differences between where it persists and where it does not, to understand the higher order evolutionary methods in play and their contribution.

  15. Stress-induced accumulation of wheat germ agglutinin and abscisic acid in roots of wheat seedlings

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    Cammue, B.P.A.; Broekaert, W.F.; Kellens, J.T.C.; Peumans, W.J. (Laboratorium voor Plantenbiochemie K. U. Leuven (Belgium)); Raikhel, N.V. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) levels in roots of 2-day-old wheat seedlings increased up to three-fold when stressed by air-drying. Similar results were obtained when seedling roots were incubated either in 0.5 molar mannitol or 180 grams per liter polyethylene glycol 6,000, with a peak level of WGA after 5 hours of stress. Longer periods of osmotic treatment resulted in a gradual decline of WGA in the roots. Since excised wheat roots incorporate more ({sup 35}S)cysteine into WGA under stress conditions, the observed increase of lectin levels is due to de novo synthesis. Measurement of abscisic acid (ABA) levels in roots of control and stressed seedlings indicated a 10-fold increase upon air-drying. Similarly, a five- and seven-fold increase of ABA content of seedling roots was found after 2 hours of osmotic stress by polyethylene glycol 6,000 and mannitol, respectively. Finally, the stress-induced increase of WGA in wheat roots could be inhibited by growing seedlings in the presence of fluridone, an inhibitor of ABA synthesis. These results indicate that roots of water-stressed wheat seedlings (a) contain more WGA as a result of an increased de novo synthesis of this lectin, and (b) exhibit higher ABA levels. The stress-induced increase of lectin accumulation seems to be under control of ABA.

  16. Effect of cafeteria diet history on cue-, pellet-priming-, and stress-induced reinstatement of food seeking in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Wei; Fiscella, Kimberly A; Bacharach, Samuel Z; Calu, Donna J

    2014-01-01

    Relapse to unhealthy eating habits is a major problem in human dietary treatment. The individuals most commonly seeking dietary treatment are overweight or obese women, yet the commonly used rat reinstatement model to study relapse to palatable food seeking during dieting primarily uses normal-weight male rats. To increase the clinical relevance of the relapse to palatable food seeking model, here we pre-expose female rats to a calorically-dense cafeteria diet in the home-cage to make them overweight prior to examining the effect of this diet history on cue-, pellet-priming- and footshock-induced reinstatement of food seeking. Post-natal day 32 female Long-Evans rats had seven weeks of home-cage access to either chow only or daily or intermittent cafeteria diet alongside chow. Next, they were trained to self-administer normally preferred 45 mg food pellets accompanied by a tone-light cue. After extinction, all rats were tested for reinstatement induced by discrete cue, pellet-priming, and intermittent footshock under extinction conditions. Access to daily cafeteria diet and to a lesser degree access to intermittent cafeteria diet decreased food pellet self-administration compared to chow-only. Prior history of these cafeteria diets also reduced extinction responding, cue- and pellet-priming-induced reinstatement. In contrast, modest stress-induced reinstatement was only observed in rats with a history of daily cafeteria diet. A history of cafeteria diet does not increase the propensity for cue- and pellet-priming-induced relapse in the rat reinstatement model but does appear to make rats more susceptible to footshock stress-induced reinstatement.

  17. Effect of cafeteria diet history on cue-, pellet-priming-, and stress-induced reinstatement of food seeking in female rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Chen

    Full Text Available Relapse to unhealthy eating habits is a major problem in human dietary treatment. The individuals most commonly seeking dietary treatment are overweight or obese women, yet the commonly used rat reinstatement model to study relapse to palatable food seeking during dieting primarily uses normal-weight male rats. To increase the clinical relevance of the relapse to palatable food seeking model, here we pre-expose female rats to a calorically-dense cafeteria diet in the home-cage to make them overweight prior to examining the effect of this diet history on cue-, pellet-priming- and footshock-induced reinstatement of food seeking.Post-natal day 32 female Long-Evans rats had seven weeks of home-cage access to either chow only or daily or intermittent cafeteria diet alongside chow. Next, they were trained to self-administer normally preferred 45 mg food pellets accompanied by a tone-light cue. After extinction, all rats were tested for reinstatement induced by discrete cue, pellet-priming, and intermittent footshock under extinction conditions.Access to daily cafeteria diet and to a lesser degree access to intermittent cafeteria diet decreased food pellet self-administration compared to chow-only. Prior history of these cafeteria diets also reduced extinction responding, cue- and pellet-priming-induced reinstatement. In contrast, modest stress-induced reinstatement was only observed in rats with a history of daily cafeteria diet.A history of cafeteria diet does not increase the propensity for cue- and pellet-priming-induced relapse in the rat reinstatement model but does appear to make rats more susceptible to footshock stress-induced reinstatement.

  18. The role of intracellular oxidation in death induction (apoptosis and necrosis) in human promonocytic cells treated with stress inducers (cadmium, heat, X-rays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, A; García-Bermejo, L; Troyano, A; Vilaboa, N E; Fernández, C; de Blas, E; Aller, P

    2001-04-01

    Treatment of U-937 human promonocytic cells with the stress inducers cadmium chloride (2 h at 200 microM), heat (2 h at 42.5 C) or X-rays (20 Gy), followed by recovery, caused death by apoptosis and stimulated caspase-3 activity. In addition, all stress agents caused intracellular oxidation, as measured by peroxide and/or anion superoxide accumulation. However, while pre-incubation with antioxidants (N-acetyl-L-cysteine or butylated hydroxyanisole) inhibited the induction of apoptosis by cadmium and X-rays, it did not affect the induction by heat-shock. Pre-incubation for 24 h with the GSH-depleting agent L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO) switched the mode of death from apoptosis to necrosis in cadmium-treated cells. By contrast, BSO only caused minor modifacions in the rate of apoptosis without affecting the mode of death in heat- and X-rays-treated cells. BSO potentiated peroxide accumulation in cells treated with both cadmium and X-rays. However, while the accumulation of peroxides was stable in the case of cadmium, it was transient in the case of X-rays. Moreover, the administration of antioxidants during the recovery period sufficed to prevent necrosis and restore apoptosis in BSO plus cadmium-treated cells. Cadmium and X-rays caused a decrease in intracellular ATP levels, but the decrease was similar in both apoptotic and necrotic cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that (i) stress inducers cause intracellular oxidation, but oxidation is not a general requirement for apoptosis; and (ii) the duration of the oxidant state seems to be critical in determining the mode of death.

  19. Acute mental stress induces mitochondrial bioenergetic crisis and hyper-fission along with aberrant mitophagy in the gut mucosa in rodent model of stress-related mucosal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Rudranil; Mazumder, Somnath; Sarkar, Souvik; Debsharma, Subhashis; Siddiqui, Asim Azhar; Saha, Shubhra Jyoti; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Nag, Shiladitya; Saha, Debanjan; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2017-10-07

    Psychological stress, depression and anxiety lead to multiple organ dysfunctions wherein stress-related mucosal disease (SRMD) is common to people experiencing stress and also occur as a side effect in patients admitted to intensive care units; however the underlying molecular aetiology is still obscure. We report that in rat-SRMD model, cold restraint-stress severely damaged gut mitochondrial functions to generate superoxide anion (O2(•-)), depleted ATP and shifted mitochondrial fission-fusion dynamics towards enhanced fission to induce mucosal injury. Activation of mitophagy to clear damaged and fragmented mitochondria was evident from mitochondrial translocation of Parkin and PINK1 along with enhanced mitochondrial proteome ubiquitination, depletion of mitochondrial DNA copy number and TOM 20. However, excess and sustained accumulation of O2(•-)-generating defective mitochondria overpowered the mitophagic machinery, ultimately triggering Bax-dependent apoptosis and NF-κB-intervened pro-inflammatory mucosal injury. We further observed that stress-induced enhanced serum corticosterone stimulated mitochondrial recruitment of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which contributed to gut mitochondrial dysfunctions as documented from reduced ETC complex 1 activity, mitochondrial O2(•-) accumulation, depolarization and hyper-fission. GR-antagonism by RU486 or specific scavenging of mitochondrial O2(•-) by a mitochondrially targeted antioxidant mitoTEMPO ameliorated stress-induced mucosal damage. Gut mitopathology and mucosal injury were also averted when the perception of mental stress was blocked by pre-treatment with a sedative or antipsychotic. Altogether, we suggest the role of mitochondrial GR-O2(•-)-fission cohort in brain-mitochondria cross-talk during acute mental stress and advocate the utilization of this pathway as a potential target to prevent mitochondrial unrest and gastropathy bypassing central nervous system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  20. Effect of vestibular stimulation on auditory and visual reaction time in relation to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Archana; Kumar, Sai Sailesh; Mukkadan, Joseph Kurien

    2017-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to provide scientific evidence and for beneficial effects of vestibular stimulation for the management of stress-induced changes in auditory and visual reaction time (RT). A total of 240 healthy college students of the age group of 18-24 of either gender were a part of this research after obtaining written consent from them. RT for right and left response was measured for two auditory stimuli (low and high pitch) and visual stimuli (red and green) were recorded. A significant decrease in the visual RT for green light and red light was observed and stress-induced changes was effectively prevented followed by vestibular stimulation. Auditory RT for high pitch right and left response was significantly decreased and stress-induced changes was effectively prevented followed by vestibular stimulation. Vestibular stimulation is effective in boosting auditory and visual RT and preventing stress-induced changes in RT in males and females. We recommend incorporation of vestibular stimulation by swinging in our lifestyle for improving cognitive functions.

  1. Effect of vestibular stimulation on auditory and visual reaction time in relation to stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Rajagopalan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to provide scientific evidence and for beneficial effects of vestibular stimulation for the management of stress-induced changes in auditory and visual reaction time (RT. A total of 240 healthy college students of the age group of 18-24 of either gender were a part of this research after obtaining written consent from them. RT for right and left response was measured for two auditory stimuli (low and high pitch and visual stimuli (red and green were recorded. A significant decrease in the visual RT for green light and red light was observed and stress-induced changes was effectively prevented followed by vestibular stimulation. Auditory RT for high pitch right and left response was significantly decreased and stress-induced changes was effectively prevented followed by vestibular stimulation. Vestibular stimulation is effective in boosting auditory and visual RT and preventing stress-induced changes in RT in males and females. We recommend incorporation of vestibular stimulation by swinging in our lifestyle for improving cognitive functions.

  2. The different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Juan; Liu, Meng-Ying; Li, Huan; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Han, Zhou; Wu, Hai-Yin; Jing, Xing; Zhou, Hai-Hui; Suh, Hoonkyo; Zhu, Dong-Ya; Zhou, Qi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) hyperactivity is observed in many patients suffering from depression and the mechanism underling the dysfunction of HPA axis is not well understood. Chronic stress has a causal relationship with the hyperactivity of HPA axis. Stress induces the over-synthesis of glucocorticoids, which will arrive at all the body containing the brain. It is still complicated whether glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity and in which part of the brain the glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity. Here, we demonstrated that glucocorticoids were indispensable and sufficient for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Although acute glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus and hypothalamus exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis, we found that chronic glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus but not in the hypothalamus accounted for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Chronic glucocorticoids exposure in the hypothalamus still exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis activity. More importantly, we found mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) - neuronal nitric oxide synthesis enzyme (nNOS) - nitric oxide (NO) pathway mediated the different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in regulating HPA axis activity. This study suggests that the glucocorticoids in the hippocampus play an important role in the development of HPA axis hyperactivity and the glucocorticoids in the hypothalamus can't induce hyperactivity of HPA axis, revealing new insights into understanding the mechanism of depression.

  3. Metformin prevents endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis through AMPK-PI3K-c-Jun NH2 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, T.W.; Lee, M.W.; Lee, Y.-J.; Kim, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is thought to be partially associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress toxicity on pancreatic beta cells and the result of decreased insulin synthesis and secretion. In this study, we showed that a well-known insulin sensitizer, metformin, directly protects against dysfunction and death of ER stress-induced NIT-1 cells (a mouse pancreatic beta cell line) via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI3) kinase activation. We also showed that exposure of NIT-1 cells to metformin (5mM) increases cellular resistance against ER stress-induced NIT-1 cell dysfunction and death. AMPK and PI3 kinase inhibitors abolished the effect of metformin on cell function and death. Metformin-mediated protective effects on ER stress-induced apoptosis were not a result of an unfolded protein response or the induced inhibitors of apoptotic proteins. In addition, we showed that exposure of ER stressed-induced NIT-1 cells to metformin decreases the phosphorylation of c-Jun NH(2) terminal kinase (JNK). These data suggest that metformin is an important determinant of ER stress-induced apoptosis in NIT-1 cells and may have implications for ER stress-mediated pancreatic beta cell destruction via regulation of the AMPK-PI3 kinase-JNK pathway.

  4. Surgical stress induced depressive and anxiety like behavior are improved by dapsone via modulating NADPH oxidase level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Tian, Xiaosheng; Wang, Qiudian; Tong, Yawei; Wang, Hecheng; Li, Zhengqian; Li, Lunxu; Zhou, Ting; Zhan, Rui; Zhao, Lei; Sun, Yang; Fan, Dongsheng; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Jing; Jin, Yinglan; Xiao, Weizhong; Guo, Xiangyang; Chui, Dehua

    2015-01-12

    Surgical stress induced depression and anxiety like behavior are common complications among aged individuals suffering from surgery. Recent studies proposed that accumulation of oxidative stress is involved in the etiology of stress induced depression and anxiety. Dapsone possesses antioxidant properties, however, whether dapsone is effective in modulating surgical stress induced brain oxidative damage remains uncertain. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of dapsone on surgical stress induced depressive and anxiety like behavior, and brain oxidative stress in a well-established surgical stress model. Depressive and anxiety like behavior accompanied by elevated brain oxidative stress were observed in aged mice underwent abdominal surgery. Pretreatment with 5 mg/kg dapsone significantly improved the behavioral disorder and ameliorated brain oxidative stress in this model. Further investigation, revealed that surgical stress increased brain NADPH oxidase level, while pretreatment with dapsone abrogated the elevation of NADPH oxidase triggered by surgical stress. These findings suggest that dapsone is effective in improving surgical stress induced brain oxidative damage via down-regulating NADPH oxidase level in aged mice. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. The Different Roles of Glucocorticoids in the Hippocampus and Hypothalamus in Chronic Stress-Induced HPA Axis Hyperactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Han, Zhou; Wu, Hai-Yin; Jing, Xing; Zhou, Hai-Hui; Suh, Hoonkyo; Zhu, Dong-Ya; Zhou, Qi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) hyperactivity is observed in many patients suffering from depression and the mechanism underling the dysfunction of HPA axis is not well understood. Chronic stress has a causal relationship with the hyperactivity of HPA axis. Stress induces the over-synthesis of glucocorticoids, which will arrive at all the body containing the brain. It is still complicated whether glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity and in which part of the brain the glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity. Here, we demonstrated that glucocorticoids were indispensable and sufficient for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Although acute glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus and hypothalamus exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis, we found that chronic glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus but not in the hypothalamus accounted for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Chronic glucocorticoids exposure in the hypothalamus still exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis activity. More importantly, we found mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) - neuronal nitric oxide synthesis enzyme (nNOS) - nitric oxide (NO) pathway mediated the different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in regulating HPA axis activity. This study suggests that the glucocorticoids in the hippocampus play an important role in the development of HPA axis hyperactivity and the glucocorticoids in the hypothalamus can't induce hyperactivity of HPA axis, revealing new insights into understanding the mechanism of depression. PMID:24831808

  6. The different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Juan Zhu

    Full Text Available Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA hyperactivity is observed in many patients suffering from depression and the mechanism underling the dysfunction of HPA axis is not well understood. Chronic stress has a causal relationship with the hyperactivity of HPA axis. Stress induces the over-synthesis of glucocorticoids, which will arrive at all the body containing the brain. It is still complicated whether glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity and in which part of the brain the glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity. Here, we demonstrated that glucocorticoids were indispensable and sufficient for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Although acute glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus and hypothalamus exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis, we found that chronic glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus but not in the hypothalamus accounted for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Chronic glucocorticoids exposure in the hypothalamus still exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis activity. More importantly, we found mineralocorticoid receptor (MR - neuronal nitric oxide synthesis enzyme (nNOS - nitric oxide (NO pathway mediated the different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in regulating HPA axis activity. This study suggests that the glucocorticoids in the hippocampus play an important role in the development of HPA axis hyperactivity and the glucocorticoids in the hypothalamus can't induce hyperactivity of HPA axis, revealing new insights into understanding the mechanism of depression.

  7. Regulation of replicative and stress-induced senescence by RSK4, which is down-regulated in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vicente, Laura; Armengol, Gemma; Pons, Berta; Coch, Laura; Argelaguet, Elisabet; Lleonart, Matilde; Hernández-Losa, Javier; de Torres, Inés; Ramon y Cajal, Santiago

    2009-07-15

    The control of senescence and its biochemical pathways is a crucial factor for understanding cell transformation. In a large RNA interference screen, the RSK4 gene was found to be related to p53-dependent arrest. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the potential role of RSK4 as a tumor suppressor gene. RSK4 expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot in 30 colon and 20 renal carcinomas, and in 7 colon adenomas. Two HCT116 colon carcinoma cell lines (p53 wt and p53 null), IMR90 human fibroblasts, and E1A-expressing IMR90 cells were infected with RSK4 cDNA and/or shRNA. RSK4 expression levels were analyzed in HCT116 p53 wt or p53 null and IMR90 after senescence induction by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. The RSK4 gene was down-regulated in 27 of 30 colon carcinomas (P < 0.001), 16 of 20 renal cell carcinomas (P < 0.01), and 6 of 7 colon adenomas (P < 0.01). In vitro overexpression of RSK4 induced cell arrest and senescence features in normal fibroblasts and malignant colon carcinoma cell lines. Interestingly, in these cell lines RSK4 mRNA levels were increased both in replicative and stress-induced senescence. Moreover, IMR90 partially immortalized by RSK4 shRNA and HCT116 with this short hairpin RNA were more resistant to cisplatin treatment. Finally, cells expressing E1A or Rb short interfering RNA were resistant to RSK4-mediated senescence. These results support the concept that RSK4 may be an important tumor suppressor gene by modulating senescence induction and contributing to cell proliferation control in colon carcinogenesis and renal cell carcinomas.

  8. Chronic subordination stress induces hyperphagia and disrupts eating behavior in mice modeling binge-eating-like disorder

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    Maria eRazzoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eating disorders are associated with physical morbidity and appear to have causal factors like stressful life events and negative affect. Binge eating disorder (BED is characterized by eating in a discrete period of time a larger than normal amount of food, a sense of lack of control over eating, and marked distress. There are still unmet needs for the identification of mechanisms regulating excessive eating, which is in part due to the lack of appropriate animal models. We developed a naturalistic murine model of subordination stress induced hyperphagia associated with the development of obesity. Here we tested the hypotheses that the eating responses of subordinate mice recapitulate the BED and that limiting hyperphagia could prevent stress-associated metabolic changes. Methods: Adult male mice were exposed to a model of chronic subordination stress associated with the automated acquisition of food intake and we performed a detailed meal pattern analysis. Additionally, using a pair-feeding protocol was test the hypothesis that the manifestation of obesity and the metabolic syndrome could be prevented by limiting hyperphagia. Results: The architecture of feeding of subordinate mice was disrupted during the stress protocol due to disproportionate amount of food ingested at higher rate and with shorter satiety ratio than control mice. Subordinate mice hyperphagia was further exacerbated in response to either hunger or to the acute application of a social defeat. Notably, the obese phenotype but not the fasting hyperglycemia of subordinate mice was abrogated by preventing hyperphagia in a pair feeding paradigm. Conclusion: Overall these results support the validity of our chronic subordination stress to model binge eating disorder allowing for the determination of the underlying molecular mechanisms and the generation of testable predictions for innovative therapies, based on the understanding of the regulation and the control of food

  9. Metabolic Stress Induces Caspase-3 Mediated Degradation and Inactivation of Farnesyl and Geranylgeranyl Transferase Activities in Pancreatic β-Cells

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    Rajakrishnan Veluthakal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: At least 300 prenylated proteins are identified in the human genome; the majority of which partake in a variety of cellular processes including growth, differentiation, cytoskeletal organization/dynamics and vesicle trafficking. Aberrant prenylation of proteins is implicated in human pathologies including cancer; neurodegenerative diseases, retinitis pigmentosa, and premature ageing syndromes. Original observations from our laboratory have demonstrated that prenylation of proteins [small G-proteins and γ-subunits of trimeric G-proteins] is requisite for physiological insulin secretion. Herein, we assessed the impact of metabolic stress [gluco-, lipotoxicity and ER-stress] on the functional status of protein prenylation pathway in pancreatic β-cells. Methods: Farnesyltransferase [FTase] and geranylgeranyltransferase [GGTase] activities were quantified by radioisotopic methods. Caspase-3 activation and FTase/GGTase-α subunit degradation were determined by Western blotting. Results: We observed that metabolic stress activates caspase-3 and induces degradation of the common α-subunit of FTase and GGTase-I in INS-1 832/13 cells, normal rodent islets and human islets leading to functional defects [inactivation] in FTase and GGTase activities. Caspase-3 activation and FTase/GGTase-α degradation were also seen in islets from the Zucker diabetic fatty [ZDF] rat, a model for Type 2 diabetes. Consequential to defects in FTase/GGTase-α signaling, we observed significant accumulation of unprenylated proteins [Rap1] in β-cells exposed to glucotoxic conditions. These findings were replicated in β-cells following pharmacological inhibition of generation of prenylpyrophosphate substrates [Simvastatin] or catalytic activity of prenylating enzymes [GGTI-2147]. Conclusions: Our findings provide the first evidence to suggest that metabolic stress induced dysfunction of the islet β-cell may, in part, be due to defective protein prenylation

  10. Chronic Subordination Stress Induces Hyperphagia and Disrupts Eating Behavior in Mice Modeling Binge-Eating-Like Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzoli, Maria; Sanghez, Valentina; Bartolomucci, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background: Eating disorders are associated with physical morbidity and appear to have causal factors like stressful life events and negative affect. Binge-eating disorder (BED) is characterized by eating in a discrete period of time a larger than normal amount of food, a sense of lack of control over eating, and marked distress. There are still unmet needs for the identification of mechanisms regulating excessive eating, which is in part due to the lack of appropriate animal models. We developed a naturalistic murine model of subordination stress-induced hyperphagia associated with the development of obesity. Here, we tested the hypotheses that the eating responses of subordinate mice recapitulate the BED and that limiting hyperphagia could prevent stress-associated metabolic changes. Methods: Adult male mice were exposed to a model of chronic subordination stress (CSS) associated with the automated acquisition of food intake and we performed a detailed meal pattern analysis. Additionally, using a pair-feeding protocol we tested the hypothesis that the manifestation of obesity and the metabolic syndrome could be prevented by limiting hyperphagia. Results: The architecture of feeding of subordinate mice was disrupted during the stress protocol due to disproportionate amount of food ingested at higher rate and with shorter satiety ratio than control mice. Subordinate mice hyperphagia was further exacerbated in response to either hunger or to the acute application of a social defeat. Notably, the obese phenotype but not the fasting hyperglycemia of subordinate mice was abrogated by preventing hyperphagia in a pair-feeding paradigm. Conclusion: Overall, these results support the validity of our CSS to model BED allowing for the determination of the underlying molecular mechanisms and the generation of testable predictions for innovative therapies, based on the understanding of the regulation and the control of food intake. PMID:25621284

  11. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure during adolescence: Effects on stress-induced social alterations and social drinking in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlinskaya, Elena I; Kim, Esther U; Spear, Linda P

    2017-01-01

    We previously observed lasting and sex-specific detrimental consequences of early adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure (AIE), with male, but not female, rats showing social anxiety-like alterations when tested as adults. The present study used Sprague Dawley rats to assess whether social alterations induced by AIE (3.5g/kg, intragastrically, every other day, between postnatal days [P] 25-45) are further exacerbated by stressors later in life. Another aim was to determine whether AIE alone or in combination with stress influenced intake of a sweetened ethanol solution (Experiment 1) or a sweetened solution ("supersac") alone (Experiment 2) under social circumstances. Animals were exposed to restraint on P66-P70 (90min/day) or left nonstressed, with corticosterone (CORT) levels assessed on day 1 and day 5 in Experiment 2. Social anxiety-like behavior emerged after AIE in non-stressed males, but not females, whereas stress-induced social anxiety was evident only in water-exposed males and females. Adult-typical habituation of the CORT response to repeated restraint was not evident in adult animals after AIE, a lack of habituation reminiscent of that normally evident in adolescents. Neither AIE nor stress affected ethanol intake under social circumstances, although AIE and restraint independently increased adolescent-typical play fighting in males during social drinking. Among males, the combination of AIE and restraint suppressed "supersac" intake; this index of depression-like behavior was not seen in females. The results provide experimental evidence associating adolescent alcohol exposure, later stress, anxiety, and depression, with young adolescent males being particularly vulnerable to long-lasting adverse effects of repeated ethanol. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Adolescent plasticity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Protective Effect of Selenium on Oxidative Stress Induced by Waterpipe (Narghile) Smoke in Lungs and Liver of Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charab, Mohamad A; Abouzeinab, Noura S; Moustafa, Mohamed E

    2016-12-01

    Waterpipe smoking is common in the Middle East populations and results in health problems. In this study, we investigated the effects of exposure of mice to waterpipe smoke on oxidative stress in lungs and liver and the effects of selenium administration before smoke exposure on the oxidative stress. Twenty-four mice were divided equally into four groups: (i) the control mice received no exposure or treatment; (ii) mice exposed to waterpipe smoke; (iii) mice received intraperitoneal injection of 0.59 μg selenium/kg body weight as sodium selenite 15 min before the exposure to waterpipe smoke; and (iv) mice received intraperitoneal injection of 1.78 μg selenium/kg body weight as sodium selenite 15 min before the exposure to waterpipe smoke. Mice were exposed to waterpipe smoke every other day for four times within 8 successive days. Malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels were significantly higher in the lungs and liver, while the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase-1, and catalase were significantly lower in the waterpipe smoke group when compared to control mice. Treating mice with 1.78 μg selenium/kg body weight significantly restored the normal levels of these parameters. Histological examinations of lungs and liver confirmed the protective actions of selenium against the effects of exposure to waterpipe smoke. In conclusion, exposure of mice to waterpipe smoke-induced oxidative stress in lungs and liver. Administration of low level of selenium, 1.78 μg selenium/kg body weight as sodium selenite, exerted protective effects against oxidative stress induced by exposure to waterpipe smoke.

  13. Chronic subordination stress induces hyperphagia and disrupts eating behavior in mice modeling binge-eating-like disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzoli, Maria; Sanghez, Valentina; Bartolomucci, Alessandro

    Eating disorders are associated with physical morbidity and appear to have causal factors like stressful life events and negative affect. Binge eating disorder (BED) is characterized by eating in a discrete period of time a larger than normal amount of food, a sense of lack of control over eating, and marked distress. There are still unmet needs for the identification of mechanisms regulating excessive eating, which is in part due to the lack of appropriate animal models. We developed a naturalistic murine model of subordination stress induced hyperphagia associated with the development of obesity. Here we tested the hypotheses that the eating responses of subordinate mice recapitulate the BED and that limiting hyperphagia could prevent stress-associated metabolic changes. Adult male mice were exposed to a model of chronic subordination stress associated with the automated acquisition of food intake and we performed a detailed meal pattern analysis. Additionally, using a pair-feeding protocol was test the hypothesis that the manifestation of obesity and the metabolic syndrome could be prevented by limiting hyperphagia. The architecture of feeding of subordinate mice was disrupted during the stress protocol due to disproportionate amount of food ingested at higher rate and with shorter satiety ratio than control mice. Subordinate mice hyperphagia was further exacerbated in response to either hunger or to the acute application of a social defeat. Notably, the obese phenotype but not the fasting hyperglycemia of subordinate mice was abrogated by preventing hyperphagia in a pair feeding paradigm. Overall these results support the validity of our chronic subordination stress to model binge eating disorder allowing for the determination of the underlying molecular mechanisms and the generation of testable predictions for innovative therapies, based on the understanding of the regulation and the control of food intake.

  14. Brain Stimulation in Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salling, Michael C; Martinez, Diana

    2016-11-01

    Localized stimulation of the human brain to treat neuropsychiatric disorders has been in place for over 20 years. Although these methods have been used to a greater extent for mood and movement disorders, recent work has explored brain stimulation methods as potential treatments for addiction. The rationale behind stimulation therapy in addiction involves reestablishing normal brain function in target regions in an effort to dampen addictive behaviors. In this review, we present the rationale and studies investigating brain stimulation in addiction, including transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and deep brain stimulation. Overall, these studies indicate that brain stimulation has an acute effect on craving for drugs and alcohol, but few studies have investigated the effect of brain stimulation on actual drug and alcohol use or relapse. Stimulation therapies may achieve their effect through direct or indirect modulation of brain regions involved in addiction, either acutely or through plastic changes in neuronal transmission. Although these mechanisms are not well understood, further identification of the underlying neurobiology of addiction and rigorous evaluation of brain stimulation methods has the potential for unlocking an effective, long-term treatment of addiction.

  15. Secreted Stress-Induced Phosphoprotein 1 Activates the ALK2-SMAD Signaling Pathways and Promotes Cell Proliferation of Ovarian Cancer Cells

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    Chia-Lung Tsai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 (STIP1, a cochaperone that organizes other chaperones, heat shock proteins (HSPs, was recently shown to be secreted by human ovarian cancer cells. In neuronal tissues, binding to prion protein was required for STIP1 to activate the ERK (extracellular-regulated MAP kinase signaling pathways. However, we report that STIP1 binding to a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP receptor, ALK2 (activin A receptor, type II-like kinase 2, was necessary and sufficient to stimulate proliferation of ovarian cancer cells. The binding of STIP1 to ALK2 activated the SMAD signaling pathway, leading to transcriptional activation of ID3 (inhibitor of DNA binding 3, promoting cell proliferation. In conclusion, ovarian-cancer-tissue-secreted STIP1 stimulates cancer cell proliferation by binding to ALK2 and activating the SMAD-ID3 signaling pathways. Although animal studies are needed to confirm these mechanisms in vivo, our results may pave the way for developing novel therapeutic strategies for ovarian cancer.

  16. Biologically Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles Ameliorate Cold and Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli

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    Xi-Feng Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique physical, chemical, and optical properties, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have recently attracted much interest in the field of nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy. Because of the enormous potential of these nanoparticles, various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted for their synthesis. Synthetic antioxidants are dangerous to human health. Thus, the search for effective, nontoxic natural compounds with effective antioxidative properties is essential. Although AuNPs have been studied for use in various biological applications, exploration of AuNPs as antioxidants capable of inhibiting oxidative stress induced by heat and cold stress is still warranted. Therefore, one goal of our study was to produce biocompatible AuNPs using biological methods that are simple, nontoxic, biocompatible, and environmentally friendly. Next, we aimed to assess the antioxidative effect of AuNPs against oxidative stress induced by cold and heat in Escherichia coli, which is a suitable model for stress responses involving AuNPs. The response of aerobically grown E. coli cells to cold and heat stress was found to be similar to the oxidative stress response. Upon exposure to cold and heat stress, the viability and metabolic activity of E. coli was significantly reduced compared to the control. In addition, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA and leakage of proteins and sugars were significantly elevated, and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH and adenosine triphosphate (ATP significantly lowered compared to in the control. Concomitantly, AuNPs ameliorated cold and heat-induced oxidative stress responses by increasing the expression of antioxidants, including glutathione (GSH, glutathione S-transferase (GST, super oxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT. These consistent physiology and biochemical data suggest that AuNPs can ameliorate cold and

  17. Lycopene Protects against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Injury by Alleviating ER Stress Induced Apoptosis in Neonatal Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiqian; Hu, Houxiang; Chen, Bin; Yue, Rongchuan; Zhou, Zhou; Liu, Yin; Zhang, Shuang; Xu, Lei; Wang, Huan; Yu, Zhengping

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced apoptosis plays a pivotal role in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-injury. Inhibiting ER stress is a major therapeutic target/strategy in treating cardiovascular diseases. Our previous studies revealed that lycopene exhibits great pharmacological potential in protecting against the I/R-injury in vitro and vivo, but whether attenuation of ER stress (and) or ER stress-induced apoptosis contributes to the effects remains unclear. In the present study, using neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes to establish an in vitro model of hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) to mimic myocardium I/R in vivo, we aimed to explore the hypothesis that lycopene could alleviate the ER stress and ER stress-induced apoptosis in H/R-injury. We observed that lycopene alleviated the H/R injury as revealed by improving cell viability and reducing apoptosis, suppressed reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and improved the phosphorylated AMPK expression, attenuated ER stress as evidenced by decreasing the expression of GRP78, ATF6 mRNA, sXbp-1 mRNA, eIF2α mRNA and eIF2α phosphorylation, alleviated ER stress-induced apoptosis as manifested by reducing CHOP/GADD153 expression, the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, caspase-12 and caspase-3 activity in H/R-treated cardiomyocytes. Thapsigargin (TG) is a potent ER stress inducer and used to elicit ER stress of cardiomyocytes. Our results showed that lycopene was able to prevent TG-induced ER stress as reflected by attenuating the protein expression of GRP78 and CHOP/GADD153 compared to TG group, significantly improve TG-caused a loss of cell viability and decrease apoptosis in TG-treated cardiomyocytes. These results suggest that the protective effects of lycopene on H/R-injury are, at least in part, through alleviating ER stress and ER stress-induced apoptosis in neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes. PMID:26291709

  18. Stress-induced eating and the relaxation response as a potential antidote: A review and hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masih, Tasmiah; Dimmock, James A; Epel, Elissa S; Guelfi, Kym J

    2017-11-01

    There is an accumulating body of evidence to indicate that stress leads to the consumption of unhealthy, energy-dense, palatable food, potentially contributing to the alarming global prevalence of chronic diseases, including obesity. However, comparatively little research has been devoted to addressing how best to remedy this growing problem. We provide an overview of the influence of stress on dietary intake, and then explore the novel, yet simple, possibility that regular elicitation of the relaxation response may effectively reduce stress-induced eating via both physiological neuroendocrine and reward pathways and psychological pathways involving emotion regulation, and habitual coping. If shown to be effective, the regular practice of relaxation may provide a convenient, cost efficient, patient-centered therapeutic practice to assist in the prevention of unhealthy weight gain and other negative consequences of unhealthy food intake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Stress-induced cognitive dysfunction: hormone-neurotransmitter interactions in the prefrontal cortex

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    Rebecca M Shansky

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms and neural circuits that drive emotion and cognition are inextricably linked. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis as a result of stress or other causes of arousal initiates a flood of hormone and neurotransmitter release throughout the brain, affecting the way we think, decide, and behave. This review will focus on factors that influence the function of the prefrontal cortex (PFC, a brain region that governs higher-level cognitive processes and executive function. The PFC becomes markedly impaired by stress, producing measurable deficits in working memory. These deficits arise from the interaction of multiple neuromodulators, including glucocorticoids, catecholamines, and gonadal hormones; here we will discuss the non- human primate and rodent literature that has furthered our understanding of the circuitry, receptors, and signaling cascades responsible for stress-induced prefrontal dysfunction.

  20. Stress induced martensite at the crack tip in NiTi alloys during fatigue loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sgambitterra

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Crack tip stress-induced phase transformation mechanisms in nickel-titanium alloys (NiTi were analyzed by Digital Image Correlation (DIC, under fatigue loads. In particular, Single Edge Crack (SEC specimens, obtained from a commercial pseudoelastic NiTi sheet, and an ad-hoc experimental setup were used, for direct measurements of the near crack tip displacement field by the DIC technique. Furthermore, a fitting procedure was developed to calculate the mode I Stress Intensity Factor (SIF, starting from the measured displacement field. Finally, cyclic tensile tests were performed at different operating temperature, in the range 298-338 K, and the evolution of the SIF was studied, which revealed a marked temperature dependence.

  1. p53 Suppresses Metabolic Stress-Induced Ferroptosis in Cancer Cells

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    Amy Tarangelo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available How cancer cells respond to nutrient deprivation remains poorly understood. In certain cancer cells, deprivation of cystine induces a non-apoptotic, iron-dependent form of cell death termed ferroptosis. Recent evidence suggests that ferroptosis sensitivity may be modulated by the stress-responsive transcription factor and canonical tumor suppressor protein p53. Using CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing, small-molecule probes, and high-resolution, time-lapse imaging, we find that stabilization of wild-type p53 delays the onset of ferroptosis in response to cystine deprivation. This delay requires the p53 transcriptional target CDKN1A (encoding p21 and is associated with both slower depletion of intracellular glutathione and a reduced accumulation of toxic lipid-reactive oxygen species (ROS. Thus, the p53-p21 axis may help cancer cells cope with metabolic stress induced by cystine deprivation by delaying the onset of non-apoptotic cell death.

  2. Estrogen- and stress-induced DNA damage in breast cancer and chemoprevention with dietary flavonoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Michiko T; Sakakibara, Hiroyuki; Shimoi, Kayoko

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed female cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Multiple factors are responsible for breast cancer and heritable factors have received much attention. DNA damage in breast cancer is induced by prolonged exposure to estrogens, such as 17β-estradiol, daily social/psychological stressors, and environmental chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heterocyclic amines (HCAs). DNA damage induced by estrogen and stress is an important factor in the pathogenesis and development of breast cancer and is now recognized as a critical provision for chemoprevention of breast cancer. In this review, we summarize the relationships between estrogen- and stress-induced DNA damage with regard to the pathogenesis and development of breast cancer. We also discuss recent investigations into chemoprevention using dietary flavonoids such as quercetin and isoflavones.

  3. Heat stress induced changes in metabolic regulators of donkeys from arid tracts in India

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    Kataria N.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available To find out heat stress induced changes in metabolic regulators of donkeys from arid tracts in India, blood samples were collected to harvest the serum during moderate and extreme hot ambiences. The metabolic enzymes determined were sorbitol dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, ornithine carbamoyl transferase, gammaglutamayl transferase, 5’nucleotidase, glucose-6-phosphatase, arginase, and aldolase. The mean values of all the serum enzymes increased significantly (p≤0.05 during hot ambience as compared to respective values during moderate ambience. It was concluded that increased activity of all the enzymes in the serum was due to modulation of metabolic reactions to combat the effect of hot ambience on the animals. Activation of gluconeogenesis along with hexose monophosphate shunt and urea cycle probably helped the animals to combat the heat stress.

  4. [Practicing subnarcotic xenon dose inhalation in spa treatment of posttraumatic stress-induced disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshina, T V; Kotrovskaya, T I; Bubeev, Yu A; Schastlivtseva, D V; Potapov, A V

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the investigation was to compare and contrast effectiveness of xenon therapy of stress-induced neurotic disorders and traditional spa-based therapy. Patients of the experimental and control groups were people of risky professions who received drug therapy, psychotherapy and physiotherapy. The experimental group was additionally treated by inhalation therapeutic doses of medical xenon. Comparative analysis of qualitative and quantitative parameters of electroencephalogram (EEG), blood oxygen level, heart rate and blood pressure were compared in the groups before and after treatment. Recovery of the central nervous system functions, activation of parasympathetic involvement, abatement of main psychopathological and somatovegetative disorders in the experimental group were considered as signs of psychic improvement and return to the gestalt behavior.

  5. Impaired Functional Connectivity in the Prefrontal Cortex: A Mechanism for Chronic Stress-Induced Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Negrón-Oyarzo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress-related psychiatric diseases, such as major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and schizophrenia, are characterized by a maladaptive organization of behavioral responses that strongly affect the well-being of patients. Current evidence suggests that a functional impairment of the prefrontal cortex (PFC is implicated in the pathophysiology of these diseases. Therefore, chronic stress may impair PFC functions required for the adaptive orchestration of behavioral responses. In the present review, we integrate evidence obtained from cognitive neuroscience with neurophysiological research with animal models, to put forward a hypothesis that addresses stress-induced behavioral dysfunctions observed in stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. We propose that chronic stress impairs mechanisms involved in neuronal functional connectivity in the PFC that are required for the formation of adaptive representations for the execution of adaptive behavioral responses. These considerations could be particularly relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of chronic stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders.

  6. Distinguishing between stress-induced and structural anisotropy at Mount Ruapehu volcano, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jessica H.; Savage, Martha K.; Townend, John

    2011-12-01

    We have created a benchmark of spatial variations in shear wave anisotropy around Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand, against which to measure future temporal changes. Anisotropy in the crust is often assumed to be caused by stress-aligned microcracks, and the polarization of the fast quasi-shear wave (ϕ) is thus interpreted to indicate the direction of maximum horizontal stress, but can also be due to aligned minerals or macroscopic fractures. Changes in seismic anisotropy have been observed following a major eruption in 1995/96 and were attributed to changes in stress from the depressurization of the magmatic system. Three-component broadband seismometers have been deployed to complement the permanent stations that surround Ruapehu, creating a combined network of 34 three-component seismometers. This denser observational network improves the resolution with which spatial variations in seismic anisotropy can be examined. Using an automated shear wave splitting analysis, we examine local earthquakes in 2008. We observe a strong azimuthal dependence of ϕ and so introduce a spatial averaging technique and two-dimensional tomography of recorded delay times. The anisotropy can be divided into regions in which ϕ agrees with stress estimations from focal mechanism inversions, suggesting stress-induced anisotropy, and those in which ϕ is aligned with structural features such as faults, suggesting structural anisotropy. The pattern of anisotropy that is inferred to be stress related cannot be modeled adequately using Coulomb modeling with a dike-like inflation source. We suggest that the stress-induced anisotropy is affected by loading of the volcano and a lithospheric discontinuity.

  7. Distinguishing between stress-induced and structural anisotropy at Mount Ruapehu volcano, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. H.; Savage, M.K.; Townend, J.

    2011-01-01

    We have created a benchmark of spatial variations in shear wave anisotropy around Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand, against which to measure future temporal changes. Anisotropy in the crust is often assumed to be caused by stress-aligned microcracks, and the polarization of the fast quasi-shear wave (??) is thus interpreted to indicate the direction of maximum horizontal stress, but can also be due to aligned minerals or macroscopic fractures. Changes in seismic anisotropy have been observed following a major eruption in 1995/96 and were attributed to changes in stress from the depressurization of the magmatic system. Three-component broadband seismometers have been deployed to complement the permanent stations that surround Ruapehu, creating a combined network of 34 three-component seismometers. This denser observational network improves the resolution with which spatial variations in seismic anisotropy can be examined. Using an automated shear wave splitting analysis, we examine local earthquakes in 2008. We observe a strong azimuthal dependence of ?? and so introduce a spatial averaging technique and two-dimensional tomography of recorded delay times. The anisotropy can be divided into regions in which ?? agrees with stress estimations from focal mechanism inversions, suggesting stress-induced anisotropy, and those in which ?? is aligned with structural features such as faults, suggesting structural anisotropy. The pattern of anisotropy that is inferred to be stress related cannot be modeled adequately using Coulomb modeling with a dike-like inflation source. We suggest that the stress-induced anisotropy is affected by loading of the volcano and a lithospheric discontinuity. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Modulating Oxidative Stress Relieves Stress-Induced Behavioral and Cognitive Impairments in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Naimesh; Salvi, Ankita; Patki, Gaurav; Salim, Samina

    2017-07-01

    Persistent psychological stress often leads to anxiety disorders and depression. Benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are popular treatment options but have limited efficacy, supporting the need for alternative treatment. Based on our recent preclinical work suggesting a causal link between neurobehavioral deficits and elevated oxidative stress, we hypothesized that interventions that mitigate oxidative stress can attenuate/overcome neurobehavioral deficits. Here, we employed the rat social defeat model of psychological stress to determine whether increasing antioxidant levels using grape powder would prevent and/or reverse social defeat-induced behavioral and cognitive deficits. Furthermore, a hippocampal-derived HT22 cell culture model of oxidative stress was employed to identify the individual beneficial constituent(s) of grape powder and the underlying mechanism(s) of action. Grape powder treatment prevented and reversed social defeat-induced behavioral and cognitive deficits and also decreased social defeat-induced increase in plasma corticosterone and 8-isoprostane (systemic and oxidative stress markers, respectively). And grape powder treatment replenished social defeat-induced depleted pool of key antioxidant enzymes glyoxalase-1, glutathione reducatse-1, and superoxide dismutase. Grape powder constituents, quercetin and resveratrol, were most effective in preventing oxidative stress-induced decreased cellular antioxidant capacity. Grape powder protected oxidative stress-induced cell death by preventing calcium influx, mitochondrial dysfunction, and release of cytochrome c. Grape powder treatment by increasing antioxidant pool and preventing cell damage and death prevented and reversed social defeat-induced behavioral and cognitive deficits in rats. Quercetin and resveratrol are the major contributors towards beneficial effects of grape powder.

  9. Cocaine- or stress-induced metaplasticity of LTP in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keralapurath, Madhusudhanan M; Clark, Jason K; Hammond, Sherri; Wagner, John J

    2014-05-01

    Despite the well documented role of the hippocampus in various modes of drug reinstatement behavior, the persisting effects of in vivo cocaine exposure on hippocampal synaptic plasticity are not sufficiently understood. In this report we investigated the effects of cocaine conditioning on long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of hippocampus along its septotemporal axis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats experienced a behavioral protocol, in which locomotor activity was monitored in response to various conditioning treatments. LTP was measured in ex vivo slice preparations taken 1-2 weeks after the last behavioral session from the ventral (vH) and dorsal (dH) sectors of hippocampus. Unexpectedly, experiencing the minor intermittent stimuli of the behavioral protocol caused stress-induced metaplastic changes in both vH (increased LTP) and dH (decreased LTP) in the saline conditioned rats relative to behaviorally naïve controls. These stress effects in the vH and dH were blocked by conditioning with either mineralocorticoid (spironolactone) or glucocorticoid (mifepristone) antagonists, respectively. Stress-induced metaplasticity in the vH was also prevented by prior administration of the kappa opioid antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. Cocaine conditioning induced locomotor sensitization and significantly increased LTP in the vH without causing significant change in LTP in the dH. Cocaine-induced metaplasticity in the vH was prevented by co-administration of the dopamine D2-like antagonist eticlopride during cocaine conditioning, but not by co-administration of the D1/5 antagonist SCH 23390. Our results suggest that the functional connectivity of hippocampus is altered by metaplastic triggers such as exposure to drugs of abuse and/or stressors, thereby shifting the efferent output of hippocampus from dH (cortical) toward vH (limbic) influenced circuits. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebhard, Catherine; Staehli, Barbara E. [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Shi, Yi; Camici, Giovanni G.; Akhmedov, Alexander; Hoegger, Lisa; Lohmann, Christine [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Matter, Christian M. [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Hassa, Paul O.; Hottiger, Michael O. [Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Malinski, Tadeusz [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Luescher, Thomas F. [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); and others

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear enzyme PARP-1 is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PARP-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This effect is mediated through inhibition of vasoconstrictor prostanoid production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus, PARP-1 may play a protective role as antioxidant defense mechanism. -- Abstract: Background: Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key feature of vascular disease. Activation of the nuclear enzyme poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Methods: PARP-1(-/-) and PARP-1(+/+) mice were injected with paraquat (PQ; 10 mg/kg i.p.) to induce intracellular oxidative stress. Aortic rings were suspended in organ chambers for isometric tension recording to analyze vascular function. Results: PQ treatment markedly impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-), but not PARP-1(+/+) mice (p < 0.0001). Maximal relaxation was 45% in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice compared to 79% in PARP-1(+/+) mice. In contrast, endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were not altered. After PQ treatment, L-NAME enhanced contractions to norepinephrine by 2.0-fold in PARP-1(-/-) mice, and those to acetylcholine by 3.3-fold, respectively, as compared to PARP-1(+/+) mice. PEG-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and PEG-catalase prevented the effect of PQ on endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.001 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+) mice. Indomethacin restored endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.05 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+). Conclusion: PARP-1 protects from acute intracellular oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction by inhibiting ROS induced production of vasoconstrictor prostanoids.

  11. Reward dependence moderates smoking-cue- and stress-induced cigarette cravings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowski, Alexandra; Erblich, Joel

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette cravings following exposure to smoking cues in a smoker's environment are thought to play an important role in cessation failure. The possibility that dispositional factors may impact cue-induced cravings, though intriguing, has received little attention. According to Cloninger's Tridimensional Personality Theory, factors such as reward dependence (RD), harm avoidance (HA), and novelty seeking (NS) may figure prominently in risk for addiction, as well as relapse, in individuals attempting to abstain from drug and alcohol use. Particularly interesting in this regard is the possibility that smokers with higher levels of RD, who are especially sensitive to reward signals, will have heightened craving reactions to smoking cues. To that end, non-treatment-seeking nicotine dependent smokers (n=96, mean age=41.1, 47% African American, 17% Caucasian, 22% Hispanic, 19.3cigs/day, FTND=7.5) underwent a classic experimental cue-induction, during which they were exposed to imagery of: (1) smoking, (2) neutral, and (3) stress cues, and reported their cigarette cravings (0-100) before and after each exposure. Participants also completed the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire. Not surprisingly, smoking and stress cues (but not neutral cues) elicited significant elevations in craving (p's<0.0001). Consistent with study hypothesis, smokers who scored higher on RD had stronger craving reactions to both smoking cues (p<.02) and stress cues (p<.03). Findings raise the possibility that dispositional characteristics, in particular, reward dependence, influence smoking by potentiating reactions to environmental smoking cues. Furthermore, the similar effects of RD on stress-induced craving suggest that both cue-and stress-induced cravings may be influenced by a common underlying disposition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficient sweat reduction of three different antiperspirant application forms during stress-induced sweating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Rose, T; Lehmbeck, F; Bürger, A; Windisch, B; Keyhani, R; Max, H

    2013-12-01

    Stress sweating can occur in everyday situations independently of thermally-induced perspiration. It is triggered by emotionally challenging situations and leads to underarm wetness and a characteristic unpleasant malodor. In this study, we aimed to determine the long-term efficacy of three unperfumed antiperspirant (AP) formulas for different application forms (roll-on, stick, aerosol) against stress-induced sweating and malodor formation. We utilized the widely accepted Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) to induce psychosocial stress in female and male volunteers (18 - 40 years) and determined physiological stress parameters. To additionally assess the efficacy of the test AP roll-on against thermally-induced sweating, a hot room study was performed. Increasing heart rates and an augmentation of saliva cortisol levels during the TSST indicated a substantial stress reaction which was paralleled by a pronounced sweat production in the untreated axillae of both males and females. Forty-eight hours after application, all three test APs significantly decreased the amount of sweat in the treated axillae independent of gender. With respect to AP effects on malodor production, trained sniffers assessed sweat samples collected during the TSST from the untreated axillae as significantly more malodorous than comparable samples from the AP-treated axillae. Also, independent of gender the test AP roll-on significantly decreased the thermally-induced sweat in the AP-treated axilla. We show for the first time a highly effective reduction of emotionally-induced axillary sweating and malodor production for three different application forms 48 h after the last product use. The specially developed roll-on, stick, and aerosol AP provide long-term protection against stress-induced sweat which is of high relevance in everyday life. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  13. Effect of erythrina indica on stress induced alteration on lipid profile in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Kamalraj

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of stress induced alteration on lipid profile in rats by different fractions (Petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and chloroform of ethanolic extract of Erythrina Indica an indigenous plant used in ayurvedic medicine in India. Methods: The study was carried on albino rats (150-200g of either sex, divided into four groups of 6 each. Group I served as control, Groups II, III and IV was treated with different fractions (Petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and chloroform of ethanolic extract of Erythrina Indica 150mg/kg, p.o. in a single daily dose from day 1 to day 22. Physical stress of 5 hours swimming was given to all the groups on day 22. Blood samples were withdrawn in group I on day O (blank control and on day 22 after stress (positive control. Blood samples were withdrawn in group II, III and IV on days 3,7,14 and 21 and on day 22 after stress. Results: All the blood samples were analyzed for total cholesterol (TC HDL, cholesterol (HDLC triglyceride (TG by enzymatic method and LDL & VLDL cholesterol was calculated by on the basis of Friedwalds equation. After 21 days of treatment changes the serum lipid levels in rats insignificantly. In control group stress increased the lipid levels in rats significantly except HDL cholesterol which reduced insignificantly. When Erythrina indica treated rats were subjected to stress on day 22, their serum lipid levels increased significantly except HDL cholesterol which reduced insignificantly. Conclusions: study indicates that various fractions (Petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and chloroform of the ethanolic extract of Erythrina Indica is effective in attenuating stress induced dislipidemia in rats.

  14. Depressive symptoms are associated with mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia after acute myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingkai Wei

    Full Text Available Depression is an adverse prognostic factor after an acute myocardial infarction (MI, and an increased propensity toward emotionally-driven myocardial ischemia may play a role. We aimed to examine the association between depressive symptoms and mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in young survivors of an MI.We studied 98 patients (49 women and 49 men age 38-60 years who were hospitalized for acute MI in the previous 6 months. Patients underwent myocardial perfusion imaging at rest, after mental stress (speech task, and after exercise or pharmacological stress. A summed difference score (SDS, obtained with observer-independent software, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II was used to measure depressive symptoms, which were analyzed as overall score, and as separate somatic and cognitive depressive symptom scores.There was a significant positive association between depressive symptoms and SDS with mental stress, denoting more ischemia. After adjustment for demographic and lifestyle factors, disease severity and medications, each incremental depressive symptom was associated with 0.14 points higher SDS. When somatic and cognitive depressive symptoms were examined separately, both somatic [β = 0.17, 95% CI: (0.04, 0.30, p = 0.01] and cognitive symptoms [β = 0.31, 95% CI: (0.07, 0.56, p = 0.01] were significantly associated with mental stress-induced ischemia. Depressive symptoms were not associated with ischemia induced by exercise or pharmacological stress.Among young post-MI patients, higher levels of both cognitive and somatic depressive symptoms are associated with a higher propensity to develop myocardial ischemia with mental stress, but not with physical (exercise or pharmacological stress.

  15. Urban stress-induced biogenic VOC emissions and SOA-forming potentials in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ghirardo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Trees can significantly impact the urban air chemistry by the uptake and emission of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs, which are involved in ozone and particle formation. Here we present the emission potentials of "constitutive" (cBVOCs and "stress-induced" BVOCs (sBVOCs from the dominant broadleaf woody plant species in the megacity of Beijing. Based on the municipal tree census and cuvette BVOC measurements on leaf level, we built an inventory of BVOC emissions, and assessed the potential impact of BVOCs on secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation in 2005 and 2010, i.e., before and after realizing the large tree-planting program for the 2008 Olympic Games. We found that sBVOCs, such as fatty acid derivatives, benzenoids, and sesquiterpenes, constituted a significant fraction ( ∼  40 % of the total annual BVOC emissions, and we estimated that the overall annual BVOC budget may have doubled from  ∼  4.8  ×  109 g C year−1 in 2005 to  ∼  10.3  ×  109 g C year−1 in 2010 due to the increase in urban greening, while at the same time the emission of anthropogenic VOCs (AVOCs decreased by 24 %. Based on the BVOC emission assessment, we estimated the biological impact on SOA mass formation potential in Beijing. Constitutive and stress-induced BVOCs might produce similar amounts of secondary aerosol in Beijing. However, the main contributors of SOA-mass formations originated from anthropogenic sources (> 90 %. This study demonstrates the general importance to include sBVOCs when studying BVOC emissions. Although the main problems regarding air quality in Beijing still originate from anthropogenic activities, the present survey suggests that in urban plantation programs, the selection of low-emitting plant species has some potential beneficial effects on urban air quality.

  16. Molecular basis for oxidative stress induced by simulated microgravity in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2017-12-31

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an important in vivo assay system for toxicological studies. Herein, we investigated the role of oxidative stress and the underlying molecular mechanism for induced adverse effects of simulated microgravity. In nematodes, simulated microgravity treatment induced a significant induction of oxidative stress. Genes (mev-1, gas-1, and isp-1) encoding a molecular machinery for the control of oxidative stress were found to be dysregulated in simulated microgravity treated nematodes. Meanwhile, genes (sod-2, sod-3, sod-4, sod-5, aak-2, skn-1, and gst-4) encoding certain antioxidant defense systems were increased in simulated microgravity treated nematodes. Mutation of mev-1, gas-1, sod-2, sod-3, aak-2, skn-1, or gst-4 enhanced susceptibility to oxidative stress induced by simulated microgravity, whereas mutation of isp-1 induced a resistance to oxidative stress induced by simulated microgravity. Mutation of sod-2, sod-3, or aak-2 further suppressed the recovery effect of simulated microgravity toxicity in nematodes after simulated microgravity treatment for 1h. Moreover, administration of ascorbate could inhibit the adverse effects including the induction of oxidative stress in simulated microgravity treated nematodes. Mutation of any of the genes encoding metallothioneins or the genes of hsp-16.1, hsp-16.2 and hsp-16.48 encoding heat-shock proteins did not affect the induction of oxidative stress in simulated microgravity treated nematodes. Our results provide a molecular basis for the induction of oxidative stress in simulated microgravity treated organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. TAK1-binding Protein 1, TAB1, Mediates Osmotic Stress-induced TAK1 Activation but Is Dispensable for TAK1-mediated Cytokine Signaling*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Maiko; Omori, Emily; Kim, Jae-Young; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Scott, Greg; Ray, Manas K.; Yamada, Gen; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Mishina, Yuji; Ninomiya-Tsuji, Jun

    2008-01-01

    TAK1 kinase is an indispensable intermediate in several cytokine signaling pathways including tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and transforming growth factor-β signaling pathways. TAK1 also participates in stress-activated intracellular signaling pathways such as osmotic stress signaling pathway. TAK1-binding protein 1 (TAB1) is constitutively associated with TAK1 through its C-terminal region. Although TAB1 is known to augment TAK1 catalytic activity when it is overexpressed, the role of TAB1 under physiological conditions has not yet been identified. In this study, we determined the role of TAB1 in TAK1 signaling by analyzing TAB1-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Tumor necrosis factor- and interleukin-1-induced activation of TAK1 was entirely normal in Tab1-deficient MEFs and could activate both mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF-κB. In contrast, we found that osmotic stress-induced activation of TAK1 was largely impaired in Tab1-deficient MEFs. Furthermore, we showed that the C-terminal 68 amino acids of TAB1 were sufficient to mediate osmotic stress-induced TAK1 activation. Finally, we attempted to determine the mechanism by which TAB1 activates TAK1. We found that TAK1 is spontaneously activated when the concentration is increased and that it is totally dependent on TAB1. Cell shrinkage under the osmotic stress condition increases the concentration of TAB1-TAK1 and may oligomerize and activate TAK1 in a TAB1-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that TAB1 mediates TAK1 activation only in a subset of TAK1 pathways that are mediated through spontaneous oligomerization of TAB1-TAK1. PMID:18829460

  18. Knockdown of WHIRLY1 Affects Drought Stress-Induced Leaf Senescence and Histone Modifications of the Senescence-Associated Gene HvS40

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianka Janack

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The plastid-nucleus located protein WHIRLY1 has been described as an upstream regulator of leaf senescence, binding to the promoter of senescence-associated genes like HvS40. To investigate the impact of WHIRLY1 on drought stress-induced, premature senescence, transgenic barley plants with an RNAi-mediated knockdown of the HvWHIRLY1 gene were grown under normal and drought stress conditions. The course of leaf senescence in these lines was monitored by physiological parameters and studies on the expression of senescence- and drought stress-related genes. Drought treatment accelerated leaf senescence in WT plants, whereas WHIRLY 1 knockdown lines (RNAi-W1 showed a stay-green phenotype. Expression of both senescence-associated and drought stress-responsive genes, was delayed in the transgenic plants. Notably, expression of transcription factors of the WRKY and NAC families, which are known to function in senescence- and stress-related signaling pathways, was affected in plants with impaired accumulation of WHIRLY1, indicating that WHIRLY1 acts as an upstream regulator of drought stress-induced senescence. To reveal the epigenetic indexing of HvS40 at the onset of drought-induced senescence in WT and RNAi-W1 lines, stress-responsive loading with histone modifications of promoter and coding sequences of HvS40 was analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantified by qRT-PCR. In the wildtype, the euchromatic mark H3K9ac of the HvS40 gene was low under control conditions and was established in response to drought treatment, indicating the action of epigenetic mechanisms in response to drought stress. However, drought stress caused no significant increase in H3K9ac in plants impaired in accumulation of WHIRLY1. The results show that WHIRLY1 knockdown sets in motion a delay in senescence that involves all aspects of gene expression, including changes in chromatin structure.

  19. Carbon monoxide blocks oxidative stress-induced hepatocyte apoptosis via inhibition of the p54 JNK isoform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conde de la Rosa, Laura; Vrenken, Titia E.; Hannivoort, Rebekka A.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Havinga, Rick; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Kauffman, Henk F.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Moshage, Han

    2008-01-01

    Most chronic liver diseases are accompanied by oxidative stress, which may induce apoptosis in hepatocytes and liver injury. Oxidative stress induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. This stress-responsive cytoprotective protein is responsible for heme degradation into carbon monoxide (CO), free

  20. Estrogen receptor-a in the medial amygdala prevents stress-induced elevations in blood pressure in females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psychological stress contributes to the development of hypertension in humans. The ovarian hormone, estrogen, has been shown to prevent stress-induced pressor responses in females by unknown mechanisms. Here, we showed that the antihypertensive effects of estrogen during stress were blunted in femal...

  1. Fast temperature cycling stress-induced and electromigration-induced interlayer dielectric cracking failure in multilevel interconnection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Van Hieu; Nguyen, H.; Salm, Cora; Vroemen, J.; Voets, J.; Krabbenborg, B.H.; Bisschop, J.; Mouthaan, A.J.; Kuper, F.G.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing reliability concern of thermal stress-induced and electromigration-induced failures in multilevel interconnections in recent years. This paper reports our investigations of thin film cracking of a multilevel interconnect due to fast temperature cycling and electromigration

  2. Tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen mediate stress-induced decline of neuronal and cognitive functions in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Robert; Rao, B S Shankaranarayana; Melchor, Jerry P; Chattarji, Sumantra; McEwen, Bruce; Strickland, Sidney

    2005-12-13

    Repeated stress can impair function in the hippocampus, a brain structure essential for learning and memory. Although behavioral evidence suggests that severe stress triggers cognitive impairment, as seen in major depression or posttraumatic stress disorder, little is known about the molecular mediators of these functional deficits in the hippocampus. We report here both pre- and postsynaptic effects of chronic stress, manifested as a reduction in the number of NMDA receptors, dendritic spines, and expression of growth-associated protein-43 in the cornu ammonis 1 region. Strikingly, the stress-induced decrease in NMDA receptors coincides spatially with sites of plasminogen activation, thereby predicting a role for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in this form of stress-induced plasticity. Consistent with this possibility, tPA-/- and plasminogen-/- mice are protected from stress-induced decrease in NMDA receptors and reduction in dendritic spines. At the behavioral level, these synaptic and molecular signatures of stress-induced plasticity are accompanied by impaired acquisition, but not retrieval, of hippocampal-dependent spatial learning, a deficit that is not exhibited by the tPA-/- and plasminogen-/- mice. These findings establish the tPA/plasmin system as an important mediator of the debilitating effects of prolonged stress on hippocampal function at multiple levels of neural organization.

  3. Carbon monoxide blocks oxidative stress-induced hepatocyte apoptosis via inhibition of the p54 JNK isoform.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosa, L Conde de la; Woudenberg-Vrenken, T.E.; Hannivoort, R.A.; Buist-Homan, M.; Havinga, R.; Slebos, D.J.; Kauffman, H.F.; Faber, K.N.; Jansen, P.L.; Moshage, H.

    2008-01-01

    Most chronic liver diseases are accompanied by oxidative stress, which may induce apoptosis in hepatocytes and liver injury. Oxidative stress induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. This stress-responsive cytoprotective protein is responsible for heme degradation into carbon monoxide (CO), free

  4. Novel sila-amide derivatives of N-acetylcysteine protects platelets from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Manoj; Thushara, Ram M; Jagadish, Swamy; Zakai, Uzma I; West, Robert; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S

    2017-02-01

    Oxidative stress-induced platelet apoptosis is one among the many causes for the development and progression of many disorders like cardiovascular diseases, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease and many chronic inflammatory responses. Many studies have demonstrated the less optimal effect of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) in oxidative stress-induced cellular damage. This could be due to its less lipophilicity which makes it difficult to enter the cellular membrane. Therefore in the present study, lipophilic sila-amide derivatives (6a and 6b) synthesized through the reaction of NAC with 3-Aminopropyltrimethylsilane and aminomethyltrimethylsilane were used to determine their protective property against oxidative stress-induced platelet apoptosis. At a concentration of 10 µM, compound 6a and 6b were able to significantly inhibit Rotenone/H2O2 induced platelet apoptotic markers like reactive oxygen species, intracellular calcium level, mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from mitochondrial to the cytosol, caspase-9 and -3 activity and phosphatidylserine externalization. Therefore, the compounds can be extrapolated as therapeutic agents to protect platelets from oxidative stress-induced platelet apoptosis and its associated complications.

  5. Relation between maximum replicative capacity and oxidative stress-induced responses in human skin fibroblasts in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Pim; De Lange, Mark J.; Dirks, Roeland W.; Van Heemst, Diana; Tanke, Hans J.; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Maier, Andrea B.

    Cellular senescence, an important factor in ageing phenotypes, can be induced by replicative exhaustion or by stress. We investigated the relation between maximum replicative capacity, telomere length, stress-induced cellular senescence, and apoptosis/cell death in human primary fibroblast strains

  6. Clarifying Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Confusion exists among database textbooks as to the goal of normalization as well as to which normal form a designer should aspire. This article discusses such discrepancies with the intention of simplifying normalization for both teacher and student. This author's industry and classroom experiences indicate such simplification yields quicker…

  7. Effect of water deprivation on baseline and stress-induced corticosterone levels in the Children's python (Antaresia childreni).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupoué, Andréaz; Angelier, Frédéric; Lourdais, Olivier; Bonnet, Xavier; Brischoux, François

    2014-02-01

    Corticosterone (CORT) secretion is influenced by endogenous factors (e.g., physiological status) and environmental stressors (e.g., ambient temperature). Heretofore, the impact of water deprivation on CORT plasma levels has not been thoroughly investigated. However, both baseline CORT and stress-induced CORT are expected to respond to water deprivation not only because of hydric stress per se, but also because CORT is an important mineralocorticoid in vertebrates. We assessed the effects of water deprivation on baseline CORT and stress-induced CORT, in Children's pythons (Antaresia childreni), a species that experiences seasonal droughts in natural conditions. We imposed a 52-day water deprivation on a group of unfed Children's pythons (i.e., water-deprived treatment) and provided water ad libitum to another group (i.e., control treatment). We examined body mass variations throughout the experiment, and baseline CORT and stress-induced CORT at the end of the treatments. Relative body mass loss averaged ~10% in pythons without water, a value 2 to 4 times higher compared to control snakes. Following re-exposition to water, pythons from the water-deprived treatment drank readily and abundantly and attained a body mass similar to pythons from the control treatment. Together, these results suggest a substantial dehydration as a consequence of water deprivation. Interestingly, stress-induced but not baseline CORT level was significantly higher in water-deprived snakes, suggesting that baseline CORT might not respond to this degree of dehydration. Therefore, possible mineralocorticoid role of CORT needs to be clarified in snakes. Because dehydration usually induces adjustments (reduced movements, lowered body temperature) to limit water loss, and decreases locomotor performances, elevated stress-induced CORT in water-deprived snakes might therefore compensate for altered locomotor performances. Future studies should test this hypothesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc

  8. The functional recombinant first extracellular (EC1) domain of PACAP receptor PAC1 normal form (PAC1-EC1(N)) recognizes selective ligands and stimulates the proliferation of PAC1-CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rongjie; Li, Juan; Wang, Jingjing; Liu, Xiaofei; Huang, Lin; Ding, Yong; Chen, Jiansu

    2010-08-09

    PAC1 is a pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) preferring receptor, which is abundant in the central and peripheral nervous systems. PAC1 belongs to the class B family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The N-terminal first extracellular (EC1) domain of PAC1 is responsible for ligand recognition and binding. In this study, the recombinant EC1 domain of the PAC1 normal (N) form (amino acids 21-155) with 6His tag at the C-terminus (named PAC1-EC1(N)) was first expressed in an Escherichia coli strain and purified by an Ni-NTA affinity column. About 6-8mg of recombinant PAC1-EC1(N) protein with purity above 95% was produced from 1L of bacterial culture. Mass spectrum and western blot were used to identify the recombinant PAC1-EC1(N). Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence (ITF) assays showed that the purified PAC1-EC1(N) protein was able to recognize and bind to the PAC1 selective agonist maxadilan, the antagonist M65 and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Maxadilan and M65 had higher affinities for PAC1-EC1(N) than VIP. The results of MTT assays showed that PAC1-EC1(N) stimulated the viability of PAC-CHO cells but blocked the effects of maxadilan on the proliferation of CHO cells expressing PAC1 (PAC1-CHO), indicating that the functional soluble PAC1-EC1(N) may act as a regulator for the activation of PAC1. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cuminum cyminum extract attenuates scopolamine-induced memory loss and stress-induced urinary biochemical changes in rats: a noninvasive biochemical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppula, Sushruta; Choi, Dong Kug

    2011-07-01

    Cuminum cyminum Linn. (Apiaceae), cumin, is a popular spice with a long history of medicinal use to treat various symptoms such as diarrhea, flatulence, gynecological, and respiratory diseases. To date, no scientific investigation was reported regarding memory-enhancing and antistress activity of cumin fruits. The present study deals with the memory-enhancing and antistress activities and further the antioxidant status via lipid peroxidation inhibition. Antistress activity was evaluated by inducing stress via forced swimming and the urinary vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) and ascorbic acid were estimated as biomarkers. Memory-enhancing activity was studied by conditioned avoidance response using Cook's pole climbing apparatus in normal and scopolamine-induced amnestic rats. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay was used to evaluate the lipid peroxidation. Daily administration of cumin at doses of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg body weight 1 h prior to induction of stress inhibited the stress-induced urinary biochemical changes in a dose-dependent manner without altering the levels in normal control groups. The cognition, as determined by the acquisition, retention, and recovery in rats, was observed to be dose-dependent. The extract also produced significant lipid peroxidation inhibition in comparison with known antioxidant ascorbic acid in both rat liver and brain. This study provides scientific support for the antistress, antioxidant, and memory-enhancing activities of cumin extract and substantiates that its traditional use as a culinary spice in foods is beneficial and scientific in combating stress and related disorders.

  10. Randomized test of an implementation intention-based tool to reduce stress-induced eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Daryl B; Armitage, Christopher J; Ferguson, Eamonn

    2015-06-01

    Stress may indirectly contribute to disease (e.g. cardiovascular disease, cancer) by producing deleterious changes to diet. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a stress management support (SMS) tool to reduce stress-related unhealthy snacking and to promote stress-related healthy snacking. Participants were randomized to complete a SMS tool with instruction to link stressful situations with healthy snack alternatives (experimental) or a SMS tool without a linking instruction (control). On-line daily reports of stressors and snacking were completed for 7 days. Daily stressors were associated with unhealthy snack consumption in the control condition but not in the experimental condition. Participants highly motivated towards healthy eating consumed a greater number of healthy snacks in the experimental condition on stressful days compared to participants in the experimental condition with low and mean levels of motivation. This tool is an effective, theory driven, intervention that helps to protect against stress-induced high-calorie snack consumption.

  11. Analysis of the stress-inducible transcription factor SsNAC23 in sugarcane plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Fava Ditt

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Stresses such as cold and drought can impair plant yield and induce a highly complex array of responses. Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. is cultivated in tropical and subtropical areas and is considered a cold-sensitive plant. We previously showed that cold stress induces the expression of several genes in in vitro sugarcane plantlets. Here we characterize one of those genes, SsNAC23, a member of the NAC family of plant-specific transcription factors, which are induced by low temperature and other stresses in several plant species. The expression of SsNAC23 was induced in sugarcane plants exposed to low temperatures (4ºC. With the aim of further understanding the regulatory network in response to stress, we used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify sugarcane proteins that interact with SsNAC23. Using SsNAC23 as bait, we screened a cDNA expression library of sugarcane plants submitted to 4ºC for 48 h. Several interacting partners were identified, including stress-related proteins, increasing our knowledge on how sugarcane plants respond to cold stress. One of these interacting partners, a thioredoxin h1, offers insights into the regulation of SsNAC23 activity.

  12. Extracts of black bean peel and pomegranate peel ameliorate oxidative stress-induced hyperglycemia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Yun; Zhu, Chuang; Qian, Tian-Wei; Guo, Hao; Wang, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Fan; Yin, Xiaoxing

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a central role in the progression of diabetes mellitus (DM), which can directly result in the injury of islet β cells and consequent hyperglycemia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible protective effects of black bean peel extract (BBPE), pomegranate peel extract (PPE) and a combination of the two (PPE + BBPE) on streptozotocin-induced DM mice. Oxidative stress was assessed by the levels of total antioxidative capability and glutathione in the serum. Fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as the pancreas weight index and the histological changes in the pancreas, were also determined. The results showed that, after fours weeks of treatment with PPE, BBPE or PPE + BBPE, DM mice showed, to different degrees, a decrease in blood glucose, increases in insulin secretion and the pancreas weight index, and an increase in antioxidative activity. These changes were particularly evident in the DM mice subjected to the combined intervention strategy of PPE + BBPE. The histological findings indicated that the injury to the pancreatic islets in DM mice was also ameliorated following treatment. In conclusion, PPE and BBPE, particularly the combination of the two, have the ability to ameliorate hyperglycemia by inhibiting oxidative stress-induced pancreatic damage; this finding may be useful in the prevention and treatment of DM.

  13. Saffron (Crocus sativus) aqueous extract and its constituent crocin reduces stress-induced anorexia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halataei, Bahar-al-Sadat; Khosravi, Maryam; Arbabian, Sedigheh; Sahraei, Hedayat; Golmanesh, Leila; Zardooz, Homeira; Jalili, Cyrus; Ghoshooni, Hassan

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, the effects of an ethanol and aqueous extract of saffron Crocus sativus and its constituents safranal and crocin on the stress-induced reduction in food intake, weight gain and anorexic time in mice were investigated. Male albino mice (20-25 g) were irregularly exposed to a trial of electroshock stress for 7 days. Then, the anorexic time as well as the animal's food intake and weight were recorded. In addition, blood samples were obtained on days 1 and 7 for corticosterone determination. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of the aqueous but not the ethanol extract (10, 50 and 100 mg/kg) significantly reduced the anorexic time. The results were similar for crocin (1, 5 and 10 mg/kg; i.p.). In addition, a reduction in weight gain was observed in the controls as well as in the groups that received alcohol extract or safranal. However, this was not observed in animals treated with aqueous extract or crocin. The plasma corticosterone level did not increase in the aqueous extract and crocin treated animals. It can be concluded that the saffron aqueous extract and its constituent crocin reduce side effects of electroshock stress in mice. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Micromechanical modeling of stress-induced strain in polycrystalline Ni–Mn–Ga by directional solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuping, E-mail: zhuyuping@126.com [Seismic Observation and Geophysical Imaging Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing 100081 (China); Shi, Tao; Teng, Yao [Faculty of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A micromechanical model of directional solidification Ni–Mn–Ga is developed. • The stress–strain curves in different directions are tested. • The martensite Young’s moduli in different directions are predicted. • The macro reorientation strains in different directions are investigated. - Abstract: Polycrystalline ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni–Mn–Ga produced by directional solidification possess unique properties. Its compressive stress–strain behaviors in loading–unloading cycle show nonlinear and anisotropic. Based on the self-consistent theory and thermodynamics principle, a micromechanical constitutive model of polycrystalline Ni–Mn–Ga by directional solidification is developed considering the generating mechanism of the macroscopic strain and anisotropy. Then, the stress induced strains at different angles to solidification direction are calculated, and the results agree well with the experimental data. The predictive curves of martensite Young’s modulus and macro reorientation strain in different directions are investigated. It may provide theoretical guidance for the design and use of ferromagnetic shape memory alloy.

  15. Reactive oxygen species mediate shear stress-induced fluid-phase endocytosis in vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Koichi; Sakai, Jiro; Karino, Takeshi; Aonuma, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Ohyama, Tohru; Inanami, Osamu; Kuwabara, Mikinori

    2006-02-01

    To elucidate the role of shear stress in fluid-phase endocytosis of vascular endothelial cells (EC), we used a rotating-disk shearing apparatus to investigate the effects of shear stress on the uptake of lucifer yellow (LY) by cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Exposure of EC to shear stress (area-mean value of 10 dynes/cm2) caused an increase in LY uptake that was abrogated by the antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, acetovanillone, and two inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), calphostin C and GF109203X. These results suggest that fluid-phase endocytosis is regulated by both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and PKC. Shear stress increased both ROS production and PKC activity in EC, and the increase in ROS was unaffected by calphostin C or GF109203X, whereas the activation of PKC was reduced by NAC and acetovanillone. We conclude that shear stress-induced increase in fluid-phase endocytosis is mediated via ROS generation followed by PKC activation in EC.

  16. The Stress-Inducible Peroxidase TSA2 Underlies a Conditionally Beneficial Chromosomal Duplication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Linder

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Although chromosomal duplications are often deleterious, in some cases they enhance cells’ abilities to tolerate specific genetic or environmental challenges. Identifying the genes that confer these conditionally beneficial effects to particular chromosomal duplications can improve our understanding of the genetic and molecular mechanisms that enable certain aneuploidies to persist in cell populations and contribute to disease and evolution. Here, we perform a screen for spontaneous mutations that improve the tolerance of haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hydrogen peroxide. Chromosome IV duplication is the most frequent mutation, as well as the only change in chromosomal copy number seen in the screen. Using a genetic mapping strategy that involves systematically deleting segments of a duplicated chromosome, we show that the chromosome IV’s duplication effect is largely due to the generation of a second copy of the stress-inducible cytoplasmic thioredoxin peroxidase TSA2. Our findings add to a growing body of literature that shows the conditionally beneficial effects of chromosomal duplication are typically mediated by a small number of genes that enhance tolerance to specific stresses when their copy numbers are increased.

  17. Preventive and therapeutic effect of treadmill running on chronic stress-induced memory deficit in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radahmadi, Maryam; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Sharifi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Nasrin

    2015-04-01

    Previous results indicated that stress impairs learning and memory. In this research, the effects of preventive, therapeutic and regular continually running activity on chronic stress-induced memory deficit in rats were investigated. 70 male rats were randomly divided into seven groups as follows: Control, Sham, Stress-Rest, Rest-Stress, Stress-Exercise, Exercise-Stress and Exercise-Stress & Exercise groups. Chronic restraint stress was applied 6 h/day for 21days and treadmill running 1 h/day. Memory function was evaluated by the passive avoidance test. The results revealed that running activities had therapeutic effect on mid and long-term memory deficit and preventive effects on short and mid-term memory deficit in stressed rats. Regular continually running activity improved mid and long-term memory compared to Exercise-Stress group. The beneficial effects of exercise were time-dependent in stress conditions. Finally, data corresponded to the possibility that treadmill running had a more important role on treatment rather than on prevention on memory impairment induced by stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Exercise effects stress-induced analgesia and spatial learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blustein, Joshua E; McLaughlin, Michael; Hoffman, John R

    2006-11-30

    Previous studies indicated that intensity level may be a determining factor in the beneficial or detrimental effects of exercise on spatial memory, as chronic low-intensity level exercise appears to enhance learning and memory which stressful situations may impair. This study examines the effects of different intensity levels of acute exercise (treadmill running) on spatial memory in rats. Using the Morris water maze, spatial learning was measured in animals exposed to treadmill running at low- (20-22 m/min for 25 min daily) and high-intensity (25 m/min for 25 min daily) levels of exercise. A stress control using an electric foot shock was used to examine if the high-intensity exercise was sufficient to serve as a stressor. Stress level was estimated by examining tail flick latencies as a measure of stress-induced analgesia. The results indicate that high-intensity exercise at a level that may not induce an analgesic state is sufficient to impair early acquisition of spatial learning. However, with additional trials, all animals are capable of learning the task. Acute exposure to the electric foot shock impaired learning in the Morris water maze. Surprisingly, across all studies, there was a significantly higher analgesic state post-swim as compared to pre-swim. The results indicate that irrespective of stress level prior to water maze testing, swimming in the Morris water maze repeatedly for short durations of time is enough to induce an analgesic state.

  19. Stress potentiates decision biases: A stress induced deliberation-to-intuition (SIDI model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjun Yu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Humans often make decisions in stressful situations, for example when the stakes are high and the potential consequences severe, or when the clock is ticking and the task demand is overwhelming. In response, a whole train of biological responses to stress has evolved to allow organisms to make a fight-or-flight response. When under stress, fast and effortless heuristics may dominate over slow and demanding deliberation in making decisions under uncertainty. Here, I review evidence from behavioral studies and neuroimaging research on decision making under stress and propose that stress elicits a switch from an analytic reasoning system to intuitive processes, and predict that this switch is associated with diminished activity in the prefrontal executive control regions and exaggerated activity in subcortical reactive emotion brain areas. Previous studies have shown that when stressed, individuals tend to make more habitual responses than goal-directed choices, be less likely to adjust their initial judgment, and rely more on gut feelings in social situations. It is possible that stress influences the arbitration between the emotion responses in subcortical regions and deliberative processes in the prefrontal cortex, so that final decisions are based on unexamined innate responses. Future research may further test this ‘stress induced deliberation-to-intuition’ (SIDI model and examine its underlying neural mechanisms.

  20. Genome wide transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to stress-induced perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal eTaymaz-Nikerel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cells respond to environmental and/or genetic perturbations in order to survive and proliferate. Characterization of the changes after various stimuli at different -omics levels is crucial to comprehend the adaptation of cells to changing conditions. Genome wide quantification and analysis of transcript levels, the genes affected by perturbations, extends our understanding of cellular metabolism by pointing out the mechanisms that play role in sensing the stress caused by those perturbations and related signaling pathways, and in this way guides us to achieve endeavors such as rational engineering of cells or interpretation of disease mechanisms. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system has been studied in response to different perturbations and corresponding transcriptional profiles were followed either statically or/and dynamically, short- and long- term. This review focuses on response of yeast cells to diverse stress inducing perturbations including nutritional changes, ionic stress, salt stress, oxidative stress, osmotic shock, as well as to genetic interventions such as deletion and over-expression of genes. It is aimed to conclude on common regulatory phenomena that allow yeast to organize its transcriptomic response after any perturbation under different external conditions.

  1. Mental stress-induced haemoconcentration in women: effects of menstrual cycle phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Jet J C S; Carroll, Douglas; Ring, Christopher

    2009-11-01

    In women, variation in the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) has been reported with phase of the menstrual cycle. Mental stress-induced rheological and haemodynamic perturbations have been implicated in the triggering of MI. This study examined cardiovascular reactions to mental stress across the menstrual cycle, as a factor contributing to the known variation between the menstrual cycle phases in MI incidence. Rheological and haemodynamic activity during rest and a prolonged mental stress task were assessed in 12 women during the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. The stress task increased haematocrit, colloid osmotic pressure, blood pressure and heart rate, and decreased heart rate variability and R-wave to pulse interval. However, there were no effects of menstrual phase on rheological or haemodynamic function at rest or in response to mental stress. There were also no moderating menstrual cycle effects for the rheological or haemodynamic reactions over time to this prolonged stress task. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that variations in reactions to mental stress can explain the reported variations in risk for MI across the menstrual cycle.

  2. Gallic Acid Protects Against Immobilization Stress-Induced Changes In Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabir, Ahmad Rather

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress triggers a wide range of body changes. Herbal medicines are rich in non specific antistress agents.Purpose: The present study was carried out to evaluate the antistress effect of gallic acid (GA, a naturally occurring plant phenol, on immobilization induced-stress in male albino Wistar rats.Methods: The immobilization stress was induced in rats by putting the rats in 20 cm Ч 7 cm plastic tubes for 2 h/day for 21 days. Rats were post orally treated with GA at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight via intragastric intubations.Results:Treatment with GA significantly increased the food intake, body weight, organ weight (spleen, testis and brain and the significant reduction was found in weight of liver, kidney, heart and adrenal glands, which was altered in stressed rats. GA also significantly reduced the elevated levels of plasma glucose, plasma and tissue cholesterol (CHL, triglycerides (TG, Low Density Lipid (LDL, Very Low Density Lipid (VLDL and also significantly increased the level of High Density Lipid (HDL. A significant decrease in hematological parameters like RBC count, total and differential WBC count was also found which were increased in immobilization stress.Conclusion: GA prevented the stress-induced physiological, biochemical and hematological changes, indicating the preventive effect against stress.

  3. Internal stress-induced melting below melting temperature at high-rate laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yong Seok; Levitas, Valery I.

    2014-06-01

    In this Letter, continuum thermodynamic and phase field approaches (PFAs) predicted internal stress-induced reduction in melting temperature for laser-irradiated heating of a nanolayer. Internal stresses appear due to thermal strain under constrained conditions and completely relax during melting, producing an additional thermodynamic driving force for melting. Thermodynamic melting temperature for Al reduces from 933.67 K for a stress-free condition down to 898.1 K for uniaxial strain and to 920.8 K for plane strain. Our PFA simulations demonstrated barrierless surface-induced melt nucleation below these temperatures and propagation of two solid-melt interfaces toward each other at the temperatures very close to the corresponding predicted thermodynamic equilibrium temperatures for the heating rate Q ≤1.51×1010K/s. At higher heating rates, kinetic superheating competes with a reduction in melting temperature and melting under uniaxial strain occurs at 902.1 K for Q = 1.51 × 1011 K/s and 936.9 K for Q = 1.46 × 1012 K/s.

  4. Internal stress-induced melting below melting temperature at high-rate laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yong Seok, E-mail: yshwang@iastate.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Levitas, Valery I., E-mail: vlevitas@iastate.edu [Departments of Aerospace Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Material Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2014-06-30

    In this Letter, continuum thermodynamic and phase field approaches (PFAs) predicted internal stress-induced reduction in melting temperature for laser-irradiated heating of a nanolayer. Internal stresses appear due to thermal strain under constrained conditions and completely relax during melting, producing an additional thermodynamic driving force for melting. Thermodynamic melting temperature for Al reduces from 933.67 K for a stress-free condition down to 898.1 K for uniaxial strain and to 920.8 K for plane strain. Our PFA simulations demonstrated barrierless surface-induced melt nucleation below these temperatures and propagation of two solid-melt interfaces toward each other at the temperatures very close to the corresponding predicted thermodynamic equilibrium temperatures for the heating rate Q≤1.51×10{sup 10}K/s. At higher heating rates, kinetic superheating competes with a reduction in melting temperature and melting under uniaxial strain occurs at 902.1 K for Q = 1.51 × 10{sup 11 }K/s and 936.9 K for Q = 1.46 × 10{sup 12 }K/s.

  5. Stress-induced endocrine response and anxiety: the effects of comfort food in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortolani, Daniela; Garcia, Márcia Carvalho; Melo-Thomas, Liana; Spadari-Bratfisch, Regina Celia

    2014-05-01

    The long-term effects of comfort food in an anxiogenic model of stress have yet to be analyzed. Here, we evaluated behavioral, endocrine and metabolic parameters in rats submitted or not to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), with access to commercial chow alone or to commercial chow and comfort food. Stress did not alter the preference for comfort food but decreased food intake. In the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test, stressed rats were less likely to enter/remain in the open arms, as well as being more likely to enter/remain in the closed arms, than were control rats, both conditions being more pronounced in the rats given access to comfort food. In the open field test, stress decreased the time spent in the centre, independent of diet; neither stress nor diet affected the number of crossing, rearing or grooming episodes. The stress-induced increase in serum corticosterone was attenuated in rats given access to comfort food. Serum concentration of triglycerides were unaffected by stress or diet, although access to comfort food increased total cholesterol and glucose. It is concluded that CUMS has an anorexigenic effect. Chronic stress and comfort food ingestion induced an anxiogenic profile although comfort food attenuated the endocrine stress response. The present data indicate that the combination of stress and access to comfort food, common aspects of modern life, may constitute a link among stress, feeding behavior and anxiety.

  6. Public speaking stress-induced neuroendocrine responses and circulating immune cell redistribution in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Lucas, Ayscha; Holtmann, Gerald; Haag, Sebastian; Gerken, Guido; Riemenschneider, Natalie; Langhorst, Jost; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2006-10-01

    Augmented neuroendocrine stress responses and altered immune functions may play a role in the manifestation of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. We tested the hypothesis that IBS patients would demonstrate enhanced psychological and endocrine responses, as well as altered stress-induced redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocytes, in response to an acute psychosocial stressor when compared with healthy controls. Responses to public speaking stress were analyzed in N = 17 IBS patients without concurrent psychiatric conditions and N = 12 healthy controls. At baseline, immediately following public speaking, and after a recovery period, state anxiety, acute GI symptoms, cardiovascular responses, serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were measured, and numbers of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations were analyzed by flow cytometry. Public speaking led to significant cardiovascular activation, a significant increase in ACTH, and a redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations, including significant increases in natural killer cells and cytotoxic/suppressor T cells. IBS patients demonstrated significantly greater state anxiety both at baseline and following public speaking. However, cardiovascular and endocrine responses, as well as the redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations after public speaking stress, did not differ for IBS patients compared with controls. In IBS patients without psychiatric comorbidity, the endocrine response as well as the circulation pattern of leukocyte subpopulations to acute psychosocial stress do not differ from healthy controls in spite of enhanced emotional responses. Future studies should discern the role of psychopathology in psychological and biological stress responses in IBS.

  7. Effect of loading speed on the stress-induced magnetic behavior of ferromagnetic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Sheng, E-mail: longtubao@zju.edu.cn; Gu, Yibin; Fu, Meili; Zhang, Da; Hu, Shengnan

    2017-02-01

    The primary goal of this research is to investigate the effect of loading speed on the stress-induced magnetic behavior of a ferromagnetic steel. Uniaxial tension tests on Q235 steel were carried out with various stress levels under different loading speeds. The variation of the magnetic signals surrounding the tested specimen was detected by a fluxgate magnetometer. The results indicated that the magnetic signal variations depended not only on the tensile load level but on the loading speed during the test. The magnetic field amplitude seemed to decrease gradually with the increase in loading speed at the same tensile load level. Furthermore, the evolution of the magnetic reversals is also related to the loading speed. Accordingly, the loading speed should be considered as one of the influencing variables in the Jies-Atherton model theory of the magnetomechanical effect. - Highlights: • Magnetic behaviors induced by different loading speeds were investigated. • Loading speed imposes strong impact on the variation of the magnetic field signals. • The magnetic field amplitude reduces gradually with the increasing loading speed. • The Jies-Atherton model theory should consider the effect of loading speed.

  8. A Study on Stress-induced Hydrogen Diffusion in Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jin-Ho; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Yong-Soo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This study was conducted to confirm whether the hydrogen can diffuse induced by stress gradient in the isothermal conditions. So far the following conclusions were drawn: Hydrogen can be diffused by stress gradient in the isothermal conditions and Certain threshold condition may exist on hydrogen diffusion. The absorbed hydrogen precipitates into a hydride platelet which is considered as one of the limiting factor threatening the integrity of spent nuclear fuel during dry storage. Thus, it is important to understand thoroughly the behavior of hydrogen in the zirconium. In particular, hydrogen diffusion is known to be affected by gradient of temperature, hydrogen, and stress. The influence of temperature and concentration is well known as Soret effect and Fick's law, respectively. However, the effect of stress gradient on hydrogen diffusion is unclear so far. For this reason, understanding of delayed hydride cracking (DHC), which is a time-dependent crack growth mechanism, continues to be a controversial issue. Currently, there are two major models to explain the process of DHC. Puls claims it is driven by diffusion of hydrogen towards crack tip due to chemical potential difference which is generated by stress gradient between the crack tip and bulk region. In contrast, Kim explains that the first step of DHC is stress-induced precipitation of supersaturated hydrogen at the crack tip. Then hydrogen migrates towards crack tip due to concentration gradient between the two regions.

  9. Stress-induced visceral pain: toward animal models of irritable-bowel syndrome and associated comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Rachel D; O'Mahony, Siobhain M; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2015-01-01

    Visceral pain is a global term used to describe pain originating from the internal organs, which is distinct from somatic pain. It is a hallmark of functional gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable-bowel syndrome (IBS). Currently, the treatment strategies targeting visceral pain are unsatisfactory, with development of novel therapeutics hindered by a lack of detailed knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Stress has long been implicated in the pathophysiology of visceral pain in both preclinical and clinical studies. Here, we discuss the complex etiology of visceral pain reviewing our current understanding in the context of the role of stress, gender, gut microbiota alterations, and immune functioning. Furthermore, we review the role of glutamate, GABA, and epigenetic mechanisms as possible therapeutic strategies for the treatment of visceral pain for which there is an unmet medical need. Moreover, we discuss the most widely described rodent models used to model visceral pain in the preclinical setting. The theory behind, and application of, animal models is key for both the understanding of underlying mechanisms and design of future therapeutic interventions. Taken together, it is apparent that stress-induced visceral pain and its psychiatric comorbidities, as typified by IBS, has a multifaceted etiology. Moreover, treatment strategies still lag far behind when compared to other pain modalities. The development of novel, effective, and specific therapeutics for the treatment of visceral pain has never been more pertinent.

  10. Stress-state effects on the stress-induced martensitic transformation of carburized 4320 steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, I.; Balzer, M.; Sehitoglu, Huseyin; Maier, H. J.

    1998-02-01

    The effect of different stress states on the stress-induced martensitic transformation of retained austenite was investigated in carburized 4320 steels with an initial retained austenite content of 15 pct. Experiments were conducted utilizing a specialized pressure rig and comparison between stress-strain behaviors of specimens with different austenitization and tempering histories was performed under these stress states. Experimental results indicated considerable asymmetry between tension and compression, with triaxial stress states resulting in the highest strength levels for the untempered material. Fine carbide precipitates due to low-temperature tempering increased the strength and ductility of the specimens and also changed the austenite-to-martensite transformation behavior. Numerical simulations of stress-strain behaviors under different stress states were obtained, with an existing micromechanical self-consistent framework utilizing the crystallographic theory of austenite/martensite transformation and the minimum complementary free-energy principle. The model was modified for carburized steels upon microstructural investigation and predicted the same trends in effective stress-effective strain behavior as observed experimentally.

  11. Neighborhood matters: divergent patterns of stress-induced plasticity across the brain.

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    Chattarji, Sumantra; Tomar, Anupratap; Suvrathan, Aparna; Ghosh, Supriya; Rahman, Mohammed Mostafizur

    2015-10-01

    The fact that exposure to severe stress leads to the development of psychiatric disorders serves as the basic rationale for animal models of stress disorders. Clinical and neuroimaging studies have shown that three brain areas involved in learning and memory--the hippocampus, amygdala and prefrontal cortex--undergo distinct structural and functional changes in individuals with stress disorders. These findings from patient studies pose several challenges for animal models of stress disorders. For instance, why does stress impair cognitive function, yet enhance fear and anxiety? Can the same stressful experience elicit contrasting patterns of plasticity in the hippocampus, amygdala and prefrontal cortex? How does even a brief exposure to traumatic stress lead to long-lasting behavioral abnormalities? Thus, animal models of stress disorders must not only capture the unique spatio-temporal features of structural and functional alterations in these brain areas, but must also provide insights into the underlying neuronal plasticity mechanisms. This Review will address some of these key questions by describing findings from animal models on how stress-induced plasticity varies across different brain regions and thereby gives rise to the debilitating emotional and cognitive symptoms of stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  12. Collectin-11 detects stress-induced L-fucose pattern to trigger renal epithelial injury.

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    Farrar, Conrad A; Tran, David; Li, Ke; Wu, Weiju; Peng, Qi; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Zhou, Wuding; Sacks, Steven H

    2016-05-02

    Physiochemical stress induces tissue injury as a result of the detection of abnormal molecular patterns by sensory molecules of the innate immune system. Here, we have described how the recently discovered C-type lectin collectin-11 (CL-11, also known as CL-K1 and encoded by COLEC11) recognizes an abnormal pattern of L-fucose on postischemic renal tubule cells and activates a destructive inflammatory response. We found that intrarenal expression of CL-11 rapidly increases in the postischemic period and colocalizes with complement deposited along the basolateral surface of the proximal renal tubule in association with L-fucose, the potential binding ligand for CL-11. Mice with either generalized or kidney-specific deficiency of CL-11 were strongly protected against loss of renal function and tubule injury due to reduced complement deposition. Ex vivo renal tubule cells showed a marked capacity for CL-11 binding that was induced by cell stress under hypoxic or hypothermic conditions and prevented by specific removal of L-fucose. Further analysis revealed that cell-bound CL-11 required the lectin complement pathway-associated protease MASP-2 to trigger complement deposition. Given these results, we conclude that lectin complement pathway activation triggered by ligand-CL-11 interaction in postischemic tissue is a potent source of acute kidney injury and is amenable to sugar-specific blockade.

  13. Differences in stress-induced changes in extinction and prefrontal plasticity in postweanling and adult animals.

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    Schayek, Rachel; Maroun, Mouna

    2015-08-01

    Postweaning is a critical developmental stage during which the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) undergoes major changes and the brain is vulnerable to the effects of stress. Surprisingly, the engagement of the mPFC in extinction of fear was reported to be identical in postweanling (PW) and adult animals. Here, we examined whether the effect of stress on extinction and mPFC plasticity would be similar in PW and adult animals. PW and adult animals were fear conditioned and exposed to the elevated platform stress paradigm, and extinction and long-term potentiation were examined. The dependency of stress-induced modulation of extinction and plasticity on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors was examined as well. We show that exposure to stress is associated with reduction of fear and enhanced induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in PW pups, in contrast to its effects in adult animals. Furthermore, we report opposite effects in the occlusion of LTP following the enhanced or impaired extinction in the two age groups and that the reversal of the effects of stress is independent of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation in PW animals. Our results show that qualitatively different mechanisms control the modulatory effects of stress on extinction and plasticity in postweanling pups compared with adult rats. Our results point to significant differences between young and adult brains, which may have potential implications for the treatment of anxiety and stress disorders across development. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  14. A large-scale perspective on stress-induced alterations in resting-state networks

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    Maron-Katz, Adi; Vaisvaser, Sharon; Lin, Tamar; Hendler, Talma; Shamir, Ron

    2016-02-01

    Stress is known to induce large-scale neural modulations. However, its neural effect once the stressor is removed and how it relates to subjective experience are not fully understood. Here we used a statistically sound data-driven approach to investigate alterations in large-scale resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) induced by acute social stress. We compared rsfMRI profiles of 57 healthy male subjects before and after stress induction. Using a parcellation-based univariate statistical analysis, we identified a large-scale rsFC change, involving 490 parcel-pairs. Aiming to characterize this change, we employed statistical enrichment analysis, identifying anatomic structures that were significantly interconnected by these pairs. This analysis revealed strengthening of thalamo-cortical connectivity and weakening of cross-hemispheral parieto-temporal connectivity. These alterations were further found to be associated with change in subjective stress reports. Integrating report-based information on stress sustainment 20 minutes post induction, revealed a single significant rsFC change between the right amygdala and the precuneus, which inversely correlated with the level of subjective recovery. Our study demonstrates the value of enrichment analysis for exploring large-scale network reorganization patterns, and provides new insight on stress-induced neural modulations and their relation to subjective experience.

  15. Blockade of Drp1 rescues oxidative stress-induced osteoblast dysfunction

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    Gan, Xueqi; Huang, Shengbin; Yu, Qing [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Higuchi Bioscience Center, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, 66047 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041 (China); Yu, Haiyang [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041 (China); Yan, Shirley ShiDu, E-mail: shidu@ku.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Higuchi Bioscience Center, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, 66047 (United States)

    2015-12-25

    Osteoblast dysfunction, induced by oxidative stress, plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of osteoporosis. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclarified. Imbalance of mitochondrial dynamics has been closely linked to oxidative stress. Here, we reveal an unexplored role of dynamic related protein 1(Drp1), the major regulator in mitochondrial fission, in the oxidative stress-induced osteoblast injury model. We demonstrate that levels of phosphorylation and expression of Drp1 significantly increased under oxidative stress. Blockade of Drp1, through pharmaceutical inhibitor or gene knockdown, significantly protected against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced osteoblast dysfunction, as shown by increased cell viability, improved cellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization and restored mitochondrial function. The protective effects of blocking Drp1 in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced osteoblast dysfunction were evidenced by increased mitochondrial function and suppressed production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These findings provide new insights into the role of the Drp1-dependent mitochondrial pathway in the pathology of osteoporosis, indicating that the Drp1 pathway may be targetable for the development of new therapeutic approaches in the prevention and the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress is an early pathological event in osteoporosis. • Imbalance of mitochondrial dynamics are linked to oxidative stress in osteoporosis. • The role of the Drp1-dependent mitochondrial pathway in osteoporosis.

  16. Oxidative stress induces apolipoprotein D overexpression in hippocampus during aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Eva; Navarro, Ana; Ordóñez, Cristina; Del Valle, Eva; Tolivia, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein D (Apo D) is a lipid binding protein whose expression is strongly induced in the mammalian brain during aging and age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), where it can play an important function as a neuroprotective and antioxidant protein. Increasing evidence suggests that the gradual increase in free radicals and oxidative stress with age is the primary determinant to aging brain. The aim of this work is to study the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in Apo D expression, in hippocampal cells, in order to investigate the relationship between oxidative stress and elevated levels of Apo D found in hippocampus during aging and AD and also elucidate the possible pathways that lead to this increase. In this study, we demonstrated that Apo D expression in hippocampal neurons of aged and AD brains directly correlates with age-related increase in oxidative stress. More importantly, our results in the HT22 cell line indicate that Apo D protein level increases in a concentration-dependent manner specifically at those H2O2 concentrations that caused oxidative damage and apoptotic cell death. These data support the idea that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis during aging and AD may be associated with the increment in the expression of Apo D in these situations.

  17. Formalin attenuates the stress-induced increase in plasma epinephrine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mravec, B; Bodnar, I; Uhereczky, G; Nagy, G M; Kvetnansky, R; Palkovits, M

    2005-11-01

    Subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of formalin into rats is frequently used as a painful stressor that produces a three-phase nociceptive response. We have shown previously that s.c. administered formalin (0.2 ml of 4% solution per 100 g body weight) unexpectedly attenuated the increase of plasma epinephrine levels in rats exposed to exteroceptive stressors (handling, immobilisation). To clarify the mechanism(s) responsible for this phenomenon, the effect of formalin applications on epinephrine plasma levels was investigated in various experimental conditions. Subcutaneous application of formalin combined with exposures of animals to an interoceptive stressor, insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, significantly attenuated the stress-induced increase in plasma epinephrine levels, whereas plasma norepinephrine levels remained highly elevated. Moreover, administration of formalin to unstressed animals also manifested signs of an attenuated epinephrine secretion. Interestingly, intraperitoneal administration of formalin did not reduce the elevated levels of plasma epinephrine. We suggest that formalin attenuates epinephrine secretion from the adrenal medulla most probably via irritation of s.c. somatosensory receptors. We hypothesise that the irritation of the primary sensory afferents fibres might reduce the activity of the sympathetic preganglionic neurones innervating adrenal medullary chromaffin cells. Further investigations are required to establish whether the observed reduction of epinephrine secretion from the adrenal medulla is controlled by either spinal or supraspinal neuronal circuits.

  18. An Elongin-Cullin-SOCS Box Complex Regulates Stress-Induced Serotonergic Neuromodulation

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    Xicotencatl Gracida

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuromodulatory cells transduce environmental information into long-lasting behavioral responses. However, the mechanisms governing how neuronal cells influence behavioral plasticity are difficult to characterize. Here, we adapted the translating ribosome affinity purification (TRAP approach in C. elegans to profile ribosome-associated mRNAs from three major tissues and the neuromodulatory dopaminergic and serotonergic cells. We identified elc-2, an Elongin C ortholog, specifically expressed in stress-sensing amphid neuron dual ciliated sensory ending (ADF serotonergic sensory neurons, and we found that it plays a role in mediating a long-lasting change in serotonin-dependent feeding behavior induced by heat stress. We demonstrate that ELC-2 and the von Hippel-Lindau protein VHL-1, components of an Elongin-Cullin-SOCS box (ECS E3 ubiquitin ligase, modulate this behavior after experiencing stress. Also, heat stress induces a transient redistribution of ELC-2, becoming more nuclearly enriched. Together, our results demonstrate dynamic regulation of an E3 ligase and a role for an ECS complex in neuromodulation and control of lasting behavioral states.

  19. Environmental Heat and Salt Stress Induce Transgenerational Phenotypic Changes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Léonie; Widmer, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Plants that can adapt their phenotype may be more likely to survive changing environmental conditions. Heritable epigenetic variation could provide a way to rapidly adapt to such changes. Here we tested whether environmental stress induces heritable, potentially adaptive phenotypic changes independent of genetic variation over few generations in Arabidopsis thaliana. We grew two accessions (Col-0, Sha-0) of A. thaliana for three generations under salt, heat and control conditions and tested for induced heritable phenotypic changes in the fourth generation (G4) and in reciprocal F1 hybrids generated in generation three. Using these crosses we further tested whether phenotypic changes were maternally or paternally transmitted. In generation five (G5), we assessed whether phenotypic effects persisted over two generations in the absence of stress. We found that exposure to heat stress in previous generations accelerated flowering under G4 control conditions in Sha-0, but heritable effects disappeared in G5 after two generations without stress exposure. Previous exposure to salt stress increased salt tolerance in one of two reciprocal F1 hybrids. Transgenerational effects were maternally and paternally inherited. Lacking genetic variability, maternal and paternal inheritance and reversibility of transgenerational effects together indicate that stress can induce heritable, potentially adaptive phenotypic changes, probably through epigenetic mechanisms. These effects were strongly dependent on plant genotype and may not be a general response to stress in A. thaliana. PMID:23585834

  20. Stress-induced DNA methylation changes and their heritability in asexual dandelions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Koen J F; Jansen, Jeroen J; van Dijk, Peter J; Biere, Arjen

    2010-03-01

    *DNA methylation can cause heritable phenotypic modifications in the absence of changes in DNA sequence. Environmental stresses can trigger methylation changes and this may have evolutionary consequences, even in the absence of sequence variation. However, it remains largely unknown to what extent environmentally induced methylation changes are transmitted to offspring, and whether observed methylation variation is truly independent or a downstream consequence of genetic variation between individuals. *Genetically identical apomictic dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) plants were exposed to different ecological stresses, and apomictic offspring were raised in a common unstressed environment. We used methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism markers to screen genome-wide methylation alterations triggered by stress treatments and to assess the heritability of induced changes. *Various stresses, most notably chemical induction of herbivore and pathogen defenses, triggered considerable methylation variation throughout the genome. Many modifications were faithfully transmitted to offspring. Stresses caused some epigenetic divergence between treatment and controls, but also increased epigenetic variation among plants within treatments. *These results show the following. First, stress-induced methylation changes are common and are mostly heritable. Second, sequence-independent, autonomous methylation variation is readily generated. This highlights the potential of epigenetic inheritance to play an independent role in evolutionary processes, which is superimposed on the system of genetic inheritance.

  1. Stress-induced cross-sensitization to amphetamine is related to changes in the dopaminergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Fábio C; Marin, Marcelo Tadeu; Leão, Rodrigo Molini; Planeta, Cleopatra S

    2012-04-01

    Repeated stress engenders behavioral sensitization. The mesolimbic dopamine system is critically involved in drug-induced behavioral sensitization. In the present study we examined the differences between adolescent and adult rats in stress-induced behavioral sensitization to amphetamine and changes in dopamine (DA) and its metabolite levels in the mesolimbic system. Adolescent or adult rats were restrained for 2 h, once a day, for 7 days. Three days after the last exposure to stress, the animals were challenged with saline or amphetamine (1.0 mg/kg i.p.) and amphetamine-induced locomotion was recorded for 40 min. Immediately after the behavioral tests, rats were decapitated and the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), ventral tegmental area (VTA) and amygdala (AM) were removed to measure tissue levels of DA and its metabolites by HPLC. Exposure to repeated restraint stress promoted behavioral sensitization to amphetamine in both adult and adolescent rats. In adult rats, amphetamine administration increased DA levels in both the stress and control groups in the NAcc and VTA. In adolescent rats, amphetamine increased DA levels in the NAcc in rats exposed to stress. Furthermore, in the AM of adolescent rats in the control group, amphetamine increased the DA levels; however, amphetamine reduced this neurotransmitter in the rats that were exposed to stress. No alteration was observed in the dopamine metabolite levels. Therefore, stress promoted behavioral sensitization to amphetamine and this may be related to changes in DA levels in the mesolimbic system. These changes appear to be dependent on ontogeny.

  2. Catecholamines and estrogen are involved in the pathogenesis of emotional stress-induced acute heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueyama, Takashi; Kasamatsu, Ken; Hano, Takuzo; Tsuruo, Yoshihiro; Ishikura, Fuminobu

    2008-12-01

    Emotional stress triggers takotsubo cardiomyopathy in postmenopausal women. Clinical analysis of autonomic nervous function has revealed a transient increase of sympathetic nervous activity and decrease of vagal nervous activity. Immobilization (IMO) stress of rats can reproduce the electrocardiographic and left ventriculographic changes that occur in takotsubo cardiomyopathy, both of which are prevented by combined blockade of alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors. Estrogen supplementation partially attenuated these cardiac changes. It also attenuated the IMO-induced increase of c-Fos immunoreactivity, or c-fos mRNA expression in the lateral septum, medial amygdaloid nucleus, paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, and locus ceruleus; these regions contain central sympathetic neurons and neurons with immunoreactive estrogen receptors. It also downregulated c-fos mRNA expression in the adrenal gland and the heart, suggesting an increase of estrogen attenuated the stress-induced hypothalamo-sympathoadrenal outflow from the central nervous system to the target organs. Estrogen treatment also upregulated the levels of cardioprotective substances, such as atrial natriuretic peptide and heat shock protein 70, in the heart. These data suggest that reduction of estrogen levels following menopause might be involved in the primary cause of takotsubo cardiomyopathy both by indirect action on the nervous system and by direct action on the heart.

  3. JNK interaction with Sab mediates ER stress induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, S; Than, T A; Fernandez-Checa, J C; Kaplowitz, N

    2014-01-09

    Our aim was to better understand the mechanism and importance of sustained c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and effects of ER stress on mitochondria by determining the role of mitochondrial JNK binding protein, Sab. Tunicamycin or brefeldin A induced a rapid and marked decline in basal mitochondrial respiration and reserve-capacity followed by delayed mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Knockdown of mitochondrial Sab prevented ER stress-induced sustained JNK activation, impaired respiration, and apoptosis, but did not alter the magnitude or time course of activation of ER stress pathways. P-JNK plus adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) added to isolated liver mitochondria promoted superoxide production, which was amplified by addition of calcium and inhibited by a blocking peptide corresponding to the JNK binding site on Sab (KIM1). This peptide also blocked tunicamycin-induced inhibition of cellular respiration. In conclusion, ER stress triggers an interaction of JNK with mitochondrial Sab, which leads to impaired respiration and increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, sustaining JNK activation culminating in apoptosis.

  4. Evaluation of Stress-Inducing Factors of Educational Environment in Hamadan Dentistry School’s Students

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    M. Dalband

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction & Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate stressor factors of educational environment in Hamadan dental school’s students in year 2002.Materials & Methods: The study design was descriptive, cross-sectional and it was accomplished using a questionnaire which was taken from DES (dental environment stress questionnaire. According to restricted number of statistical population all members of population (154 students were evaluated as samples and this study was a survey one. Results: The results of this study indicated that most stressfull factors in dental students has been related to class work with mean score 3.18±0.83 and faculty-student relationship with mean score 3.05±0.83. Female students showed more total stress than male students (2.73 vs. 2.44. The fourth-year students had the most stress rate in all students of different years (3.05 and preclinical and clinical factors were the most stress-inducing factors of these students (3.63.Conclusion: It is concluded that the environment of Hamadan dental school and the process of education in the field of dentistry is potentially stressful. Also there is a reverse relationship between level of stress in students and their academic efficiencies.

  5. Hyperosmotic Stress Induces Tau Proteolysis by Caspase-3 Activation in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera-Santa Catalina, Marta; Caballero-Bermejo, Montaña; Argent, Ricardo; Alonso, Juan C; Cuenda, Ana; Lorenzo, María J; Centeno, Francisco

    2016-12-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and other related tauopathies. In this subset of neurodegenerative disorders, Tau auto-assembles into insoluble fibrils that accumulate in neurons as paired helical filaments (PHFs), promoting cellular dysfunction and cytotoxic effects. Growing evidence suggests that abnormal post-translational regulation, mainly hyperphosphorylation and aberrant cleavage, drives Tau to this pathological state. In this work we show that sorbitol-induced hyperosmotic stress promotes Tau proteolysis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The appearance of cleaved Tau was preceded by the activation of μ-calpain, the proteasome system and caspase-3. Tau proteolysis was completely prevented by caspase-3 inhibition but unaffected by neither the proteasome system nor μ-calpain activity blockade. Concomitantly, hyperosmotic stress induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells, which was efficiently avoided by the inhibition of caspase-3 activity. Altogether, our results provide the first evidence that Tau protein is susceptible to caspase-3 proteolysis under hyperosmotic stress and suggest a positive relationship between Tau proteolysis and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2781-2790, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Stress-induced decreases in local cerebral glucose utilization in specific regions of the mouse brain

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    Warnock Geoff I

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restraint stress in rodents has been reported to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis and to increase c-fos expression in regions that express components of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF system. We have previously reported that acute central administration of CRF increased a measure of relative local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU, a measure of neuronal activity in specific brain regions, and activated the HPA axis in mice. It was hypothesized that the involvement of the CRF system in the stress response would lead to similar changes in relative LCGU after restraint stress. In the present studies the effect of restraint stress on relative LCGU and on the HPA axis in C57BL/6N mice were examined. Findings Restraint stress activated the HPA axis in a restraint-duration dependent manner, but in contrast to the reported effects of CRF, significantly decreased relative LCGU in frontal cortical, thalamic, hippocampal and temporal dissected regions. These findings support evidence that stressors enforcing limited physical activity reduce relative LCGU, in contrast to high activity stressors such as swim stress. Conclusions In conclusion, the present studies do not support the hypothesis that stress-induced changes in relative LCGU are largely mediated by the CRF system. Further studies will help to delineate the role of the CRF system in the early phases of the relative LCGU response to stress and investigate the role of other neurotransmitter systems in this response.

  7. Stress-induced decreases in local cerebral glucose utilization in specific regions of the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Geoff I; Steckler, Thomas

    2011-03-31

    Restraint stress in rodents has been reported to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and to increase c-fos expression in regions that express components of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system. We have previously reported that acute central administration of CRF increased a measure of relative local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU), a measure of neuronal activity in specific brain regions, and activated the HPA axis in mice. It was hypothesized that the involvement of the CRF system in the stress response would lead to similar changes in relative LCGU after restraint stress. In the present studies the effect of restraint stress on relative LCGU and on the HPA axis in C57BL/6N mice were examined. Restraint stress activated the HPA axis in a restraint-duration dependent manner, but in contrast to the reported effects of CRF, significantly decreased relative LCGU in frontal cortical, thalamic, hippocampal and temporal dissected regions. These findings support evidence that stressors enforcing limited physical activity reduce relative LCGU, in contrast to high activity stressors such as swim stress. In conclusion, the present studies do not support the hypothesis that stress-induced changes in relative LCGU are largely mediated by the CRF system. Further studies will help to delineate the role of the CRF system in the early phases of the relative LCGU response to stress and investigate the role of other neurotransmitter systems in this response.

  8. Lithium modulates the chronic stress-induced effect on blood glucose level of male rats

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    Popović Nataša

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we examined gross changes in the mass of whole adrenal glands and that of the adrenal cortex, as well as the serum corticosterone and glucose level of mature male Wistar rats subjected to three different treatments: animals subjected to chronic restraint-stress, animals injected with lithium (Li and chronically stressed rats treated with Li. Under all three conditions we observed hypertrophy of whole adrenals, as well as the adrenal cortices. Chronic restraint stress, solely or in combination with Li treatment, significantly elevated the corticosterone level, but did not change the blood glucose level. Animals treated only with Li exhibited an elevated serum corticosterone level and blood glucose level. The aim of our study was to investigate the modulation of the chronic stress-induced effect on the blood glucose level by lithium, as a possible mechanism of avoiding the damage caused by chronic stress. Our results showed that lithium is an agent of choice which may help to reduce stress-elevated corticosterone and replenish exhausted glucose storages in an organism.

  9. Fish can show emotional fever: stress-induced hyperthermia in zebrafish.

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    Rey, Sonia; Huntingford, Felicity A; Boltaña, Sebastian; Vargas, Reynaldo; Knowles, Toby G; Mackenzie, Simon

    2015-11-22

    Whether fishes are sentient beings remains an unresolved and controversial question. Among characteristics thought to reflect a low level of sentience in fishes is an inability to show stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH), a transient rise in body temperature shown in response to a variety of stressors. This is a real fever response, so is often referred to as 'emotional fever'. It has been suggested that the capacity for emotional fever evolved only in amniotes (mammals, birds and reptiles), in association with the evolution of consciousness in these groups. According to this view, lack of emotional fever in fishes reflects a lack of consciousness. We report here on a study in which six zebrafish groups with access to a temperature gradient were either left as undisturbed controls or subjected to a short period of confinement. The results were striking: compared to controls, stressed zebrafish spent significantly more time at higher temperatures, achieving an estimated rise in body temperature of about 2-4°C. Thus, zebrafish clearly have the capacity to show emotional fever. While the link between emotion and consciousness is still debated, this finding removes a key argument for lack of consciousness in fishes. © 2015 The Authors.

  10. Molecular mechanism of emotional stress-induced and catecholamine-induced heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueyama, Takashi; Senba, Emiko; Kasamatsu, Ken; Hano, Takuzo; Yamamoto, Katsuhiro; Nishio, Ichiro; Tsuruo, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2003-01-01

    Emotional or physical stress triggers 'tako-tsubo' cardiomyopathy or 'transient left ventricular apical ballooning', but the pathogenesis is unclear. In response to the immobilization stress of rats, a useful model of emotional stress, rapid activation of p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase was observed in the heart, followed by a transient upregulation of immediate early genes in the smooth muscle cells of coronary arteries, the endothelial cells and the myocardium. Heat shock protein 70 was induced in the aortic and coronary arterial smooth muscle cells and in the myocardium. Natriuretic peptide genes were also upregulated in the myocardium. Sequential gene expression can be considered as an adaptive response to emotional stress. Blocking of both alpha-adrenoceptors and beta-adrenoceptors eliminated the upregulation of immediate early genes induced by stress, while alpha-agonists and beta-agonists upregulated immediate early genes in the perfused heart. Activation of alpha-adrenoceptors and beta-adrenoceptors is the primary trigger of emotional stress-induced molecular changes in the heart.

  11. Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with POLG-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formichi, Patrizia; Radi, Elena; Branca, Chiara; Battisti, Carla; Brunetti, Jlenia; Da Pozzo, Paola; Giannini, Fabio; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Bracci, Luisa; Federico, Antonio

    2016-09-15

    POLG-related disorders are a group of heterogeneous diseases characterized by an overlapping clinical presentations and associated with mutations in the POLG gene. POLG codes for the catalytic subunit of mitochondrial polymerase gamma (POLG), essential for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and repair. Studies on mutator POLG mice showed an increase in oxidative stress and apoptosis. In this regard we analysed the involvement of POLG mutations in the apoptotic regulation, evaluating apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from patients with POLG-related diseases. Cells were cultured under basal conditions and with 2-deoxy-d-ribose (dRib), a reducing sugar that induces apoptosis by oxidative stress. Apoptosis rate was assessed by flow cytometry. Phosphatidylserine translocation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and caspase 3 activation were also analysed. Our data showed higher percentages of apoptosis after dRib treatment in patients with POLG mutations than in controls, while under basal culture conditions, apoptosis levels were similar in the two groups. Cells with POLG mutations are more sensitive than control cells to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, confirming that mtDNA mutations may have a role in mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. We also suggest that redox state homeostasis may play a crucial role in phenotypic expression of POLG-related diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Binary Stress Induces an Increase in Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus

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    Wei eZhu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus is an important medicinal plant, which produces a variety of indole alkaloids of significant pharmaceutical relevance. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the potential stress-induced increase of indole alkaloid biosynthesis in C. roseus using proteomic technique. The contents of the detectable alkaloids ajmalicine, vindoline, catharanthine, and strictosidine in C. roseus were significantly increased under binary stress. Proteomic analysis revealed that the abundance of proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle and cell wall was largely increased; while, that of proteins related to tetrapyrrole synthesis and photosynthesis was decreased. Of note, 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of indole alkaloid was two-fold more abundant in treated group compared to that in control. In addition, mRNA expression levels of genes involved in the indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathway indicated an up-regulation in their transcription in C. roseus under UV-B irradiation. These results suggest that binary stress might negatively affect the process of photosynthesis in C. roseus. In addition, the induction of alkaloid biosynthesis appears to be responsive to binary stress.

  13. Binary stress induces an increase in indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Yang, Bingxian; Komatsu, Setsuko; Lu, Xiaoping; Li, Ximin; Tian, Jingkui

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus is an important medicinal plant, which produces a variety of indole alkaloids of significant pharmaceutical relevance. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the potential stress-induced increase of indole alkaloid biosynthesis in C. roseus using proteomic technique. The contents of the detectable alkaloids ajmalicine, vindoline, catharanthine, and strictosidine in C. roseus were significantly increased under binary stress. Proteomic analysis revealed that the abundance of proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle and cell wall was largely increased; while, that of proteins related to tetrapyrrole synthesis and photosynthesis was decreased. Of note, 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of indole alkaloid was two-fold more abundant in treated group compared to the control. In addition, mRNA expression levels of genes involved in the indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathway indicated an up-regulation in their transcription in C. roseus under UV-B irradiation. These results suggest that binary stress might negatively affect the process of photosynthesis in C. roseus. In addition, the induction of alkaloid biosynthesis appears to be responsive to binary stress. PMID:26284098

  14. Role of dopamine D2 receptors in plasticity of stress-induced addictive behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Hye-Ri; Choi, Tae-Yong; Lee, Hyo Jin; Kang, Eun Young; Yoon, Sehyoun; Han, Pyung-Lim; Choi, Se-Young; Baik, Ja-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Dopaminergic systems are implicated in stress-related behaviour. Here we investigate behavioural responses to chronic stress in dopamine D2 receptor knockout mice and find that anxiety-like behaviours are increased compared with wild-type mice. Repeated stress exposure suppresses cocaine-induced behavioural sensitization, cocaine-seeking and relapse behaviours in dopamine D2 receptor knockout mice. Cocaine challenge after drug withdrawal in cocaine-experienced wild-type or dopamine D2 receptor knockout mice is associated with inhibition of long-term depression in the nucleus accumbens, and chronic stress during withdrawal prevents inhibition after cocaine challenge in cocaine-experienced dopamine D2 receptor knockout mice, but not in wild-type mice. Lentiviral-induced knockdown of dopamine D2 receptors in the nucleus accumbens of wild-type mice does not affect basal locomotor activity, but confers stress-induced inhibition of the expression of cocaine-induced behavioural sensitization. Stressed mice depleted of dopamine D2 receptors do not manifest long-term depression inhibition. Our results suggest that dopamine D2 receptors have roles in regulating synaptic modification triggered by stress and drug addiction.

  15. The effects of psychological stress on humans: increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and a Th1-like response in stress-induced anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, M; Song, C; Lin, A; De Jongh, R; Van Gastel, A; Kenis, G; Bosmans, E; De Meester, I; Benoy, I; Neels, H; Demedts, P; Janca, A; Scharpé, S; Smith, R S

    1998-04-01

    There is some evidence that, in humans and experimental animals, psychological stress may suppress or enhance immune functions, depending on the nature of the stressor and the immune variables under consideration. The possibility that psychological stress may affect the production of pro-inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines was investigated in 38 medical students, who had blood samplings a few weeks before and after as well as one day before an academic examination. Psychological stress significantly increased the stimulated production of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-10. Students with high stress perception during the stressful condition had a significantly higher production of TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1Ra and IFN-gamma than students with a low-stress perception. Students with a high anxiety response had a significantly higher production of IFN-gamma and a lower production of the negative immunoregulatory cytokines, IL-10 and IL-4, than students without anxiety. These findings suggest that, in humans, changes in the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IFN-gamma, and negative immunoregulatory cytokines, IL-10 and IL-4, take part in the homeostatic responses to psychological stress and that stress-induced anxiety is related to a T-helper-1-like response.

  16. Elevated dietary intake of L-tryptophan counteracts the stress-induced elevation of plasma cortisol in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, Olivier; Tottmar, Olof; Winberg, Svante

    2002-12-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout were isolated in individual compartments and allowed to acclimate for 1 week, during which they were fed commercial trout pellets. The feed was then replaced by pelleted feed supplemented with L-tryptophan (TRP) at two, four or eight times the concentration in the commercial feed. Fish were fed these supplemented feeds daily to satiety for 1 week, after which half of the fish were stressed, by lowering the water level for 2 h, while the remaining fish were left undisturbed. In undisturbed fish, supplementary dietary TRP resulted in slightly elevated plasma cortisol levels. In response to the stress, fish that had been fed control feed showed elevated plasma cortisol levels, but fish fed the TRP-supplemented feed displayed a significant reduction in this stress-induced elevation of plasma cortisol levels. Plasma and brain TRP levels were elevated in fish fed TRP-supplemented feed. TRP is the precursor of the monoamine neurotransmitter serotonin. Brain serotonergic activity was elevated by stress and also tended to be increased by elevated dietary TRP intake. The central serotonergic system is involved in the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal axis, the action of serotonin being to stimulate or inhibit this neuroendocrine axis through different projections.

  17. Birkhoff normalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, H.; Hoveijn, I.; Lunter, G.; Vegter, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Birkhoff normal form procedure is a widely used tool for approximating a Hamiltonian systems by a simpler one. This chapter starts out with an introduction to Hamiltonian mechanics, followed by an explanation of the Birkhoff normal form procedure. Finally we discuss several algorithms for

  18. Oxidative stress induced by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase modulates the enzyme's performance in gene immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaguliants, Maria; Smirnova, Olga; Ivanov, Alexander V; Kilpelainen, Athina; Kuzmenko, Yulia; Petkov, Stefan; Latanova, Anastasia; Krotova, Olga; Engström, Gunnel; Karpov, Vadim; Kochetkov, Sergey; Wahren, Britta; Starodubova, Elizaveta

    2013-10-01

    HIV-1 infection induces chronic oxidative stress. The resultant neurotoxicity has been associated with Tat protein. Here, we for the first time describe the induction of oxidative stress by another HIV-1 protein, reverse transcriptase (RT). Expression of HIV-1 RT in human embryonic kidney cells generated potent production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), detected by the fluorescence-based probes. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that expression of RT in HEK293 cells induced a 10- to 15-fold increased transcription of the phase II detoxifying enzymes human quinone oxidoreductase (Nqo1) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), indicating the induction of oxidative stress response. The capacity to induce oxidative stress and stress response appeared to be an intrinsic property of a vast variety of RTs: enzymatically active and inactivated, bearing mutations of drug resistance, following different routes of processing and presentation, expressed from viral or synthetic expression-optimized genes. The total ROS production induced by RT genes of the viral origin was found to be lower than that induced by the synthetic/expression-optimized or chimeric RT genes. However, the viral RT genes induced higher levels of ROS production and higher levels of HO-1 mRNA than the synthetic genes per unit of protein in the expressing cell. The capacity of RT genes to induce the oxidative stress and stress response was then correlated with their immunogenic performance. For this, RT genes were administered into BALB/c mice by intradermal injections followed by electroporation. Splenocytes of immunized mice were stimulated with the RT-derived and control antigens and antigen-specific proliferation was assessed by IFN-γ/IL-2 Fluorospot. RT variants generating high total ROS levels induced significantly stronger IFN-γ responses than the variants inducing lower total ROS, while high levels of ROS normalized per unit of protein in expressing cell were associated with a weak IFN-γ response. Poor

  19. PreImplantation Factor (PIF*) Regulates Stress-Induced Adrenal Steroidogenesis and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines: Potential Application for Bioartificial Adrenal Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balyura, Mariya; Gelfgat, Evgeny; Ullmann, Enrico; Ludwig, Barbara; Barnea, Eytan R; Bornstein, Stefan R

    2017-10-24

    The main treatment algorithm for adrenal insufficiency is hormonal replacement, however, inadequate hormone substitution often leads to severe side effects. Adrenal cell transplantation could be a more effective alternative but would require life-long immune suppressive therapy. PreImplantation Factor (PIF) is an endogenous peptide secreted by viable human embryos that leads to maternal tolerance without immunosuppression. PIF could be effective for xenogeneic cell transplantation such as of bovine adrenocortical cells (BAC), which are used for bioartificial adrenal gland development that may more effectively restore complex adrenal functions. We report here that PIF exerts a dual regulatory effect on BAC by targeting mostly hyper-activated cells to specifically reduce adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-stimulated cortisol secretion. Reverse transcription real time PCR analysis revealed that PIF modulates the expression of two genes in the cortisol synthesis pathway, Steroidogenic Factor 1 (SF1), an activator of steroidogenesis, and the downstream steroidogenic enzyme Cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1). PIF increased basal expression of SF1 and CYP17A1 regardless of the activation level of the adrenocortical cells. In contrast, following ACTH stimulation, PIF reduced SF1 expression and induced expression of the immune suppressing anti-inflammatory cytokine IL10 only in the hyper-activated cells, suggesting both a protective and immune tolerant function. In conclusion, PIF regulates stress-induced adrenal steroidogenesis and immune tolerance in BAC, supporting a potential clinical application to reduce rejection by the host's immune response following xenotransplantation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Low-level laser therapy suppresses the oxidative stress-induced glucocorticoids resistance in U937 cells: relevance to cytokine secretion and histone deacetylase in alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, N H C; Marcondes, P T; Albertini, R; Mesquita-Ferrari, R A; Fernandes, K P S; Aimbire, F

    2014-01-05

    Oxidative stress is present in severe asthma and contributes to the low response to corticoids through the downregulation of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and the increase of cytokines. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been proven to be an anti-inflammatory. Thus, we investigated the laser effect on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine secretion and HDAC activity in U937 cells under oxidative stress. U937 cells activated with oxidative stress were treated with dexamethasone (dexa) or laser. Cytokines and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) were measured by ELISA whilst the HDAC was detected through colorimetric assay. LPS activated- U937 cells cytokines secretion increased with H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) as well as with TSA (trichostatin). The HDAC activity in activated U937 cells was decreased. LLLT and dexa inhibited the LPS-stimulated U937 cells cytokines, but dexa effect disappeared with H2O2. With TSA, the LLLT was less effective on H2O2/LPS stimulated- U937 cells cytokines. Dexa failed on H2O2/LPS- induced HDAC, while LLLT restored the HDAC and the dexa effect. LLLT plus prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and potentiated the laser action on oxidative stress-induced cytokine. LLLT reduced the PI3K and its effects on cytokine and HDAC was suppressed with LY294002. In situations of corticoid resistance, LLLT acts decreasing the cytokines and HDAC through the activation of the protein kinase A via the inhibition of PI3K. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Skeletal muscle PGC-1α1 modulates kynurenine metabolism and mediates resilience to stress-induced depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agudelo, Leandro Z; Femenía, Teresa; Orhan, Funda

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a debilitating condition with a profound impact on quality of life for millions of people worldwide. Physical exercise is used as a treatment strategy for many patients, but the mechanisms that underlie its beneficial effects remain unknown. Here, we describe a mechanism by which...... skeletal muscle PGC-1α1 induced by exercise training changes kynurenine metabolism and protects from stress-induced depression. Activation of the PGC-1α1-PPARα/δ pathway increases skeletal muscle expression of kynurenine aminotransferases, thus enhancing the conversion of kynurenine into kynurenic acid......, a metabolite unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Reducing plasma kynurenine protects the brain from stress-induced changes associated with depression and renders skeletal muscle-specific PGC-1α1 transgenic mice resistant to depression induced by chronic mild stress or direct kynurenine administration...

  2. Ursolic acid protects monocytes against metabolic stress-induced priming and dysfunction by preventing the induction of Nox4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Ullevig

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: UA protects THP-1 monocytes against dysfunction by suppressing metabolic stress-induced Nox4 expression, thereby preventing the Nox4-dependent dysregulation of redox-sensitive processes, including actin turnover and MAPK-signaling, two key processes that control monocyte migration and adhesion. This study provides a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory and athero- and renoprotective properties of UA and suggests that dysfunctional blood monocytes may be primary targets of UA and related compounds.

  3. Effects of Red Wine Tannat on Oxidative Stress Induced by Glucose and Fructose in Erythrocytes in Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Pazzini, Camila Eliza Fernandes; Colpo, Ana Ceolin; Poetini, M?rcia R?sula; Pires, Cau? Ferreira; de Camargo, Vanessa Brum; Mendez, Andreas Sebastian Loureiro; Azevedo, Miriane Lucas; Soares, J?lio C?sar Mendes; Folmer, Vanderlei

    2015-01-01

    The literature indicates that red wine presents in its composition several substances that are beneficial to health. This study has investigated the antioxidant effects of Tannat red wine on oxidative stress induced by glucose and fructose in erythrocytes in vitro, with the purpose to determine some of its majoritarian phenolic compounds and its antioxidant capacity. Erythrocytes were incubated using different concentrations of glucose and fructose in the presence or absence of wine. From the...

  4. Chronic noise stress-induced alterations of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid and their metabolism in the rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Amajad Iqbal Kazi; Anna Oommen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress induces neurochemical changes that include neurotransmitter imbalance in the brain. Noise is an environmental factor inducing stress. Chronic noise stress affects monoamine neurotransmitter systems in the central nervous system. The effect on other excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is not known. The aim was to study the role of chronic noise stress on the glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic systems of the brain. Female Wistar rats (155 ± 5 g) ...

  5. Stress induced a shift from dorsal hippocampus to prefrontal cortex-dependent memory retrieval: role of regional corticosterone.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaelle eDominguez; Pierre eFaucher; Nadia eHenkous; Ali eKrazem; Christophe ePierard; Daniel eBeracochea

    2014-01-01

    Most of the deleterious effects of stress on memory retrieval are due to a dysfunction of the hippocampo-prefrontal cortex interplay. The role of the stress-induced regional corticosterone increase in such dysfunction remains however unclear, since there is no published study as yet dedicated to measuring corticosterone concentrations simultaneously in both the prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the hippocampus (dHPC) in relation with memory impairments. To that aim, we first showed in Experiment 1...

  6. Theoretical and experimental evaluation of effective stress-induced sorption capacity change and its influence on coal permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengwu; Dong, Lihui; Xu, Xiaomeng; Hu, Po; Tian, Jianwei; Zhang, Yihuai; Yang, Leilei

    2017-06-01

    The gas sorption effect is an important factor affecting the gas permeability of a coal seam, which has been proved in many previous experimental measurements and analytical permeability studies. However, the sorption capacity of coal is usually not static due to the complexity of external stress variation and internal gas media features. The stress-induced sorption capacity variation and its effect on the coal permeability change have not been fully identified yet. Thus, in this paper we present a preliminary evaluation of the stress-induced sorption capacity change by introducing the adsorption capacity modified term, and an experiment is carried out to verify the influence of the altered effective stress on coal permeability. Langmuir-like adsorption deformation constant parameters were combined into the modified coal permeability model and were given values to fully estimate the influence on permeability caused by the modification term. We found that different change modes of effective stress would yield different change effects on the permeability, that is, with the same effective stress change amount, the altered external stress-induced change had less influence than the altered-pore pressure-induced change; however, both modes demonstrated that the model taking sorption capacity change into consideration is more consistent with the experimental data. The effect of sorption capacity change on coal permeability variation was also found to be tightly connected with the physical and mechanical properties of the coal itself. It is proved that considering stress-induced sorption ability change has a critical role in characterizing the permeability variation of coal.

  7. The obesity-induced transcriptional regulator TRIP-Br2 mediates visceral fat endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang, Guifen; Kong, Hyerim Whang; Fang, Difeng; McCann, Maximilian; Yang, Xiuying; Du, Guanhua; Bl?her, Matthias; Zhu, Jinfang; Liew, Chong Wee

    2016-01-01

    The intimate link between location of fat accumulation and metabolic disease risk and depot-specific differences is well established, but how these differences between depots are regulated at the molecular level remains largely unclear. Here we show that TRIP-Br2 mediates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced inflammatory responses in visceral fat. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we demonstrate that obesity-induced circulating factors upregulate TRIP-Br2 specifically in vi...

  8. Regional Stress-Induced Ischemia in Non-fibrotic Hypertrophied Myocardium in Young HCM Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, Robert; Fernlund, Eva; Aletras, Anthony H; Engblom, Henrik; Heiberg, Einar; Liuba, Petru; Arheden, Håkan; Carlsson, Marcus

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between hypertrophy, perfusion abnormalities and fibrosis is unknown in young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Since mounting evidence suggests causal relationship between myocardial ischemia and major adverse cardiac events, we sought to investigate whether (1) regional myocardial perfusion is decreased in young HCM patients and in individuals at risk of HCM, and (2) hypoperfused areas are larger than areas with fibrosis. HCM patients (n = 12), HCM-risk subjects (n = 15) and controls (n = 9) were imaged on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Myocardial hypertrophy was assessed on cine images. Perfusion images were acquired during adenosine hyperemia and at rest. Maximum upslope ratios of perfusion (stress/rest) were used for semiquantitative analysis. Fibrosis was assessed by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Results are presented as median and range. Perfusion in HCM-risk subjects and in non-hypertrophied segments in HCM patients showed no difference compared to controls (P = ns). Hypertrophic segments in HCM patients without LGE showed decreased perfusion compared to segments without hypertrophy [1.5 (1.1-2.3) vs. 2.0 (1.8-2.6), P myocardium in HCM patients during adenosine exceeded the extent of fibrosis on LGE [20 (0-48) vs. 4 (0-7) % slice area, P myocardium and is lowest in fibrotic myocardium in young HCM patients but does not discriminate HCM-risk subjects from controls. The stress-induced hypoperfused regions exceed regions with LGE, indicating that hypoperfusion precedes fibrosis and may be a more sensitive marker of diseased myocardium in HCM.

  9. Multiple cis-elements mediate shear stress-induced gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyy, J Y; Li, Y S; Lin, M C; Chen, W; Yuan, S; Usami, S; Chien, S

    1995-12-01

    Fluid shear stress activates the expression of immediate early (IE) genes in vascular endothelial cells. The transcriptional regulation can be mediated through the shear stress-sensitive cis-acting elements at the 5' promoter regions of various IE genes such as the monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) gene. We linked wild-type and mutated MCP-1 promoters to the reporter gene luciferase and used such constructs to investigate the role of the phorbol ester TPA responsive element (TRE) in the shear-induced MCP-1 gene expression in vascular endothelial cells. Functional analysis showed that TGACTCC (a divergent TRE) located at nt -54 to -60 is necessary for shear-inducibility in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). The induction of the wild-type MCP-1 promoter construct by shear stress was attenuated by pretreating the cells with 1 microM dexamethasone or 1 microM retinoic acid 12 h before the shear stress experiments. The induction by shear stress reduced from 13-fold in the untreated cells to 7- and 3-folds in the dexamethasone- and retinoic acid-treated cells, respectively. These results demonstrate that the glucocorticoid receptor and retinoic acid receptor may interfere with the shear stress-activated AP-1/TRE. The reporter activity of HIV(LTR), which is a plasmid construct of the long terminal repeats of the human immunodeficiency virus and contains a kappa B enhancer element, was also activated by shear stress. The results of our investigations indicate that the shear stress-induced IE gene expression can be mediated through multiple cis-elements.

  10. Disulfide stress-induced aluminium toxicity: molecular insights through genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tun, Nay M; O'Doherty, Patrick J; Perrone, Gabriel G; Bailey, Trevor D; Kersaitis, Cindy; Wu, Ming J

    2013-08-01

    Formation of non-native disulfide bonds within or between proteins can lead to protein misfolding and disruption to cellular metabolism. Such a process is defined as disulfide stress. A marked effect of disulfide stress in cells is the elevated accumulation of the intracellular aluminium ion (Al(3+)) accompanied by increased cytotoxicity. To gain an in-depth understanding of the underlying molecular mechanism for disulfide stress-induced aluminium toxicity, the complete set of Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion mutants (5047) was screened in this study simultaneously with a combination of the two stressors, diamide and Al(3+). The combined treatment of a benign concentration of diamide (0.8 mM) with a sublethal concentration of aluminium sulfate (0.4 mM) revealed 494 sensitive deletion mutants, distinct from those found when either of the single stressors (0.8 mM diamide or 0.4 mM aluminium sulfate) was used. Hierarchical clustering and functional analyses of the 494 mutants sensitive to the dual stressors indicated a significant enrichment in the genes involved in cell wall homeostasis, signaling cascades, secretory transport machinery and detoxification. The results highlight the process of maintaining cell wall integrity as the central response to the combined exposure of diamide and Al(3+), which is mediated by the signaling pathways and transcription activation via Rlm1p and Swi6p for biosynthesis of the essential cell wall components such as glucan and chitin. Sensitivity of mutants associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER), vesicle and vacuole functions demonstrates that secretory machinery is essential for surviving the stress conditions, probably due to their roles in transporting polysaccharides to the cell wall and detoxification of accumulated Al(3+). Finally, the phenotype of 100 previously uncharacterized genes against the dual stressors will contribute to their eventual functional annotation.

  11. Designing And Calculating The Stresses Induced In Scissors Jack For Three Different Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaideep Chitransh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A Scissor Jack is a mechanical device used to lift a heavy vehicle from the ground for changing the wheel and for maintenance purpose. The most important fact of a jack is that it gives the user a mechanical advantage by changing the rotational motion into linear motion and allowing user to lift a heavy car to the require height. In this work we have designed different components of scissors jack using CAE tools i.e. CATIA andCalculate stresses induced in its different part which are responsible for failure and To Reduce its cost so that everyone can afford this. We have taken reference of Mahindra Bolero Scissors Jack. The Dimensions of scissors jack was measured by Vernier caliper. By measuring all the dimensions of components of scissors jack we have designed it in CATIA after that we assemble all the components of Jack to shape a model of scissors jack and calculated different parameters Max. shear stress Max. principal Tensile Stress Total torque required to lift the vehicle etc which is used in all components of scissors jack to avoid failure. To reduce the cost of jack we have taken two different sections of three different materials i.e. Mild Steel AISI 1045 grade Steel GS-52.3 Cast Steel and comparing which will be suited for above mentioned purpose. By using these materials we have calculate and compare the Strength to weight ratio and find which material is best suited for high load carrying capacity with minimum failure or deformation.

  12. Seagrass proliferation precedes mortality during hypo-salinity events: a stress-induced morphometric response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine J Collier

    Full Text Available Halophytes, such as seagrasses, predominantly form habitats in coastal and estuarine areas. These habitats can be seasonally exposed to hypo-salinity events during watershed runoff exposing them to dramatic salinity shifts and osmotic shock. The manifestation of this osmotic shock on seagrass morphology and phenology was tested in three Indo-Pacific seagrass species, Halophila ovalis, Halodule uninervis and Zostera muelleri, to hypo-salinity ranging from 3 to 36 PSU at 3 PSU increments for 10 weeks. All three species had broad salinity tolerance but demonstrated a moderate hypo-salinity stress response--analogous to a stress induced morphometric response (SIMR. Shoot proliferation occurred at salinities <30 PSU, with the largest increases, up to 400% increase in shoot density, occurring at the sub-lethal salinities <15 PSU, with the specific salinity associated with peak shoot density being variable among species. Resources were not diverted away from leaf growth or shoot development to support the new shoot production. However, at sub-lethal salinities where shoots proliferated, flowering was severely reduced for H. ovalis, the only species to flower during this experiment, demonstrating a diversion of resources away from sexual reproduction to support the investment in new shoots. This SIMR response preceded mortality, which occurred at 3 PSU for H. ovalis and 6 PSU for H. uninervis, while complete mortality was not reached for Z. muelleri. This is the first study to identify a SIMR in seagrasses, being detectable due to the fine resolution of salinity treatments tested. The detection of SIMR demonstrates the need for caution in interpreting in-situ changes in shoot density as shoot proliferation could be interpreted as a healthy or positive plant response to environmental conditions, when in fact it could signal pre-mortality stress.

  13. Role of Nitric Oxide in Stress-Induced Anxiety: From Pathophysiology to Therapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A; Chanana, P

    2017-01-01

    Stress is often marked by a state of hyperarousal to aid the initiation of necessary stress response for the successful management of stressful stimuli. It can be manifested as a challenge (stimulus) that requires behavioral, psychological, and physiological adaptations for the maintenance of a state of homeostasis in response to stressful stimuli. In an organism, miscellaneous stressors trigger a wide spectrum of alterations in hormonal and neuronal physiologies, resulting in behavioral (anxiety and depression disorders, diminished food intake and gastrointestinal dysfunctions, decline in sexual behavior, diabetes, and loss of cognitive function) and other physiological responses. Stress serves as a potent etiological link to development of several neuropsychiatric diseases such as depression, anxiety, and cognitive impairments. Exposure to stressful stimuli has been found to be associated with activation of nitric oxide synthase and generation of NO which reacts with spontaneous oxygen species to aid formation of active nitrogen radicals. High concentrations of reactive nitrogen radicals may cause damage to intracellular proteins, in addition to causing impairment to components of the mitochondrial transport chain, leading to cellular energy deficiency. This may further serve as an etiological link to the development of secondary neurological diseases associated with chronic stress. Also, during stress exposure, pharmacological inhibition of nitric oxide production displays reduction in indicators of anxiety- and depressive-like behavior in animal models. Therefore, the purpose of this chapter is to present an overview on the role of NO in stress-evoked emergence of secondary neurological disorders like anxiety as well as citing examples where NO has been used as a therapeutic target for the management of stress-induced anxiety-like behavior. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxidative stress induces caveolin 1 degradation and impairs caveolae functions in skeletal muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Mougeolle

    Full Text Available Increased level of oxidative stress, a major actor of cellular aging, impairs the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle and leads to the reduction in the number and size of muscle fibers causing sarcopenia. Caveolin 1 is the major component of caveolae, small membrane invaginations involved in signaling and endocytic trafficking. Their role has recently expanded to mechanosensing and to the regulation of oxidative stress-induced pathways. Here, we increased the amount of reactive oxidative species in myoblasts by addition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 at non-toxic concentrations. The expression level of caveolin 1 was significantly decreased as early as 10 min after 500 μM H2O2 treatment. This reduction was not observed in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor, suggesting that caveolin 1 was rapidly degraded by the proteasome. In spite of caveolin 1 decrease, caveolae were still able to assemble at the plasma membrane. Their functions however were significantly perturbed by oxidative stress. Endocytosis of a ceramide analog monitored by flow cytometry was significantly diminished after H2O2 treatment, indicating that oxidative stress impaired its selective internalization via caveolae. The contribution of caveolae to the plasma membrane reservoir has been monitored after osmotic cell swelling. H2O2 treatment increased membrane fragility revealing that treated cells were more sensitive to an acute mechanical stress. Altogether, our results indicate that H2O2 decreased caveolin 1 expression and impaired caveolae functions. These data give new insights on age-related deficiencies in skeletal muscle.

  15. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of hypothalamus in rats with inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Leonid O; Ershov, Nikita I; Efimov, Vadim M; Markel, Arcady L; Redina, Olga E

    2016-01-27

    The hypothalamus has an important role in the onset and maintenance of hypertension and stress responses. Rats with inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension (ISIAH), reproducing the human stress-sensitive hypertensive state with predominant involvement of the neuroendocrine hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathoadrenal axes, were used for analysis of the hypothalamus transcriptome. RNA-seq analysis revealed 139 genes differentially expressed in the hypothalami of hypertensive ISIAH and normotensive Wistar Albino Glaxo (WAG) rats. According to the annotation in databases, 18 of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were associated with arterial hypertension. The Gene Ontology (GO) functional annotation showed that these genes were related to different biological processes that may contribute to the hypertension development in the ISIAH rats. The most significantly affected processes were the following: regulation of hormone levels, immune system process, regulation of response to stimulus, blood circulation, response to stress, response to hormone stimulus, transport, metabolic processes, and endocrine system development. The most significantly affected metabolic pathways were those associated with the function of the immune system and cell adhesion molecules and the metabolism of retinol and arachidonic acid. Of the top 40 DEGs making the greatest contribution to the interstrain differences, there were 3 genes (Ephx2, Cst3 and Ltbp2) associated with hypertension that were considered to be suitable for further studies as potential targets for the stress-sensitive hypertension therapy. Seven DEGs were found to be common between hypothalamic transcriptomes of ISIAH rats and Schlager mice with established neurogenic hypertension. The results of this study revealed multiple DEGs and possible mechanisms specifying the hypothalamic function in the hypertensive ISIAH rats. These results provide a basis for further investigation of the signalling mechanisms

  16. Stress-induced changes of neurosteroid profiles in rat brain and plasma under immobilized condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myeong Hyeon; Rehman, Shaheed Ur; Kim, In Sook; Choi, Min Sun; Yoo, Hye Hyun

    2017-05-10

    In this study, various neurosteroids in brain and plasma were simultaneously determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and their profile changes in a stress-induced rats were investigated. The investigated neurosteroids are as follows: progesterone (P4), 5α-dihydroprogesterone (5α-DHP), 5β-dihydroprogesterone, estrone, androstenedione (AE), cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone (CORT), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), pregnanolone (3α,5β-THP), allopregnanolone (ALLO), 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC), 11-deoxycortisol, pregnenolone (PREG), and 5α/5β-tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (5α/5β-THDOC). Brain and plasma samples were processed using solid-phase extraction with methanol and acetic acid (99:1), and derivatized with a hydroxylamine reagent. Separation was achieved within 13min at a flow rate of 0.4mL/min with a C18 column (3.0×50mm, 2.7μm). The triple quadrupole mass spectrometer was operated in the positive electrospray ionization mode. Using this method, the neurosteroid level variation was quantitated and investigated in the brain and plasma upon immobilization stress in rats. As a result, AE, CORT, DOC, P4, 5α-DHP, 5α/5β-THDOC, DHEA, 3α,5β-THP, ALLO, and PREG levels were significantly altered in both the brain and plasma samples when stress was induced. These findings demonstrated that stress leads to the alteration of the GABAergic neurosteroid profile. The present results will be helpful for furthering an understanding of the role of neurosteroids in stressed conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Stress-induced chemical detection using flexible metal-organic frameworks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Hesketh, Peter J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Gall, Kenneth A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Choudhury, A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Pikarsky, J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Andruszkiewicz, Leanne (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Houk, Ronald J. T.; Talin, Albert Alec (National Institute of Standards & Technology, Gaithersburg, MD)

    2009-09-01

    In this work we demonstrate the concept of stress-induced chemical detection using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by integrating a thin film of the MOF HKUST-1 with a microcantilever surface. The results show that the energy of molecular adsorption, which causes slight distortions in the MOF crystal structure, can be efficiently converted to mechanical energy to create a highly responsive, reversible, and selective sensor. This sensor responds to water, methanol, and ethanol vapors, but yields no response to either N{sub 2} or O{sub 2}. The magnitude of the signal, which is measured by a built-in piezoresistor, is correlated with the concentration and can be fitted to a Langmuir isotherm. Furthermore, we show that the hydration state of the MOF layer can be used to impart selectivity to CO{sub 2}. We also report the first use of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to characterize the structure of a MOF film. We conclude that the synthetic versatility of these nanoporous materials holds great promise for creating recognition chemistries to enable selective detection of a wide range of analytes. A force field model is described that successfully predicts changes in MOF properties and the uptake of gases. This model is used to predict adsorption isotherms for a number of representative compounds, including explosives, nerve agents, volatile organic compounds, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The results show that, as a result of relatively large heats of adsorption (> 20 kcal mol{sup -1}) in most cases, we expect an onset of adsorption by MOF as low as 10{sup -6} kPa, suggesting the potential to detect compounds such as RDX at levels as low as 10 ppb at atmospheric pressure.

  18. FKBP5 polymorphisms influence pre-learning stress-induced alterations of learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Dailey, Alison M; Nagle, Hannah E; Fiely, Miranda K; Mosley, Brianne E; Brown, Callie M; Duffy, Tessa J; Scharf, Amanda R; Earley, McKenna B; Rorabaugh, Boyd R

    2017-03-01

    FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP5) is a co-chaperone of heat shock protein 90 and significantly influences glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FKBP5 gene are associated with altered hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, changes in the structure and function of several cognitive brain areas, and increased susceptibility to post-traumatic stress disorder, major depression, bipolar disorder and suicidal events. The mechanisms underlying these associations are largely unknown, but it has been speculated that the influence of these SNPs on emotional memory systems may play a role. In the present study, 112 participants were exposed to the socially evaluated cold pressor test (stress) or control (no stress) conditions immediately prior to learning a list of 42 words. Participant memory was assessed immediately after learning (free recall) and 24 h later (free recall and recognition). Participants provided a saliva sample that enabled the genotyping of three FKBP5 polymorphisms: rs1360780, rs3800373 and rs9296158. Results showed that stress impaired immediate recall in risk allele carriers. More importantly, stress enhanced long-term recall and recognition memory in non-carriers of the risk alleles, effects that were completely absent in risk allele carriers. Follow-up analyses revealed that memory performance was correlated with salivary cortisol levels in non-carriers, but not in carriers. These findings suggest that FKBP5 risk allele carriers may possess a sensitized stress response system, perhaps specifically for stress-induced changes in corticosteroid levels, which might aid our understanding of how SNPs in the FKBP5 gene confer increased risk for stress-related psychological disorders and their related phenotypes. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Stress-induced changes in gastric emptying, postprandial motility, and plasma gut hormone levels in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gué, M; Peeters, T; Depoortere, I; Vantrappen, G; Buéno, L

    1989-11-01

    The influence of acoustic stress on postprandial gastrointestinal motility, gastric emptying, and plasma gastrin, pancreatic polypeptide, motilin, and somatostatin was evaluated in conscious dogs. Six dogs were equipped with strain-gauge transducers and were exposed from 1-3 h after the meal to prerecorded music (80-90 dB broad frequency noise), which produced a significant (p less than or equal to 0.05) lengthening of the gastric (31.2%) and jejunal (37.0%) postprandial pattern. In 4 other dogs with gastric cannula, a 2-h session of acoustic stress beginning just after eating a radiolabeled standard meal induced a slowing of gastric emptying of both liquid (45.7%) and solid (47.1%) phases of the test meal when measured 0.5 h after feeding. In contrast, when measured 2 h after feeding, similar values of gastric emptying of liquids and solids were observed in stressed and control animals. Compared with controls, the postprandial increases of plasma gastrin and pancreatic polypeptide levels were significantly enhanced in stressed animals and occurred early (15 min after the meal). Although postprandial decrease in plasma motilin was unchanged by acoustic stress, the rise in plasma somatostatin level was significantly (p less than or equal to 0.05) prolonged in stressed dogs. These results indicate that acoustic stress affects gastric and intestinal postprandial motility in dogs, delaying the recovery of the migrating motor complex pattern, inducing a transient slowing of gastric emptying, and enhancing the feeding-induced release of gastrin, pancreatic polypeptide, and somatostatin. Such hormonal changes might be due to a direct effect of stress rather than being the consequence of acoustic stress-induced slowing of gastric emptying.

  20. RHEB1 insufficiency in aged male mice is associated with stress-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qi; Gromov, Pavel; Clement, Joachim H; Wang, Yingming; Riemann, Marc; Weih, Falk; Sun, Xiao-Xin; Dai, Mu-Shui; Fedorov, Lev M

    2017-12-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), a protein kinase, is a central regulator of mammalian metabolism and physiology. Protein mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) functions as a major sensor for the nutrient, energy, and redox state of a cell and is activated by ras homolog enriched in brain (RHEB1), a GTP-binding protein. Increased activation of mTORC1 pathway has been associated with developmental abnormalities, certain form of epilepsy (tuberous sclerosis), and cancer. Clinically, those mTOR-related disorders are treated with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and its rapalogs. Because the effects of chronic interference with mTOR signaling in the aged brain are yet unknown, we used a genetic strategy to interfere with mTORC1 signaling selectively by introducing mutations of Rheb1 into the mouse. We created conventional knockout (Rheb1 +/- ) and gene trap (Rheb1 Δ/+ ) mutant mouse lines. Rheb1-insufficient mice with different combinations of mutant alleles were monitored over a time span of 2 years. The mice did not show any behavioral/neurological changes during the first 18 months of age. However, after aging (> 18 months of age), both the Rheb1 +/- and Rheb1 Δ /- hybrid males developed rare stress-induced seizures, whereas Rheb1 +/- and Rheb1 Δ /- females and Rheb1 Δ/+ and Rheb1 Δ/Δ mice of both genders did not show any abnormality. Our findings suggest that chronic intervention with mTORC1 signaling in the aged brain might be associated with major adverse events.

  1. Restraint stress-induced morphological changes at the blood-brain barrier in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eSántha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is well known to contribute to the development of both neurological and psychiatric diseases. While the role of the blood-brain barrier is increasingly recognised in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier has been linked to stress-related psychiatric diseases only recently. In the present study the effects of restraint stress with different duration (1, 3 and 21 days were investigated on the morphology of the blood-brain barrier in male adult Wistar rats. Frontal cortex and hippocampus sections were immunostained for markers of brain endothelial cells (claudin-5, occludin and glucose transporter-1 and astroglia (GFAP. Staining pattern and intensity were visualized by confocal microscopy and evaluated by several types of image analysis. The ultrastructure of brain capillaries was investigated by electron microscopy. Morphological changes and intensity alterations in brain endothelial tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin were induced by stress. Following restraint stress significant increases in the fluorescence intensity of glucose transporter-1 were detected in brain endothelial cells in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Significant reductions in GFAP fluorescence intensity were observed in the frontal cortex in all stress groups. As observed by electron microscopy, one-day acute stress induced morphological changes indicating damage in capillary endothelial cells in both brain regions. After 21 days of stress thicker and irregular capillary basal membranes in the hippocampus and edema in astrocytes in both regions were seen. These findings indicate that stress exerts time-dependent changes in the staining pattern of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin-5 and glucose transporter-1 at the level of brain capillaries and in the ultrastructure of brain endothelial cells and astroglial endfeet, which may contribute to neurodegenerative processes

  2. Stress-induced immune-related diseases and health outcomes of pharmacy students: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Areej M

    2013-01-01

    Stress in health sciences students has been studied extensively. Nevertheless, only few studies have been conducted on pharmacy students and nothing was done to compare stress effects on the immune responses of Pharmacy and Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students. The aim of this pilot study was (1) to measure the self-reported perceived stresses, immune-related diseases and health outcomes of pharmacy and PharmD students, (2) to investigate the relationship between perceived stresses, health outcomes and immune-related diseases and (3) to compare stress induced changes in the health and immune system of pharmacy and PharmD students. The study represents a cross sectional survey using an interviewer administered questionnaire about stress and students' health states during the fall semester of 2009/2010. At commence of this study, 222 of pharmacy and PharmD participant students (113 and 109 respectively) from the third and uppermost levels of study were picked up randomly. They were found to perceive stress related to program intensity, lack of exercise and social activities, bad nutritional routines and accommodation. Effects of increased study loads on students' health and immune-related diseases were more pronounced on PharmD students, while showing significant changes on Pharmacy students. In general, more than 50% of students of each program got ill several times, mainly during the midterm period, had cold/flu, were under medical care and had problems in skin and/or hair. Also, PharmD students reported relatively higher levels of perceived stress and lower emotional and satisfaction quality of life compared to Pharmacy students. Results may help to increase the awareness of students to get prepared to what they might face, and may enable them to reduce the program's negative effects.

  3. Stress-induced endogenous siRNAs targeting regulatory intron sequences in Brachypodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiao-Lin V; Dinwiddie, Brandon L; Lee, Herman; Chekanova, Julia A

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to abiotic stresses triggers global changes in the expression of thousands of eukaryotic genes at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Small RNA (smRNA) pathways and splicing both function as crucial mechanisms regulating stress-responsive gene expression. However, examples of smRNAs regulating gene expression remain largely limited to effects on mRNA stability, translation, and epigenetic regulation. Also, our understanding of the networks controlling plant gene expression in response to environmental changes, and examples of these regulatory pathways intersecting, remains limited. Here, to investigate the role of smRNAs in stress responses we examined smRNA transcriptomes of Brachypodium distachyon plants subjected to various abiotic stresses. We found that exposure to different abiotic stresses specifically induced a group of novel, endogenous small interfering RNAs (stress-induced, UTR-derived siRNAs, or sutr-siRNAs) that originate from the 3' UTRs of a subset of coding genes. Our bioinformatics analyses predicted that sutr-siRNAs have potential regulatory functions and that over 90% of sutr-siRNAs target intronic regions of many mRNAs in trans. Importantly, a subgroup of these sutr-siRNAs target the important intron regulatory regions, such as branch point sequences, that could affect splicing. Our study indicates that in Brachypodium, sutr-siRNAs may affect splicing by masking or changing accessibility of specific cis-elements through base-pairing interactions to mediate gene expression in response to stresses. We hypothesize that this mode of regulation of gene expression may also serve as a general mechanism for regulation of gene expression in plants and potentially in other eukaryotes. © 2015 Wang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  4. Obesity decreases the oxidant stress induced by tobacco smoke in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaño, Martha; Pérez-Ramos, J; Esquivel, A; Rivera-Rosales, R; González-Avila, G; Becerril, C; Checa, M; Ramos, C

    2016-09-01

    Obesity and emphysema are associated with low-grade systemic inflammation and oxidant stress. Assuming that the oxidant stress induced by emphysema would be decreased by obesity, we analyzed the oxidant/antioxidant state in a rat model combining both diseases simultaneously. Obesity was induced using sucrose, while emphysema by exposure to tobacco smoke. End-points evaluated were: body weight, abdominal fat, plasma dyslipidemia and malondialdehyde (MDA), insulin and glucose AUC, activities of Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx); lung MnSOD and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) immunostaining, and expression of αV and β6 integrin subunits. In rats with obesity, the body weight, abdominal fat, plasma triglyceride levels, glucose AUC, insulin levels, GST activity, and αV and β6 integrin expressions were amplified. The rats with emphysema had lower values of body weight, abdominal fat, plasma insulin, triglycerides and glucose AUC but higher values of plasma MDA, GPx activity, and the lung expression of the αV and β6 integrins. The combination of obesity and emphysema compared to either condition alone led to diminished body weight, abdominal fat, plasma insulin MDA levels, GPx and GST activities, and αV and β6 integrin expressions; these parameters were all previously increased by obesity. Immunostaining for MnSOD augmented in all experimental groups, but the staining for 3-NT only increased in rats treated with tobacco alone or combined with sucrose. Results showed that obesity reduces oxidant stress and integrin expression, increasing antioxidant enzyme activities; these changes seem to partly contribute to a protective mechanism of obesity against emphysema development.

  5. Thermal stress induced voids in nanoscale copper interconnects by in-situ TEM heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jin Ho

    Stress induced void formation in Cu interconnects, due to thermal stresses generated during the processing of semiconductors, is an increasing reliability issue in the semiconductor industry as Cu interconnects are being downscaled to follow the demand for faster chip speed. In this work, 1.8 micron and 180 nm wide Cu interconnects, fabricated by Freescale Semiconductors, were subjected to thermal cycles, in-situ in the TEM, to investigate the stress relaxation mechanisms as a function of interconnect linewidth. The experiments show that the 1.8 micron Cu interconnect lines relax the thermal stresses through dislocation nucleation and motion while the Cu interconnect 180 nm lines exhibit void formation. Void formation in 180 nm lines occurs predominantly at triple junctions where the Ta diffusion barrier meets a Cu grain boundary. In order to understand void formation in 180 nm lines, the grain orientation and local stresses are determined. In particular, Nanobeam Diffraction (NBD) in the TEM is used to obtain the diffraction pattern of each grain, from which the crystal orientation is evaluated by the ACT (Automated Crystallography for TEM) software. In addition, 2D Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations are performed using the Object Oriented Finite Modeling (OOF2) software to correlate grain orientation with local stresses, and consequently void formation. According to the experimental and simulation results obtained, void formation in 180nm Cu interconnects does not seem to be solely dependent on local stresses, but a combination of diffusion paths available, stress gradients and possibly the presence of defects. In addition, based on the in-situ TEM observations, void growth seems to occur through grain boundary and/or interfacial diffusion. However, in-situ STEM observations of fully opened voids post-failure show pileup of material at the Cu grain surfaces. This means that surface or interface diffusion is also very active during void growth in the presence

  6. Nrf2 protects photoreceptor cells from photo-oxidative stress induced by blue light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan-Ju; Wu, Caiying; Xu, Zhenhua; Kuse, Yoshiki; Hara, Hideaki; Duh, Elia J

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in age-related macular degeneration and hereditary retinal degenerations. Light damage in rodents has been used extensively to model oxidative stress-induced photoreceptor degeneration, and photo-oxidative injury from blue light is particularly damaging to photoreceptors. The endogenous factors protecting photoreceptors from oxidative stress, including photo-oxidative stress, are continuing to be elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the effect of blue light exposure on photoreceptors and its relationship to Nrf2 using cultured murine photoreceptor (661W) cells. 661W cells were exposed to blue light at 2500 lux. Exposure to blue light for 6-24 h resulted in a significant increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and death of 661W cells in a time-dependent fashion. Blue light exposure resulted in activation of Nrf2, as indicated by an increase in nuclear translocation of Nrf2. This was associated with a significant induction of expression of Nrf2 as well as an array of Nrf2 target genes, including antioxidant genes, as indicated by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). In order to determine the functional role of Nrf2, siRNA-mediated knockdown studies were performed. Nrf2-knockdown in 661W cells resulted in significant exacerbation of blue light-induced reactive oxygen species levels as well as cell death. Taken together, these findings indicate that Nrf2 is an important endogenous protective factor against oxidative stress in photoreceptor cells. This suggests that drugs targeting Nrf2 could be considered as a neuroprotective strategy for photoreceptors in AMD and other retinal conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Naltrexone changes the expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum stress induced hepatic steatosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehi, Azam; Nabavizadeh, Fatemeh; Zekri, Ali; Amiri, Fatemeh

    2017-02-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is closely associated with several chronic diseases such as obesity, atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, and hepatic steatosis. Steatosis in hepatocytes may also lead to disorders such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, and possibly cirrhosis. Opioid peptides are involved in triglyceride and cholesterol dysregulation. Naltrexone also attenuates ER stress induced hepatic steatosis in mice. In this study, we evaluated the effects of naltrexone on the expression of lipid metabolism-related nuclear factors and enzymes in the ER stress induced hepatic steatosis. C57/BL6 mice received saline, DMSO and naltrexone as control groups. In a fourth group, ER stress was induced by tunicamycin (TM) injection and in the last group, naltrexone was given before TM administration. Histopathological evaluations, real-time RT-PCR and western blot were performed. We found that GRP78, IRE1α, PERK and ATF6 gene expression and steatosis significantly reduced in naltrexone treated animals. Naltrexone alleviated the gene and protein expression of SREBP1c. Expression of ACAT1, apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and PPARα also increased after naltrexone treatment. In conclusion, this study, for the first time, shows that naltrexone has a considerable role in attenuation of ER stress-induced liver injury. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) protects against stress-induced acute gastric lesions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Jeon, Byung Ju; Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Tae Il; Lee, Hee Kyoung; Han, Dae Seob; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Tae Bum; Kim, Jung Wha; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2012-11-01

    The protective activity of prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) fruit juice and its main constituent, betanin, were evaluated against stress-induced acute gastric lesions in rats. After 6 h of water immersion restraint stress (WIRS), gastric mucosal lesions with bleeding were induced in Sprague-Dawley rats. Pretreatment of a lyophilized powder containing O. ficus indica var. saboten fruit juice and maltodextrin (OFSM) and betanin significantly reduced stress lesions (800-1600 mg/kg). Both OFSM and betanin effectively prevented the decrease in gastric mucus content as detected by alcian blue staining. In addition, OFSM significantly suppressed WIRS-induced increases in the level of gastric mucosal tumor necrosis factor-α and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Betanin alone was only effective in decreasing MPO. These results revealed the protective activity of OFSM against stress-induced acute gastric lesions and that betanin may contribute to OFSM's gastric protective activity, at least in part. When OFSM and betanin were taken together, OFSM exerted gastroprotective activity against stress-induced gastric lesions by maintaining gastric mucus, which might be related to the attenuation of MPO-mediated damage and proinflammatory cytokine production.

  9. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Wei Liu

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system.

  10. [Advances in molecular mechanisms of bacterial resistance caused by stress-induced transfer of resistance genes--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongchang; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Lihong

    2013-07-04

    The transfer of resistance gene is one of the most important causes of bacterial resistance. Recent studies reveal that stresses induce the transfer of antibiotic resistance gene through multiple mechanisms. DNA damage stresses trigger bacterial SOS response and induce the transfer of resistance gene mediated by conjugative DNA. Antibiotic stresses induce natural bacterial competence for transformation in some bacteria which lack the SOS system. In addition, our latest studies show that the general stress response regulator RpoS regulates a novel type of resistance gene transfer which is mediated by double-stranded plasmid DNA and occurs exclusively on the solid surface. In this review, we summarized recent advances in SOS dependent and independent stress-induced DNA transfer which is mediated by conjugation and transformation respectively, and the transfer of double-stranded plasmid DNA on the solid surface which is regulated by RpoS. We propose that future work should address how stresses activate the key regulators and how these regulators control the expression of gene transfer related genes. Answers to the above questions would pave the way for searching for candidate targets for controlling bacterial resistance resulted from the transfer of antibiotic genes.

  11. Heat shock preconditioning protects against ER stress-induced apoptosis through the regulation of the BH3-only protein BIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Kennedy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A mild heat shock (HS preconditioning and acquisition of thermotolerance protects cells against a variety of cytotoxic agents that otherwise induce apoptosis. Here we tested whether there is a molecular link between HS preconditioning and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-induced apoptosis. ER stress results from a loss of ER lumen homeostasis, culminating in an accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the ER and activation of unfolded protein response (UPR. Unresolved, ER stress leads to activation of BH3-only proteins, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, caspase activation and apoptotic cell death. HS preconditioning (1 h at 42 °C induced a rapid increase in HSPA1 (HSP70 levels which remained elevated for at least 48 h post-HS. HS preconditioning significantly reduced BAX, caspase activation and apoptosis in cell cultures treated with the ER stress-inducing agents thapsigargin (TG and tunicamycin (TM. HS-mediated protection was found to be due to regulation of the BH3-only protein BIM. Further, overexpression of HSPA1 could not mimic the effect of HS on BIM expression, suggesting that other HS factors may play a role in inhibiting ER stress-induced apoptosis by regulating BIM.

  12. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-Wei; Liu, Fu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system.

  13. The obesity-induced transcriptional regulator TRIP-Br2 mediates visceral fat endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Guifen; Kong, Hyerim Whang; Fang, Difeng; McCann, Maximilian; Yang, Xiuying; Du, Guanhua; Blüher, Matthias; Zhu, Jinfang; Liew, Chong Wee

    2016-04-25

    The intimate link between location of fat accumulation and metabolic disease risk and depot-specific differences is well established, but how these differences between depots are regulated at the molecular level remains largely unclear. Here we show that TRIP-Br2 mediates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced inflammatory responses in visceral fat. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we demonstrate that obesity-induced circulating factors upregulate TRIP-Br2 specifically in visceral fat via the ER stress pathway. We find that ablation of TRIP-Br2 ameliorates both chemical and physiological ER stress-induced inflammatory and acute phase response in adipocytes, leading to lower circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines. Using promoter assays, as well as molecular and pharmacological experiments, we show that the transcription factor GATA3 is responsible for the ER stress-induced TRIP-Br2 expression in visceral fat. Taken together, our study identifies molecular regulators of inflammatory response in visceral fat that-given that these pathways are conserved in humans-might serve as potential therapeutic targets in obesity.

  14. Overall evaluation of the effect of residual stress induced by shot peening in the improvement of fatigue fracture resistance for metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Renzhi; Ru, Jilai

    2015-03-01

    Before 1980s, the circular suspension spring in automobile subjected to torsion fatigue load, under the cyclic normal tensile stresses, the majority of fatigue fracture occurred was in normal tensile fracture mode(NTFM) and the fracture surface was under 45° diagonal. Because there exists the interaction between the residual stresses induced by shot peening and the applied cyclic normal tensile stresses in NTFM, which represents as "stress strengthening mechanism", shot peening technology could be used for improving the fatigue fracture resistance(FFR) of springs. However, since 1990s up to date, in addition to regular NTFM, the fatigue fractures occurred of peened springs from time to time are in longitudinal shear fracture mode(LSFM) or transverse shear fracture mode(TSFM) with the increase of applied cyclic shear stresses, which leads to a remarkable decrease of FFR. However, LSFM/TSFM can be avoided effectively by means of shot peening treatment again on the peened springs. The phenomena have been rarely happened before. At present there are few literatures concerning this problem. Based upon the results of force analysis of a spring, there is no interaction between the residual stresses by shot peening and the applied cyclic shear stresses in shear fracture. This means that the effect of "stress strengthening mechanism" for improving the FFR of LSFM/TSFM is disappeared basically. During shot peening, however, both of residual stress and cyclic plastic deformed microstructure are induced synchronously like "twins" in the surface layer of a spring. It has been found for the first time by means of force analysis and experimental results that the modified microstructure in the "twins" as a "structure strengthening mechanism" can improve the FFR of LSFM/TSFM. At the same time, it is also shown that the optimum technology of shot peening strengthening must have both "stress strengthening mechanism" and "structure strengthening mechanism" simultaneously so that the

  15. Stress-induced drinking in parents of boys with attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder: heterogeneous groups in an experimental study of adult-child interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashdan, Todd B; Adams, Leah M; Kleiman, Evan M; Pelham, William E; Lang, Alan R

    2013-08-01

    Research on whether parents of children with externalizing disorders are at elevated risk for alcohol problems is equivocal. To reduce this ambiguity, we examined how individual differences in stress reactivity might moderate the drinking behavior of such parents. Parents (119 mothers, 44 fathers) of ADHD sons interacted with different child confederates during each of two counter-balanced sessions. In one, the confederate portrayed a friendly, cooperative, "normal" boy; in the other, the confederate portrayed a "deviant" boy who exhibited behavior characteristic of externalizing disorders. Following each interaction, parents were given an opportunity for ad lib consumption of alcohol while anticipating a second interaction. Latent class analysis identified three subgroups of parents using distress scores and alcohol consumption: minimal stress reactivity; reacts to child deviance with increased distress, but not increased drinking; marked stress-induced drinking. Decisions about the nature and proper treatment of parents raising children with ADHD may be compromised by failure to attend to individual differences in stress reactivity and inclinations to use drinking to cope.

  16. MusaDHN-1, a novel multiple stress-inducible SK(3)-type dehydrin gene, contributes affirmatively to drought- and salt-stress tolerance in banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, Upendra K Singh; Srinivas, Lingam; Ganapathi, Thumballi R

    2011-11-01

    Dehydrins are highly hydrophilic proteins involved in playing key adaptive roles in response to abiotic stress conditions having dehydration as a common component. In the present study, a novel banana SK(3)-type dehydrin, MusaDHN-1, was identified and later characterized using transgenic banana plants to investigate its functions in abiotic stress tolerance. Expression profiling in native banana plants demonstrated that MusaDHN-1 was induced in leaves by drought, salinity, cold, oxidative and heavy metal stress as well as by treatment with signalling molecules like abscisic acid, ethylene and methyl jasmonate. Promoter analysis carried out by making a MusaDHN-1 promoter: β-glucuronidase fusion construct reconfirmed the abiotic stress inducibility of MusaDHN-1. Transgenic banana plants constitutively overexpressing MusaDHN-1 were phenotypically normal and displayed improved tolerance to drought and salt-stress treatments in both in vitro and ex vitro assays. Enhanced accumulation of proline and reduced malondialdehyde levels in drought and salt-stressed MusaDHN-1 overexpressing plants further established their superior performance in stressed conditions. This study is the first to report generation of transgenic banana plants engineered for improved drought and salt-stress tolerance.

  17. Role of the plant-specific endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducible gene TIN1 in the formation of pollen surface structure in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Iwata, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells triggers the transcriptional activation of ER-resident molecular chaperones and folding enzymes to maintain cellular homeostasis. This process is known as the ER stress response or the unfolded protein response. We have identified tunicamycin induced 1 (TIN1), a plant-specific ER stress-inducible Arabidopsis thaliana gene. The TIN1 protein is localized in the ER; however, its molecular function has yet to be clarified. In this study, we performed functional analysis of TIN1 in planta. RT-PCR analysis showed that TIN1 is highly expressed in pollen. Analysis using the β-glucuronidase reporter gene demonstrated that the TIN1 promoter is active throughout pollen development, peaking at the time of flowering and in an ovule of an open flower. Although a T-DNA insertion mutant of TIN1 grows normally under ambient laboratory conditions, abnormal pollen surface morphology was observed under a scanning electron microscope. Based on the current and previous observations, a possible physiological function of TIN1 during pollen development is discussed. © 2012 The Japanese Society for Plant Cell and Molecular Biology.

  18. Acute social stress-induced immunomodulation in pigs high and low responders to ACTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacou, Elodie; Haurogné, Karine; Mignot, Grégoire; Allard, Marie; De Beaurepaire, Laurence; Marchand, Jordan; Terenina, Elena; Billon, Yvon; Jacques, Julien; Bach, Jean-Marie; Mormède, Pierre; Hervé, Julie; Lieubeau, Blandine

    2017-02-01

    Pig husbandry is known as an intensive breeding system, piglets being submitted to multiple stressful events such as early weaning, successive mixing, crowding and shipping. These stressors are thought to impair immune defences and might contribute, at least partly, to the prophylactic use of antibiotics. Robustness was recently defined as the ability of an individual to express a high-production potential in a wide variety of environmental conditions. Increasing robustness thus appears as a valuable option to improve resilience to stressors and could be obtained by selecting piglets upon their adrenocortical activity. In this study, we aimed at depicting the consequences of an acute social stress on the immune capacity of piglets genetically selected upon divergent hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity. For this purpose, we monitored neuroendocrine and immune parameters, in high- (HPAhi) and low- (HPAlo) responders to ACTH, just before and immediately after a one-hour mixing with unfamiliar conspecifics. As expected, stressed piglets displayed higher levels of circulating cortisol and norepinephrine. Blood cell count analysis combined to flow cytometry revealed a stress-induced leukocyte mobilization in the bloodstream with a specific recruitment of CD8α+ lymphocytes. Besides, one-hour mixing decreased LPS-induced IL-8 and TNFα secretions in whole-blood assays (WBA) and reduced mononuclear cell phagocytosis. Altogether, our data demonstrate that acute social stress alters immune competence of piglets from both groups, and bring new insights in favour of good farming practices. While for most parameters high- and low-responders to ACTH behaved similarly, HPAhi piglets displayed higher number of CD4+ CD8α- T cells, as well as increased cytokine production in WBA (LPS-induced TNFα and PIL-induced IL-8), which could confer them increased resistance to pathogens. Finally, a principal component analysis including all parameters highlighted that

  19. High susceptibility of activated lymphocytes to oxidative stress-induced cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna R. Degasperi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study provides evidence that activated spleen lymphocytes from Walker 256 tumor bearing rats are more susceptible than controls to tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH-induced necrotic cell death in vitro. The iron chelator and antioxidant deferoxamine, the intracellular Ca2+ chelator BAPTA, the L-type Ca2+ channel antagonist nifedipine or the mitochondrial permeability transition inhibitor cyclosporin A, but not the calcineurin inhibitor FK-506, render control and activated lymphocytes equally resistant to the toxic effects of t-BOOH. Incubation of activated lymphocytes in the presence of t-BOOH resulted in a cyclosporin A-sensitive decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. These results indicate that the higher cytosolic Ca2+ level in activated lymphocytes increases their susceptibility to oxidative stress-induced cell death in a mechanism involving the participation of mitochondrial permeability transition.O presente estudo demonstra que linfócitos ativados de baço de ratos portadores do tumor de Walker 256 são mais susceptíveis à morte celular necrótica induzida por tert-butil hidroperóxido (t-BOOH in vitro quando comparados aos controles. O quelante de ferro e antioxidante deferoxamina, o quelante intracelular de Ca2+ BAPTA, o antagonista de canal de Ca2+ nifedipina ou o inibidor da transição de permeabilidade mitocondrial ciclosporina-A, mas não o inibidor de calcineurina FK-506, inibiram de maneira similar a morte celular induzida por t-BOOH em linfócitos ativados e controles. Os linfócitos ativados apresentaram redução do potencial de membrana mitocondrial induzida por t-BOOH num mecanismo sensível a ciclosporina-A. Nossos resultados indicam que o aumento da concentração de Ca2+ citosólico em linfócitos ativados aumenta a susceptibilidade dos mesmos à morte celular induzida por estresse oxidativo, num mecanismo envolvendo a participação do poro de transição de permeabilidade mitocondrial.

  20. Involvement of parasympathetic pelvic efferent pathway in psychological stress-induced defecation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Kazunori; Setoyama, Hiromi; Nanno, Masanobu; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Kawai, Mitsuhisa

    2013-02-28

    To investigate the role of the pelvic nerve pathway in stress-induced acceleration of colorectal transit and defecation in rats. Surgical transection of rectal nerves (rectal branches of the pelvic nerve), vagotomy (Vag) or adrenalectomy (Adx) were performed bilaterally in rats. Number of fecal pellet output of these rats was measured during 1-h water avoidance stress (WAS). To evaluate the colonic transit, rats were given phenol red through the catheter indwelled in the proximal colon and subjected to WAS. After WAS session, entire colon and rectum were isolated and distribution of phenol red was measured. Distal colonic and rectal transit was evaluated using glass bead. Rats were inserted the glass bead into the distal colon and evacuation rate of the bead was measured. Neural activation was assessed by immunohistochemical staining of c-Fos and PGP9.5 in colonic whole-mount preparations of longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus (LMMP). In the sham-operated rats (sham op), WAS significantly increased defecation and accelerated colorectal transit with marked elevation of plasma corticosterone level. Compared with sham-operated rats, increase in the excretion of fecal pellets during WAS was significantly reduced by rectal nerve transection (RNT) (sham op: 6.9 ± 0.8 vs RNT: 4.3 ± 0.6, P elevated. Adx-rats significantly increased the defecation despite the lower corticosterone level. Distribution pattern of phenol red showed RNT inhibited distal colonic and rectal transit accelerated by WAS, while Vag inhibited proximal colonic transit. Suppression of distal colonic and rectal transit by RNT was further confirmed by the bead evacuation rate (sham op: 80.0% vs RNT: 53.8%). WAS significantly increased the number of c-Fos-immunoreactive neural cells in the LMMP of the proximal and distal colon, whereas c-Fos expression was decreased by RNT in the distal colon (sham op: 9.0 ± 2.0 vs RNT: 4.4 ± 1.0, P Pelvic nerve conveys WAS stimuli from the brain to the distal colon

  1. Effect of Escitalopram on Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia: The Results of the REMIT Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Velazquez, Eric J.; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Samad, Zainab; Boyle, Stephen H.; Kuhn, Cynthia; Becker, Richard C.; Ortel, Thomas L.; Williams, Redford B.; Rogers, Joseph G.; O’Connor, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Importance Mental-stress-induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) is an intermediate surrogate endpoint representing the pathophysiological link between psychosocial risk factors and adverse outcomes of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, pharmacological interventions aimed at reducing MSIMI have not been well studied. Objective To examine the effects of 6 weeks of escitalopram treatment vs. placebo on MSIMI and other psychological stress-related biophysiological and emotional parameters. Design, Setting, and Participants The REMIT study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of patients with clinically stable CHD and laboratory MSIMI. Enrollment occurred from 7/24/2007–8/24/2011 at a tertiary medical center. Interventions Eligible participants were randomized 1:1 to receive escitalopram (dose began at 5 mg with titration to 20 mg/day in 3 weeks) or placebo over 6 weeks. Main Outcome Measure Occurrence of MSIMI, defined as (1) development or worsening of regional wall motion abnormality; (2) left ventricular ejection fraction reduction ≥8%; and/or (3) horizontal or downsloping ST-segment depression ≥1mm in ≥2 leads lasting for ≥3 consecutive beats during ≥1 of 3 mental tasks. Results 127 participants were randomized to escitalopram (n=64) or placebo (n=63); 112 (96.1%) completed endpoint assessments (n=56 in each arm). At the end of 6 weeks, more patients taking escitalopram (34.2% [95% CI, 25.4 to 43.0]) had absence of MSIMI during the 3 mental stressors compared with patients taking placebo (17.5% [95% CI, 10.4 to 24.5]) based on unadjusted multiple imputation model for intention-to-treat analysis. A significant difference favoring escitalopram was observed (OR=2.62 [95% CI, 1.06 to 6.44]). Rates of exercise-induced ischemia were slightly lower at 6 weeks in the escitalopram group (45.8% [95% CI, 36.6 to 55.0]) than in patients receiving placebo (52.5% [95% CI, 43.3 to 61.7]), compared with baseline escitalopram (49.2% [95% CI, 39.9 to

  2. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated inhibits oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by regulating heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji Hoon; Cho, Soon Ok; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Nanhee; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2015-03-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is caused by mutational inactivation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) gene, which is involved in DNA repair. Increased oxidative stress has been shown in human AT cells and neuronal tissues of Atm-deficient mice. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible antioxidant enzyme and protects cells against oxidative stress. The purpose of this study is to determine whether ATM induces antioxidant enzyme HO-1 and protects cells from oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis by driving the activation of PKC-δ and NF-κB, by increasing cell viability, and by downregulating DNA fragmentation and apoptotic indicators (apoptosis-inducing factor and cleaved caspase-3). AT fibroblasts stably transfected with human full-length ATM cDNA (YZ5 cells) or the empty vector (MOCK cells) were treated with H2O2 as a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). As a result, transfection with ATM inhibited ROS-induced cell death and DNA fragmentation in MOCK cells. Transfection with ATM induced expression of HO-1 which was mediated by PKC-δ and NF-κB in H2O2-treated MOCK cells. ZnPP, an HO-1 inhibitor, and transfection with HO-1 siRNA increased ROS levels and apoptosis, whereas hemin, an HO-1 activator, reduced ROS levels and apoptosis in H2O2-treated YZ5 cells. Rottlerin, a PKC-δ inhibitor, inhibited NF-κB activation and HO-1 expression in H2O2-treated YZ5 cells. MOCK cells showed increased cell death, DNA fragmentation, and apoptotic indicators compared to YZ5 cells exposed to H2O2. In addition, transfection with p65 siRNA increased ROS levels and DNA fragmentation, but decreased HO-1 protein levels in H2O2-treated YZ5 cells. In conclusion, ATM induces HO-1 expression via activation of PKC-δ and NF-κB and inhibits oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. A loss of HO-1 induction may explain why AT patients are vulnerable to oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. ATF2 knockdown reinforces oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in TE7 cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walluscheck, Diana; Poehlmann, Angela; Hartig, Roland; Lendeckel, Uwe; Schönfeld, Peter; Hotz-Wagenblatt, Agnes; Reissig, Kathrin; Bajbouj, Khuloud; Roessner, Albert; Schneider-Stock, Regine

    2013-08-01

    Cancer cells showing low apoptotic effects following oxidative stress-induced DNA damage are mainly affected by growth arrest. Thus, recent studies focus on improving anti-cancer therapies by increasing apoptosis sensitivity. We aimed at identifying a universal molecule as potential target to enhance oxidative stress-based anti-cancer therapy through a switch from cell cycle arrest to apoptosis. A cDNA microarray was performed with hydrogen peroxide-treated oesophageal squamous epithelial cancer cells TE7. This cell line showed checkpoint activation via p21(WAF1) , but low apoptotic response following DNA damage. The potential target molecule was chosen depended on the following demands: it should regulate DNA damage response, cell cycle and apoptosis. As the transcription factor ATF2 is implicated in all these processes, we focused on this protein. We investigated checkpoint activation via ATF2. Indeed, ATF2 knockdown revealed ATF2-triggered p21(WAF1) protein expression, suggesting p21(WAF1) transactivation through ATF2. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we identified a hitherto unknown ATF2-binding sequence in the p21(WAF1) promoter. p-ATF2 was found to interact with p-c-Jun, creating the AP-1 complex. Moreover, ATF2 knockdown led to c-Jun downregulation. This suggests ATF2-driven induction of c-Jun expression, thereby enhancing ATF2 transcriptional activity via c-Jun-ATF2 heterodimerization. Notably, downregulation of ATF2 caused a switch from cell cycle arrest to reinforced apoptosis, presumably via p21(WAF1) downregulation, confirming the importance of ATF2 in the establishment of cell cycle arrest. 1-Chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene also led to ATF2-dependent G2/M arrest, suggesting that this is a general feature induced by oxidative stress. As ATF2 knockdown also increased apoptosis, we propose ATF2 as a target for combined oxidative stress-based anti-cancer therapies. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine Published by Foundation

  4. Infinitary normalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Klop (Jan Willem); R. de Vrijer

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIn infinitary orthogonal first-order term rewriting the properties confluence (CR), Uniqueness of Normal forms (UN), Parallel Moves Lemma (PML) have been generalized to their infinitary versions CR-inf, UN-inf, PML-inf, and so on. Several relations between these properties have been

  5. In vivo immunoprotective role of Indigofera tinctoria and Scoparia dulcis aqueous extracts against chronic noise stress induced immune abnormalities in Wistar albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boothapandi Madakkannu

    Full Text Available Indigofera tinctoria and Scoparia dulcis are being widely used in Indian folk medicine for the treatment of various disorders. Environmental noise pollution is thought to be an important factor for many health problems and it causes immune abnormalities. In the present study immune-regulating potential of I. tinctoria and S. dulcis aqueous extracts on innate and adaptive immune system of wistar albino rats was evaluated during normal and chronic noise induced stress conditions. The results demonstrated that both I. tinctoria and S. dulcis aqueous extracts (200 mg/kg b.w showed immunostimulant effect on both innate and adaptive immune response of wistar albino rat compared to control group under normal condition. The noise stress (100 dB for 1 h, 20 days induced animals showed suppressive effects on immune response by decreasing macrophage phagocytosis, antibody secretion by spleen cells, humoral immune response, proliferation of lymphocytes, cytotoxicity, TNF α expression, granzyme B and perforin expression in splenic NK cells. Similarly, noise stress also caused DNA damage in tissues. However, the suppressed effects induced by noise stress on rat immune system were significantly prevented by oral administration of both I. tinctoria and S. dulcis aqueous extracts. Considering all these results it is suggested that the selected medicinal plant’s aqueous extracts have the potential to prevent the effects of noise stress induced rat immune system and explore a strong immunostimulant potential applicable to clinical practices. Keywords: Indigofera tinctoria, Scoparia dulcis, Chronic noise stress, Immunomodulatory, Innate immunity, Adaptive immunity

  6. Stress-induced activation of nitric oxide-producing neurons in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukoff, T L; Khalili, P

    1997-01-27

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous neurotransmitter that may mediate a decrease in sympathetic output to the periphery. This implication predicts that NO-producing neurons in the brain are activated in animals experiencing increased levels of sympathetic activity. To test this prediction, we subjected three groups of experimental rats to differing levels of environmental stimulation for 1 hour: minimal stimulation, moderate stimulation, and restraint stress. NO-producing neurons were histochemically visualized in sections of the brain, and activation of these neurons was assessed according to the neuronal expression of the immediate early gene c-fos. Constitutive activation of NO-producing neurons was found in the hypothalamus (paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei), dorsal raphe nuclei, and spinal nucleus of the trigeminal nerve of minimally stimulated rats. When animals were subjected to a novel environment (moderate stimulation), additional NO-producing neurons were activated in the medial septum, medial amygdala, hypothalamic nuclei (lateral, periventricular, and posterior), colliculi, nucleus raphe obscurus, medial vestibular nucleus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and several components of the ventrolateral medulla. Restraint stress caused the activation of NO-producing neurons in all of these areas, often in increasing numbers, and the activation of additional NO-producing neurons in the diagonal band of Broca, lateral and medial preoptic areas, basomedial and basolateral amygdalar nuclei, hypothalamic nuclei (dorsomedial, retrochiasmatic supraoptic, and circularis), nucleus raphe pontus, lateral parabrachial nucleus, and pontine nuclei. Expressed as a proportion of NO-producing neurons per section, the largest percentages (>20%) of double-stained neurons were found in the basolateral amygdala (46%), hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (35%), corpora quadrigemina (estimated at 40%), dorsal raphe (45%), nuclei raphe pontus (33%) and obscurus (63%), lateral

  7. Malware Normalization

    OpenAIRE

    Christodorescu, Mihai; Kinder, Johannes; Jha, Somesh; Katzenbeisser, Stefan; Veith, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Malware is code designed for a malicious purpose, such as obtaining root privilege on a host. A malware detector identifies malware and thus prevents it from adversely affecting a host. In order to evade detection by malware detectors, malware writers use various obfuscation techniques to transform their malware. There is strong evidence that commercial malware detectors are susceptible to these evasion tactics. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a malware normalizer ...

  8. Basal and stress-induced corticosterone levels in olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) in relation to their mass nesting behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, R A; Owens, D W; MacKenzie, D S; Amoss, M S

    1999-11-01

    Adrenocortical responsiveness to turning stress was examined in wild, reproductively-active olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) in relation to their mass nesting (arribada) behavior. We hypothesized that the high sensitivity threshold (HST) observed in ovipositing sea turtles is associated with a diminished sensitivity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to stressful stimuli in arribada females. We tested this hypothesis by determining whether arribada females exhibited an increased activation threshold of the HPA axis to an imposed stressor (turning stress). Mean basal corticosterone (B) and glucose levels were below 1.0 ng/ml and 60 mg/dl, respectively. Basal B remained unchanged throughout a 24-hr period in basking females. Most animals responded to turning stress with elevated mean B levels (up to 6.5 ng/ml after 6 hr) and no increase in circulating glucose. Nearly 50% of females (and none of the males) were refractory to the stimulation. Males exhibited the most rapid response, with B levels significantly elevated by 20 min over basal levels. Among females, arribada and solitary nesters exhibited a slower rate of response than basking, non-nesting animals. These results demonstrate that olive ridleys exhibit stress-induced changes in circulating B which are slower than those observed in most reptilian and in mammalian, avian, and piscine species. Furthermore, the presence of refractory females and the relatively slower increase in B in arribada and solitary nesters indicate a hyporesponsiveness of the HPA axis to turning stress in nesting olive ridleys. The hyporesponsiveness may be part of a mechanism to facilitate arribada nesting. J. Exp. Zool. 284:652-662, 1999. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. The dorsomedial hypothalamus mediates stress-induced hyperalgesia and is the source of the pronociceptive peptide cholecystokinin in the rostral ventromedial medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, K M; Roeder, Z; Desrochers, K; Buhler, A V; Heinricher, M M; Cleary, D R

    2013-05-15

    While intense or highly arousing stressors have long been known to suppress pain, relatively mild or chronic stress can enhance pain. The mechanisms underlying stress-induced hyperalgesia (SIH) are only now being defined. The physiological and neuroendocrine effects of mild stress are mediated by the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), which has documented connections with the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), a brainstem region capable of facilitating nociception. We hypothesized that stress engages both the DMH and the RVM to produce hyperalgesia. Direct pharmacological activation of the DMH increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulation in awake animals, confirming that the DMH can mediate behavioral hyperalgesia. A behavioral model of mild stress also produced mechanical hyperalgesia, which was blocked by inactivation of either the DMH or the RVM. The neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK) acts in the RVM to enhance nociception and is abundant in the DMH. Using a retrograde tracer and immunohistochemical labeling, we determined that CCK-expressing neurons in the DMH are the only significant supraspinal source of CCK in the RVM. However, not all neurons projecting from the DMH to the RVM contained CCK, and microinjection of the CCK2 receptor antagonist YM022 in the RVM did not interfere with SIH, suggesting that transmitters in addition to CCK play a significant role in this connection during acute stress. While the RVM has a well-established role in facilitation of nociception, the DMH, with its well-documented role in stress, may also be engaged in a number of chronic or abnormal pain states. Taken as a whole, these findings establish an anatomical and functional connection between the DMH and RVM by which stress can facilitate pain. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Circulating interleukin-1β promotes endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced myocytes apoptosis in diabetic cardiomyopathy via interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongwei; Zhao, Na; Zhu, Huolan; Zhu, Shunming; Pan, Shuo; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Junkui

    2015-09-23

    IL-1β was considered as an important inflammatory cytokine in diabetic cardiovascular complications. DCM is one of the major manifestations of diabetic cardiovascular complications whose specific mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of IL-1β in myocytes apoptosis in DCM. In the in vitro study, high- glucose medium and/or IL-1β were used to incubate the isolated primary myocytes. siRNA was used to knockdown the irak2 gene expression. Apoptosis was evaluated by Hoechst and TUNEL staining. In the in vivo study, DCM in rats was induced by STZ injection and confirmed by cardiac hemodynamic determinations. The IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-1Ra was also used to treat DCM rats. Myocardial apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL assay. In both in vitro and in vivo studies, expression levels of GRP-78, IRAK-2 and CHOP were analyzed by Western Blotting. ELISA was employed to exam the IL-1β content in serum and cell supernatants. Myocytes were not identified as the source of IL-1β secretion under high- glucose incubation. High glucose incubation and/or IL-1β incubation elevated ER- stress mediated myocytes apoptosis which was attenuated by irak2 silencing. Dramatically increased circulating and myocardial IL-1β levels were found in DCM rats which stimulated activation of ER stress and lead to elevated myocytes apoptosis. The administration of IL-1Ra, however, attenuated IRAK2/CHOP induced apoptosis without affecting fasting blood glucose concentration. Elevated circulating IL-1β contributed to promote ER stress- induced myocytes apoptosis by affecting IRAK-2/CHOP pathway in DCM.

  11. A key role for stress-induced satellite III transcripts in the relocalization of splicing factors into nuclear stress granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Alexandra; Soret, Johann; Vourc'h, Claire; Tazi, Jamal; Jolly, Caroline

    2004-09-01

    Exposure of cells to stressful conditions results in the rapid synthesis of a subset of specialized proteins termed heat shock proteins (HSPs) which function in protecting the cell against damage. The stress-induced activation of hsp genes is controlled by the heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1). At the cellular level, one of the most striking effects of stress is the rapid and reversible redistribution of HSF1 into a few nuclear structures termed nuclear stress granules which form primarily on the 9q12 locus in humans. Within these structures, HSF1 binds to satellite III repeated elements and drives the RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription of these sequences into stable RNAs which remain associated with the 9q12 locus for a certain time after synthesis. Other proteins, in particular splicing factors, were also shown to relocalize to the granules upon stress. Here, we investigated the role of stress-induced satellite III transcripts in the relocalization of splicing factors to the granules. We show that the recruitment of the two serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins SF2/ASF and SRp30c requires the presence of stress-induced satellite III transcripts. In agreement with these findings, we identified the second RNA-recognition motif (RRM2) of hSF2/ASF as the motif required for the targeting to the granules, and we showed by immunoprecipitation that the endogenous hSF2/ASF protein is present in a complex with satellite III transcripts in stressed cells in vivo. Interestingly, satellite III transcripts also immunoprecipitate together with small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) in vivo whereas the intronless hsp70 transcripts do not, supporting the proposal that these transcripts are subject to splicing. Altogether, these data highlight the central role for satellite III transcripts in the targeting and/or retention of splicing factors into the granules upon stress.

  12. The endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducible protein, Herp, is a potential triggering antigen for anti-DNA response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Yasuhiko; Oka, Yumiko; Ikeda, Tomoko; Fujii, Hiroshi; Ishii, Tomonori; Sasaki, Takeshi; Harigae, Hideo

    2010-03-15

    Anti-dsDNA Abs are highly specific indicators of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and play a pathogenic role in lupus nephritis. Human anti-dsDNA Abs are most likely generated by an Ag-driven mechanism. However, the Ag responsible for triggering anti-dsDNA Ab production has not been identified. To search for proteins that are cross-reactive with anti-dsDNA Abs, we screened a cDNA library from a patient with SLE with single-chain Fv of O-81 human anti-ss/dsDNA mAb by using a two-hybrid system. Homocysteine-induced ER protein (Herp), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducible ER membrane protein, was identified and shown to bind to original O-81 Ab and human lupus anti-dsDNA Abs. Some IgG purified from patients with active SLE by Herp-immobilized affinity chromatography bound to dsDNA. BALB/c mice immunized with Herp showed IgG anti-dsDNA Abs, IgG anti-nucleosome Abs, and glomerular IgG deposition. Herp reactivity was strongly positive in a proportion of PBLs from patients with active SLE, but undetectable in those from healthy controls. Moreover, activation of caspases was observed in the Herp-positive cells, implying that ER stress-induced apoptosis likely occurs in patients with active SLE. Herp is exposed on blebs of ER stress-induced apoptotic cells, suggesting that Herp can be recognized by immune cells. These results indicate that Herp mimics structural determinants of DNA immunologically and can be immunogenic in vivo. Thus, Herp represents a candidate autoantigen for anti-DNA Abs. This study may help explain how common environmental factors induce the production of anti-DNA Abs and contribute the development of SLE.

  13. Involvement of nitrate reductase (NR) in osmotic stress-induced NO generation of Arabidopsis thaliana L. roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Ortega, Leandro; Erdei, László

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is undoubtedly a potential signal molecule in diverse developmental processes and stress responses. Despite our extensive knowledge about the role of NO in physiological and stress responses, the source of this gaseous molecule is still unresolved. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of nitrate reductase (NR) as the source of NO accumulation in the root system of wild-type and NR-deficient nia1, nia2 mutant Arabidopsis plants under osmotic stress conditions induced by a polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000) treatment. Reduction of primary root (PR) length was detected as the effect of osmotic stress in wild-type and NR-deficient plants. We found that osmotic stress-induced lateral root (LR) initiation in wild-type, but not in NR-mutant plants. High levels of NO formation occurred in roots of Col-1 plants as the effect of PEG treatment. The mammalian nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) had no effect on LR initiation or NO generation, while tungstate, an NR inhibitor, inhibited the later phase of osmotic stress-induced NO accumulation and slightly decreased the LR development. In nia1, nia2 roots, the PEG treatment induced the first phase of NO production, but later NO production was inhibited. We conclude that the first phase of PEG-induced NO generation is not dependent on NOS-like or NR activity. It is also suggested that the activity of NR in roots is required for the later phase of osmotic stress-induced NO formation.

  14. Stress induced a shift from dorsal hippocampus to prefrontal cortex-dependent memory retrieval: role of regional corticosterone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaelle eDominguez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of the deleterious effects of stress on memory retrieval are due to a dysfunction of the hippocampo-prefrontal cortex interplay. The role of the stress-induced regional corticosterone increase in such dysfunction remains however unclear, since there is no published study as yet dedicated to measuring corticosterone concentrations simultaneously in both the prefrontal cortex (mPFC and the hippocampus (dHPC in relation with memory impairments. To that aim, we first showed in Experiment 1 that an acute stress (3 electric footschocks; 0.9 mA each delivered before memory testing reversed the memory retrieval pattern (MRP in a serial discrimination task in which mice learned two successive discriminations. More precisely, whereas non-stressed animals remembered accurately the first learned discrimination and not the second one, stressed mice remembered more accurately the second discrimination but not the first one. We demonstrated that local inactivation of dHPC or mPFC with the anesthetic lidocaine recruited the dHPC activity in non-stress conditions whereas the stress-induced MRP inversion recruited the mPFC activity. In a second experiment, we showed that acute stress induced a very similar time-course evolution of corticosterone rises within both the mPFC and dHPC. In a 3rd experiment, we found however that in situ injections of corticosterone either within the mPFC or the dHPC before memory testing favored the emergence of the mPFC-dependent MRP but blocked the emergence of the dHPC-dependent one. Overall, our study evidences that the simultaneous increase of corticosterone after stress in both areas induces a shift from dHPC (non stress condition to mPFC-dependent memory retrieval pattern and that corticosterone is critically involved in mediating the deleterious effects of stress on cognitive functions involving the mPFC-HPC interplay.

  15. Reduction in the cumulative effect of stress-induced inbreeding depression due to intragenerational purging in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, L S; Nunney, L

    2016-03-01

    Environmental stress generally exacerbates the harmful effects of inbreeding and it has been proposed that this could be exploited in purging deleterious alleles from threatened inbred populations. However, understanding what factors contribute to variability in the strength of inbreeding depression (ID) observed across adverse environmental conditions remains a challenge. Here, we examined how the nature and timing of stress affects ID and the potential for purging using inbred and outbred Drosophila melanogaster larvae exposed to biotic (larval competition, bacteria infection) and abiotic (ethanol, heat) stressors compared with unstressed controls. ID was measured during (larval survival) and after (male mating success) stress exposure. The level of stress imposed by each stressor was approximately equal, averaging a 42% reduction in outbred larval survival relative to controls. All stressors induced on average the same ID, causing a threefold increase in lethal equivalents for larval survival relative to controls. However, stress-induced ID in larval success was followed by a 30% reduction in ID in mating success of surviving males. We propose that this fitness recovery is due to 'intragenerational purging' whereby fitness correlations facilitate stress-induced purging that increases the average fitness of survivors in later life history stages. For biotic stressors, post-stress reductions in ID are consistent with intragenerational purging, whereas for abiotic stressors, there appeared to be an interaction between purging and stress-induced physiological damage. For all stressors, there was no net effect of stress on lifetime ID compared with unstressed controls, undermining the prediction that stress enhances the effectiveness of population-level purging across generations.

  16. Ghrelin-reactive immunoglobulins and anxiety, depression and stress-induced cortisol response in adolescents. The TRAILS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Marie; Schaefer, Johanna M; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Déchelotte, Pierre; Verhulst, Frank C; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2015-06-03

    Ghrelin, a hunger hormone, has been implicated in the regulation of stress-response, anxiety and depression. Ghrelin-reactive immunoglobulins (Ig) were recently identified in healthy and obese humans showing abilities to increase ghrelin's stability and orexigenic effects. Here we studied if ghrelin-reactive Ig are associated with anxiety and depression and with the stress-induced cortisol response in a general population of adolescents. Furthermore, to test the possible infectious origin of ghrelin-reactive Ig, their levels were compared with serum IgG against common viruses. We measured ghrelin-reactive IgM, IgG and IgA in serum samples of 1199 adolescents from the Dutch TRAILS study and tested their associations with 1) anxiety and depression symptoms assessed with the Youth Self-Report, 2) stress-induced salivary cortisol levels and 3) IgG against human herpesvirus 1, 2, 4 and 6 and Influenza A and B viruses. Ghrelin-reactive IgM and IgG correlated positively with levels of antibodies against Influenza A virus. Ghrelin-reactive IgM correlated negatively with antibodies against Influenza B virus. Ghrelin-reactive IgM correlated positively with anxiety scores in girls and ghrelin-reactive IgG correlated with stress-induced cortisol secretion, but these associations were weak and not significant after correction for multiple testing. These data indicate that production of ghrelin-reactive autoantibodies could be influenced by viral infections. Serum levels of ghrelin-reactive autoantibodies probably do not play a role in regulating anxiety, depression and the stress-response in adolescents from the general population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. SIRT1 sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells expressing hepatitis B virus X protein to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srisuttee, Ratakorn [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Functional Genomics, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Malilas, Waraporn; Moon, Jeong; Cho, Il-Rae [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Jhun, Byung Hak [Department of Applied Nanoscience, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Horio, Yoshiyuki [Department of Pharmacology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Chung, Young-Hwa, E-mail: younghc@pusan.ac.kr [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Up-regulation of SIRT1 protein and activity sensitizes Hep3B-HBX cells to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for oxidation-induced apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression and enhanced activity of SIRT1 attenuate JNK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of SIRT1 activity restores resistance to oxidation-induced apoptosis through JNK activation. -- Abstract: We previously showed that SIRT1 deacetylase inhibits proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells expressing hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBX), by destabilization of {beta}-catenin. Here, we report another role for SIRT1 in HBX-mediated resistance to oxidative stress. Ectopic expression and enhanced activity of SIRT1 sensitize Hep3B cells stably expressing HBX to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. SIRT1 mutant analysis showed that nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for sensitization of oxidation-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, ectopic expression of SIRT1 and treatment with resveratrol (a SIRT1 activator) attenuated JNK phosphorylation, which is a prerequisite for resistance to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Conversely, suppression of SIRT1 activity with nicotinamide inhibited the effect of resveratrol on JNK phosphorylation, leading to restoration of resistance to oxidation-induced apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that up-regulation of SIRT1 under oxidative stress may be a therapeutic strategy for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma cells related to HBV through inhibition of JNK activation.

  18. Maternal chewing during prenatal stress ameliorates stress-induced hypomyelination, synaptic alterations, and learning impairment in mouse offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ayumi; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Hayashi, Sakurako; Sato, Yuichi; Azuma, Kagaku; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2016-11-15

    Maternal chewing during prenatal stress attenuates both the development of stress-induced learning deficits and decreased cell proliferation in mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus. Hippocampal myelination affects spatial memory and the synaptic structure is a key mediator of neuronal communication. We investigated whether maternal chewing during prenatal stress ameliorates stress-induced alterations of hippocampal myelin and synapses, and impaired development of spatial memory in adult offspring. Pregnant mice were divided into control, stress, and stress/chewing groups. Stress was induced by placing mice in a ventilated restraint tube, and was initiated on day 12 of pregnancy and continued until delivery. Mice in the stress/chewing group were given a wooden stick to chew during restraint. In 1-month-old pups, spatial memory was assessed in the Morris water maze, and hippocampal oligodendrocytes and synapses in CA1 were assayed by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Prenatal stress led to impaired learning ability, and decreased immunoreactivity of myelin basic protein (MBP) and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) in the hippocampal CA1 in adult offspring. Numerous myelin sheath abnormalities were observed. The G-ratio [axonal diameter to axonal fiber diameter (axon plus myelin sheath)] was increased and postsynaptic density length was decreased in the hippocampal CA1 region. Maternal chewing during stress attenuated the prenatal stress-induced impairment of spatial memory, and the decreased MBP and CNPase immunoreactivity, increased G-ratios, and decreased postsynaptic-density length in the hippocampal CA1 region. These findings suggest that chewing during prenatal stress in dams could be an effective coping strategy to prevent hippocampal behavioral and morphologic impairments in their offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Protective effect of eugenol against restraint stress-induced gastrointestinal dysfunction: Potential use in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabadu, Debapriya; Shah, Ankit; Singh, Sanjay; Krishnamurthy, Sairam

    2015-07-01

    Eugenol, an essential constituent found in plants such as Eugenia caryophyllata Thunb. (Myrtaceae) is reported to possess neuroprotective and anti-stress activities. These activities can potentially be useful in the treatment of stress-induced irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The protective effect of eugenol was assessed against restraint stress (RS)-induced IBS-like gastrointestinal dysfunction in rats. Further, its centrally mediated effect was evaluated in this model. Eugenol (12.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg), ondansetron (4.0 mg/kg, p.o.), and vehicle were administered to rats for 7 consecutive days before exposure to 1 h RS. One control group was not exposed to RS-induction. The effect of eugenol (50 mg/kg) with and without RS exposure was evaluated for mechanism of action and per se effect, respectively. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal cortex (HPA)-axis function was evaluated by estimating the plasma corticosterone level. The levels of brain monoamines, namely serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, and their metabolites were estimated in stress-responsive regions such as hippocampus, hypothalamus, pre-frontal cortex (PFC), and amygdala. Oxidative damage and antioxidant defenses were also assessed in brain regions. Eugenol (50 mg/kg) reduced 80% of RS-induced increase in fecal pellets similar to that of ondansetron. Eugenol attenuated 80% of stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone and modulated the serotonergic system in the PFC and amygdala. Eugenol attenuated stress-induced changes in norepinephrine and potentiated the antioxidant defense system in all brain regions. Eugenol protected against RS-induced development of IBS-like gastrointestinal dysfunction through modulation of HPA-axis and brain monoaminergic pathways apart from its antioxidant effect.

  20. Stress induced a shift from dorsal hippocampus to prefrontal cortex dependent memory retrieval: role of regional corticosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Gaelle; Faucher, Pierre; Henkous, Nadia; Krazem, Ali; Piérard, Christophe; Béracochéa, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Most of the deleterious effects of stress on memory retrieval are due to a dysfunction of the hippocampo-prefrontal cortex interplay. The role of the stress-induced regional corticosterone increase in such dysfunction remains however unclear, since there is no published study as yet dedicated to measuring corticosterone concentrations simultaneously in both the prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the hippocampus (dHPC) in relation with memory impairments. To that aim, we first showed in Experiment 1 that an acute stress (3 electric footschocks; 0.9 mA each) delivered before memory testing reversed the memory retrieval pattern (MRP) in a serial discrimination task in which mice learned two successive discriminations. More precisely, whereas non-stressed animals remembered accurately the first learned discrimination and not the second one, stressed mice remembered more accurately the second discrimination but not the first one. We demonstrated that local inactivation of dHPC or mPFC with the anesthetic lidocaine recruited the dHPC activity in non-stress conditions whereas the stress-induced MRP inversion recruited the mPFC activity. In a second experiment, we showed that acute stress induced a very similar time-course evolution of corticosterone rises within both the mPFC and dHPC. In a 3rd experiment, we found however that in situ injections of corticosterone either within the mPFC or the dHPC before memory testing favored the emergence of the mPFC-dependent MRP but blocked the emergence of the dHPC-dependent one. Overall, our study evidences that the simultaneous increase of corticosterone after stress in both areas induces a shift from dHPC (non-stress condition) to mPFC-dependent MRP and that corticosterone is critically involved in mediating the deleterious effects of stress on cognitive functions involving the mPFC-HPC interplay.