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Sample records for stimulated echo pulsed

  1. Two-pulse and stimulated nuclear-quadrupole-resonance echoes in YAlO3:Pr3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    The dephasing of trivalent praseodymium dilute in yttrium aluminum oxide (YAlO 3 ) in the ground electronic state 3 H 4 state is evaluated using an optically detected method, to measure two-rf-pulse- and three-rf-pulse-stimulated nuclear quadrupole echoes. The magnitude of the echo is obtained by detecting the weak Raman optical field generated by the interaction of the magnetic moment of the echo and a light beam resonant with the 3 H 4 (0 cm 1 ) to 1 D 2 (16 374 cm -1 ) optical transition. This same light beam is used as an optical pump (37-ms duration) prior the rf-pulse sequence to increase the population difference of the hyperfine energy levels, thereby improving the echo signal. The light is turned off 9 ms before the rf-pulse sequence and remains off until the echo to avoid optical-pumping effects on the measured nuclear-quadrupole-resonance (NQR) echo lifetime. The dephasing time T 2 from two-pulse nuclear-quadrupole-echo measurement is found to be 366±29 μs

  2. Grating stimulated echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubetsky, B.; Berman, P.R.; Sleator, T.

    1992-01-01

    A theory of a grating simulated echo (GTE) is developed. The GSE involves the sequential excitation of atoms by two counterpropagating traveling waves, a standing wave, and a third traveling wave. It is shown that the echo signal is very sensitive to small changes in atomic velocity, much more sensitive than the normal stimulated echo. Use of the GSE as a collisional probe or accelerometer is discussed

  3. Optical decoherence times and spectral diffusion in an Er-doped optical fiber measured by two-pulse echoes, stimulated photon echoes, and spectral hole burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macfarlane, R.M.; Sun, Y.; Sellin, P.B.; Cone, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Two-pulse and stimulated photon echoes and spectral hole burning were measured on the transition from the lowest component of the 4 I 15/2 manifold to the lowest component of 4 I 13/2 of Er 3+ in a silicate optical fiber at 1.6 K. The two-pulse echo decays gave decoherence times as long as 230 ns for magnetic fields above 2 T. A large field dependent contribution to the homogeneous line width of >2 MHz was found and interpreted in terms of coupling to magnetic tunneling modes (TLS) in the glass. The stimulated echoes measured at 2 T showed spectral diffusion of 0.8 MHz/decade of time between 0.4 and 500 μs. Spectral diffusion in this high field region is attributed to coupling to elastic TLS modes which have a distribution of flip rates in glasses. Time-resolved spectral hole burning at very low field showed stronger spectral diffusion of 5.7 MHz/decade of time, attributed to coupling to magnetic spin-elastic TLS modes

  4. Observation of a new coherent transient in NMR - nutational two-pulse stimulated echo in the angular distribution of gamma-radiation from oriented nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakhmuratova, L.N.; Hutchison, W.D.; Isbister, D.J.; Chaplin, D.H. [University of New South Wales, Australian Defence Force Academy, School of Physics, University College (Australia)

    1997-07-15

    A new coherent transient in pulsed NMR, the two-pulse nutational stimulated echo, is reported for the ferromagnetic system {sup 60}CoFe using resonant perturbations on the directional emission of anisotropic gamma-radiation from thermally oriented nuclei. The new spin echo is a result of non-linear nuclear spin dynamics due to large Larmor inhomogeneity active during radiofrequency pulse application. It is made readily observable through the gross detuning between NMR radiofrequency excitation and gamma radiation detection, and inhomogeneity in the Rabi frequency caused by metallic skin-effect. The method of concatenation of perturbation factors in a statistical tensor formalism is quantitatively applied to successfully predict and then fit in detail the experimental time-domain data.

  5. Observation of a new coherent transient in NMR - nutational two-pulse stimulated echo in the angular distribution of gamma-radiation from oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakhmuratova, L.N.; Hutchison, W.D.; Isbister, D.J.; Chaplin, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    A new coherent transient in pulsed NMR, the two-pulse nutational stimulated echo, is reported for the ferromagnetic system 60 CoFe using resonant perturbations on the directional emission of anisotropic gamma-radiation from thermally oriented nuclei. The new spin echo is a result of non-linear nuclear spin dynamics due to large Larmor inhomogeneity active during radiofrequency pulse application. It is made readily observable through the gross detuning between NMR radiofrequency excitation and gamma radiation detection, and inhomogeneity in the Rabi frequency caused by metallic skin-effect. The method of concatenation of perturbation factors in a statistical tensor formalism is quantitatively applied to successfully predict and then fit in detail the experimental time-domain data

  6. Observation of a new coherent transient in NMR -- nutational two-pulse stimulated echo in the angular distribution of γ-radiation from oriented nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhmuratova, L. N.; Hutchison, W. D.; Isbister, D. J.; Chaplin, D. H.

    1997-07-01

    A new coherent transient in pulsed NMR, the two-pulse nutational stimulated echo, is reported for the ferromagnetic system 60CoFe using resonant perturbations on the directional emission of anisotropic γ-radiation from thermally oriented nuclei. The new spin echo is a result of non-linear nuclear spin dynamics due to large Larmor inhomogeneity active during radiofrequency pulse application. It is made readily observable through the gross detuning between NMR radiofrequency excitation and gamma radiation detection, and inhomogeneity in the Rabi frequency caused by metallic skin-effect. The method of concatenation of perturbation factors in a statistical tensor formalism is quantitatively applied to successfully predict and then fit in detail the experimental time-domain data.

  7. 21 CFR 892.1560 - Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... system. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system is a device intended to project a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system. 892.1560... receiver. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and display equipment, patient and...

  8. Suppressing magnetization exchange effects in stimulated-echo diffusion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagès, Guilhem; Dvinskikh, Sergey V; Furó, István

    2013-09-01

    Exchange of nuclear magnetization between spin pools, either by chemical exchange or by cross-relaxation or both, has a significant influence on the signal attenuation in stimulated-echo-type pulsed field gradient experiments. Hence, in such cases the obtained molecular self-diffusion coefficients can carry a large systematic error. We propose a modified stimulated echo pulse sequence that contains T2-filters during the z-magnetization store period. We demonstrate, using a common theoretical description for chemical exchange and cross-relaxation, that these filters suppress the effects of exchange on the diffusional decay in that frequent case where one of the participating spin pools is immobile and exhibits a short T2. We demonstrate the performance of this experiment in an agarose/water gel. We posit that this new experiment has advantages over other approaches hitherto used, such as that consisting of measuring separately the magnetization exchange rate, if suitable by Goldman-Shen type experiments, and then correcting for exchange effects within the framework of a two-site exchange model. We also propose experiments based on selective decoupling and applicable in systems with no large T2 difference between the different spin pools. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Collision-induced stimulated photon echoes in ‘strong’ magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetov, V. A.

    2018-05-01

    Collision-induced stimulated photon echoes formed in a gaseous medium on the transition with the angular momentum change Ja=0 → Jb=1 under the action of ‘strong’ longitudinal magnetic field, when the echo pulse becomes unpolarized, are considered with an account of elastic depolarizing collisions. In the case of narrow spectral line the explicit expressions for the echo polarization density matrix and the degree of polarization are obtained. In the case of broad spectral line the results of the numeric calculations reproduce qualitatively the curve obtained in the experiments with ytterbium vapor.

  10. Piston cylinder cell for high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kepa, M. W., E-mail: mkepa@staffmail.ed.ac.uk; Huxley, A. D. [SUPA, Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Ridley, C. J.; Kamenev, K. V. [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3FD (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    Ultrasonic techniques such as pulse echo, vibrating reed, or resonant ultrasound spectroscopy are powerful probes not only for studying elasticity but also for investigating electronic and magnetic properties. Here, we report on the design of a high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo apparatus, based on a piston cylinder cell, with a simplified electronic setup that operates with a single coaxial cable and requires sample lengths of mm only. The design allows simultaneous measurements of ultrasonic velocities and attenuation coefficients up to a pressure of 1.5 GPa. We illustrate the performance of the cell by probing the phase diagram of a single crystal of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe{sub 2}.

  11. Stimulated nuclear spin echos and spectral diffusion in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, N.M.; Engelsberg, M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results of stimulated nuclear spin echos decay in glasses are presented. The measurements were performed in B 2 O 3 glasses, at the 23Na and 11 B resonance lines. The data analysis allows the study of Spectral diffusion at an inhomogeneous nuclear magnetic (NMR) resonance line, broadened for a desordered system of nuclear spins. A model is proposed to explain the time constants, and the particular form of the decay. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  12. Identification of pulse echo impulse responses for multi source transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    is a mixture of the information corresponding to several transmitters. There is, thus, no direct way of determining which information corresponds to which transmitter, preventing proper focusing. In this paper we decode the received signal by estimating the pulse echo impulse responses between every....... The method is evaluated using the simulation tool Field II. Three point spread functions are simulated where axial movement of 1 m/s is present. The axial resolution for the moving scatterer is 0.249 mm (-3dB) and 0.291 mm (-6dB), which is compared to a standard STA transmission scheme with sequential...

  13. Correction of echo shift in reconstruction processing for ultra-short TE pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Masahiro; Ootsuka, Takehiro; Abe, Takayuki; Takahashi, Tetsuhiko

    2010-01-01

    An ultra-short echo time (TE) pulse sequence is composed of a radial sampling that acquires echo signals radially in the K-space and a half-echo acquisition that acquires only half of the echo signal. The shift in the position of the echo signal (echo shift) caused by the timing errors in the gradient magnetic field pulses affects the image quality in the radial sampling with the half-echo acquisition. To improve image quality, we have developed a signal correction algorithm that detects and eliminates this echo shift during reconstruction by performing a pre-scan within 10 seconds. The results showed that image quality is improved under oblique and/or off-centering conditions that frequently cause image distortion due to hardware error. In conclusion, we have developed a robust ultra-short TE pulse sequence that allows wide latitude in the scan parameters, including oblique and off-centering conditions. (author)

  14. Ultrasound pulse-echo measurements on rough surfaces with linear array transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøj, Sidsel M. N.; Blanco, Esther N.; Wilhjelm, Jens E.

    2012-01-01

    The echo from planar surfaces with rms roughness, Rq, in the range from 0-155 μm was measured with a clinical linear array transducer at different angles of incidence at 6 MHz and 12 MHz. The echo-pulse from the surfaces was isolated with an equal sized window and the power of the echo-pulse was ......The echo from planar surfaces with rms roughness, Rq, in the range from 0-155 μm was measured with a clinical linear array transducer at different angles of incidence at 6 MHz and 12 MHz. The echo-pulse from the surfaces was isolated with an equal sized window and the power of the echo......-pulse was calculated. The power of the echo from the smooth surface (Rq = 0) is highly angle-dependent due to a high degree of specular reflection. Within the angular range considered here, -10° to 10°, the variation spans a range of 18 dB at both 6 MHz and 12 MHz. When roughness increases, the angle......-dependence decreases, as the echo process gradually changes from pure reflection to being predominantly governed by backscattering. The power of the echoes from the two roughest surfaces (Rq = 115 μm and 155 μm) are largely independent of angle at both 6 MHz and 12 MHz with a variation of 2 dB in the angular range...

  15. Echo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, Dustin Yewell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-25

    This document is a white paper marketing proposal for Echo™ is a data analysis platform designed for efficient, robust, and scalable creation and execution of complex workflows. Echo’s analysis management system refers to the ability to track, understand, and reproduce workflows used for arriving at results and decisions. Echo improves on traditional scripted data analysis in MATLAB, Python, R, and other languages to allow analysts to make better use of their time. Additionally, the Echo platform provides a powerful data management and curation solution allowing analysts to quickly find, access, and consume datasets. After two years of development and a first release in early 2016, Echo is now available for use with many data types in a wide range of application domains. Echo provides tools that allow users to focus on data analysis and decisions with confidence that results are reported accurately.

  16. Numerical calculation of spin echo amplitude in pulsed NMR: effects of quadrupole interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobral, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The spin echo obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance, in systems which atomic nuclei interact with magnetic fields and electric field gradients, present oscillations in function of the time interval between two excitations pulses. Using the density matrix formalism, the amplitudes of these echo is calculated, analytically. In this work, echo amplitudes obtained under different excitation conditions for nuclei of different nuclear spin values are calculated. The numerical results are compared with disposable analytical solutions. Applications of this method to the case of electric field gradient without axial symmetry were studied. Within the used approximation limits, an expression for attnuation of oscillatory behaviour of echo amplitude in function of the time interval between experimentally observed pulses was obtained. (M.C.K.) [pt

  17. Accurate step-FMCW ultrasound ranging and comparison with pulse-echo signaling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Shyam; Singh, Rahul S.; Lee, Michael; Cox, Brian P.; Culjat, Martin O.; Grundfest, Warren S.; Lee, Hua

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a method setup for high-frequency ultrasound ranging based on stepped frequency-modulated continuous waves (FMCW), potentially capable of producing a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to traditional pulse-echo signaling. In current ultrasound systems, the use of higher frequencies (10-20 MHz) to enhance resolution lowers signal quality due to frequency-dependent attenuation. The proposed ultrasound signaling format, step-FMCW, is well-known in the radar community, and features lower peak power, wider dynamic range, lower noise figure and simpler electronics in comparison to pulse-echo systems. In pulse-echo ultrasound ranging, distances are calculated using the transmit times between a pulse and its subsequent echoes. In step-FMCW ultrasonic ranging, the phase and magnitude differences at stepped frequencies are used to sample the frequency domain. Thus, by taking the inverse Fourier transform, a comprehensive range profile is recovered that has increased immunity to noise over conventional ranging methods. Step-FMCW and pulse-echo waveforms were created using custom-built hardware consisting of an arbitrary waveform generator and dual-channel super heterodyne receiver, providing high SNR and in turn, accuracy in detection.

  18. Bias-Voltage Stabilizer for HVHF Amplifiers in VHF Pulse-Echo Measurement Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hojong; Park, Chulwoo; Kim, Jungsuk; Jung, Hayong

    2017-10-23

    The impact of high-voltage-high-frequency (HVHF) amplifiers on echo-signal quality is greater with very-high-frequency (VHF, ≥100 MHz) ultrasound transducers than with low-frequency (LF, ≤15 MHz) ultrasound transducers. Hence, the bias voltage of an HVHF amplifier must be stabilized to ensure stable echo-signal amplitudes. We propose a bias-voltage stabilizer circuit to maintain stable DC voltages over a wide input range, thus reducing the harmonic-distortion components of the echo signals in VHF pulse-echo measurement systems. To confirm the feasibility of the bias-voltage stabilizer, we measured and compared the deviations in the gain of the HVHF amplifier with and without a bias-voltage stabilizer. Between -13 and 26 dBm, the measured gain deviations of a HVHF amplifier with a bias-voltage stabilizer are less than that of an amplifier without a bias-voltage stabilizer. In order to confirm the feasibility of the bias-voltage stabilizer, we compared the pulse-echo responses of the amplifiers, which are typically used for the evaluation of transducers or electronic components used in pulse-echo measurement systems. From the responses, we observed that the amplitudes of the echo signals of a VHF transducer triggered by the HVHF amplifier with a bias-voltage stabilizer were higher than those of the transducer triggered by the HVHF amplifier alone. The second, third, and fourth harmonic-distortion components of the HVHF amplifier with the bias-voltage stabilizer were also lower than those of the HVHF amplifier alone. Hence, the proposed scheme is a promising method for stabilizing the bias voltage of an HVHF amplifier, and improving the echo-signal quality of VHF transducers.

  19. Output Pressure and Pulse-Echo Characteristics of CMUTs as Function of Plate Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Søren Elmin; Hansen, Jesper Mark Fly; Engholm, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the acoustic performance of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (CMUTs) as function of plate dimensions. The objective is to increase the output pressure without decreasingthe pulse-echo signal. The CMUTs are fabricated with a LOCOS process......-to-peak output pressure and pulse-echo signal is obtained for the 9.3μm plate, which still has a moderate pulseecho bandwidth of 60%. The 9.3μm plate results in a 1.9 times higher peak-to-peak output pressure and a 3.6 times higherpulse-echo signal compared to the 2μm plate. By adjusting the plate dimensions...

  20. Numerical evaluation of pulse-echo damage detection in train rail

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Long, CS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A guided wave based monitoring system for welded freight rail, has previously been developed. The existing system was designed to only detect complete breaks. Current research efforts are focused on including a pulse-echo mode of operation in order...

  1. Effect of electromagnetic and phonon pulses on a photon echo in LaF3: Pr3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shegeda, A.M.; Khabibullin, B.M.; Lisin, V.N.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of electromagnetic-field pulses of the nanosecond duration on the inverted two-pulse, three-pulse, and long-lived three-pulse photon echoes in LaF 3 :Pr 3+ is studied. The eletromagnetic pulses were produced by a current pulse flowing through a thin metal film evaporated on the sample surface parallel to the C 3- axis. A strong decrease in echo signals is observed, even if the eletromagnetic pulses were switched on prior to laser pulses. The experimental results can be qualitatively interpreted under the assumption that during the flowing of current through the metal film, the generation of transverse acoustic and electromagnetic fields occurs that induces the pseudo-Stark splitting of energy levels of Pr 3+ ions and, as a consequence, the decrease in echo signals, if the current was switched on prior to or, correspondingly, at the instant of the action of the laser pulses. 12 refs., 5 figs

  2. Nanosecond time-resolved EPR in pulse radiolysis via the spin echo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.; Norris, J.R.; Lawler, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    The design and operation of a time-resolved electron spin echo spectrometer suitable for detecting transient radicals produced by 3 MeV electron radiolysis is described. Two modes of operation are available: Field swept mode which generates a normal EPR spectrum and kinetic mode in which the time dependence of a single EPR line is monitored. Techniques which may be used to minimize the effects of nonideal microwave pulses and overlapping sample tube signals are described. The principal advantages of the spin echo method over other time-resolved EPR methods are: (1) Improved time resolution (presently approx.30--50 nsec) allows monitoring of fast changes in EPR signals of transient radicals, (2) Lower susceptibility to interference between the EPR signal and the electron beam pulse at short times, and (3) Lack of dependence of transient signals on microwave field amplitude or static field inhomogeneity at short times. The performance of the instrument is illustrated using CIDEP from acetate radical formed in pulsed radiolysis of aqueous solutions of potassium acetate. The relaxation time and CIDEP enhancement factor obtained for this radical using the spin echo method compare favorably with previous determinations using direct detection EPR. Radical decay rates yield estimates of initial radical concentrations of 10 -4 10 -3 M per electron pulse. The Bloch equations are solved to give an expression for the echo signal for samples exhibiting CIDEP using arbitrary microwave pulse widths and distributions of Larmor frequencies. Conditions are discussed under which the time-dependent signal would be distorted by deviations from an ideal nonselective 90 0 --tau--180 0 pulse sequence

  3. Fetal stimulation by pulsed diagnostic ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, M; Ogburn, P L; Greenleaf, J F

    2001-08-01

    To show that pulsed ultrasound from a clinical ultrasonic imaging system can stimulate the fetus. Stimulation is defined mainly as increased fetal gross body movements in response to excitation. Fetuses of a group of 9 volunteer women (mean gestational age, 33.37 weeks; range, 25-40 weeks) were evaluated for body movement under 3 different conditions: (1) control, with no ultrasound exposure; (2) ultrasound in continuous wave Doppler mode; and (3) pulsed ultrasound in pulsed Doppler and B modes. A conventional external fetal monitor, with negligible ultrasonic output, was used to monitor fetal gross body motions. After an initial rest period of 3 minutes with 1 or no fetal motion, fetuses were monitored for an additional 3 minutes under the exposure criterion defined for each condition. Resulting fetal motions under the 3 conditions were compared using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The test showed that fetuses moved significantly more frequently under condition 3 (mean +/- SD, 3.43 +/- 1.93 movements per minute) than under condition 1 (0.40 +/- 7.33 movements per minute) or condition 2 (0.63 +/- 7.67 movements per minute); P = .004 and .016, respectively. Fetal movements under conditions 1 and 2 did not differ significantly. Diagnostic ultrasound may stimulate fetal body motion.

  4. Phase-processing as a tool for speckle reduction in pulse-echo images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Healey, AJ; Leeman, S; Forsberg, F

    1991-01-01

    . Traditional speckle reduction procedures regard speckle correction as a stochastic process and trade image smoothing (resolution loss) for speckle reduction. Recently, a new phase acknowledging technique has been proposed that is unique in its ability to correct for speckle interference with no image......Due to the coherent nature of conventional ultrasound medical imaging systems interference artefacts occur in pulse echo images. These artefacts are generically termed 'speckle'. The phenomenon may severely limit low contrast resolution with clinically relevant information being obscured...

  5. Optimized, unequal pulse spacing in multiple echo sequences improves refocusing in magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenista, Elizabeth R; Stokes, Ashley M; Branca, Rosa Tamara; Warren, Warren S

    2009-11-28

    A recent quantum computing paper (G. S. Uhrig, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 100504 (2007)) analytically derived optimal pulse spacings for a multiple spin echo sequence designed to remove decoherence in a two-level system coupled to a bath. The spacings in what has been called a "Uhrig dynamic decoupling (UDD) sequence" differ dramatically from the conventional, equal pulse spacing of a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) multiple spin echo sequence. The UDD sequence was derived for a model that is unrelated to magnetic resonance, but was recently shown theoretically to be more general. Here we show that the UDD sequence has theoretical advantages for magnetic resonance imaging of structured materials such as tissue, where diffusion in compartmentalized and microstructured environments leads to fluctuating fields on a range of different time scales. We also show experimentally, both in excised tissue and in a live mouse tumor model, that optimal UDD sequences produce different T(2)-weighted contrast than do CPMG sequences with the same number of pulses and total delay, with substantial enhancements in most regions. This permits improved characterization of low-frequency spectral density functions in a wide range of applications.

  6. Digitising of ultrasonic pulse echo devices as a means for automation of ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.

    1989-01-01

    A universal multi-purpose test equipment - EPOCH 2002 - with a 12.5 cm picture tube and a digitally generated echo pulse representation with a format of 80x57 mm is introduced. The content of the screen and the equipment adjustment data can be passed on to external units via a video or RS 232 interface. These parameters favour the use of equipment in part-automated test systems, such as, for example, level monitoring with difficult geometries, continuous testing of shrinkage during profile extrusion and testing for cracks around bolts and rivets with a rotor scanner in aircraft construction. (orig./MM) [de

  7. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Feed Flow Loop Phase VI: PulseEcho System Performance Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.

    2012-11-21

    This document presents the visual and ultrasonic PulseEcho critical velocity test results obtained from the System Performance test campaign that was completed in September 2012 with the Remote Sampler Demonstration (RSD)/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform located at the Monarch test facility in Pasco, Washington. This report is intended to complement and accompany the report that will be developed by WRPS on the design of the System Performance simulant matrix, the analysis of the slurry test sample concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) data, and the design and construction of the RSD/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform.

  8. An efficient ultrasonic SAFT imaging for pulse-echo immersion testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hong Wei [Changsha University of Science and Technology, Changsha (China); Jeong, Hyun Jo [Div. of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    An ultrasonic synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) using a root mean square (RMS) velocity model is proposed for pulse-echo immersion testing to improve the computational efficiency. Considering the immersion ultrasonic testing of a steel block as an example, three kinds of imaging were studied (B-Scan, SAFT imaging based on ray tracing technology and RMS velocity). The experimental results show that two kinds of SAFT imaging have almost the same imaging performance, while the efficiency of RMS velocity SAFT imaging is almost 25 times greater than the SAFT based on Snell's law.

  9. An efficient ultrasonic SAFT imaging for pulse-echo immersion testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hong Wei; Jeong, Hyun Jo

    2017-01-01

    An ultrasonic synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) using a root mean square (RMS) velocity model is proposed for pulse-echo immersion testing to improve the computational efficiency. Considering the immersion ultrasonic testing of a steel block as an example, three kinds of imaging were studied (B-Scan, SAFT imaging based on ray tracing technology and RMS velocity). The experimental results show that two kinds of SAFT imaging have almost the same imaging performance, while the efficiency of RMS velocity SAFT imaging is almost 25 times greater than the SAFT based on Snell's law

  10. Phase-alternated composite π/2 pulses for solid state quadrupole echo NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamoorthy, A.; Narasimhan, P.T.

    1991-01-01

    Phase-alternated composite π/2 pulses have been constructed for spin I=1 to overcome quadrupole interaction effects in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) spectroscopy. Magnus expansion approach is used to design these sequences in a manner similar to the NMR coherent averaging theory. It is inferred that the symmetric phase-alternated composite π/2 pulses reported here are quite successful in producing quadrupole echo free phase distortions. This effectiveness of the present composite pulses is due to the fact that most of them are of shorter durations as compared to the ones reported in literature. In this theoretical procedure, irreducible spherical tensor operator formalism is employed to simplify the complexity involved in the evaluation of Magnus expansion terms. It has been argued in this paper that composite π/2 pulse sequences for this purpose can also be derived from the broadband inversion π pulses which are designed to compensate electric field gradient(efg) inhomogeniety in spin I=1 nuclear quadrupole resonance(NQR) spectroscopy. (author). 28 refs

  11. MATLAB/Simulink Pulse-Echo Ultrasound System Simulator Based on Experimentally Validated Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehoon; Shin, Sangmin; Lee, Hyongmin; Lee, Hyunsook; Kim, Heewon; Shin, Eunhee; Kim, Suhwan

    2016-02-01

    A flexible clinical ultrasound system must operate with different transducers, which have characteristic impulse responses and widely varying impedances. The impulse response determines the shape of the high-voltage pulse that is transmitted and the specifications of the front-end electronics that receive the echo; the impedance determines the specification of the matching network through which the transducer is connected. System-level optimization of these subsystems requires accurate modeling of pulse-echo (two-way) response, which in turn demands a unified simulation of the ultrasonics and electronics. In this paper, this is realized by combining MATLAB/Simulink models of the high-voltage transmitter, the transmission interface, the acoustic subsystem which includes wave propagation and reflection, the receiving interface, and the front-end receiver. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our simulator, the models are experimentally validated by comparing the simulation results with the measured data from a commercial ultrasound system. This simulator could be used to quickly provide system-level feedback for an optimized tuning of electronic design parameters.

  12. Development of gap measurement technique in-vessel corium retention using ultrasonic pulse echo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Kil Mo; Kim, Jong Hwan; Kang, Kyung Ho; Kim, Sang Baik; Sim, Cheul Muu

    1999-03-01

    A gap between a molten material and a lower vessel is formed in the LAVA experiment, a phase 1 study of Sonata-IV program. In this technical report, quantitative results of the gap measurement using an off-line ultrasonic pulse echo method are presented. This report aims at development of an appropriate ultrasonics test method, by analyzing the problems from the external environmental reason and the internal characteristic reason. The signal analyzing methods to improve the S/N ratio in these problems are divided into the time variant synthesized signal analyzing method and the time invariant synthesized signal analyzing method. In this report, the possibility of the application of these two methods to the gap signal and the noise is considered. In this test, the signal of the propagational direction and reflectional direction through solid-liquid-solid specimen was analyzed to understand the behavior of the reflectional signal in a multi-layered structure by filling the gap with water between the melt and the lower head vessel. The quantitative gap measurement using the off-line ultrasonic pulse echo method was available for a little of the scanned region. But furtherly using DSP technique and imaging technique, the better results will be obtained. Some of the measured signals are presented as 2-dimensional spherical mapping method using distance and amplitude. Other signals difficult in quantitative measurement are saved for a new signal processing method. (author). 11 refs., 4 tabs., 54 figs

  13. A Radiation Dosimetry Method Using Pulsed Optically Stimulated Luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akselrod, M.S.; McKeever, S.W.S.

    1999-01-01

    A method for the determination of absorbed radiation dose is described based on pulsed optically stimulated luminescence (POSL). The method relies upon the stimulation of an irradiated sample with a train of light pulses from a suitable light source (e.g. a laser) using a wavelength which is within the range of wavelengths corresponding to the radiation-induced optical absorption in the irradiated sample. The subsequent emitted light, due to the detrapping of trapped charges and their subsequent recombination with charge of the opposite sign, is synchronously detected in the period between each stimulation pulse. The total luminescence is summed over the desired number of stimulation pulses and this forms the measured POSL signal. By monitoring the emitted light only in the period between stimulation pulses one can reduce the optical filtering required to discriminate between the stimulation light and the emission light; in this way a high measurement efficiency, and, therefore, a high radiation sensitivity (luminescence intensity per unit absorbed dose) is achieved. Key parameters in the method are the intrinsic luminescence lifetime for the material being used as the luminescent detector, the width of the optical stimulation pulse, and the period between pulses. For optimum operation the measurement parameters should be such that both the pulse width and the time between pulses are much less than the luminescence lifetime. By appropriate choice of the power of the optical stimulation, the frequency of the stimulation pulses, and the total stimulation period, one can also re-measure the absorbed dose several times. In this way, a re-read capability is available with the procedure. The method is illustrated using light from a 2nd-harmonic Nd:YAG laser, with irradiated, anion-deficient aluminium oxide as the luminescent detector material. (author)

  14. Dispersed three-pulse infrared photon echoes of nitrous oxide in water and octanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattuck, J T; Schneck, J R; Chieffo, L R; Erramilli, S; Ziegler, L D

    2013-12-12

    Dispersed IR three-pulse photon echoes due to the antisymmetric (ν3) stretch mode of N2O dissolved in H2O and 1-octanol at room temperature are reported and analyzed. The experimentally determined transition frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) in these two solvents is explained in terms of inertial solvent contributions, hydrogen bond network fluctuations, and, for octanol, the motions of the alkyl chains. The H2O hydrogen bond fluctuations result in 1.5 ps FFCF decay, in agreement with relaxation rates determined from photon echo based measurements of other aqueous solutions including salt solutions. In octanol, hydrogen bond fluctuations decay on a slower time scale of 3.3 ps and alkyl chain motions result in an inhomogeneous broadening contribution to the ν3 absorption spectrum that decays on a 35 ps time scale. Rotational reorientation of N2O is nearly 3 times faster in octanol as compared to water. Although the vibrational ν3 N2O absorption line shapes in water and octanol are similar, the line widths result from different coherence loss mechanisms. A hot band contribution in the N2O in octanol solution is found to have a significant effect on the echo spectrum due to its correspondingly stronger transition moment than that of the fundamental transition. The dephasing dynamics of the N2O ν3 stretch mode is of interest as a probe in ultrafast studies of complex or nanoconfined systems with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions such as phospholipids, nucleic acids, and proteins. These results demonstrate the value of the N2O molecule to act as a reporter of equilibrium fluctuations in such complex systems particularly due to its solubility characteristics and long vibrational lifetime.

  15. Functional imaging of submandibular glands: diffusion-weighted echo-planar MRI before and after stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, C.; Cramer, M.C.; Weiss, F.; Kaul, M.G.; Adam, G.; Habermann, C.R.; Graessner, J.; Petersen, K.; Reitmeier, F.; Jaehne, M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DWI) echo-planar imaging (EPI) to depict the submandibular glands and to measure different functional conditions. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven healthy volunteers were examined. Diffusion weighted sequence was performed prior to stimulation. Exactly 30 seconds after a commercially available lemon juice was given orally, the diffusion weighted sequence was repeated. All examinations were performed by using a 1.5-T superconducting system with a 30 mT/m maximum gradient capability and maximum slew rate of 125 mT/m/sec (Magnetom Symphony, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The lower part of the circularly polarized (CP) head coil and a standard two-element CP neck array coil were used. The flexibility of the neck array coil allowed positioning the N1 element (upper part of the coil) right next to the submandibular gland. The axial diffusion-weighted EPI (echo planar imaging) sequence was performed using a matrix of 119 x 128, a field of view of 250 x 250 mm (pixel size 2.1 x 1.95 mm), a section thickness of 5 mm with an interslice gap of 1 mm. The b factors used were 0 sec/mm 2 , 500 sec/mm 2 and 1000 sec/mm 2 . Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were digitally transferred to MRIcro (Chris Rorden, University of Nottingham, Great Britain). After detecting the submandibular glands a region of interest (ROI) was placed manually exactly within the boarder of both submandibular glands, excluding the external carotid artery on ADC maps. These procedures were performed on all ADC slices the submandibular glands could be differentiated in before and after oral stimulation. For statistical comparison of results, a student's t-test was performed with an overall two-tailed significance level of p=0.05. Results: The visualization of the submandibular glands using the diffusion-weighted EPI sequence was possible in all of the 27 volunteers. Prior to oral stimulation an ADC of 1.31 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec (95% CI, 1

  16. Theoretical determination of transit time locus curves for ultrasonic pulse echo testing - ALOK. Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grohs, B.

    1983-01-01

    The ALOK-technique allows the simultaneous detection of flaws and their evaluation with respect to type, location and dimension by interpretation of the transit time behaviour during scanning of the reflector. The accuracy of information obtained by means of this technique can be further improved both during interference elimination and reconstruction owing to the ability of exact calculation of possible transit time locus curves of given reflectors. The mathematical solution of transit time locus curve calculations refers here to pulse echo testing in consideration of the refraction of sound on the forward wedge/test object - interface. The method of solving the problem is equivalent to the Fermat's principle in optics. (orig.) [de

  17. The maturity characterization of orange fruit by using high frequency ultrasonic echo pulse method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboudaoud, I; Faiz, B; Aassif, E; Izbaim, D; Abassi, D; Malainine, M; Azergui, M; Moudden, A

    2012-01-01

    In this present work, we develop a new ultrasonic echo pulse method in order to study the feasibility of maturity assessment of orange fruit. This study concerns two varieties of orange (Navel and Mandarin) which are the most harvested in the region of Souss-Massa-Drāa in Morocco. We worked in the range of high frequencies by the means of a focusing transducer with 20MHz as a central frequency. By taking into account the strong attenuation of the ultrasounds in the texture of fruits and vegetables, we limited our study only to the external layer of orange peel. This control is based mainly on the measure of the ultrasonic parameters eventually velocity and attenuation in order to check the aptitude of this technique to detect the maturity degree of the fruit without passing by penetrometric and biochemical measurements which are generally destructives but the mostly correlated with human perception concerning the firmness of the fruit.

  18. Functional imaging of parotid glands: Diffusion-weighted echo-planar MRI before and after stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habermann, C.R.; Cramer, M.C.; Gossrau, P.; Adam, G. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Graessner, J. [Siemens AG, Hamburg (Germany). Medical Solutions; Reitmeier, F.; Jaehne, M. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Department of Oto-, Rhino-, Laryngology; Fiehler, J. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Department of Neuroradiology; Schoder, V. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Institute for Medical Biometry and Epidemiology

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) echo-planar imaging (EPI) for measuring different functional conditions of the parotid gland and to compare different measurement approaches. Materials and Methods: Parotid glands of 27 healthy volunteers were examined with a DW EPI sequence (TR 1,500 msec, TE 77 msec, field-of-view 250 x 250 mm, pixel size 2.10 x 1.95 mm, section thickness 5 mm) before and after oral stimulation with commercially available lemon juice. The b factors used were 0, 500, and 1,000 sec/mm{sup 2}. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were digitally transferred to MRIcro (Chris Rorden, University of Nottingham, Great Britain) and evaluated with a manually placed circular region of interest (ROI) containing 100-200 pixel. Additional ROIs including the entire parotid gland were placed on either side. The results of both measurements were compared, using the Student's t test based on the median ADC values for each person. A two-tailed p-value of less than.05 was determined to indicate statistical significance. To compare both measurement approaches, the Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) was calculated. Results: Diffusion-weighted echo-planar MR imaging successfully visualized the parotid gland of all volunteers. In a first step, the median ADC value per person was computed. Using ROIs of 100-200 pixels, the mean was calculated to be 1.08 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec{+-}0.12 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec for both parotid glands prior to simulation. After stimulation, the mean ADC was measured at 1.15 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec{+-}0.11 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec for both parotid glands. Evaluating the entire parotid gland, the ADC was 1.12 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec{+-}0.08 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec prior to simulation, whereas the ADC increased to 1.18 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec{+-}0.09 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec after simulation with lemon juice. For both types of measurements, the increase in ADC after

  19. Stimulated brillouin backscatter of a short-pulse laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkel, D.E.; Williams, E.A.; Berger, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBBS) from a short-pulse laser, where the pulse length is short compared to the plasma length, is found to be qualitatively different than in the long pulse regime, where the pulse length is long compared to the plasma length. We find that after an initial transient of order the laser pulse length transit time, the instability reaches a steady state in the variables x' = x - V g t, t' = t, where V g is the pulse group velocity. In contrast, SBBS in a long pulse can be absolutely unstable and grows indefinitely, or until nonlinearities intervene. We find that the motion of the laser pulse induces Doppler related effects that substantially modify the backscattered spectrum at higher intensities, where the instability is strongly coupled (i.e. , has a growth rate large compared to the ion acoustic frequency)

  20. Generation of ultrafast pulse via combined effects of stimulated

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A project of ultrafast pulse generation has been presented and demonstrated by utilizing the combined nonlinear effects of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and non-degenerate two-photon absorption (TPA) based on silicon nanophotonic chip, in which a continuous wave (CW) and an ultrafast dark pulse are ...

  1. SBS [stimulated Brillouin scattering] pulse distortion in multimode optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.R.; Hawkins, R.J.; Laumann, C.W.; Hatch, J.

    1989-01-01

    We have observed sever temporal-pulse-shape distortion due to stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in multimode optical fibers used to diagnose 351 m laser pulses on the Nova laser system. Our measurements can be fit by a basic model of SBS and provide a clear indication of the intensity and temporal regimes where significant SBS-induced temporal-pulse-shape distortion can be avoided. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Transcranial stimulability of phosphenes by long lightning electromagnetic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peer, J.; Kendl, A.

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic pulses of rare long (order of seconds) repetitive lightning discharges near strike point (order of 100 m) are analyzed and compared to magnetic fields applied in standard clinical transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) practice. It is shown that the time-varying lightning magnetic fields and locally induced electric fields are in the same order of magnitude and frequency as those established in TMS experiments to study stimulated perception phenomena, like magnetophosphenes. Lightning electromagnetic pulse induced transcranial magnetic stimulation of phosphenes in the visual cortex is concluded to be a plausible interpretation of a large class of reports on luminous perceptions during thunderstorms.

  3. Transcranial stimulability of phosphenes by long lightning electromagnetic pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peer, J. [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kendl, A., E-mail: alexander.kendl@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-06-28

    The electromagnetic pulses of rare long (order of seconds) repetitive lightning discharges near strike point (order of 100 m) are analyzed and compared to magnetic fields applied in standard clinical transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) practice. It is shown that the time-varying lightning magnetic fields and locally induced electric fields are in the same order of magnitude and frequency as those established in TMS experiments to study stimulated perception phenomena, like magnetophosphenes. Lightning electromagnetic pulse induced transcranial magnetic stimulation of phosphenes in the visual cortex is concluded to be a plausible interpretation of a large class of reports on luminous perceptions during thunderstorms.

  4. Collision-induced stimulated photon echo generated at transition 0-1 on broad spectral line conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsova, N. N.; Gol'dort, V. G.; Ishchenko, V. N.; Khvorostov, E. B.; Kochubei, S. A.; Borisov, G. M.; Ledovskikh, D. V.; Reshetov, V. A.

    2018-04-01

    For the first time, the collision induced stimulated photon echo generated at transition 1S0 → 3 P1 of 174Yb (type 0-1) in the mixture of gases Yb  +  Xe was investigated in the presence of weak longitudinal magnetic field, with experimental parameters corresponding to broad spectral line conditions. Comparison of the experimental echo amplitude versus magnetic field strength dependence with the theoretical curve shows a very good agreement, giving rise to an improved estimate for the difference between alignment and orientation decay rates.

  5. Development of an ultrasonic pulse-echo (UPE) technique for aircraft icing studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang; Hu, Hui [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, 2271 Howe Hall, Room 1200, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Chen, Wen-Li [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, 2271 Howe Hall, Room 1200, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); School of Civil Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150090 (China); Bond, Leonard J. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, 2271 Howe Hall, Room 1200, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, 1915 Scholl Road, 151 ASC II, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Aircraft operating in some cold weather conditions face the risk of icing. Icing poses a threat to flight safety and its management is expensive. Removing light frost on a clear day from a medium-size business jet can cost $300, heavy wet snow removal can cost $3,000 and removal of accumulated frozen/freezing rain can cost close to $10,000. Understanding conditions that lead to severe icing events is important and challenging. When an aircraft or rotorcraft flies in a cold climate, some of the super cooled droplets impinging on exposed aircraft surfaces may flow along the surface prior to freezing and give various forms and shapes of ice. The runback behavior of a water film on an aircraft affects the morphology of ice accretion and the rate of formation. In this study, we report the recent progress to develop an Ultrasonic Pulse-Echo (UPE) technique to provide real-time thickness distribution measurements of surface water flows driven by boundary layer airflows for aircraft icing studies. A series of initial experimental investigations are conducted in an ice wind tunnel employing an array of ultrasonic transducers placed underneath the surface of a flat plate. The water runback behavior on the plate is evaluated by measuring the thickness profile variation of the water film along the surface by using the UPE technique under various wind speed and flow rate conditions.

  6. Pulse Width Affects Scalp Sensation of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V; Luber, Bruce; Westin, Gregory G; Lisanby, Sarah H

    Scalp sensation and pain comprise the most common side effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which can reduce tolerability and complicate experimental blinding. We explored whether changing the width of single TMS pulses affects the quality and tolerability of the resultant somatic sensation. Using a controllable pulse parameter TMS device with a figure-8 coil, single monophasic magnetic pulses inducing electric field with initial phase width of 30, 60, and 120 µs were delivered in 23 healthy volunteers. Resting motor threshold of the right first dorsal interosseus was determined for each pulse width, as reported previously. Subsequently, pulses were delivered over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex at each of the three pulse widths at two amplitudes (100% and 120% of the pulse-width-specific motor threshold), with 20 repetitions per condition delivered in random order. After each pulse, subjects rated 0-to-10 visual analog scales for Discomfort, Sharpness, and Strength of the sensation. Briefer TMS pulses with amplitude normalized to the motor threshold were perceived as slightly more uncomfortable than longer pulses (with an average 0.89 point increase on the Discomfort scale for pulse width of 30 µs compared to 120 µs). The sensation of the briefer pulses was felt to be substantially sharper (2.95 points increase for 30 µs compared to 120 µs pulse width), but not stronger than longer pulses. As expected, higher amplitude pulses increased the perceived discomfort and strength, and, to a lesser degree the perceived sharpness. Our findings contradict a previously published hypothesis that briefer TMS pulses are more tolerable. We discovered that the opposite is true, which merits further study as a means of enhancing tolerability in the context of repetitive TMS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Continued Evaluation of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 12518

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Hopkins, Derek F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Thien, Michael G.; Wooley, Theodore A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will be governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. In 2010 Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to accurately identify critical velocities in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of >50 micrometers. In 2011 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated to identify critical velocities for slurries containing fast-settling, high-density particles with a mean particle diameter of <15 micrometers. This two-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

  8. WE-DE-206-04: MRI Pulse Sequences - Spin Echo, Gradient Echo, EPI, Non-Cartesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pooley, R. [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential part of clinical imaging due to its ability to render high soft tissue contrast. Instead of ionizing radiation, MRI use strong magnetic field, radio frequency waves and field gradients to create diagnostic useful images. It can be used to image the anatomy and also functional and physiological activities within the human body. Knowledge of the basic physical principles underlying MRI acquisition is vitally important to successful image production and proper image interpretation. This lecture will give an overview of the spin physics, imaging principle of MRI, the hardware of the MRI scanner, and various pulse sequences and their applications. It aims to provide a conceptual foundation to understand the image formation process of a clinical MRI scanner. Learning Objectives: Understand the origin of the MR signal and contrast from the spin physics level. Understand the main hardware components of a MRI scanner and their purposes Understand steps for MR image formation including spatial encoding and image reconstruction Understand the main kinds of MR pulse sequences and their characteristics.

  9. Development of pulse-echo ultrasonic propagation imaging system and its delivery to Korea Air Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hasan; Hong, Seung-Chan; Lee, Jung-Ryul; Park, Jongwoon; Ihn, Jeong-Beom

    2017-04-01

    This paper proposes a full-field pulse-echo ultrasonic propagation imaging (FF-PE-UPI) system for non-destructive evaluation of structural defects. The system works by detection of bulk waves that travel through the thickness of a specimen. This is achieved by joining the laser beams for the ultrasonic wave generation and sensing. This enables accurate and clear damage assessment and defect localization in the thickness with minimum signal processing since bulk waves are less susceptible to dispersion during short propagation through the thickness. The system consists of a Qswitched laser for generating the aforementioned waves, a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) for sensing, optical elements to combine the generating and sensing laser beams, a dual-axis automated translation stage for raster scanning of the specimen and a digitizer to record the signals. A graphical user interface (GUI) is developed to control all the individual blocks of the system. Additionally, the software also manages signal acquisition, processing, and display. The GUI is created in C++ using the QT framework. In view of the requirements posed by the Korean Air Force(KAF), the system is designed to be compact and portable to allow for in situ inspection of a selected area of a larger structure such as radome or rudder of an aircraft. The GUI is designed with a minimalistic approach to promote usability and adaptability while masking the intricacies of actual system operation. Through the use of multithreading the software is able to show the results while a specimen is still being scanned. This is achieved by real-time and concurrent acquisition, processing, and display of ultrasonic signal of the latest scan point in the scan area.

  10. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulator with controllable pulse parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; Murphy, David L.; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10-310 µs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1-56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation up to 82% and 57% and decreases coil heating up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency.

  11. DrSPINE - New approach to data reduction and analysis for neutron spin echo experiments from pulsed and reactor sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolnierczuk, P.A.; Ohl, M.; Holderer, O.; Monkenbusch, M.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron spin echo (NSE) method at a pulsed neutron source presents new challenges to the data reduction and analysis as compared to the instruments installed at reactor sources. The main advantage of the pulsed source NSE is the ability to resolve the neutron wavelength and collect neutrons over a wider bandwidth. This allows us to more precisely determine the symmetry phase and measure the data for several Q-values at the same time. Based on the experience gained at the SNS NSE - the first, and to date the only one, NSE instrument installed at a pulsed spallation source, we propose a novel and unified approach to the NSE data processing called DrSPINE. The goals of the DrSPINE project are: -) exploit better symmetry phase determination due to the broader bandwidth at a pulsed source; -) take advantage of larger Q coverage for TOF instruments; -) use objective statistical criteria to get the echo fits right; -) provide robust reduction with report generation; -) incorporate absolute instrument calibration; and -) allow for background subtraction. The software must be able to read the data from various instruments, perform data integrity, consistency and compatibility checks and combine the data from compatible sets, partial scans, etc. We chose to provide a console-based interface with the ability to process macros (scripts) for batch evaluation. And last and not the least, a good software package has to provide adequate documentation. DrSPINE software is currently under development

  12. A Novel Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator Inducing Near Rectangular Pulses with Controllable Pulse Width (cTMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalinous, Reza; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2013-01-01

    A novel transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) device with controllable pulse width (PW) and near rectangular pulse shape (cTMS) is described. The cTMS device uses an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) with appropriate snubbers to switch coil currents up to 7 kA, enabling PW control from 5 μs to over 100 μs. The near-rectangular induced electric field pulses use 22–34% less energy and generate 67–72% less coil heating compared to matched conventional cosine pulses. CTMS is used to stimulate rhesus monkey motor cortex in vivo with PWs of 20 to 100 μs, demonstrating the expected decrease of threshold pulse amplitude with increasing PW. The technological solutions used in the cTMS prototype can expand functionality, and reduce power consumption and coil heating in TMS, enhancing its research and therapeutic applications. PMID:18232369

  13. Higher-order power harmonics of pulsed electrical stimulation modulates corticospinal contribution of peripheral nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiun-Fan; Bikson, Marom; Chou, Li-Wei; Shan, Chunlei; Khadka, Niranjan; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Fregni, Felipe

    2017-03-03

    It is well established that electrical-stimulation frequency is crucial to determining the scale of induced neuromodulation, particularly when attempting to modulate corticospinal excitability. However, the modulatory effects of stimulation frequency are not only determined by its absolute value but also by other parameters such as power at harmonics. The stimulus pulse shape further influences parameters such as excitation threshold and fiber selectivity. The explicit role of the power in these harmonics in determining the outcome of stimulation has not previously been analyzed. In this study, we adopted an animal model of peripheral electrical stimulation that includes an amplitude-adapted pulse train which induces force enhancements with a corticospinal contribution. We report that the electrical-stimulation-induced force enhancements were correlated with the amplitude of stimulation power harmonics during the amplitude-adapted pulse train. In an exploratory analysis, different levels of correlation were observed between force enhancement and power harmonics of 20-80 Hz (r = 0.4247, p = 0.0243), 100-180 Hz (r = 0.5894, p = 0.0001), 200-280 Hz (r = 0.7002, p harmonics. This is a pilot, but important first demonstration that power at high order harmonics in the frequency spectrum of electrical stimulation pulses may contribute to neuromodulation, thus warrant explicit attention in therapy design and analysis.

  14. Choice of reference measurements affects quantification of long diffusion time behaviour using stimulated echoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinnijenhuis, Michiel; Mollink, Jeroen; Lam, Wilfred W; Kinchesh, Paul; Khrapitchev, Alexandre A; Smart, Sean C; Jbabdi, Saad; Miller, Karla L

    2018-02-01

    To demonstrate how reference data affect the quantification of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in long diffusion time measurements with diffusion-weighted stimulated echo acquisition mode (DW-STEAM) measurements, and to present a modification to avoid contribution from crusher gradients in DW-STEAM. For DW-STEAM, reference measurements at long diffusion times have significant b 0 value, because b = 0 cannot be achieved in practice as a result of the need for signal spoiling. Two strategies for acquiring reference data over a range of diffusion times were considered: constant diffusion weighting (fixed-b 0 ) and constant gradient area (fixed-q 0 ). Fixed-b 0 and fixed-q 0 were compared using signal calculations for systems with one and two diffusion coefficients, and experimentally using data from postmortem human corpus callosum samples. Calculations of biexponential diffusion decay show that the ADC is underestimated for reference images with b > 0, which can induce an apparent time-dependence for fixed-q 0 . Restricted systems were also found to be affected. Experimentally, the exaggeration of the diffusion time-dependent effect under fixed-q 0 versus fixed-b 0 was in a range predicted theoretically, accounting for 62% (longitudinal) and 35% (radial) of the time dependence observed in white matter. Variation in the b-value of reference measurements in DW-STEAM can induce artificial diffusion time dependence in ADC, even in the absence of restriction. Magn Reson Med 79:952-959, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  15. Controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulator with enhanced circuit topology and pulse shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; DʼOstilio, Kevin; Rothwell, John C.; Murphy, David L.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. This work aims at flexible and practical pulse parameter control in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which is currently very limited in commercial devices. Approach. We present a third generation controllable pulse parameter device (cTMS3) that uses a novel circuit topology with two energy-storage capacitors. It incorporates several implementation and functionality advantages over conventional TMS devices and other devices with advanced pulse shape control. cTMS3 generates lower internal voltage differences and is implemented with transistors with a lower voltage rating than prior cTMS devices. Main results. cTMS3 provides more flexible pulse shaping since the circuit topology allows four coil-voltage levels during a pulse, including approximately zero voltage. The near-zero coil voltage enables snubbing of the ringing at the end of the pulse without the need for a separate active snubber circuit. cTMS3 can generate powerful rapid pulse sequences (\\lt 10 ms inter pulse interval) by increasing the width of each subsequent pulse and utilizing the large capacitor energy storage, allowing the implementation of paradigms such as paired-pulse and quadripulse TMS with a single pulse generation circuit. cTMS3 can also generate theta (50 Hz) burst stimulation with predominantly unidirectional electric field pulses. The cTMS3 device functionality and output strength are illustrated with electrical output measurements as well as a study of the effect of pulse width and polarity on the active motor threshold in ten healthy volunteers. Significance. The cTMS3 features could extend the utility of TMS as a research, diagnostic, and therapeutic tool.

  16. Power MOSFET Linearizer of a High-Voltage Power Amplifier for High-Frequency Pulse-Echo Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hojong; Woo, Park Chul; Yeom, Jung-Yeol; Yoon, Changhan

    2017-04-04

    A power MOSFET linearizer is proposed for a high-voltage power amplifier (HVPA) used in high-frequency pulse-echo instrumentation. The power MOSFET linearizer is composed of a DC bias-controlled series power MOSFET shunt with parallel inductors and capacitors. The proposed scheme is designed to improve the gain deviation characteristics of the HVPA at higher input powers. By controlling the MOSFET bias voltage in the linearizer, the gain reduction into the HVPA was compensated, thereby reducing the echo harmonic distortion components generated by the ultrasonic transducers. In order to verify the performance improvement of the HVPA implementing the power MOSFET linearizer, we measured and found that the gain deviation of the power MOSFET linearizer integrated with HVPA under 10 V DC bias voltage was reduced (-1.8 and -0.96 dB, respectively) compared to that of the HVPA without the power MOSFET linearizer (-2.95 and -3.0 dB, respectively) when 70 and 80 MHz, three-cycle, and 26 dB m input pulse waveforms are applied, respectively. The input 1-dB compression point (an index of linearity) of the HVPA with power MOSFET linearizer (24.17 and 26.19 dB m at 70 and 80 MHz, respectively) at 10 V DC bias voltage was increased compared to that of HVPA without the power MOSFET linearizer (22.03 and 22.13 dB m at 70 and 80 MHz, respectively). To further verify the reduction of the echo harmonic distortion components generated by the ultrasonic transducers, the pulse-echo responses in the pulse-echo instrumentation were compared when using HVPA with and without the power MOSFET linearizer. When three-cycle 26 dB m input power was applied, the second, third, fourth, and fifth harmonic distortion components of a 75 MHz transducer driven by the HVPA with power MOSFET linearizer (-48.34, -44.21, -48.34, and -46.56 dB, respectively) were lower than that of the HVPA without the power MOSFET linearizer (-45.61, -41.57, -45.01, and -45.51 dB, respectively). When five-cycle 20 dB m input

  17. Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

  18. Optimally shaped narrowband picosecond pulses for femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David P; Valley, David; Ellis, Scott R; Creelman, Mark; Mathies, Richard A

    2013-09-09

    A comparison between a Fabry-Pérot etalon filter and a conventional grating filter for producing the picosecond (ps) Raman pump pulses for femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is presented. It is shown that for pulses of equal energy the etalon filter produces Raman signals twice as large as that of the grating filter while suppressing the electronically resonant background signal. The time asymmetric profile of the etalon-generated pulse is shown to be responsible for both of these observations. A theoretical discussion is presented which quantitatively supports this hypothesis. It is concluded that etalons are the ideal method for the generation of narrowband ps pulses for FSRS because of the optical simplicity, efficiency, improved FSRS intensity and reduced backgrounds.

  19. Characterization of echoes: A Dyson-series representation of individual pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Miguel R.; Cardoso, Vitor

    2018-04-01

    The ability to detect and scrutinize gravitational waves from the merger and coalescence of compact binaries opens up the possibility to perform tests of fundamental physics. One such test concerns the dark nature of compact objects: are they really black holes? It was recently pointed out that the absence of horizons—while keeping the external geometry very close to that of General Relativity—would manifest itself in a series of echoes in gravitational wave signals. The observation of echoes by LIGO/Virgo or upcoming facilities would likely inform us on quantum gravity effects or unseen types of matter. Detection of such signals is in principle feasible with relatively simple tools but would benefit enormously from accurate templates. Here we analytically individualize each echo waveform and show that it can be written as a Dyson series, for arbitrary effective potential and boundary conditions. We further apply the formalism to explicitly determine the echoes of a simple toy model: the Dirac delta potential. Our results allow to read off a few known features of echoes and may find application in the modeling for data analysis.

  20. A fast random walk algorithm for computing the pulsed-gradient spin-echo signal in multiscale porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, Denis S

    2011-02-01

    A new method for computing the signal attenuation due to restricted diffusion in a linear magnetic field gradient is proposed. A fast random walk (FRW) algorithm for simulating random trajectories of diffusing spin-bearing particles is combined with gradient encoding. As random moves of a FRW are continuously adapted to local geometrical length scales, the method is efficient for simulating pulsed-gradient spin-echo experiments in hierarchical or multiscale porous media such as concrete, sandstones, sedimentary rocks and, potentially, brain or lungs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Underlying Mechanism of Preventing Facial Nerve Stimulation by Triphasic Pulse Stimulation in Cochlear Implant Users Assessed With Objective Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmer, Andreas; Baumann, Uwe

    2016-10-01

    Triphasic pulse stimulation prevents from facial nerve stimulation (FNS) because of a different electromyographic input-output function compared with biphasic pulse stimulation. FNS is sometimes observed in cochlear implant users as an unwanted side effect of electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. The common stimulation applied in current cochlear implant consists of biphasic pulse patterns. Two common clinical remedies to prevent unpleasant FNS caused by activation of certain electrodes are to expand their pulse phase duration or simply deactivate them. Unfortunately, in some patients these methods do not provide sufficient FNS prevention. In these patients triphasic pulse can prevent from FNS. The underlying mechanism is yet unclear. Electromyographic (EMG) recordings of muscles innervated by the facial nerve (musculi orbicularis ori and oculi) were applied to quantitatively assess the effects on FNS. Triphasic and biphasic fitting maps were compared in four subjects with severe FNS. Based on the recordings, a model is presented which intends to explain the beneficial effects of triphasic pulse application. Triphasic stimulation provided by fitting of an OPUS 2 speech processor device. For three patients, EMG was successfully recorded depending on stimulation level up to uncomfortable and intolerable FNS stimulation as upper boarder. The obtained EMG recordings demonstrated high individual variability. However, a difference between the input-output function for biphasic and triphasic pulse stimulation was visually observable. Compared with standard biphasic stimulation, triphasic pulses require higher stimulation levels to elicit an equal amount of FNS, as reflected by EMG amplitudes. In addition, we assume a steeper slope of the input-output function for biphasic pulse stimulation compared with triphasic pulse stimulation. Triphasic pulse stimulation prevents from FNS because of a smaller gradient of EMG input-output function compared with biphasic pulse

  2. Application of MSS-neutron spin echo spectrometer to pulsed neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaki, S.; Ebisawa, T.; Hino, M.; Kawai, T.

    2001-01-01

    A multilayer spin splitter (MSS) is a neutron device that gives phase difference between field-parallel and -antiparallel spin component of a superposing state. Since the phase difference is equivalent to the Larmor precession angle, MSS enables us to construct a new type of neutron spin echo (NSE) spectrometer. The new NSE spectrometer has its properties that 1. since the phase shift is neutron flight path length, the spectrometer can be drastically small, 2. the neutron spin echo time is proportional to the neutron wavelength. (author)

  3. Paired pulse TMS stimulation and human tongue corticomotor pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk

    Objectives: Paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS) can be used to assess short-term interval intra-cortical inhibitory (SICI) and facilitatory (ICF) networks. The degree of SICI and ICF varies with interstimulus intervals (ISI) and stimulus intensities of the conditioning stimulus...... ms were applied 8 times each in randomized order in two blocks (CS intensity of 70% and 80% of rMT, respectively). The amplitudes of the averaged MEPs were analyzed with analysis of variance. Results: There was an overall effect of ISI (P... intensities (P = 0.984). Post-hoc tests revealed that there was significant SICI with ppTMS ISI of 2, 2.5, 3, and 3.5 ms compared with single pulse stimulation (Pstimulation (P=0.988). There was no interaction between...

  4. Modelling NDE pulse-echo inspection of misorientated planar rough defects using an elastic finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettit, J. R.; Lowe, M. J. S. [UK Research Centre for NDE, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Walker, A. E. [Rolls-Royce Nuclear, PO BOX 2000, Derby, DE21 7XX (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-31

    Pulse-echo ultrasonic NDE examination of large pressure vessel forgings is a design and construction code requirement in the power generation industry. Such inspections aim to size and characterise potential defects that may have formed during the forging process. Typically these defects have a range of orientations and surface roughnesses which can greatly affect ultrasonic wave scattering behaviour. Ultrasonic modelling techniques can provide insight into defect response and therefore aid in characterisation. However, analytical approaches to solving these scattering problems can become inaccurate, especially when applied to increasingly complex defect geometries. To overcome these limitations a elastic Finite Element (FE) method has been developed to simulate pulse-echo inspections of embedded planar defects. The FE model comprises a significantly reduced spatial domain allowing for a Monte-Carlo based approach to consider multiple realisations of defect orientation and surface roughness. The results confirm that defects aligned perpendicular to the path of beam propagation attenuate ultrasonic signals according to the level of surface roughness. However, for defects orientated away from this plane, surface roughness can increase the magnitude of the scattered component propagating back along the path of the incident beam. This study therefore highlights instances where defect roughness increases the magnitude of ultrasonic scattered signals, as opposed to attenuation which is more often assumed.

  5. Anomalous diffusion measured by a twice-refocused spin echo pulse sequence: analysis using fractional order calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qing; Srinivasan, Girish; Magin, Richard L; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe

    2011-05-01

    To theoretically develop and experimentally validate a formulism based on a fractional order calculus (FC) diffusion model to characterize anomalous diffusion in brain tissues measured with a twice-refocused spin-echo (TRSE) pulse sequence. The FC diffusion model is the fractional order generalization of the Bloch-Torrey equation. Using this model, an analytical expression was derived to describe the diffusion-induced signal attenuation in a TRSE pulse sequence. To experimentally validate this expression, a set of diffusion-weighted (DW) images was acquired at 3 Tesla from healthy human brains using a TRSE sequence with twelve b-values ranging from 0 to 2600 s/mm(2). For comparison, DW images were also acquired using a Stejskal-Tanner diffusion gradient in a single-shot spin-echo echo planar sequence. For both datasets, a Levenberg-Marquardt fitting algorithm was used to extract three parameters: diffusion coefficient D, fractional order derivative in space β, and a spatial parameter μ (in units of μm). Using adjusted R-squared values and standard deviations, D, β, and μ values and the goodness-of-fit in three specific regions of interest (ROIs) in white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid, respectively, were evaluated for each of the two datasets. In addition, spatially resolved parametric maps were assessed qualitatively. The analytical expression for the TRSE sequence, derived from the FC diffusion model, accurately characterized the diffusion-induced signal loss in brain tissues at high b-values. In the selected ROIs, the goodness-of-fit and standard deviations for the TRSE dataset were comparable with the results obtained from the Stejskal-Tanner dataset, demonstrating the robustness of the FC model across multiple data acquisition strategies. Qualitatively, the D, β, and μ maps from the TRSE dataset exhibited fewer artifacts, reflecting the improved immunity to eddy currents. The diffusion-induced signal attenuation in a TRSE pulse sequence

  6. Discovery of pulsed OH maser emission stimulated by a pulsar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Joel M; Johnston, Simon; Koribalski, Bärbel; Stanimirovic, Snezana

    2005-07-01

    Stimulated emission of radiation has not been directly observed in astrophysical situations up to this time. Here we demonstrate that photons from pulsar B1641-45 stimulate pulses of excess 1720-megahertz line emission in an interstellar hydroxyl (OH) cloud. As this stimulated emission is driven by the pulsar, it varies on a few-millisecond time scale, which is orders of magnitude shorter than the quickest OH maser variations previously detected. Our 1612-megahertz spectra are inverted copies of the 1720-megahertz spectra. This "conjugate line" phenomenon enables us to constrain the properties of the interstellar OH line-producing gas. We also show that pulsar signals undergo significantly deeper OH absorption than do other background sources, which confirms earlier tentative findings that OH clouds are clumpier on small scales than are neutral hydrogen clouds.

  7. MRI in neuro-Behcet's syndrome: comparison of conventional spin-echo and FLAIR pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, H.R.; Albrecht, T.; Curati-Alasonatti, W.L.; Williams, E.J.; Haskard, D.O.

    1999-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity of a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) sequence with that of a conventional dual-echo spin-echo (SE) sequence to brain lesions in 20 patients with Behcet's syndrome. They underwent 25 MRI examinations. The images were independently analysed for the number, type and anatomical location of lesions shown. There were 18 abnormal studies (13 initial and 5 follow-up). The FLAIR sequence detected significantly more lesions than the SE TE 80 (P < 0.05) and SE TE 20 (P < 0.01) sequences. It was particularly useful for demonstrating lesions in the juxtacortical white matter, which accounted for over half the lesions detected on the FLAIR images. Of patients presenting with nonspecific symptoms such as headache, seven had normal and five had abnormal studies. All patients presenting with focal neurological signs had abnormal imaging. We found supratentorial and, in particular, juxtacortical lesions to be more frequent than previously described. (orig.)

  8. A paradoxical signal intensity increase in fatty livers using opposed-phase gradient echo imaging with fat-suppression pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulkern, Robert V.; Voss, Stephan; Loeb Salsberg, Sandra; Krauel, Marta Ramon; Ludwig, David S.

    2008-01-01

    With the increase in obese and overweight children, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has become more prevalent in the pediatric population. Appreciating subtleties of magnetic resonance (MR) signal intensity behavior from fatty livers under different imaging conditions thus becomes important to pediatric radiologists. We report an initially confusing signal behavior - increased signal from fatty livers when fat-suppression pulses are applied in an opposed-phase gradient echo imaging sequence - and seek to explain the physical mechanisms for this paradoxical signal intensity behavior. Abdominal MR imaging at 3 T with a 3-D volumetric interpolated breath-hold (VIBE) sequence in the opposed-phase condition (TR/TE 3.3/1.3 ms) was performed in five obese boys (14±2 years of age, body mass index >95th percentile for age and sex) with spectroscopically confirmed fatty livers. Two VIBE acquisitions were performed, one with and one without the use of chemical shift selective (CHESS) pulse fat suppression. The ratios of fat-suppressed over non-fat-suppressed signal intensities were assessed in regions-of-interest (ROIs) in five tissues: subcutaneous fat, liver, vertebral marrow, muscle and spleen. The boys had spectroscopically estimated hepatic fat levels between 17% and 48%. CHESS pulse fat suppression decreased subcutaneous fat signals dramatically, by more than 85% within regions of optimal fat suppression. Fatty liver signals, in contrast, were elevated by an average of 87% with CHESS pulse fat suppression. Vertebral marrow signal was also significantly elevated with CHESS pulse fat suppression, while spleen and muscle signals demonstrated only small signal increases on the order of 10%. We demonstrated that CHESS pulse fat suppression actually increases the signal intensity from fatty livers in opposed-phase gradient echo imaging conditions. The increase can be attributed to suppression of one partner of the opposed-phase pair that normally contributes to the

  9. A paradoxical signal intensity increase in fatty livers using opposed-phase gradient echo imaging with fat-suppression pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulkern, Robert V.; Voss, Stephan [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Loeb Salsberg, Sandra; Krauel, Marta Ramon; Ludwig, David S. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Medicine, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-10-15

    With the increase in obese and overweight children, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has become more prevalent in the pediatric population. Appreciating subtleties of magnetic resonance (MR) signal intensity behavior from fatty livers under different imaging conditions thus becomes important to pediatric radiologists. We report an initially confusing signal behavior - increased signal from fatty livers when fat-suppression pulses are applied in an opposed-phase gradient echo imaging sequence - and seek to explain the physical mechanisms for this paradoxical signal intensity behavior. Abdominal MR imaging at 3 T with a 3-D volumetric interpolated breath-hold (VIBE) sequence in the opposed-phase condition (TR/TE 3.3/1.3 ms) was performed in five obese boys (14{+-}2 years of age, body mass index >95th percentile for age and sex) with spectroscopically confirmed fatty livers. Two VIBE acquisitions were performed, one with and one without the use of chemical shift selective (CHESS) pulse fat suppression. The ratios of fat-suppressed over non-fat-suppressed signal intensities were assessed in regions-of-interest (ROIs) in five tissues: subcutaneous fat, liver, vertebral marrow, muscle and spleen. The boys had spectroscopically estimated hepatic fat levels between 17% and 48%. CHESS pulse fat suppression decreased subcutaneous fat signals dramatically, by more than 85% within regions of optimal fat suppression. Fatty liver signals, in contrast, were elevated by an average of 87% with CHESS pulse fat suppression. Vertebral marrow signal was also significantly elevated with CHESS pulse fat suppression, while spleen and muscle signals demonstrated only small signal increases on the order of 10%. We demonstrated that CHESS pulse fat suppression actually increases the signal intensity from fatty livers in opposed-phase gradient echo imaging conditions. The increase can be attributed to suppression of one partner of the opposed-phase pair that normally contributes to the

  10. Photon Echoes in the 3P0 ← 3H4 Transition of Pr3+/LaF3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, Jos B.W.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1979-01-01

    Photon-echo quantum beats observed in the two-pulse and three-pulse photon echo of the 3P0 ← 3H4 transition in Pr3+/LaF3 were used to determine the excited-state spin-hamiltonian. In addition we report on the anomalous stimulated photon echo observed in the same transition which in a magnetic field

  11. Evaluation of short repetition time, partial flip angle, gradient recalled echo pulse sequences in cervical spine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enzmann, D.; Rubin, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    A short repetition time (TR), partial flip angle, gradient recalled echo pulse sequence (GRASS) was prospectively studied to optimize it for the diagnosis of cervical disk and cord disease in 98 patients. Changes in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast were measured as the following parameters were varied: flip angle (3 0 to 18 0 ), TR (22-60 msec), and echo time (TE) (12.5-25 msec). Flip angle was the single most important parameter. For disk disease, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) SNR peaked at an 8 0 flip angle in the axial view but at a 4 0 flip angle in the sagittal view. In the sagittal view, disk-CSF contrast decreased progressively from a flip angle of 3 0 , while in the axial view it peaked at 10 0 . For cord lesions the findings were similar except that lesion-cord contrast could be increased by lengthening both TR and TE. No one combination of parameters proved greatly superior for either disk disease or cord disease. The selection of parameters required balancing of several factors that often had opposing effects

  12. Speckle noise reduction technique for Lidar echo signal based on self-adaptive pulse-matching independent component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Wang, Jiaxing; Zhu, Daiyin; Tu, Qi

    2018-04-01

    Speckle noise has always been a particularly tricky problem in improving the ranging capability and accuracy of Lidar system especially in harsh environment. Currently, effective speckle de-noising techniques are extremely scarce and should be further developed. In this study, a speckle noise reduction technique has been proposed based on independent component analysis (ICA). Since normally few changes happen in the shape of laser pulse itself, the authors employed the laser source as a reference pulse and executed the ICA decomposition to find the optimal matching position. In order to achieve the self-adaptability of algorithm, local Mean Square Error (MSE) has been defined as an appropriate criterion for investigating the iteration results. The obtained experimental results demonstrated that the self-adaptive pulse-matching ICA (PM-ICA) method could effectively decrease the speckle noise and recover the useful Lidar echo signal component with high quality. Especially, the proposed method achieves 4 dB more improvement of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than a traditional homomorphic wavelet method.

  13. Short repetition time multiband echo-planar imaging with simultaneous pulse recording allows dynamic imaging of the cardiac pulsation signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yunjie; Hocke, Lia M; Frederick, Blaise deB

    2014-11-01

    Recently developed simultaneous multislice echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences permit imaging of the whole brain at short repetition time (TR), allowing the cardiac fluctuations to be fully sampled in blood-oxygen-level dependent functional MRI (BOLD fMRI). A novel low computational analytical method was developed to dynamically map the passage of the pulsation signal through the brain and visualize the whole cerebral vasculature affected by the pulse signal. This algorithm is based on a simple combination of fast BOLD fMRI and the scanner's own built-in pulse oximeter. Multiple, temporally shifted copies of the pulse oximeter data (with 0.08 s shifting step and coverage of a 1-s span) were downsampled and used as cardiac pulsation regressors in a general linear model based analyses (FSL) of the fMRI data. The resulting concatenated z-statistics maps show the voxels that are affected as the cardiac signal travels through the brain. Many voxels were highly correlated with the pulsation regressor or its temporally shifted version. The dynamic and static cardiac pulsation maps obtained from both the task and resting state scans, resembled cerebral vasculature. The results demonstrated: (i) cardiac pulsation significantly affects most voxels in the brain; (ii) combining fast fMRI and this analytical method can reveal additional clinical information to functional studies. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A novel and practical approach for determination of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter using a pulse-echo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Barnard, Dan; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter β are frequently made for early detection of damage in various materials. The practical implementation of the measurement technique has been limited to the through-transmission setup for determining the nonlinearity parameter of the second harmonic wave. In this work, a feasibility study is performed to assess the possibility of using pulse-echo methods in determining the nonlinearity parameter β of solids with a stress-free boundary. The multi-Gaussian beam model is developed based on the quasilinear theory of the KZK equation. Simulation results and discussion are presented for the reflected beam fields of the fundamental and second harmonic waves, the uncorrected β behavior and the properties of total correction that incorporate reflection, attenuation and diffraction effects.

  15. Fully automated dual-frequency three-pulse-echo 2DIR spectrometer accessing spectral range from 800 to 4000 wavenumbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leger, Joel D.; Nyby, Clara M.; Varner, Clyde; Tang, Jianan; Rubtsova, Natalia I.; Yue, Yuankai; Kireev, Victor V.; Burtsev, Viacheslav D.; Qasim, Layla N.; Rubtsov, Igor V., E-mail: irubtsov@tulane.edu [Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Rubtsov, Grigory I. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15

    A novel dual-frequency two-dimensional infrared instrument is designed and built that permits three-pulse heterodyned echo measurements of any cross-peak within a spectral range from 800 to 4000 cm{sup −1} to be performed in a fully automated fashion. The superior sensitivity of the instrument is achieved by a combination of spectral interferometry, phase cycling, and closed-loop phase stabilization accurate to ∼70 as. The anharmonicity of smaller than 10{sup −4} cm{sup −1} was recorded for strong carbonyl stretching modes using 800 laser shot accumulations. The novel design of the phase stabilization scheme permits tuning polarizations of the mid-infrared (m-IR) pulses, thus supporting measurements of the angles between vibrational transition dipoles. The automatic frequency tuning is achieved by implementing beam direction stabilization schemes for each m-IR beam, providing better than 50 μrad beam stability, and novel scheme for setting the phase-matching geometry for the m-IR beams at the sample. The errors in the cross-peak amplitudes associated with imperfect phase matching conditions and alignment are found to be at the level of 20%. The instrument can be used by non-specialists in ultrafast spectroscopy.

  16. A comparison of brief pulse and ultrabrief pulse electroconvulsive stimulation on rodent brain and behaviour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donovan, Sinead

    2012-04-27

    Brief pulse electroconvulsive therapy (BP ECT; pulse width 0.5-1.5ms) is a very effective treatment for severe depression but is associated with cognitive side-effects. It has been proposed that ultrabrief pulse (UBP; pulse width 0.25-0.30ms) ECT may be as effective as BP ECT but have less cognitive effects because it is a more physiological form of neuronal stimulation. To investigate this further, we treated normal rats with a 10 session course of either BP (0.5ms), UBP (0.3ms), or sham electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) and measured antidepressant-related changes in dentate gyrus cell proliferation and hippocampal BDNF protein levels as well as hippocampal-dependant spatial reference memory using the water plus maze and immobility time on the forced swim test. Both BP and UBP ECS induced very similar types of motor seizures. However, BP ECS but not UBP ECS treatment led to a significant, near 3-fold, increase in cell proliferation (p=0.026) and BDNF levels (p=0.01). In the forced swim test, only BP ECS treated animals had a significantly lower immobility time (p=0.046). There was a trend for similarly reduced hippocampal-dependent memory function in both BP and UBP groups but overall there was not a significant difference between treatment and control animals when tested 10 days after completing allocated treatment. These findings show that, even though both forms of ECS elicited similar motor seizures, UBP ECS was less efficient than BP ECS in inducing antidepressant-related molecular, cellular and behavioural changes.

  17. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Hopkins, Derek F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of =14 micrometers (μm). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS' System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

  18. Water Flow Investigation on Quartz Sand with 13-interval Stimulated Echo Multi Slice Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Natascha; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Galvosas, Petrik

    2011-03-01

    Understanding root water uptake in soils is of high importance for securing nutrition in the context of climate change and linked phenomena like stronger varying weather conditions (draught, strong rain). One step to understand how root water uptake occurs is the knowledge of the water flow in soil towards plant roots. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in combination with q-space imaging is potentially the most powerful analytical tool for non-invasive three dimensional visualization of flow and transport in porous media. Numerous attempts have been made to measure local velocity in porous media by combining velocity phase encoding with fast imaging methods, where flow velocities in the vascular bundles of plant stems were investigated. In contrast to water situated in the cellular structure of plants, NMR signal arising from water in the pore space in soil may be much more affected by the presence of internal magnetic field gradients. In this work we account for the existence of these gradients by employing bipolar pulsed field magnetic gradients for velocity encoding. This enables one to study flow through sand (as a model system for soil) at flow rates relevant for the water uptake of plant roots.

  19. Two-photon stimulated emission and pulse amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuen, H.P.

    1975-01-01

    Threshold conditions are given for the sustained operation of standing-wave and long-pulse traveling-wave two-photon lasers. Pulse shortening in long-pulse two-photon amplification, a behavior absent in the one-photon case, is also demonstrated analytically. (U.S.)

  20. Nanosecond laser pulse stimulation of spiral ganglion neurons and model cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettenmaier, Alexander; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Günter

    2014-04-01

    Optical stimulation of the inner ear has recently attracted attention, suggesting a higher frequency resolution compared to electrical cochlear implants due to its high spatial stimulation selectivity. Although the feasibility of the effect is shown in multiple in vivo experiments, the stimulation mechanism remains open to discussion. Here we investigate in single-cell measurements the reaction of spiral ganglion neurons and model cells to irradiation with a nanosecond-pulsed laser beam over a broad wavelength range from 420 nm up to 1950 nm using the patch clamp technique. Cell reactions were wavelength- and pulse-energy-dependent but too small to elicit action potentials in the investigated spiral ganglion neurons. As the applied radiant exposure was much higher than the reported threshold for in vivo experiments in the same laser regime, we conclude that in a stimulation paradigm with nanosecond-pulses, direct neuronal stimulation is not the main cause of optical cochlea stimulation.

  1. MR imaging of the knee: Improvement of signal and contrast efficiency of T1-weighted turbo spin echo sequences by applying a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radlbauer, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.radlbauer@stpoelten.lknoe.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Lomoschitz, Friedrich, E-mail: friedrich.lomoschitz@stpoelten.lknoe.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Salomonowitz, Erich, E-mail: erich.salomonowitz@stpoelten.lknoe.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Eberhardt, Knut E., E-mail: info@mrt-kompetenzzentrum.d [MRT Competence Center Schloss Werneck, Balthasar-Neumann-Platz 2, 97440 Werneck (Germany); Stadlbauer, Andreas, E-mail: andi@nmr.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse incorporated in a standard T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence as used in our routine MRI protocol for examination of pathologies of the knee. Sixteen consecutive patients with knee disorders were examined using the routine MRI protocol, including T1-weighted TSE-sequences with and without a DRIVE pulse. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of anatomical structures and pathologies were calculated and compared for both sequences. The differences in diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images with and without DRIVE pulse were assessed. SNR was significantly higher on images acquired with DRIVE pulse for fluid, effusion, cartilage and bone. Differences in the SNR of meniscus and muscle between the two sequences were not statistically significant. CNR was significantly increased between muscle and effusion, fluid and cartilage, fluid and meniscus, cartilage and meniscus, bone and cartilage on images acquired using the DRIVE pulse. Diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images was found to be improved for delineation of anatomic structures and for diagnosing a variety of pathologies when a DRIVE pulse is incorporated in the sequence. Incorporation of a DRIVE pulse into a standard T1-weighted TSE-sequence leads to significant increase of SNR and CNR of both, anatomical structures and pathologies, and consequently to an increase in diagnostic value within the same acquisition time.

  2. MR imaging of the knee: Improvement of signal and contrast efficiency of T1-weighted turbo spin echo sequences by applying a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radlbauer, Rudolf; Lomoschitz, Friedrich; Salomonowitz, Erich; Eberhardt, Knut E.; Stadlbauer, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse incorporated in a standard T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence as used in our routine MRI protocol for examination of pathologies of the knee. Sixteen consecutive patients with knee disorders were examined using the routine MRI protocol, including T1-weighted TSE-sequences with and without a DRIVE pulse. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of anatomical structures and pathologies were calculated and compared for both sequences. The differences in diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images with and without DRIVE pulse were assessed. SNR was significantly higher on images acquired with DRIVE pulse for fluid, effusion, cartilage and bone. Differences in the SNR of meniscus and muscle between the two sequences were not statistically significant. CNR was significantly increased between muscle and effusion, fluid and cartilage, fluid and meniscus, cartilage and meniscus, bone and cartilage on images acquired using the DRIVE pulse. Diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images was found to be improved for delineation of anatomic structures and for diagnosing a variety of pathologies when a DRIVE pulse is incorporated in the sequence. Incorporation of a DRIVE pulse into a standard T1-weighted TSE-sequence leads to significant increase of SNR and CNR of both, anatomical structures and pathologies, and consequently to an increase in diagnostic value within the same acquisition time.

  3. Pulsed Light Stimulation Increases Boundary Preference and Periodicity of Episodic Motor Activity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Qiu

    Full Text Available There is considerable interest in the therapeutic benefits of long-term sensory stimulation for improving cognitive abilities and motor performance of stroke patients. The rationale is that such stimulation would activate mechanisms of neural plasticity to promote enhanced coordination and associated circuit functions. Experimental approaches to characterize such mechanisms are needed. Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most attractive model organisms to investigate neural mechanisms responsible for stimulation-induced behaviors with its powerful accessibility to genetic analysis. In this study, the effect of chronic sensory stimulation (pulsed light stimulation on motor activity in w1118 flies was investigated. Flies were exposed to a chronic pulsed light stimulation protocol prior to testing their performance in a standard locomotion assay. Flies responded to pulsed light stimulation with increased boundary preference and travel distance in a circular arena. In addition, pulsed light stimulation increased the power of extracellular electrical activity, leading to the enhancement of periodic electrical activity which was associated with a centrally-generated motor pattern (struggling behavior. In contrast, such periodic events were largely missing in w1118 flies without pulsed light treatment. These data suggest that the sensory stimulation induced a response in motor activity associated with the modifications of electrical activity in the central nervous system (CNS. Finally, without pulsed light treatment, the wild-type genetic background was associated with the occurrence of the periodic activity in wild-type Canton S (CS flies, and w+ modulated the consistency of periodicity. We conclude that pulsed light stimulation modifies behavioral and electrophysiological activities in w1118 flies. These data provide a foundation for future research on the genetic mechanisms of neural plasticity underlying such behavioral modification.

  4. Fast spin-echo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackey, K.; Zoarski, G.; Bentson, J.R.; Lufkin, R.B.; Melki, P.; Jolesz, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a partial radio-frequency (RF) echo-planar pulse sequence called contiguous slice fast spin echo (CSFSE) which is undergoing clinical trials for spine MR imaging. In this variation of rapid acquisition relaxation enhanced (RARE) spin-echo imaging, rapid 180 degrees RF pulse generated refocused echoes, producing T2-weighted images in about one-third the time of conventional double-echo technique. Forty patients with suspected pathology of the spine were imaged with conventional double-echo and closely matched CSFSE techniques on a GE Signa 1.5-T Advantage system. Cases were reviewed by two board-certified neuroradiologists. In all cases the CSFSE images were of equal or superior quality compared with those obtained with the conventional double-echo technique. Pathologic processes that were imaged consisted of inflammatory, neoplastic, posttraumatic, and degenerative conditions

  5. Versatile Stimulation Back-End With Programmable Exponential Current Pulse Shapes for a Retinal Visual Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghami, Mohammad Hossein; Sodagar, Amir M; Sawan, Mohamad

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on the design, implementation, and test of a stimulation back-end, for an implantable retinal prosthesis. In addition to traditional rectangular pulse shapes, the circuit features biphasic stimulation pulses with both rising and falling exponential shapes, whose time constants are digitally programmable. A class-B second generation current conveyor is used as a wide-swing, high-output-resistance stimulation current driver, delivering stimulation current pulses of up to ±96 μA to the target tissue. Duration of the generated current pulses is programmable within the range of 100 μs to 3 ms. Current-mode digital-to-analog converters (DACs) are used to program the amplitudes of the stimulation pulses. Fabricated using the IBM 130 nm process, the circuit consumes 1.5×1.5 mm 2 of silicon area. According to the measurements, the DACs exhibit DNL and INL of 0.23 LSB and 0.364 LSB, respectively. Experimental results indicate that the stimuli generator meets expected requirements when connected to electrode-tissue impedance of as high as 25 k Ω. Maximum power consumption of the proposed design is 3.4 mW when delivering biphasic rectangular pulses to the target load. A charge pump block is in charge of the upconversion of the standard 1.2-V supply voltage to ±3.3V.

  6. The role of pulse shape in motor cortex transcranial magnetic stimulation using full-sine stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delvendahl, Igor; Gattinger, Norbert; Berger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A full-sine (biphasic) pulse waveform is most commonly used for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), but little is known about how variations in duration or amplitude of distinct pulse segments influence the effectiveness of a single TMS pulse to elicit a corticomotor response. Using......) compared monophasic, half-sine, and full-sine pulses, (ii) applied two-segment pulses consisting of two identical half-sines, and (iii) manipulated amplitude, duration, and current direction of the first or second full-sine pulse half-segments. RMT was significantly higher using half-sine or monophasic...... in considerably higher RMT, whereas varying the amplitude of the half-segment inducing anterior-posterior current had a smaller effect. These findings provide direct experimental evidence that the pulse segment inducing a posterior-anterior directed current in M1 contributes most to corticospinal pathway...

  7. Standard practice for evaluating performance characteristics of ultrasonic Pulse-Echo testing instruments and systems without the use of electronic measurement instruments

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes procedures for evaluating the following performance characteristics of ultrasonic pulse-echo examination instruments and systems: Horizontal Limit and Linearity; Vertical Limit and Linearity; Resolution - Entry Surface and Far Surface; Sensitivity and Noise; Accuracy of Calibrated Gain Controls. Evaluation of these characteristics is intended to be used for comparing instruments and systems or, by periodic repetition, for detecting long-term changes in the characteristics of a given instrument or system that may be indicative of impending failure, and which, if beyond certain limits, will require corrective maintenance. Instrument characteristics measured in accordance with this practice are expressed in terms that relate to their potential usefulness for ultrasonic testing. Instrument characteristics expressed in purely electronic terms may be measured as described in E1324. 1.2 Ultrasonic examination systems using pulsed-wave trains and A-scan presentation (rf or video) may be ev...

  8. Effects of pulsed magnetic stimulation on tumor development and immune functions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Sachiko; Ogiue-Ikeda, Mari; Sekino, Masaki; Ueno, Shoogo

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effects of pulsed magnetic stimulation on tumor development processes and immune functions in mice. A circular coil (inner diameter = 15 mm, outer diameter = 75 mm) was used in the experiments. Stimulus conditions were pulse width = 238 micros, peak magnetic field = 0.25 T (at the center of the coil), frequency = 25 pulses/s, 1,000 pulses/sample/day and magnetically induced eddy currents in mice = 0.79-1.54 A/m(2). In an animal study, B16-BL6 melanoma model mice were exposed to the pulsed magnetic stimulation for 16 days from the day of injection of cancer cells. A tumor growth study revealed a significant tumor weight decrease in the stimulated group (54% of the sham group). In a cellular study, B16-BL6 cells were also exposed to the magnetic field (1,000 pulses/sample, and eddy currents at the bottom of the dish = 2.36-2.90 A/m(2)); however, the magnetically induced eddy currents had no effect on cell viabilities. Cytokine production in mouse spleens was measured to analyze the immunomodulatory effect after the pulsed magnetic stimulation. tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) production in mouse spleens was significantly activated after the exposure of the stimulus condition described above. These results showed the first evidence of the anti-tumor effect and immunomodulatory effects brought about by the application of repetitive magnetic stimulation and also suggested the possible relationship between anti-tumor effects and the increase of TNF-alpha levels caused by pulsed magnetic stimulation.

  9. The role of pulse shape in motor cortex transcranial magnetic stimulation using full-sine stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Delvendahl

    Full Text Available A full-sine (biphasic pulse waveform is most commonly used for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, but little is known about how variations in duration or amplitude of distinct pulse segments influence the effectiveness of a single TMS pulse to elicit a corticomotor response. Using a novel TMS device, we systematically varied the configuration of full-sine pulses to assess the impact of configuration changes on resting motor threshold (RMT as measure of stimulation effectiveness with single-pulse TMS of the non-dominant motor hand area (M1. In young healthy volunteers, we (i compared monophasic, half-sine, and full-sine pulses, (ii applied two-segment pulses consisting of two identical half-sines, and (iii manipulated amplitude, duration, and current direction of the first or second full-sine pulse half-segments. RMT was significantly higher using half-sine or monophasic pulses compared with full-sine. Pulses combining two half-sines of identical polarity and duration were also characterized by higher RMT than full-sine stimuli resulting. For full-sine stimuli, decreasing the amplitude of the half-segment inducing posterior-anterior oriented current in M1 resulted in considerably higher RMT, whereas varying the amplitude of the half-segment inducing anterior-posterior current had a smaller effect. These findings provide direct experimental evidence that the pulse segment inducing a posterior-anterior directed current in M1 contributes most to corticospinal pathway excitation. Preferential excitation of neuronal target cells in the posterior-anterior segment or targeting of different neuronal structures by the two half-segments can explain this result. Thus, our findings help understanding the mechanisms of neural stimulation by full-sine TMS.

  10. ECHO virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that can lead ...

  11. Rabi oscillation and electron-spin-echo envelope modulation of the photoexcited triplet spin system in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Waseem; Sekiguchi, Takeharu; Itahashi, Tatsumasa; Filidou, Vasileia; Morton, John J. L.; Vlasenko, Leonid; Itoh, Kohei M.

    2012-09-01

    We report on a pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of the photoexcited triplet state (S=1) of oxygen-vacancy centers in silicon. Rabi oscillations between the triplet sublevels are observed using coherent manipulation with a resonant microwave pulse. The Hahn echo and stimulated echo decay profiles are superimposed with strong modulations known as electron-spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM). The ESEEM spectra reveal a weak but anisotropic hyperfine coupling between the triplet electron spin and a 29Si nuclear spin (I=1/2) residing at a nearby lattice site, that cannot be resolved in conventional field-swept EPR spectra.

  12. Micro-pulses generation in ECR breakdown stimulated by gyrotron radiation at 37,5 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalyga, V.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Sidorov, A.; Vodopyanov, A.

    2012-01-01

    The present work is devoted to experimental and theoretical investigation of the creation of short pulsed (< 100 μs) multicharged ion beams. The possibility of quasi-stationary generation of short pulsed beams under conditions of quasi-gasdynamic plasma confinement was shown in recent experiments. Later another way of such beams creation based on the Pre-glow effect was proposed. In present work it was demonstrated that in the case when duration of microwave (MW) pulse is less than formation time of Pre-glow peak, realization of a regime when ion current is negligible during MW pulse and intense multicharged ions flux appears only when MW ends could be possible. Such pulses after the end of MW were called micro-pulses. In the present work the generation of micro-pulses was observed in experiments with ECR discharge stimulated by gyrotron radiation at 37,5 GHz, 100 kW. In this case pulses with duration less than 30 μs were obtained. Probably the same effect was observed in GANIL where 14 GHz radiation was used and pulses with duration about 2 ms were registered. In present work it was shown that the intensity of such micro-pulse could be higher than intensity of Pre-glow peak at the same conditions but with longer MW pulse. The generation of micro-pulses of nitrogen and argon multicharged ions with current of a few mA and length about 30 μs after MW pulse with duration of 30-100 μs was demonstrated. The low level of impurities, high current density and rather high average charge make possible to consider such micro-pulse regime as a possibility for the creation of a short pulsed ion source. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  13. Optimal MR pulse sequences for hepatic hemangiomas : comparison of T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo, T2-weighted breath-hold turbo-spin-echo, and T1-weighted FLASH dynamic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wen Chao; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Cho, Soon Gu

    1997-01-01

    To optimize MR imaging pulse sequences in the imaging of hepatic hemangioma and to evaluate on dynamic MR imaging the enhancing characteristics of the lesions. Twenty patients with 35 hemangiomas were studied by using Turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequence (T2-weighted, T2- and heavily T2-weighted breath-hold) and T1-weighted FLASH imaging acquired before, immediately on, and 1, 3 and 5 minutes after injection of a bolus of Gd-DTPA (0.1mmol/kg). Phased-array multicoil was employed. Images were quantitatively analyzed for lesion-to-liver signal difference to noise ratios (SD/Ns), and lesion-to-liver signal ratios (H/Ls), and qualitatively analyzed for lesion conspicuity. The enhancing characteristics of the hemangiomas were described by measuring the change of signal intensity as a curve in T1-weighted FLASH dynamic imaging. For T2-weighted images, breath-hold T2-weighted TSE had a slightly higher SD/N than other pulse sequences, but there was no statistical difference in three fast pulse sequences (p=0.211). For lesion conspicuity, heavily T2-weighted breath-hold TSE images was superior to T2-weighted breath-hold or non-breath-hold TSE (H/L, 5.75, 3.81, 2.87, respectively, p<0.05). T2-weighted breath-hold TSE imaging was more effective than T2-weighted TSE imaging in removing lesion blurring or lack of sharpness, and there was a 12-fold decrease in acquisition time (20sec versus 245 sec). T1-weighted FLASH dynamic images of normal liver showed peak enhancement at less than 1 minute, and of hemangioma at more than 3 minutes;the degree of enhancement for hemangioma decreased after a 3 minute delay. T2-weighed breath-hold TSE imaging and Gd-DTPA enhanced FLASH dynamic imaging with 5 minutes delay are sufficient for imaging hepatic hemangiomas

  14. Effects of pulse current stimulation on the thermal fatigue crack propagation behavior of CHWD steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.Q.; Zhao, Y.G.; Gao, Z.M.; Han, L.G.

    2008-01-01

    The fatigue crack propagating behaviors of cast hot working die (CHWD) steel untreated and treated by an electric current in the intermediate stage of thermal fatigue were investigated in the present study. The circle/elliptical heating affected zone (HAZ) was formed ahead of the notch tip on the fatigued specimens after pulse electric current stimulation. Both SEM observation and X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that pulse electric current stimulation refined grains/subgrains in the HAZs. With the prolonging of discharging duration, the grains/subgrains decreased in size and the dislocation density and microhardness increased gradually. The grain refinement and dislocation density increase played an important role in the material strengthening, which inevitably enhanced the propagation resistance and delayed the propagation of thermal fatigue cracks. Therefore, the pulse electric current stimulation was an effective method to improve the service lifetime of die material

  15. Further investigations into pulsed optically stimulated luminescence from feldspars using blue and green light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankjaergaard, C.; Jain, M.; Kalchgruber, R.; Lapp, T.; Klein, D.; McKeever, S.W.S.; Murray, A.S.; Morthekai, P.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate characteristics of luminescence signals resulting from pulsed optical stimulation of feldspars and thereby to understand the underlying processes giving rise to the signal. Fourteen different feldspar specimens were investigated using time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence (TR-OSL), and these signals can be mathematically described as a sum of 4 exponential components (a, b, c, d). The slowest component, d, increases with the duration of the light pulse as expected from the exponential model. The stimulation temperature dependence experiment suggests that the TR-OSL signal decay is governed by the recombination process and not by the excited state lifetime. Furthermore data from the TR-OSL signal dependence on stimulation time and preheat temperature suggest that the recombination process may not be a sum of exponentials, although the model cannot be rejected definitively.

  16. [Negative air ions generated by plants upon pulsed electric field stimulation applied to soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ren-ye; Deng, Chuan-yuan; Yang, Zhi-jian; Weng, Hai-yong; Zhu, Tie-jun-rong; Zheng, Jin-gui

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigated the capacity of plants (Schlumbergera truncata, Aloe vera var. chinensis, Chlorophytum comosum, Schlumbergera bridgesii, Gymnocalycium mihanovichii var. friedrichii, Aspidistra elatior, Cymbidium kanran, Echinocactus grusonii, Agave americana var. marginata, Asparagus setaceus) to generate negative air ions (NAI) under pulsed electric field stimulation. The results showed that single plant generated low amounts of NAI in natural condition. The capacity of C. comosum and G. mihanovichii var. friedrichii generated most NAI among the above ten species, with a daily average of 43 ion · cm(-3). The least one was A. americana var. marginata with the value of 19 ion · cm(-3). When proper pulsed electric field stimulation was applied to soil, the NAI of ten plant species were greatly improved. The effect of pulsed electric field u3 (average voltage over the pulse period was 2.0 x 10(4) V, pulse frequency was 1 Hz, and pulse duration was 50 ms) was the greatest. The mean NAI concentration of C. kanran was the highest 1454967 ion · cm(-3), which was 48498.9 times as much as that in natural condition. The lowest one was S. truncata with the value of 34567 ion · cm(-3), which was 843.1 times as much as that in natural condition. The capacity of the same plants to generate negative air ion varied extremely under different intensity pulsed electric fields.

  17. Inertial cavitation initiated by polytetrafluoroethylene nanoparticles under pulsed ultrasound stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qiaofeng; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Zheng, Hairong; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-09-01

    Nanoscale gas bubbles residing on a macroscale hydrophobic surface have a surprising long lifetime (on the order of days) and can serve as cavitation nuclei for initiating inertial cavitation (IC). Whether interfacial nanobubbles (NBs) reside on the infinite surface of a hydrophobic nanoparticle (NP) and could serve as cavitation nuclei is unknown, but this would be very meaningful for the development of sonosensitive NPs. To address this problem, we investigated the IC activity of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) NPs, which are regarded as benchmark superhydrophobic NPs due to their low surface energy caused by the presence of fluorocarbon. Both a passive cavitation detection system and terephthalic dosimetry was applied to quantify the intensity of IC. The IC intensities of the suspension with PTFE NPs were 10.30 and 48.41 times stronger than those of deionized water for peak negative pressures of 2 and 5MPa, respectively. However, the IC activities were nearly completely inhibited when the suspension was degassed or ethanol was used to suspend PTFE NPs, and they were recovered when suspended in saturated water, which may indicates the presence of interfacial NBs on PTFE NPs surfaces. Importantly, these PTFE NPs could sustainably initiate IC for excitation by a sequence of at least 6000 pulses, whereas lipid microbubbles were completely depleted after the application of no more than 50 pulses under the same conditions. The terephthalic dosimetry has shown that much higher hydroxyl yields were achieved when PTFE NPs were present as cavitation nuclei when using ultrasound parameters that otherwise did not produce significant amounts of free radicals. These results show that superhydrophobic NPs may be an outstanding candidate for use in IC-related applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Long pacing pulses reduce phrenic nerve stimulation in left ventricular pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortshøj, Søren; Heath, Finn; Haugland, Morten; Eschen, Ole; Thøgersen, Anna Margrethe; Riahi, Sam; Toft, Egon; Struijk, Johannes Jan

    2014-05-01

    Phrenic nerve stimulation is a major obstacle in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Activation characteristics of the heart and phrenic nerve are different with higher chronaxie for the heart. Therefore, longer pulse durations could be beneficial in preventing phrenic nerve stimulation during CRT due to a decreased threshold for the heart compared with the phrenic nerve. We investigated if long pulse durations decreased left ventricular (LV) thresholds relatively to phrenic nerve thresholds in humans. Eleven patients, with indication for CRT and phrenic nerve stimulation at the intended pacing site, underwent determination of thresholds for the heart and phrenic nerve at different pulse durations (0.3-2.9 milliseconds). The resulting strength duration curves were analyzed by determining chronaxie and rheobase. Comparisons for those parameters were made between the heart and phrenic nerve, and between the models of Weiss and Lapicque as well. In 9 of 11 cases, the thresholds decreased faster for the LV than for the phrenic nerve with increasing pulse duration. In 3 cases, the thresholds changed from unfavorable for LV stimulation to more than a factor 2 in favor of the LV. The greatest change occurred for pulse durations up to 1.5 milliseconds. The chronaxie of the heart was significantly higher than the chronaxie of the phrenic nerve (0.47 milliseconds vs. 0.22 milliseconds [P = 0.029, Lapicque] and 0.79 milliseconds vs. 0.27 milliseconds [P = 0.033, Weiss]). Long pulse durations lead to a decreased threshold of the heart relatively to the phrenic nerve and may prevent stimulation of the phrenic nerve in a clinical setting. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. SU-E-J-224: Using UTE and T1 Weighted Spin Echo Pulse Sequences for MR-Only Treatment Planning; Phantom Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, H; Fatemi, A [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, A [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Investigating a new approach in MRI based treatment planning using the combination of (Ultrashort Echo Time) UTE and T1 weighted spin echo pulse sequences to delineate air, bone and water (soft tissues) in generating pseudo CT images comparable with CT. Methods: A gel phantom containing chicken bones, ping pang balls filled with distilled water and air bubbles, was made. It scanned with MRI using UTE and 2D T1W SE pulse sequences with (in plane resolution= 0.53mm, slice thickness= 2 mm) and CT with (in plane resolution= 0.5 mm and slice thickness= 0.75mm) as a ground truth for geometrical accuracy. The UTE and T1W SE images were registered with CT using mutual information registration algorithm provided by Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The phantom boundaries were detected using Canny edge detection algorithm for CT, and MR images. The bone, air bubbles and water in ping pong balls were segmented from CT images using threshold 300HU, - 950HU and 0HU, respectively. These tissue inserts were automatically segmented from combined UTE and T1W SE images using edge detection and relative intensity histograms of the phantom. The obtained segmentations of air, bone and water inserts were evaluated with those obtained from CT. Results: Bone and air can be clearly differentiated in UTE images comparable to CT. Combining UTE and T1W SE images successfully segmented the air, bone and water. The maximum segmentation differences from combine MRI images (UTE and T1W SE) and CT are within 1.3 mm, 1.1mm for bone, air, respectively. The geometric distortion of UTE sequence is small less than 1 pixel (0.53 mm) of MR image resolution. Conclusion: Our approach indicates that MRI can be used solely for treatment planning and its quality is comparable with CT.

  20. Experimental and modelling study of pulsed optically stimulated luminescence in quartz, marble and beta irradiated salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagonis, V; Mian, S M; Barnold, C; Chithambo, M L; Christensen, E

    2009-01-01

    Optical stimulation luminescence (OSL) signals can be obtained using continuous-wave optical stimulation (CW-OSL), the linear modulation optical stimulation method (LM-OSL) and the time-resolved optical stimulation (TR-OSL) method. During TR-OSL measurements, the stimulation and emission of luminescence are experimentally separated in time by using short light pulses. This paper presents new TR-OSL data for annealed high purity synthetic quartz, for marble and for commercially available iodized salt. A new type of behaviour for TR-OSL signals for quartz and iodized salt is presented, in which the OSL signal exhibits a nonmonotonic behaviour during optical stimulation; this type of behaviour has not been reported previously in the literature for quartz. Furthermore, a luminescence component with very long luminescence lifetime is reported for some quartz aliquots, which may be due to the presence of a delayed-OSL (DOSL) mechanism in quartz. A new kinetic model for TR-OSL in quartz is presented, which is based on a main electron trap and on several luminescence centres. The model is used to quantitatively fit several sets of experimental data of pulsed optically stimulated luminescence from quartz.

  1. The neuronal response to electrical constant-amplitude pulse train stimulation: additive Gaussian noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, A J; Abbas, P J; Rubinstein, J T; Miller, C A

    2000-11-01

    Experimental results from humans and animals show that electrically evoked compound action potential (EAP) responses to constant-amplitude pulse train stimulation can demonstrate an alternating pattern, due to the combined effects of highly synchronized responses to electrical stimulation and refractory effects (Wilson et al., 1994). One way to improve signal representation is to reduce the level of across-fiber synchrony and hence, the level of the amplitude alternation. To accomplish this goal, we have examined EAP responses in the presence of Gaussian noise added to the pulse train stimulus. Addition of Gaussian noise at a level approximately -30 dB relative to EAP threshold to the pulse trains decreased the amount of alternation, indicating that stochastic resonance may be induced in the auditory nerve. The use of some type of conditioning stimulus such as Gaussian noise may provide a more 'normal' neural response pattern.

  2. Further investigations into pulsed optically stimulated luminescence from feldspars using blue and green light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank; Kalchgruber, R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate characteristics of luminescence signals resulting from pulsed optical stimulation of feldspars and thereby to understand the underlying processes giving rise to the signal. Fourteen different feldspar specimens were investigated using time-resolved opti......The purpose of this paper is to investigate characteristics of luminescence signals resulting from pulsed optical stimulation of feldspars and thereby to understand the underlying processes giving rise to the signal. Fourteen different feldspar specimens were investigated using time...... suggests that the TR-OSL signal decay is governed by the recombination process and not by the excited state lifetime. Furthermore data from the TR-OSL signal dependence on stimulation time and preheat temperature suggest that the recombination process may not be a sum of exponentials, although the model...... cannot be rejected definitively....

  3. Optimising the separation of quartz and feldspar optically stimulated luminescence using pulsed excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankjaergaard, C.; Jain, M.; Thomsen, K.J.; Murray, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    In luminescence dating, the two most commonly used natural minerals, quartz and feldspar, are exposed to different dose rates in the natural environment, and so record different doses. The luminescence signals also have different stabilities. For accurate dosimetry, the signals from these two minerals must be separated, either by physical separation of the mineral grains, or by instrumental separation of the luminescence signals. The luminescence signals from quartz and feldspar have different luminescence lifetimes under pulsed optical stimulation. This difference in lifetime can be used to discriminate between the two signals from a mixed quartz-feldspar sample. The purpose of this study is to identify optimum measurement conditions for the best separation of quartz OSL from that of feldspar in a mixed sample using pulsed stimulation and time-resolved OSL. We integrate the signal from 5 μs after the LEDs are switched off until just before the LEDs are switched on again, with the pulse on-time equal to the pulse off-time of 50 μs. By using only the initial interval of the pulsed OSL decay curve (equivalent to 0.2 s of CW-OSL using blue light at 50 mW cm -2 ) we find that the quartz to feldspar pulsed OSL intensity ratio is at a maximum. By using these parameters with an additional infrared (IR) stimulation at 175 o C before measurement (to further reduce the feldspar signal intensity), we obtain a factor of 25 enhancement in signal separation compared to that from a conventional prior-IR CW measurement. This ratio can be further improved if the counting window in the pulse off-time is restricted to detect between 20 and 50 μs instead of the entire off-period.

  4. Muscle oxygenation of vastus lateralis and medialis muscles during alternating and pulsed current electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldayel, Abdulaziz; Muthalib, Makii; Jubeau, Marc; McGuigan, Michael; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2011-05-01

    This study compared between alternating and pulsed current electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) for muscle oxygenation and blood volume during isometric contractions. Nine healthy men (23-48 years) received alternating current EMS (2500 Hz) modulated at 75 Hz on the knee extensors of one leg, and pulsed current EMS (75 Hz) for the other leg separated by 2 weeks in a randomised, counter-balanced order. Pulse duration (400 μs), on-off ratio (5-15 s) and other stimulation parameters were matched between conditions and 30 isometric contractions were induced at the knee joint angle of 100° (0° full extension). Changes in tissue oxygenation index (∆TOI) and total hemoglobin volume (∆tHb) of vastus lateralis and medialis muscles over 30 contractions were assessed by a near-infrared spectroscopy, and were compared between conditions by a two-way repeated measures ANOVA. Peak torque produced during EMS increased over 30 contractions in response to the increase in the stimulation intensity for pulsed current, but not for the alternating current EMS. The torque during each isometric contraction was less stable in alternating than pulsed current EMS. The changes in ∆TOI amplitude during relaxation phases and ∆tHb amplitude were not significantly different between conditions. However, the decreases in ∆TOI amplitude during contraction phases from baseline were significantly (P < 0.05) greater for the pulsed current than alternating current from the 18th contraction (-15.6 ± 2.3 vs. -8.9 ± 1.8%) to 30th contraction (-10.7 ± 1.8 vs. -4.8 ± 1.5%). These results suggest that the muscles were less activated in the alternating current EMS when compared with the pulsed current EMS.

  5. An analysis of the uncertainty and bias in DCE-MRI measurements using the spoiled gradient-recalled echo pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subashi, Ergys; Choudhury, Kingshuk R.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI have been used in more than 100 phase I trials and investigator led studies. A comparison of the absolute values of these quantities requires an estimation of their respective probability distribution function (PDF). The statistical variation of the DCE-MRI measurement is analyzed by considering the fundamental sources of error in the MR signal intensity acquired with the spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) pulse sequence. Methods: The variance in the SPGR signal intensity arises from quadrature detection and excitation flip angle inconsistency. The noise power was measured in 11 phantoms of contrast agent concentration in the range [0–1] mM (in steps of 0.1 mM) and in onein vivo acquisition of a tumor-bearing mouse. The distribution of the flip angle was determined in a uniform 10 mM CuSO 4 phantom using the spin echo double angle method. The PDF of a wide range of T1 values measured with the varying flip angle (VFA) technique was estimated through numerical simulations of the SPGR equation. The resultant uncertainty in contrast agent concentration was incorporated in the most common model of tracer exchange kinetics and the PDF of the derived pharmacokinetic parameters was studied numerically. Results: The VFA method is an unbiased technique for measuringT1 only in the absence of bias in excitation flip angle. The time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent measured in vivo is within the theoretically predicted uncertainty. The uncertainty in measuring K trans with SPGR pulse sequences is of the same order, but always higher than, the uncertainty in measuring the pre-injection longitudinal relaxation time (T1 0 ). The lowest achievable bias/uncertainty in estimating this parameter is approximately 20%–70% higher than the bias/uncertainty in the measurement of the pre-injection T1 map. The fractional volume parameters derived from the extended Tofts model were found to be

  6. Investigation of timing effects in modified composite quadrupolar echo pulse sequences by mean of average Hamiltonian theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane

    2018-01-01

    The utility of the average Hamiltonian theory and its antecedent the Magnus expansion is presented. We assessed the concept of convergence of the Magnus expansion in quadrupolar spectroscopy of spin-1 via the square of the magnitude of the average Hamiltonian. We investigated this approach for two specific modified composite pulse sequences: COM-Im and COM-IVm. It is demonstrated that the size of the square of the magnitude of zero order average Hamiltonian obtained on the appropriated basis is a viable approach to study the convergence of the Magnus expansion. The approach turns to be efficient in studying pulse sequences in general and can be very useful to investigate coherent averaging in the development of high resolution NMR technique in solids. This approach allows comparing theoretically the two modified composite pulse sequences COM-Im and COM-IVm. We also compare theoretically the current modified composite sequences (COM-Im and COM-IVm) to the recently published modified composite pulse sequences (MCOM-I, MCOM-IV, MCOM-I_d, MCOM-IV_d).

  7. Ultradian hormone stimulation induces glucocorticoid receptor-mediated pulses of gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavreva, Diana A; Wiench, Malgorzata; John, Sam; Conway-Campbell, Becky L; McKenna, Mervyn A; Pooley, John R; Johnson, Thomas A; Voss, Ty C; Lightman, Stafford L; Hager, Gordon L

    2009-09-01

    Studies on glucocorticoid receptor (GR) action typically assess gene responses by long-term stimulation with synthetic hormones. As corticosteroids are released from adrenal glands in a circadian and high-frequency (ultradian) mode, such treatments may not provide an accurate assessment of physiological hormone action. Here we demonstrate that ultradian hormone stimulation induces cyclic GR-mediated transcriptional regulation, or gene pulsing, both in cultured cells and in animal models. Equilibrium receptor-occupancy of regulatory elements precisely tracks the ligand pulses. Nascent RNA transcripts from GR-regulated genes are released in distinct quanta, demonstrating a profound difference between the transcriptional programs induced by ultradian and constant stimulation. Gene pulsing is driven by rapid GR exchange with response elements and by GR recycling through the chaperone machinery, which promotes GR activation and reactivation in response to the ultradian hormone release, thus coupling promoter activity to the naturally occurring fluctuations in hormone levels. The GR signalling pathway has been optimized for a prompt and timely response to fluctuations in hormone levels, indicating that biologically accurate regulation of gene targets by GR requires an ultradian mode of hormone stimulation.

  8. Adjusting Pulse Amplitude During Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Does Not Provide Greater Hypoalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron-Vézina, Kayla; Filion, Camille; Couture, Chantal; Vallée, Élisabeth; Laroche, Sarah; Léonard, Guillaume

    2018-03-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is an electrotherapeutic modality commonly used in rehabilitation to relieve pain. Adjusting pulse amplitude (intensity) during TENS treatment has been suggested to overcome nerve habituation. However, it is still unclear if this procedure leads to greater hypoalgesia. The aim of this study was to determine if the hypoalgesic effect of TENS is greater when pulse amplitude is adjusted throughout the TENS treatment session in chronic low-back pain patients. Randomized double-blind crossover study. Recruitment and assessment were conducted at the Clinique universitaire de réadaptation de l'Estrie (CURE) of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences of the Université de Sherbrooke. Twenty-one volunteers with chronic low-back pain were enrolled and completed this investigation. Each patient received two high-frequency TENS treatments on two separate sessions: (1) with adjustment of pulse amplitude and (2) without pulse amplitude adjustment. Pain intensity and unpleasantness were assessed before, during, and after TENS application with a 10 cm visual analog scale. Both TENS conditions (with and without adjustment of intensity) decreased pain intensity and unpleasantness when compared with baseline. No difference was observed between the two stimulation conditions for both pain intensity and unpleasantness. The current results suggest that adjustment of pulse amplitude during TENS application does not provide greater hypoalgesia in individuals with chronic low-back pain. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings in other pain populations.

  9. Optimal timing of pulse onset for language mapping with navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Sandro M; Tarapore, Phiroz E; Picht, Thomas; Tanigawa, Noriko; Houde, John; Sollmann, Nico; Meyer, Bernhard; Vajkoczy, Peter; Berger, Mitchel S; Ringel, Florian; Nagarajan, Srikantan

    2014-10-15

    Within the primary motor cortex, navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) has been shown to yield maps strongly correlated with those generated by direct cortical stimulation (DCS). However, the stimulation parameters for repetitive nTMS (rTMS)-based language mapping are still being refined. For this purpose, the present study compares two rTMS protocols, which differ in the timing of pulse train onset relative to picture presentation onset during object naming. Results were the correlated with DCS language mapping during awake surgery. Thirty-two patients with left-sided perisylvian tumors were examined by rTMS prior to awake surgery. Twenty patients underwent rTMS pulse trains starting at 300 ms after picture presentation onset (delayed TMS), whereas another 12 patients received rTMS pulse trains starting at the picture presentation onset (ONSET TMS). These rTMS results were then evaluated for correlation with intraoperative DCS results as gold standard in terms of differential consistencies in receiver operating characteristics (ROC) statistics. Logistic regression analysis by protocols and brain regions were conducted. Within and around Broca's area, there was no difference in sensitivity (onset TMS: 100%, delayed TMS: 100%), negative predictive value (NPV) (onset TMS: 100%, delayed TMS: 100%), and positive predictive value (PPV) (onset TMS: 55%, delayed TMS: 54%) between the two protocols compared to DCS. However, specificity differed significantly (onset TMS: 67%, delayed TMS: 28%). In contrast, for posterior language regions, such as supramarginal gyrus, angular gyrus, and posterior superior temporal gyrus, early pulse train onset stimulation showed greater specificity (onset TMS: 92%, delayed TMS: 20%), NPV (onset TMS: 92%, delayed TMS: 57%) and PPV (onset TMS: 75%, delayed TMS: 30%) with comparable sensitivity (onset TMS: 75%, delayed TMS: 70%). Logistic regression analysis also confirmed the greater fit of the predictions by rTMS that had the

  10. Subfemtosecond pulse generation by cascade-stimulated Raman scattering with modulated Raman excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Kun; Wu Jian; Zeng Heping

    2003-01-01

    Subfemtosecond (sub-fs) pulses can be generated by cascade-stimulated Raman scattering in a Raman medium with modulated Raman excitations, driven by two sufficiently intense laser beams, one of which is amplitude modulated. The nonadiabatic Raman interaction establishes a strong modulated Raman coherence, which supports compression of the generated broadband Raman sidebands to a train of sub-fs pulses regardless of whether the carrier frequencies of the driving lasers are tuned above, below or on two-photon Raman resonance. (letter to the editor)

  11. EUV stimulated emission from MgO pumped by FEL pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Jonnard

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Stimulated emission is a fundamental process in nature that deserves to be investigated and understood in the extreme ultra-violet (EUV and x-ray regimes. Today, this is definitely possible through high energy density free electron laser (FEL beams. In this context, we give evidence for soft-x-ray stimulated emission from a magnesium oxide solid target pumped by EUV FEL pulses formed in the regime of travelling-wave amplified spontaneous emission in backward geometry. Our results combine two effects separately reported in previous works: emission in a privileged direction and existence of a material-dependent threshold for the stimulated emission. We develop a novel theoretical framework, based on coupled rate and transport equations taking into account the solid-density plasma state of the target. Our model accounts for both observed mechanisms that are the privileged direction for the stimulated emission of the Mg L2,3 characteristic emission and the pumping threshold.

  12. Desynchronization boost by non-uniform coordinated reset stimulation in ensembles of pulse-coupled neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücken, Leonhard; Yanchuk, Serhiy; Popovych, Oleksandr V.; Tass, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Several brain diseases are characterized by abnormal neuronal synchronization. Desynchronization of abnormal neural synchrony is theoretically compelling because of the complex dynamical mechanisms involved. We here present a novel type of coordinated reset (CR) stimulation. CR means to deliver phase resetting stimuli at different neuronal sub-populations sequentially, i.e., at times equidistantly distributed in a stimulation cycle. This uniform timing pattern seems to be intuitive and actually applies to the neural network models used for the study of CR so far. CR resets the population to an unstable cluster state from where it passes through a desynchronized transient, eventually resynchronizing if left unperturbed. In contrast, we show that the optimal stimulation times are non-uniform. Using the model of weakly pulse-coupled neurons with phase response curves, we provide an approach that enables to determine optimal stimulation timing patterns that substantially maximize the desynchronized transient time following the application of CR stimulation. This approach includes an optimization search for clusters in a low-dimensional pulse coupled map. As a consequence, model-specific non-uniformly spaced cluster states cause considerably longer desynchronization transients. Intriguingly, such a desynchronization boost with non-uniform CR stimulation can already be achieved by only slight modifications of the uniform CR timing pattern. Our results suggest that the non-uniformness of the stimulation times can be a medically valuable parameter in the calibration procedure for CR stimulation, where the latter has successfully been used in clinical and pre-clinical studies for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and tinnitus. PMID:23750134

  13. Suppression of Protonated Organic Solvents in NMR Spectroscopy Using a Perfect Echo Low-Pass Filtration Pulse Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Peter W A

    2018-04-03

    Proton NMR spectra are usually acquired using deuterated solvents, but in many cases it is necessary to obtain spectra on samples in protonated solvents. In these cases, the intense resonances of the protonated solvents need to be suppressed to maximize sensitivity and spectral quality. A wide range of highly effective solvent suppression methods have been developed, but additional measures are needed to suppress the 13 C satellites of the solvent. Because the satellites represent 1.1% of the original solvent signal, they remain problematic if unsuppressed. The recently proposed DISPEL pulse sequences suppress 13 C satellites extremely effectively, and this Technical Note demonstrates that combining DISPEL and presaturation results in exceptionally effective solvent suppression. An important element in the effectiveness is volume selection, which is inherent within the DISPEL sequence. Spectra acquired in protonated dimethlysulfoxide and tetrahydrofuran show that optimum results are obtained by modifying the phase cycle, cycling the pulse-field gradients, and using broadband 13 C inversion pulses to reduce the effects of radiofrequency offset and inhomogeneity.

  14. Sensitivity to pulse phase duration in cochlear implant listeners: Effects of stimulation mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Monita; Kulkarni, Aditya M.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate charge-integration at threshold by cochlear implant listeners using pulse train stimuli in different stimulation modes (monopolar, bipolar, tripolar). The results partially confirmed and extended the findings of previous studies conducted in animal models showing that charge-integration depends on the stimulation mode. The primary overall finding was that threshold vs pulse phase duration functions had steeper slopes in monopolar mode and shallower slopes in more spatially restricted modes. While the result was clear-cut in eight users of the Cochlear CorporationTM device, the findings with the six user of the Advanced BionicsTM device who participated were less consistent. It is likely that different stimulation modes excite different neuronal populations and/or sites of excitation on the same neuron (e.g., peripheral process vs central axon). These differences may influence not only charge integration but possibly also temporal dynamics at suprathreshold levels and with more speech-relevant stimuli. Given the present interest in focused stimulation modes, these results have implications for cochlear implant speech processor design and protocols used to map acoustic amplitude to electric stimulation parameters. PMID:25096116

  15. Time-resolved Femtosecond Photon Echo Probes Bimodal Solvent Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, M.S; Duppen, K.; Wiersma, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    We report on time-resolved femtosecond photon echo experiments of a dye molecule in a polar solution. The photon echo is time resolved by mixing the echo with a femtosecond gate pulse in a nonlinear crystal. It is shown that the temporal profile of the photon echo allows separation of the

  16. Functional imaging of submandibular glands: diffusion-weighted echo-planar MRI before and after stimulation; Diffusionsgewichtete MRT zur Funktionsdiagnostik der Glandula submandibularis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arndt, C.; Cramer, M.C.; Weiss, F.; Kaul, M.G.; Adam, G.; Habermann, C.R. [Zentrum fuer Bildgebende Diagnostik und Intervention, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Graessner, J. [Siemens Medical Solutions (Germany); Petersen, K. [Zentrum fuer Psychosoziale Medizin, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Reitmeier, F.; Jaehne, M. [Kopf und Hautzentrum, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DWI) echo-planar imaging (EPI) to depict the submandibular glands and to measure different functional conditions. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven healthy volunteers were examined. Diffusion weighted sequence was performed prior to stimulation. Exactly 30 seconds after a commercially available lemon juice was given orally, the diffusion weighted sequence was repeated. All examinations were performed by using a 1.5-T superconducting system with a 30 mT/m maximum gradient capability and maximum slew rate of 125 mT/m/sec (Magnetom Symphony, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The lower part of the circularly polarized (CP) head coil and a standard two-element CP neck array coil were used. The flexibility of the neck array coil allowed positioning the N1 element (upper part of the coil) right next to the submandibular gland. The axial diffusion-weighted EPI (echo planar imaging) sequence was performed using a matrix of 119 x 128, a field of view of 250 x 250 mm (pixel size 2.1 x 1.95 mm), a section thickness of 5 mm with an interslice gap of 1 mm. The b factors used were 0 sec/mm{sup 2}, 500 sec/mm{sup 2} and 1000 sec/mm{sup 2}. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were digitally transferred to MRIcro (Chris Rorden, University of Nottingham, Great Britain). After detecting the submandibular glands a region of interest (ROI) was placed manually exactly within the boarder of both submandibular glands, excluding the external carotid artery on ADC maps. These procedures were performed on all ADC slices the submandibular glands could be differentiated in before and after oral stimulation. For statistical comparison of results, a student's t-test was performed with an overall two-tailed significance level of p=0.05. Results: The visualization of the submandibular glands using the diffusion-weighted EPI sequence was possible in all of the 27 volunteers. Prior to oral stimulation an ADC of 1.31 x 10{sup -3

  17. Diffusional behavior of n-paraffins with various chain lengths in urea adduct channels by pulsed field-gradient spin-echo NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sunmi; Kuroki, Shigeki; Ando, Isao

    2006-01-01

    The diffusion coefficients (D) of n-paraffin molecules (n-C n H 2n+2 ) with various chain-lengths (n = 8, 12, 21, 26, 28 and 32) in the long channels of a deuterated urea-d 4 adduct have been measured at 25 deg. C by means of pulsed field-gradient spin-echo 1 H NMR method. The aim is to clarify diffusional behavior of the n-paraffin molecules in the urea adduct channels. From the experimental results, it is found that n-paraffin molecules are diffusing in the long channels and have two kinds of diffusion components, namely a fast (D ∼ 10 -10 m 2 /s) and a slow diffusion component (D ∼ 10 -11 m 2 /s). The diffusing-time (Δ) dependence of the diffusion coefficients of the n-paraffins shows some likely evidence of restricted diffusion since the n-paraffin molecules are confined in the urea channel. The diffusion coefficients (D) decrease as the carbon number increases from 8 to 28, and very slowly decreases as the carbon number increases from 28 to 32

  18. The effect of pulse width and contact configuration on paresthesia coverage in spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsheimer, Jan; Buitenweg, Jan R; Das, John; de Sutter, Paul; Manola, Ljubomir; Nuttin, Bart

    2011-05-01

    In spinal cord stimulation for the management of chronic, intractable pain, a satisfactory analgesic effect can be obtained only when the stimulation-induced paresthesias cover all painful body areas completely or partially. To investigate the effect of stimulus pulse width (PW) and contact configuration (CC) on the area of paresthesia (PA), perception threshold (VPT), discomfort threshold (VDT), and usage range (UR) in spinal cord stimulation. Chronic pain patients were tested during a follow-up visit. They were stimulated monopolarly and with the CC giving each patient the best analgesia. VPT, VDT, and UR were determined for PWs of 90, 210, and 450 microseconds. The paresthesia contours at VDT were drawn on a body map and digitized; PA was calculated; and its anatomic composition was described. The effects of PW and CC on PA, VPT, VDT, and UR were tested statistically. Twenty-four of 31 tests with low thoracic stimulation and 8 of 9 tests with cervical stimulation gave a significant extension of PA at increasing PW. In 14 of 18 tests (low thoracic), a caudal extension was obtained (primarily in L5-S2). In cervical stimulation the extension was predominantly caudal as well. In contrast to VPT and VDT, UR is not significantly different when stimulating with any CC. PA extends caudally with increasing PW. The mechanism includes that the larger and smaller dorsal column fibers have a different mediolateral distribution and that smaller dorsal column fibers have a smaller UR and can be activated only when PW is sufficiently large. A similar effect of CC on PA is unlikely as long as electrodes with a large intercontact distance are applied.

  19. Low-frequency pulse profile variation in PSR B2217+47: evidence for echoes from the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michilli, D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Donner, J. Y.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Serylak, M.; Shaw, B.; Stappers, B. W.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Deller, A. T.; Driessen, L. N.; Stinebring, D. R.; Bondonneau, L.; Geyer, M.; Hoeft, M.; Karastergiou, A.; Kramer, M.; Osłowski, S.; Pilia, M.; Sanidas, S.; Weltevrede, P.

    2018-05-01

    We have observed a complex and continuous change in the integrated pulse profile of PSR B2217+47, manifested as additional components trailing the main peak. These transient components are detected over 6 yr at 150 MHz using the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR), but they are not seen in contemporaneous Lovell observations at 1.5 GHz. We argue that propagation effects in the ionized interstellar medium (IISM) are the most likely cause. The putative structures in the IISM causing the profile variation are roughly half-way between the pulsar and the Earth and have transverse radii R ˜ 30 au. We consider different models for the structures. Under the assumption of spherical symmetry, their implied average electron density is \\overline{n}_e ˜ 100 cm-3. Since PSR B2217+47 is more than an order of magnitude brighter than the average pulsar population visible to LOFAR, similar profile variations would not have been identified in most pulsars, suggesting that subtle profile variations in low-frequency profiles might be more common than we have observed to date. Systematic studies of these variations at low frequencies can provide a new tool to investigate the proprieties of the IISM and the limits to the precision of pulsar timing.

  20. Square biphasic pulse deep brain stimulation for essential tremor: The BiP tremor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Sol; Almeida, Leonardo; Shahgholi, Leili; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Roper, Jaimie; Hass, Chris J; Akbar, Umer; Wagle Shukla, Aparna; Raike, Robert S; Okun, Michael S

    2018-01-01

    Conventional deep brain stimulation (DBS) utilizes regular, high frequency pulses to treat medication-refractory symptoms in essential tremor (ET). Modifications of DBS pulse shape to achieve improved effectiveness is a promising approach. The current study assessed the safety, tolerability and effectiveness of square biphasic pulse shaping as an alternative to conventional ET DBS. This pilot study compared biphasic pulses (BiP) versus conventional DBS pulses (ClinDBS). Eleven ET subjects with clinically optimized ventralis intermedius nucleus DBS were enrolled. Objective measures were obtained over 3 h while ON BiP stimulation. There was observed benefit in the Fahn-Tolosa Tremor Rating Scale (TRS) for BiP conditions when compared to the DBS off condition and to ClinDBS setting. Total TRS scores during the DBS OFF condition (28.5 IQR = 24.5-35.25) were significantly higher than the other time points. Following active DBS, TRS improved to (20 IQR = 13.8-24.3) at ClinDBS setting and to (16.5 IQR = 12-20.75) at the 3 h period ON BiP stimulation (p = 0.001). Accelerometer recordings revealed improvement in tremor at rest (χ 2  = 16.1, p = 0.006), posture (χ 2  = 15.9, p = 0.007) and with action (χ 2  = 32.1, p=<0.001) when comparing median total scores at ClinDBS and OFF DBS conditions to 3 h ON BiP stimulation. There were no adverse effects and gait was not impacted. BiP was safe, tolerable and effective on the tremor symptoms when tested up to 3 h. This study demonstrated the feasibility of applying a novel DBS waveform in the clinic setting. Larger prospective studies with longer clinical follow-up will be required. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. The number of full-sine cycles per pulse influences the efficacy of multicycle transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pechmann, Astrid; Delvendahl, Igor; Bergmann, Til O

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the efficacy of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to excite corticospinal neurons depends on pulse waveform. OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESES: In this study, we examined whether the effectiveness of polyphasic TMS can be increased by using a pulse profile that consists...

  2. Two-stage optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier using sub-nanosecond pump pulse generated by stimulated Brillouin scattering compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Jumpei; Miyamoto, Sho; Matsuyama, Takahiro; Sueda, Keiichi; Yoshida, Hidetsugu; Tsubakimoto, Koji; Miyanaga, Noriaki

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) based on two-beam pumping, using sub-nanosecond pulses generated by stimulated Brillouin scattering compression. Seed pulse energy, duration, and center wavelength were 5 nJ, 220 ps, and ˜1065 nm, respectively. The 532 nm pulse from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was compressed to ˜400 ps in heavy fluorocarbon FC-40 liquid. Stacking of two time-delayed pump pulses reduced the amplifier gain fluctuation. Using a walk-off-compensated two-stage OPCPA at a pump energy of 34 mJ, a total gain of 1.6 × 105 was obtained, yielding an output energy of 0.8 mJ. The amplified chirped pulse was compressed to 97 fs.

  3. Can a single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation targeted to the motor cortex interrupt pain processing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisler, Lee-Bareket; Gurion, Ilan; Granovsky, Yelena; Sinai, Alon; Sprecher, Elliot; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone; Weissman-Fogel, Irit

    2018-01-01

    The modulatory role of the primary motor cortex (M1), reflected by an inhibitory effect of M1-stimulation on clinical pain, motivated us to deepen our understanding of M1's role in pain modulation. We used Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS)-induced virtual lesion (VL) to interrupt with M1 activity during noxious heat pain. We hypothesized that TMS-VL will effect experimental pain ratings. Three VL protocols were applied consisting of single-pulse TMS to transiently interfere with right M1 activity: (1) VLM1- TMS applied to 11 subjects, 20 msec before the individual's first pain-related M1 peak activation, as determined by source analysis (sLORETA), (2) VL-50 (N = 16; TMS applied 50 ms prior to noxious stimulus onset), and (3) VL+150 (N = 16; TMS applied 150 ms after noxious stimulus onset). Each protocol included 3 conditions ('pain-alone', ' TMS-VL', and 'SHAM-VL'), each consisted of 30 noxious heat stimuli. Pain ratings were compared, in each protocol, for TMS-VL vs. SHAM-VL and vs. pain-alone conditions. Repeated measures analysis of variance, corrected for multiple comparisons revealed no significant differences in the pain ratings between the different conditions within each protocol. Therefore, our results from this exploratory study suggest that a single pulse TMS-induced VL that is targeted to M1 failed to interrupt experimental pain processing in the specific three stimulation timing examined here.

  4. Stimulated echo diffusion tensor imaging and SPAIR T2 -weighted imaging in chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the lower leg muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, Eric E; Sui, Dabang; Ukpebor, Obehi; Baete, Steven; Fieremans, Els; Babb, James S; Mechlin, Michael; Liu, Kecheng; Kwon, Jane; McGorty, KellyAnne; Hodnett, Philip A; Bencardino, Jenny

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the performance of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in the evaluation of chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) as compared to T2 -weighted (T2w) imaging. Using an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant protocol, spectral adiabatic inversion recovery (SPAIR) T2w imaging and stimulated echo DTI were applied to eight healthy volunteers and 14 suspected CECS patients before and after exertion. Longitudinal and transverse diffusion eigenvalues, mean diffusivity (MD), and fractional anisotropy (FA) were measured in seven calf muscle compartments, which in patients were classified by their response on T2w: normal (20% change). Mixed model analysis of variance compared subject groups and compartments in terms of response factors (post/pre-exercise ratios) of DTI parameters. All diffusivities significantly increased (P DTI shows promise as an ancillary imaging method in the diagnosis and understanding of the pathophysiology in CECS. Future studies may explore its utility in predicting response to treatment. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Femtosecond time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy using sub-7-fs pulses: Apparatus and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramochi, Hikaru [Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei, E-mail: tahei@riken.jp [Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Ultrafast Spectroscopy Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (RAP), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    We describe details of the setup for time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy (TR-ISRS). In this method, snapshot molecular vibrational spectra of the photoreaction transients are captured via time-domain Raman probing using ultrashort pulses. Our instrument features transform-limited sub-7-fs pulses to impulsively excite and probe coherent nuclear wavepacket motions, allowing us to observe vibrational fingerprints of transient species from the terahertz to 3000-cm{sup −1} region with high sensitivity. Key optical components for the best spectroscopic performance are discussed. The TR-ISRS measurements for the excited states of diphenylacetylene in cyclohexane are demonstrated, highlighting the capability of our setup to track femtosecond dynamics of all the Raman-active fundamental molecular vibrations.

  6. Prenatal androgen excess enhances stimulation of the GNRH pulse in pubertal female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaonan; Yuan, Chun; Zhao, Nannan; Cui, Yugui; Liu, Jiayin

    2014-07-01

    In adolescent girls with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), neuroendocrine derangements manifest after the onset of puberty, characterized by rapid LH pulse frequency. The early mechanism underlying the pubertal regulation of the GNRH/LH pulsatile release in adolescents with PCOS remains uncertain. To determine the effects of prenatal androgen exposure on the activation of GNRH neurons and generation of LH pulse at puberty, we administrated 5α-dihydrotestosterone to pregnant rats and observed serum LH levels and expression of hypothalamic genes in female offspring from postnatal 4 to 8 weeks. The 6-week-old prenatally androgenized (PNA) female rats exhibited an increase in LH pulse frequency. The hypothalamic expression of neurokinin B (Nkb (Tac2)) and Lepr mRNA levels in PNA rats increased remarkably before puberty and remained high during puberty, whereas elevated Kiss1 mRNA levels were detected only after the onset of puberty. Exogenous kisspeptin, NK3R agonist, and leptin triggered tonic stimulation of GNRH neurons and increased LH secretion in 6-week-old PNA rats. Leptin upregulated Kiss1 mRNA levels in the hypothalamus of pubertal PNA rats; however, pretreatment with a kisspeptin antagonist failed to suppress the elevated serum LH stimulated by leptin, indicating that the stimulatory effects of leptin may be conveyed indirectly to GNRH neurons via other neural components within the GNRH neuronal network, rather than through the kisspeptin-GPR54 pathway. These findings validate the hypotheses that NKB and leptin play an essential role in the activation of GNRH neurons and initiation of increased LH pulse frequency in PNA female rats at puberty and that kisspeptin may coordinate their stimulatory effects on LH release. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  7. A computerized system based on an alternative pulse echo immersion technique for acoustic characterization of non-porous solid tissue mimicking materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazihah Mat Daud, Anis; Jaafar, Rosly; Kadri Ayop, Shahrul; Supar Rohani, Md

    2018-04-01

    This paper discusses the development of a computerized acoustic characterization system of non-porous solid tissue mimicking materials. This system employs an alternative pulse echo immersion technique and consists of a pulser/receiver generator, a transducer used as both a transmitter and a receiver, a digital oscilloscope, and a personal computer with a custom-developed program installed. The program was developed on the LabVIEW 2012 platform and comprises two main components, a user interface and a block diagram. The user interface consists of three panels: a signal acquisition and selection panel, a display panel, and a calculation panel. The block diagram comprises four blocks: a signal acquisition block, a peak signal analysis block, an acoustic properties calculation and display block, and an additional block. Interestingly, the system can be operated in both online and offline modes. For the online mode, the measurements are performed by connecting the system with a Rigol DS2000 Series digital oscilloscope. In contrast, the measurements are carried out by processing the saved data on the computer for the offline mode. The accuracy and consistency of the developed system was validated by a KB-Aerotech Alpha Series transducer with 5 MHz center frequency and a Rigol DS2202 two-channel 200 MHz 2 GSa s-1 digital oscilloscope, based on the measurement of the acoustic properties of three poly(methyl methacrylate) samples immersed in a medium at a temperature of (24.0  ±  0.1) °C. The findings indicated that the accuracy and consistency of the developed system was exceptionally high, within a 1.04% margin of error compared to the reference values. As such, this computerized system can be efficiently used for the acoustic characterization of non-porous solid tissues, given its spontaneous display of results, user-friendly interface, and convenient hardware connection.

  8. Femoral perfusion after pulsed electromagnetic field stimulation in a steroid-induced osteonecrosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Akira; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Saito, Masazumi; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujioka, Mikihiro; Hayashi, Shigeki; Ishida, Masashi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-07-01

    This study was designed to evaluate femoral perfusion after pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) stimulation in a steroid-induced osteonecrosis rabbit model by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Steroid-induced osteonecrosis was produced by single intramuscular injection of methylprednisolone in 15 rabbits. Eight rabbits underwent PEMF stimulation (PEMF group) and seven did not (control group). DCE-MRI was performed before PEMF stimulation, immediately before steroid administration, and 1, 5, 10, and 14 days after steroid administration. Regions of interest were set in the bilateral proximal femora. Enhancement ratio (ER), initial slope (IS), and area under the curve (AUC) were analyzed. ER, IS, and AUC in the control group significantly decreased after steroid administration compared with before administration (P<0.05). In PEMF group, IS significantly decreased; however, ER and AUC showed no significant differences after steroid administration compared with before. ER and IS in PEMF group were higher than in control group until 10th day, and AUC was higher until 5th day after steroid administration (P<0.05). PEMF stimulation restrains the decrease in blood flow after steroid administration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Exponential current pulse generation for efficient very high-impedance multisite stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, S; Sawan, M

    2011-02-01

    We describe in this paper an intracortical current-pulse generator for high-impedance microstimulation. This dual-chip system features a stimuli generator and a high-voltage electrode driver. The stimuli generator produces flexible rising exponential pulses in addition to standard rectangular stimuli. This novel stimulation waveform is expected to provide superior energy efficiency for action potential triggering while releasing less toxic reduced ions in the cortical tissues. The proposed fully integrated electrode driver is used as the output stage where high-voltage supplies are generated on-chip to significantly increase the voltage compliance for stimulation through high-impedance electrode-tissue interfaces. The stimuli generator has been implemented in 0.18-μm CMOS technology while a 0.8-μm CMOS/DMOS process has been used to integrate the high-voltage output stage. Experimental results show that the rectangular pulses cover a range of 1.6 to 167.2 μA with a DNL and an INL of 0.098 and 0.163 least-significant bit, respectively. The maximal dynamic range of the generated exponential reaches 34.36 dB at full scale within an error of ± 0.5 dB while all of its parameters (amplitude, duration, and time constant) are independently programmable over wide ranges. This chip consumes a maximum of 88.3 μ W in the exponential mode. High-voltage supplies of 8.95 and -8.46 V are generated by the output stage, boosting the voltage swing up to 13.6 V for a load as high as 100 kΩ.

  10. Variability and Reliability of Paired-Pulse Depression and Cortical Oscillation Induced by Median Nerve Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Hideaki; Otsuru, Naofumi; Kojima, Sho; Miyaguchi, Shota; Saito, Kei; Inukai, Yasuto; Yamashiro, Koya; Sato, Daisuke; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Shigeki

    2018-05-08

    Paired-pulse depression (PPD) has been widely used to investigate the functional profiles of somatosensory cortical inhibition. However, PPD induced by somatosensory stimulation is variable, and the reasons for between- and within-subject PPD variability remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to clarify the factors influencing PPD variability induced by somatosensory stimulation. The study participants were 19 healthy volunteers. First, we investigated the relationship between the PPD ratio of each component (N20m, P35m, and P60m) of the somatosensory magnetic field, and the alpha, beta, and gamma band changes in power [event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS)] induced by median nerve stimulation. Second, because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene polymorphisms reportedly influence the PPD ratio, we assessed whether BDNF genotype influences PPD ratio variability. Finally, we evaluated the test-retest reliability of PPD and the alpha, beta, and gamma ERD/ERS induced by somatosensory stimulation. Significant positive correlations were observed between the P60m_PPD ratio and beta power change, and the P60m_PPD ratio was significantly smaller for the beta ERD group than for the beta ERS group. P35m_PPD was found to be robust and highly reproducible; however, P60m_PPD reproducibility was poor. In addition, the ICC values for alpha, beta, and gamma ERD/ERS were 0.680, 0.760, and 0.552 respectively. These results suggest that the variability of PPD for the P60m deflection may be influenced by the ERD/ERS magnitude, which is induced by median nerve stimulation.

  11. Echo project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gfader, Verina; Carson, Rebecca; Kraus, Chris

    2016-01-01

    team to both present the printed matter in the format of running a book stall, and stage a discursive event at the Classroom. Echo reverberates some of the encounters and debates there, with new commissioned chapters propelling a ongoing correspondence across urban environs: An essay on the General...... mothers and demonology (Kathy Acker’s property deals in the UK), and more; and future materials formalized as poster texts . . ....

  12. Method for pulse control in a laser including a stimulated brillouin scattering mirror system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz B.

    2007-10-23

    A laser system, such as a master oscillator/power amplifier system, comprises a gain medium and a stimulated Brillouin scattering SBS mirror system. The SBS mirror system includes an in situ filtered SBS medium that comprises a compound having a small negative non-linear index of refraction, such as a perfluoro compound. An SBS relay telescope having a telescope focal point includes a baffle at the telescope focal point which blocks off angle beams. A beam splitter is placed between the SBS mirror system and the SBS relay telescope, directing a fraction of the beam to an alternate beam path for an alignment fiducial. The SBS mirror system has a collimated SBS cell and a focused SBS cell. An adjustable attenuator is placed between the collimated SBS cell and the focused SBS cell, by which pulse width of the reflected beam can be adjusted.

  13. Experimental separation of a frequency spin echo signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bun'kov, Yu.M.; Dmitriev, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    To study systems with bound nuclear-electron precession CsMnF 2 antiferromagnetic light-plane monocrystal was investigated. Crystal orientation was carried out by roentgenoscopy. Measurements were performed at helium temperatures in the 500-700 MHz frequency range. A NMR pulsed spectrometer with generators of both resonance and doubled frequency was used to produce an echo signal (to study by the parametric echo method). It was shown that the theory of the formation of a frequency modulated echo (FM echo) did not fully describe the properties of the echo signals in systems with dynamic frequency shift (DFS). An intense spin echo signal, which formation was apparently connected with other nonlinear properties of the systems with nuclear-electron precession, was observed. The spin echo signal in magnetics with DFS, which properties correspond to notions of the frequency mechanism of echo formation, was experimentally separated. As a result of the investigations it had been possible to settle contradictions between the theory of FM echo formation and the experimental results for the last 9 years. It turned out that the mechanism of FM echo formation in the magnetics with bound nuclear-electron precession was effective only at large delay times between the pulses. In the range of small delays the FM echo is ''jammed'' by a gigantic echo signal of a nature different from that of the traditional FM signal. The constant of gigantic echo intensity drop at increasing delay between the pulses weakly depends on spin-spin relaxation time [ru

  14. Transient Sensory Recovery in Stroke Patients After Pulsed Radiofrequency Electrical Stimulation on Dorsal Root Ganglia: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apiliogullari, Seza; Gezer, Ilknur A; Levendoglu, Funda

    2017-01-01

    The integrity of the somatosensory system is important for motor recovery and neuroplasticity after strokes. Peripheral stimulation or central stimulation in patients with central nervous system lesions can be an effective modality in improving function and in facilitating neuroplasticity. We present 2 hemiplegic cases with sensory motor deficit and the result of the pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) electrical stimulation to the dorsal root ganglia. After PRF electrical stimulation, significant improvement was achieved in the examination of patients with superficial and deep sensation. However, during the follow-up visits were observed that the effect of PRF electrical stimulation disappeared. We believe that these preliminary results could be used in the development of future prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trials that focus on the effect of PRF electrical stimulation on dorsal root ganglia to treat sensory deficits in poststroke patients.

  15. Transcranial magnetic stimulation with a half-sine wave pulse elicits direction-specific effects in human motor cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Delvendahl, Igor; Pechmann, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) commonly uses so-called monophasic pulses where the initial rapidly changing current flow is followed by a critically dampened return current. It has been shown that a monophasic TMS pulse preferentially excites different cortical circuits in the human motor...... hand area (M1-HAND), if the induced tissue current has a posterior-to-anterior (PA) or anterior-to-posterior (AP) direction. Here we tested whether similar direction-specific effects could be elicited in M1-HAND using TMS pulses with a half-sine wave configuration....

  16. Ps laser pulse induced stimulated Raman scattering of ammonium nitrate dissolved in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V. Rakesh; Kiran, P. Prem

    2018-04-01

    An intense picosecond laser pulse focused into a liquid medium generates a shock wave in the focal region. This shock wave while propagating into the medium varies the pressure and temperature of the liquid locally leading to the appearance of novel phases which are manifested by the appearance of Raman peaks. We present the phase changes of ammonium nitrate (AN) dissolved in water by studying the forward and backward stimulated Raman Scattering (FSRS and BSRS) signals due to propagation of 30 ps laser pulse induced shockwaves. The dominant peak corresponding to the NO3- symmetric stretching mode is observed with a Raman shift of 1045 cm-1 which represents phase IV of AN with an orthogonal crystalline structure. Apart from this peak, the dominant mode of liquid phase of water with a Raman shift of 3400 cm-1 and an ice VII peak at a Raman shift of 3050 cm-1 confirming the pressure of 10 GPa is observed. The effect of the concentration and input energy on the appearance of the phases will be presented.

  17. Gaussian-approximation formalism for evaluating decay of NMR spin echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recchia, C.H.; Gorny, K.; Pennington, C.H.

    1996-01-01

    We present a formalism for evaluating the amplitude of the NMR spin echo and stimulated echo as a function of pulse spacings, for situations in which the nuclear spins experience an effective longitudinal magnetic field h z (t) resulting from an arbitrary number of independent sources, each characterized by its own arbitrary time correlation function. The distribution of accumulated phase angles for the ensemble of nuclear spins at the time of the echo is approximated as a Gaussian. The development of the formalism is motivated by the need to understand the transverse relaxation of 89 Y in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 , in which the 89 Y experiences 63,65 Cu dipolar fields which fluctuate due to 63,65 Cu T 1 processes. The formalism is applied successfully to this example, and to the case of nuclei diffusing in a spatially varying magnetic field. Then we examine a situation in which the approximation fails emdash the classic problem of chemical exchange in dimethylformamide, where the methyl protons experience a chemical shift which fluctuates between two discrete values. In this case the Gaussian approximation yields a monotonic decay of the echo amplitude with increasing pulse spacing, while the exact solution yields distinct open-quote open-quote beats close-quote close-quote in the echo height, which we confirm experimentally. In light of this final example the limits of validity of the approximation are discussed. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. Cartilage destruction in small joints by rheumatoid arthritis: assessment of fat-suppressed three-dimensional gradient-echo MR pulse sequences in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhl, M.; Allmann, K.H.; Hauer, M.P.; Langer, M.; Ihling, C.; Conca, W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the accuracy of different MR sequences for the detection of articular cartilage abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis. Design and patients. Ten metacarpophalangeal joints and 10 metatarsophalangeal joints (specimens from arthritis patients undergoing ablative joint surgery) were examined with a fat-suppressed (FS) 3D FLASH, a FS 3D FISP, a FS 2D fast spin-echo T2-weighted, and a 2D FS spin-echo T1-weighted sequence. Each cartilage lesion and each cortical lesion was graded from 0 to 4 (modified Outerbridge staging system). Subsequently, the results of each sequence were compared with the macroscopic findings and statistically tested against each other. Results. The study shows that 3D gradient-echo sequences with fat suppression were best for imaging and grading of cartilage lesions in arthritis of the small joints of the hands and feet. Using 3D techniques, all grade 2, grade 3, and grade 4 lesions of cartilage or cortical bone were detected. Conclusion. FS 3D gradient-echo techniques were best for the detection and grading of hyaline cartilage and subchondral bone lesions in rheumatoid arthritis. MRI has a great potential as an objective method of evaluating cartilage damage and bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  19. Cartilage destruction in small joints by rheumatoid arthritis: assessment of fat-suppressed three-dimensional gradient-echo MR pulse sequences in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhl, M.; Allmann, K.H.; Hauer, M.P.; Langer, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Ihling, C. [Department of Pathology, University Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Conca, W. [Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    1998-12-01

    Purpose. To assess the accuracy of different MR sequences for the detection of articular cartilage abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis. Design and patients. Ten metacarpophalangeal joints and 10 metatarsophalangeal joints (specimens from arthritis patients undergoing ablative joint surgery) were examined with a fat-suppressed (FS) 3D FLASH, a FS 3D FISP, a FS 2D fast spin-echo T2-weighted, and a 2D FS spin-echo T1-weighted sequence. Each cartilage lesion and each cortical lesion was graded from 0 to 4 (modified Outerbridge staging system). Subsequently, the results of each sequence were compared with the macroscopic findings and statistically tested against each other. Results. The study shows that 3D gradient-echo sequences with fat suppression were best for imaging and grading of cartilage lesions in arthritis of the small joints of the hands and feet. Using 3D techniques, all grade 2, grade 3, and grade 4 lesions of cartilage or cortical bone were detected. Conclusion. FS 3D gradient-echo techniques were best for the detection and grading of hyaline cartilage and subchondral bone lesions in rheumatoid arthritis. MRI has a great potential as an objective method of evaluating cartilage damage and bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.) With 5 figs., 19 refs.

  20. Lithium ion diffusion measurements on a garnet-type solid conductor Li6.6La3Zr1.6Ta0.4O12 by using a pulsed-gradient spin-echo NMR method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayamizu, Kikuko; Matsuda, Yasuaki; Matsui, Masaki; Imanishi, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    The garnet-type solid conductor Li7-xLa3Zr2-xTaxO12 is known to have high ionic conductivity. We synthesized a series of compositions of this conductor and found that cubic Li6.6La3Zr1.6Ta0.4O12 (LLZO-Ta) has a high ionic conductivity of 3.7×10(-4)Scm(-1) at room temperature. The (7)Li NMR spectrum of LLZO-Ta was composed of narrow and broad components, and the linewidth of the narrow component varied from 0.69kHz (300K) to 0.32kHz (400K). We carried out lithium ion diffusion measurements using pulsed-field spin-echo (PGSE) NMR spectroscopy and found that echo signals were observed at T≥313K with reasonable sensitivity. The lithium diffusion behavior was measured by varying the observation time and pulsed-field gradient (PFG) strength between 313 and 384K. We found that lithium diffusion depended significantly on the observation time and strength of the PFG, which is quite different from lithium ion diffusion in liquids. It was shown that lithium ion migration in the solid conductor was distributed widely in both time and space. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cytoprotective Role of Nrf2 in Electrical Pulse Stimulated C2C12 Myotube.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Horie

    Full Text Available Regular physical exercise is central to a healthy lifestyle. However, exercise-related muscle contraction can induce reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS production in skeletal muscle. The nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2 transcription factor is a cellular sensor for oxidative stress. Regulation of nuclear Nrf2 signaling regulates antioxidant responses and protects organ structure and function. However, the role of Nrf2 in exercise- or contraction-induced ROS/RNS production in skeletal muscle is not clear. In this study, using differentiated C2C12 cells and electrical pulse stimulation (EPS of muscle contraction, we explored whether Nrf2 plays a role in the skeletal muscle response to muscle contraction-induced ROS/RNS. We found that EPS (40 V, 1 Hz, 2 ms stimulated ROS/RNS accumulation and Nrf2 activation. We also showed that expression of NQO1, HO-1 and GCLM increased after EPS-induced muscle contraction and was remarkably suppressed in cells with Nrf2 knockdown. We also found that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC significantly attenuated Nrf2 activation after EPS, whereas the nitric oxide synthetase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME did not. Furthermore, Nrf2 knockdown after EPS markedly decreased ROS/RNS redox potential and cell viability and increased expression of the apoptosis marker Annexin V in C2C12 myotubes. These results indicate that Nrf2 activation and expression of Nrf2 regulated-genes protected muscle against the increased ROS caused by EPS-induced muscle contraction. Thus, our findings suggest that Nrf2 may be a key factor for preservation of muscle function during muscle contraction.

  2. Revival of silenced echo and quantum memory for light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damon, V; Bonarota, M; Louchet-Chauvet, A; Chaneliere, T; Le Gouet, J-L, E-mail: jean-louis.legouet@lac.u-psud.fr [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS-UPR 3321, Univ. Paris-Sud, Bat. 505, 91405 Orsay cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    We propose an original quantum memory protocol. It belongs to the class of rephasing processes and is closely related to two-pulse photon echo. It is known that the strong population inversion produced by the rephasing pulse prevents the plain two-pulse photon echo from serving as a quantum memory scheme. Indeed, gain and spontaneous emission generate prohibitive noise. A second {pi}-pulse can be used to simultaneously reverse the atomic phase and bring the atoms back into the ground state. Then a secondary echo is radiated from a non-inverted medium, avoiding contamination by gain and spontaneous emission noise. However, one must kill the primary echo, in order to preserve all the information for the secondary signal. In the present work, spatial phase mismatching is used to silence the standard two-pulse echo. An experimental demonstration is presented.

  3. The pulse duration of electrical stimulation influences H-reflexes but not corticospinal excitability for tibialis anterior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Alyssa R; Lou, Jenny W H; Collins, David F

    2014-10-01

    The afferent volley generated by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) influences corticospinal (CS) excitability and frequent NMES sessions can strengthen CS pathways, resulting in long-term improvements in function. This afferent volley can be altered by manipulating NMES parameters. Presently, we manipulated one such parameter, pulse duration, during NMES over the common peroneal nerve and assessed the influence on H-reflexes and CS excitability. We hypothesized that compared with shorter pulse durations, longer pulses would (i) shift the H-reflex recruitment curve to the left, relative to the M-wave curve; and (ii) increase CS excitability more. Using 3 pulse durations (50, 200, 1000 μs), M-wave and H-reflex recruitment curves were collected and, in separate experiments, CS excitability was assessed by comparing motor evoked potentials elicited before and after 30 min of NMES. Despite finding a leftward shift in the H-reflex recruitment curve when using the 1000 μs pulse duration, consistent with a larger afferent volley for a given efferent volley, the increases in CS excitability were not influenced by pulse duration. Hence, although manipulating pulse duration can alter the relative recruitment of afferents and efferents in the common peroneal nerve, under the present experimental conditions it is ineffective for maximizing CS excitability for rehabilitation.

  4. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation facilitates osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Hu

    Full Text Available Human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs possess stem cell properties, which play a key role in periodontal regeneration. Physical stimulation at appropriate intensities such as low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS enhances cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesechymal stem cells. However, the impacts of LIPUS on osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs in vitro and its molecular mechanism are unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of LIPUS on osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs. HPDLCs were isolated from premolars of adolescents for orthodontic reasons, and exposed to LIPUS at different intensities to determine an optimal LIPUS treatment dosage. Dynamic changes of alkaline phosphatase (ALP activities in the cultured cells and supernatants, and osteocalcin production in the supernatants after treatment were analyzed. Runx2 and integrin β1 mRNA levels were assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis after LIPUS stimulation. Blocking antibody against integrinβ1 was used to assess the effects of integrinβ1 inhibitor on LIPUS-induced ALP activity, osteocalcin production as well as calcium deposition. Our data showed that LIPUS at the intensity of 90 mW/cm2 with 20 min/day was more effective. The ALP activities in lysates and supernatants of LIPUS-treated cells started to increase at days 3 and 7, respectively, and peaked at day 11. LIPUS treatment significantly augmented the production of osteocalcin after day 5. LIPUS caused a significant increase in the mRNA expression of Runx2 and integrin β1, while a significant decline when the integrinβ1 inhibitor was used. Moreover, ALP activity, osteocalcin production as well as calcium nodules of cells treated with both daily LIPUS stimulation and integrinβ1 antibody were less than those in the LIPUS-treated group. In conclusion, LIPUS promotes osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs, which is associated with upregulation of Runx2 and

  5. Laser and Plasma Parameters for Laser Pulse Amplification by Stimulated Brillouin Backscattering in the Strong Coupling Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangolf, Thomas; Blecher, Marius; Bolanos, Simon; Lancia, Livia; Marques, Jean-Raphael; Cerchez, Mirela; Prasad, Rajendra; Aurand, Bastian; Loiseau, Pascal; Fuchs, Julien; Willi, Oswald

    2017-10-01

    In the ongoing quest for novel techniques to obtain ever higher laser powers, plasma amplification has drawn much attention, benefiting from the fact that a plasma can sustain much higher energy densities than a solid state amplifier. As a plasma process, Stimulated Brillouin Backscattering in the strong coupling regime (sc-SBS) can be used to transfer energy from one laser pulse (pump) to another (seed), by a nonlinear ion oscillation forced by the pump laser. Here, we report on experimental results on amplification by sc-SBS using the ARCTURUS Ti:Sapphire multi-beam laser system at the University of Duesseldorf, Germany. Counter-propagating in a supersonic Hydrogen gas jet target, an ultrashort seed pulse with a pulse duration between 30 and 160 fs and an energy between 1 and 12 mJ was amplified by a high-energy pump pulse (1.7 ps, 700 mJ). For some of the measurements, the gas was pre-ionized with a separate laser pulse (780 fs, 460 mJ). Preliminary analysis shows that the amplification was larger for the longer seed pulses, consistent with theoretical predictions.

  6. Electric Dipole Echoes in Rydberg Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, S.; Reinhold, C. O.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Zhao, W.; Mestayer, J. J.; Lancaster, J. C.; Dunning, F. B.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first observation of echoes in the electric dipole moment of an ensemble of Rydberg atoms precessing in an external electric field F. Rapid reversal of the field direction is shown to play a role similar to that of a π pulse in NMR in rephasing a dephased ensemble of electric dipoles resulting in the buildup of an echo. The mechanisms responsible for this are discussed with the aid of classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations

  7. PERIPHERAL APPLICATION OF REPETITIVE PULSE MAGNETIC STIMULATION ON JOINT CONTRACTURE FOR MOBILITY RESTORATION: CONTROLLED RANDOMIZED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthimios J. Kouloulas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Joint contracture is a limitation in the passive or active range of motion (ROM of a joint, where in addition to the mobility limiting factor the pain is also present. Repetitive pulsed Magnetic Stimulation (rPMS appears to be an effective, non-invasive and safety solution for treating this condition. Therefore aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of rPMS in treating joint contracture. Methods: 30 subjects with joint contracture in the knee were enrolled in this study and divided respectively into Treatment and Control group. The treatment group were delivered with rPMS therapy. The control group was delivered with conventional physiotherapy method (ultrasound. The primary outcome measurements were: 1. Mobility evaluation by goniometry (ROM in degrees while performing flexion and Patient Functional Assessment Questionnaire (PFAQ for ability to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADL and 2. Pain evaluation by 10-point Visual Analog Scale (VAS for pain perception. Absence of adverse events was set as a secondary measure. Results: The results of the study show statistical difference (p<0.05 between the levels of improvement of all studied parameters while comparing between both groups. The results suggest greater immobility restoration and pain relieving effect of the rPMS in comparison to conventional physiotherapy method. Conclusion: rPMS an effective and safe non-invasive method for mobility restoration and pain relief in case of joint contractures. This study suggests the method as beneficial and quality of life ameliorating among patients suffering from immobilized joints accompanied by pain.

  8. Reduction of the pace polarization artefact for capture detection applications by a tri-phasic stimulation pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, R; Fröhlig, G; de Voogt, W G; Goethals, M; Hintringer, F; Kennergren, C; Scanu, P; Guilleman, D; Treese, N; Hartung, W M; Stammwitz, E; Muetstege, A

    2004-11-01

    This study investigated the ability to minimize pace polarization artefacts (PPA) by adjusting the post-stimulus pulse duration of a tri-phasic stimulation pulse. Adjustment of the stimulation pulse was enabled by downloading special study software into an already implanted pacemaker. Tests were performed in a total of 296 atrial leads and 311 ventricular leads. Both chronic and acute leads were included in the study. Statistically significant differences were found in the initial PPA (without any adjustment of the stimulus pulse) between atrial and ventricular leads. In addition, significant differences were observed among various lead models with respect to changes over time in the initial ventricular PPA. Successful PPA reduction was defined as a reduction of the PPA below 0.5 mV for atrial leads and below 1 mV for ventricular leads. Results show a success rate for ventricular and atrial PPA reduction of 97.8% and 98.7%, respectively. Threshold tests showed that after reduction of the PPA loss of ventricular capture can be reliably detected. However, atrial threshold tests showed many false positive evoked response detections. In addition, unexpectedly high evoked response amplitudes were observed in the atrium after reduction of the PPA. Results from additional measurements suggest that these high atrial evoked response amplitudes come from the influence of the input filter of the pacemaker.

  9. The influence of stellate ganglion transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on signal quality of pulse oximetry in prehospital trauma care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Renate; Lang, Thomas; Hager, Helmut; Steinlechner, Barbara; Hoerauf, Klaus; Zimpfer, Michael; Kober, Alexander

    2007-05-01

    Accurate monitoring of the peripheral arterial oxygen saturation has become an important tool in the prehospital emergency medicine. This monitoring requires an adequate plethysmographic pulsation. Signal quality is diminished by cold ambient temperature due to vasoconstriction. Blockade of the stellate ganglion can improve peripheral vascular perfusion and can be achieved by direct injection or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) stimulation. We evaluated whether TENS on the stellate ganglion would reduce vasoconstriction and thereby improve signal detection quality of peripheral pulse oximetry. In our study, 53 patients with minor trauma who required transport to the hospital were enrolled. We recorded vital signs, including core and skin temperature before and after transport to the hospital. Pulse oximetry sensors were attached to the patient's second finger on both hands. TENS of the stellate ganglion was started on one side after the beginning of the transport. Pulse oximeter alerts, due to poor signal detection, were recorded for each side separately. On the hand treated with TENS we detected a significant reduction of alerts compared to the other side (mean alerts TENS 3.1 [1-15] versus control side 8.8 [1-28] P signal quality of pulse oximeters in the prehospital setting.

  10. Exhausted implanted pulse generator in sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence: What next in daily practice for patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchalais, Emilie; Meurette, Guillaume; Perrot, Bastien; Wyart, Vincent; Kubis, Caroline; Lehur, Paul-Antoine

    2016-02-01

    The efficacy of sacral nerve stimulation in faecal incontinence relies on an implanted pulse generator known to have a limited lifespan. The long-term use of sacral nerve stimulation raises concerns about the true lifespan of generators. The aim of the study was to assess the lifespan of sacral nerve stimulation implanted pulse generators in daily practice, and the outcome of exhausted generator replacement, in faecal incontinent patients. Faecal incontinent patients with pulse generators (Medtronic Interstim™ or InterstimII™) implanted in a single centre from 2001 to 2014 were prospectively followed up. Generator lifespan was measured according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Patients with a generator explanted/turned off before exhaustion were excluded. Morbidity of exhausted generator replacement and the outcome (Cleveland Clinic Florida Faecal Incontinence (CCF-FI) and Faecal Incontinence Quality of Life (FIQL) scores) were recorded. Of 135 patients with an implanted pulse generator, 112 (InterstimII 66) were included. Mean follow-up was 4.9 ± 2.8 years. The generator reached exhaustion in 29 (26%) cases. Overall median lifespan of an implanted pulse generator was approximately 9 years (95% CI 8-9.2). Interstim and InterstimII 25th percentile lifespan was 7.2 (CI 6.4-8.3) and 5 (CI 4-not reached) years, respectively. After exhaustion, generators were replaced, left in place or explanted in 23, 2 and 4 patients, respectively. Generator replacement was virtually uneventful. CCF-FI/FIQL scores remained unchanged after generator replacement (CCF-FI 8 ± 2 vs 7 ± 3; FIQL 3 ± 0.6 vs 3 ± 0.5; p = ns). In this study, the implanted pulse generator observed median lifespan was 9 years. After exhaustion, generators were safely and efficiently replaced. The study also gives insight into long-term needs and costs of sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) therapy.

  11. Echo-Interleaved-Spiral MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Shirrie; Azhari, Haim [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Montag, Avram [Elscint Ltd., MRI division, Haifa (Israel)

    1999-12-31

    Interleaved-Spiral imaging is an efficient method for MRI fast scans. However, images suffer from blurring and artifacts due to field inhomogeneities and the long readout times. In this paper, we combine interleaved-spirals with spin-echo for 3D scans. The refocusing RF-pulses (echoes) refocus off-resonance spins, thus allowing longer acquisition times per excitation, by limiting inhomogeneity effects. The total number of excitations for a 3D scan is reduced by half. The 3D Fourier transform of an object is divided into pairs of slices, one slice is scanned in an outgoing interleaved-spiral, initiated after a 90 degree pulse has been applied. The second slice is scanned in an ingoing interleaved-spiral, after a 180 degree pulse has been applied, thus reaching the slice origin at the echo time. (authors) 4 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Echo-Interleaved-Spiral MR Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, Shirrie; Azhari, Haim; Montag, Avram

    1998-01-01

    Interleaved-Spiral imaging is an efficient method for MRI fast scans. However, images suffer from blurring and artifacts due to field inhomogeneities and the long readout times. In this paper, we combine interleaved-spirals with spin-echo for 3D scans. The refocusing RF-pulses (echoes) refocus off-resonance spins, thus allowing longer acquisition times per excitation, by limiting inhomogeneity effects. The total number of excitations for a 3D scan is reduced by half. The 3D Fourier transform of an object is divided into pairs of slices, one slice is scanned in an outgoing interleaved-spiral, initiated after a 90 degree pulse has been applied. The second slice is scanned in an ingoing interleaved-spiral, after a 180 degree pulse has been applied, thus reaching the slice origin at the echo time. (authors)

  13. Microsecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma stimulation of tissue macrophages for treatment of peripheral vascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, V., E-mail: vmiller@coe.drexel.edu; Lin, A.; Brettschneider, J.; Fridman, G.; Fridman, A. [AJ Drexel Plasma Institute, Drexel University, Camden, New Jersey 08103 (United States); Kako, F.; Gabunia, K.; Kelemen, S.; Autieri, M. [Department of Physiology, Independence Blue Cross Cardiovascular Research Center, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19140 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels and normally occurs during the process of inflammatory reactions, wound healing, tissue repair, and restoration of blood flow after injury or insult. Stimulation of angiogenesis is a promising and an important step in the treatment of peripheral artery disease. Reactive oxygen species have been shown to be involved in stimulation of this process. For this reason, we have developed and validated a non-equilibrium atmospheric temperature and pressure short-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma system, which can non-destructively generate reactive oxygen species and other active species at the surface of the tissue being treated. We show that this plasma treatment stimulates the production of vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and CXCL 1 that in turn induces angiogenesis in mouse aortic rings in vitro. This effect may be mediated by the direct effect of plasma generated reactive oxygen species on tissue.

  14. EUV emission stimulated by use of dual laser pulses from continus liquid microjet targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Rajyaguru, Chirag; Sasaki, Wataru; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2004-11-01

    A continuous water-jet or water-jet mixed with LiF with several tens μm diameter was formed in a vacuum chamber through a small capillary nozzle. Usage of two laser pulses is an efficient way to produce EUV emission, since a density and temperature of a plasma formed by the first laser pulse are regulated by the second laser pulse. By adjusting the delay of the second pulse, one could maximize the EUV emission. A subpicosecond Ti:Sapphire laser at a wavelength of 800 nm produced a maximum energy around 30 mJ. The beam was divided by a Michelson interferometer, which produced two laser pulses with energies of 5 mJ. The pulse duration was adjusted around 300 fs (FWHM). Both beams were focused on a micro-jet using a lens with a focal length of 15 cm. The delay time between the two pulses was varied from 100 to 800 ps by use of an optical delay line. Clear enhancement of the EUV emission yield was observed when the delay between the two pulses was around 500 ps. The experimentally observed delay agrees reasonably well with that of a plasma to expand to its critical density of 10^21 cm-3.

  15. Effect of tendon vibration during wide-pulse neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on the decline and recovery of muscle force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkezanian, Vanesa; Newton, Robert U; Trajano, Gabriel S; Vieira, Amilton; Pulverenti, Timothy S; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2017-05-02

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is commonly used to activate skeletal muscles and reverse muscle atrophy in clinical populations. Clinical recommendations for NMES suggest the use of short pulse widths (100-200 μs) and low-to-moderate pulse frequencies (30-50 Hz). However, this type of NMES causes rapid muscle fatigue due to the (non-physiological) high stimulation intensities and non-orderly recruitment of motor units. The use of both wide pulse widths (1000 μs) and tendon vibration might optimize motor unit activation through spinal reflex pathways and thus delay the onset of muscle fatigue, increasing muscle force and mass. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine the acute effects of patellar tendon vibration superimposed onto wide-pulse width (1000 μs) knee extensor electrical stimulation (NMES, 30 Hz) on peak muscle force, total impulse before "muscle fatigue", and the post-exercise recovery of muscle function. Tendon vibration (Vib), NMES (STIM) or NMES superimposed onto vibration (STIM + Vib) were applied in separate sessions to 16 healthy adults. Total torque-time integral (TTI), maximal voluntary contraction torque (MVIC) and indirect measures of muscle damage were tested before, immediately after, 1 h and 48 h after each stimulus. TTI increased (145.0 ± 127.7%) in STIM only for "positive responders" to the tendon vibration (8/16 subjects), but decreased in "negative responders" (-43.5 ± 25.7%). MVIC (-8.7%) and rectus femoris electromyography (RF EMG) (-16.7%) decreased after STIM (group effect) for at least 1 h, but not after STIM + Vib. No changes were detected in indirect markers of muscle damage in any condition. Tendon vibration superimposed onto wide-pulse width NMES increased TTI only in 8 of 16 subjects, but reduced voluntary force loss (fatigue) ubiquitously. Negative responders to tendon vibration may derive greater benefit from wide-pulse width NMES alone.

  16. Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation on the Radial artery’s Pressure Pulse Wave in Healthy Young Participants: Protocol for a prospective, single-Arm, Exploratory, Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Shin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aims to investigate the effects of acupuncture stimulation on the radial artery’s pressure pulse wave, along with various hemodynamic parameters, and to explore the possible underlying mechanism of pulse diagnosis in healthy participants in their twenties. Methods and analysis: This study is a prospective, si

  17. Kilohertz and Low-Frequency Electrical Stimulation With the Same Pulse Duration Have Similar Efficiency for Inducing Isometric Knee Extension Torque and Discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Flávia Vanessa; Bottaro, Martim; Vieira, Amilton; Lucas, Tiago Pires; Modesto, Karenina Arrais; Bo, Antonio Padilha L; Cipriano, Gerson; Babault, Nicolas; Durigan, João Luiz Quagliotti

    2017-06-01

    To test the hypotheses that, as compared with pulsed current with the same pulse duration, kilohertz frequency alternating current would not differ in terms of evoked-torque production and perceived discomfort, and as a result, it would show the same current efficiency. A repeated-measures design with 4 stimuli presented in random order was used to test 25 women: (1) 500-microsecond pulse duration, (2) 250-microsecond pulse duration, (3) 500-microsecond pulse duration and low carrier frequency (1 kHz), (4) 250-microsecond pulse duration and high carrier frequency (4 kHz). Isometric peak torque of quadriceps muscle was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Discomfort was measured using a visual analog scale. Currents with long pulse durations induced approximately 21% higher evoked torque than short pulse durations. In addition, currents with 500 microseconds delivered greater amounts of charge than stimulation patterns using 250-microsecond pulse durations (P torque and discomfort. However, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) with longer pulse duration induces higher NMES-evoked torque, regardless of the carrier frequency. Pulse duration is an important variable that should receive more attention for an optimal application of NMES in clinical settings.

  18. The Effects of Transcranial Pulsed Electromagnetic Field stimulation on quality of life in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morberg, Bo Mohr; Malling, Anne Sofie; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulsed electromagnetic fields induce a protective and anti-inflammatory effect in the nervous system primarily due to growth factor up regulation that possibly abates neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. This study investigated treatment effects of transcranial pulsed......:3 to either active (n=49) or placebo treatment (n=48). Treatment with transcranial pulsed electromagnetic fields entailed one daily 30-minute home treatment for eight consecutive weeks. The 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire was assessed at baseline and at endpoint. Profiling adverse events a special...... PDQ-39 dimensions no between group differences were found. There were no between group difference in adverse events. Treatment compliance was 97.9%. CONCLUSION: Treatment with transcranial pulsed electromagnetic fields improved mobility and ADL scores for clinical effect size only in the active group...

  19. Fat suppression with short inversion time inversion-recovery and chemical-shift selective saturation: a dual STIR-CHESS combination prepulse for turbo spin echo pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Koji; Nishikawa, Keiichi; Sano, Tsukasa; Sakai, Osamu; Jara, Hernán

    2010-05-01

    To test a newly developed fat suppression magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prepulse that synergistically uses the principles of fat suppression via inversion recovery (STIR) and spectral fat saturation (CHESS), relative to pure CHESS and STIR. This new technique is termed dual fat suppression (Dual-FS). To determine if Dual-FS could be chemically specific for fat, the phantom consisted of the fat-mimicking NiCl(2) aqueous solution, porcine fat, porcine muscle, and water was imaged with the three fat-suppression techniques. For Dual-FS and STIR, several inversion times were used. Signal intensities of each image obtained with each technique were compared. To determine if Dual-FS could be robust to magnetic field inhomogeneities, the phantom consisting of different NiCl(2) aqueous solutions, porcine fat, porcine muscle, and water was imaged with Dual-FS and CHESS at the several off-resonance frequencies. To compare fat suppression efficiency in vivo, 10 volunteer subjects were also imaged with the three fat-suppression techniques. Dual-FS could suppress fat sufficiently within the inversion time of 110-140 msec, thus enabling differentiation between fat and fat-mimicking aqueous structures. Dual-FS was as robust to magnetic field inhomogeneities as STIR and less vulnerable than CHESS. The same results for fat suppression were obtained in volunteers. The Dual-FS-STIR-CHESS is an alternative and promising fat suppression technique for turbo spin echo MRI. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Intracranial cerebrospinal fluid spaces imaging using a pulse-triggered three-dimensional turbo spin echo MR sequence with variable flip-angle distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodel, Jerome [Unite Analyse et Restauration du Mouvement, UMR-CNRS, 8005 LBM ParisTech Ensam, Paris (France); University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neuroradiology, Creteil (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Creteil (France); Silvera, Jonathan [University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neuroradiology, Creteil (France); Bekaert, Olivier; Decq, Philippe [Unite Analyse et Restauration du Mouvement, UMR-CNRS, 8005 LBM ParisTech Ensam, Paris (France); University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neurosurgery, Creteil (France); Rahmouni, Alain [University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Radiology, Creteil (France); Bastuji-Garin, Sylvie [University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Public Health, Creteil (France); Vignaud, Alexandre [Siemens Healthcare, Saint Denis (France); Petit, Eric; Durning, Bruno [Laboratoire Images Signaux et Systemes Intelligents, UPEC, Creteil (France)

    2011-02-15

    To assess the three-dimensional turbo spin echo with variable flip-angle distribution magnetic resonance sequence (SPACE: Sampling Perfection with Application optimised Contrast using different flip-angle Evolution) for the imaging of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces. We prospectively investigated 18 healthy volunteers and 25 patients, 20 with communicating hydrocephalus (CH), five with non-communicating hydrocephalus (NCH), using the SPACE sequence at 1.5T. Volume rendering views of both intracranial and ventricular CSF were obtained for all patients and volunteers. The subarachnoid CSF distribution was qualitatively evaluated on volume rendering views using a four-point scale. The CSF volumes within total, ventricular and subarachnoid spaces were calculated as well as the ratio between ventricular and subarachnoid CSF volumes. Three different patterns of subarachnoid CSF distribution were observed. In healthy volunteers we found narrowed CSF spaces within the occipital aera. A diffuse narrowing of the subarachnoid CSF spaces was observed in patients with NCH whereas patients with CH exhibited narrowed CSF spaces within the high midline convexity. The ratios between ventricular and subarachnoid CSF volumes were significantly different among the volunteers, patients with CH and patients with NCH. The assessment of CSF spaces volume and distribution may help to characterise hydrocephalus. (orig.)

  1. Intracranial cerebrospinal fluid spaces imaging using a pulse-triggered three-dimensional turbo spin echo MR sequence with variable flip-angle distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodel, Jerome; Silvera, Jonathan; Bekaert, Olivier; Decq, Philippe; Rahmouni, Alain; Bastuji-Garin, Sylvie; Vignaud, Alexandre; Petit, Eric; Durning, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    To assess the three-dimensional turbo spin echo with variable flip-angle distribution magnetic resonance sequence (SPACE: Sampling Perfection with Application optimised Contrast using different flip-angle Evolution) for the imaging of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces. We prospectively investigated 18 healthy volunteers and 25 patients, 20 with communicating hydrocephalus (CH), five with non-communicating hydrocephalus (NCH), using the SPACE sequence at 1.5T. Volume rendering views of both intracranial and ventricular CSF were obtained for all patients and volunteers. The subarachnoid CSF distribution was qualitatively evaluated on volume rendering views using a four-point scale. The CSF volumes within total, ventricular and subarachnoid spaces were calculated as well as the ratio between ventricular and subarachnoid CSF volumes. Three different patterns of subarachnoid CSF distribution were observed. In healthy volunteers we found narrowed CSF spaces within the occipital aera. A diffuse narrowing of the subarachnoid CSF spaces was observed in patients with NCH whereas patients with CH exhibited narrowed CSF spaces within the high midline convexity. The ratios between ventricular and subarachnoid CSF volumes were significantly different among the volunteers, patients with CH and patients with NCH. The assessment of CSF spaces volume and distribution may help to characterise hydrocephalus. (orig.)

  2. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation for mandibular condyle osteoarthritis lesions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaguchi Arita, A; Yonemitsu, I; Ikeda, Y; Miyazaki, M; Ono, T

    2018-05-01

    This study evaluated low-intensity pulsed ultrasound effects for temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis in adult rats. Osteoarthritis-like lesions were induced in 24 adult rats' temporomandibular joints with low-dose mono-iodoacetate injections. The rats were divided into four groups: control and mono-iodoacetate groups, injected with contrast media and mono-iodoacetate, respectively, at 12 weeks and observed until 20 weeks; and low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and mono-iodoacetate + low-intensity pulsed ultrasound groups, injected with contrast media and mono-iodoacetate, respectively, at 12 weeks with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound performed from 16 to 20 weeks. Condylar bone mineral density, bone mineral content and bone volume were evaluated weekly with microcomputed tomography. Histological and immunohistochemical staining for matrix metalloproteinases-13 was performed at 20 weeks. At 20 weeks, the mono-iodoacetate + low-intensity pulsed ultrasound group showed significantly higher bone mineral density, bone mineral content and bone volume than the mono-iodoacetate group; however, these values remained lower than those in the other two groups. On histological and immunohistochemical analysis, the chondrocytes were increased, and fewer matrix metalloproteinases-13 immunopositive cells were identified in the mono-iodoacetate + low-intensity pulsed ultrasound group than mono-iodoacetate group. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound for 2 weeks may have therapeutic potential for treating temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis lesions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. ECHO Gov Login | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  4. Effect of a target on the stimulated emission of microsecond CO2-laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, V. Iu.; Dolgov, V. A.; Maliuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Semak, V. V.

    1987-12-01

    The paper reports a change in the pulse shape of a TEA CO2 laser with an unstable cavity under the interaction between the laser radiation and a metal surface in the presence of a breakdown plasma. It is shown that a continuous change in the phase difference between the wave reflected in the cavity and the principal cavity wave gives rise to changes in the pulse shape and the appearance of power fluctuations. The possible effect of these phenomena on the laser treatment of materials is considered.

  5. Pulse and integral optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Similarities and dissimilarities to thermoluminescence (TL) dose dependence and dose-rate effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, R.; Leung, P.L.

    2000-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (Tl) are two possible methods to monitor the absorbed radiation in solid samples, and therefore are utilized for dosimetry. For this application, two properties are desirable, namely, linear dose dependence of the measured quantity and dose-rate independence. For Tl, different kinds of super linear dose dependence have been reported in the literature in different materials, and in some cases, dose-rate dependence has also been found. These have been explained as being the result of competition. In OSL, some recent works reported on super linear dose dependence in annealed samples. In the present work, we explain the possible occurrence of these phenomena in OSL by solving numerically the relevant rate equations governing the process during irradiation, relaxation and read-out (heating or light stimulation). The results show that for short pulse OSL, quadratic dose dependence can be expected when only one trapping state and one kind of recombination center are involved and when the excitation starts with empty traps and centers. With the short pulse OSL, the calculation also reveals a possible dose-rate effect. Under the same circumstances, the area under the OSL curve depends linearly on the dose. The dependence of the whole area under the OSL curve on the dose is shown to be super linear when a disconnected trapping state or radiationless center take part in the process. Also, dose-rate effect can be expected in these cases, although no experimental effect of this sort has been reported so far. In pulse OSL, the analogy is made between the measured intensity and the initial rise range of non-first order Tl, whereas for the total area OSL, there is a nearly full analogy with the dose behavior of the Tl maximum. (Author)

  6. Spread of cochlear excitation during stimulation with pulsed infrared radiation: inferior colliculus measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, C.-P.; Rajguru, S. M.; Matic, A. I.; Moreno, E. L.; Fishman, A. J.; Robinson, A. M.; Suh, E.; Walsh, J. T., Jr.

    2011-10-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has received considerable attention over the last few years. It provides an alternative method to artificially stimulate neurons without electrical current or the introduction of exogenous chromophores. One of the primary benefits of INS could be the improved spatial selectivity when compared with electrical stimulation. In the present study, we have evaluated the spatial selectivity of INS in the acutely damaged cochlea of guinea pigs and compared it to stimulation with acoustic tone pips in normal-hearing animals. The radiation was delivered via a 200 µm diameter optical fiber, which was inserted through a cochleostomy into the scala tympani of the basal cochlear turn. The stimulated section along the cochlear spiral ganglion was estimated from the neural responses recorded from the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). ICC responses were recorded in response to cochlear INS using a multichannel penetrating electrode array. Spatial tuning curves (STCs) were constructed from the responses. For INS, approximately 55% of the activation profiles showed a single maximum, ~22% had two maxima and ~13% had multiple maxima. The remaining 10% of the profiles occurred at the limits of the electrode array and could not be classified. The majority of ICC STCs indicated that the spread of activation evoked by optical stimuli is comparable to that produced by acoustic tone pips.

  7. Effects of combined pulse electromagnetic field stimulation plus glutamine on the healing of colonic anastomosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgin, Sadullah; Gedik, Ercan; Ozturk, Hayrettin; Akpolat, Veysi; Akbulut, Veysi; Kale, Ebru; Buyukbayram, Huseyin; Celik, Salih

    2009-04-01

    An experimental study was designed to investigate the effect of combined pulse electromagnetic field (PEMF) stimulation plus glutamine administration on colonic anastomosis. Anastomosis of the left colon was performed in 28 rats, which were divided into four groups; Group 1: normal resection anastomosis plus oral 50 mg/kg/day glutamine; Group 2: normal resection anastomosis plus PEMF stimulation plus oral 50 mg/kg/day glutamine; Group 3: normal resection anastomosis plus PEMF stimulation; Group 4: normal resection anastomosis. On the seventh postoperative day, the animals were killed and the bursting pressure and tissue hydroxyproline concentration of the anastomosis were analyzed and compared. The mean anastomotic bursting pressure in Group 2 was significantly higher than in Groups 1 and 4. On the other hand, the mean anastomotic bursting pressure in Group 1 was significantly higher than in Group 4. The collagen deposition and the fibroblast infiltration were significantly increased on the seventh day in Group 3 compared the other groups. On the other hand, Groups 1 and 2 had higher scores for collagen deposition and fibroblast infiltration than Group 4. In conclusion, burst pressures, hydroxyproline, and histologic features (fibroblast infiltration and collagen deposition) were improved in the PEMF group, and both PEMF and glutamine-enriched nutrition provide a significant gain in the strength of colonic anastomoses in rats.

  8. MPD model for radar echo signal of hypersonic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Xuefei

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The stop-and-go (SAG model is typically used for echo signal received by the radar using linear frequency modulation pulse compression. In this study, the authors demonstrate that this model is not applicable to hypersonic targets. Instead of SAG model, they present a more realistic echo signal model (moving-in-pulse duration (MPD for hypersonic targets. Following that, they evaluate the performances of pulse compression under the SAG and MPD models by theoretical analysis and simulations. They found that the pulse compression gain has an increase of 3 dB by using the MPD model compared with the SAG model in typical cases.

  9. A frequency and pulse-width co-modulation strategy for transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation based on sEMG time-domain features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Xuan; Wang, Hai-Peng; Bao, Xue-Liang; Lü, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Zhi-Gong

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is often used as a control signal in neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) systems to enhance the voluntary control and proprioceptive sensory feedback of paralyzed patients. Most sEMG-controlled NMES systems use the envelope of the sEMG signal to modulate the stimulation intensity (current amplitude or pulse width) with a constant frequency. The aims of this study were to develop a strategy that co-modulates frequency and pulse width based on features of the sEMG signal and to investigate the torque-reproduction performance and the level of fatigue resistance achieved with our strategy. Approach. We examined the relationships between wrist torque and two stimulation parameters (frequency and pulse width) and between wrist torque and two sEMG time-domain features (mean absolute value (MAV) and number of slope sign changes (NSS)) in eight healthy volunteers. By using wrist torque as an intermediate variable, customized and generalized transfer functions were constructed to convert the two features of the sEMG signal into the two stimulation parameters, thereby establishing a MAV/NSS dual-coding (MNDC) algorithm. Wrist torque reproduction performance was assessed by comparing the torque generated by the algorithms with that originally recorded during voluntary contractions. Muscle fatigue was assessed by measuring the decline percentage of the peak torque and by comparing the torque time integral of the response to test stimulation trains before and after fatigue sessions. Main Results. The MNDC approach could produce a wrist torque that closely matched the voluntary wrist torque. In addition, a smaller decay in the wrist torque was observed after the MNDC-coded fatigue stimulation was applied than after stimulation using pulse-width modulation alone. Significance. Compared with pulse-width modulation stimulation strategies that are based on sEMG detection, the MNDC strategy is more effective for both voluntary muscle

  10. The effect of pulse width and contact configuration on paresthesia coverage in spinal cord stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holsheimer, J.; Buitenweg, Jan R.; Das, John; de Sutter, Paul; Manola, L.; Nuttin, Bart

    Objective. To investigate the effect of stimulus pulsewidth (PW) and contact configuration (CC) on the area of paresthesia (PA), perception threshold (VPT), discomfort threshold (VDT) and usage range (UR) in spinal cord stimulation (SCS). Methods. Chronic pain patients were tested during a follow-up

  11. Pain as the Sole Presenting Symptom of Infected Sacral Nerve Stimulation Implantable Pulse Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayan Elkattah

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Two patients presented from outside hospitals with complaints of pain at the site of implantable pulse generator (IPG. Neither patient had constitutional or local signs and symptoms of infection; however, during operations performed for revision and/or troubleshooting of the device, infection was encountered and all components were removed. Both individuals recovered well from the operation, and one patient underwent subsequent placement of a new InterStim device with good results. Possibility of infection should be considered in patients with complaint of pain associated with IPG site.

  12. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation, Transcranial Pulsed Current Stimulation, and Their Combination on Brain Oscillations in Patients with Chronic Visceral Pain: A Pilot Crossover Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibaut, Aurore; Russo, Cristina; Hurtado-Puerto, Aura Maria; Morales-Quezada, Jorge Leon; Deitos, Alícia; Petrozza, John Christopher; Freedman, Steven; Fregni, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Chronic visceral pain (CVP) syndromes are persistently painful disorders with a remarkable lack of effective treatment options. This study aimed at evaluating the effects of different neuromodulation techniques in patients with CVP on cortical activity, through electreocephalography (EEG) and on pain perception, through clinical tests. A pilot crossover randomized controlled study. Out-patient. Adults with CVP (>3 months). Participants received four interventions in a randomized order: (1) transcranial pulsed current stimulation (tPCS) and active transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) combined, (2) tPCS alone, (3) tDCS alone, and (4) sham condition. Resting state quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) and pain assessments were performed before and after each intervention. Results were compared with a cohort of 47 healthy controls. We enrolled six patients with CVP for a total of 21 visits completed. Compared with healthy participants, patients with CVP showed altered cortical activity characterized by increased power in theta, alpha and beta bands, and a significant reduction in the alpha/beta ratio. Regarding tES, the combination of tDCS with tPCS had no effect on power in any of the bandwidths, nor brain regions. Comparing tPCS with tDCS alone, we found that tPCS induced higher increase in power within the theta and alpha bandwidths. This study confirms that patients with CVP present abnormal EEG-indexed cortical activity compared with healthy controls. Moreover, we showed that combining two types of neurostimulation techniques had no effect, whereas the two interventions, when applied individually, have different neural signatures.

  13. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation, Transcranial Pulsed Current Stimulation, and Their Combination on Brain Oscillations in Patients with Chronic Visceral Pain: A Pilot Crossover Randomized Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Thibaut

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveChronic visceral pain (CVP syndromes are persistently painful disorders with a remarkable lack of effective treatment options. This study aimed at evaluating the effects of different neuromodulation techniques in patients with CVP on cortical activity, through electreocephalography (EEG and on pain perception, through clinical tests.DesignA pilot crossover randomized controlled study.SettingsOut-patient.SubjectsAdults with CVP (>3 months.MethodsParticipants received four interventions in a randomized order: (1 transcranial pulsed current stimulation (tPCS and active transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS combined, (2 tPCS alone, (3 tDCS alone, and (4 sham condition. Resting state quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG and pain assessments were performed before and after each intervention. Results were compared with a cohort of 47 healthy controls.ResultsWe enrolled six patients with CVP for a total of 21 visits completed. Compared with healthy participants, patients with CVP showed altered cortical activity characterized by increased power in theta, alpha and beta bands, and a significant reduction in the alpha/beta ratio. Regarding tES, the combination of tDCS with tPCS had no effect on power in any of the bandwidths, nor brain regions. Comparing tPCS with tDCS alone, we found that tPCS induced higher increase in power within the theta and alpha bandwidths.ConclusionThis study confirms that patients with CVP present abnormal EEG-indexed cortical activity compared with healthy controls. Moreover, we showed that combining two types of neurostimulation techniques had no effect, whereas the two interventions, when applied individually, have different neural signatures.

  14. Propagation of an intense laser pulse in an under-dense plasma: channeling and stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friou, A.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is divided in two parts: i) the laser channeling in hundreds of microns long under-dense plasmas (0.1 nc ≤ n ≤ nc, nc being the critical density) of a laser pulse of intensity 10 18-20 W/cm 2 and duration 1-10 ps; ii) the saturation mechanisms of stimulated Raman back-scattering of a laser pulse of intensity 10 14 to 10 16 W/cm 2 and duration of about 1 ps. A parametric study was performed to study the channeling of a very intense laser pulse, using a 2D PIC (Particle In Cell) code. Various kinds of channels were obtained depending on the laser and plasma parameters, thereby reproducing and enlarging previous studies. Moreover, the channeling velocity was measured and scaling laws were established for homogeneous plasmas. They are then applied to inhomogeneous plasmas, similar to those encountered in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It is then possible to estimate the energy necessary to channel to the critical density, an important step for the fast ignition scheme of ICF. Raman saturation was studied using numerical simulations, in order to determine if it is due to dephasing or to the growth of sidebands, using different approaches. The first is to study Raman simulations (electromagnetic) performed with kinetic PIC and Vlasov codes. The second, is to study the evolution of a plasma initialized with a distribution function after the adiabatic theory, using a Vlasov code (electrostatic). In this case, we observe the growth of a sideband, with dominant wave number and growth rate in good agreement with kinetic simulations. The saturation of the plasma wave can be caused by both saturation mechanisms. [fr

  15. Transcranial magnetic stimulation: no effect on mood with single pulse during learned helplessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, U; Wild, B; Topka, H; Kircher, T; Salloum, J B; Schneider, F

    2001-04-01

    1. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is suggested to be an effective tool in the treatment of depression. However, the methodology most suitable for clinical application remains unclear. 2. The effect of TMS was tested in a double-blind and placebo-controlled setting on 18 healthy subjects. At the same time an established learned helplessness paradigm was applied to induce dysphoria, which consisted of unsolvable anagrams. 3. Sixty 0.5 Hz stimuli were administered at an intensity of 130% of the subject's motor threshold after the subjects were exposed to the learned helplessness situation. Using a vertically positioned coil, the stimuli were applied to the right or to the left frontal cortex, or on the occipital cortex as a placebo condition. 4. Although dysphoria was successfully induced by unsolvable anagrams, TMS on either of the two frontal locations did not influence mood. This lack of effect may be due to the stimulation characteristics employed here (low TMS intensity, and low frequency). On the other hand, the findings may reflect the neurobiological difference between experimentally induced sad mood and clinical depression.

  16. Modeling seismic stimulation: Enhanced non-aqueous fluid extraction from saturated porous media under pore-pressure pulsing at low frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Sposito, Garrison; Huang, Yu-Han

    2012-03-01

    Seismic stimulation, the application of low-frequency stress-pulsing to the boundary of a porous medium containing water and a non-aqueous fluid to enhance the removal of the latter, shows great promise for both contaminated groundwater remediation and enhanced oil recovery, but theory to elucidate the underlying mechanisms lag significantly behind the progress achieved in experimental research. We address this conceptual lacuna by formulating a boundary-value problem to describe pore-pressure pulsing at seismic frequencies that is based on the continuum theory of poroelasticity for an elastic porous medium permeated by two immiscible fluids. An exact analytical solution is presented that is applied numerically using elasticity parameters and hydraulic data relevant to recent proof-of-principle laboratory experiments investigating the stimulation-induced mobilization of trichloroethene (TCE) in water flowing through a compressed sand core. The numerical results indicated that significant stimulation-induced increases of the TCE concentration in effluent can be expected from pore-pressure pulsing in the frequency range of 25-100 Hz, which is in good agreement with what was observed in the laboratory experiments. Sensitivity analysis of our numerical results revealed that the TCE concentration in the effluent increases with the porous medium framework compressibility and the pulsing pressure. Increasing compressibility also leads to an optimal stimulation response at lower frequencies, whereas changing the pulsing pressure does not affect the optimal stimulation frequency. Within the context of our model, the dominant physical cause for enhancement of non-aqueous fluid mobility by seismic stimulation is the dilatory motion of the porous medium in which the solid and fluid phases undergo opposite displacements, resulting in stress-induced changes of the pore volume.

  17. Theory of electron spin echoes in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Asadullina, N Y; Asadullin, Y Y

    2002-01-01

    We propose modified Bloch equations (MBEs) with specific power-dependent relaxation and dispersion parameters characteristic for two-pulse excitation and when the magnetic dipole-dipole interactions in the electron spin system control the dephasing. We discriminate between the 'active' (excited by both pulses) and 'passive' (excited by the second pulse only) spins: it is shown that the 'active' spins participate in a new effect, an active spin frequency modulation effect giving rise to the power-dependent dispersion and multiple electron spin echoes (ESEs); the 'passive' spins contribute to the power-dependent relaxation. The MBEs are solved and a general expression for the two-pulse ESEs is obtained. Detailed numerical analysis of this expression gives results in good quantitative agreement with the recent experiments on the two-pulse ESEs at conventional low applied fields. The developed theory is applied also to high field ESEs, which are promising for future investigations. On the basis of published resul...

  18. Happy birthday Echo!

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2010-01-01

    You are reading the number hundred and one (no. 101) edition of our bulletin Echo. Just over four years ago, on 27th March 2006, the first untitled edition was published (Fig. 1 on the left). The title Echo appeared on the second edition on 10th April 2006 (Fig. 1 in the centre). Today (see Fig. 1 on the right), the layout is slightly different, but the structure of each edition has remained more or less the same: an editorial informing you of the important issues, followed by articles on club life, cultural activities (exhibitions and conferences), information from GAC-EPA, and special offers for our members.     Fig. 1 : Nos. 1, 2 and 100 of our twice-monthly publication Echo Echo was created in March 2006 when, much to our regret, CERN official communication and that of your representatives were separated. November 2009 saw a return to normal practice, and since then the CERN st...

  19. Ultrawide spectral broadening and compression of single extremely short pulses in the visible, uv-vuv, and middle infrared by high-order stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalosha, V. P.; Herrmann, J.

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive analytical and numerical study of ultrawide spectral broadening and compression of isolated extremely short visible, uv-vuv and middle infrared (MIR) pulses by high-order stimulated Raman scattering in hollow waveguides. Spectral and temporal characteristics of the output pulses and the mechanism of pulse compression using dispersion of the gas filling and output glass window are investigated without the slowly varying envelope approximation. Physical limitations due to phase mismatch, velocity walk off, and pump-pulse depletion as well as improvements through the use of pump-pulse sequences and dispersion control are studied. It is shown that phase-locked pulses as short as ∼2 fs in the visible and uv-vuv, and 6.5 fs in the MIR can be generated by coherent scattering in impulsively excited Raman media without the necessity of external phase control. Using pump-pulse sequences, shortest durations in the range of about 1 fs for visible and uv-vuv probe pulses are predicted

  20. Anti-fatigue effect of percutaneous stimulation of the hepatic region by mid-frequency pulse current in different diadynamic cycles in soldiers with exercise-induced fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-yi DAI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the anti-fatigue effect of percutaneous stimulation of the hepatic region with the mid-frequency pulse current in different diadynamic cycles in exercise-induced fatigued soldiers. Methods  One hundred twenty healthy PLA recruits who did not have physical exercise were randomly divided into four groups with thirty ones in each: control, stimulation group A, stimulation group B, and stimulation group C. All the subjects of four groups were ordered intensive training (exercise from Monday to Saturday, with rest on Sunday for five weeks to establish the exercise-induced fatigue model. Each day after the exercise, the recruits of stimulation groups A, B, and C were treated immediately with mid-frequency (1204Hz, current intensity ≤80mA stimulation to the hepatic region with diadynamic cycles of 0.5, 1, and 2 seconds, respectively. No pulse current stimulation was given in the control group. Venous blood was collected before breakfast on Sundays to measure the fasting plasma glucose (FPG and blood lactate (LAC contents, and liver function was determined by determination of alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. The 3000-m running performance of the recruits in each group was recorded on the same day. Results  There was no significant difference between the four groups in terms of the FPG level at the end of the first week (P>0.05. At the end of the third and fifth weeks, the FPG level was significantly higher in the three stimulation groups than in the control group (PPP>0.05. At the end of the first, third, and fifth weeks, the ALT, AST, LDH, and LAC levels were significantly lower in every stimulation group than in the control group (PPPPP>0.05. At the end of the first week, there was no significant difference in 3000-m running performance (P>0.05 between the 4 groups. At the end of the third and fifth weeks, the 3000-m running performance was significantly

  1. Quadri-Pulse Theta Burst Stimulation using Ultra-High Frequency Bursts - A New Protocol to Induce Changes in Cortico-Spinal Excitability in Human Motor Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Gleich, Bernhard; Gattinger, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Patterned transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) such as theta burst stimulation (TBS) or quadri-pulse stimulation (QPS) can induce changes in cortico-spinal excitability, commonly referred to as long-term potentiation (LTP)-like and long-term depression (LTD)-like effects in human motor cortex (M...... of sinusoidal TMS pulses elicited either a posterior-anterior (PA) or anterior-posterior (AP) directed current in M1. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded before and after qTBS to probe changes in cortico-spinal excitability. PA-qTBS at 666 Hz caused a decrease in PA-MEP amplitudes, whereas AP...... in cortico-spinal excitability. Induced current direction in the brain appears to be relevant when qTBS targets I-wave periodicity, corroborating that high-fidelity spike timing mechanisms are critical for inducing bi-directional plasticity in human M1....

  2. Self-normalizing multiple-echo technique for measuring the in vivo apparent diffusion coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perman, W.H.; Gado, M.; Sandstrom, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents work to develop a new technique for quantitating the in vivo apparent diffusion/perfusion coefficient (ADC) by obtaining multiple data points from only two images with the capability to normalize the data from consecutive images, thus minimizing the effect of interimage variation. Two multiple-echo (six-to eight-echo) cardiac-gated images are obtained, one without and one with additional diffusion/perfusion encoding gradients placed about the 180 RF pulses of all but the first echo. Since the first echoes of both images have identical pulse sequence parameters, variations in signal intensity-between the first echoes represent image-to-image variation. The signal intensities of the subsequent echoes with additional diffusion/perfusion encoding gradients are then normalized by using the ratio of the first-echo signal intensities

  3. Safety and Tolerability of Theta Burst Stimulation versus Single and Paired Pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Comparative Study of 165 Pediatric Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaejee H Hong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although single- and paired-pulse (sp/pp transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS studies are considered minimal risk in adults and children, the safety profile for theta-burst TMS (TBS is unknown.Objective: In this comparative analysis, we explored the rate, severity, and specific symptoms of TMS-related adverse effects (AEs between sp/ppTMS and TBS in subjects between ages 6 and 18 years.Method: Data from 165 participants from 2009-2014 were analyzed. Assessment of AEs was performed based on baseline and post-TMS administration of a symptom-based questionnaire that rated AEs on a 5-level ordinal scale (minimal, mild, moderate, marked, severe. AE rates and severity were compared using Chi Square or Fisher’s Exact Test depending on data characteristics.Result: Overall, no seizures or severe-rated AEs were reported by 165 pediatric participants. The rate of AE in all TBS sessions was 10.5% (n=76, 95% CI: 4.7 - 19.7%, whereas the rate of AE in all sp/ppTMS sessions was 12.4% (n=89, 95% CI: 6.3 - 21.0%. There was no statistical difference in AE rates between TBS and sp/ppTMS (p=0.71. In all sp/ppTMS and TBS sessions, 20 subjects reported a total of 35 AEs, among these 31 (~88.6% were rated as minimal or mild. There was no difference in the severity of AE between TBS and sp/ppTMS (p=1.0. Only one of 76 TBS participants reported an AE rated as more than minimal/mild.Conclusion: Our comparative analysis showed that TBS appears to be as safe as sp/ppTMS in terms of AE rate and severity. This report supports further investigation of TBS in children.

  4. Nano-Pulse Stimulation induces immunogenic cell death in human papillomavirus-transformed tumors and initiates an adaptive immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph G Skeate

    Full Text Available Nano-Pulse Stimulation (NPS is a non-thermal pulsed electric field modality that has been shown to have cancer therapeutic effects. Here we applied NPS treatment to the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16-transformed C3.43 mouse tumor cell model and showed that it is effective at eliminating primary tumors through the induction of immunogenic cell death while subsequently increasing the number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes within the tumor microenvironment. In vitro NPS treatment of C3.43 cells resulted in a doubling of activated caspase 3/7 along with the translocation of phosphatidylserine (PS to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, indicating programmed cell death activity. Tumor-bearing mice receiving standard NPS treatment showed an initial decrease in tumor volume followed by clearing of tumors in most mice, and a significant increase in overall survival. Intra-tumor analysis of mice that were unable to clear tumors showed an inverse correlation between the number of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and the size of the tumor. Approximately half of the mice that cleared established tumors were protected against tumor re-challenge on the opposite flank. Selective depletion of CD8+ T cells eliminated this protection, suggesting that NPS treatment induces an adaptive immune response generating CD8+ T cells that recognize tumor antigen(s associated with the C3.43 tumor model. This method may be utilized in the future to not only ablate primary tumors, but also to induce an anti-tumor response driven by effector CD8+ T cells capable of protecting individuals from disease recurrence.

  5. Nano-Pulse Stimulation induces immunogenic cell death in human papillomavirus-transformed tumors and initiates an adaptive immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeate, Joseph G; Da Silva, Diane M; Chavez-Juan, Elena; Anand, Snjezana; Nuccitelli, Richard; Kast, W Martin

    2018-01-01

    Nano-Pulse Stimulation (NPS) is a non-thermal pulsed electric field modality that has been shown to have cancer therapeutic effects. Here we applied NPS treatment to the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16)-transformed C3.43 mouse tumor cell model and showed that it is effective at eliminating primary tumors through the induction of immunogenic cell death while subsequently increasing the number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes within the tumor microenvironment. In vitro NPS treatment of C3.43 cells resulted in a doubling of activated caspase 3/7 along with the translocation of phosphatidylserine (PS) to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, indicating programmed cell death activity. Tumor-bearing mice receiving standard NPS treatment showed an initial decrease in tumor volume followed by clearing of tumors in most mice, and a significant increase in overall survival. Intra-tumor analysis of mice that were unable to clear tumors showed an inverse correlation between the number of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and the size of the tumor. Approximately half of the mice that cleared established tumors were protected against tumor re-challenge on the opposite flank. Selective depletion of CD8+ T cells eliminated this protection, suggesting that NPS treatment induces an adaptive immune response generating CD8+ T cells that recognize tumor antigen(s) associated with the C3.43 tumor model. This method may be utilized in the future to not only ablate primary tumors, but also to induce an anti-tumor response driven by effector CD8+ T cells capable of protecting individuals from disease recurrence.

  6. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelinger, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications.

  7. Characteristics of pulsed photo-stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence for the identification of gamma irradiated poultry eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, I.A.; Kwon, J.-H.

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed photo-stimulated luminescence (PPSL) is a simple screening method that can be employed qualitatively at the spot for the detection of eggs treated with ionizing radiation. In spite of the variations in the results during storage, the eggs of ostrich, duck, hen and quail irradiated to doses of 0, 1, 2 and 3 kGy, most of the samples were correctly identified up to six months during storage after irradiation. Thermoluminescence (TL) technique was also tried by using eggshells in order to confirm the PPSL results. TL glow curves were recorded between the temperatures 50 to 400 degree C at the rate of 5 degree per second for all the control and irradiated samples. On the basis of integrated areas of first glow curves (TL1), the glow curve ratios (TL1/TL2) and the shapes of maxima of TL1, the irradiation treatment of all the eggs was confirmed. Furthermore, the presence of calcite and aragonite minerals that cause the TL signal in the eggshells were studied using X-ray diffraction spectrometry. (authors)

  8. Characteristics of pulsed photo-stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence for the identification of gamma irradiated poultry eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, I.A.; Kwon, J.-H.; Ur-rehman, S.

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed photo-stimulated luminescence (PPSL) is a simple screening method that can be employed qualitatively at the spot for the detection of eggs treated with ionizing radiation. Due to the variations in the results during storage, the eggs of ostrich, duck, hen, and quail were irradiated to doses of 0, 1, 2, and 3 kGy. Most of the samples were incorrectly identified during storage after four months of irradiation. Thermoluminescence (TL) technique was also tried by using egg shells in order to confirm the irradiation treatment in eggs. TL glow curves were recorded between the temperatures 50 degree C to 400 degree C at the rate of 5 degree/s for all the control and irradiated samples. On the basis of integrated areas of first glow curves (TL1), the glow curve ratios (TL1/TL2) and the shapes of maxima of TL1, the irradiation treatment of all the eggs was confirmed. Furthermore, the presence of calcite and aragonite minerals that cause the TL signal in the egg shells were studied using X-ray diffraction spectrometry. (authors)

  9. Applications of anomalous diffraction systems, generation of attosecond electron and photon pulses and Raman amplification by stimulated emission of radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartak, Sameer Dinkar

    1998-10-01

    efficient delivery of this power to the screen. We describe a method based on optical rectification to create an electron acceleration process which can act simultaneously on a femtosecond photo-electron pulse as well as cancel space-charge effects. This method can be used to produce attosecond electron and photon pulses. Narrow linewidth high intensity tunable light pulses are very useful for applications such as spectroscopic studies and remote sensing. Tunable lasers and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) process are commonly used for this purpose. SRS process has high threshold because of small spontaneous Raman scattering cross-sections. We combined amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from dye molecules with SRS process in solvent molecules in which dye molecules are dissolved. ASE seeds SRS process and SRS peak is further amplified by stimulated emission gain. We got amplifications ~100 over SRS from pure solvent. This peak can be tuned over gain bandwidth of dye molecules.

  10. Rotary spin echoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, I. [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, BP2, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1959-07-01

    Torrey has observed the free precession of nuclear spins around an r-f field H{sub 1}, fixed in a frame rotating at the Larmor frequency ω{sub 0} = γH{sub 0} around a large d-c magnetic field H{sub 0}. He showed that for an H{sub 1}, much larger than inhomogeneity of H{sub 0}, the latter has a negligible effect on the decay of the spin magnetization which is mainly due to the inhomogeneity of H{sub 1}. We report here on a method of overcoming the inhomogeneity of H{sub 1}, by production of echoes in the rotating frame ('rotary echoes'). These echoes are obtained by a 180 deg. phase shift at t = τ on the r-f field so that H{sub 1}, is suddenly reversed, producing a re-focussing of the magnetization vectors at the time t = 2 τ. The rotary echoes so obtained are very similar to the usual spin-echoes with, however some specific features that make them particularly suitable for the measurement of long relaxation times. Reprint of a paper published in Physical Review Letters, vol. 2, no. 7, Apr 1959, p. 301-302.

  11. Rotary spin echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, I.

    1959-01-01

    Torrey has observed the free precession of nuclear spins around an r-f field H 1 , fixed in a frame rotating at the Larmor frequency ω 0 = γH 0 around a large d-c magnetic field H 0 . He showed that for an H 1 , much larger than inhomogeneity of H 0 , the latter has a negligible effect on the decay of the spin magnetization which is mainly due to the inhomogeneity of H 1 . We report here on a method of overcoming the inhomogeneity of H 1 , by production of echoes in the rotating frame ('rotary echoes'). These echoes are obtained by a 180 deg. phase shift at t = τ on the r-f field so that H 1 , is suddenly reversed, producing a re-focussing of the magnetization vectors at the time t = 2 τ. The rotary echoes so obtained are very similar to the usual spin-echoes with, however some specific features that make them particularly suitable for the measurement of long relaxation times. Reprint of a paper published in Physical Review Letters, vol. 2, no. 7, Apr 1959, p. 301-302

  12. Effect of tendon vibration during wide-pulse neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on muscle force production in people with spinal cord injury (SCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkezanian, Vanesa; Newton, Robert U; Trajano, Gabriel S; Vieira, Amilton; Pulverenti, Timothy S; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2018-02-13

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is commonly used in skeletal muscles in people with spinal cord injury (SCI) with the aim of increasing muscle recruitment and thus muscle force production. NMES has been conventionally used in clinical practice as functional electrical stimulation (FES), using low levels of evoked force that cannot optimally stimulate muscular strength and mass improvements, and thus trigger musculoskeletal changes in paralysed muscles. The use of high intensity intermittent NMES training using wide-pulse width and moderate-intensity as a strength training tool could be a promising method to increase muscle force production in people with SCI. However, this type of protocol has not been clinically adopted because it may generate rapid muscle fatigue and thus prevent the performance of repeated high-intensity muscular contractions in paralysed muscles. Moreover, superimposing patellar tendon vibration onto the wide-pulse width NMES has been shown to elicit further increases in impulse or, at least, reduce the rate of fatigue in repeated contractions in able-bodied populations, but there is a lack of evidence to support this argument in people with SCI. Nine people with SCI received two NMES protocols with and without superimposing patellar tendon vibration on different days (i.e. STIM and STIM+vib), which consisted of repeated 30 Hz trains of 58 wide-pulse width (1000 μs) symmetric biphasic pulses (0.033-s inter-pulse interval; 2 s stimulation train; 2-s inter-train interval) being delivered to the dominant quadriceps femoris. Starting torque was 20% of maximal doublet-twitch torque and stimulations continued until torque declined to 50% of the starting torque. Total knee extensor impulse was calculated as the primary outcome variable. Total knee extensor impulse increased in four subjects when patellar tendon vibration was imposed (59.2 ± 15.8%) but decreased in five subjects (- 31.3 ± 25.7%). However, there were no

  13. Long-pulse gastric electrical stimulation protects interstitial cells of Cajal in diabetic rats via IGF-1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai; Chen, Yan; Liu, Shi; Hou, Xiao-Hua

    2016-06-21

    To investigate the effects of different parameters of gastric electrical stimulation (GES) on interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and changes in the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signal pathway in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Male rats were randomized into control, diabetic (DM), diabetic with sham GES (DM + SGES), diabetic with GES1 (5.5 cpm, 100 ms, 4 mA) (DM + GES1), diabetic with GES2 (5.5 cpm, 300 ms, 4 mA) (DM + GES2) and diabetic with GES3 (5.5 cpm, 550 ms, 2 mA) (DM + GES3) groups. The expression levels of c-kit, M-SCF and IGF-1 receptors were evaluated in the gastric antrum using Western blot analysis. The distribution of ICCs was observed using immunolabeling for c-kit, while smooth muscle cells and IGF-1 receptors were identified using α-SMA and IGF-1R antibodies. Serum level of IGF-1 was tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Gastric emptying was delayed in the DM group but improved in all GES groups, especially in the GES2 group. The expression levels of c-kit, M-SCF and IGF-1R were decreased in the DM group but increased in all GES groups. More ICCs (c-kit(+)) and smooth muscle cells (α-SMA(+)/IGF-1R(+)) were observed in all GES groups than in the DM group. The average level of IGF-1 in the DM group was markedly decreased, but it was up-regulated in all GES groups, especially in the GES2 group. The results suggest that long-pulse GES promotes the regeneration of ICCs. The IGF-1 signaling pathway might be involved in the mechanism underlying this process, which results in improved gastric emptying.

  14. Brain activity modification produced by a single radioelectric asymmetric brain stimulation pulse: a new tool for neuropsychiatric treatments. Preliminary fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castagna A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore Rinaldi1,2, Vania Fontani1, Alessandro Castagna1 1Department of Neuro-Psycho-Physio Pathology, Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Florence, Italy; 2Medical School of Occupational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy Purpose: Radioelectric asymmetric brain stimulation technology with its treatment protocols has shown efficacy in various psychiatric disorders. The aim of this work was to highlight the mechanisms by which these positive effects are achieved. The current study was conducted to determine whether a single 500-millisecond radioelectric asymmetric conveyor (REAC brain stimulation pulse (BSP, applied to the ear, can effect a modification of brain activity that is detectable using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers, six females and four males, underwent fMRI during a simple finger-tapping motor task before and after receiving a single 500-millisecond REAC-BSP. Results: The fMRI results indicate that the average variation in task-induced encephalic activation patterns is lower in subjects following the single REAC pulse. Conclusion: The current report demonstrates that a single REAC-BSP is sufficient to modulate brain activity in awake subjects, able to be measured using fMRI. These initial results open new perspectives into the understanding of the effects of weak and brief radio pulses upon brain activity, and provide the basis for further indepth studies using REAC-BSP and fMRI. Keywords: fMRI, brain stimulation, brain modulation, REAC, neuropsychiatric treatments

  15. [New use of pulse-oximeter as a prophylactic Stimulator to the wearer and a lifesaving tools for prevention of hypoxic mishaps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Tohru; Terasaki, Hidenori

    2014-03-01

    Pulse-oximeter has been widely used for the clinical assessment of physical status of a patient and as an alarming tool of hypoxia to medical personnel at the bedside or in the observation center. However, it has never been used for direct stimulation of the wearer. We considered innovation of pulse-oximeter as a prophylactic alarm-oximeter for the wearer. If SPO2 goes down to unfavorable level, the alarm-oximeter starts to send signal through a control box to a stimulator, such as an electrical nerve stimulator, a cold thermal tip, or mechanical device like a vibrator or compressor. The dermal stimulator is usually fixed to the right or left wrist with a Velcro band. The control box is affixed to the wristband by using Velcro. The alarm may be sent to an earphone or speaker with a verbal command like "take a deep breath". Alarm-oximeter will be combined to an oxygen inhaler or mechanical ventilatory assist device, or a drug administration system through electric line or wireless transmitter to start or change its function before the arrival of medical personnel. It will prevent hypoxic mishaps during medical intervention or sleep apnea syndrome. It will be also applicable to stop snoring.

  16. Self-synchronization of the modulation of energy-levels population with electrons in GaAs induced by picosecond pulses of probe radiation and intrinsic stimulated emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageeva, N. N.; Bronevoi, I. L., E-mail: bil@cplire.ru; Zabegaev, D. N.; Krivonosov, A. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel’nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    Picosecond optical pumping leads to the initiation of intrinsic picosecond stimulated emission in GaAs. As was established previously, due to the interaction of pulses of probe radiation with those of intrinsic emission, the dependence of the absorption α of the probe pulse on its delay τ with respect to the pump pulse is modulated with oscillations. It is found that the oscillatory dependences α(τ) have a similar shape only in the case of certain combinations of energies of the interacting pulses. As a result, it is assumed that the above interaction is, in fact, a synchronization of modulations (formed by pulses) of charge-carrier populations at energy levels; this synchronization occurs in the direction of the reconstruction of detailed equilibrium. The real-time picosecond self-modulation of the absorption α is measured for the first time. The characteristics of this self-modulation as well as absorption α and intrinsic emission self-modulation characteristics measured previously by correlation methods are now accounted for by the concept of synchronization.

  17. Fast spin echo MRI techniques. Contrast characteristics and clinical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melki, P.; Mulkern, R.V.; Dacher, J.N.; Helenon, O.; Higuchi, N.; Oshio, K.; Jolesz, F.; Pourcelot, L.; Einstein, S.

    1993-01-01

    Based on partial RF echo planar principles, Fast Spin Echo techniques (FSE) were implemented on high field systems. These methods produce image quality and contrast which resemble to conventional spin echo (SE) techniques. By reducing acquisition times by factors between 1.4 and 16 over SE methods, FSE allows for several imaging options usually prohibitive with conventional spin echo (SE) sequences. These include fast scans (especially breathold acquisitions); improved T2 contrast with longer TR intervals; increased spatial resolution with the use of larger image matrices and/or smaller fields of view; and 3D volume imaging with a 3D multislab FSE technique. Contrast features of FSE techniques are directly comparable to those of multiple echo SE sequences using the same echo spacing than FSE methods. However, essential contrast differences existing between the FSE sequences and their routine asymmetric dual SE counterpart can be identified. Decreased magnetic susceptibility effects and increased fat signal present within T2 weighted images compared to conventional dual SE images are due to the use of shorter echo spacings employed in FSE sequences. Off-resonance irradiation inherent to the use of a large number of radio frequency pulses in shown to results in dramatic magnetization contrast transfer effects in FSE images acquired in multislice mode

  18. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulates cell proliferation, proteoglycan synthesis and expression of growth factor-related genes in human nucleus pulposus cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Kobayashi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS stimulation has been shown to effect differentiation and activation of human chondrocytes. A study involving stimulation of rabbit disc cells with LIPUS revealed upregulation of cell proliferation and proteoglycan (PG synthesis. However, the effect of LIPUS on human nucleus pulposus cells has not been investigated. In the present study, therefore, we investigated whether LIPUS stimulation of a human nucleus pulposus cell line (HNPSV-1 exerted a positive effect on cellular activity. HNPSV-1 cells were encapsulated in 1.2% sodium alginate solution at 1x105 cells/ml and cultured at 10 beads/well in 6-well plates. The cells were stimulated for 20 min each day using a LIPUS generator, and the effects of LIPUS were evaluated by measuring DNA and PG synthesis. Furthermore, mRNA expression was analyzed by cDNA microarray using total RNA extracted from the cultured cells. Our study revealed no significant difference in cell proliferation between the control and the ultrasound treated groups. However, PG production was significantly upregulated in HNPSV cells stimulated at intensities of 15, 30, 60, and 120 mW/cm2 compared with the control. The results of cDNA array showed that LIPUS significantly stimulated the gene expression of growth factors and their receptors (BMP2, FGF7, TGFbetaR1 EGFRF1, VEGF. These findings suggest that LIPUS stimulation upregulates PG production in human nucleus pulposus cells by the enhancement of several matrix-related genes including growth factor-related genes. Safe and non-invasive stimulation using LIPUS may be a useful treatment for delaying the progression of disc degeneration.

  19. Finite element method simulating temperature distribution in skin induced by 980-nm pulsed laser based on pain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Dong, Xiao-Xi; Yang, Ji-Chun; Huang, He; Li, Ying-Xin; Zhang, Hai-Xia

    2017-07-01

    For predicting the temperature distribution within skin tissue in 980-nm laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) experiments, a five-layer finite element model (FEM-5) was constructed based on Pennes bio-heat conduction equation and the Lambert-Beer law. The prediction results of the FEM-5 model were verified by ex vivo pig skin and in vivo rat experiments. Thirty ex vivo pig skin samples were used to verify the temperature distribution predicted by the model. The output energy of the laser was 1.8, 3, and 4.4 J. The laser spot radius was 1 mm. The experiment time was 30 s. The laser stimulated the surface of the ex vivo pig skin beginning at 10 s and lasted for 40 ms. A thermocouple thermometer was used to measure the temperature of the surface and internal layers of the ex vivo pig skin, and the sampling frequency was set to 60 Hz. For the in vivo experiments, nine adult male Wistar rats weighing 180 ± 10 g were used to verify the prediction results of the model by tail-flick latency. The output energy of the laser was 1.4 and 2.08 J. The pulsed width was 40 ms. The laser spot radius was 1 mm. The Pearson product-moment correlation and Kruskal-Wallis test were used to analyze the correlation and the difference of data. The results of all experiments showed that the measured and predicted data had no significant difference (P > 0.05) and good correlation (r > 0.9). The safe laser output energy range (1.8-3 J) was also predicted. Using the FEM-5 model prediction, the effective pain depth could be accurately controlled, and the nociceptors could be selectively activated. The FEM-5 model can be extended to guide experimental research and clinical applications for humans.

  20. New spoiled spin-echo technique for three-dimensional MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrasse, L.; Mao, L.; Saint-Jalmes, H.

    1989-01-01

    For 3D MR imaging within a convenient scanning time, the authors propose an improved spin-echo technique that permits the use of TRs shorter than 100 msec. They use a two-pulse RF sequence (α-π echo). The echo is read with conventional 3DFT encoding. To avoid steady-state signal refocusing before either α or (imperfect) π pulses, we apply randomized gradient spoilers both before each α pulse and on each side of the π pulse. So the sequence works like standard spin- echo sequences, with the z-magnetization recovery being adjusted by means of α rather than TR. The authors have investigated the method on a new 0.1-T Magnetom system dedicated for 3D MR imaging

  1. Echoes in correlated neural systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helias, M; Tetzlaff, T; Diesmann, M

    2013-01-01

    Correlations are employed in modern physics to explain microscopic and macroscopic phenomena, like the fractional quantum Hall effect and the Mott insulator state in high temperature superconductors and ultracold atoms. Simultaneously probed neurons in the intact brain reveal correlations between their activity, an important measure to study information processing in the brain that also influences the macroscopic signals of neural activity, like the electroencephalogram (EEG). Networks of spiking neurons differ from most physical systems: the interaction between elements is directed, time delayed, mediated by short pulses and each neuron receives events from thousands of neurons. Even the stationary state of the network cannot be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics. Here we develop a quantitative theory of pairwise correlations in finite-sized random networks of spiking neurons. We derive explicit analytic expressions for the population-averaged cross correlation functions. Our theory explains why the intuitive mean field description fails, how the echo of single action potentials causes an apparent lag of inhibition with respect to excitation and how the size of the network can be scaled while maintaining its dynamical state. Finally, we derive a new criterion for the emergence of collective oscillations from the spectrum of the time-evolution propagator. (paper)

  2. The evaluation of clinical therapy effects of oral western medicine combined with magnetic pulse acupoint stimulation in treating elderly patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Guo, Li; Jiang, Zheng-Ming; Xu, Ai-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Treat the patients suffered from coronary heart disease with oral western medicine, combining with magnetic pulse acupoint stimulation, and observe the therapeutic effects of such combination therapy method. 56 old people with coronary heart disease are randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group. Both groups of patients are treated by the routine drugs, in addition, the patients of the treatment group are treated by magnetic pulse therapy additionally. Compare clinical symptoms, blood lipid and blood rheological indexes of the patients in the two groups when they are selected and after 30 days' treatment. after 30 days' treatment, it is found that clinical symptoms, blood lipid and blood rheological indexes of the patients in the treatment group are significantly improved compared with those when they are selected and those of the control group (Pmagnetic therapy and the conventional drug intervention, had relieved synptom, improve blood lipid and heart blood supply function.

  3. Dissecting a Light Echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for audio animation This animation illustrates how a light echo works, and how an optical illusion of material moving outward is created. A light echo occurs when a star explodes, acting like a cosmic flashbulb. The light from this explosion zips through nearby dust clumps, illuminating and heating them up slightly. This brief period of warming causes them to glow in infrared, like a chain of Christmas bulbs lighting up one by one. The animation starts by showing the explosion of a star, which results in a flash of light that moves outward in all directions. The direction of our line of sight from Earth is indicated by the blue arrow. When the light flash reaches surrounding dust, shown here as three dark clouds, the dust is heated up, creating infrared light that begins to travel toward Earth (indicated by the red arrows). Dust closest to the explosion lights up first, while the explosion's shock wave takes longer to reach more distant material. This results in light from different parts of the cloud reaching Earth at different times, creating the illusion of motion over time. As the animation shows, the inclination of the cloud toward our line of sight can result in the material seeming to move both away from and toward the central star.

  4. Verbal attribute magnitude estimates of pulse trains acros selectrode places and stimulation rates in cochlear implant listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamping, Wiebke; Santurette, Sébastien; Marozeau, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    For cochlear implant users, temporal and place cue are assumed to varyalong two orthogonal perceptual dimensions linked to pitch height and timbre.Here, the effect of electrode place, pulse rate, and amplitude modulationfrequency on those perceptual dimensions was investigated. Combinations...

  5. A short TE gradient-echo sequence using asymmetric sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Norihiko; Harada, Kohshi; Sakurai, Kosuke; Nakanishi, Katsuyuki; Kim, Shyogen; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a gradient-echo pulse sequence with a short TE less than 4 msec using a data set of asymmetric off-center sampling with a broad bandwidth. The use of such a short TE significantly reduces T 2 * dephasing effect even in a two-dimensional mode, and by collecting an off-center echo, motion-induced phase dispersion is also considerably decreased. High immunity of this sequence to these dephasing effects permits clear visualization of anatomical details near the skull base where large local field inhomogeneities and rapid blood flow such as in the internal carotid artery are present. (author)

  6. Observation of the geometric phase using photon echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Mingzhen; Reibel, Randy R.; Barber, Zeb W.; Fischer, Joe A.; Babbitt, Wm. Randall

    2003-01-01

    The geometric phase of an atomic system has been observed in V-type three-level barium atoms using photon echoes. The geometric phase results from a cyclic evolution of a two-level subsystem driven by a laser pulse. The phase change is observed on the echo field produced on a different subsystem that is coupled via the ground state to the driven subsystem. The measured geometric phase was half of the solid angle subtended by the Bloch vector along the driven evolution circuit. This evolution has the potential to form universal operations of quantum bits

  7. The effectiveness of pulsed electrical stimulation (E-PES in the management of osteoarthritis of the knee: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Ritu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA of the knee is one of the main causes of musculoskeletal disability in the western world. Current available management options provide symptomatic relief (exercise and self-management, medication and surgery but do not, in general, address the disease process itself. Moreover, adverse effects and complications with some of these interventions (medication and surgery and the presence of co-morbidities commonly restrict their use. There is clearly a need to investigate treatments that are more widely applicable for symptom management and which may also directly address the disease process itself. In two randomised controlled trials of four and 12 weeks duration, pulsed electrical stimulation was shown to be effective in managing the symptoms of OA of the knee. Laboratory and animal studies demonstrate the capacity of externally applied electric and electromagnetic fields to positively affect chondrocyte proliferation and extracellular matrix protein production. This latter evidence provides strong theoretical support for the use of electrical stimulation to maintain and repair cartilage in the clinical setting and highlights its potential as a disease-modifying modality. Methods/Design A double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, repeated measures trial to examine the effectiveness of pulsed electrical stimulation in providing symptomatic relief for people with OA of the knee over 26 weeks. Seventy people will be recruited and information regarding age, gender, body mass index and medication use will be recorded. The population will be stratified for age, gender and baseline pain levels. Outcome measures will include pain (100 mm VAS and WOMAC 3.1, function (WOMAC 3.1, stiffness (WOMAC 3.1, patient global assessment (100 mm VAS and quality of life (SF-36. These outcomes will be measured at baseline, four, 16 and 26 weeks. Activity levels will be measured at baseline and 16 weeks using accelerometers and

  8. A spin echo study of A15 intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoep, G.K.

    1976-01-01

    This thesis mainly concerns the measurement of spin-lattice relaxation times in intermetallic compounds of the bcc lattice structure, having the formula V 3 X (C = Pt, Ir, Os, Pd, Rh, Ni, Co, Au). When, in a spin echo experiment, a two-pulse sequence was applied, several quadrupolar echoes were observed. Special attention is given to the 'forbidden' echoes (absol.(Δm')GT1) in V 3 Au and V 3 Co. In relation to the V 3 X compounds, several characteristics are discussed including temperature dependence and concentration dependence of spin relaxation times, superconductivity and the importance of d-state electrons in determination of the spin relaxation times. Finally, the above characteristics were determined for 6 different samples of the vanadium-gold alloy, V 3 Au, specifically

  9. Help Content for ECHO Reports | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  10. ECHO-UseFY17.png | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  11. Signatures of the self-similar regime of strongly coupled stimulated brillouin scattering for efficient short laser pulse amplification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lancia, L.; Giribono, A.; Vassura, L.; Chiaramello, M.; Riconda, C.; Weber, Stefan A.; Castan, A.; Chatelain, A.; Frank, A.; Gangolf, T.; Quinn, M.N.; Fuchs, J.; Marqués, J.-R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 7 (2016), 1-5, č. článku 075001. ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162; ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : light-pulses * compression * plasmas * Raman Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 8.462, year: 2016

  12. Custom Search | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  13. Watershed Statistics | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  14. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulates mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells through calcium and phosphate uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassinary, João Alberto Fioravante; Lunardelli, Adroaldo; Basso, Bruno de Souza; Dias, Henrique Bregolin; Catarina, Anderson Velasque; Stülp, Simone; Haute, Gabriela Viegas; Martha, Bianca Andrade; Melo, Denizar Alberto da Silva; Nunes, Fernanda Bordignon; Donadio, Márcio Vinícius Fagundes; Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues de

    2018-03-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on pre-osteoblast mineralization using in vitro bioassays. Pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were exposed to LIPUS at 1 MHz frequency, 0.2 W/cm 2 intensity and 20% duty cycle for 30 min. The analyses were carried out up to 336 h (14 days) after exposure. The concentration of collagen, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, calcium and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) in cell supernatant and the presence of calcium deposits in the cells were analyzed. Our results showed that LIPUS promotes mineralized nodules formation. Collagen, phosphate, and calcium levels were decreased in cell supernatant at 192 h after LIPUS exposure. However, alkaline phosphatase and TGF-β1 concentrations remained unchanged. Therapeutic pulsed ultrasound is capable of stimulating differentiation and mineralization of pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells by calcium and phosphate uptake with consequent hydroxyapatite formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Rapid Gradient-Echo Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Gradient echo sequences are widely used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for numerous applications ranging from angiography to perfusion to functional MRI. Compared with spin-echo techniques, the very short repetition times of gradient-echo methods enable very rapid 2D and 3D imaging, but also lead to complicated “steady states.” Signal and contrast behavior can be described graphically and mathematically, and depends strongly on the type of spoiling: fully balanced (no spoiling), gradient spoiling, or RF-spoiling. These spoiling options trade off between high signal and pure T1 contrast while the flip angle also affects image contrast in all cases, both of which can be demonstrated theoretically and in image examples. As with spin-echo sequences, magnetization preparation can be added to gradient-echo sequences to alter image contrast. Gradient echo sequences are widely used for numerous applications such as 3D perfusion imaging, functional MRI, cardiac imaging and MR angiography. PMID:23097185

  16. Determination of the amounts of C, CH, CH/sub 2/, and CH fragments by the spin echo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polonov, V.M.; Kalabin, G.A.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Latyshev, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    A new method has been developed for the quantitative determination of the amounts of primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary carbon atoms in soluble products of coal origin which is based on pulsed sequence of /sup 13/C NMR spin echo.

  17. Pulsed electromagnetic fields preserve bone architecture and mechanical properties and stimulate porous implant osseointegration by promoting bone anabolism in type 1 diabetic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, J; Li, W; Sun, T; Li, X; Luo, E; Jing, D

    2018-05-01

    The effects of exogenous pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) stimulation on T1DM-associated osteopathy were investigated in alloxan-treated rabbits. We found that PEMF improved bone architecture, mechanical properties, and porous titanium (pTi) osseointegration by promoting bone anabolism through a canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling-associated mechanism, and revealed the clinical potential of PEMF stimulation for the treatment of T1DM-associated bone complications. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with deteriorated bone architecture and impaired osseous healing potential; nonetheless, effective methods for resisting T1DM-associated osteopenia/osteoporosis and promoting bone defect/fracture healing are still lacking. PEMF, as a safe and noninvasive method, have proven to be effective for promoting osteogenesis, whereas the potential effects of PEMF on T1DM osteopathy remain poorly understood. We herein investigated the effects of PEMF stimulation on bone architecture, mechanical properties, bone turnover, and its potential molecular mechanisms in alloxan-treated diabetic rabbits. We also developed novel nontoxic Ti2448 pTi implants with closer elastic modulus with natural bone and investigated the impacts of PEMF on pTi osseointegration for T1DM bone-defect repair. The deteriorations of cancellous and cortical bone architecture and tissue-level mechanical strength were attenuated by 8-week PEMF stimulation. PEMF also promoted osseointegration and stimulated more adequate bone ingrowths into the pore spaces of pTi in T1DM long-bone defects. Moreover, T1DM-associated reduction of bone formation was significantly attenuated by PEMF, whereas PEMF exerted no impacts on bone resorption. We also found PEMF-induced activation of osteoblastogenesis-related Wnt/β-catenin signaling in T1DM skeletons, but PEMF did not alter osteoclastogenesis-associated RANKL/RANK signaling gene expression. We reveal that PEMF improved bone architecture, mechanical properties, and

  18. Deep brain stimulation: custom-made silicone-coated pulse-generator implantation after allergic reaction to generator compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthofer, Judith; Herbst, Andreas; Janzen, Annettte; Lange, Max; Brawanski, Alexander; Schlaier, Juergen

    2018-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease has become an established treatment option in recent years. The method and its application in clinical practice has proved to be safe and effective. Nevertheless, procedure-related and hardware-related complications occur. We present a rare case of a patient with an allergic reaction to the impulse generator. The patient suffered from delayed wound-healing deficits with several wound revisions and generator repositionings. After diagnosis of an allergic reaction to components of the generator, a custom-made silicon-coated model was implanted. Hereafter, no wound healing-deficit occurred throughout long-term follow-up. Allergic reaction to hardware components may lead to wound-healing deficits. In such cases, custom-made silicon-coated models may be an effective treatment option.

  19. Realization of the revival of silenced echo (ROSE) quantum memory scheme in orthogonal geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnegaliev, M. M.; Gerasimov, K. I.; Urmancheev, R. V.; Moiseev, S. A.; Chanelière, T.; Louchet-Chauvet, A.

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrated quantum memory scheme on revival of silenced echo in orthogonal geometry in Tm3+: Y3Al5O12 crystal. The retrieval efficiency of ˜14% was demonstrated with the 36 µs storage time. In this scheme for the first time we also implemented a suppression of the revived echo signal by applying an external electric field and the echo signal has been recovered on demand if we then applied a second electric pulse with opposite polarity. This technique opens the possibilities for realizing addressing in multi-qubit quantum memory in Tm3+: Y3Al5O12 crystal.

  20. Ultrafast Dephasing and Incoherent Light Photon Echoes in Organic Amorphous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Ryuzi; Matsumoto, Yoshinori; Tani, Toshiro; Nakatsuka, Hiroki

    1989-10-01

    Incoherent light photon echoes were observed in organic amorphous systems (cresyl violet in polyvinyl alcohol and 1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinone in polymethacrylic acid) by using temporally-incoherent nanosecond laser pulses. It was found that an echo decay curve of an organic amorphous system is composed of a sharp peak which decays very rapidly and a slowly decaying wing at the tail. We show that the persistent hole burning (PHB) spectra were reproduced by the Fourier-cosine transforms of the echo decay curves. We claim that in general, we must take into account the multi-level feature of the system in order to explain ultrafast dephasing at very low temperatures.

  1. Significance of spin-echo intracardiac signal during cine cardiac MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiglin, D.H.I.; O'Donnell, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty patient studies were performed using several multisection spin multi-echo pulse sequences (SEPS) formattable into the cine mode, with repetition time (TR)≤RR interval and 18 msec ≤ echo time (TE) ≤ 64 msec. Thirteen studies were performed in patients with various cardiomyopathies, ten in patients with cardiac tumors, and seven in healthy volunteers. The SEPS in the multi-echo acquisition format differentiated between tumor and stasis in terms of signal behavior. Healthy subjects may exhibit stasis of flow adjacent to the endocardium during the cardiac cycle

  2. Chirp echo Fourier transform EPR-detected NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wili, Nino; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2018-04-01

    A new ultra-wide band (UWB) pulse EPR method is introduced for observing all nuclear frequencies of a paramagnetic center in a single shot. It is based on burning spectral holes with a high turning angle (HTA) pulse that excites forbidden transitions and subsequent detection of the hole pattern by a chirp echo. We term this method Chirp Echo Epr SpectroscopY (CHEESY)-detected NMR. The approach is a revival of FT EPR-detected NMR. It yields similar spectra and the same type of information as electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR)-detected NMR, but with a multiplex advantage. We apply CHEESY-detected NMR in Q band to nitroxides and correlate the hyperfine spectrum to the EPR spectrum by varying the frequency of the HTA pulse. Furthermore, a selective π pulse before the HTA pulse allows for detecting hyperfine sublevel correlations between transitions of one nucleus and for elucidating the coupling regime, the same information as revealed by the HYSCORE experiment. This is demonstrated on hexaaquamanganese(II). We expect that CHEESY-detected NMR is generally applicable to disordered systems and that our results further motivate the development of EPR spectrometers capable of coherent UWB excitation and detection, especially at higher fields and frequencies. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chirp echo Fourier transform EPR-detected NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wili, Nino; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2018-04-01

    A new ultra-wide band (UWB) pulse EPR method is introduced for observing all nuclear frequencies of a paramagnetic center in a single shot. It is based on burning spectral holes with a high turning angle (HTA) pulse that excites forbidden transitions and subsequent detection of the hole pattern by a chirp echo. We term this method Chirp Echo Epr SpectroscopY (CHEESY)-detected NMR. The approach is a revival of FT EPR-detected NMR. It yields similar spectra and the same type of information as electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR)-detected NMR, but with a multiplex advantage. We apply CHEESY-detected NMR in Q band to nitroxides and correlate the hyperfine spectrum to the EPR spectrum by varying the frequency of the HTA pulse. Furthermore, a selective π pulse before the HTA pulse allows for detecting hyperfine sublevel correlations between transitions of one nucleus and for elucidating the coupling regime, the same information as revealed by the HYSCORE experiment. This is demonstrated on hexaaquamanganese(II). We expect that CHEESY-detected NMR is generally applicable to disordered systems and that our results further motivate the development of EPR spectrometers capable of coherent UWB excitation and detection, especially at higher fields and frequencies.

  4. Transient effects in beam-plasma interactions in a space simulation chamber stimulated by a fast pulse electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitt, W. J.; Banks, P. M.; Denig, W. F.; Anderson, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    Interest in the interaction of electron beams with plasma generated by ionization caused by the primary electron beam was stimulated by the need to develop special vacuum tubes to operate in the kMHz frequency region. The experiments of Getty and Smullin (1963) indicated that the interaction of an energetic electron beam with its self-produced plasma resulted in the emission of wave energy over a wide range of frequencies associated with cyclotron and longitudinal plasma instabilities. This enhanced the thermal plasma density in the vicinity of the beam, and the term Beam-Plasma Discharge (BPD) was employed to described this phenomenon. The present investigation is concerned with some of the transient phenomena associated with wave emission during the beam switch-on and switch-off periods. Results are presented on the changes in electron energy spectra on a time scale of tens of milliseconds following beam switch-on. The results are discussed in terms of the beam plasma discharge phenomenon.

  5. Transient effects in beam-plasma interactions in a space simulation chamber stimulated by a fast pulse electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raitt, W.J.; Banks, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    Interest in the interaction of electron beams with plasma generated by ionization caused by the primary electron beam was stimulated by the need to develop special vacuum tubes to operate in the kMHz frequency region. The experiments of Getty and Smullin (1963) indicated that the interaction of an energetic electron beam with its self-produced plasma resulted in the emission of wave energy over a wide range of frequencies associated with cyclotron and longitudinal plasma instabilities. This enhanced the thermal plasma density in the vicinity of the beam, and the term Beam-Plasma Discharge (BPD) was employed to described this phenomenon. The present investigation is concerned with some of the transient phenomena associated with wave emission during the beam switch-on and switch-off periods. Results are presented on the changes in electron energy spectra on a time scale of tens of milliseconds following beam switch-on. The results are discussed in terms of the beam plasma discharge phenomenon. 5 references

  6. A Pilot Study Assessing ECG versus ECHO Ventriculoventricular Optimization in Pediatric Resynchronization Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punn, Rajesh; Hanisch, Debra; Motonaga, Kara S; Rosenthal, David N; Ceresnak, Scott R; Dubin, Anne M

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy indications and management are well described in adults. Echocardiography (ECHO) has been used to optimize mechanical synchrony in these patients; however, there are issues with reproducibility and time intensity. Pediatric patients add challenges, with diverse substrates and limited capacity for cooperation. Electrocardiographic (ECG) methods to assess electrical synchrony are expeditious but have not been extensively studied in children. We sought to compare ECHO and ECG CRT optimization in children. Prospective, pediatric, single-center cross-over trial comparing ECHO and ECG optimization with CRT. Patients were assigned to undergo either ECHO or ECG optimization, followed for 6 months, and crossed-over to the other assignment for another 6 months. ECHO pulsed-wave tissue Doppler and 12-lead ECG were obtained for 5 VV delays. ECG optimization was defined as the shortest QRSD and ECHO optimization as the lowest dyssynchrony index. ECHOs/ECGs were interpreted by readers blinded to optimization technique. After each 6 month period, these data were collected: ejection fraction, velocimetry-derived cardiac index, quality of life, ECHO-derived stroke distance, M-mode dyssynchrony, study cost, and time. Outcomes for each optimization method were compared. From June 2012 to December 2013, 19 patients enrolled. Mean age was 9.1 ± 4.3 years; 14 (74%) had structural heart disease. The mean time for optimization was shorter using ECG than ECHO (9 ± 1 min vs. 68 ± 13 min, P cost for charges was $4,400 ± 700 less for ECG. No other outcome differed between groups. ECHO optimization of synchrony was not superior to ECG optimization in this pilot study. ECG optimization required less time and cost than ECHO optimization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Fast spin echo MRI techniques. Contrast characteristics and clinical potential. Techniques d'IRM en fast spin echo. Caracteristiques de contraste et potentiels cliniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melki, P.; Mulkern, R.V.; Dacher, J.N.; Helenon, O.; Higuchi, N. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Oshio, K.; Jolesz, F. (Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan)); Pourcelot, L. (Hopital Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France)); Einstein, S. (General Electric Medical System, Milwaukee, WI (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Based on partial RF echo planar principles, Fast Spin Echo techniques (FSE) were implemented on high field systems. These methods produce image quality and contrast which resemble to conventional spin echo (SE) techniques. By reducing acquisition times by factors between 1.4 and 16 over SE methods, FSE allows for several imaging options usually prohibitive with conventional spin echo (SE) sequences. These include fast scans (especially breathold acquisitions); improved T2 contrast with longer TR intervals; increased spatial resolution with the use of larger image matrices and/or smaller fields of view; and 3D volume imaging with a 3D multislab FSE technique. Contrast features of FSE techniques are directly comparable to those of multiple echo SE sequences using the same echo spacing than FSE methods. However, essential contrast differences existing between the FSE sequences and their routine asymmetric dual SE counterpart can be identified. Decreased magnetic susceptibility effects and increased fat signal present within T2 weighted images compared to conventional dual SE images are due to the use of shorter echo spacings employed in FSE sequences. Off-resonance irradiation inherent to the use of a large number of radio frequency pulses in shown to results in dramatic magnetization contrast transfer effects in FSE images acquired in multislice mode.

  8. Echo phenomena in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlenko, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanism of echo phenomenon in different plasma media: laboratory and cosmic plasma, metals and semiconductors is analyzed to get a more comprehensive idea on collective processes in a plasma and for practical applications in radiophysics and plasma diagnostics. The echo phenomenon permitted to confirm a reversible nature of the Landau damping, to prove the fact that the information on perturbation is conserved in a plasma (as non-damping oscillations of the distribution function) even after disappearing of the macroscopic field. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the velocity is measured, microturbulences in a plasma are investigated. New ways of the plasma wave conversion are suggested, as well as ''lightning'' of super-critical plasma layers and regions of plasma non-transparency. Prospective advantages of using echo for studying the mechanisms of charged particle interaction with the surface bounding a plasma are revealed

  9. A novel MR-compatible sensor to assess active medical device safety: stimulation monitoring, rectified radio frequency pulses, and gradient-induced voltage measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Thérèse; Aissani, Sarra; Weber, Nicolas; Pasquier, Cédric; Felblinger, Jacques

    2018-03-30

    To evaluate the function of an active implantable medical device (AIMD) during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. The induced voltages caused by the switching of magnetic field gradients and rectified radio frequency (RF) pulse were measured, along with the AIMD stimulations. An MRI-compatible voltage probe with a bandwidth of 0-40 kHz was designed. Measurements were carried out both on the bench with an overvoltage protection circuit commonly used for AIMD and with a pacemaker during MRI scans on a 1.5 T (64 MHz) MR scanner. The sensor exhibits a measurement range of ± 15 V with an amplitude resolution of 7 mV and a temporal resolution of 10 µs. Rectification was measured on the bench with the overvoltage protection circuit. Linear proportionality was confirmed between the induced voltage and the magnetic field gradient slew rate. The pacemaker pacing was recorded successfully during MRI scans. The characteristics of this low-frequency voltage probe allow its use with extreme RF transmission power and magnetic field gradient positioning for MR safety test of AIMD during MRI scans.

  10. [Histomorphological analyse of accelerating the fibrocartilage layer repair of patella-patellar tendon junction in rabbits by low intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baoliang; Lü, Hongbin; Hu, Jianzhong; Xu, Daqi; Zhou, Jingyong; Wang, Ye

    2013-08-01

    To analyse the effect of low intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation (LIPUS) on accelerating the fibrocartilage layer repair of patella-patellar tendon junction. A total of 60 mature female New Zealand white rabbits undergoing standard partial patellectomy were divided into 2 groups randomly. The control group was given comfort treatment and the treatment group was given LIPUS treatment starting from day 3 to the end of week 6 postoperatively. The scheduled time points of animal euthanization would be at week 6, week 12 and week 18 postoperatively. The patella-patellar tendon (PPT) complex would be harvested and cut into sections after decalcification for H&E staining, Safranine o/fast green staining. The thickness and gray value of fibrocartilage layer were analyzed by SANO Microscope Partner image analyzer. At week 6, week 12 and week 18 postoperatively, the fibrocartilage layer in the treatment group was significantly thicker than that in the control group (Pfibrocartilage layer was significantly smaller than that in the control group (Pfibrocartilage layer repair of patella-patellar tendon junction in rabbit models.

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging by visual stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yukiko; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori; Hashida, Masahiro

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated functional magnetic resonance images obtained in 8 healthy subjects in response to visual stimulation using a conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging system with multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging. Activation in the visual cortex was clearly demonstrated by the multi-slice experiment with a task-related change in signal intensity. In addition to the primary visual cortex, other areas were also activated by a complicated visual task. Multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging offers high temporal resolution and allows the three-dimensional analysis of brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides a useful noninvasive method of mapping brain function. (author)

  12. Quantification of liver iron concentration with magnetic resonance imaging by combining T1-, T2-weighted spin echo sequences and a gradient echo sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreeftenberg, HG; Mooyaart, EL; Sluiter, WJ; Kreeftenberg, HG; Huizenga, Reint

    Background: The aim of the study was to quantify hepatic iron by MRI for practical use. Methods: In twenty-three patients with various degrees of iron overload, measurements were carried out with a 1.5 Tesla MR unit. A combination of pulse sequences (T1, T2 and gradient echo) enabled us to quantify

  13. MR fingerprinting using the quick echo splitting NMR imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun; Ma, Dan; Jerecic, Renate; Duerk, Jeffrey; Seiberlich, Nicole; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop a quantitative method for the relaxation properties with a reduced radio frequency (RF) power deposition by combining magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) technique with quick echo splitting NMR imaging technique (QUEST). A QUEST-based MRF sequence was implemented to acquire high-order echoes by increasing the gaps between RF pulses. Bloch simulations were used to calculate a dictionary containing the range of physically plausible signal evolutions using a range of T 1 and T 2 values based on the pulse sequence. MRF-QUEST was evaluated by comparing to the results of spin-echo methods. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of MRF-QUEST was compared with the clinically available methods. MRF-QUEST quantifies the relaxation properties with good accuracy at the estimated head SAR of 0.03 W/kg. T 1 and T 2 values estimated by MRF-QUEST are in good agreement with the traditional methods. The combination of the MRF and the QUEST provides an accurate quantification of T 1 and T 2 simultaneously with reduced RF power deposition. The resulting lower SAR may provide a new acquisition strategy for MRF when RF energy deposition is problematic. Magn Reson Med 77:979-988, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. MR contrast of ferritin and hemosiderin in the brain: comparison among gradient-echo, conventional spin-echo and fast spin-echo sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, Tabassum Laz; Miki, Yukio; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Akira; Konishi, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Konishi, Junji

    2003-12-01

    Objective: To compare the magnetic resonance image contrasts due to ferritin and hemosiderin in the brain tissue among different pulse sequences. Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with cavernous hemangioma in the brain prospectively underwent MR imaging with T2*-weighted gradient-echo (GRE), T2-weighted conventional spin-echo (SE) and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences. The relative contrast ratios (CRs) of the hypointense part of cavernous hemangioma, globus pallidus and putamen to the deep frontal white matter were measured on each pulse sequence and statistically analyzed using analysis of variance followed by paired t-test. Results: In the hypointense part of cavernous hemangioma, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2*-weighted GRE than on T2-weighted SE images (P=0.0001), and on T2-weighted SE than on T2-weighted FSE images (P=0.0001). In the globus pallidus, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.002), and on T2*-weighted GRE than on T2-weighted FSE images (P=0.0002). In the putamen, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.001), and there was no significant difference between CRs on T2-weighted FSE and T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.90). Conclusion: Hemosiderin showed best image contrast on T2*-weighted GRE images but ferritin showed more prominent image contrast on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images, which may help to determine an appropriate pulse sequence in neurological diseases associated with excessive ferritin accumulation.

  15. MR contrast of ferritin and hemosiderin in the brain: comparison among gradient-echo, conventional spin-echo and fast spin-echo sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, Tabassum Laz; Miki, Yukio; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Akira; Konishi, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Konishi, Junji

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the magnetic resonance image contrasts due to ferritin and hemosiderin in the brain tissue among different pulse sequences. Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with cavernous hemangioma in the brain prospectively underwent MR imaging with T2*-weighted gradient-echo (GRE), T2-weighted conventional spin-echo (SE) and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences. The relative contrast ratios (CRs) of the hypointense part of cavernous hemangioma, globus pallidus and putamen to the deep frontal white matter were measured on each pulse sequence and statistically analyzed using analysis of variance followed by paired t-test. Results: In the hypointense part of cavernous hemangioma, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2*-weighted GRE than on T2-weighted SE images (P=0.0001), and on T2-weighted SE than on T2-weighted FSE images (P=0.0001). In the globus pallidus, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.002), and on T2*-weighted GRE than on T2-weighted FSE images (P=0.0002). In the putamen, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.001), and there was no significant difference between CRs on T2-weighted FSE and T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.90). Conclusion: Hemosiderin showed best image contrast on T2*-weighted GRE images but ferritin showed more prominent image contrast on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images, which may help to determine an appropriate pulse sequence in neurological diseases associated with excessive ferritin accumulation

  16. Comparison of third-order plasma wave echoes with ballistic second-order plasma wave echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leppert, H.D.; Schuelter, H.; Wiesemann, K.

    1982-01-01

    The apparent dispersion of third-order plasma wave echoes observed in a high frequency plasma is compared with that of simultaneously observed ballistic second-order echoes. Amplitude and wavelength of third-order echoes are found to be always smaller than those of second-order echoes, however, the dispersion curves of both types of echoes are very similar. These observations are in qualitative agreement with calculations of special ballistic third-order echoes. The ballistic nature of the observed third-order echoes may, therefore, be concluded from these measurements. (author)

  17. A study on the development of personal radiation dosimetry system based on the pulsed optically stimulated luminescence of α-Al2O3:C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Yoon

    2000-02-01

    High quality radiation dosimetry is for workers who rely upon personal dosimeters to record the amount of radiation to which they are exposed. Radiation physicists have been exploring thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) for personal monitoring since the mid 1960s, although, widespread use has only occurred in the last 20 years as automated analytical systems and high quality TLD crystals became commercially available. nowadays, multiple TLD (thermoluminescence dosimeter) chips with appropriate physical filters are generally used for measurements of the personal dose equivalent quantities, H p (d). Though the TLD offers several advantages not possessed by radiological film, it does not offer the some type of advantages as films: re-analysis of an exposure situation is prohibited because the analysis process clears all of the useful dosimetric traps and a record of the luminescence intensity in the form of a glow curve is all that is available after analysis. In addition, the high heating temperatures restrict packaging methods and prevent competitively priced thin films of TLD crystal powders. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technology avoids many engineering limitations imposed by the high heating temperatures used for TLD technology. OSL crystalline powders can be dispersed in various plastics unable to withstand the TLD heating regimen. With uniform dispersion in the plastic, mass-manufacturing techniques can produce large quantities of identically performing detectors. The first proposal conducted by Markey et al. for applications and potentials of α-AI 2 O 3 :C for OSL dosimetry opened a new era for this phosphor. Pulsed and continuous wave OSL studies carried out on α-AI 2 O 3 :C have shown that the material seems to be the most promising for routine application of OSL for dosimetric purposes. The main objective of this study is to develop a multi-area personal OSL dosimetry system using α-AI 2 O 3 :C by taking advantage of its optical properties and

  18. Short echo time, fast gradient-echo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haacke, E.M.; Lenz, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    Present fast-gradient-echoes schemes can acquire volume data rapidly and are flexible in T1 or T1/T2 contrast behavior. However, sequences used to date employ echo time (TE) values of about 15 ms +- 5 and, because of in vivo field inhomogeneities (short T2), they suffer badly from signal loss near sinuses and tissue boundaries. The authors implemented sequences with TE = 4-6 ms and found significant improvement in image quality, especially at high fields. Examples with long TEs vs. short TEs are given in the knee, spine, head, and orbits. Further advantages include (1) faster repetition times (15 ms), (2) higher-quality spin-density or T1-weighted images, and (3) reduction of blood motion artifacts

  19. Prospects for Precise Measurements with Echo Atom Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brynle Barrett

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Echo atom interferometers have emerged as interesting alternatives to Raman interferometers for the realization of precise measurements of the gravitational acceleration g and the determination of the atomic fine structure through measurements of the atomic recoil frequency ω q . Here we review the development of different configurations of echo interferometers that are best suited to achieve these goals. We describe experiments that utilize near-resonant excitation of laser-cooled rubidium atoms by a sequence of standing wave pulses to measure ω q with a statistical uncertainty of 37 parts per billion (ppb on a time scale of ∼50 ms and g with a statistical precision of 75 ppb. Related coherent transient techniques that have achieved the most statistically precise measurements of atomic g-factor ratios are also outlined. We discuss the reduction of prominent systematic effects in these experiments using off-resonant excitation by low-cost, high-power lasers.

  20. Fully phase-encoded MRI near metallic implants using ultrashort echo times and broadband excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Curtis N; Artz, Nathan S; Jang, Hyungseok; McMillan, Alan B; Koch, Kevin M; Reeder, Scott B

    2018-04-01

    To develop a fully phase-encoded MRI method for distortion-free imaging near metallic implants, in clinically feasible acquisition times. An accelerated 3D fully phase-encoded acquisition with broadband excitation and ultrashort echo times is presented, which uses a broadband radiofrequency pulse to excite the entire off-resonance induced by the metallic implant. Furthermore, fully phase-encoded imaging is used to prevent distortions caused by frequency encoding, and to obtain ultrashort echo times for rapidly decaying signal. Phantom and in vivo acquisitions were used to describe the relationship among excitation bandwidth, signal loss near metallic implants, and T 1 weighting. Shorter radiofrequency pulses captured signal closer to the implant by improving spectral coverage and allowing shorter echo times, whereas longer pulses improved T 1 weighting through larger maximum attainable flip angles. Comparisons of fully phase-encoded acquisition with broadband excitation and ultrashort echo times to T 1 -weighted multi-acquisition with variable resonance image combination selective were performed in phantoms and subjects with metallic knee and hip prostheses. These acquisitions had similar contrast and acquisition efficiency. Accelerated fully phase-encoded acquisitions with ultrashort echo times and broadband excitation can generate distortion free images near metallic implants in clinically feasible acquisition times. Magn Reson Med 79:2156-2163, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. Skew Projection of Echo-Detected EPR Spectra for Increased Sensitivity and Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Michael K.; Krzyaniak, Matthew D.; Cruce, Alex A.; Weber, Ralph T.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of EPR spectra during pulsed EPR experiments is commonly accomplished by recording the integral of the electron spin echo as the applied magnetic field is stepped through the spectrum. This approach to echo-detected EPR spectral measurement (ED-EPR) limits sensitivity and spectral resolution and can cause gross distortions in the resulting spectra because some of the information present in the electron spin echo is discarded in such measurements. However, Fourier Transformation of echo shapes measured at a series of magnetic field values followed by skew projection onto either a magnetic field or resonance frequency axis can increase both spectral resolution and sensitivity without the need to trade one against the other. Examples of skew-projected spectra with single crystals, glasses and powders show resolution improvements as large as a factor of seven with sensitivity increases of as much as a factor of five. PMID:23644351

  2. Longitudinal collective echoes in coasting particle beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Khateeb

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal ballistic and collective beam echoes with diffusion effects are investigated theoretically. In the presence of the space-charge impedance, the collective echo amplitude is obtained as a closed form expression. In contrast to the ballistic case, the collective echo amplitude consists of one maximum at time t_{echo}. The echo amplitude grows up and damps down with a rate proportional to the Landau damping rate of space-charge waves. The effect of weak diffusion is found to modify the ballistic and the collective echo amplitudes in the same manner. This effect of diffusion was confirmed using a “noiseless,” grid-based simulation code. As a first application the amount of numerical diffusion in our simulation code was determined using the echo effect.

  3. Spin echo SPI methods for quantitative analysis of fluids in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linqing; Han, Hui; Balcom, Bruce J

    2009-06-01

    Fluid density imaging is highly desirable in a wide variety of porous media measurements. The SPRITE class of MRI methods has proven to be robust and general in their ability to generate density images in porous media, however the short encoding times required, with correspondingly high magnetic field gradient strengths and filter widths, and low flip angle RF pulses, yield sub-optimal S/N images, especially at low static field strength. This paper explores two implementations of pure phase encode spin echo 1D imaging, with application to a proposed new petroleum reservoir core analysis measurement. In the first implementation of the pulse sequence, we modify the spin echo single point imaging (SE-SPI) technique to acquire the k-space origin data point, with a near zero evolution time, from the free induction decay (FID) following a 90 degrees excitation pulse. Subsequent k-space data points are acquired by separately phase encoding individual echoes in a multi-echo acquisition. T(2) attenuation of the echo train yields an image convolution which causes blurring. The T(2) blur effect is moderate for porous media with T(2) lifetime distributions longer than 5 ms. As a robust, high S/N, and fast 1D imaging method, this method will be highly complementary to SPRITE techniques for the quantitative analysis of fluid content in porous media. In the second implementation of the SE-SPI pulse sequence, modification of the basic measurement permits fast determination of spatially resolved T(2) distributions in porous media through separately phase encoding each echo in a multi-echo CPMG pulse train. An individual T(2) weighted image may be acquired from each echo. The echo time (TE) of each T(2) weighted image may be reduced to 500 micros or less. These profiles can be fit to extract a T(2) distribution from each pixel employing a variety of standard inverse Laplace transform methods. Fluid content 1D images are produced as an essential by product of determining the

  4. Mono-Exponential Fitting in T2-Relaxometry: Relevance of Offset and First Echo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Milford

    Full Text Available T2 relaxometry has become an important tool in quantitative MRI. Little focus has been put on the effect of the refocusing flip angle upon the offset parameter, which was introduced to account for a signal floor due to noise or to long T2 components. The aim of this study was to show that B1 imperfections contribute significantly to the offset. We further introduce a simple method to reduce the systematic error in T2 by discarding the first echo and using the offset fitting approach.Signal curves of T2 relaxometry were simulated based on extended phase graph theory and evaluated for 4 different methods (inclusion and exclusion of the first echo, while fitting with and without the offset. We further performed T2 relaxometry in a phantom at 9.4T magnetic resonance imaging scanner and used the same methods for post-processing as in the extended phase graph simulated data. Single spin echo sequences were used to determine the correct T2 time.The simulation data showed that the systematic error in T2 and the offset depends on the refocusing pulse, the echo spacing and the echo train length. The systematic error could be reduced by discarding the first echo. Further reduction of the systematic T2 error was reached by using the offset as fitting parameter. The phantom experiments confirmed these findings.The fitted offset parameter in T2 relaxometry is influenced by imperfect refocusing pulses. Using the offset as a fitting parameter and discarding the first echo is a fast and easy method to minimize the error in T2, particularly for low to intermediate echo train length.

  5. Independence of echo-threshold and echo-delay in the barn owl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian S Nelson

    Full Text Available Despite their prevalence in nature, echoes are not perceived as events separate from the sounds arriving directly from an active source, until the echo's delay is long. We measured the head-saccades of barn owls and the responses of neurons in their auditory space-maps while presenting a long duration noise-burst and a simulated echo. Under this paradigm, there were two possible stimulus segments that could potentially signal the location of the echo. One was at the onset of the echo; the other, after the offset of the direct (leading sound, when only the echo was present. By lengthening the echo's duration, independently of its delay, spikes and saccades were evoked by the source of the echo even at delays that normally evoked saccades to only the direct source. An echo's location thus appears to be signaled by the neural response evoked after the offset of the direct sound.

  6. Classification of radar echoes using fractal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzaz, Nafissa; Haddad, Boualem

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Implementation of two concepts of fractal geometry to classify two types of meteorological radar echoes. • A new approach, called a multi-scale fractal dimension is used for classification between fixed echoes and rain echoes. • An Automatic identification system of meteorological radar echoes was proposed using fractal geometry. - Abstract: This paper deals with the discrimination between the precipitation echoes and the ground echoes in meteorological radar images using fractal geometry. This study aims to improve the measurement of precipitations by weather radars. For this, we considered three radar sites: Bordeaux (France), Dakar (Senegal) and Me lbourne (USA). We showed that the fractal dimension based on contourlet and the fractal lacunarity are pertinent to discriminate between ground and precipitation echoes. We also demonstrated that the ground echoes have a multifractal structure but the precipitations are more homogeneous than ground echoes whatever the prevailing climate. Thereby, we developed an automatic classification system of radar using a graphic interface. This interface, based on the fractal geometry makes possible the identification of radar echoes type in real time. This system can be inserted in weather radar for the improvement of precipitation estimations.

  7. Determination of the amounts of C, CH, CH/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/ fragments by the spin echo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polonov, V.M.; Kalabin, G.A.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Latyshev, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is presented for the quantitative determination of primary, secondary, tertiary and quarternary carbon atoms in soluble coal products. The method is based on pulsed spin echo of /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance.

  8. Effects of Energy Chirp on Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation Free-Electron Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z.

    2009-01-01

    We study effects of energy chirp on echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG). Analytical expressions are compared with numerical simulations for both harmonic and bunching factors. We also discuss the EEHG free-electron laser bandwidth increase due to an energy-modulated beam and its pulse length dependence on the electron energy chirp

  9. MR imaging of articular cartilage : comparison of magnetization transfer contrast and fat-suppression in multiplanar and 3D gradient-echo, spin-echo, turbo spin-echo techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Joon; Joo, Eun Young; Eun, Choong Ki

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of magnetization transfer contrast(MTC) and fat-suppression(FS) in variable spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences for articular cartilage imaging and to determine the optimal pulse sequences. Using variable 7-pulse sequences, the knees of 15 pigs were imaged Axial images were obtained using proton density and T2-weighted spin-echo (PDWSE and T2WSE), turbo spin-echo (TSE), multiplanar gradient-echo (MPGR), and 3D steady-state gradient-echo (3DGRE) sequences, and the same pulse sequences were then repeated using MTC. Also T1-weighted spin-echo(T1WSE) and 3D spoiled gradient-echo(3DSPGR) images of knees were also acquired, and the procedure was repeated using FS. For each knee, a total of 14 axial images were acquired, and using a 6-band scoring system, the visibility of and the visibilities of the the articular cartilage was analyzed. The visual effect of MTC and FS was scored using a 4-band scale. For each image, the signal intensities of articular cartilage, subchondral bone, muscles, and saline were measured, and signal-to-noise ratios(SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios(CNR) were also calculated. Visibility of the cartilage was best when 3DSPGR and T1WSE sequences were used. MTC imaging increased the negative contrast between cartilage and saline, but FS imaging provided more positive contrast. CNR between cartilage and saline was highest when using TSE with FS(-351.1±15.3), though CNR between cartilage and bone then fell to -14.7±10.8. In MTC imaging using MPGR showed the greatest increase of negative contrast between cartilage and saline(CNR change=-74.7); the next highest was when 3DGRE was used(CNR change=-34.3). CNR between cartilage and bone was highest with MPGR(161.9±17.7), but with MTC, the greatest CNR decrease(-81.8) was observed. The greatest CNR increase between cartilage and bone was noted in T1WSE with FS. In all scans, FS provided a cartilage-only positive contrast image, though the absolute

  10. A radar-echo model for Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, T.W.; Moore, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers developed a radar-echo model for Mars based on 12.6 cm continuous wave radio transmissions backscattered from the planet. The model broadly matches the variations in depolarized and polarized total radar cross sections with longitude observed by Goldstone in 1986 along 7 degrees S. and yields echo spectra that are generally similiar to the observed spectra. Radar map units in the model include an extensive cratered uplands unit with weak depolarized echo cross sections, average thermal inertias, moderate normal refelectivities, and moderate rms slopes; the volcanic units of Tharsis, Elysium, and Amazonis regions with strong depolarized echo cross sections, low thermal inertia, low normal reflectivities, and large rms slopes; and the northern planes units with moderate to strong depolarized echo cross sections, moderate to very high thermal inertias, moderate to large normal reflectivities, and moderate rms slopes. The relevance of the model to the interpretation of radar echoes from Mars is discussed

  11. The acoustics of the echo cornet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Robert W., Jr.; Klaus, Sabine K.

    2002-11-01

    The echo cornet was an instrument produced by a number of makers in several countries from about the middle of the nineteenth to the early twentieth centuries. It consists of an ordinary three-valve cornet to which a fourth valve has been added, downstream of the three normal valves. The extra valve diverts the airstream from the normal bell to an ''echo'' bell that gives a muted tone quality. Although the air column through the echo bell is typically 15 cm longer than the path through the normal bell, there is no appreciable change of playing pitch when the echo bell is in use. Acoustic input impedance and impulse response measurements and consideration of the standing-wave pattern within the echo bell show how this can be so. Acoustically, the echo bell is more closely related to hand-stopping on the French horn than to the mutes commonly used on the trumpet and cornet.

  12. Beam echoes in the presence of coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Axel [Case Western Reserve U.

    2017-10-03

    Transverse beam echoes could provide a new technique of measuring diusion characteristics orders of magnitude faster than the current methods; however, their interaction with many accelerator parameters is poorly understood. Using a program written in C, we explored the relationship between coupling and echo strength. We found that echoes could be generated in both dimensions, even with a dipole kick in only one dimension. We found that the echo eects are not destroyed even when there is strong coupling, falling o only at extremely high coupling values. We found that at intermediate values of skew quadrupole strength, the decoherence time of the beam is greatly increased, causing a destruction of the echo eects. We found that this is caused by a narrowing of the tune width of the particles. Results from this study will help to provide recommendations to IOTA (Integrable Optics Test Accelerator) for their upcoming echo experiment.

  13. Influence of percutaneous stimulation of hepatic region with mid-frequency pulse current on the activity of serum GSH-PX, SOD, T-AOC and the content of malondialdehyde in exercise-induced fatigued soldiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-yi DAI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the influence of percutaneous stimulation of the hepatic region with mid-frequency pulsed current on the serum activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX, superoxide dismutase (SOD and total antioxidant capacity and content of malondialdehyde (MDA in exercise-induced fatigued soldiers. Methods  Sixty healthy male recruits without training history were randomly divided into control group and stimulation group (n=30. Subjects in both groups received intensive training for 5 weeks (trained from Monday to Saturday, and rest on Sunday to establish an exercise-induced fatigue model. The recruits in stimulation group received rehabilitation therapy of percutaneous stimulation of the hepatic region with mid-frequency pulse current (frequency was 1024Hz, dynamic cycle 1s, stimulation time 20min, output intensity ≤80mA after the training immediately. In every Sunday morning of the 1st, 3rd and 5th week, venous blood samples were obtained from recruits of both groups for determination of the serum activity of GSH-PX, SOD and T-AOC and content of MDA. Results  In both groups, the serum activity of GSH-PX and T-AOC on 5th weekend was lower than that of 1st and 3rd weekends, and the serum activity of GSH-PX and T-AOC on 3rd weekend was lower than that of 1st weekend (P0.05; the serum MDA content on 5th weekend was higher than that of 3rd and 1st weekends, and the content on 3rd weekend was higher than that of 1st weekend (P<0.01. The activity of GSH-PX, SOD and T-AOC increased and the MDA content decreased on 1st, 3rd and 5th weekends in stimulation group when compared with control group (P<0.05, P<0.01. Conclusions  The percutaneous stimulation of the hepatic region by mid-frequency pulsed current in exercise-induced fatigued soldiers may improve the activity of antioxidant enzymes in the liver, enhance the function of antioxidant system, promote free radical scavenging, delay the occurrence of and promote the recovery from

  14. How to misuse echo contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Missios Anna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary intracardiac tumours are rare, there are however several entities that can mimic tumours. Contrast echocardiography has been suggested to aid the differentiation of various suspected masses. We present a case where transthoracic echocardiography completely misdiagnosed a left atrial mass, partly due to use of echo contrast. Case presentation An 80 year-old woman was referred for transthoracic echocardiography because of one-month duration of worsening of dyspnoea. Transthoracic echocardiography displayed a large echodense mass in the left atrium. Intravenous injection of contrast (SonoVue, Bracco Inc., It indicated contrast-enhancement of the structure, suggesting tumour. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed, however, a completely normal finding in the left atrium. Subsequent gastroscopy examination showed a hiatal hernia. Conclusion It is noteworthy that the transthoracic echocardiographic exam completely misdiagnosed what seemed like a left atrial mass, which in part was an effect of the use of echo contrast. This example highlights that liberal use of transoesophageal echocardiography is often warranted if optimal display of cardiac structures is desired.

  15. Light echoes - Type II supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    Type II supernovae (SNs) light curves show a remarkable range of shapes. Data have been collected for the 12 Type II SNs that have light curve information for more than four months past maximum. Contrary to previous reports, it is found that (1) the decay rate after 100 days past maximum varies by almost an order of magnitude and (2) the light curve shapes are not bimodally distributed, but actually form a continuum. In addition, it is found that the extinctions to the SNs are related to the light curve shapes. This implies that the absorbing dust is local to the SNs. The dust is likely to be part of a circumstellar shell emitted by the SN progenitor that Dwek (1983) has used to explain infrared echoes. The optical depth of the shell can get quite large. In such cases, it is found that the photons scattered and delayed by reflection off dust grains will dominate the light curve several months after peak brightness. This light echo offers a straightforward explanation of the diversity of Type II SN light curves. 22 references

  16. Ultra-high-speed inversion recovery echo planar MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehling, M.K.; Ordidge, R.J.; Coxon, R.; Chapman, B.; Houseman, A.M.; Guifoyle, D.; Blamire, A.; Gibbs, P.; Mansfield, P.

    1988-01-01

    Fast two-dimensional FT MR imaging techniques such as fast low-angle shot do not allow inversion recovery (IR). Rapid repetition of low-angle pulses is incompatible with a 180 0 inversion pulse. Echo planar imaging (EPI) can be applied in conjunction with IR, because after preparation of the spin system, a complete image is acquired. Data acquisition in less than 100 msec and real-time display allows interactive optimization of inversion time (4.0-9,000 msec) with little time penalty. The authors have applied IR EPI to the study of the brain, liver, and kidneys in normal volunteers and patients. Technical details are presented, and the applications of this first ultra-high-speed IR technique will be shown

  17. Time-resolved echo-shared parallel MRA of the lung: observer preference study of image quality in comparison with non-echo-shared sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, C.; Puderbach, M.; Zaporozhan, J.; Plathow, C.; Kauczor, H.-U.; Ley, S.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of time-resolved echo-shared parallel MRA of the lung. The pulmonary vasculature of nine patients (seven females, two males; median age: 44 years) with pulmonary disease was examined using a time-resolved MRA sequence combining echo sharing with parallel imaging (time-resolved echo-shared angiography technique, or TREAT). The sharpness of the vessel borders, conspicuousness of peripheral lung vessels, artifact level, and overall image quality of TREAT was assessed independently by four readers in a side-by-side comparison with non-echo-shared time-resolved parallel MRA data (pMRA) previously acquired in the same patients. Furthermore, the SNR of pulmonary arteries (PA) and veins (PV) achieved with both pulse sequences was compared. The mean voxel size of TREAT MRA was decreased by 24% compared with the non-echo-shared MRA. Regarding the sharpness of the vessel borders, conspicuousness of peripheral lung vessels, and overall image quality the TREAT sequence was rated superior in 75-76% of all cases. If the TREAT images were preferred over the pMRA images, the advantage was rated as major in 61-71% of all cases. The level of artifacts was not increased with the TREAT sequence. The mean interobserver agreement for all categories ranged between fair (artifact level) and good (overall image quality). The maximum SNR of TREAT did not differ from non-echo-shared parallel MRA (PA: TREAT: 273±45; pMRA: 280±71; PV: TREAT: 273±33; pMRA: 258±62). TREAT achieves a higher spatial resolution than non-echo-shared parallel MRA which is also perceived as an improved image quality. (orig.)

  18. Fast method of NMR imaging based on trains of spin echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennel, F.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical introduction to Fourier NMR imaging and a discussion of fast methods are presented. Then an application of the method of echo-planar imaging (EPI) with spin echoes in a micro-imaging system is described together with introduced modifications of the sequence. A new technique for the measurement of flow profiles in liquids which results from a modification of x-pulsed EPI is presented. The development of new software for a NMR micro-imaging system is described, too. 51 refs, 29 refs

  19. Application of velocity imaging and gradient-recalled echo in neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyko, O.B.; Pelc, N.J.; Shimakawa, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the initial clinical experience with imaging blood flow at 1.5 T by means of a phase-sensitive gradient refocused pulse sequence. A spin-echo flow-encoding technique was modified to a gradient recalled acquisition in a steady state sequence, producing a velocity imaging and gradient recalled echo (VIGRE) sequence (TR = 24 msec, TE = 13 msec, flip angle = 45 degrees, 24-cm field of view, 7 mm contiguous sections). Two views per phase-encoding step are acquired; one using the first-moment flow-compensation gradient waveform and the second having a (selectable) nonzero first moment. A phase subtraction image is obtained where the signal is dependent on the direction and velocity of flow. The sequence was done following routine spin-echo imaging in 35 patients

  20. Rotation commensurate echo of asymmetric molecules—Molecular fingerprints in the time domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesnokov, E. N., E-mail: chesnok@kinetics.nsc.ru [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kubarev, V. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Koshlyakov, P. V. [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-29

    Using the pulses of terahertz free electron laser and ultra-fast Schottky diode detectors, we observed the coherent transients within a free induction decay of gaseous nitrogen dioxide NO{sub 2}. The laser excited different sub-bands of rotation spectra of NO{sub 2} containing about 50–70 lines. The free induction signal continued more than 30 ns and consisted of many echo-like bursts duration about 0.2 ns. Unlike the similar effect observed previously for linear and symmetric top molecules, the sequence of echo bursts is not periodic. The values for delay of individual echo are stable, and the set of these delays can be considered as a “molecular fingerprint” in the time domain.

  1. Gravitational wave sources: reflections and echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Richard H.; Khanna, Gaurav

    2017-11-01

    The recent detection of gravitational waves has generated interest in alternatives to the black hole interpretation of sources. A subset of such alternatives involves a prediction of gravitational wave ‘echoes’. We consider two aspects of possible echoes: first, general features of echoes coming from spacetime reflecting conditions. We find that the detailed nature of such echoes does not bear any clear relationship to quasi-normal frequencies. Second, we point out the pitfalls in the analysis of local reflecting ‘walls’ near the horizon of rapidly rotating black holes.

  2. Gravitational wave sources: reflections and echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Richard H; Khanna, Gaurav

    2017-01-01

    The recent detection of gravitational waves has generated interest in alternatives to the black hole interpretation of sources. A subset of such alternatives involves a prediction of gravitational wave ‘echoes’. We consider two aspects of possible echoes: first, general features of echoes coming from spacetime reflecting conditions. We find that the detailed nature of such echoes does not bear any clear relationship to quasi-normal frequencies. Second, we point out the pitfalls in the analysis of local reflecting ‘walls’ near the horizon of rapidly rotating black holes. (paper)

  3. Sparse adaptive filters for echo cancellation

    CERN Document Server

    Paleologu, Constantin

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive filters with a large number of coefficients are usually involved in both network and acoustic echo cancellation. Consequently, it is important to improve the convergence rate and tracking of the conventional algorithms used for these applications. This can be achieved by exploiting the sparseness character of the echo paths. Identification of sparse impulse responses was addressed mainly in the last decade with the development of the so-called ``proportionate''-type algorithms. The goal of this book is to present the most important sparse adaptive filters developed for echo cancellati

  4. Seasonal and diel patterns in sedimentary flux of krill fecal pellets recorded by an echo sounder

    KAUST Repository

    Røstad, Anders

    2013-11-01

    We used a moored upward-facing 200 kHz echo sounder to address sedimentation of fecal pellets (FPs) from dielly migrating Meganyctiphanes norvegica. The echo sounder was located on the bottom at 150 m depth in the Oslofjord, Norway, and was cabled to shore for continuous measurements during winter and spring. Records of sinking pellets were for the first time observed with an echo sounder. Seasonal patterns of sedimentation of krill FPs were strongly correlated with data from continuous measurement of fluorescence, which illustrate the development of the spring bloom. Sedimenting particles were first observed as fluorescence values started to increase at the end of February and continued to increase until the bloom suddenly culminated at the end of March. This collapse of the bloom was detected on the echo sounder as a pulse of slowly sinking acoustic targets over a 2 d period. Prior to this event, there was a strong diel pattern in sedimentation, which correlated, with some time lag, with the diel migration of krill foraging at night near the surface. Pellet average sinking speeds ranged between 423 m d−1 and 804 m d−1, with a strong relation to pellet target strength, which is an acoustic proxy for size. This novel approach shows that echo sounders may be a valuable tool in studies of vertical pellet flux and, thereby, carbon flux, providing temporal resolution and direct observation of the sedimentation process, which are not obtained from standard methods.

  5. Wind yield forecast with Echo State Networks; Windertragsprognose mit Echo State Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobialka, Hans-Ulrich [Fraunhofer IAIS, Sankt Augustin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Statistical methods are able to create models of complex system dynamics which are difficult to capture analytically. This paper describes a wind energy prediction system based on a machine learning method, called Echo State Networks. Echo State Networks enable the training of large recurrent neural networks which are able to model and predict highly non-linear system dynamics. This paper gives a short description of Echo State Networks and the realization of the wind energy prediction system. (orig.)

  6. Hazardous Waste Dashboard Help | ECHO | US EPA

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    The dashboards found on the Enforcement and Compliance History Online (ECHO) website are specialized to track both facility and agency performance as they relate to compliance with and enforcement of environmental standards under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

  7. Air Dashboard Help | ECHO | US EPA

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    The dashboards found on the Enforcement and Compliance History Online (ECHO) website are specialized to track both facility and agency performance as they relate to compliance with and enforcement of environmental standards under the Clean Air Act (CAA).

  8. MEASUREMENT OF TRANSVERSE ECHOES IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISCHER, W.; SATOGATA, T.; TOMAS, R.

    2005-01-01

    Beam echoes are a very sensitive method to measure diffusion, and longitudinal echo measurements were performed in a number of machines. In RHIC, for the first time, a transverse beam echo was observed after applying a dipole kick followed by a quadrupole .kick. After application of the dipole kick, the dipole moment decohered completely due to lattice nonlinearities. When a quadrupole kick is applied at time τ after the dipole kick, the beam re-cohered at time 2τ thus showing an echo response. We describe the experimental setup and measurement results. In the measurements the dipole and quadrupole kick amplitudes, amplitude dependent tune shift, and the time between dipole and quadrupole kick were varied. In addition, measurements were taken with gold bunches of different intensities. These should exhibit different transverse diffusion rates due to intra-beam scattering

  9. Water Dashboard Help | ECHO | US EPA

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    The dashboards on the ECHO website are specialized to track both facility and agency performance as they relate to compliance with and enforcement of environmental standards under the Clean Water Act (CWA).

  10. Stellar Echo Imaging of Exoplanets, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — All stars exhibit intensity fluctuations over several time scales, from nanoseconds to days; these intensity fluctuations echo off planetary bodies in the star...

  11. Stellar Echo Imaging of Exoplanets, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — All stars exhibit intensity fluctuations over several time scales, from nanoseconds to days; these intensity fluctuations echo off planetary bodies in the star...

  12. Time Delay Estimation Algoritms for Echo Cancellation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill Sakhnov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The following case study describes how to eliminate echo in a VoIP network using delay estimation algorithms. It is known that echo with long transmission delays becomes more noticeable to users. Thus, time delay estimation, as a part of echo cancellation, is an important topic during transmission of voice signals over packetswitching telecommunication systems. An echo delay problem associated with IP-based transport networks is discussed in the following text. The paper introduces the comparative study of time delay estimation algorithm, used for estimation of the true time delay between two speech signals. Experimental results of MATLab simulations that describe the performance of several methods based on cross-correlation, normalized crosscorrelation and generalized cross-correlation are also presented in the paper.

  13. Enforcement and Compliance History Online (ECHO) Facilities

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — ECHO provides integrated compliance and enforcement information for about 800,000 regulated facilities nationwide. Its features range from simple to advanced,...

  14. Horizontal maps of echo power in the lower stratosphere using the MU radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hirono

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent works, zenithal and azimuthal angle variations of echo power measured by VHF Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST radars have been analyzed in detail using different radar multi-beam configurations. It was found that the azimuthal angle corresponding to maximum echo power is closely related to the direction of the horizontal wind shear. These properties indicate that local wind shear affects the tilt of the scatterers. Moreover, horizontal maps of echo power collected using a large set of beams steered pulse-to-pulse up to 40 degrees off zenith revealed that the power distribution pattern in the troposphere is often skewed. In this work, a three-dimensional description of echo power variations up to 24 degrees off zenith is shown for measurements in the lower stratosphere (i.e. up to approximately 20km using a "sequential multi-beam" (SMB configuration. Such a description was not possible above the tropopause with classical multi-beam configurations because of the loss of radar sensitivity due to the limited integration time by the use of a large number of beams. This work attempts to complete previous descriptions of the phenomenon by some observations in the lower stratosphere discussed in association with complementary balloon measurements. Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence – Radio Science (remote sensing

  15. Horizontal maps of echo power in the lower stratosphere using the MU radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hirono

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent works, zenithal and azimuthal angle variations of echo power measured by VHF Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST radars have been analyzed in detail using different radar multi-beam configurations. It was found that the azimuthal angle corresponding to maximum echo power is closely related to the direction of the horizontal wind shear. These properties indicate that local wind shear affects the tilt of the scatterers. Moreover, horizontal maps of echo power collected using a large set of beams steered pulse-to-pulse up to 40 degrees off zenith revealed that the power distribution pattern in the troposphere is often skewed. In this work, a three-dimensional description of echo power variations up to 24 degrees off zenith is shown for measurements in the lower stratosphere (i.e. up to approximately 20km using a "sequential multi-beam" (SMB configuration. Such a description was not possible above the tropopause with classical multi-beam configurations because of the loss of radar sensitivity due to the limited integration time by the use of a large number of beams. This work attempts to complete previous descriptions of the phenomenon by some observations in the lower stratosphere discussed in association with complementary balloon measurements.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence – Radio Science (remote sensing

  16. Report Environmental Violations | ECHO | US EPA

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    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  17. Denuncie violaciones ambientales | ECHO | US EPA

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  15. Water Pollution Search | ECHO | US EPA

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    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  16. Technical Users Background Document | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  17. Echoes from a Dying Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    When a passing star is torn apart by a supermassive black hole, it emits a flare of X-ray, ultraviolet, and optical light. What can we learn from the infrared echo of a violent disruption like this one?Stellar DestructionOptical (black triangles) and infrared (blue circles and red squares) observations of F010042237. Day 0 marks the day the optical emission peaked. The infrared emission rises steadily through the end of the data. [Dou et al. 2017]Tidal disruption events occur when a star passes within the tidal radius of a supermassive black hole. After tidal forces pull the star apart, much of the stellar matter falls onto the black hole, radiating briefly in X-ray, ultraviolet and optical as it accretes. This signature rise and gradual fall of emission has allowed us to detect dozens of tidal disruption events thus far.One of the recently discovered candidate events is a little puzzling. Not only does the candidate in ultraluminous infrared galaxy F010042237 have an unusual host most disruptions occur in galaxies that are no longer star-forming, in contrast to this one but its optical light curve also shows an unusually long decay time.Now mid-infrared observations of this event have beenpresented by a team of scientists led by Liming Dou (Guangzhou University and Department of Education, Guangdong Province, China), revealing why this disruption is behaving unusually.Schematic of a convex dusty ring (red bows) that absorbs UV photons and re-emits in the infrared. It simultaneously scatters UV and optical photons into our line of sight. The dashed lines illustrate the delays at lags of 60 days, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years. [Adapted from Dou et al. 2017]A Dusty Solution?The optical flare from F010042237s nucleus peaked in 2010, so Dou and collaborators obtained archival mid-infrared data from the WISE and NEOWISE missions from 2010 to 2016. The data show that the galaxy is quiescent in mid-infrared in 2010 but in data from three years later, the infrared emission has

  18. Diagnostic equivalence of conventional and fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munk, P.L.; Hilborn, M.D.; Vellet, A.D.; University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta,; Romano, C.C.; University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta,

    1997-01-01

    Many techniques and pulse sequences have been devised for the assessment of the anterior cruciate ligament. The present study compares fast spin echo (FSE) imaging to conventional spin echo imaging at a field strength of 1.5 T in an effort to determine if these sequences are diagnostically equivalent. Where available, arthroscopy was also done. A total of 52 patients were imaged using both FSE and conventional spin echo sequences. Eight volunteers were used as controls. Arthroscopy was performed on 10 patients. The anterior cruciate ligament was assessed in a blinded fashion by three radiologists. The Kappa statistic was then used to determine the percentage agreement between FSE and conventional spin echo imaging. Fast spin echo sequencing demonstrated a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 94.8% and an accuracy of 96.3% when compared to arthroscopy. Conventional spin echo imaging and arthroscopy had a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 84.6% and an accuracy of 88.9%. The remaining 34 patients who did not undergo arthroscopy were followed clinically because clinical and imaging findings were not suggestive of ACL tears. These demonstrated 72% agreement between FSE and conventional spin echo imaging using the Kappa statistic, with regards to calling ACL normal or having only a low-grade partial tear. Fast spin echo imaging produces images of the anterior cruciate ligament that have similar diagnostic accuracy to conventional spin echo images (P<0.05) within a much shorter scan time. These results however, require further validation in a larger group, preferably with arthroscopic correlation. (author)

  19. Usefulness of enhanced breathhold 3D spoiled gradient-echo MRA for intrathoracic mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kadoya, Masumi; Kamimura, Ryoichi; Takashima, Tsutomu

    1999-01-01

    Enhanced Breathhold 3D Spoiled Gradient-echo MRA was very attractive method for not only evaluating relationship between intrathoracic mass and intrathoracic vessels, but also visualizing small pulmonary vessels that could not be detected conventional MRA methods. Moreover, this methods could be applied for evaluating vascularity of the lesions. This method will be accepted as routine pulse sequence for evaluating intrathoracic mass especially malignant tumors. (author)

  20. Information entropy method and the description of echo hologram formation in gaseous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnaeva, G. I.; Nefediev, L. A.; Akhmedshina, E. N.

    2018-02-01

    The effect of collisions with a change in velocity of gas particles, on the value of information entropy, is associated with the spectral structure of the echo hologram’s response, where its temporal form is considered. It is shown that collisions with a change in gas particle velocity increase the ‘parasitical’ information, on the background of which the information contained in the temporary shape of the object laser pulse is lost.

  1. Magnetic resonance findings in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using a spin echo magnetization transfer sequence: preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROCHA ANTÔNIO JOSÉ DA

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the magnetic resonance (MR findings of five patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS using a spin-echo sequence with an additional magnetization transfer (MT pulse on T1-weighted images (T1 SE/MT. These findings were absent in the control group and consisted of hyperintensity of the corticospinal tract. Moreover we discuss the principles and the use of this fast but simple MR technique in the diagnosis of ALS

  2. Quantitation of structural distortion with gradient-echo imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tien, R.D.; Schwaighofer, B.W.; Hesselink, J.R.; Chu, P.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the structural distortion and measurement error associated with fast MR imaging of the spinal neural foramina. Dry skeletal specimens and a thin cadaveric sagittal section through the neural foramina were placed in a water bath. MR images were obtained with a 1.5-T unit in different planes and with various pulse sequences. The size and shape of each neural foramen were carefully measured on the images and on the skeletal specimens. Gradient-echo (GRE) techniques (gradient recalled acquisition in a steady state, MPGR, three-dimensional volume acquisition) resulted in structural distortion in up to 10% on the fresh skeleton and 30% of the dry skeleton specimens when a small TE was used (the foramina appear narrower on the images)

  3. Neutron spin echo and high resolution inelastic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, F.; Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest. Central Research Inst. for Physics)

    1982-01-01

    The principles of neutrons spin echo (NSE) technique are considered. It is shown that the basis of NSE principle is a single step measurement of the change of the neutron velocity in the scattering process. The backscattering soectroscopy and the NSE techniques are compared. The NSF spectrometer is described. It is shown that 0.5 MeV energy resolution achieved in the NSE experiment is about 40 times superior to those achieved by the other techniques. The NSE technique has the unique feature that provides high resolution in neutron energy change independently of the monochromatization of the beam. The NSE instrument not only covers a wider dynamic range on a pulsed source that on a continuous one, but also collects data more efficiently

  4. Increased flow sensitivity from gradient recalled echoes and short TRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearshen, D.O.; Froelich, J.W.; Wehrli, F.W.; Haggar, A.M.; Shimakawa, A.

    1986-01-01

    Time-of-flight effects from flow have been characterized in spin-echo images. ''Paradoxical'' enhancement and flow void are observed. Similar enhancement is seen on GRASS images. With no flow void and gradients existing throughout the volume, spins experiencing radio-frequency pulses will give rise to signals even for fast flow, providing a greater velocity sensitivity. GRASS images were obtained from a volunteer with a blood pressure cuff placed over the right thigh. With the cuff inflated, flow in the popliteal vein results in signal saturation. Increasing TR increases intensity in the popliteal vein relative to other vessels. This suggests a clinical role for the technique in assessment of slow flow

  5. Entrainment of prefrontal beta oscillations induces an endogenous echo and impairs memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanslmayr, Simon; Matuschek, Jonas; Fellner, Marie-Christin

    2014-04-14

    Brain oscillations across all frequency bands play a key role for memory formation. Specifically, desynchronization of local neuronal assemblies in the left inferior prefrontal cortex (PFC) in the beta frequency (∼18 Hz) has been shown to be central for encoding of verbal memories. However, it remains elusive whether prefrontal beta desynchronization is causally relevant for memory formation and whether these endogenous beta oscillations can be entrained by external stimulation. By using combined EEG-TMS (transcranial magnetic stimulation), we here address these fundamental questions in human participants performing a word-list learning task. Confirming our predictions, memory encoding was selectively impaired when the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) was driven at beta (18.7 Hz) compared to stimulation at other frequencies (6.8 Hz and 10.7 Hz) and to ineffective sham stimulation (18.7 Hz). Furthermore, a sustained oscillatory "echo" in the left IFG, which outlasted the stimulation period by approximately 1.5 s, was observed solely after beta stimulation. The strength of this beta echo was related to memory impairment on a between-subjects level. These results show endogenous oscillatory entrainment effects and behavioral impairment selectively in beta frequency for stimulation of the left IFG, demonstrating an intimate causal relationship between prefrontal beta desynchronization and memory formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Electron transfer processes occurring on platinum neural stimulating electrodes: pulsing experiments for cathodic-first, charge-balanced, biphasic pulses for 0.566  ⩽  k  ⩽  2.3 in rat subcutaneous tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumsa, Doe W.; Bhadra, Narendra; Hudak, Eric M.; Mortimer, J. Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Our mission is twofold: (1) find a way to safely inject more charge through platinum electrodes than the Shannon limit (k  =  1.75) permits and (2) nurture an interest in the neural stimulation community to understand the electron transfer process occurring on neural stimulating electrodes. Approach. We report here on measurements of the electrode potential, performed on platinum neural stimulating electrodes in the subcutaneous space of an anesthetized rat under neural stimulation conditions. Main results. The results for six platinum electrodes with areas ranging from 0.2 mm2 to 12.7 mm2 were similar to prior results in sulfuric acid, except that the measured potentials were shifted negative 0.36 V because of the pH difference between the two media. The anodic ‘end’ potential, measured at t  =  20 ms after the onset of the biphasic current pulse, was the primary focus of the data collected because previous results had shown that as charge injection crosses the Shannon limit (k  =  1.75), this potential moves into a range where platinum surface oxidation and dissolution is likely to occur. The behavior of V e(t  =  20 ms) over a range of electrode surface areas studied was consistent with our sulfuric acid study. Implicit, but little noticed, in Shannon’s formulation is that small and large platinum electrodes behave the same in terms of k value; our data supports this idea. Significance. We hypothesize that the k  =  1.75 Shannon limit for safe stimulation designates a charge-injection boundary above which platinum toxicity becomes a relevant consideration for living cells around an electrode, a possibility that can be directly tested, and is a vital step forward in mission (1).

  7. An Investigation of the Effects of Different Pulse Patterns of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on Perceptual Embodiment of a Rubber Hand in Healthy Human Participants With Intact Limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Matthew R; Fawkner, Helen J; Johnson, Mark I

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the strength of perceptual embodiment achieved during an adapted version of the rubber hand illusion (RHI) in response to a series of modified transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) pulse patterns with dynamic temporal and spatial characteristics which are more akin to the mechanical brush stroke in the original RHI. A repeated-measures counterbalanced experimental study was conducted where each participant was exposed to four TENS interventions: continuous pattern TENS; burst pattern TENS (fixed frequency of 2 bursts per second of 100 pulses per second); amplitude-modulated pattern TENS (intensity increasing from zero to a preset level, then back to zero again in a cyclical fashion); and sham (no current) TENS. Participants rated the intensity of the RHI using a three-item numerical rating scale (each item was ranked from 0 to 10). Friedman's analysis of ranks (one-factor repeated measure) was used to test the differences in perceptual embodiment between TENS innervations; alpha was set at p ≤ 0.05. There were statistically significant differences in the intensity of misattribution and perceptual embodiment between sham and active TENS interventions, but no significant differences between the three active TENS conditions (amplitude-modulated TENS, burst TENS, and continuous TENS). Amplitude-modulated and burst TENS produced significantly higher intensity scores for misattribution sensation and perceptual embodiment compared with sham (no current) TENS, whereas continuous TENS did not. The findings provide tentative, but not definitive, evidence that TENS parameters with dynamic spatial and temporal characteristics may produce more intense misattribution sensations and intense perceptual embodiment than parameters with static characteristics (e.g., continuous pulse patterns). © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  8. Meteor head echoes - observations and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pellinen-Wannberg

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Meteor head echoes - instantaneous echoes moving with the velocities of the meteors - have been recorded since 1947. Despite many attempts, this phenomenon did not receive a comprehensive theory for over 4 decades. The High Power and Large Aperture (HPLA features, combined with present signal processing and data storage capabilities of incoherent scatter radars, may give an explanation for the old riddle. The meteoroid passage through the radar beam can be followed with simultaneous spatial-time resolution of about 100m-ms class. The current views of the meteor head echo process will be presented and discussed. These will be related to various EISCAT observations, such as dual-frequency target sizes, altitude distributions and vector velocities.

  9. J-NSE: Neutron spin echo spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Holderer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neutron Spin-Echo (NSE spectroscopy is well known as the only neutron scattering technique that achieves energy resolution of several neV. By using the spin precession of polarized neutrons in magnetic field one can measure tiny velocity changes of the individual neutron during the scattering process. Contrary to other inelastic neutron scattering techniques, NSE measures the intermediate scattering function S(Q,t in reciprocal space and time directly. The Neutron Spin-Echo spectrometer J-NSE, operated by JCNS, Forschungszentrum Jülich at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ in Garching, covers a time range (2 ps to 200 ns on length scales accessible by small angle scattering technique. Along with conventional NSE spectroscopy that allows bulk measurements in transmission mode, J-NSE offers a new possibility - gracing incidence spin echo spectroscopy (GINSENS, developed to be used as "push-button" option in order to resolve the depth dependent near surface dynamics.

  10. Black hole ringdown echoes and howls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Hiroyuki; Sago, Norichika; Tagoshi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2017-07-01

    Recently the possibility of detecting echoes of ringdown gravitational waves from binary black hole mergers was shown. The presence of echoes is expected if the black hole is surrounded by a mirror that reflects gravitational waves near the horizon. Here, we present slightly more sophisticated templates motivated by a waveform which is obtained by solving the linear perturbation equation around a Kerr black hole with a complete reflecting boundary condition in the stationary traveling wave approximation. We estimate that the proposed template can bring about a 10% improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio.

  11. Evolution of entanglement under echo dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosen, Tomaz; Znidaric, Marko; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    Echo dynamics and fidelity are often used to discuss stability in quantum-information processing and quantum chaos. Yet fidelity yields no information about entanglement, the characteristic property of quantum mechanics. We study the evolution of entanglement in echo dynamics. We find qualitatively different behavior between integrable and chaotic systems on one hand and between random and coherent initial states for integrable systems on the other. For the latter the evolution of entanglement is given by a classical time scale. Analytic results are illustrated numerically in a Jaynes-Cummings model

  12. Short term memory in echo state networks

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeger, H.

    2001-01-01

    The report investigates the short-term memory capacity of echo state recurrent neural networks. A quantitative measure MC of short-term memory capacity is introduced. The main result is that MC 5 N for networks with linear Output units and i.i.d. input, where N is network size. Conditions under which these maximal memory capacities are realized are described. Several theoretical and practical examples demonstrate how the short-term memory capacities of echo state networks can be exploited for...

  13. How can dolphins recognize fish according to their echoes? A statistical analysis of fish echoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yossi Yovel

    Full Text Available Echo-based object classification is a fundamental task of animals that use a biosonar system. Dolphins and porpoises should be able to rely on echoes to discriminate a predator from a prey or to select a desired prey from an undesired object. Many studies have shown that dolphins and porpoises can discriminate between objects according to their echoes. All of these studies however, used unnatural objects that can be easily characterized in human terminologies (e.g., metallic spheres, disks, cylinders. In this work, we collected real fish echoes from many angles of acquisition using a sonar system that mimics the emission properties of dolphins and porpoises. We then tested two alternative statistical approaches in classifying these echoes. Our results suggest that fish species can be classified according to echoes returning from porpoise- and dolphin-like signals. These results suggest how dolphins and porpoises can classify fish based on their echoes and provide some insight as to which features might enable the classification.

  14. Multielectrode intrafascicular and extraneural stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Petrus H.; van Alste, Jan A.; Boom, H.B.K.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between nerve stimulation, pulse amplitude and isometric muscle force was measured to investigate recruitment of motor units. Force addition experiments were performed to obtain insight in the intersection of motor unit groups recruited by different electrodes. Intrafascicular and

  15. Electron spin echo study of the E'-center phase relaxation in γ-irradiated quartz glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudkin, V.I.; Petrun'kin, V.Yu.; Rubinov, S.V.; Uspenskij, L.I.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental studies of phase relaxation of E'-centres in γ-irradiated quartz glass are conducted by the method of electron spin echo (ESE) for different concentrations of paramagnetic centres. Contribution of mechanisms of spectral and prompt diffusion to kinetics of amplitude drop of echo signal is proved to reduce with growth of delay time between exciting microwave pulse that results in increase of phase memory time at large delays. The mentioned property can be used in electric controlled delay lines on the base of ESE

  16. High frequency and pulse scattering physical acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Pierce, Allan D

    1992-01-01

    High Frequency and Pulse Scattering investigates high frequency and pulse scattering, with emphasis on the phenomenon of echoes from objects. Geometrical and catastrophe optics methods in scattering are discussed, along with the scattering of sound pulses and the ringing of target resonances. Caustics and associated diffraction catastrophes are also examined.Comprised of two chapters, this volume begins with a detailed account of geometrically based approximation methods in scattering theory, focusing on waves transmitted through fluid and elastic scatterers and glory scattering; surface ray r

  17. Optimal pulse-sequence parameters for MR imaging of the immature brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowell, M.A.; Hackney, D.B.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Grossman, R.I.; Goldberg, H.I.

    1986-01-01

    Appropriate spin-echo pulse sequence parameters generate MR images with very high gray matter/white matter contrast in neonates and young infants. Low-contrast images appear to result from utilization of ''adult-type'' parameters to investigate tissues that have relaxation characteristics quite different than those of adult brain. In these young patients long spin-echo sequences with repetition times of 3,000-3,500 msec and multiple echoes with the longest echo time set at 120-160 msec are employed to yield high-contrast ''T2-weighted'' images

  18. Comparison of multi-echo and single-echo gradient-recalled echo sequences for SPIO-enhanced Liver MRI at 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.S.; Kim, M.-J.; Kim, J.H.; Choi, J.-Y.; Chung, Y.E.; Park, M.-S.; Kim, K.W.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To assess the utility of a T2*-weighted, multi-echo data imaging combination sequenced on superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-enhanced liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 3 T system. Materials and methods: Fifty patients underwent SPIO-enhanced MRI at 3 T using T2*-weighted, single-echo, gradient-recalled echo (GRE) sequences [fast imaging with steady precession; repetition time (TR)/echo time (TE), 126 ms/9 ms; flip angle, 30 o ] and multi-echo GRE (multi-echo data image combination) sequences (TR/TE, 186 ms/9 ms; flip angle, 30 o ). Three radiologists independently reviewed the images in a random order. The sensitivity and accuracy for the detection of focal hepatic lesions (a total of 76 lesions in 33 patients; 48 solid lesions, 28 non-solid lesions) were compared by analysing the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves. Image artefacts (flow artefacts, susceptibility artefacts, dielectric artefacts, and motion artefacts), lesion conspicuity, and overall image quality were evaluated according to a four-point scale: 1, poor; 2, fair; 3, good; 4, excellent. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the lesions were compared. Results: Image artefacts were more frequent with single-echo GRE (p < 0.05). The mean scale of image quality assessment for flow, susceptibility, dielectric, and motion artefacts were 2.76, 3.13, 3.42, and 2.89 with singe-echo, respectively, compared with 3.47, 3.43, 3.47, and 3.39, respectively, with multi-echo GRE. There was no significant difference in lesion conspicuity between single-echo (3.15) and multi-echo (3.30) GRE sequences. The overall image quality was significantly (p < 0.05) better with multi-echo (3.37) than with single-echo GRE (2.89). The mean SNR and CNR of the lesions were significantly (p < 0.05) higher on multi-echo (79 ± 23 and 128 ± 59, respectively) images than on single-echo (38 ± 11 and 102 ± 44, respectively) images. Lesion detection accuracy and

  19. Pesticide Dashboard Help | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The dashboards found on the Enforcement and Compliance History Online (ECHO) website are specialized to track both facility and agency performance as they relate to compliance with and enforcement of environmental standards under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA).

  20. Long range echo classification for minehunting sonars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theije, P.A.M. de; Groen, J.; Sabel, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper focesus on single-ping classification of sea mines, at a range of about 400 m, and combining a hull mounted sonar (HMS) and a propelled variable-depth sonar (PDVS). The deleoped classifier is trained and tested on a set of simulated realistic echoes of mines and non-mines. As the mines

  1. Pulse Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An apparatus and a computer-implemented method for generating pulses synchronized to a rising edge of a tachometer signal from rotating machinery are disclosed. For example, in one embodiment, a pulse state machine may be configured to generate a plurality of pulses, and a period state machine may be configured to determine a period for each of the plurality of pulses.

  2. Electric Dipole Echoes and Noise-Induced Coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestayer, J.J.; Zhao, W.; Lancaster, J.C.; Dunning, F.B.; Yoshida, S.; Reinhold, Carlos O.; Burgdorfer, J.

    2007-01-01

    The generation of echoes in the electric dipole moment of a Rydberg wavepacket precessing in an external electric field by reversal of the field is described. When the wavepacket experiences reversible dephasing, large echoes are observed pointing to strong refocusing of the wavepacket. The presence of irreversible dephasing leads to a reduction in the size of the echoes. The effect of irreversible dynamics on echoes is investigated using artificially synthesized noise. Methods to determine the decoherence rate are discussed

  3. Corticomotor control of lumbar multifidus muscles is impaired in chronic low back pain: concurrent evidence from ultrasound imaging and double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massé-Alarie, Hugo; Beaulieu, Louis-David; Preuss, Richard; Schneider, Cyril

    2016-04-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is often associated with impaired control of deep trunk muscles and reorganization of the primary motor areas (M1). Precisely, functional changes of the lumbar multifidus muscles (MF) involved in spine stability may be of special interest in rehabilitation. Therefore, we tested MF corticomotor control using double transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigms for the first time in this muscle and examined its link with MF volitional activation. Eleven individuals with lateralized CLBP and 13 pain-free participants were recruited. Ultrasound imaging enabled measurement of MF volitional isometric contraction in prone lying. TMS of MF M1 area was used to test hemispheric excitability and mechanisms in relation to motor programming, i.e., active motor threshold (AMT), amplitude of motor-evoked potentials and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and facilitation (SICF). In CLBP, SICI level was lower in the left hemisphere and MF volitional contraction was not related to AMT (M1 excitability), conversely to what was observed in the pain-free group. No other between-group difference was detected. These original findings support a plasticity of cortical maps controlling paravertebral muscles and likely including a different motor strategy for the control of MF. Changes of M1 function may thus underlie impaired motor control of lumbopelvic spine and pain persistence in CLBP.

  4. Relaxation oscillations in stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachen, G.I.; Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Light pulses created by stimulated Raman scattering having been found to exhibit a complex time dependence which resembles relaxation oscillations. A focused laser pulse generated both forward and backward Raman emissions which appeared as a series of pulses with durations much shorter than the incident laser pulse. Time dependence of the Raman emission was observed directly by use of a streak camera. The number of observed pulses increased with the intensity of the incident pulse, while separation of the pulses in time depended on the length of the focal region. Beam focusing was incorporated in the coupled wave equations for stimulated Raman scattering. These rate equations were then solved numerically, and the results are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The short Raman pulses are created by a process associated with depletion of the incident laser pulse. This process occurs under a broad range of conditions

  5. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormos, J M; Catalá, M D; Pascual-Leone, A

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) permits stimulation of the cerebral cortex in humans without requiring open access to the brain and is one of the newest tools available in neuroscience. There are two main types of application: single-pulse TMS and repetitive TMS. The magnetic stimulator is composed of a series of capacitors that store the voltage necessary to generate a stimulus of the sufficient intensity of generate an electric field in the stimulation coil. The safety of TMS is supported by the considerable experience derived from studies involving electrical stimulation of the cortex in animals and humans, and also specific studies on the safety of TMS in humans. In this article we review historical and technical aspects of TMS, describe its adverse effects and how to avoid them, summarize the applications of TMS in the investigation of different cerebral functions, and discuss the possibility of using TMS for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  6. EchoScan: A new system to objectively assess peripheral hearing disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Venet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure-tone air-conduction audiometry (PTA is the reference clinical test used in Europe and the United States to measure the extent of hearing loss. It is a subjective, behavioral test, which measures thresholds of hearing sensations and perceptions based on patient responses to frequency-specific pure-tone stimuli. PTA can detect hearing problems due to cochlear or retro-cochlear impairment, without identifying the source of the problem. In contrast, cubic distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs detect inner-ear dysfunctions, particularly those involving the outer hair cells sensitive to noise and ototoxicants. Recently, ototoxicants were shown to have an action on the central nuclei driving the middle-ear acoustic reflex. Therefore, a new device, called EchoScan, was conceived to collect and measure performance both in the middle- and inner-ear. Its originality: the use of a battery of DPOAE measurements associated with contra-lateral acoustic stimulation. Changes in DPOAE amplitude due to ageing and gender were incidentally detected and EchoScan was more sensitive than impedancemetry to detect the stapedial reflex. EchoScan can be used both in clinical investigations and in occupational medicine, especially for the auditory follow-up of people exposed to noise or ototoxic agents. EchoScan could be promising to assess early detection in programs to prevent hearing loss.

  7. New MR pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, S.E.; Flamig, D.P.; Griffey, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method for fat suppression for three-dimensional MR imaging. The FATS (fat-suppressed acquisition with echo time shortened) sequence employs a pair of opposing adiabatic half-passage RF pulses tuned on fat resonance. The imaging parameters are as follows: TR, 20 msec; TE, 21.7-3.2 msec; 1,024 x 128 x 128 acquired matrix; imaging time, approximately 11 minutes. A series of 54 examinations were performed. Excellent fat suppression with water excitation is achieved in all cases. The orbital images demonstrate superior resolution of small orbital lesions. The high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in cranial studies demonstrates excellent petrous bone and internal auditory canal anatomy

  8. Storage and manipulation of light using a Raman gradient-echo process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, M; Sparkes, B M; Campbell, G T; Lam, P K; Buchler, B C

    2012-01-01

    The gradient-echo memory (GEM) scheme has potential to be a suitable protocol for storage and retrieval of optical quantum information. In this paper, we review the properties of the Λ-GEM method that stores information in the ground states of three-level atomic ensembles via Raman coupling. The scheme is versatile in that it can store and re-sequence multiple pulses of light. To date, this scheme has been implemented using warm rubidium gas cells. There are different phenomena that can influence the performance of these atomic systems. We investigate the impact of atomic motion and four-wave mixing and present experiments that show how parasitic four-wave mixing can be mitigated. We also use the memory to demonstrate preservation of pulse shape and the backward retrieval of pulses. (paper)

  9. Workshop on neutron spin-echo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aynajian, P.; Habicht, K.; Keller, Th.; Keimer, B.; Mezei, F.; Monkenbusch, M.; Allgaier, J.; Richter, D.; Fetters, L.J.; Muller, K.; Kreiling, S.; Dehnicke, K.; Greiner, A.; Ehlers, G.; Arbe, A.; Colmenero, J.; Richter, D.; Farago, B.; Monkenbusch, M.; Ohl, M.; Butzek, M.; Kozielewski, T.; Monkenbusch, M.; Richter, D.; Pappas, C.; Hillier, A.; Manuel, P.; Cywinski, R.; Bentley, P.; Alba, M.; Mezei, F.; Campbell, I.A.; Zimmermann, U.; Ellis, J.; Jobic, H.; Pickup, R.M.; Pappas, C.; Farago, B.; Cywinski, R.; Haussler, W.; Holderer, O.; Frielinghaus, H.; Byelov, D.; Monkenbusch, M.; Allgaier, J.; Richter, D.; Egger, H.; Hellweg, Th.; Malikova, N.; Cadene, A.; Marry, V.; Dubois, E.; Turq, P.; Gardner, J.S.; Ehlers, G.; Bramwell, St.S.; Grigoriev, S.; Kraan, W.; Rekveldt, T.; Bouwman, W.; Van Dijk, N.; Falus, P.; Vorobiev, A.; Major, J.; Felcher, G.P.; Te-velthuis, S.; Dosch, H.; Vorobiev, A.; Dridi, M.H.; Major, J.; Dosch, H.; Falus, P.; Felcher, G.P.; Te Velthuis, S.G.E.; Bleuel, M.; Broell, M.; Lang, E.; Littrell, K.; Gahler, R.; Lal, J.; Lauter, H.; Toperverg, B.; Lauter, V.; Jernenkov, M.; Stueber, S.; Enderle, M.; Janoschek, M.; Keller, Th.; Klimko, S.; Boeni, P.; Nagao, M.; Yamada, N.; Kawabata, Y.; Seto, H.; Takeda, T.; Yoshizawa, H.; Yoshida, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Bellissent-Funel, M.C.; Longeville, St

    2005-07-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of most papers presented at the workshop. Neutron spin-echo (NSE) spectroscopy is a well established technique with a growing expert user community, the aim of the meeting was to discuss the latest achievements in neutron spin-echo science and instrumentation. One of the applications presented is the investigation on the microscopic scale of the dynamics of water in montmorillonite clays with Na{sup +} and Cs{sup +} ions in monolayer and bilayer states. The NSE technique has been used in the normal and resonance modes. NSE results show consistently slower dynamics (higher relaxation times) than both time-of-flight technique (TOF) and classical molecular dynamics simulations (MD). In the present TOF and NSE experiments, anisotropy of the water motion in the interlayer is almost impossible to detect, due to the use of powder samples and insufficient resolution. (A.C.)

  10. The EChO science case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Drossart, Pierre; Eccleston, Paul

    2015-01-01

    in the Solar System. Observations to date have shown that our Solar System is certainly not representative of the general population of planets in our Milky Way. The key science questions that urgently need addressing are therefore: What are exoplanets made of? Why are planets as they are? How do planetary....... The mission can target super-Earths, Neptune-like, and Jupiter-like planets, in the very hot to temperate zones (planet temperatures of 300–3000 K) of F to M-type host stars. The EChO core science would be delivered by a three-tier survey. The EChO Chemical Census: This is a broad survey of a few...

  11. Functional MR imaging of cerebral auditory cortex with linguistic and non-linguistic stimulation: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Su Jin; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Shin, Tae Min

    1999-01-01

    To obtain preliminary data for understanding the central auditory neural pathway by means of functional MR imaging (fMRI) of the cerebral auditory cortex during linguistic and non-linguistic auditory stimulation. In three right-handed volunteers we conducted fMRI of auditory cortex stimulation at 1.5 T using a conventional gradient-echo technique (TR/TE/flip angle: 80/60/40 deg). Using a pulsed tone of 1000 Hz and speech as non-linguistic and linguistic auditory stimuli, respectively, images-including those of the superior temporal gyrus of both hemispheres-were obtained in sagittal plases. Both stimuli were separately delivered binaurally or monoaurally through a plastic earphone. Images were activated by processing with homemade software. In order to analyze patterns of auditory cortex activation according to type of stimulus and which side of the ear was stimulated, the number and extent of activated pixels were compared between both temporal lobes. Biaural stimulation led to bilateral activation of the superior temporal gyrus, while monoaural stimulation led to more activation in the contralateral temporal lobe than in the ipsilateral. A trend toward slight activation of the left (dominant) temporal lobe in ipsilateral stimulation, particularly with a linguistic stimulus, was observed. During both biaural and monoaural stimulation, a linguistic stimulus produced more widespread activation than did a non-linguistic one. The superior temporal gyri of both temporal lobes are associated with acoustic-phonetic analysis, and the left (dominant) superior temporal gyrus is likely to play a dominant role in this processing. For better understanding of physiological and pathological central auditory pathways, further investigation is needed

  12. Single-shot echo-planar imaging of multiple sclerosis: effects of varying echo time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolansky, L.J.; Chong, S.; Liu, W.C.; Kang, E.; Simpson, S.W.; Karimi, S.; Akbari, H.

    1999-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the relative merits of short and long echo times (TE) with single-shot echo-planar imaging for imaging cerebral lesions such as multiple sclerosis. We examined seven patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis were imaged at 1.5 T. Patients were scanned with spin-echo, single-shot echo-planar imaging, using TEs of 45, 75, 105, and 135 ms. Region of interest (ROI) measurements were performed on 36 lesions at or above the level of the corona radiata. The mean image contrast (IC) was highest (231.1) for a TE of 45 ms, followed by 75 ms (218.9), 105 ms (217.9), and 135 ms (191.6). When mean contrast-to-noise ratios (C/N) were compared, the value was again highest (29.7) for TE 45 ms, followed by 75 ms (28.9), 105 ms (28.5), and 135 ms (26.3). In a lesion-by-lesion comparison, TE 45 ms had the highest IC and C/N in the largest number of cases (50 % and 47.2 %, respectively). IC and C/N for TE 45 ms were superior to those of 75 ms in 64 % and 58 %, respectively. These results support the use of relatively short TEs for single-shot echo-planar imaging in the setting of cerebral lesions such as multiple sclerosis. (orig.) (orig.)

  13. Short echo time proton spectroscopy of the brain in healthy volunteers using an insert gradient head coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Danielsen, E R; Schneider, M

    1995-01-01

    An insert gradient head coil with built-in X, Y, and Z gradients was used for localized proton spectroscopy in the brain of healthy volunteers, using short echo time stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) sequences. Volume of interest size was 3.4 ml, repetition time was 6.0 s, and echo times...... were 10 and 20 ms, respectively. Good quality proton spectra with practically no eddy current artefacts were acquired allowing observation of strongly coupled compounds, and compounds with short T2 relaxation times. The gradient head coil thus permits further studies of compounds such as glutamine....../glutamate and myo-inositols. These compounds were more prominent within grey matter than within white matter. Rough estimations of metabolite concentrations using water as an internal standard were in good agreement with previous reports....

  14. Temperature sheets and aspect sensitive radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    Full Text Available here have been years of discussion and controversy about the existence of very thin and stable temperature sheets and their relationship to the VHF radar aspect sensitivity. It is only recently that very high-resolution in situ temperature observations have brought credence to the reality and ubiquity of these structures in the free atmosphere and to their contribution to radar echo enhancements along the vertical. Indeed, measurements with very high-resolution sensors are still extremely rare and rather difficult to obtain outside of the planetary boundary layer. They have only been carried out up to the lower stratosphere by Service d’A´ eronomie (CNRS, France for about 10 years. The controversy also persisted due to the volume resolution of the (Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere VHF radars which is coarse with respect to sheet thickness, although widely sufficient for meteorological or mesoscale investigations. The contribution within the range gate of many of these structures, which are advected by the wind, and decay and grow at different instants and could be distorted either by internal gravity waves or turbulence fields, could lead to radar echoes with statistical properties similar to those produced by anisotropic turbulence. Some questions thus remain regarding the manner in which temperature sheets contribute to VHF radar echoes. In particular, the zenithal and azimuthal angular dependence of the echo power may not only be produced by diffuse reflection on stable distorted or corrugated sheets, but also by extra contributions from anisotropic turbulence occurring in the stratified atmosphere. Thus, for several years, efforts have been put forth to improve the radar height resolution in order to better describe thin structures. Frequency interferometric techniques are widely used and have been recently further developed with the implementation of high-resolution data processings. We begin by reviewing briefly some characteristics

  15. Temperature sheets and aspect sensitive radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available here have been years of discussion and controversy about the existence of very thin and stable temperature sheets and their relationship to the VHF radar aspect sensitivity. It is only recently that very high-resolution in situ temperature observations have brought credence to the reality and ubiquity of these structures in the free atmosphere and to their contribution to radar echo enhancements along the vertical. Indeed, measurements with very high-resolution sensors are still extremely rare and rather difficult to obtain outside of the planetary boundary layer. They have only been carried out up to the lower stratosphere by Service d’A´ eronomie (CNRS, France for about 10 years. The controversy also persisted due to the volume resolution of the (Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere VHF radars which is coarse with respect to sheet thickness, although widely sufficient for meteorological or mesoscale investigations. The contribution within the range gate of many of these structures, which are advected by the wind, and decay and grow at different instants and could be distorted either by internal gravity waves or turbulence fields, could lead to radar echoes with statistical properties similar to those produced by anisotropic turbulence. Some questions thus remain regarding the manner in which temperature sheets contribute to VHF radar echoes. In particular, the zenithal and azimuthal angular dependence of the echo power may not only be produced by diffuse reflection on stable distorted or corrugated sheets, but also by extra contributions from anisotropic turbulence occurring in the stratified atmosphere. Thus, for several years, efforts have been put forth to improve the radar height resolution in order to better describe thin structures. Frequency interferometric techniques are widely used and have been recently further developed with the implementation of high-resolution data processings. We begin by reviewing briefly some characteristics

  16. Neural field theory of perceptual echo and implications for estimating brain connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.; Pagès, J. C.; Gabay, N. C.; Babaie, T.; Mukta, K. N.

    2018-04-01

    Neural field theory is used to predict and analyze the phenomenon of perceptual echo in which random input stimuli at one location are correlated with electroencephalographic responses at other locations. It is shown that this echo correlation (EC) yields an estimate of the transfer function from the stimulated point to other locations. Modal analysis then explains the observed spatiotemporal structure of visually driven EC and the dominance of the alpha frequency; two eigenmodes of similar amplitude dominate the response, leading to temporal beating and a line of low correlation that runs from the crown of the head toward the ears. These effects result from mode splitting and symmetry breaking caused by interhemispheric coupling and cortical folding. It is shown how eigenmodes obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments can be combined with temporal dynamics from EC or other evoked responses to estimate the spatiotemporal transfer function between any two points and hence their effective connectivity.

  17. The EChO science case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Drossart, Pierre; Eccleston, Paul; Hartogh, Paul; Isaak, Kate; Linder, Martin; Lovis, Christophe; Micela, Giusi; Ollivier, Marc; Puig, Ludovic; Ribas, Ignasi; Snellen, Ignas; Swinyard, Bruce; Allard, France; Barstow, Joanna; Cho, James; Coustenis, Athena; Cockell, Charles; Correia, Alexandre; Decin, Leen; de Kok, Remco; Deroo, Pieter; Encrenaz, Therese; Forget, Francois; Glasse, Alistair; Griffith, Caitlin; Guillot, Tristan; Koskinen, Tommi; Lammer, Helmut; Leconte, Jeremy; Maxted, Pierre; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo; Nelson, Richard; North, Chris; Pallé, Enric; Pagano, Isabella; Piccioni, Guseppe; Pinfield, David; Selsis, Franck; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Stixrude, Lars; Tennyson, Jonathan; Turrini, Diego; Zapatero-Osorio, Mariarosa; Beaulieu, Jean-Philippe; Grodent, Denis; Guedel, Manuel; Luz, David; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Ray, Tom; Rickman, Hans; Selig, Avri; Swain, Mark; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Barlow, Mike; Bowles, Neil; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; du Foresto, Vincent Coudé; Gerard, Jean-Claude; Gizon, Laurent; Hornstrup, Allan; Jarchow, Christopher; Kerschbaum, Franz; Kovacs, Géza; Lagage, Pierre-Olivier; Lim, Tanya; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Pace, Emanuele; Pascale, Enzo; Vandenbussche, Bart; Wright, Gillian; Ramos Zapata, Gonzalo; Adriani, Alberto; Azzollini, Ruymán; Balado, Ana; Bryson, Ian; Burston, Raymond; Colomé, Josep; Crook, Martin; Di Giorgio, Anna; Griffin, Matt; Hoogeveen, Ruud; Ottensamer, Roland; Irshad, Ranah; Middleton, Kevin; Morgante, Gianluca; Pinsard, Frederic; Rataj, Mirek; Reess, Jean-Michel; Savini, Giorgio; Schrader, Jan-Rutger; Stamper, Richard; Winter, Berend; Abe, L.; Abreu, M.; Achilleos, N.; Ade, P.; Adybekian, V.; Affer, L.; Agnor, C.; Agundez, M.; Alard, C.; Alcala, J.; Allende Prieto, C.; Alonso Floriano, F. J.; Altieri, F.; Alvarez Iglesias, C. A.; Amado, P.; Andersen, A.; Aylward, A.; Baffa, C.; Bakos, G.; Ballerini, P.; Banaszkiewicz, M.; Barber, R. J.; Barrado, D.; Barton, E. J.; Batista, V.; Bellucci, G.; Belmonte Avilés, J. A.; Berry, D.; Bézard, B.; Biondi, D.; Błęcka, M.; Boisse, I.; Bonfond, B.; Bordé, P.; Börner, P.; Bouy, H.; Brown, L.; Buchhave, L.; Budaj, J.; Bulgarelli, A.; Burleigh, M.; Cabral, A.; Capria, M. T.; Cassan, A.; Cavarroc, C.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Cerulli, R.; Chadney, J.; Chamberlain, S.; Charnoz, S.; Christian Jessen, N.; Ciaravella, A.; Claret, A.; Claudi, R.; Coates, A.; Cole, R.; Collura, A.; Cordier, D.; Covino, E.; Danielski, C.; Damasso, M.; Deeg, H. J.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Del Vecchio, C.; Demangeon, O.; De Sio, A.; De Wit, J.; Dobrijévic, M.; Doel, P.; Dominic, C.; Dorfi, E.; Eales, S.; Eiroa, C.; Espinoza Contreras, M.; Esposito, M.; Eymet, V.; Fabrizio, N.; Fernández, M.; Femenía Castella, B.; Figueira, P.; Filacchione, G.; Fletcher, L.; Focardi, M.; Fossey, S.; Fouqué, P.; Frith, J.; Galand, M.; Gambicorti, L.; Gaulme, P.; García López, R. J.; Garcia-Piquer, A.; Gear, W.; Gerard, J.-C.; Gesa, L.; Giani, E.; Gianotti, F.; Gillon, M.; Giro, E.; Giuranna, M.; Gomez, H.; Gomez-Leal, I.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J.; González Merino, B.; Graczyk, R.; Grassi, D.; Guardia, J.; Guio, P.; Gustin, J.; Hargrave, P.; Haigh, J.; Hébrard, E.; Heiter, U.; Heredero, R. L.; Herrero, E.; Hersant, F.; Heyrovsky, D.; Hollis, M.; Hubert, B.; Hueso, R.; Israelian, G.; Iro, N.; Irwin, P.; Jacquemoud, S.; Jones, G.; Jones, H.; Justtanont, K.; Kehoe, T.; Kerschbaum, F.; Kerins, E.; Kervella, P.; Kipping, D.; Koskinen, T.; Krupp, N.; Lahav, O.; Laken, B.; Lanza, N.; Lellouch, E.; Leto, G.; Licandro Goldaracena, J.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.; Liu, S. J.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lodieu, N.; Lognonné, P.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Lundgaard Rasmussen, I.; Luntzer, A.; Machado, P.; MacTavish, C.; Maggio, A.; Maillard, J.-P.; Magnes, W.; Maldonado, J.; Mall, U.; Marquette, J.-B.; Mauskopf, P.; Massi, F.; Maurin, A.-S.; Medvedev, A.; Michaut, C.; Miles-Paez, P.; Montalto, M.; Montañés Rodríguez, P.; Monteiro, M.; Montes, D.; Morais, H.; Morales, J. C.; Morales-Calderón, M.; Morello, G.; Moro Martín, A.; Moses, J.; Moya Bedon, A.; Murgas Alcaino, F.; Oliva, E.; Orton, G.; Palla, F.; Pancrazzi, M.; Pantin, E.; Parmentier, V.; Parviainen, H.; Peña Ramírez, K. Y.; Peralta, J.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Petrov, R.; Pezzuto, S.; Pietrzak, R.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.; Piskunov, N.; Prinja, R.; Prisinzano, L.; Polichtchouk, I.; Poretti, E.; Radioti, A.; Ramos, A. A.; Rank-Lüftinger, T.; Read, P.; Readorn, K.; Rebolo López, R.; Rebordão, J.; Rengel, M.; Rezac, L.; Rocchetto, M.; Rodler, F.; Sánchez Béjar, V. J.; Sanchez Lavega, A.; Sanromá, E.; Santos, N.; Sanz Forcada, J.; Scandariato, G.; Schmider, F.-X.; Scholz, A.; Scuderi, S.; Sethenadh, J.; Shore, S.; Showman, A.; Sicardy, B.; Sitek, P.; Smith, A.; Soret, L.; Sousa, S.; Stiepen, A.; Stolarski, M.; Strazzulla, G.; Tabernero, H. M.; Tanga, P.; Tecsa, M.; Temple, J.; Terenzi, L.; Tessenyi, M.; Testi, L.; Thompson, S.; Thrastarson, H.; Tingley, B. W.; Trifoglio, M.; Martín Torres, J.; Tozzi, A.; Turrini, D.; Varley, R.; Vakili, F.; de Val-Borro, M.; Valdivieso, M. L.; Venot, O.; Villaver, E.; Vinatier, S.; Viti, S.; Waldmann, I.; Waltham, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Waters, R.; Watkins, C.; Watson, D.; Wawer, P.; Wawrzaszk, A.; White, G.; Widemann, T.; Winek, W.; Wiśniowski, T.; Yelle, R.; Yung, Y.; Yurchenko, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of almost two thousand exoplanets has revealed an unexpectedly diverse planet population. We see gas giants in few-day orbits, whole multi-planet systems within the orbit of Mercury, and new populations of planets with masses between that of the Earth and Neptune—all unknown in the Solar System. Observations to date have shown that our Solar System is certainly not representative of the general population of planets in our Milky Way. The key science questions that urgently need addressing are therefore: What are exoplanets made of? Why are planets as they are? How do planetary systems work and what causes the exceptional diversity observed as compared to the Solar System? The EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory) space mission was conceived to take up the challenge to explain this diversity in terms of formation, evolution, internal structure and planet and atmospheric composition. This requires in-depth spectroscopic knowledge of the atmospheres of a large and well-defined planet sample for which precise physical, chemical and dynamical information can be obtained. In order to fulfil this ambitious scientific program, EChO was designed as a dedicated survey mission for transit and eclipse spectroscopy capable of observing a large, diverse and well-defined planet sample within its 4-year mission lifetime. The transit and eclipse spectroscopy method, whereby the signal from the star and planet are differentiated using knowledge of the planetary ephemerides, allows us to measure atmospheric signals from the planet at levels of at least 10-4 relative to the star. This can only be achieved in conjunction with a carefully designed stable payload and satellite platform. It is also necessary to provide broad instantaneous wavelength coverage to detect as many molecular species as possible, to probe the thermal structure of the planetary atmospheres and to correct for the contaminating effects of the stellar photosphere. This requires wavelength

  18. Longitudinal space charge assisted echo seeding of a free-electron laser with laser-spoiler noise suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Hacker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Seed lasers are employed to improve the temporal coherence of free-electron laser (FEL light. However, when these seed pulses are short relative to the particle bunch, the noisy, temporally incoherent radiation from the unseeded electrons can overwhelm the coherent, seeded radiation. In this paper, a technique to seed a particle bunch with an external laser is presented in which a new mechanism to improve the contrast between coherent and incoherent free electron laser radiation is employed together with a novel, simplified echo-seeding method. The concept relies on a combination of longitudinal space charge wakes and an echo-seeding technique to make a short, coherent pulse of FEL light together with noise background suppression. Several different simulation codes are used to illustrate the concept with conditions at the soft x-ray free-electron laser in Hamburg, FLASH.

  19. Frequency shifts in stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinth, W.; Kaiser, W.

    1980-01-01

    The nonresonant contributions to the nonlinear susceptibility chisup(()3) produce a frequency chirp during stimulated Raman scattering. In the case of transient stimulated Raman scattering, the spectrum of the generated Stokes pulse is found at higher frequencies than expected from spontaneous Raman data. The frequency difference can be calculated from the theory of stimulated Raman scattering. (orig.)

  20. Analysis of Partial Volume Effects on Arterial Input Functions Using Gradient Echo: A Simulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølby, Birgitte Fuglsang; Mikkelsen, Irene Klærke; Pedersen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    of an AIF voxel including the relaxation properties of blood and tissue. Artery orientations parallel and perpendicular to the main magnetic field were investigated and AIF voxels were modeled to either include or be situated close to a large artery. The impact of partial volume effects on quantitative...... perfusion metrics was investigated for the gradient echo pulse sequence at 1.5 T and 3.0 T. It is shown that the tissue contribution broadens and introduces fluctuations in the AIF. Furthermore, partial volume effects bias perfusion metrics in a nonlinear fashion, compromising quantitative perfusion...

  1. Memory and convulsive stimulation: effects of stimulus waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanis, C W; Squire, L R

    1981-09-01

    Electrical stimulation with brief pulses can produce a seizure requiring less energy than conventional sine-wave stimulation, and it has been suggested that brief-pulse stimulation might reduce the memory loss associated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The authors evaluated the effects of electroconvulsive shock (ECS) on memory in mice by using various waveforms, current intensities, training-ECS intervals, pulse widths, and stimulus durations. When equated for ability to produce seizures, low-energy, brief-pulse stimulation caused as much amnesia as sine-wave stimulation and sometimes more. In the absence of comparisons of the amnesic effects of brief-pulse and sine-wave stimulation in humans, the use of brief pulses for administering ECT is unwarranted.

  2. Wavelet Analysis of Ultrasonic Echo Waveform and Application to Nondestructive Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ik Keun; Park, Un Su; Ahn, Hyung Keun; Kwun, Sook In; Byeon, Jai Won

    2000-01-01

    Recently, advanced signal analysis which is called 'time-frequency analysis' has been used widely in nondestructive evaluation applications. Wavelet transform(WT) and Wigner Distribution are the most advanced techniques for processing signals with time-varying spectra. Wavelet analysis method is an attractive technique for evaluation of material characterization nondestructively. Wavelet transform is applied to the time-frequency analysis of ultrasonic echo waveform obtained by an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. In this study, the feasibility of noise suppression of ultrasonic flaw signal and frequency-dependent ultrasonic group velocity and attenuation coefficient using wavelet analysis of ultrasonic echo waveform have been verified experimentally. The Gabor function is adopted the analyzing wavelet. The wavelet analysis shows that the variations of ultrasonic group velocity and attenuation coefficient due to the change of material characterization can be evaluated at each frequency. Furthermore, to assure the enhancement of detectability and new sizing performance, both computer simulated results and experimental measurements using wavelet signal processing are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the noise suppression of ultrasonic flaw signal obtained from austenitic stainless steel weld including EDM notch

  3. [Echo-tracking technology for evaluating femoral artery endothelial function in patients with Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Jingyuan; Zhao, Qiaoling; Yang, Jinru

    2012-10-01

    To assess the value of echo-tracking technology in evaluating endothelial function of the femoral artery in patients with Grave's disease. Thirty-four patients with Grave's disease patients and 30 normal adults as controls were recruited in this study. The intima-media thickness (IMT), arterial stiffness (β), pressure strain elastic modulus (Ep), arterial compliance (AC), pulse wave conducting velocity (PWVβ) and augmentation index (AI) parameters were examined using echo-tracking technology for evaluating the right femoral arterial elasticity. Compared with the control subjects, the patients with Grave's disease showed significantly increased β, Ep, and PWVβ and significantly decreased AC (P0.05). In patients with Grave's disease, β and Ep were positively correlated with FT3, FT4, TT3, TT4, and PWVβ was positively correlated with FT3 and FT4. Echo-tracking technology can provide more accurate quantitative evidences for early diagnosis of femoral artery endothelial dysfunction in patients with Grave's disease, but the influence of procedural factors on the measurement accuracy should be considered in the evaluation.

  4. Diagnosis of partial and complete rotator cuff tears using combined gradient echo and spin echo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuite, M.J.; Yandow, D.R.; DeSmet, A.A.; Orwin, J.F.; Quintana, F.A.

    1994-01-01

    Most magnetic resonance (MR) studies evaluating the rotator cuff for tears have used T2-weighted imaging in the coronal oblique and sagittal oblique planes. T2 * -weighted gradient echo imaging, however, has advantages over spin echo imaging, including contiguous slices without cross-talk, high contrast around the cuff, and intrinsically shorter imaging times which can be used to increase the number of signals averaged and thus improve the signal-to-noise ratio. We reviewed the shoulder MR scans of 87 consecutive patients who underwent both a MR scan and a shoulder arthroscopy during which the size of tears, if present, was graded. The reviewers were blinded as to the history and arthroscopic results. The MR scans included oblique coronal T2 * -weighted gradient echo and oblique sagittal T2-weighted spin echo images. MR cuff grades were correlated with arthroscopic findings. For complete tears, the sensitivity of MR was 0.91 and the specificity 0.95. For partial tears, the sensitivity was 0.74 and the specificity 0.87. This accuracy is similar to two-plane T2-weighted imaging as previously reported in the literature. There was a statistically significant correlation (p < 0.0005) between the cuff grade as determined by MR and the arthroscopic findings. (orig.)

  5. Diagnosis of partial and complete rotator cuff tears using combined gradient echo and spin echo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuite, M J [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yandow, D R [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); DeSmet, A A [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Orwin, J F [Div. of Orthopedic Surgery, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Quintana, F A [Dept. of Biostatistics, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Most magnetic resonance (MR) studies evaluating the rotator cuff for tears have used T2-weighted imaging in the coronal oblique and sagittal oblique planes. T2{sup *}-weighted gradient echo imaging, however, has advantages over spin echo imaging, including contiguous slices without cross-talk, high contrast around the cuff, and intrinsically shorter imaging times which can be used to increase the number of signals averaged and thus improve the signal-to-noise ratio. We reviewed the shoulder MR scans of 87 consecutive patients who underwent both a MR scan and a shoulder arthroscopy during which the size of tears, if present, was graded. The reviewers were blinded as to the history and arthroscopic results. The MR scans included oblique coronal T2{sup *}-weighted gradient echo and oblique sagittal T2-weighted spin echo images. MR cuff grades were correlated with arthroscopic findings. For complete tears, the sensitivity of MR was 0.91 and the specificity 0.95. For partial tears, the sensitivity was 0.74 and the specificity 0.87. This accuracy is similar to two-plane T2-weighted imaging as previously reported in the literature. There was a statistically significant correlation (p < 0.0005) between the cuff grade as determined by MR and the arthroscopic findings. (orig.)

  6. X-ray echoes from gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermer, C.D.; Hurley, K.C.; Hartmann, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    The identification of an echo of reflected radiation in time histories of gamma-ray burst spectra can provide important information about the existence of binary companions or accretion disks in gamma-ray burst systems. Because of the nature of Compton scattering, the spectrum of the echo will be attenuated at gamma-ray energies compared with the spectrum of the primary burst emission. The expected temporal and spectral signatures of the echo and a search for such echoes are described, and implications for gamma-ray burst models are discussed. 35 refs

  7. Functional MR imaging at 1.5 T. Initial results using photic and motoric stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Larsson, H B; Ring, P

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the effects of stimulation of the visual and the motor cortex was made on a conventional 1.5 T MR imaging scanner. Both types of activation gave a detectable change in the signal between rest and stimulation using a gradient echo sequence with an echo time of 60 ms....... The observed effects were assumed to be caused by variation in the amount of paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin between stimulation and rest due to local increase of capillary blood flow in the human brain during stimulation....

  8. Functional MR imaging at 1.5 T. Initial results using photic and motoric stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Larsson, H B; Ring, P

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the effects of stimulation of the visual and the motor cortex was made on a conventional 1.5 T MR imaging scanner. Both types of activation gave a detectable change in the signal between rest and stimulation using a gradient echo sequence with an echo time of 60 ms........ The observed effects were assumed to be caused by variation in the amount of paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin between stimulation and rest due to local increase of capillary blood flow in the human brain during stimulation....

  9. Triple echo steady-state (TESS) relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heule, Rahel; Ganter, Carl; Bieri, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Rapid imaging techniques have attracted increased interest for relaxometry, but none are perfect: they are prone to static (B0 ) and transmit (B1 ) field heterogeneities, and commonly biased by T2 /T1 . The purpose of this study is the development of a rapid T1 and T2 relaxometry method that is completely (T2 ) or partly (T1 ) bias-free. A new method is introduced to simultaneously quantify T1 and T2 within one single scan based on a triple echo steady-state (TESS) approach in combination with an iterative golden section search. TESS relaxometry is optimized and evaluated from simulations, in vitro studies, and in vivo experiments. It is found that relaxometry with TESS is not biased by T2 /T1 , insensitive to B0 heterogeneities, and, surprisingly, that TESS-T2 is not affected by B1 field errors. Consequently, excellent correspondence between TESS and reference spin echo data is observed for T2 in vitro at 1.5 T and in vivo at 3 T. TESS offers rapid T1 and T2 quantification within one single scan, and in particular B1 -insensitive T2 estimation. As a result, the new proposed method is of high interest for fast and reliable high-resolution T2 mapping, especially of the musculoskeletal system at high to ultra-high fields. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Neutron spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pynn, R.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Fritzsche, H.; Gierlings, M.; Major, J.; Jason, A.

    2005-01-01

    We describe experiments in which the neutron spin echo technique is used to measure neutron scattering angles. We have implemented the technique, dubbed spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME), using thin films of Permalloy electrodeposited on silicon wafers as sources of the magnetic fields within which neutron spins precess. With 30-μm-thick films we resolve neutron scattering angles to about 0.02 deg. with neutrons of 4.66 A wavelength. This allows us to probe correlation lengths up to 200 nm in an application to small angle neutron scattering. We also demonstrate that SESAME can be used to separate specular and diffuse neutron reflection from surfaces at grazing incidence. In both of these cases, SESAME can make measurements at higher neutron intensity than is available with conventional methods because the angular resolution achieved is independent of the divergence of the neutron beam. Finally, we discuss the conditions under which SESAME might be used to probe in-plane structure in thin films and show that the method has advantages for incident neutron angles close to the critical angle because multiple scattering is automatically accounted for

  11. Detection of renal arteries with fast spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tello, R.; Mitchell, P.J.; Witte, D.J.; Thomson, K.R. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia). Department of Radiology

    1998-08-01

    With the increasing use of non-invasive imaging with MR and volumetric CT to evaluate renal arteries, the ability to accurately detect the number and state of native renal arteries becomes critical if conventional angiography is to be supplanted in these settings. The present study evaluated the utility of a fast spin-echo (FSE) T2-weighted sequence to detect the number and course of renal arteries and their ostia compared to conventional angiography. Ten patients underwent conventional catheter angiography either for renal artery stenosis evaluation or as potential renal donors. Each patient then had an MR study of the renal arteries and kidneys with FSE MR (TR = 4000 ms, TE = 102 ms, eight- echo train length, 5-mm-thick interleaved 128 phase encodes, superior and inferior saturation pulses, number of excitations (NEX) = 4, on a 1.5-T superconducting magnet). Images were reviewed by two `blinded` radiologists and renal arteries were counted and their ostia were evaluated. Results were compared with angiography and inter- and intra-observer statistics were calculated. All 10 patients underwent MR successfully, nine for renal artery stenosis (RAS) evaluation and one was a renal donor. A total of 24 renal arteries were imaged in 19 kidneys. Fast spin-echo MR is 95% accurate (95%CI: 88-100%) in detection of renal arteries, with no statistical difference between FSE MR and catheter angiography (McNemar P = 0.0). Inter- and intra-observer statistics demonstrate good-to-excellent agreement in renal artery detection (kappa: 0.63-0.90). In one case of RAS evaluation an incidental adrenal mass was detected as the aetiology of the patient`s hypertension. Fast spin-echo MR can be a useful adjunct as part of the imaging for renal arteries with MRI. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 16 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Detection of renal arteries with fast spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tello, R.; Mitchell, P.J.; Witte, D.J.; Thomson, K.R.

    1998-01-01

    With the increasing use of non-invasive imaging with MR and volumetric CT to evaluate renal arteries, the ability to accurately detect the number and state of native renal arteries becomes critical if conventional angiography is to be supplanted in these settings. The present study evaluated the utility of a fast spin-echo (FSE) T2-weighted sequence to detect the number and course of renal arteries and their ostia compared to conventional angiography. Ten patients underwent conventional catheter angiography either for renal artery stenosis evaluation or as potential renal donors. Each patient then had an MR study of the renal arteries and kidneys with FSE MR (TR = 4000 ms, TE = 102 ms, eight- echo train length, 5-mm-thick interleaved 128 phase encodes, superior and inferior saturation pulses, number of excitations (NEX) = 4, on a 1.5-T superconducting magnet. Images were reviewed by two 'blinded' radiologists and renal arteries were counted and their ostia were evaluated. Results were compared with angiography and inter- and intra-observer statistics were calculated. All 10 patients underwent MR successfully, nine for renal artery stenosis (RAS) evaluation and one was a renal donor. A total of 24 renal arteries were imaged in 19 kidneys. Fast spin-echo MR is 95% accurate (95%CI: 88-100%) in detection of renal arteries, with no statistical difference between FSE MR and catheter angiography (McNemar P = 0.0). Inter- and intra-observer statistics demonstrate good-to-excellent agreement in renal artery detection (kappa: 0.63-0.90). In one case of RAS evaluation an incidental adrenal mass was detected as the aetiology of the patient's hypertension. Fast spin-echo MR can be a useful adjunct as part of the imaging for renal arteries with MRI. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  13. The Direct Detection and Characterization of M-dwarf Planets Using Light Echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, William B.; White, Richard L.; Lupu, Roxana E.; Ford, Holland C.

    2018-02-01

    Exoplanets orbiting M-dwarf stars are a prime target in the search for life in the universe. M-dwarf stars are active, with powerful flares that could adversely impact prospects for life, though there are counter-arguments. Here, we turn flaring to advantage and describe ways in which it can be used to enhance the detectability of planets, in the absence of transits or a coronagraph, significantly expanding the accessible discovery and characterization space. Flares produce brief bursts of intense luminosity, after which the star dims. Due to the light travel time between the star and planet, the planet receives the high-intensity pulse, which it re-emits through scattering (a light echo) or intrinsic emission when the star is much fainter, thereby increasing the planet’s detectability. The planet’s light-echo emission can potentially be discriminated from that of the host star by means of a time delay, Doppler shift, spatial shift, and polarization, each of which can improve the contrast of the planet to the star. Scattered light can reveal the albedo spectrum of the planet to within a size scale factor, and is likely to be polarized. Intrinsic emission mechanisms include fluorescent pumping of multiple molecular hydrogen and neutral oxygen lines by intense Lyα and Lyβ flare emission, recombination radiation of ionized and photodissociated species, and atmospheric processes such as terrestrial upper atmosphere airglow and near-infrared hydroxyl emission. We discuss the feasibility of detecting light echoes and find that light echo detection is possible under favorable circumstances.

  14. Temporal compression of quantum-information-carrying photons using a photon-echo quantum memory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseev, S. A.; Tittel, W.

    2010-01-01

    We study quantum compression and decompression of light pulses that carry quantum information using a photon-echo quantum memory technique with controllable inhomogeneous broadening of an isolated atomic absorption line. We investigate media with differently broadened absorption profiles, transverse and longitudinal, finding that the recall efficiency can be as large as unity and that the quantum information encoded into the photonic qubits can remain unperturbed. Our results provide insight into reversible light-atom interaction and are interesting in view of future quantum communication networks, where pulse compression and decompression may play an important role in increasing the qubit rate or in mapping quantum information from photonic carriers with large optical bandwidth into atomic memories with smaller bandwidth.

  15. ENDOR with band-selective shaped inversion pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Claudia E.; Stoll, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Electron Nuclear DOuble Resonance (ENDOR) is based on the measurement of nuclear transition frequencies through detection of changes in the polarization of electron transitions. In Davies ENDOR, the initial polarization is generated by a selective microwave inversion pulse. The rectangular inversion pulses typically used are characterized by a relatively low selectivity, with full inversion achieved only for a limited number of spin packets with small resonance offsets. With the introduction of pulse shaping to EPR, the rectangular inversion pulses can be replaced with shaped pulses with increased selectivity. Band-selective inversion pulses are characterized by almost rectangular inversion profiles, leading to full inversion for spin packets with resonance offsets within the pulse excitation bandwidth and leaving spin packets outside the excitation bandwidth largely unaffected. Here, we explore the consequences of using different band-selective amplitude-modulated pulses designed for NMR as the inversion pulse in ENDOR. We find an increased sensitivity for small hyperfine couplings compared to rectangular pulses of the same bandwidth. In echo-detected Davies-type ENDOR, finite Fourier series inversion pulses combine the advantages of increased absolute ENDOR sensitivity of short rectangular inversion pulses and increased sensitivity for small hyperfine couplings of long rectangular inversion pulses. The use of pulses with an almost rectangular frequency-domain profile also allows for increased control of the hyperfine contrast selectivity. At X-band, acquisition of echo transients as a function of radiofrequency and appropriate selection of integration windows during data processing allows efficient separation of contributions from weakly and strongly coupled nuclei in overlapping ENDOR spectra within a single experiment.

  16. Electrical stimulation in dysphagia treatment: a justified controversy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaardt, H. C. A.

    2008-01-01

    Electrical stimulation in dysphagia treatment: a justified controversy? Neuromuscular electrostimulation (LAMES) is a method for stimulating muscles with short electrical pulses. Neuromuscular electrostimulation is frequently used in physiotherapy to strengthen healthy muscles (as in sports

  17. In Vitro Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Fragmented, Open-Coil, Percutaneous Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellock, Frank G; Zare, Armaan; Ilfeld, Brian M; Chae, John; Strother, Robert B

    2018-04-01

    Percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) is an FDA-cleared pain treatment. Occasionally, fragments of the lead (MicroLead, SPR Therapeutics, LLC, Cleveland, OH, USA) may be retained following lead removal. Since the lead is metallic, there are associated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) risks. Therefore, the objective of this investigation was to evaluate MRI-related issues (i.e., magnetic field interactions, heating, and artifacts) for various lead fragments. Testing was conducted using standardized techniques on lead fragments of different lengths (i.e., 50, 75, and 100% of maximum possible fragment length of 12.7 cm) to determine MRI-related problems. Magnetic field interactions (i.e., translational attraction and torque) and artifacts were tested for the longest lead fragment at 3 Tesla. MRI-related heating was evaluated at 1.5 Tesla/64 MHz and 3 Tesla/128 MHz with each lead fragment placed in a gelled-saline filled phantom. Temperatures were recorded on the lead fragments while using relatively high RF power levels. Artifacts were evaluated using T1-weighted, spin echo, and gradient echo (GRE) pulse sequences. The longest lead fragment produced only minor magnetic field interactions. For the lead fragments evaluated, physiologically inconsequential MRI-related heating occurred at 1.5 Tesla/64 MHz while under certain 3 Tesla/128 MHz conditions, excessive temperature elevations may occur. Artifacts extended approximately 7 mm from the lead fragment on the GRE pulse sequence, suggesting that anatomy located at a position greater than this distance may be visualized on MRI. MRI may be performed safely in patients with retained lead fragments at 1.5 Tesla using the specific conditions of this study (i.e., MR Conditional). Due to possible excessive temperature rises at 3 Tesla, performing MRI at that field strength is currently inadvisable. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  18. Three-dimensional T1 and T2* mapping of human lung parenchyma using interleaved saturation recovery with dual echo ultrashort echo time imaging (ITSR-DUTE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Neville D; Malayeri, Ashkan A; Bluemke, David A

    2017-04-01

    To develop and assess a new technique for three-dimensional (3D) full lung T1 and T2* mapping using a single free breathing scan during a clinically feasible time. A 3D stack of dual-echo ultrashort echo time (UTE) radial acquisition interleaved with and without a WET (water suppression enhanced through T1 effects) saturation pulse was used to map T1 and T2* simultaneously in a single scan. Correction for modulation due to multiple views per segment was derived. Bloch simulations were performed to study saturation pulse excitation profile on lung tissue. Optimization of the saturation delay time (for T1 mapping) and echo time (for T2* mapping) was performed. Monte Carlo simulation was done to predict accuracy and precision of the sequence with signal-to-noise ratio of in vivo images used in the simulation. A phantom study was carried out using the 3D interleaved saturation recovery with dual echo ultrashort echo time imaging (ITSR-DUTE) sequence and reference standard inversion recovery spin echo sequence (IR-SE) to compare accuracy of the sequence. Nine healthy volunteers were imaged and mean (SD) of T1 and T2* in lung parenchyma at 3T were estimated through manually assisted segmentation. 3D lung coverage with a resolution of 2.5 × 2.5 × 6 mm 3 was performed and nominal scan time was recorded for the scans. Repeatability was assessed in three of the volunteers. Regional differences in T1/T2* values were also assessed. The phantom study showed accuracy of T1 values to be within 2.3% of values obtained from IR-SE. Mean T1 value in lung parenchyma was 1002 ± 82 ms while T2* was 0.85 ± 0.1 ms. Scan time was ∼10 min for volunteer scans. Mean coefficient of variation (CV) across slices was 0.057 and 0.09, respectively. Regional variation along the gravitational direction and between right and left lung were not significant (P = 0.25 and P = 0.06, respectively) for T1. T2* showed significant variation (P = 0.03) along the

  19. Managing Clutter in a High Pulse Rate Echolocation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Isbell

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of echolocation for navigating in dense, cluttered environments is a challenge due to the need for rapid sampling of nearby objects in the face of delayed echoes from distant objects. In the wild, echolocating bats frequently encounter this situation when leaving the roost or while hunting. If long-delay echoes from a distant object are received after the next pulse is sent out, these “aliased” echoes appear as close-range phantom objects. Little is known about how bats cope with these situations. In this work, we demonstrate a novel strategy to manage aliasing in cases where a single target is actively being tracked at close range. This paper presents three reactive strategies for a high pulse-rate sonar system to combat aliased echoes: (1 changing the interpulse interval to move the aliased echoes away in time from the tracked target, (2 changing positions to create a geometry without aliasing, and (3 a phase-based, transmission beam-shaping strategy to illuminate the target and not the aliasing object.

  20. Ultrasound stimulation on bone healing. The optimization of stimulation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosim, R.C.; Paulin, J.B.P.; Goncalves, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    Previous works in ultrasonic simulation of bone healing dealt with parameters optimization. Albertin (1983) studied the stimulation time and found forty minutes as ideal. However, this stimulation time was the largest one employed and remained some doubt about the most appropriated value. 30, 40, 50 and 60 minutes of stimulation time were selected, while others parameters were held constant with: pulse width in 200 μs, repetition rate in 1000 pulses per second and amplitude in 30 V. Partial incomplete transverse osteotomies were done in the middle third of radio in the right forearm of rabbits. Twenty four animals divided in four subgroups, with 6 animals each were stimulated. The daily stimulation time for each subgroup was 30, 40, 50 and minutes respectively, during 15 consecutive days. The stimulation procedure started 24 hours after surgery. After the stimulation period, radiological, histological and morphometric evaluations were done and greater bone healing was found for the 50 minutes stimulation subgroup, in them new bone was also prominent. (author)

  1. Quantification of glutathione transverse relaxation time T2 using echo time extension with variable refocusing selectivity and symmetry in the human brain at 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanberg, Kelley M.; Prinsen, Hetty; Coman, Daniel; de Graaf, Robin A.; Juchem, Christoph

    2018-05-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is an endogenous antioxidant implicated in numerous biological processes, including those associated with multiple sclerosis, aging, and cancer. Spectral editing techniques have greatly facilitated the acquisition of glutathione signal in living humans via proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, but signal quantification at 7 Tesla is still hampered by uncertainty about the glutathione transverse decay rate T2 relative to those of commonly employed quantitative references like N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), total creatine, or water. While the T2 of uncoupled singlets can be derived in a straightforward manner from exponential signal decay as a function of echo time, similar estimation of signal decay in GSH is complicated by a spin system that involves both weak and strong J-couplings as well as resonances that overlap those of several other metabolites and macromolecules. Here, we extend a previously published method for quantifying the T2 of GABA, a weakly coupled system, to quantify T2 of the strongly coupled spin system glutathione in the human brain at 7 Tesla. Using full density matrix simulation of glutathione signal behavior, we selected an array of eight optimized echo times between 72 and 322 ms for glutathione signal acquisition by J-difference editing (JDE). We varied the selectivity and symmetry parameters of the inversion pulses used for echo time extension to further optimize the intensity, simplicity, and distinctiveness of glutathione signals at chosen echo times. Pairs of selective adiabatic inversion pulses replaced nonselective pulses at three extended echo times, and symmetry of the time intervals between the two extension pulses was adjusted at one extended echo time to compensate for J-modulation, thereby resulting in appreciable signal-to-noise ratio and quantifiable signal shapes at all measured points. Glutathione signal across all echo times fit smooth monoexponential curves over ten scans of occipital cortex voxels in nine

  2. Theory and optical design of x-ray echo spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2017-08-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a space-domain counterpart of neutron spin echo, is a recently proposed inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) technique. X-ray echo spectroscopy relies on imaging IXS spectra and does not require x-ray monochromatization. Due to this, the echo-type IXS spectrometers are broadband, and thus have a potential to simultaneously provide dramatically increased signal strength, reduced measurement times, and higher resolution compared to the traditional narrow-band scanning-type IXS spectrometers. The theory of x-ray echo spectrometers presented earlier [Yu. Shvyd'ko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 080801 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.080801] is developed here further with a focus on questions of practical importance, which could facilitate optical design and assessment of the feasibility and performance of the echo spectrometers. Among others, the following questions are addressed: spectral resolution, refocusing condition, echo spectrometer tolerances, refocusing condition adjustment, effective beam size on the sample, spectral window of imaging and scanning range, impact of the secondary source size on the spectral resolution, angular dispersive optics, focusing and collimating optics, and detector's spatial resolution. Examples of optical designs and characteristics of echo spectrometers with 1-meV and 0.1-meV resolutions are presented.

  3. Echo Shaping Using Sums of Damped Complex Sinusoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putnam, Lance Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Feedback delay lines are the basis of myriad audio effects and reverberation schemes. The feedback delay line, by itself, is limited to producing an infinite sequence of exponentially decaying echoes. We introduce a new type of linear time-invariant echo effect whose impulse response is a general...

  4. ECHO Data Partners Join Forces to Federate Access to Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, J.; Macie, M.

    2003-12-01

    During the past year the NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) project has been collaborating with various Earth science data and client providers to design and implement the EOS Clearinghouse (ECHO). ECHO is an open, interoperable metadata clearinghouse and order broker system. ECHO functions as a repository of information intended to streamline access to digital data and services provided by NASA's Earth Science Enterprise and the extended Earth science community. In a unique partnership, ECHO data providers are working to extend their services in the digital era, to reflect current trends in scientific and educational communications. The multi-organization, inter-disciplinary content of ECHO provides a valuable new service to a growing number of Earth science applications and interdisciplinary research efforts. As such, ECHO is expected to attract a wide audience. In this poster, we highlight the contributions of current ECHO data partners and provide information for prospective data partners on how the project supports the incorporation of new collections and effective long-term asset management that is directly under the control of the organizations who contribute resources to ECHO.

  5. Myocardial viability: comparison of free-breathing navigator-echo-gated three-dimensional inversion-recovery gradient-echo MR and standard multiple breath-hold two-dimensional inversion-recovery gradient-echo MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Seo, Joon Beom; Do, Kyung Hyun; Yang, Dong Hyun; Lee, Soo Hyun; Ko, Sung Min; Heo, Jeong Nam; Lim, Tae Hwan

    2004-01-01

    To compare a free-breathing, navigator-echo-gated, three-dimensional, inversion-recovery, gradient-echo, MR pulse sequence (3D-MRI) with standard, multiple breath-hold, two-dimensional, inversion-recovery, gradient-echo MR (2D-MRI) for the evaluation of delayed hyperenhancement of nonviable myocardium in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease. Ten patients with chronic ischemic heart disease were enrolled in this study. MRI was performed on a 1.5-T system. 3D-MRI was obtained in the short axis plane at 10 minutes after the administration of Gd-DTPA (0.2 mmol/kg, 4 cc/sec). Prospective gating of the acquisition based on the navigator echo was applied. 2D-MRI was performed immediately after finishing 3D-MRI. The area of total and hyperenhanced myocardium measured on both image sets was compared with paired Student t-test and Bland-Altman method. By using a 60-segment model, the transmural extent and segment width of the hyperenhanced area were recorded by 3-scale grading method. The agreement between the two sequences was evaluated with kappa statistics. We also evaluated the agreement of hyperenhancement among the three portions (apical, middle and basal portion) of the left ventricle with kappa statistics. The two sequences showed good agreement for the measured area of total and hyperenhanced myocardium on paired t-test (ρ = 0.11 and ρ = 0.34, respectively). No systematic bias was shown on Bland-Altman analysis. Good agreement was found for the segmental width (Κ = 0.674) and transmural extent (Κ = 0.615) of hyperenhancement on the segmented analysis. However, the agreement of the transmural extent of hyperenhancement in the apical segments was relatively poor compared with that in the middle or basal portions. This study showed good agreement between 3D-MRI and 2D-MRI in evaluation of non-viable myocardium. Therefore, 3D-MRI may be useful in the assessment of myocardial viability in patients with dyspnea and children because it allows free

  6. Seismic echo character northern Hatteras Abyssal Plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCreery, C.J.; Laine, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    Latest efforts in echo-character mapping of the northern Hatteras Abyssal Plain have discerned variations in thickness in a near-surface sedimentary sequence which has been designated seismic unit A. This unit probably represents the last episode of progradation of the Hatteras Deep Sea Fan in the southern part of the study area, and has infilled probable paleochannels from the Wilmington Canyon and Sohm Gap in the north. Unit A thins to a minimum in the central part of the plain, where older sediments come within 1 meter of the surface. Variations in the character of the surface reflector probably represent differing degrees of microtopography developed on a Late Pleistocene surface overlain by Holocene sediments. With the exception of one area identified as a relict surface outcropping in the western plain, this microtopography seems related to present-day thalweg locations on the abyssal plain. 11 references, 13 figures

  7. Challenges in neutron spin echo spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappas, C., E-mail: c.pappas@tudelft.n [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for Materials and Energy, Glienicker Str. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Lelievre-Berna, E.; Falus, P.; Farago, B. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Bentley, P. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for Materials and Energy, Glienicker Str. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Moskvin, E. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for Materials and Energy, Glienicker Str. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); PNPI, 188300 Gatchina, Leningrad District (Russian Federation); Krist, Th. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for Materials and Energy, Glienicker Str. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Grigoriev, S. [PNPI, 188300 Gatchina, Leningrad District (Russian Federation)

    2009-09-01

    With the new brilliant neutron sources and the developments of novel optical elements, neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy evolves to tackle new problems and scientific fields. The new developments pave the way to complex experimental set-ups such as the intensity modulated variant of NSE (IMNSE), a powerful technique which was introduced some 20 years ago but found limited use up to now. With the new compact supermirror or He{sup 3} polarizers IMNSE becomes attractive for a broad range of applications in magnetism, soft matter and biology. A novel development along this line is the polarimetric NSE technique, which combines IMNSE and the zero-field polarimeter Cryopad to access components of the scattered polarization that are transverse to the incoming polarization. Polarimetric NSE is the method of choice for studying chiral fluctuations, as illustrated by new results on the reference helimagnet MnSi.

  8. The basics of neutron spin echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farago, B.

    1999-01-01

    Until 1974 inelastic neutron scattering consisted of producing by some means a neutron beam of known speed and measuring the final speed of the neutrons after the scattering event. The smaller the energy change was, the better the neutron speed had to be defined. As the neutrons come form a reactor with an approximately Maxwell distribution, an infinitely good energy resolution can be achieved only at the expense of infinitely low count rate. This introduces a practical resolution limit around 0.1 μeV on back-scattering instruments. In 1972 F. Mezei discovered the method of Neutron Spin Echo. This method decouples the energy resolution from intensity loss. The basics of this method is presented. (author)

  9. Parallel electric fields detected via conjugate electron echoes during the Echo 7 sounding rocket flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemzek, R. J.; Winckler, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Electron detectors on the Echo 7 active sounding rocket experiment measured 'conjugate echoes' resulting from artificial electron beam injections. Analysis of the drift motion of the electrons after a complete bounce leads to measurements of the magnetospheric convection electric field mapped to ionospheric altitudes. The magnetospheric field was highly variable, changing by tens of mV/m on time scales of as little as hundreds of millisec. While the smallest-scale magnetospheric field irregularities were mapped out by ionospheric conductivity, larger-scale features were enhanced by up to 50 mV/m in the ionosphere. The mismatch between magnetospheric and ionspheric convection fields indicates a violation of the equipotential field line condition. The parallel fields occurred in regions roughly 10 km across and probably supported a total potential drop of 10-100 V.

  10. Anteroinferior tears of the glenoid labrum: fat-suppressed fast spin-echo T2 versus gradient-recalled echo MR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuite, M J [Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); De Smet, A A [Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Norris, M A [Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Orwin, J F [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53792 (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Objective. To compare fat-suppressed fast spin-echo (FSE) T2-weighted images with gradient-recalled echo (GRE) T2*-weighted images in the evaluation of anteroinferior labral tears. Design. MR images were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists masked to the history and arthroscopic findings. They separately interpreted the anteroinferior labrum as torn or intact, first on one pulse sequence and then, 4 weeks later, on the other sequence. The MR interpretations were correlated with the arthroscopic findings. Patients. Nine patients with anteroinferior labral tears, and nine similarly-aged patients with normal, labra were studied. Results and conclusions. Observer 1 had a sensitivity of 0.56 on the GRE images and 0.67 on the FSE images (P>0.5), with a specificity of 1.0 for both sequences. Observer 2 had a sensitivity of 0.78 and a specificity of 0.89 for both sequences. In this small study there is no significant difference between GRE and fat-suppressed FSE images in their ability to diagnose anteroinferior labral tears. When evaluating the labrum with conventional MRI, axial fat-suppressed FSE T2-weighted images can be used in place of GRE images without a loss of accuracy. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Recent Results for the ECHo Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, C.; Blaum, K.; Goodacre, T. Day; Dorrer, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Eliseev, S.; Enss, C.; Filianin, P.; Fäßler, A.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Goncharov, M.; Hengstler, D.; Jochum, J.; Johnston, K.; Keller, M.; Kempf, S.; Kieck, T.; Köster, U.; Krantz, M.; Marsh, B.; Mokry, C.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Ranitzsch, P. C. O.; Rothe, S.; Rischka, A.; Runke, J.; Saenz, A.; Schneider, F.; Scholl, S.; Schüssler, R. X.; Simkovic, F.; Stora, T.; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Türler, A.; Veinhard, M.; Wegner, M.; Wendt, K.; Zuber, K.

    2016-08-01

    The Electron Capture in ^{163}Ho experiment, ECHo, is designed to investigate the electron neutrino mass in the sub-eV range by means of the analysis of the calorimetrically measured spectrum following the electron capture (EC) in ^{163}Ho. Arrays of low-temperature metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), read-out by microwave SQUID multiplexing, will be used in this experiment. With a first MMC prototype having the ^{163}Ho source ion-implanted into the absorber, we performed the first high energy resolution measurement of the EC spectrum, which demonstrated the feasibility of such an experiment. In addition to the technological challenges for the development of MMC arrays, which preserve the single pixel performance in terms of energy resolution and bandwidth, the success of the experiment relies on the availability of large ultra-pure ^{163}Ho samples, on the precise description of the expected spectrum, and on the identification and reduction of background. We present preliminary results obtained with standard MMCs developed for soft X-ray spectroscopy, maXs-20, where the ^{163}Ho ion-implantation was performed using a high-purity ^{163}Ho source produced by advanced chemical and mass separation. With these measurements, we aim at determining an upper limit for the background level due to source contamination and provide a refined description of the calorimetrically measured spectrum. We discuss the plan for a medium scale experiment, ECHo-1k, in which about 1000 mathrm {Bq} of high-purity ^{163}Ho will be ion-implanted into detector arrays. With one year of measuring time, we will be able to achieve a sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass below 20 eV/c^2 (90 % C.L.), improving the present limit by more than one order of magnitude. This experiment will guide the necessary developments to reach the sub-eV sensitivity.

  12. Spring and Its Global Echo: Quantitative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Korotayev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the Arab Spring acted as a trigger for a global wave of socio-political destabilization, which signifi cantly exceeded the scale of the Arab Spring itself and affected absolutely all world-system zones. Only in 2011 the growth of the global number of largescale anti-government demonstrations, riots and political strikes was to a high degree (although not entirely due to their growth in the Arab world. In the ensuing years, the Arab countries rather made a negative contribution to a very noticeable further increase in the global number of large-scale anti-government demonstrations, riots and general strikes (the global intensity of all these three important types of socio-political destabilization continued to grow despite the decline in the Arab world. Thus, for all these three important indicators of sociopolitical destabilization, the scale of the global echo of the Arab Spring has overshadowed the scale of the Arab Spring itself. Only as regards the fourth considered indicator (major terrorist attacks / guerrilla warfare the scale of the global echo for the entire period considered did not overshadow the scale of the Arab Spring (and, incidentally, «Winter» - and in 2014-2015 Arab countries continued to make a disproportionate contribution to the historically record global values of this sad indicator – global number of major terrorist attacks/ guerilla warfare. To conclude, triggered by the Arab Spring, the global wave of socio-political destabilization led after 2010 to a very signifi cant growth of socio-political instability in absolutely all World System zones. However, this global destabilization wave manifested itself in different World System zones in different ways and not completely synchronously.

  13. Mock ECHO: A Simulation-Based Medical Education Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Rebecca C; Katzman, Joanna G; Comerci, George D; Shelley, Brian M; Duhigg, Daniel; Olivas, Cynthia; Arnold, Thomas; Kalishman, Summers; Monnette, Rebecca; Arora, Sanjeev

    2018-04-16

    This study was designed to develop a deeper understanding of the learning and social processes that take place during the simulation-based medical education for practicing providers as part of the Project ECHO® model, known as Mock ECHO training. The ECHO model is utilized to expand access to care of common and complex diseases by supporting the education of primary care providers with an interprofessional team of specialists via videoconferencing networks. Mock ECHO trainings are conducted through a train the trainer model targeted at leaders replicating the ECHO model at their organizations. Trainers conduct simulated teleECHO clinics while participants gain skills to improve communication and self-efficacy. Three focus groups, conducted between May 2015 and January 2016 with a total of 26 participants, were deductively analyzed to identify common themes related to simulation-based medical education and interdisciplinary education. Principal themes generated from the analysis included (a) the role of empathy in community development, (b) the value of training tools as guides for learning, (c) Mock ECHO design components to optimize learning, (d) the role of interdisciplinary education to build community and improve care delivery, (e) improving care integration through collaboration, and (f) development of soft skills to facilitate learning. Mock ECHO trainings offer clinicians the freedom to learn in a noncritical environment while emphasizing real-time multidirectional feedback and encouraging knowledge and skill transfer. The success of the ECHO model depends on training interprofessional healthcare providers in behaviors needed to lead a teleECHO clinic and to collaborate in the educational process. While building a community of practice, Mock ECHO provides a safe opportunity for a diverse group of clinician experts to practice learned skills and receive feedback from coparticipants and facilitators.

  14. Ultrafast bold fMRI using single-shot spin-echo echo planar imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boujraf Said

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The choice of imaging parameters for functional MRI can have an impact on the accuracy of functional localization by affecting the image quality and the degree of blood oxygenation-dependent (BOLD contrast achieved. By improving sampling efficiency, parallel acquisition techniques such as sensitivity encoding (SENSE have been used to shorten readout trains in single-shot (SS echo planar imaging (EPI. This has been applied to susceptibility artifact reduction and improving spatial resolution. SENSE together with single-shot spin-echo (SS-SE imaging may also reduce off-resonance artifacts. The goal of this work was to investigate the BOLD response of a SENSE-adapted SE-EPI on a three Tesla scanner. Whole-brain fMRI studies of seven healthy right hand-dominant volunteers were carried out in a three Tesla scanner. fMRI was performed using an SS-SE EPI sequence with SENSE. The data was processed using statistical parametric mapping. Both, group and individual subject data analyses were performed. Individual average percentage and maximal percentage signal changes attributed to the BOLD effect in M1 were calculated for all the subjects as a function of echo time. Corresponding activation maps and the sizes of the activated clusters were also calculated. Our results show that susceptibility artifacts were reduced with the use of SENSE; and the acquired BOLD images were free of the typical quadrature artifacts of SS-EPI. Such measures are crucial at high field strengths. SS SE-EPI with SENSE offers further benefits in this regard and is more specific for oxygenation changes in the microvasculature bed. Functional brain activity can be investigated with the help of single-shot spin echo EPI using SENSE at high magnetic fields.

  15. A pulse spectrometer for NMR measurements on magnetically ordered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englich, J.; Pikner, B.; Sedlak, B.

    1975-01-01

    A simple design of a pulse nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer is described. The spectrometer permits spin echo measurements on magnetically ordered substances. It operates in the frequency range 10 to 130 MHz, but this basic range can be extended by a replacement of the compact radiofrequency unit. The transmitter gives radiofrequency pulses with an amplitude of up to 1 kV on the coil with the investigated sample. The pulse programmer makes possible relaxation measurements in a time interval of 10 -5 to 10 -1 s. Attention was devoted to obtaining a maximum signal-to-noise ratio in the whole frequency range. Sensitivity of the spectrometer is demonstrated by spin echo measurement on pure iron powder. (author)

  16. First results in rapid MR imaging of focal liver and spleen lesions using field echos and small angle excitation (gradient echo sequences)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griebel, J.; Hess, C.F.; Kurtz, B.; Klose, U.; Kueper, K.

    1987-01-01

    15 healthy subjects and 39 patients with focal liver and spleen lesions were examined via MR tomography at 1.5 tesla. Gradient field echos at small angle excitation ( 0 ) were employed. The imaging time per layer was 10 seconds so that rapid imaging could be carried out at respiratory standstill. This enabled visualisation of liver and spleen without interference by breathing artifacts and with accurate localisation. Focal lesions can be imaged best at low flip-angle pulses (liver) or low to medium-angle pulses (spleen). The primary liver cell carcinoma is visualised as an inhomogeneous structure with similar signal intensity as the surrounding tissue. All other examined liver lesions (metastases, haemangiomas, lymphatic infiltrates, echinococcus cysts, FNH, gummae) showed greater signal intensity than the remaining organ at small angle excitation. Furthermore, contrast reversals were seen at medium-angle pulses. Contrariwise, with the exception of the light-coloured spleen infarcts, spleen lesions (lymphatic infiltrate, Boeck's disease or sarcoidosis) appeared darker at all excitation angles than the surrounding tissue. (orig.) [de

  17. First results in rapid MR imaging of focal liver and spleen lesions using field echos and small angle excitation (gradient echo sequences)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griebel, J.; Hess, C.F.; Kurtz, B.; Klose, U.; Kueper, K.

    1987-01-01

    15 healthy subjects and 39 patients with focal liver and spleen lesions were examined via MR tomography at 1.5 tesla. Gradient field echos at small angle excitation (< 90/sup 0/) were employed. The imaging time per layer was 10 seconds so that rapid imaging could be carried out at respiratory standstill. This enabled visualisation of liver and spleen without interference by breathing artifacts and with accurate localisation. Focal lesions can be imaged best at low flip-angle pulses (liver) or low to medium-angle pulses (spleen). The primary liver cell carcinoma is visualised as an inhomogeneous structure with similar signal intensity as the surrounding tissue. All other examined liver lesions (metastases, haemangiomas, lymphatic infiltrates, echinococcus cysts, FNH, gummae) showed greater signal intensity than the remaining organ at small angle excitation. Furthermore, contrast reversals were seen at medium-angle pulses. Contrariwise, with the exception of the light-coloured spleen infarcts, spleen lesions (lymphatic infiltrate, Boeck's disease or sarcoidosis) appeared darker at all excitation angles than the surrounding tissue.

  18. Liver iron content determined by MRI. Spin-echo vs. gradient-echo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juchems, M.S.; Wunderlich, A.P. [Universitaetskliniken Ulm (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Cario, H. [Universitaetskliniken Ulm (Germany). Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin; Schmid, M. [Stadtspital Triemli, Zuerich (Switzerland). Medizinische Onkologie und Haematologie

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Liver iron content (LIC) measurement plays a central role in the management of patients with transfusional iron overload. Calculating the LIC with data obtained from standardized MRI sequences represents an attractive alternative diagnostic possibility. The purpose of this study was to compare the LIC measurement obtained with gradient-echo (GRE) sequences to the mean liver proton transverse relaxation (R2) acquired with SE sequences. Materials and Methods: 68 patients with iron overload (median age: 24, range: 3 - 88) underwent 1.5 T MRI for liver iron content measurement. All patients received spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (GRE) sequences. Results: The two MRI methods revealed different liver iron content results although a significant correlation was found (r = 0.85, p < 0.001). Values evaluated using GRE sequences (median: 260 {mu}mol/g dry weight [d.w.], range: 6 - 732) were generally higher than those obtained by SE examinations (median: 161 {mu}mol /g d.w., range: 5 - 830). Conclusion: In conclusion, our study revealed different results for both MRI measurements, which could lead to different decisions concerning the management of chelation therapy in individual patients. (orig.)

  19. Stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold in fiber amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Liping; Chang Liping

    2011-01-01

    Based on the wave coupling theory and the evolution model of the critical pump power (or Brillouin threshold) for stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in double-clad fiber amplifiers, the influence of signal bandwidth, fiber-core diameter and amplifier gain on SBS threshold is simulated theoretically. And experimental measurements of SBS are presented in ytterbium-doped double-clad fiber amplifiers with single-frequency hundred nanosecond pulse amplification. Under different input signal pulses, the forward amplified pulse distortion is observed when the pulse energy is up to 660 nJ and the peak power is up to 3.3 W in the pulse amplification with pulse duration of 200 ns and repetition rate of 1 Hz. And the backward SBS narrow pulse appears. The pulse peak power equals to SBS threshold. Good agreement is shown between the modeled and experimental data. (authors)

  20. Long T2 suppression in native lung 3-D imaging using k-space reordered inversion recovery dual-echo ultrashort echo time MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Neville D; Malayeri, Ashkan A; Bluemke, David A

    2017-08-01

    Long T2 species can interfere with visualization of short T2 tissue imaging. For example, visualization of lung parenchyma can be hindered by breathing artifacts primarily from fat in the chest wall. The purpose of this work was to design and evaluate a scheme for long T2 species suppression in lung parenchyma imaging using 3-D inversion recovery double-echo ultrashort echo time imaging with a k-space reordering scheme for artifact suppression. A hyperbolic secant (HS) pulse was evaluated for different tissues (T1/T2). Bloch simulations were performed with the inversion pulse followed by segmented UTE acquisition. Point spread function (PSF) was simulated for a standard interleaved acquisition order and a modulo 2 forward-reverse acquisition order. Phantom and in vivo images (eight volunteers) were acquired with both acquisition orders. Contrast to noise ratio (CNR) was evaluated in in vivo images prior to and after introduction of the long T2 suppression scheme. The PSF as well as phantom and in vivo images demonstrated reduction in artifacts arising from k-space modulation after using the reordering scheme. CNR measured between lung and fat and lung and muscle increased from -114 and -148.5 to +12.5 and 2.8 after use of the IR-DUTE sequence. Paired t test between the CNRs obtained from UTE and IR-DUTE showed significant positive change (p lung-fat CNR and p = 0.03 for lung-muscle CNR). Full 3-D lung parenchyma imaging with improved positive contrast between lung and other long T2 tissue types can be achieved robustly in a clinically feasible time using IR-DUTE with image subtraction when segmented radial acquisition with k-space reordering is employed.

  1. Parameter Optimization for Quantitative Signal-Concentration Mapping Using Spoiled Gradient Echo MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasser Hathout

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale and Objectives. Accurate signal to tracer concentration maps are critical to quantitative MRI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and optimize spoiled gradient echo (SPGR MR sequences for the use of gadolinium (Gd-DTPA as a kinetic tracer. Methods. Water-gadolinium phantoms were constructed for a physiologic range of gadolinium concentrations. Observed and calculated SPGR signal to concentration curves were generated. Using a percentage error determination, optimal pulse parameters for signal to concentration mapping were obtained. Results. The accuracy of the SPGR equation is a function of the chosen MR pulse parameters, particularly the time to repetition (TR and the flip angle (FA. At all experimental values of TR, increasing FA decreases the ratio between observed and calculated signals. Conversely, for a constant FA, increasing TR increases this ratio. Using optimized pulse parameter sets, it is possible to achieve excellent accuracy (approximately 5% over a physiologic range of concentration tracer concentrations. Conclusion. Optimal pulse parameter sets exist and their use is essential for deriving accurate signal to concentration curves in quantitative MRI.

  2. Techniques for measuring the atomic recoil frequency using a grating-echo atom interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Brynle

    I have developed three types of time-domain echo atom interferometer (AIs) that use either two or three standing-wave pulses in different configurations. Experiments approaching the transit time limit are achieved using samples of laser-cooled rubidium atoms with temperatures AI. This interferometer uses two standing-wave pulses applied at times t = 0 and t = T 21 to create a superposition of atomic momentum states differing by multiples of the two-photon momentum, ħq = 2 ħk where k is the optical wave number, that interfere in the vicinity of t = 2T 21. This interference or "echo" manifests itself as a density grating in the atomic sample, and is probed by applying a near-resonant traveling-wave "read-out" pulse and measuring the intensity of the coherent light Bragg-scattered in the backward direction. The scattered light from the grating is associated with a λ/2-periodic modulation produced by the interference of momentum states differing by ħq. Interfering states that differ by more than ħq—which produce higher-frequency spatial modulation within the sample—cannot be detected due to the nature of the Bragg scattering detection technique employed in the experiment. The intensity of the scattered light varies in a periodic manner as a function of the standing-wave pulse separation, T21. The fundamental frequency of this modulation is the two-photon atomic recoil frequency, ω q = ħq2/2M, where q = 2k and M is the mass of the atom (a rubidium isotope in this case). The recoil frequency, ω q, is related to the recoil energy, Eq = ħωq, which is the kinetic energy associated with the recoil of the atom after a coherent two-photon scattering process. By performing the experiment on a suitably long time scale ( T21 >> τq = π/ω q ˜32 μs), ωq can be measured precisely. Since ωq contains the ratio of Planck's constant to the mass of the atom, h/M, a precise measurement of ωq can be used as a strict test of quantum theories of the electromagnetic force

  3. Paired associative stimulation targeting the tibialis anterior muscle using either mono or biphasic transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Paired associative stimulation (PAS) protocols induce plastic changes within the motor cortex. The objectives of this study were to investigate PAS effects targeting the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle using a biphasic transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulse form and, to determine whether...... a reduced intensity of this pulse would lead to significant changes as has been reported for hand muscles using a monophasic TMS pulse. Three interventions were investigated: (1) suprathreshold PAbi-PAS (n = 11); (2) suprathreshold PAmono-PAS (n = 11) where PAS was applied using a biphasic or monophasic......% for subthreshold PAbi-PAS. PAS using a biphasic pulse form at subthreshold intensities induces similar effects to conventional PAS....

  4. Ultrasound stimulation of mandibular bone defect healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schortinghuis, Jurjen

    2004-01-01

    The conclusions of the experimental work presented in this thesis are: 1. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound is not effective in stimulating bone growth into a rat mandibular defect, either with or without the use of osteoconductive membranes. 2. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound does not seem to have an

  5. No counterpart of visual perceptual echoes in the auditory system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barkın İlhan

    Full Text Available It has been previously demonstrated by our group that a visual stimulus made of dynamically changing luminance evokes an echo or reverberation at ~10 Hz, lasting up to a second. In this study we aimed to reveal whether similar echoes also exist in the auditory modality. A dynamically changing auditory stimulus equivalent to the visual stimulus was designed and employed in two separate series of experiments, and the presence of reverberations was analyzed based on reverse correlations between stimulus sequences and EEG epochs. The first experiment directly compared visual and auditory stimuli: while previous findings of ~10 Hz visual echoes were verified, no similar echo was found in the auditory modality regardless of frequency. In the second experiment, we tested if auditory sequences would influence the visual echoes when they were congruent or incongruent with the visual sequences. However, the results in that case similarly did not reveal any auditory echoes, nor any change in the characteristics of visual echoes as a function of audio-visual congruence. The negative findings from these experiments suggest that brain oscillations do not equivalently affect early sensory processes in the visual and auditory modalities, and that alpha (8-13 Hz oscillations play a special role in vision.

  6. A comparison of multi-echo spin-echo and triple-echo steady-state T2 mapping for in vivo evaluation of articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juras, Vladimir; Szomolanyi, Pavol [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Institute of Measurement Science, Department of Imaging Methods, Bratislava (Slovakia); Bohndorf, Klaus; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Hager, Benedikt; Zbyn, Stefan [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Heule, Rahel; Bieri, Oliver [University of Basel Hospital, Division of Radiological Physics, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    To assess the clinical relevance of T{sub 2} relaxation times, measured by 3D triple-echo steady-state (3D-TESS), in knee articular cartilage compared to conventional multi-echo spin-echo T{sub 2}-mapping. Thirteen volunteers and ten patients with focal cartilage lesions were included in this prospective study. All subjects underwent 3-Tesla MRI consisting of a multi-echo multi-slice spin-echo sequence (CPMG) as a reference method for T{sub 2} mapping, and 3D TESS with the same geometry settings, but variable acquisition times: standard (TESSs 4:35min) and quick (TESSq 2:05min). T{sub 2} values were compared in six different regions in the femoral and tibial cartilage using a Wilcoxon signed ranks test and the Pearson correlation coefficient (r). The local ethics committee approved this study, and all participants gave written informed consent. The mean quantitative T{sub 2} values measured by CPMG (mean: 46±9ms) in volunteers were significantly higher compared to those measured with TESS (mean: 31±5ms) in all regions. Both methods performed similarly in patients, but CPMG provided a slightly higher difference between lesions and native cartilage (CPMG: 90ms→61ms [31%],p=0.0125;TESS 32ms→24ms [24%],p=0.0839). 3D-TESS provides results similar to those of a conventional multi-echo spin-echo sequence with many benefits, such as shortening of total acquisition time and insensitivity to B{sub 1} and B{sub 0} changes. (orig.)

  7. A comparison of multi-echo spin-echo and triple-echo steady-state T2 mapping for in vivo evaluation of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juras, Vladimir; Bohndorf, Klaus; Heule, Rahel; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Hager, Benedikt; Bieri, Oliver; Zbyn, Stefan; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2016-06-01

    To assess the clinical relevance of T2 relaxation times, measured by 3D triple-echo steady-state (3D-TESS), in knee articular cartilage compared to conventional multi-echo spin-echo T2-mapping. Thirteen volunteers and ten patients with focal cartilage lesions were included in this prospective study. All subjects underwent 3-Tesla MRI consisting of a multi-echo multi-slice spin-echo sequence (CPMG) as a reference method for T2 mapping, and 3D TESS with the same geometry settings, but variable acquisition times: standard (TESSs 4:35min) and quick (TESSq 2:05min). T2 values were compared in six different regions in the femoral and tibial cartilage using a Wilcoxon signed ranks test and the Pearson correlation coefficient (r). The local ethics committee approved this study, and all participants gave written informed consent. The mean quantitative T2 values measured by CPMG (mean: 46±9ms) in volunteers were significantly higher compared to those measured with TESS (mean: 31±5ms) in all regions. Both methods performed similarly in patients, but CPMG provided a slightly higher difference between lesions and native cartilage (CPMG: 90ms→61ms [31%],p=0.0125;TESS 32ms→24ms [24%],p=0.0839). 3D-TESS provides results similar to those of a conventional multi-echo spin-echo sequence with many benefits, such as shortening of total acquisition time and insensitivity to B1 and B0 changes. • 3D-TESS T 2 mapping provides clinically comparable results to CPMG in shorter scan-time. • Clinical and investigational studies may benefit from high temporal resolution of 3D-TESS. • 3D-TESS T 2 values are able to differentiate between healthy and damaged cartilage.

  8. A comparison of multi-echo spin-echo and triple-echo steady-state T2 mapping for in vivo evaluation of articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juras, Vladimir; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Bohndorf, Klaus; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Hager, Benedikt; Zbyn, Stefan; Heule, Rahel; Bieri, Oliver; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    To assess the clinical relevance of T 2 relaxation times, measured by 3D triple-echo steady-state (3D-TESS), in knee articular cartilage compared to conventional multi-echo spin-echo T 2 -mapping. Thirteen volunteers and ten patients with focal cartilage lesions were included in this prospective study. All subjects underwent 3-Tesla MRI consisting of a multi-echo multi-slice spin-echo sequence (CPMG) as a reference method for T 2 mapping, and 3D TESS with the same geometry settings, but variable acquisition times: standard (TESSs 4:35min) and quick (TESSq 2:05min). T 2 values were compared in six different regions in the femoral and tibial cartilage using a Wilcoxon signed ranks test and the Pearson correlation coefficient (r). The local ethics committee approved this study, and all participants gave written informed consent. The mean quantitative T 2 values measured by CPMG (mean: 46±9ms) in volunteers were significantly higher compared to those measured with TESS (mean: 31±5ms) in all regions. Both methods performed similarly in patients, but CPMG provided a slightly higher difference between lesions and native cartilage (CPMG: 90ms→61ms [31%],p=0.0125;TESS 32ms→24ms [24%],p=0.0839). 3D-TESS provides results similar to those of a conventional multi-echo spin-echo sequence with many benefits, such as shortening of total acquisition time and insensitivity to B 1 and B 0 changes. (orig.)

  9. A full simulation of the Quetzal echo at the Mayan pyramid of Kukulkan at Chichen Itza in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declercq, Nico F.; Degrieck, Joris; Briers, Rudy; Leroy, Oswald

    2003-04-01

    It is well known that a handclap in front of the staircase of the pyramid produces an echo that sounds similar to the chirp of the Quetzal bird. This phenomenon occurs due to diffraction. There exist some publications concerning this phenomenon and even some first attempts are reported to simulate it. However, no full simulation (amplitude, frequency, time) has ever been reported before. The present work presents a simulation which is based on the theory of the diffraction of plane waves and which takes into account continuity conditions. The latter theory is the building block for an extended theory that tackles the diffraction of a spherical sound pulse. By means of these principles it is possible to entirely simulate the echo following a handclap in front of the staircase. [Work supported by The Flemish Institute for the Encouragement of the Scientific and Technological Research in Industry (I.W.T.)

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of renal masses with rapid-acquisition spin-echo technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eilenberg, S.S.; Lee, J.K.T.; Brown, J.J.; Heiken, J.P.; Mirowitz, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper compares the diagnostic accuracy of Gd-DTPA-enhanced rapid-acquisition spin-echo (RASE) imaging with standard spin-echo techniques for detecting renal cysts and solid renal neoplasms. RASE imaging combines a short TR (275 msec)/short TE (10 msec), single excitation pulse sequence with half-Fourier data sampling. Eighteen patients with CT evidence of renal masses were first evaluated with standard T1-and T2-weighted SE sequences. Pre- and serial postcontrast (Cd-DTPA, 0.1 mmol./kg) RASE sequences were then performed during suspended respiration. A final set of postcontrast images was obtained with the standard T1-weighted SE sequence. Each set of MR images was first reviewed separately (ie, T1, T2, pre- and post-contrast RASE, etc)

  11. The science of EChO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Cho, James Y.-K.; Griffith, Caitlin A.; Grasset, Olivier; Grenfell, Lee; Guillot, Tristan; Koskinen, Tommi T.; Moses, Julianne I.; Pinfield, David; Tennyson, Jonathan; Tessenyi, Marcell; Wordsworth, Robin; Aylward, Alan; van Boekel, Roy; Coradini, Angioletta; Encrenaz, Therese; Snellen, Ignas; Zapatero-Osorio, Maria R.; Bouwman, Jeroen; Coudé du Foresto, Vincent; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo; Pallé, Enric; Selsis, Franck; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Beaulieu, Jean-Philippe; Henning, Thomas; Meyer, Michael; Micela, Giuseppina; Ribas, Ignasi; Stam, Daphne; Swain, Mark; Krause, Oliver; Ollivier, Marc; Pace, Emanuele; Swinyard, Bruce; Ade, Peter A. R.; Achilleos, Nick; Adriani, Alberto; Agnor, Craig B.; Afonso, Cristina; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Bakos, Gaspar; Barber, Robert J.; Barlow, Michael; Bernath, Peter; Bézard, Bruno; Bordé, Pascal; Brown, Linda R.; Cassan, Arnaud; Cavarroc, Céline; Ciaravella, Angela; Cockell, Charles; Coustenis, Athéna; Danielski, Camilla; Decin, Leen; De Kok, Remco; Demangeon, Olivier; Deroo, Pieter; Doel, Peter; Drossart, Pierre; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Focardi, Matteo; Forget, Francois; Fossey, Steve; Fouqué, Pascal; Frith, James; Galand, Marina; Gaulme, Patrick; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Grassi, Davide; Griffin, Matt J.; Grözinger, Ulrich; Guedel, Manuel; Guio, Pactrick; Hainaut, Olivier; Hargreaves, Robert; Hauschildt, Peter H.; Heng, Kevin; Heyrovsky, David; Hueso, Ricardo; Irwin, Pat; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Kervella, Patrick; Kipping, David; Kovacs, Geza; La Barbera, Antonino; Lammer, Helmut; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Leto, Giuseppe; Lopez Morales, Mercedes; Valverde, Lopez Miguel A.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Lovi, Christophe; Maggio, Antonio; Maillard, Jean-Pierre; Prado, Jesus Maldonado; Marquette, Jean-Baptiste; Martin-Torres, Francisco J.; Maxted, Pierre; Miller, Steve; Molinari, Sergio; Montes, David; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Mousis, Olivier; Tuong, Napoléon Nguyen; Nelson, Richard; Orton, Glenn S.; Pantin, Eric; Pascale, Enzo; Pezzuto, Stefano; Poretti, Ennio; Prinja, Raman; Prisinzano, Loredana; Réess, Jean-Michel; Reiners, Ansgar; Samuel, Benjamin; Sanz Forcada, Jorge; Sasselov, Dimitar; Savini, Giorgio; Sicardy, Bruno; Smith, Alan; Stixrude, Lars; Strazzulla, Giovanni; Vasisht, Gautam; Vinatier, Sandrine; Viti, Serena; Waldmann, Ingo; White, Glenn J.; Widemann, Thomas; Yelle, Roger; Yung, Yuk; Yurchenko, Sergey

    2011-11-01

    The science of extra-solar planets is one of the most rapidly changing areas of astrophysics and since 1995 the number of planets known has increased by almost two orders of magnitude. A combination of ground-based surveys and dedicated space missions has resulted in 560-plus planets being detected, and over 1200 that await confirmation. NASA's Kepler mission has opened up the possibility of discovering Earth-like planets in the habitable zone around some of the 100,000 stars it is surveying during its 3 to 4-year lifetime. The new ESA's Gaia mission is expected to discover thousands of new planets around stars within 200 parsecs of the Sun. The key challenge now is moving on from discovery, important though that remains, to characterisation: what are these planets actually like, and why are they as they are? In the past ten years, we have learned how to obtain the first spectra of exoplanets using transit transmission and emission spectroscopy. With the high stability of Spitzer, Hubble, and large ground-based telescopes the spectra of bright close-in massive planets can be obtained and species like water vapour, methane, carbon monoxide and dioxide have been detected. With transit science came the first tangible remote sensing of these planetary bodies and so one can start to extrapolate from what has been learnt from Solar System probes to what one might plan to learn about their faraway siblings. As we learn more about the atmospheres, surfaces and near-surfaces of these remote bodies, we will begin to build up a clearer picture of their construction, history and suitability for life. The Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory, EChO, will be the first dedicated mission to investigate the physics and chemistry of Exoplanetary Atmospheres. By characterising spectroscopically more bodies in different environments we will take detailed planetology out of the Solar System and into the Galaxy as a whole. EChO has now been selected by the European Space Agency to be

  12. Femtosecond Broadband Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo-Y; Yoon, Sagwoon; Mathies, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is a new technique where a narrow bandwidth picosecond Raman pump pulse and a red-shifted broadband femtosecond Stokes probe pulse (with or without time delay between the pulses) act on a sample to produce a high resolution Raman gain spectrum with high efficiency and speed, free from fluorescence background interference. It can reveal vibrational structural information and dynamics of stationary or transient states. Here, the quantum picture for femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is used to develop the semiclassical coupled wave theory of the phenomenon and to derive an expression for the measurable Raman gain in FSRS. The semiclassical theory is applied to study the dependence of lineshapes in FSRS on the pump-probe time delay and to deduce vibrational dephasing times in cyclohexane in the ground state

  13. Wavelet Domain Radiofrequency Pulse Design Applied to Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Huettner

    Full Text Available A new method for designing radiofrequency (RF pulses with numerical optimization in the wavelet domain is presented. Numerical optimization may yield solutions that might otherwise have not been discovered with analytic techniques alone. Further, processing in the wavelet domain reduces the number of unknowns through compression properties inherent in wavelet transforms, providing a more tractable optimization problem. This algorithm is demonstrated with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS spin echo refocusing pulses because reduced peak RF power is necessary for SMS diffusion imaging with high acceleration factors. An iterative, nonlinear, constrained numerical minimization algorithm was developed to generate an optimized RF pulse waveform. Wavelet domain coefficients were modulated while iteratively running a Bloch equation simulator to generate the intermediate slice profile of the net magnetization. The algorithm minimizes the L2-norm of the slice profile with additional terms to penalize rejection band ripple and maximize the net transverse magnetization across each slice. Simulations and human brain imaging were used to demonstrate a new RF pulse design that yields an optimized slice profile and reduced peak energy deposition when applied to a multiband single-shot echo planar diffusion acquisition. This method may be used to optimize factors such as magnitude and phase spectral profiles and peak RF pulse power for multiband simultaneous multi-slice (SMS acquisitions. Wavelet-based RF pulse optimization provides a useful design method to achieve a pulse waveform with beneficial amplitude reduction while preserving appropriate magnetization response for magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. The effect of strong pitch angle scattering on the use of artificial auroral streaks for echo detection - Echo 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, R.L.; Steffen, J.E.; Winckler, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    During the Echo 5 experiment launched 13 November 1979 from the Poker Flat Research Range (Fairbanks, Alaska), a 0.75 A, 37 keV electron beam was injected both up and down the field line to test the use of optical and X-ray methods to detect the beam as it interacted with the atmosphere below the rocket for both the downward injections (markers) and the upward injected electrons which mirrored at the Southern Hemisphere and returned echoes. The artificial auroral streaks created by the markers were easily visible on the ground TV system but the large intensity of photons produced around the rocket masked any response to the markers by the on-board photometers and X-ray detectors. No echoes were detected with any of the detection systems although the power in some of the upward injections was 7.6 times the power in a detected downward injection thus setting an upper limit on the loss-cone echo flux. The magnitude of the bounce averaged pitch angle diffusion coefficient necessary to explain the lack of observable echoes was found to be 4 x 10 -4 S -1 . It was found that an equatorial wave electric field of 11 mVm -1 would account for the lack of echoes. Such fields should cause strong pitch angle scattering of up to 10 keV natural electrons and thus be consistent with the presence of diffuse aurora on the Echo 5 trajectory. (author)

  15. Development of Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy: Stimulated Raman Gain via Elimination of Cross Phase Modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Seung Min; Lee, Young Jong; Yu, Jong Wan; Kim, Seong Keun

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new femtosecond probe technique by using stimulated Raman spectroscopy. The cross phase modulation in femtosecond time scale associated with off-resonant interaction was shown to be eliminated by integrating the transient gain/loss signal over the time delay between the Raman pump pulse and the continuum pulse. The stimulated Raman gain of neat cyclohexane was obtained to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. Spectral and temporal widths of stimulated Raman spectra were controlled by using a narrow band pass filter. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy was proposed as a highly useful probe in time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

  16. Geomagnetic control of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bremer

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Using observations with the ALOMAR SOUSY radar near Andenes (69.3°N, 16.0°E from 1994 until 1997 polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE have been investigated in dependence on geomagnetic K indices derived at the Auroral Observatory Tromsø (69.66°N, 18.94°E. During night-time and morning hours a significant correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the radar results and the geomagnetic K indices could be detected with a maximum correlation near midnight. The correlation becomes markedly smaller in the afternoon and early evening hours with a minimum near 17 UT. This diurnal variation is in reasonable agreement with riometer absorption at Ivalo (68.55°N, 27.28°E and can be explained by the diurnal variation of ionization due to precipitating high energetic particles. Therefore, a part of the diurnal PMSE variation is caused by this particle precipitation. The variability of the solar EUV variation, however, has no significant influence on the PMSE during the observation period.Keywords: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating - Radio science (remote sensing

  17. Pulse plating

    CERN Document Server

    Hansal, Wolfgang E G; Green, Todd; Leisner, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The electrodeposition of metals using pulsed current has achieved practical importance in recent years. Although it has long been known that changes in potential, with or without polarity reversal, can significantly affect the deposition process, the practical application of this has been slow to be adopted. This can largely be explained in terms of the complex relationship between the current regime and its effect on the electrodeposition process. In order to harness these effects, an understanding of the anodic and cathodic electrochemical processes is necessary, together with the effects of polarity reversal and the rate of such reversals. In this new monograph, the basics of metal electrodeposition from solution are laid out in great detail in seven distinct chapters. With this knowledge, the reader is able to predict how a given pulse train profile can be adopted to achieve a desired outcome. Equally important is the choice of a suitable rectifier and the ancillary control circuits to enable pulse platin...

  18. Mimicking muscle activity with electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lise A.; Fuglevand, Andrew J.

    2011-02-01

    Functional electrical stimulation is a rehabilitation technology that can restore some degree of motor function in individuals who have sustained a spinal cord injury or stroke. One way to identify the spatio-temporal patterns of muscle stimulation needed to elicit complex upper limb movements is to use electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from able-bodied subjects as a template for electrical stimulation. However, this requires a transfer function to convert the recorded (or predicted) EMG signals into an appropriate pattern of electrical stimulation. Here we develop a generalized transfer function that maps EMG activity into a stimulation pattern that modulates muscle output by varying both the pulse frequency and the pulse amplitude. We show that the stimulation patterns produced by this transfer function mimic the active state measured by EMG insofar as they reproduce with good fidelity the complex patterns of joint torque and joint displacement.

  19. Book review: Musical echoes: South African women thinking in jazz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Title: Musical echoes: South African women thinking in jazz. Author: Muller, Carol and Sathima, Bea Benjamin. Publisher: Duke University Press. Publication year: 2011. ISBN 978-0-8223-4914-3 ...

  20. Classification of underwater target echoes based on auditory perception characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiukun; Meng, Xiangxia; Liu, Hang; Liu, Mingye

    2014-06-01

    In underwater target detection, the bottom reverberation has some of the same properties as the target echo, which has a great impact on the performance. It is essential to study the difference between target echo and reverberation. In this paper, based on the unique advantage of human listening ability on objects distinction, the Gammatone filter is taken as the auditory model. In addition, time-frequency perception features and auditory spectral features are extracted for active sonar target echo and bottom reverberation separation. The features of the experimental data have good concentration characteristics in the same class and have a large amount of differences between different classes, which shows that this method can effectively distinguish between the target echo and reverberation.

  1. Water Pollution Search Results Help - TRI | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  2. Water Pollution Search Criteria Help | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  3. TRI DMR Dashboard Top Industries_Chemicals.png | ECHO ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  4. TRI DMR Dashboard Pie Chart.png | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  5. DW_Dashboard_CalendarView.png | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  6. TRI DMR Dashboard Summary Table.png | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  7. TRI DMR Dashboard Top Industries Graph.png | ECHO | US ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  8. eff-date-range.png | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  9. PWS_Dashboard_2.png | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  10. eff-hover-chart.png | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  11. PWS_Dashboard_1.png | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  12. eff-toggle-chart.png | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  13. ECHO Services: Foundational Middleware for a Science Cyberinfrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes ECHO, an interoperability middleware solution. It uses open, XML-based APIs, and supports net-centric architectures and solutions. ECHO has a set of interoperable registries for both data (metadata) and services, and provides user accounts and a common infrastructure for the registries. It is built upon a layered architecture with extensible infrastructure for supporting community unique protocols. It has been operational since November, 2002 and it available as open source.

  14. Puget Sound Watershed.pdf | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  15. Numerical modelling of so-called secondary ultrasonic echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenberg, K.J.; Fellinger, P.; Hofmann, C.

    1994-01-01

    The formation of secondary ultrasonic echoes is discussed for a particularly simple testing situation. This discussion is based upon the intuitive visualization of elastic wave propagation as obtained with the numerical EFIT-Code (Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique). The resulting travel times for the econdary echoes contain well-defined limits as they originate from the simple model of grazing incidence plane longitudinal wave mode conversion. (orig.) [de

  16. Civil Enforcement Case Report Data Dictionary | ECHO | US ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  17. Water Quality Indicators Data Review | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  18. The architecture of dynamic reservoir in the echo state network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongyan; Liu, Xiang; Li, Lixiang

    2012-09-01

    Echo state network (ESN) has recently attracted increasing interests because of its superior capability in modeling nonlinear dynamic systems. In the conventional echo state network model, its dynamic reservoir (DR) has a random and sparse topology, which is far from the real biological neural networks from both structural and functional perspectives. We hereby propose three novel types of echo state networks with new dynamic reservoir topologies based on complex network theory, i.e., with a small-world topology, a scale-free topology, and a mixture of small-world and scale-free topologies, respectively. We then analyze the relationship between the dynamic reservoir structure and its prediction capability. We utilize two commonly used time series to evaluate the prediction performance of the three proposed echo state networks and compare them to the conventional model. We also use independent and identically distributed time series to analyze the short-term memory and prediction precision of these echo state networks. Furthermore, we study the ratio of scale-free topology and the small-world topology in the mixed-topology network, and examine its influence on the performance of the echo state networks. Our simulation results show that the proposed echo state network models have better prediction capabilities, a wider spectral radius, but retain almost the same short-term memory capacity as compared to the conventional echo state network model. We also find that the smaller the ratio of the scale-free topology over the small-world topology, the better the memory capacities.

  19. Hypoxia Task Force Scope and Methodology | ECHO | US ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  20. Electrode contact configuration and energy consumption in spinal cord stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Cecilia Cecilia Clementine; de Vos, Cecile C.; Hilgerink, Marjolein P.; Buschman, Hendrik P.J.; Buschman, H.P.J.; Holsheimer, J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To test the hypothesis that in spinal cord stimulation, in contrast to an increase of the number of anodes which reduces energy consumption per pulse, an increase of the number of cathodes raises the energy per pulse. Methods. Patients with an Itrel 3 pulse generator and a Pisces Quad

  1. Velocities of Auroral Coherent Echoes At 12 and 144 Mhz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koustov, A. V.; Danskin, D. W.; Makarevitch, R. A.; Uspensky, M. V.; Janhunen, P.; Nishitani, N.; Nozawa, N.; Lester, M.; Milan, S.

    Two Doppler coherent radar systems are currently working at Hankasalmi, Finland, the STARE and CUTLASS radars operating at 144 MHz and 12 MHz, respectively. The STARE beam 3 is nearly co-located with the CUTLASS beam 5 providing an opportunity for echo velocity comparison along the same direction but at significantly different radar frequencies. In this study we consider one event when STARE radar echoes are detected t the same ranges as CUTLASS radar echoes. The observations are complemented by EISCAT measurements of the ionospheric electric field and elec- tron density behavior at one range of 900 km. Two separate situations are studied; for the first one, CUTLASS observed F-region echoes (including the range of the EIS- CAT measurements) while for the second one CUTLASS observed E-region echoes. In both cases STARE E-region measurements were available. We show that F-region CUTLASS velocities agree well with the convection component along the CUTLASS radar beam while STARE velocities are sometimes smaller by a factor of 2-3. For the second case, STARE velocities are found to be either smaller or larger than CUTLASS velocities, depending on range. Plasma physics of E- and F-region irregularities is dis- cussed in attempt to explain inferred relationship between various velocities. Special attention is paid to ionospheric refraction that is important for the detection of 12-MHz echoes.

  2. Wavelet-LMS algorithm-based echo cancellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharaman, Lalith K.; Rao, Sathyanarayana S.

    2002-12-01

    This paper presents Echo Cancellers based on the Wavelet-LMS Algorithm. The performance of the Least Mean Square Algorithm in Wavelet transform domain is observed and its application in Echo cancellation is analyzed. The Widrow-Hoff Least Mean Square Algorithm is most widely used algorithm for Adaptive filters that function as Echo Cancellers. The present day communication signals are widely non-stationary in nature and some errors crop up when Least Mean Square Algorithm is used for the Echo Cancellers handling such signals. The analysis of non-stationary signals often involves a compromise between how well transitions or discontinuities can be located. The multi-scale or multi-resolution of signal analysis, which is the essence of wavelet transform, makes Wavelets popular in non-stationary signal analysis. In this paper, we present a Wavelet-LMS algorithm wherein the wavelet coefficients of a signal are modified adaptively using the Least Mean Square Algorithm and then reconstructed to give an Echo-free signal. The Echo Canceller based on this Algorithm is found to have a better convergence and a comparatively lesser MSE (Mean Square error).

  3. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of reactive hematopoietic bone marrow in aplastic anemia using MR spectroscopy with variable echo times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Yasuo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo [Department of Radiology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess quantitative and qualitative differences in water components between normal bone marrow and reactive hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia using magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy with variable echo times (TEs). Design: Water content, T2 value of the water component, and signal change in water related to TE were assessed in normal bone marrow and reactive hematopoietic bone marrow by a stimulated echo acquisition mode with TEs of 30, 45, 60, and 90 ms. Patients: Six patients with aplastic anemia (13-84 years) and seven normal volunteers (25-38 years) were examined. Results and conclusion: Reactive hematopoietic marrow showed significantly higher water content than normal bone marrow. The T2 value of water components tended to be longer in reactive hematopoietic marrow. Water signal ratio related to TE was significantly higher in reactive hematopoietic marrow. These results suggest a quantitative and qualitative difference in water components between normal and reactive hematopoietic bone marrow. (orig.)

  4. Imaging of the brain using the fast-spin-echo and gradient-spin-echo techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umek, W.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Prokesch, R.; Mallek, R.; Heimberger, K.; Hittmair, K.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of our study was to compare gradient-spin-echo (GRASE) to fast-spin-echo (FSE) sequences for fast T2-weighted MR imaging of the brain. Thirty-one patients with high-signal-intensity lesions on T2-weighted images were examined on a 1.5-T MR system. The FSE and GRASE sequences with identical sequence parameters were obtained and compared side by side. Image assessment criteria included lesion conspicuity, contrast between different types of normal tissue, and image artifacts. In addition, signal-to-noise, contrast-to-noise, and contrast ratios and were determined. The FSE technique demonstrated more lesions than GRASE and with generally better conspicuity. Smaller lesions in particular were better demonstrated on FSE because of lower image noise and slightly weaker image artifacts. Gray-white differentiation was better on FSE. Ferritin and hemosiderin depositions appeared darker on GRASE, which resulted in better contrast. Fatty tissue was less bright on GRASE. With current standard hardware equipment, the FSE technique seems preferable to GRASE for fast T2-weighted routine MR imaging of the brain. For the assessment of hemosiderin or ferritin depositions, GRASE might be considered. (orig.)

  5. Spatial resolution properties in 3D fast spin-echo using variable refocusing flip angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Masanori; Mizukami, Shinya; Hata, Hirofumi; Sato, Mayumi; Komi, Syotaro; Miyati, Tosiaki; Nozaki, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    A new 3-dimensional fast spin-echo (3D FSE) method that uses a variable refocusing flip angle technique has recently been applied to imaging. The imaging pulse sequence can inhibit T 2 decay by varying the refocusing flip angle. Use of a long echo train length allows acquisition of 3D T 2 -weighted images with less blurring in a short scan time. The smaller refocusing flip angle in the new 3D FSE method than in the conventional method can reduce the specific absorption rate. However, T 2 decay differs between the new and conventional 3D FSE methods, so the resolution properties of the 2 methods may differ. We investigated the resolution properties of the new 3D FSE method using a variable refocusing flip angle technique. Varying the refocusing flip angle resulted in different resolution properties for the new 3D FSE method compared to the conventional method, a difference particularly noticeable when the imaging parameters were set for obtaining proton density weighted images. (author)

  6. Optimizing Management of Heart Failure by Using Echo and Natriuretic Peptides in the Outpatient Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, Frank Lloyd; Bajraktari, Gani; Zara, Cornelia; Mumoli, Nicola; Rosa, Gian Marco

    2018-01-28

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is an important public health problem and is associated with high morbidity, high mortality, and considerable healthcare costs. More than 90% of hospitalizations due to worsening HF result from elevations of left ventricular (LV) filling pressures and fluid overload, which are often accompanied by the increased synthesis and secretion of natriuretic peptides (NPs). Furthermore, persistently abnormal LV filling pressures and a rise in NP circulating levels are well known indicators of poor prognosis. Frequent office visits with the resulting evaluation and management are most often needed. The growing pressure from hospital readmissions in HF patients is shifting the focus of interest from traditionally symptom-guided care to a more specific patient-centered follow-up care based on clinical findings, BNP and echo. Recent studies supported the value of serial NP measurements and Doppler echocardiographic biomarkers of elevated LV filling pressures as tools to scrutinize patients with impending clinically overt HF. Therefore, combination of echo and pulsed-wave blood-flow and tissue Doppler with NPs appears valuable in guiding ambulatory HF management, since they are potentially useful to distinguish stable patients from those at high risk of decompensation.

  7. Graphical programming for pulse automated NMR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belmonte, S.B.; Oliveira, I.S.; Guimaraes, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a software program designed to control a broadband pulse Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometer used in zero-field NMR studies of magnetic metals. The software is written in the graphical language LabVIEW. This type of programming allows modifications and the inclusion of new routines to be easily made by the non-specialist, without changing the basic structure of the program. The program corrects for differences in the gain of the two acquisition channels [U (phase) and V (quadrature)], and automatic baseline subtraction. We present examples of measurements of NMR spectra, spin-echo decay (T 2 ), and quadrupolar oscillations, performed in magnetic intermetallic compounds. (author)

  8. A meteor head echo analysis algorithm for the lower VHF band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kero

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an automated analysis scheme for meteor head echo observations by the 46.5 MHz Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar near Shigaraki, Japan (34.85° N, 136.10° E. The analysis procedure computes meteoroid range, velocity and deceleration as functions of time with unprecedented accuracy and precision. This is crucial for estimations of meteoroid mass and orbital parameters as well as investigations of the meteoroid-atmosphere interaction processes. In this paper we present this analysis procedure in detail. The algorithms use a combination of single-pulse-Doppler, time-of-flight and pulse-to-pulse phase correlation measurements to determine the radial velocity to within a few tens of metres per second with 3.12 ms time resolution. Equivalently, the precision improvement is at least a factor of 20 compared to previous single-pulse measurements. Such a precision reveals that the deceleration increases significantly during the intense part of a meteoroid's ablation process in the atmosphere. From each received pulse, the target range is determined to within a few tens of meters, or the order of a few hundredths of the 900 m long range gates. This is achieved by transmitting a 13-bit Barker code oversampled by a factor of two at reception and using a novel range interpolation technique. The meteoroid velocity vector is determined from the estimated radial velocity by carefully taking the location of the meteor target and the angle from its trajectory to the radar beam into account. The latter is determined from target range and bore axis offset. We have identified and solved the signal processing issue giving rise to the peculiar signature in signal to noise ratio plots reported by Galindo et al. (2011, and show how to use the range interpolation technique to differentiate the effect of signal processing from physical processes.

  9. growth stimulant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of timing and duration of supplementation of LIVFIT VET ® (growth stimulant) as substitute for fish meal on the growth performance, haematology and clinical enzymes concentration of growing pigs.

  10. Echo signal from rough planar interfaces influence of roughness, angle, range and transducer type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Pedersen, P.C.; Jacobsen, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    The received electrical signal from a pulse-echo system insonifying a planar acoustical interface was measured for varying degrees of rms roughness (0-0.16 mm), angle of incidence (typically +/-7°) and range to the transducer. A planar and a focused 5 MHz transducer was used. When insonifying...... a smooth interface, the normalized spectrum of the received signals for a planar transducer exhibits an increasing number of nulls with increased angle of insonification, as predicted from numerical modeling while the dependence on insonification angle for the focused transducer was smaller and the null...... pattern was much less distinct. For the planar transducer and for the focused transducer with the interface located at the geometrical point of focus, the energy of the received signal as a function of incident angle was approximately Gaussian with maximum at 0°. For the smooth interface, the -3 dB width...

  11. Magnetization transfer contrast on gradient echo MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, M.; Hirohata, H.; Yoshioka, H.; Anno, I.; Campeau, N.G.; Itai, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-nine temporomandibular joints (TMJ) from 20 patients with suspected internal derangements were imaged by a 1.5 T MR imager. The on-resonance binomial magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) pulse was applied to gradient echo images with a dual receiver coil (9 s/section). With the use of an opening device, a series of sequential images were obtained at increments of mouth opening and closing. The tissue signal intensities with (Ms) and without (Mo) MTC were measured and subjective image analysis was performed. Compared with the standard images, MTC technique provided selective signal suppression of disks. The average of Ms/Mo ratio of the disks (0.56) was lower than that of the retrodiskal pad (0.79) and of the effusion (0.89). With MTC technique, fluid conspicuity was superior to standard image. However, no significant superiority was found in disk definition subjectively. (orig.)

  12. Assessment of diagnosing metastatic bone tumor on T2*-weighted images. Comparison between turbo spin echo (TSE) method and gradient echo (GE) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takahiko; Sugiyama, Akira; Katayama, Motoyuki

    1996-01-01

    We examined the usefulness of T2 * weighted gradient field echo images for diagnosis for metastatic bone tumors in comparison with T2 weighted turbo spin echo (fast spin echo) images. In T2 * weighted gradient field echo sequence to obtain maximum contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), we experimentally manipulated flip angle (FA) (5deg-90deg), repetition time (TR) (400, 700 msec), and echo time (TE) (10-50 msec). The best CNR was 16.4 in fast low angle shot (FLASH) (TE: 24 msec, TR: 700 msec, FA: 40deg). Magnetic resonance imaging was carried out in 28 patients with metastatic bone tumors. In addition to conventional T1 weighted spin echo images, T2 weighted turbo spin echo (fast spin echo images) and T2 * weighted gradient field echo images were obtained. T2 * weighted gradient field echo images were superior to T2 weighted turbo spin echo (fast spin echo) images in delineating the tumors, adjacent fat tissues, and bone marrow. (author)

  13. Characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging with partial flip angle and gradient field echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tatsumi; Uto, Tatsurou; Okafuji, Tatsumasa; Ookusa, Akihiko; Oonishi, Takuya; Mabuchi, Nobuhisa; Fujii, Kouichi; Yoshioka, Hiroyasu; Ishida, Osamu

    1988-01-01

    Characteristics of a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging pulse sequence with short repetition time (Tr), short echo time (Te), partial flip angle and gradient field echo, at 0.5 T, were studied. A series of sagittal images of the cerebrospinal region was obtained with varied Tr, Te and flip angle, signal intensities were measured by means of a region of interest (ROI) function, and optimal parameters to achieve maximum tissue contrast were found. Of the parameters flip angle had the greatest effect on tissue contrast. Flip angles less than 20 or more than 60 degrees were necessary to discriminate between spinal cord and cerebrospinal fluid. So called MR myelography was obtained with the flip angle of 15 degrees. Opposed and inphase images were obtained at the Te levels of 21 and 28 ms, respectively. Likewise, a series of transverse images of the abdomen with short Tr, short Te and varied flip angles was obtained in a breath-holding interval, and signal intensities of ROIs were measured. Maximum intensities of the liver, the spleen and perirenal fat were obtained at the flip angles of 40, 30 and 60 degrees, respectively. Although maximum intensity was found at the flip angle of 30 degrees for both of the renal cortex and medulla, the maximum contrast between the two tissues was obtained at the flip angles of 50-60 degrees. The image contrast obtained by these pulse sequences was also theoretically predictable, and so it is thought possible that flip angle, Tr and Te are manipulated to yield a desired contrast. (author)

  14. Pulsed power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The key element of our pulsed power program is concentration of power in time and space by suppression of breakdown in dielectrics and in vacuum. Magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines and magnetic suppression of insulator flashover have continued as the main reserch directions. Vacuum insulated line studies at Physics International have been expanded and a test bed at Sandia, called MITE (Magnetically Insulated Transmission Experiment), is under development. The choice for the baseline EBFA design will depend on the outcome of these studies and should be made in July 1977. The slow and intermediate speed pulsed power approaches to EBFA will be based on Proto I and Proto II results and several of the projected EBFA subsystems are presently being tested in Proto II. A further stage of power concentration, within the vacuum diode itself, would considerably ease the burden on dielectrics; methods of power multiplication involving magnetically imploded plasmas are being considered and tests have begun using the Ripple III apparatus

  15. X-ray shout echoing through space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    a flash of X-rays hi-res Size hi-res: 3991 Kb Credits: ESA, S. Vaughan (University of Leicester) EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays XMM-Newton's X-ray EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays scattered by dust in our Galaxy. The X-rays were produced by a powerful gamma-ray burst that took place on 3 December 2003. The slowly fading afterglow of the gamma-ray burst is at the centre of the expanding rings. Other, unrelated, X-ray sources can also be seen. The time since the gamma-ray explosion is shown in each panel in hours. At their largest size, the rings would appear in the sky about five times smaller than the full moon. a flash of X-rays hi-res Size hi-res: 2153 Kb Credits: ESA, S. Vaughan (University of Leicester) EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays (Please choose "hi-res" version for animation) XMM-Newton's X-ray EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays scattered by dust in our Galaxy. The X-rays were produced by a powerful gamma-ray burst that took place on 3 December 2003. The slowly fading afterglow of the gamma-ray burst is at the centre of the expanding rings. Other, unrelated, X-ray sources can also be seen. The time since the gamma-ray explosion is shown in each panel in seconds. At their largest size, the rings would appear in the sky about five times smaller than the full moon. This echo forms when the powerful radiation of a gamma-ray burst, coming from far away, crosses a slab of dust in our Galaxy and is scattered by it, like the beam of a lighthouse in clouds. Using the expanding rings to precisely pin-point the location of this dust, astronomers can identify places where new stars and planets are likely to form. On 3 December 2003 ESA's observatory, Integral, detected a burst of gamma rays, lasting about 30 seconds, from the direction of a distant galaxy. Within minutes of the detection, thanks to a sophisticated alert network, many

  16. E-region echo characteristics governed by auroral arc electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available Observations of a pair of auroral arc features by two imagers, one ground- and one space-based, allows the associated field-aligned current (FAC and electric field structure to be inferred. Simultaneous observations of HF radar echoes provide an insight into the irregularity-generating mechanisms. This is especially interesting for the E-region echoes observed, which form the focus of our analysis, and from which several conclusions can be drawn, summarized as follows. Latitudinal variations in echo characteristics are governed by the FAC and electric field background. Particularly sharp boundaries are found at the edges of auroral arcs. Within regions of auroral luminosity, echoes have Doppler shifts below the ion-acoustic speed and are proportional to the electric field, suggesting scatter from gradient drift waves. Regions of downward FAC are associated with mixed high and low Doppler shift echoes. The high Doppler shift component is greatly in excess of the ion-acoustic speed, but seems to be commensurate with the driving electric field. The low Doppler shift component appears to be much depressed below expectations.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; electric fields and currents

  17. Dynamic rayed aurora and enhanced ion-acoustic radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Blixt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation mechanism for naturally enhanced ion-acoustic echoes is still debated. One important issue is how these enhancements are related to auroral activity. All events of enhanced ion-acoustic echoes observed simultaneously with the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR and with high-resolution narrow field-of-view auroral imagers have been collected and studied. Characteristic of all the events is the appearance of very dynamic rayed aurora, and some of the intrinsic features of these auroral displays are identified. Several of these identified features are directly related to the presence of low energy (10-100eV precipitating electrons in addition to the higher energy population producing most of the associated light. The low energy contribution is vital for the formation of the enhanced ion-acoustic echoes. We argue that this type of aurora is sufficient for the generation of naturally enhanced ion-acoustic echoes. In one event two imagers were used to observe the auroral rays simultaneously, one from the radar site and one 7km away. The data from these imagers shows that the auroral rays and the strong backscattering filaments (where the enhanced echoes are produced are located on the same field line, which is in contrast to earlier statements in the litterature that they should be separated.

  18. E-region echo characteristics governed by auroral arc electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Observations of a pair of auroral arc features by two imagers, one ground- and one space-based, allows the associated field-aligned current (FAC and electric field structure to be inferred. Simultaneous observations of HF radar echoes provide an insight into the irregularity-generating mechanisms. This is especially interesting for the E-region echoes observed, which form the focus of our analysis, and from which several conclusions can be drawn, summarized as follows. Latitudinal variations in echo characteristics are governed by the FAC and electric field background. Particularly sharp boundaries are found at the edges of auroral arcs. Within regions of auroral luminosity, echoes have Doppler shifts below the ion-acoustic speed and are proportional to the electric field, suggesting scatter from gradient drift waves. Regions of downward FAC are associated with mixed high and low Doppler shift echoes. The high Doppler shift component is greatly in excess of the ion-acoustic speed, but seems to be commensurate with the driving electric field. The low Doppler shift component appears to be much depressed below expectations.Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; electric fields and currents

  19. Faraday rotation echo spectroscopy and detection of quantum fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Wen; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2014-04-15

    Central spin decoherence is useful for detecting many-body physics in environments and moreover, the spin echo control can remove the effects of static thermal fluctuations so that the quantum fluctuations are revealed. The central spin decoherence approach, however, is feasible only in some special configurations and often requires uniform coupling between the central spin and individual spins in the baths, which are very challenging in experiments. Here, by making analogue between central spin decoherence and depolarization of photons, we propose a scheme of Faraday rotation echo spectroscopy (FRES) for studying quantum fluctuations in interacting spin systems. The echo control of the photon polarization is realized by flipping the polarization with a birefringence crystal. The FRES, similar to spin echo in magnetic resonance spectroscopy, can suppress the effects of the static magnetic fluctuations and therefore reveal dynamical magnetic fluctuations. We apply the scheme to a rare-earth compound LiHoF4 and calculate the echo signal, which is related to the quantum fluctuations of the system. We observe enhanced signals at the phase boundary. The FRES should be useful for studying quantum fluctuations in a broad range of spin systems, including cold atoms, quantum dots, solid-state impurities, and transparent magnetic materials.

  20. Access to long-term optical memories using photon echoes retrieved from semiconductor spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, L.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Yugova, I. A.; Salewski, M.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Karczewski, G.; Wojtowicz, T.; Akimov, I. A.; Bayer, M.

    2014-11-01

    The ability to store optical information is important for both classical and quantum communication. Achieving this in a comprehensive manner (converting the optical field into material excitation, storing this excitation, and releasing it after a controllable time delay) is greatly complicated by the many, often conflicting, properties of the material. More specifically, optical resonances in semiconductor quantum structures with high oscillator strength are inevitably characterized by short excitation lifetimes (and, therefore, short optical memory). Here, we present a new experimental approach to stimulated photon echoes by transferring the information contained in the optical field into a spin system, where it is decoupled from the optical vacuum field and may persist much longer. We demonstrate this for an n-doped CdTe/(Cd,Mg)Te quantum well, the storage time of which could be increased by more than three orders of magnitude, from the picosecond range up to tens of nanoseconds.

  1. Investigation of echo sounding parameters for the characterisation of bottom sediments in a sub-tropical reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Hilgert

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of reservoirs around the world today reaches a surface area of around 500,000 km², equaling one third of that of non-artificial surface water bodies. By impounding rivers through the construction of dams, riverine systems and biochemical cycles are disrupted. Different types of transported materials are trapped behind the dams and form layers of sediment. A method to characterise the spatially extensive sediment volumes with an EA 400 echo sounder was tested in the Vossoroca reservoir in the southeast of Brazil, Paraná State. A number of core and grab samples was taken and analysed for a variety of chemical and physical parameters. These data served as ground truthing for the hydro-acoustic assessment of the sediment. Eight hydro-acoustic parameters were derived from the echo signals using the Sonar5-Pro software. The major objective of defining the optimal survey parameters for the echo sounder as well as determining the difference between core and grab samples was reached by correlating the various single parameters and identifying the best combinations. Density and grain size distribution represented the best detectable sediment features with r-values of 0.94 and 0.95. The lower 38 kHz frequency generally had a better performance than the 200 kHz frequency. Results show that core samples reached a significantly higher quality of correlation for sediment characterisation. Additionally, it is was found that shorter pulse lengths yield a better characterisation. The results underline the potential of single beam echo sounders for extensive sediment characterisation. This methodology may be used for future mass balance estimations of large reservoirs.

  2. Variable-flip-angle spin-echo imaging (VFSE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Toshifumi; Sugimura, Kazuro; Kawamitsu, Hideaki; Yasui, Kiyoshi; Ishida, Tetsuya; Tsukamoto, Tetsuji.

    1990-01-01

    T 2 weighted imaging provides images with high object contrast for pathologic conditions in which the water content of tissues is increased. The authors predicted theoretical analysis of the effects of changing flip angle, and analyzed the effects in MR imaging of both phantoms and humans. Variable flip angle spin echo MR imaging (VFSE) with a 1,000/80 (repetition time msec/echo time msec) can obtain T 2 weighted image when flip angle is smaller than 80 degrees. VFSE with 40 to 60 degrees flip angle have higher contrast than other flip angle images. Signal to noise ratio (S/N) of VFSE are 55% at a 30 degree, 76% at a 45 degree, 92% at a 60 degree respectively as compared with conventional spin echo image (2000/80, flip angle 90 degree). VFSE is applicable to obtain T 2 weighted image reduced imaging time. (author)

  3. Detection of generalized synchronization using echo state networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Soria, D.; Garcia-Ojalvo, J.; Soria-Frisch, A.; Ruffini, G.

    2018-03-01

    Generalized synchronization between coupled dynamical systems is a phenomenon of relevance in applications that range from secure communications to physiological modelling. Here, we test the capabilities of reservoir computing and, in particular, echo state networks for the detection of generalized synchronization. A nonlinear dynamical system consisting of two coupled Rössler chaotic attractors is used to generate temporal series consisting of time-locked generalized synchronized sequences interleaved with unsynchronized ones. Correctly tuned, echo state networks are able to efficiently discriminate between unsynchronized and synchronized sequences even in the presence of relatively high levels of noise. Compared to other state-of-the-art techniques of synchronization detection, the online capabilities of the proposed Echo State Network based methodology make it a promising choice for real-time applications aiming to monitor dynamical synchronization changes in continuous signals.

  4. Echo 7: Magnetospheric properties determined by artificial electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemzek, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The sounding rocket Echo 7 was launched from the Poker Flat Research Range. An on-board accelerator injected high-power electron beams into the magnetospheric tail near L = 6.5. After mirroring at the southern conjugate point, about 20 percent of the initial beam electrons returned to the North as Conjugate Echoes, where detectors (scintillators and spectrometers) on four subpayloads measured their energy and bounce time. The other 80 percent of the beam was pitch angle diffused by wave near the equatorial plane either into the conjugate atmosphere or up to mirror points above the payload. Comparison of measured values to calculations showed that the actual magnetosphere during the flight was well-described by the Tsyganenko-Usmanov model magnetosphere with a Kp value of 2- or 2+. Analysis of echo energies yielded values for the highly variable magnetospheric convection electric field

  5. PULSE COLUMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmett, E.S.

    1964-01-01

    This patent covers a continuous countercurrent liquidsolids contactor column having a number of contactor states each comprising a perforated plate, a layer of balls, and a downcomer tube; a liquid-pulsing piston; and a solids discharger formed of a conical section at the bottom of the column, and a tubular extension on the lowest downcomer terminating in the conical section. Between the conical section and the downcomer extension is formed a small annular opening, through which solids fall coming through the perforated plate of the lowest contactor stage. This annular opening is small enough that the pressure drop thereacross is greater than the pressure drop upward through the lowest contactor stage. (AEC)

  6. Pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenshields, H.; Seddon, W.A.

    1982-03-01

    This supplement to two bibliographies published in 1970 and 1972 lists 734 references to the literature of pulse radiolysis, arranged under eight broad subject headings. The references were compiled by searching Biological Abstracts, Chemical Abstracts, Nuclear Science Abstracts and the Weekly List of Papers in Radiation Chemistry issued by the Radiation Chemistry Data Center of Notre Dame University. Full bibliographic data is given for papers published in the period 1971 to 1974. A personal author index listing more than 600 authors and a similar number of co-authors is included

  7. A computational model for biosonar echoes from foliage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ming

    Full Text Available Since many bat species thrive in densely vegetated habitats, echoes from foliage are likely to be of prime importance to the animals' sensory ecology, be it as clutter that masks prey echoes or as sources of information about the environment. To better understand the characteristics of foliage echoes, a new model for the process that generates these signals has been developed. This model takes leaf size and orientation into account by representing the leaves as circular disks of varying diameter. The two added leaf parameters are of potential importance to the sensory ecology of bats, e.g., with respect to landmark recognition and flight guidance along vegetation contours. The full model is specified by a total of three parameters: leaf density, average leaf size, and average leaf orientation. It assumes that all leaf parameters are independently and identically distributed. Leaf positions were drawn from a uniform probability density function, sizes and orientations each from a Gaussian probability function. The model was found to reproduce the first-order amplitude statistics of measured example echoes and showed time-variant echo properties that depended on foliage parameters. Parameter estimation experiments using lasso regression have demonstrated that a single foliage parameter can be estimated with high accuracy if the other two parameters are known a priori. If only one parameter is known a priori, the other two can still be estimated, but with a reduced accuracy. Lasso regression did not support simultaneous estimation of all three parameters. Nevertheless, these results demonstrate that foliage echoes contain accessible information on foliage type and orientation that could play a role in supporting sensory tasks such as landmark identification and contour following in echolocating bats.

  8. Pulse pile-up. I: Short pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, D.H.

    1990-07-01

    The search for rare large pulses against an intense background of smaller ones involves consideration of pulse pile-up. Approximate methods are presented, based on ruin theory, by which the probability of such pile-up may be estimated for pulses of arbitrary form and of arbitrary pulse-height distribution. These methods are checked against cases for which exact solutions are available. The present paper is concerned chiefly with short pulses of finite total duration. (Author) (5 refs., 24 figs.)

  9. MR venography using the 3D-MEDIC (multi echo data imaging combination) sequence for lower extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Hisashi; Kishi, Takayuki; Saito, Ryo; Shohji, Tomokazu; Noguchi, Keiji; Sunohara, Nobuo

    2008-01-01

    It is possible to diagnose varicose vein from medical history and physical examinations including inspection and palpation. Non-contrast enhanced MRV (magnetic resonance venography) is becoming popular because it can be easily performed without being affected by the radiographer's skill. We thought that the use of MEDIC (multi echo data imaging combination) would enable us to delineate varicose veins within a short acquisition time and without need for synchronization or contrast enhancement. We used the SIEMENS MAGNETOM Avanto 1.5-Tesla unit to acquire images. Our subjects were five healthy volunteers and five patients with varicose vein. The signal strength of deep veins and muscles were measured. The SNR (signal-to-nose ratio) of deep veins and the CNR (contrast-to-noise ratio) between deep veins and muscles were also measured. Flip angle, fat suppression methods, MTC (magnetic transfer contrast) pulse, and combined echo. Using the optimum image acquisition protocol following our preliminary study with varicose vein patients, the ability of the 3D-MEDIC method to delineate varicose veins was compared with that of the electrocardiogram (ECG)-synchronized two-dimensional time of flight (2D-TOF) method. We found that the following settings would enable us to acquire images from a wide range=coronal, within short acquisition time and needless ECG-triggering. Flip angle=20 degrees, fat suppression method=water excitation, MTC pulse=ON, combined echo=2. 3D-MEDIC was better than the 2D-TOF method in delineating the varicose vein itself and the connection between the varicose vein and deep veins. It is expected that 3D-MEDIC may be useful in the clinical diagnosis of varicose veins. (author)

  10. Fat suppression in MR imaging with binomial pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudovin, C.J.; Bryant, D.J.; Bydder, G.M.; Young, I.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a study to develop pulse sequences allowing suppression of fat signal on MR images without eliminating signal from other tissues with short T1. They have developed such a technique involving selective excitation of protons in water, based on a binomial pulse sequence. Imaging is performed at 0.15 T. Careful shimming is performed to maximize separation of fat and water peaks. A spin-echo 1,500/80 sequence is used, employing 90 degrees pulse with transit frequency optimized for water with null excitation of 20 H offset, followed by a section-selective 180 degrees pulse. With use of the binomial sequence for imagining, reduction in fat signal is seen on images of the pelvis and legs of volunteers. Patient studies show dramatic improvement in visualization of prostatic carcinoma compared with standard sequences

  11. General solution to inhomogeneous dephasing and smooth pulse dynamical decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Junkai; Deng, Xiu-Hao; Russo, Antonio; Barnes, Edwin

    2018-03-01

    In order to achieve the high-fidelity quantum control needed for a broad range of quantum information technologies, reducing the effects of noise and system inhomogeneities is an essential task. It is well known that a system can be decoupled from noise or made insensitive to inhomogeneous dephasing dynamically by using carefully designed pulse sequences based on square or delta-function waveforms such as Hahn spin echo or CPMG. However, such ideal pulses are often challenging to implement experimentally with high fidelity. Here, we uncover a new geometrical framework for visualizing all possible driving fields, which enables one to generate an unlimited number of smooth, experimentally feasible pulses that perform dynamical decoupling or dynamically corrected gates to arbitrarily high order. We demonstrate that this scheme can significantly enhance the fidelity of single-qubit operations in the presence of noise and when realistic limitations on pulse rise times and amplitudes are taken into account.

  12. Combining multi-pulse excitation and chirp coding in contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocco, M; Sciallero, C; Trucco, A; Pellegretti, P

    2009-01-01

    The development of techniques to separate the response of the contrast agent from that of the biological tissues is of great importance in ultrasound medical imaging. In the literature, one can find various solutions involving the use of multiple transmitted signals and the weighted sum of related echoes. In this paper, the combination of one of these multi-pulse techniques with a coded excitation is proposed and assessed. Coded excitation has been used mainly to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the penetration depth, provided that a matched filtering is applied in the reception chain. However, it has been shown that a signal with a long duration time also increases the backscattered echoes produced by the microbubbles and, consequently, the contrast-to-tissue ratio. Therefore, the implementation of a multi-pulse technique using a long coded pulse can yield a better contrast-to-tissue ratio and SNR. This paper investigates the combination of the linear chirp pulse with a multi-pulse technique based on the transmission of three pulses. The performance was evaluated using both simulated and real signals, assessing the improvement in the contrast-to-tissue ratio and SNR, the visual quality of the images obtained and the axial accuracy. A comparison with the same multi-pulse technique implemented using a traditional amplitude-modulated pulse revealed that the deployment of a chirp pulse produces several noticeable advantages and only a minor drawback

  13. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  14. Pulse-echo phased array ultrasonic inspection of pultruded rod stitched efficient unitized structure (PRSEUS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P. H.

    2011-01-01

    A PRSEUS test article was subjected to controlled impact on the skin face followed by static and cyclic axial compressions. Phased array ultrasonic inspection was conducted before impact, and after each of the test conditions. A linear phased array probe with a manual X-Y scanner was used for interrogation. Ultrasound showed a delamination between the skin and stringer flange adjacent to the impact. As designed, the stitching in the flange arrested the lateral flaw formation. Subsequent ultrasonic data showed no delamination growth due to continued loading.

  15. Short echo time MR spectroscopy of human brain at 3 Tesla using asymmetric pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mlynárik, V.; Gruber, S.; Starčuk, Zenon; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Moser, E.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 8, 1-Suppl. (1999), s. 231-232 E-ISSN 1352-8661. [ESMRMB /16./ - Annual Meeting of the European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology. 16.09.1999-19.09.1999, Sevila] Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  16. Cardiac T2-mapping using a fast gradient echo spin echo sequence - first in vitro and in vivo experience

    OpenAIRE

    Baessler, Bettina; Schaarschmidt, Frank; Stehning, Christian; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Maintz, David; Bunck, Alexander C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was the evaluation of a fast Gradient Spin Echo Technique (GraSE) for cardiac T2-mapping, combining a robust estimation of T2 relaxation times with short acquisition times. The sequence was compared against two previously introduced T2-mapping techniques in a phantom and in vivo. Methods: Phantom experiments were performed at 1.5 T using a commercially available cylindrical gel phantom. Three different T2-mapping techniques were compared: a Multi Echo Spin Ec...

  17. Comparison of gradient-recalled echo and spin-echo echo-planar imaging MR elastography in staging liver fibrosis. A meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Seek; Jang, Yu Na; Song, Ji Soo

    2018-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of gradient-recalled echo-based magnetic resonance elastography (GRE-MRE) and spin-echo echo-planar imaging-based MRE (SE-EPI-MRE) in liver fibrosis staging. A systematic literature search was performed to identify studies involving the performance of MRE for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, the diagnostic odds ratio, and a summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were estimated by using a bivariate random effects model. Subgroup analyses were performed between different study characteristics. Twenty-six studies with a total of 3,200 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled sensitivity and specificity of GRE-MRE and SE-EPI-MRE did not differ significantly. The area under the summary ROC curve for stage diagnosis of any (F ≥ 1), significant (F ≥ 2), advanced (F ≥ 3), and cirrhosis (F = 4) on GRE-MRE and SE-EPI-MRE were 0.93 versus 0.94, 0.95 versus 0.94, 0.94 versus 0.95, and 0.92 versus 0.93, respectively. Substantial heterogeneity was detected for both sequences. Both GRE and SE-EPI-MRE show high sensitivity and specificity for detection of each stage of liver fibrosis, without significant differences. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) may be useful for noninvasive evaluation of liver fibrosis in chronic liver disease. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of crosstalk effect on spin-echo images at 1.5 and 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajisako, Masaaki; Taniguchi, Masahiro; Koizumi, Koji; Hiraga, Akira; Miyati, Tosiaki; Syakudo, Yuko; Miki, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the crosstalk effect on spin-echo (SE) images at 1.5 and 3 T MRI. We examined the influence of crosstalk by comparing the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and slice profile of images of a wedge-shaped phantom for various slice gaps. We also assessed crosstalk effect in the brain by comparing image contrast among healthy volunteers (n=8). Among the subjects, the shapes of the slice profiles at 1.5 T were similar to those at 3 T for long repetition times (TRs); however, at shorter TRs, differences in slice profiles were observed among the subjects and were more apparent at 3 than at 1.5 T. The relative contrast between white matter and gray matter on T 1 -weighted images was lower at 3 than at 1.5 T. The crosstalk effect was strongest when the TR of the excitation pulse was short. The influence of the adjacent excitation pulse is important in the process of T 1 relaxation because T 1 values are greater at 3 T. In conclusion, the influence of crosstalk on SE T 1 -weighted images is greater at 3 than at 1.5 T. (author)

  19. Phosphorus-31 MRI of bones using quadratic echo line-narrowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Merideth; Barrett, Sean; Insogna, Karl; Vanhouten, Joshua

    2012-02-01

    There is a great need to probe the internal composition of bone on the sub-0.1 mm length scale, both to study normal features and to look for signs of disease. Despite the obvious importance of the mineral fraction to the biomechanical properties of skeletal tissue, few non-destructive techniques are available to evaluate changes in its chemical structure and functional microarchitecture on the interior of bones. MRI would be an excellent candidate, but bone is a particularly challenging tissue to study given the relatively low water density and wider linewidths of its solid components. Recent fundamental research in quantum computing gave rise to a new NMR pulse sequence - the quadratic echo - that can be used to narrow the broad NMR spectrum of solids. This offers a new route to do high spatial resolution, 3D ^31P MRI of bone that complements conventional MRI and x-ray based techniques to study bone physiology and structure. We have used our pulse sequence to do 3D ^31P MRI of ex vivo bones with a spatial resolution of (sub-450 μm)^3, limited only by the specifications of a conventional 4 Tesla liquid-state MRI system. We will describe our plans to push this technique towards the factor of 1000 increase in spatial resolution imposed by fundamental limits.

  20. Time-resolved photon echoes from donor-bound excitons in ZnO epitaxial layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kosarev, A. N.; Akimov, I. A.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Sadofev, S.; Puls, J.; Hoffmann, S. P.; Albert, M.; Meier, C.; Meier, T.; Bayer, M.

    2017-07-01

    The coherent optical response from 140 nm and 65 nm thick ZnO epitaxial layers is studied using four-wave-mixing spectroscopy with picosecond temporal resolution. Resonant excitation of neutral donor-bound excitons results in two-pulse and three-pulse photon echoes. For the donor-bound A exciton (D0XA ) at temperature of 1.8 K we evaluate optical coherence times T2=33 -50 ps corresponding to homogeneous line widths of 13 -19 μ eV , about two orders of magnitude smaller as compared with the inhomogeneous broadening of the optical transitions. The coherent dynamics is determined mainly by the population decay with time T1=30 -40 ps, while pure dephasing is negligible. Temperature increase leads to a significant shortening of T2 due to interaction with acoustic phonons. In contrast, the loss of coherence of the donor-bound B exciton (D0XB ) is significantly faster (T2=3.6 ps ) and governed by pure dephasing processes.

  1. Seafloor characterisation using echo peak amplitudes of multibeam hydrosweep system - A preliminary study at Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Sudhakar, T.

    In this paper an interface to acquire 59-beams echo peak amplitudes of the Hydrosweep Multibeam system is established. The echo peak amplitude values collected at varying seabed provinces of Arabian sea are presented. The study reveals...

  2. 31P NMR imaging of solid bone with solid echoes combined with refocused gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L.; Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT; Kruger, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    This note on 31 p NMR imaging presents some observations of the solid echoes acquired from solid bone and how the proposed solid echo imaging method can be employed to obtain the 31 images of solid bone. (UK)

  3. Edward Albee’s The Zoo Story: Echo/es of Contemporary Subversive Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naqibun Nabi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The post-world war II American social and cultural setting was ambiguously featured with enforced conformity in the name of prosperity and Americanization of the nation. Despite of this fact, American writers, especially, dramatists conveyed their message against this fixation through variety and intellectuality. Edward Albee’s The Zoo Story is one of those literary assets which dedicatedly cut through the illusions of contemporary American social and cultural ethos. Here, his characters are seen struggling constantly with their insecurities and existential angst in the society. He presents America, the so-called ‘Land of Free and Home of Braves’ (note 1, in such a portrayal that unveils the traps of cages and confinement underneath. The target of this paper is to trace Edward Albee’s heightened awareness about the post-war American socio-cultural reality evident in The Zoo Story. It also looks for the voice in which the text echoes out the anti-communist, materialistic, gender-coded boundaries, coupled with paradoxical media representations, religious bordering and how Albee challenges these issues with an anti-establishment tone. Keywords: subversive culture, anti-communism, media, religion and homosexuality

  4. Infrared photon-echo spectroscopy of water : The thermalization effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Yeremenko, Sergey; Wiersma, Douwe A.; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Nelson, Keith A.; Okada, Tadashi; Silvestri, Sandro De

    2005-01-01

    The larger part of the nonlinear response in IR photon-echo and transient-grating spectroscopy on HDO-D2O mixtures at > 1-ps delays is found to originate from the D2O refractive index modulation due to local volume thermalization.

  5. Characterization of trehalose aqueous solutions by neutron spin echo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branca, C.; Faraone, A.; Magazu' , S.; Maisano, G.; Mangione, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFM, Universita di Messina, PO Box 55, 98166 Messina (Italy); Pappas, C.; Triolo, A. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut, BENSC (NI), Glienicker Strasse, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The present work reports neutron spin-echo (NSE) results on aqueous mixtures of trehalose, a naturally occurring disaccharide of glucose, which shows an extraordinary bioprotective effectiveness against dehydration and freezing. The aim of the work is to furnish new results on the dynamics of the trehalose/water system on the nano- and picosecond scales. (orig.)

  6. Spin-Echo Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uca, O.

    2003-01-01

    Spin-Echo Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SESANS) instrument is a novel SANS technique which enables one to characterize distances from a few nanometers up to the micron range. The most striking difference between normal SANS and SESANS is that in SESANS one gets information in real space, whereas

  7. Participatory Culture at the Echo Park Film Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Jennifer Ann

    2013-01-01

    The Echo Park Film Center, a Los Angeles nonprofit media education organization, teaches underprivileged youth how to comprehend and make media in order to empower them to speak and be heard. Due to the organization's nonmainstream media courses and its connection to its community, the Center is able to create a participatory and socially…

  8. HF Radar Sea-echo from Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Kohut

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available HF radar systems are widely and routinely used for the measurement of ocean surface currents and waves. Analysis methods presently in use are based on the assumption of infinite water depth, and may therefore be inadequate close to shore where the radar echo is strongest. In this paper, we treat the situation when the radar echo is returned from ocean waves that interact with the ocean floor. Simulations are described which demonstrate the effect of shallow water on radar sea-echo. These are used to investigate limits on the existing theory and to define water depths at which shallow-water effects become significant. The second-order spectral energy increases relative to the first-order as the water depth decreases, resulting in spectral saturation when the waveheight exceeds a limit defined by the radar transmit frequency. This effect is particularly marked for lower radar transmit frequencies. The saturation limit on waveheight is less for shallow water. Shallow water affects second-order spectra (which gives wave information far more than first-order (which gives information on current velocities, the latter being significantly affected only for the lowest radar transmit frequencies for extremely shallow water. We describe analysis of radar echo from shallow water measured by a Rutgers University HF radar system to give ocean wave spectral estimates. Radar-derived wave height, period and direction are compared with simultaneous shallow-water in-situ measurements.

  9. Echo pattern of lymph nodes in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Kronborg, Ole; Fenger, Claus

    1992-01-01

    Surgical specimens from 75 patients with colorectal cancer were examined within 15 min of removal with a 7.5 MHz linear-array transducer. The echo pattern of 139 lymph nodes was analysed to evaluate previous criteria of malignancy and to establish other possible criteria, which could be tested...

  10. Characterization of trehalose aqueous solutions by neutron spin echo

    CERN Document Server

    Branca, C; Magazù, S; Maisano, G; Mangione, A; Pappas, C; Triolo, A

    2002-01-01

    The present work reports neutron spin-echo (NSE) results on aqueous mixtures of trehalose, a naturally occurring disaccharide of glucose, which shows an extraordinary bioprotective effectiveness against dehydration and freezing. The aim of the work is to furnish new results on the dynamics of the trehalose/water system on the nano- and picosecond scales. (orig.)

  11. Echoing in Autistic Children: A Chronometric Study of Semantic Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Theodore; Lucy, Peter

    1978-01-01

    Explores the idea that echoing in autistics differs from normal imitation and represents a different species of production. Subjects were five autistic children, ranging in age from 3 years 10 months to 6 years 8 months, and two normal children, aged 2 years 6 months and 3 years 11 months. (MP)

  12. Analysis of multibeam-hydrosweep echo peaks for seabed characterisation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Schenke, H.W.; Kodagali, V.N.; Hagen, R.

    , in general, Gaussian in nature except in the case of the Kainan Maru seamount summit (area D). The outer beams of the Enderby abyssal plain (area C) echo-peak PDF statistics reveal the highest possible large-scale feature dominance. Interestingly, Extremal...

  13. Relativistic electron dropout echoes induced by interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Q.; Kanekal, S. G.; Boyd, A. J.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Spence, H. E.

    2017-12-01

    Interplanetary shocks that impact Earth's magnetosphere can produce immediate and dramatic responses in the trapped relativistic electron population. One well-studied response is a prompt injection capable of transporting relativistic electrons deep into the magnetosphere and accelerating them to multi-MeV energies. The converse effect, electron dropout echoes, are observations of a sudden dropout of electron fluxes observed after the interplanetary shock arrival. Like the injection echo signatures, dropout echoes can also show clear energy dispersion signals. They are of particular interest because they have only recently been observed and their causal mechanism is not well understood. In the analysis presented here, we show observations of electron drift echo signatures from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) and Magnetic Electron and Ion Sensors (MagEIS) onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission, which show simultaneous prompt enhancements and dropouts within minutes of the associated with shock impact. We show that the observations associated with both enhancements and dropouts are explained by the inward motion caused by the electric field impulse induced by the interplanetary shock, and either energization to cause the enhancement, or lack of a seed population to cause the dropout.

  14. Electron Dropout Echoes Induced by Interplanetary Shock: A Statistical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Zong, Q.; Hao, Y.; Zhou, X.; Ma, X.; Liu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    "Electron dropout echo" as indicated by repeated moderate dropout and recovery signatures of the flux of energetic electron in the out radiation belt region has been investigated systematically. The electron dropout and its echoes are usually found for higher energy (> 300 keV) channels fluxes, whereas the flux enhancements are obvious for lower energy electrons simultaneously after the interplanetary shock arrives at the Earth's geosynchronous orbit. 104 dropout echo events have been found from 215 interplanetary shock events from 1998 to 2007 based on LANL satellite data. In analogy to substorm injections, these 104 events could be naturally divided into two categories: dispersionless (49 events) or dispersive (55 events) according to the energy dispersion of the initial dropout. It is found that locations of dispersionless events are distributed mainly in the duskside magnetosphere. Further, the obtained locations derived from dispersive events with the time-of-flight technique of the initial dropout regions are mainly located at the duskside as well. Statistical studies have shown that the effect of shock normal, interplanetary magnetic field Bz and solar wind dynamic pressure may be insignificant to these electron dropout events. We suggest that the electric field impulse induced by the IP shock produces a more pronounced inward migration of electrons at the dusk side, resulting in the observed dusk-side moderate dropout of electron flux and its consequent echoes.

  15. Real-Time Forecasting of Echo-Centroid Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    is apparent that after five observations are obtained, the forecast error drops considerably. The normal lifetime of an echo (25 to 30 min) is...10kmI I ! Fig. 11. Track of 5 April 1978 mesocyclone (M) and two TVS’s (1) and (2). Times are CST. Pumpkin Center tornado is hatched and Marlow tornado is

  16. Larry Echo Hawk: A Rising Star from Idaho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisecarver, Charmaine

    1993-01-01

    Larry Echo Hawk, Idaho attorney general and former state legislator, discusses success factors in college and law school; early experiences as an Indian lawyer; first election campaign; and his views on tribal sovereignty, state-tribal relationship, gambling, and his dual responsibility to the general public and Native American issues. (SV)

  17. Numerical experiment with modelled return echo of a satellite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have simulated the return echo of a satellite altimeter from a rough ocean surface using an analytical formula and have studied its sensitivity with respect to various oceanic and altimeter parameters. Our numerical expcriment shows that for normally observed significant wave heights (SWFI) the effect of ...

  18. Direct magnetic field estimation based on echo planar raw data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testud, Frederik; Splitthoff, Daniel Nicolas; Speck, Oliver; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2010-07-01

    Gradient recalled echo echo planar imaging is widely used in functional magnetic resonance imaging. The fast data acquisition is, however, very sensitive to field inhomogeneities which manifest themselves as artifacts in the images. Typically used correction methods have the common deficit that the data for the correction are acquired only once at the beginning of the experiment, assuming the field inhomogeneity distribution B(0) does not change over the course of the experiment. In this paper, methods to extract the magnetic field distribution from the acquired k-space data or from the reconstructed phase image of a gradient echo planar sequence are compared and extended. A common derivation for the presented approaches provides a solid theoretical basis, enables a fair comparison and demonstrates the equivalence of the k-space and the image phase based approaches. The image phase analysis is extended here to calculate the local gradient in the readout direction and improvements are introduced to the echo shift analysis, referred to here as "k-space filtering analysis." The described methods are compared to experimentally acquired B(0) maps in phantoms and in vivo. The k-space filtering analysis presented in this work demonstrated to be the most sensitive method to detect field inhomogeneities.

  19. Characteristics of spondylotic myelopathy on 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo and 2D fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging: a retrospective cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulhadi, Mike A; Perno, Joseph R; Melhem, Elias R; Nucifora, Paolo G P

    2014-01-01

    In patients with spinal stenosis, magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine can be improved by using 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences to provide a high-resolution assessment of osseous and ligamentous structures. However, it is not yet clear whether 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences adequately evaluate the spinal cord itself. As a result, they are generally supplemented by additional 2D fast spin echo sequences, adding time to the examination and potential discomfort to the patient. Here we investigate the hypothesis that in patients with spinal stenosis and spondylotic myelopathy, 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences can characterize cord lesions equally well as 2D fast spin echo sequences. We performed a retrospective analysis of 30 adult patients with spondylotic myelopathy who had been examined with both 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences and 2D fast spin echo sequences at the same scanning session. The two sequences were inspected separately for each patient, and visible cord lesions were manually traced. We found no significant differences between 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo and 2D fast spin echo sequences in the mean number, mean area, or mean transverse dimensions of spondylotic cord lesions. Nevertheless, the mean contrast-to-noise ratio of cord lesions was decreased on 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences compared to 2D fast spin echo sequences. These findings suggest that 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences do not need supplemental 2D fast spin echo sequences for the diagnosis of spondylotic myelopathy, but they may be less well suited for quantitative signal measurements in the spinal cord.

  20. The electron capture in 163Ho experiment - ECHo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaldo, L.; Blaum, K.; Chrysalidis, K.; Day Goodacre, T.; Domula, A.; Door, M.; Dorrer, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Eliseev, S.; Enss, C.; Faessler, A.; Filianin, P.; Fleischmann, A.; Fonnesu, D.; Gamer, L.; Haas, R.; Hassel, C.; Hengstler, D.; Jochum, J.; Johnston, K.; Kebschull, U.; Kempf, S.; Kieck, T.; Köster, U.; Lahiri, S.; Maiti, M.; Mantegazzini, F.; Marsh, B.; Neroutsos, P.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Ranitzsch, P. C. O.; Rothe, S.; Rischka, A.; Saenz, A.; Sander, O.; Schneider, F.; Scholl, S.; Schüssler, R. X.; Schweiger, Ch.; Simkovic, F.; Stora, T.; Szücs, Z.; Türler, A.; Veinhard, M.; Weber, M.; Wegner, M.; Wendt, K.; Zuber, K.

    2017-06-01

    Neutrinos, and in particular their tiny but non-vanishing masses, can be considered one of the doors towards physics beyond the Standard Model. Precision measurements of the kinematics of weak interactions, in particular of the 3H β-decay and the 163Ho electron capture (EC), represent the only model independent approach to determine the absolute scale of neutrino masses. The electron capture in 163Ho experiment, ECHo, is designed to reach sub-eV sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass by means of the analysis of the calorimetrically measured electron capture spectrum of the nuclide 163Ho. The maximum energy available for this decay, about 2.8 keV, constrains the type of detectors that can be used. Arrays of low temperature metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are being developed to measure the 163Ho EC spectrum with energy resolution below 3 eV FWHM and with a time resolution below 1 μs. To achieve the sub-eV sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass, together with the detector optimization, the availability of large ultra-pure 163Ho samples, the identification and suppression of background sources as well as the precise parametrization of the 163Ho EC spectrum are of utmost importance. The high-energy resolution 163Ho spectra measured with the first MMC prototypes with ion-implanted 163Ho set the basis for the ECHo experiment. We describe the conceptual design of ECHo and motivate the strategies we have adopted to carry on the present medium scale experiment, ECHo-1K. In this experiment, the use of 1 kBq 163Ho will allow to reach a neutrino mass sensitivity below 10 eV/ c 2. We then discuss how the results being achieved in ECHo-1k will guide the design of the next stage of the ECHo experiment, ECHo-1M, where a source of the order of 1 MBq 163Ho embedded in large MMCs arrays will allow to reach sub-eV sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass.

  1. Relapse and long-term cognitive performance after brief pulse or ultrabrief pulse right unilateral electroconvulsive therapy: A multicenter naturalistic follow up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwijk, E.; Spaans, H.P.; Comijs, H.C.; Kho, K.H.; Sienaert, P.; Bouckaert, F.; Obbels, J.; Scherder, E.J.A.; Stek, M.L.; Kok, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Superior cognitive functioning for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) with right unilateral (RUL) ultrabrief pulse (UBP) stimulation compared to RUL brief pulse (BP) stimulation is not clearly established and long-term data is needed. Methods We conducted a prospective naturalistic follow-up

  2. Improving Pain Care with Project ECHO in Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daren; Zlateva, Ianita; Davis, Bennet; Bifulco, Lauren; Giannotti, Tierney; Coman, Emil; Spegman, Douglas

    2017-10-01

    Pain is an extremely common complaint in primary care, and patient outcomes are often suboptimal. This project evaluated the impact of Project ECHO Pain videoconference case-based learning sessions on knowledge and quality of pain care in two Federally Qualified Health Centers. Quasi-experimental, pre-post intervention, with comparison group. Two large, multisite federally qualified health centers in Connecticut and Arizona. Intervention (N = 10) and comparison (N = 10) primary care providers. Primary care providers attended 48 weekly Project ECHO Pain sessions between January and December 2013, led by a multidisciplinary pain specialty team. Surveys and focus groups assessed providers' pain-related knowledge and self-efficacy. Electronic health record data were analyzed to evaluate opioid prescribing and specialty referrals. Compared with control, primary care providers in the intervention had a significantly greater increase in pain-related knowledge and self-efficacy. Providers who attended ECHO were more likely to use formal assessment tools and opioid agreements and refer to behavioral health and physical therapy compared with control providers. Opioid prescribing decreased significantly more among providers in the intervention compared with those in the control group. Pain is an extremely common and challenging problem, particularly among vulnerable patients such as those cared for at the more than 1,200 Federally Qualified Health Centers in the United States. In this study, attendance at weekly Project ECHO Pain sessions not only improved knowledge and self-efficacy, but also altered prescribing and referral patterns, suggesting that knowledge acquired during ECHO sessions translated into practice changes. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine.

  3. Bursting behaviours in cascaded stimulated Brillouin scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhan-Jun; He Xian-Tu; Zheng Chun-Yang; Wang Yu-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering is studied by numerically solving the Vlasov—Maxwell system. A cascade of stimulated Brillouin scattering can occur when a linearly polarized laser pulse propagates in a plasma. It is found that a stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can reduce the scattering and increase the transmission of light, as well as introduce a bursting behaviour in the evolution of the laser-plasma interaction. The bursting time in the reflectivity is found to be less than half the ion acoustic period. The ion temperature can affect the stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade, which can repeat several times at low ion temperatures and can be completely eliminated at high ion temperatures. For stimulated Brillouin scattering saturation, higher-harmonic generation and wave—wave interaction of the excited ion acoustic waves can restrict the amplitude of the latter. In addition, stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can restrict the amplitude of the scattered light. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  4. Duel frequency echo data acquisition system for sea-floor classification

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Navelkar, G.S.; Desai, R.G.P.; Chakraborty, B.

    An echo data acquisition system is designed to digitize echo signal from a single beam shipboard echo-sounder for use in sea-floor classification studies using a 12 bit analog to digital (A/D) card with a maximum sampling frequency of 1 MHz. Both 33...

  5. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung-chi Lihn.

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed

  6. Application of pulsed OSL to polymineral fine-grained samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feathers, James K.; Casson, M. Aksel; Schmidt, Amanda Henck; Chithambo, Makaiko L.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed OSL is applied to nine fine-grained sediment samples from Sichuan province, China, using stimulating pulses of 10 μs on and 240 μs off, with an infrared exposure prior to each OSL measurement. Comparison of fading rates between pulsed and non-pulsed signals, the latter also obtained with a preceding IR exposure, shows that fading is significant for mainly the non-pulsed signals. Presence of a pulsed IRSL and the magnitudes of b-value to correct for lower alpha efficiency suggest that pulsing does not fully remove a significant feldspar signal, only a fading component. Comparison with ages of quartz extracts shows that pulsed OSL ages are consistent, while CW-OSL ages are slightly older and CW-IRSL ages are much older. The older ages suggest a less well-bleached feldspar component.

  7. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Mark

    2000-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is rapidly developing as a powerful, non-invasive tool for studying the human brain. A pulsed magnetic field creates current flow in the brain and can temporarily excite or inhibit specific areas. TMS of motor cortex can produce a muscle twitch or block movement; TMS of occipital cortex can produce visual phosphenes or scotomas. TMS can also alter the functioning of the brain beyond the time of stimulation, offering potential for therapy.

  8. Propagation of complex shaped ultrafast pulses in highly optically dense samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J. C.; Fetterman, M. R.; Warren, W. S.; Goswami, D.

    2008-01-01

    We examine the propagation of shaped (amplitude- and frequency-modulated) ultrafast laser pulses through optically dense rubidium vapor. Pulse reshaping, stimulated emission dynamics, and residual electronic excitation all strongly depend on the laser pulse shape. For example, frequency swept pulses, which produce adiabatic passage in the optically thin limit (independent of the sign of the frequency sweep), behave unexpectedly in optically dense samples. Paraxial Maxwell optical Bloch equations can model our ultrafast pulse propagation results well and provide insight

  9. Enhancement of cortical network activity in vitro and promotion of GABAergic neurogenesis by stimulation with an electromagnetic field with a 150 MHz carrier wave pulsed with an alternating 10 and 16 Hz modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eGramowski-Voss

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, various stimuli were identified capable of enhancing neurogenesis, a process which is dysfunctional in the senescent brain and in neurodegenerative and certain neuropsychiatric diseases. Applications of electromagnetic fields to brain tissue have been shown to affect cellular properties and their importance for therapies in medicine is recognized.In this study, differentiating murine cortical networks on multiwell microelectrode arrays were repeatedly exposed to an extremely low electromagnetic field (ELEMF with alternating 10 and 16 Hz frequencies piggy-backed onto a 150 MHz carrier frequency. The ELEMF exposure stimulated the electrical network activity and intensified the structure of bursts. Further, the exposure with an electromagnetic field within the first 28 days of the differentiation the network activity induced also reorganization within the burst structure. This effect was already most pronounced at 14 days in vitro after 10 days of exposure. Overall, the development of cortical activity under these conditions was accelerated. These functional electrophysiological changes were accompanied by morphological ones. The percentage of neurons in the neuron glia co-culture was increased without affecting the total number of cells, indicating an enhancement of neurogenesis. The ELEMF exposure selectively promoted the proliferation of a particular population of neurons, evidenced by the increased proportion of GABAergic neurons. The results support the initial hypothesis that this kind of ELEMF stimulation is a treatment option for specific indications with promising potential for CNS applications, especially for degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

  10. Clinical characteristics in normal healthy adults with microbleeds on echo-planar gradient-echo T2*-weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Wakoh; Ide, Michiru; Ohnuki, Tomohide; Takagi, Shigeharu; Shinohara, Yukito

    2004-01-01

    The gradient-echo T 2 * -weighted sequence in magnetic resonance imaging is known to be useful for detecting microbleeds (MBs) in patients with intracranial hemorrhage or lacunar stroke. We investigated the characteristics of apparently healthy adults with MBs but without stroke, employing echo-planar gradient-echo T 2 * -weighted MRI. The subjects were recruited from among 3,537 participants who underwent brain check-ups at the HIMEDIC Imaging Center. Of the 3,537 participants, 3,296 (mean age, 55±11 years) without any history of cerebrovascular disease or apparent focal neurological manifestations were selected for the present study. MBs on echo-planar gradient-echo T 2 * -weighted MRI were observed in 74 (2.2%) of the 3,296 subjects. Of a total of 133 lesions found in these 74 persons, 31 were located in the basal ganglia or cortico-subcortical regions. Thirty were in the deep white matter, 19 in the thalamus, 16 in the cerebellum, and 6 in the brain stem. The subjects with MBs were significantly older than the subjects without MBs, and the mean values for their systolic and diastolic blood pressures were higher than those in the subjects without MBs. Asymptomatic cerebral infarction, periventricular hyperintensity, and deep and subcortical white matter hyperintensity on T 1 - and T 2 -weighted MRI were more frequent in the subjects with MBs, as compared with those without MBs. Asymptomatic cerebral infarction, periventricular hyperintensity, and deep and subcortical white matter hyperintensity on T 1 - and T 2 -weighted MRI were more frequent in the subjects with MBs of the basal ganglia or thalamus than in those with MBs in other regions. MBs on echo-planar gradient-echo T 2 * -weighted MRI were thus relatively rare in apparently healthy adults. However, MBs in the basal ganglia or thalamus are suggested to be closely related to intracerebral microangiopathy. Persons with MBs in such regions should therefore be carefully checked for cerebrovascular risk

  11. Sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Wald, Lawrence L; Belliveau, John W; Posse, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) provides spatially resolved metabolite information that is invaluable for both neuroscience studies and clinical applications. However, lengthy data acquisition times, which are a result of time-consuming phase encoding, represent a major challenge for MRSI. Fast MRSI pulse sequences that use echo-planar readout gradients, such as proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI), are capable of fast spectral-spatial encoding and thus enable acceleration of image acquisition times. Combining PEPSI with recent advances in parallel MRI utilizing RF coil arrays can further accelerate MRSI data acquisition. Here we investigate the feasibility of ultrafast spectroscopic imaging at high field (3T and 4T) by combining PEPSI with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) MRI using eight-channel head coil arrays. We show that the acquisition of single-average SENSE-PEPSI data at a short TE (15 ms) can be accelerated to 32 s or less, depending on the field strength, to obtain metabolic images of choline (Cho), creatine (Cre), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), and J-coupled metabolites (e.g., glutamate (Glu) and inositol (Ino)) with acceptable spectral quality and localization. The experimentally measured reductions in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) of metabolite resonances were well explained by both the g-factor and reduced measurement times. Thus, this technology is a promising means of reducing the scan times of 3D acquisitions and time-resolved 2D measurements. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Partial flip angle spin-echo imaging to obtain T1 weighted images with electrocardiographic gating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamitsu, Hideaki; Sugimura, Kazuro; Kasai, Toshifumi; Kimino, Katsuji

    1993-01-01

    ECG-gated spin-echo (SE) imaging can reduce physiologic motion artifact. However, it does not provide strong T 1 -weighted images, because the repetition time (TR) depends on heart rate (HR). For odd-echo SE imaging, T 1 contrast can be maximized by using a smaller flip angle (FA) of initial excitation RF pulses. We investigated the usefulness of partial FA SE imaging in order to obtain more T 1 -dependent contrast with ECG gating and determined the optimal FA at each heart rate. In computer simulation and phantom study, the predicted image contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) obtained for each FA (0∼180deg) and each HR (55∼90 beats per minute (bpm)) were compared with those obtained with conventional T 1 -weighted SE imaging (TR=500 ms, TE=20 ms, FA=90deg). The optimal FA was decreased by reducing HR. The FA needed to obtain T 1 -dependent contrast identical to that with T 1 -weighted SE imaging was 43deg at a HR of 65 bpm, 53deg at 70 bpm, 60deg at 75 bpm. This predicted FA were in excellent agreement with that obtained with clinical evaluation. The predicted SNR was decreased by reducing FA. The SNR of partial FA SE imaging at HR of 65 bpm (FA=43deg) was 80% of that with conventional T 1 -weighted SE imaging. However, this imaging method presented no marked clinical problem. ECG-gated partial FA SE imaging provides better T 1 -dependent contrast than conventional ECG-gated SE imaging, especially for Gd-DTPA enhanced imaging. (author)

  13. Measurements of RF Heating during 3.0T MRI of a Pig Implanted with Deep Brain Stimulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorny, Krzysztof R; Presti, Michael F; Goerss, Stephan J; Hwang, Sun C; Jang, Dong-Pyo; Kim, Inyong; Shu, Yunhong; Favazza, Christopher P; Lee, Kendall H; Bernstein, Matt A

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To present preliminary, in vivo temperature measurements during MRI of a pig implanted with a deep brain stimulation (DBS) system. Materials and Methods DBS system (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN) was implanted in the brain of an anesthetized pig. 3.0T MRI was performed with a T/R head coil using the low-SAR GRE EPI and IR-prepped GRE sequences (SAR: 0.42 W/kg and 0.39 W/kg, respectively), and the high-SAR 4-echo RF spin echo (SAR: 2.9 W/kg). Fluoroptic thermometry was used to directly measure RF-related heating at the DBS electrodes, and at the implantable pulse generator (IPG). For reference the measurements were repeated in the same pig at 1.5T and, at both field strengths, in a phantom. Results At 3.0T, the maximal temperature elevations at DBS electrodes were 0.46 °C and 2.3 °C, for the low- and high-SAR sequences, respectively. No heating was observed on the implanted IPG during any of the measurements. Measurements of in-vivo heating differed from those obtained in the phantom. Conclusion The 3.0T MRI using GRE EPI and IR-prepped GRE sequences resulted in local temperature elevations at DBS electrodes of no more than 0.46°C. Although no extrapolation should be made to human exams and much further study will be needed, these preliminary data are encouraging for the future use 3.0T MRI in patients with DBS. PMID:23228310

  14. Measurements of RF heating during 3.0-T MRI of a pig implanted with deep brain stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorny, Krzysztof R; Presti, Michael F; Goerss, Stephan J; Hwang, Sun C; Jang, Dong-Pyo; Kim, Inyong; Min, Hoon-Ki; Shu, Yunhong; Favazza, Christopher P; Lee, Kendall H; Bernstein, Matt A

    2013-06-01

    To present preliminary, in vivo temperature measurements during MRI of a pig implanted with a deep brain stimulation (DBS) system. DBS system (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN) was implanted in the brain of an anesthetized pig. 3.0-T MRI was performed with a T/R head coil using the low-SAR GRE EPI and IR-prepped GRE sequences (SAR: 0.42 and 0.39 W/kg, respectively), and the high-SAR 4-echo RF spin echo (SAR: 2.9 W/kg). Fluoroptic thermometry was used to directly measure RF-related heating at the DBS electrodes, and at the implantable pulse generator (IPG). For reference the measurements were repeated in the same pig at 1.5 T and, at both field strengths, in a phantom. At 3.0T, the maximal temperature elevations at DBS electrodes were 0.46 °C and 2.3 °C, for the low- and high-SAR sequences, respectively. No heating was observed on the implanted IPG during any of the measurements. Measurements of in vivo heating differed from those obtained in the phantom. The 3.0-T MRI using GRE EPI and IR-prepped GRE sequences resulted in local temperature elevations at DBS electrodes of no more than 0.46 °C. Although no extrapolation should be made to human exams and much further study will be needed, these preliminary data are encouraging for the future use 3.0-T MRI in patients with DBS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Short-echo 3D H-1 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of patients with glioma at 7T for characterization of differences in metabolite levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Larson, Peder; Chen, Albert P.; Lupo, Janine M.; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Kelley, Douglas; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a short echo time, 3D H-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequence at 7T to assess the metabolic signature of lesions for patients with glioma. Materials and Methods 29 patients with glioma were studied. MRSI data were obtained using CHESS water suppression, spectrally-selective adiabatic inversion-recovery pulses and automatically prescribed outer-volume-suppression for lipid suppression, and spin echo slice selection (TE=30ms). An interleaved flyback echo-planar trajectory was applied to shorten the total acquisition time (~10min). Relative metabolite ratios were estimated in tumor and in normal-appearing white and gray matter (NAWM, GM). Results Levels of glutamine, myo-inositol, glycine and glutathione relative to total creatine (tCr) were significantly increased in the T2 lesions for all tumor grades compared to those in the NAWM (p < 0.05), while N-acetyl aspartate to tCr were significantly decreased (p < 0.05). In grade 2 gliomas, level of total choline-containing-compounds to tCr was significantly increased (p = 0.0137), while glutamate to tCr was significantly reduced (p = 0.0012). Conclusion The improved sensitivity of MRSI and the increased number of metabolites that can be evaluated using 7T MR scanners is of interest for evaluating patients with glioma. This study has successfully demonstrated the application of a short-echo spin-echo MRSI sequence to detect characteristic differences in regions of tumor versus normal appearing brain. PMID:24935758

  16. Study of {sup 14}N NQR response to SORC pulse sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konnai, A., E-mail: konnai@nmri.go.jp; Odano, N. [National Maritime Research Institute, Department of Navigation and System Engineering (Japan); Asaji, T. [Nihon University, Department of Chemistry, College of Humanities and Sciences (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    The behavior of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signals between RF pulses of the strong off-resonance comb (SORC) as well as the spin-locking spin-echo (SLSE) pulse sequences was studied as for {sup 14}N NQR line {nu}{sub +} of dimethylnitramine (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}NNO{sub 2} at 77 K. The periodic variation of the signal amplitude observed by using SORC pulse sequence could be reasonably explained by the theoretical expression reported in the literature.

  17. Evaluation of various somatosensory stimulations for functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Kazushi; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Mizoi, Kazuo; Yoshimoto, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroaki.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to test detectability of activated area using various somatosensory stimulations. The following stimulations were performed in normal volunteers: regular or irregular electrical median nerve stimulation (n=5, each), tactile stimulation to the palm and fingers (n=8), pain stimulation to the index finger (n=5) or to the palm and fingers (n=5). fMRI was acquired with a spoiled gradient echo sequence at 1.5 T. Detectability of activated area was the highest when the pain stimulation was applied to the palm and fingers (80%). A successful rate for the tactile stimulation was 25%, and the other stimulations failed to demonstrate any activation. When successful, the highest signal activation on fMRI was seen on a sulcus, which presumably arose from a vein. The sulcus was defined as the central sulcus by somatosensory evoked field using a median nerve stimulation. Our study indicates that the pain stimulation to the palm and fingers may be a choice for the sensory fMRI. (author)

  18. Benefits of the Multiple Echo Technique for Ultrasonic Thickness Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, J.; Vandekamp, R.

    2011-02-10

    Much effort has been put into determining methods to make accurate thickness measurements, especially at elevated temperatures. An accuracy of +/- 0.001 inches is typically noted for commercial ultrasonic thickness gauges and ultrasonic thickness techniques. Codes and standards put limitations on many inspection factors including equipment, calibration tolerance and temperature variations. These factors are important and should be controlled, but unfortunately do not guarantee accurate and repeatable measurements in the field. Most technicians long for a single technique that is best for every situation, unfortunately, there are no 'silver bullets' when it comes to nondestructive testing. This paper will describe and discuss some of the major contributors to measurement error as well as some advantages and limitations of multiple echo techniques and why multiple echo techniques should be more widely utilized for ultrasonic thickness measurements.

  19. Efficient Multichannel NLMS Implementation for Acoustic Echo Cancellation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schüldt Christian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An acoustic echo cancellation structure with a single loudspeaker and multiple microphones is, from a system identification perspective, generally modelled as a single-input multiple-output system. Such a system thus implies specific echo-path models (adaptive filter for every loudspeaker to microphone path. Due to the often large dimensionality of the filters, which is required to model rooms with standard reverberation time, the adaptation process can be computationally demanding. This paper presents a selective updating normalized least mean square (NLMS-based method which reduces complexity to nearly half in practical situations, while showing superior convergence speed performance as compared to conventional complexity reduction schemes. Moreover, the method concentrates the filter adaptation to the filter which is most misadjusted, which is a typically desired feature.

  20. Efficient Multichannel NLMS Implementation for Acoustic Echo Cancellation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredric Lindstrom

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available An acoustic echo cancellation structure with a single loudspeaker and multiple microphones is, from a system identification perspective, generally modelled as a single-input multiple-output system. Such a system thus implies specific echo-path models (adaptive filter for every loudspeaker to microphone path. Due to the often large dimensionality of the filters, which is required to model rooms with standard reverberation time, the adaptation process can be computationally demanding. This paper presents a selective updating normalized least mean square (NLMS-based method which reduces complexity to nearly half in practical situations, while showing superior convergence speed performance as compared to conventional complexity reduction schemes. Moreover, the method concentrates the filter adaptation to the filter which is most misadjusted, which is a typically desired feature.