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Sample records for steven impact test

  1. LX-04 VIOLENCE MEASUREMENTS- STEVEN TESTS IMPACTED BY PROJECTILES SHOT FROM A HOWITZER GUN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidester, S K; Vandersall, K S; Switzer, L L; Tarver, C M

    2005-01-01

    Characterization of the reaction violence of LX-04 explosive (85% HMX and 15% Viton A by weight) was obtained from Steven Impact Tests performed above the reaction initiation threshold. A 155 mm Howitzer propellant driven gas gun was used to accelerate the Steven Test projectiles in the range of approximately 170-300 m/s to react (ignite) the LX-04 explosive. Blast overpressure gauges, acoustic microphones, and high-speed photography characterized the level of high explosive reaction violence. A detonation in this velocity range was not observed and when comparing these results (and the Susan test results) with that of other HMX based explosives, LX-04 has a more gradual reaction violence slope as the impact velocity increases. The high binder content (15%) of the LX-04 explosive is believed to be the key factor to the lower level of violence

  2. Low amplitude impact of PBX 9501: Modified Steven spigot gun tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idar, D.J.; Lucht, R.A.; Straight, J.W. [and others

    1998-12-01

    Low-velocity mechanical impact and subsequent high explosive (HE) reaction are of concern in credible accident scenarios involving the handling, transport, and storage of nuclear weapons. Using modified Steven spigot gun tests, the authors have investigated the high-explosive violent-reaction (HEVR) potential of PBX 9501 to low-amplitude insult. Reliable modeling predictions require that one identify the relevant parameters and behavioral responses that are key to the reaction mechanism(s) in PBX 9501. Additional efforts have been targeted at identifying relevant differences in the response between baseline and stockpile-aged PBX 9501 to low-velocity impacts.

  3. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after blisters form If you have Stevens-Johnson syndrome, several days before the rash develops you may experience: Fever Sore mouth and throat Fatigue Cough Burning eyes When to see a doctor Stevens-Johnson ...

  4. Characterization of fish sauce aroma-impact compounds using GC-MS, SPME-Osme-GCO, and Stevens' power law exponents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, A J; Schilling, M W; Yoon, Y; Kamadia, V V; Marshall, D L

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize volatile compounds and to determine the characteristic aromas associated with impact compounds in 4 fish sauces using solid-phase micro-extraction, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, Osme, and gas chromatography olfactometry (SPME-Osme-GCO) coupled with Stevens' Power Law. Compounds were separated using GCMS and GCO and were identified with the mass spectral database, aroma perceived at the sniffing port, retention indices, and verification of compounds by authentic standards in the GCMS and GCO. Aromas that were isolated and present in all 4 fish sauce samples at all concentrations included fishy (trimethylamine), pungent and dirty socks (combination of butanoic, pentanoic, hexanoic, and heptanoic acids), cooked rice and buttery popcorn (2,6-dimethyl pyrazine), and sweet and cotton candy (benzaldehyde). All fish sauces contained the same aromas as determined by GCO and GCMS (verified using authentic standard compounds), but the odor intensity associated with each compound or group of compounds was variable for different fish sauce samples. Stevens' Power Law exponents were also determined using this analytical technique, but exponents were not consistent for the same compounds that were found in all fish sauces. Stevens' Power Law exponents ranged from 0.14 to 0.37, 0.24 to 0.34, 0.09 to 0.21, and 0.10 to 0.35 for dirty socks, fishy, buttery popcorn, and sweet aromas, respectively. This demonstrates that there is variability in Stevens' Power Law exponents for odorants within fish sauce samples.

  5. Pinkerton's Creator: Steven Kellogg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the life of Steven Kellogg, a children's book illustrator and writer. Includes extension ideas for school library media center activities related to his works and presents a selected annotated bibliography in chronological order, videos, and biographical information. (LRW)

  6. Steven Weinberg visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Steven Weinberg visiting the ATLAS cavern accompanied by Peter JenniIt was no surprise that the CERN audience arrived early in the Globe of Science and Innovation for the colloquium on 7 July. Nobel laureate Steven Weinberg is one of the major contributors to the Standard Model of particle physics. He received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1979 for his work on the unified theory of the electromagnetic and weak interactions, one of the essential pillars of the Standard Model. After lunch at CERN and a visit to ATLAS, Weinberg gave a colloquium on "The Quantum Theory of Fields: Effective or Fundamental" to a packed audience. In his talk, he looked at how the use of quantum field theory in particle physics has fluctuated in popularity since Paul Dirac first introduced the approach to describe the interaction of particles with electromagnetic fields in the late 1920s. In particular, he posed the question: Is quantum field theory fundamental or does it a...

  7. Characterization of Fish Sauce Aroma Impact Compounds Using GC-MS, SPME-Osme-GCO, and Stevens' Power Law Exponents

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study were to characterize volatile compounds and to determine the characteristic aromas associated with impact compounds in 4 fish sauces using solid-phase micro-extraction, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, Osme, and gas chromatography olfactometry (SPME-Osme-GCO) couple...

  8. Steven Vogel (1940–2015)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    duced in this issue. Steven Vogel was an eminent American biophysicist. ... as unusual and remarkable as his own work. He pre- .... called Reynolds stress, after the scientist who taught us to think in this ... PES Institute of Technology. Campus.

  9. Solid propellant impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow, E.C.

    1976-03-01

    Future space missions, as in the past, call for the continued use of radioisotopes as heat sources for thermoelectric power generators. In an effort to minimize the risk of radioactive contamination of the environment, a complete safety analysis of each such system is necessary. As a part of these analyses, the effects on such a system of a solid propellant fire environment resulting from a catastrophic launch pad abort must be considered. Several impact tests were conducted in which either a simulant MHW-FSA or a steel ball was dropped on the cold, unignited or the hot, burning surface of a block of UTP-3001 solid propellant. The rebound velocities were measured for both surface conditions of the propellant. The resulting coefficient of restitution, determined as the ratio of the components of the impact and rebound velocities perpendicular to the impact surface of the propellant, were not very dependent on whether the surface was cold or hot at the time of impact

  10. James Stevens / James Stevens ; interv. Tilman Baumgärtel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Stevens, James

    2006-01-01

    Inglise disainerist James Stevensist (sünd. 1962) ja tema tegevusest. J. Stevens 2000. a. Amsterdamis tehtud intervjuus koos Jon Bainsi ja Kim Bulliga 1995. a. Londonis avatud Interneti-agentuurist Obsolete, 1996-2000 tegutsenud Interneti-kohvikust Backspace, mittekommertsiaalse juhtmeteta nerworki Consume.net rajamisest Londonis

  11. Impact test of components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsoi, L.; Buland, P.; Labbe, P.

    1987-01-01

    Stops with gaps are currently used to support components and piping: it is simple, low cost, efficient and permits free thermal expansion. In order to keep the nonlinear nature of stops, such design is often modeled by beam elements (for the component) and nonlinear springs (for the stops). This paper deals with the validity and the limits of these models through the comparison of computational and experimental results. The experimental results come from impact laboratory tests on a simplified mockup. (orig.)

  12. Steven Hawking with Robert Aymar

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Steven Hawking is seen meeting with CERN's Director-General, Robert Aymar. Hawking visited CERN between 24 September and 1 October 2006. During his stay he gave two lectures and toured the LHC, which may provide insights into Hawking's most famous area of study, black holes.

  13. SRL canister impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelker, J.W. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is being constructed at the SRP for the containerization of high-level nuclear waste as a waste form for eventual permanent disposal. The waste will be incorporated in molten glass and solidified in Type 304L stainless steel canisters 2 feet in diameter x 9 feet 10 inches long. The canisters have a minimum wall thickness of 3/8 inch. Over a three-year period, nineteen drop-tests of nine canisters, filled with simulated waste glass, were made in support of the DWPF containerization program. Eight of the canister evaluation tests were of Type 304L stainless steel material and one was of commercially pure titanium. Three different length (9.44, 5.06, and 7.88 inch) nozzle configurations containing final closure upset welds were evaluated for the stainless steel canisters. All impact tests of the stainless steel canisters, which included bottom-, side-, and top-drops, were acceptable. The bottom-drop test of the titanium canister, which contained a final closure upset weld, was acceptable; however, the top-drop resulted in a breaching of the top head where it joins the nozzle. The final closure titanium upset weld was acceptable. The titanium canister wall thickness was 1/4 inch

  14. Rail Impact Testing. Test Operations Procedure (TOP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-15

    impact test. The rail impact test is used to verify structural integrity of the test item and the adequacy of the tie-down system and tie-down...strength of provisions, connection and supporting structural frame, paragraph 5.2.3 ** Superscript...parts, to include outriggers and booms) without advanced approval by SDDCTEA. Torque nuts on wire rope clips to their correct value. Torque cable

  15. CANFLEX fuel bundle impact test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Seok Kyu; Chung, C. H.; Park, J. S.; Hong, S. D.; Kim, B. D.

    1997-08-01

    This document outlines the test results for the impact test of the CANFLEX fuel bundle. Impact test is performed to determine and verify the amount of general bundle shape distortion and defect of the pressure tube that may occur during refuelling. The test specification requires that the fuel bundles and the pressure tube retain their integrities after the impact test under the conservative conditions (10 stationary bundles with 31kg/s flow rate) considering the pressure tube creep. The refuelling simulator operating with pneumatic force and simulated shield plug were fabricated and the velocity/displacement transducer and the high speed camera were also used in this test. The characteristics of the moving bundle (velocity, displacement, impacting force) were measured and analyzed with the impact sensor and the high speed camera system. The important test procedures and measurement results were discussed as follows. 1) Test bundle measurements and the pressure tube inspections 2) Simulated shield plug, outlet flange installation and bundle loading 3) refuelling simulator, inlet flange installation and sensors, high speed camera installation 4) Perform the impact test with operating the refuelling simulator and measure the dynamic characteristics 5) Inspections of the fuel bundles and the pressure tube. (author). 8 refs., 23 tabs., 13 figs

  16. Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA) is the primary law governing marine fisheries management in U.S. federal waters. It has since been...

  17. Stevens-Johnson syndrome after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, W.R.; Knight, A.L.; Scruggs, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    We have reported a case of classic Stevens-Johnson syndrome in association with treatment using a cobalt radiation therapy unit. Previous reports of such an association have been extremely rare. At the time of the reaction, the patient's only medications were methyldopa and trichlormethiazide. Other drugs in the thiazide class have been associated with such a reaction. We feel this is an unlikely association in our patient, however, because she had been on trichlormethiazide for a number of years. This report suggests the role of radiotherapy as a rare cause of Stevens-Johnson syndrome. 14 references

  18. Steven Spielberg hädas Peeter Paaniga / Timo Diener

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Diener, Timo

    2004-01-01

    Steven Spielbergi raskused J.M. Barrie "Peeter Paani" ekraniseerimisel, tulemuseks mängufilm "Hook" : Ameerika Ühendriigid 1991. Järgneb 16. aug. 2004, lk. 38 pealkirja all "Rahulolematu Steven Spielberg"

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of HLA-B*58: 01 genetic testing before initiation of allopurinol therapy to prevent allopurinol-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis in a Malaysian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Huey Yi; Lim, Yi Heng; Prawjaeng, Juthamas; Tassaneeyakul, Wichittra; Mohamed, Zahurin; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2018-02-01

    Studies found a strong association between allopurinol-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and the HLA-B*58:01 allele. HLA-B*58:01 screening-guided therapy may mitigate the risk of allopurinol-induced SJS/TEN. This study aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of HLA-B*58:01 screening before allopurinol therapy initiation compared with the current practice of no screening for Malaysian patients with chronic gout in whom a hypouricemic agent is indicated. This cost-effectiveness analysis adopted a societal perspective with a lifetime horizon. A decision tree model coupled with Markov models were developed to estimate the costs and outcomes, represented by quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained, of three treatment strategies: (a) current practice (allopurinol initiation without HLA-B*58:01 screening); (b) HLA-B*58:01 screening before allopurinol initiation; and (c) alternative treatment (probenecid) without HLA-B*58:01 screening. The model was populated with data from literature review, meta-analysis, and published government documents. Cost values were adjusted for the year 2016, with costs and health outcomes discounted at 3% per annum. A series of sensitivity analysis including probabilistic sensitivity analysis were carried out to determine the robustness of the findings. Both HLA-B*58:01 screening and probenecid prescribing were dominated by current practice. Compared with current practice, HLA-B*58:01 screening resulted in 0.252 QALYs loss per patient at an additional cost of USD 322, whereas probenecid prescribing resulted in 1.928 QALYs loss per patient at an additional cost of USD 2203. One SJS/TEN case would be avoided for every 556 patients screened. At the cost-effectiveness threshold of USD 8695 per QALY, the probability of current practice being the best choice is 99.9%, in contrast with 0.1 and 0% in HLA-B*58:01 screening and probenecid prescribing, respectively. This is because of the low incidence of

  20. Steven Moffat and Sue Vertue visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Caraban Gonzalez, Noemi

    2016-01-01

    Steven William Moffat, OBE is a Scottish television writer and producer, known for his work as showrunner, writer and producer of the British television series Doctor Who and Sherlock. Susan "Sue" Nicola Vertue is an English television producer, mainly of comedy shows, including Mr. Bean and Coupling.

  1. Stevens Johnsons syndrom og toksisk epidermal nekrolyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Zachariae, Claus; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2013-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are acute mucocutaneous diseases primarily due to drug intake. The diseases are characterised by the separation of epidermis from dermis which can be life-threatening. Mortality is often caused by sepsis and multiple organ failure. The most...

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of impact test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahoshi, Y.; Schmauder, S.; Ludwig, M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an impact test by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to evaluate embrittlement of bcc Fe at different temperatures. A new impact test model is developed for MD simulation. The typical fracture behaviors show transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and a history of the impact loads also demonstrates its transition. We conclude that the impact test by MD could be feasible. (orig.)

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of impact test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahoshi, Y. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan); Schmauder, S.; Ludwig, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes an impact test by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to evaluate embrittlement of bcc Fe at different temperatures. A new impact test model is developed for MD simulation. The typical fracture behaviors show transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and a history of the impact loads also demonstrates its transition. We conclude that the impact test by MD could be feasible. (orig.)

  4. 76 FR 11857 - Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act Provisions; Fisheries of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    .... The pollock peer-reviewed benchmark stock assessment review (Stock Assessment Workshop, or SAW, 50... overfishing, rebuild overfished stocks, achieve optimum yield (OY), and minimize the economic impact of... Management Act (Magnuson-Stevens Act). This action would revise the biological reference points and stock...

  5. High Pressure Quick Disconnect Particle Impact Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) performed particle impact testing to determine whether there is a particle impact ignition hazard in the quick disconnects (QDs) in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) on the International Space Station (ISS). Testing included standard supersonic and subsonic particle impact tests on 15-5 PH stainless steel, as well as tests performed on a QD simulator. This paper summarizes the particle impact tests completed at WSTF. Although there was an ignition in Test Series 4, it was determined the ignition was caused by the presence of a machining imperfection. The sum of all the test results indicates that there is no particle impact ignition hazard in the ISS ECLSS QDs. KEYWORDS: quick disconnect, high pressure, particle impact testing, stainless steel

  6. 30 CFR 7.46 - Impact test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Impact test. 7.46 Section 7.46 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.46 Impact test. (a) Test... individual cells. At the test temperature range of 65 °F -80 °F (18.3 °C-26.7 °C), apply a dynamic force of...

  7. Charpy Impact Test on Polymeric Molded Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Raicu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the Charpy impact tests on the AcrylonitrileButadiene-Styrene (ABS polymeric material parts. The Charpy impact test, also known as the Charpy V-notch test, is a standardized strain rate test which determines the amount of energy absorbed by a material during fracture. This is a typical method described in ASTM Standard D 6110. We use for testing an Instron - Dynatup equipment which have a fully integrated hardware and software package that let us capture load information at very high speed from the impact tests.

  8. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome After Armodafinil Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holfinger, Steven; Roy, Asim; Schmidt, Markus

    2018-05-15

    We present the case of a 21-year-old woman in whom Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) developed after initiation of armodafinil. Although this rare and life-threatening reaction is listed on armodafinil's label, no cases have been reported in the literature. This case, in addition to an update of the drug's label after post-marketing research, both support the link between armodafinil and SJS. Providers should maintain a high clinical suspicion for SJS when starting therapy to minimize associated morbidity and mortality by discontinuing armodafinil at the onset of first symptoms. © 2018 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  9. Steven Vogel was an eminent American biophysicist. He made ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Steven Vogel, biomechanics, Péclet number, diffusion, advection, transport. Abstract. Steven Vogel was a pinoneer in applying principles of mechanics to diverse living systems. This article first provides a brief overview of his career. It then reviews the concepts of P´eclet number and Reynolds number which are ...

  10. Co-amoxiclav-induced Stevens Johnson Syndrome in a child ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stevens-Johnson Syndrome is an uncommon life threatening disease generally induced by drugs. Antibiotics, mainly sulphonamides, are the most involved drugs in Stevens-Johnson Syndrome in children. Co-amoxiclav is a well tolerated antibiotic. It has never been reported to cause, lonely this syndrome in children.

  11. Light-weight radioisotope heater impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Rinehart, G.H.; Herrera, A.

    1998-01-01

    The light-weight radioisotope heater unit (LWRHU) is a 238 PuO 2 -fueled heat source designed to provide one thermal watt in each of various locations on a spacecraft. Los Alamos National Laboratory designed, fabricated, and safety tested the LWRHU. The heat source consists of a hot-pressed 238 PuO 2 fuel pellet, a Pt-30Rh vented capsule, a pyrolytic graphite insulator, and a fineweave-pierced fabric graphite aeroshell assembly. To compare the performance of the LWRHUs fabricated for the Cassini mission with the performance of those fabricated for the Galileo mission, and to determine a failure threshold, two types of impact tests were conducted. A post-reentry impact test was performed on one of 180 flight-quality units produced for the Cassini mission and a series of sequential impact tests using simulant-fueled LWRHU capsules were conducted respectively. The results showed that deformation and fuel containment of the impacted Cassini LWRHU was similar to that of a previously tested Galileo LWRHU. Both units sustained minimal deformation of the aeroshell and fueled capsule; the fuel was entirely contained by the platinum capsule. Sequential impacting, in both end-on and side-on orientations, resulted in increased damage with each subsequent impact. Sequential impacting of the LWRHU appears to result in slightly greater damage than a single impact at the final impact velocity of 50 m/s

  12. Understanding protocol performance: impact of test performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Robert G

    2013-01-01

    This is the second of two articles that examine the factors that determine protocol performance. The objective of these articles is to provide a general understanding of protocol performance that can be used to estimate performance, establish limits on performance, decide if a protocol is justified, and ultimately select a protocol. The first article was concerned with protocol criterion and test correlation. It demonstrated the advantages and disadvantages of different criterion when all tests had the same performance. It also examined the impact of increasing test correlation on protocol performance and the characteristics of the different criteria. To examine the impact on protocol performance when individual tests in a protocol have different performance. This is evaluated for different criteria and test correlations. The results of the two articles are combined and summarized. A mathematical model is used to calculate protocol performance for different protocol criteria and test correlations when there are small to large variations in the performance of individual tests in the protocol. The performance of the individual tests that make up a protocol has a significant impact on the performance of the protocol. As expected, the better the performance of the individual tests, the better the performance of the protocol. Many of the characteristics of the different criteria are relatively independent of the variation in the performance of the individual tests. However, increasing test variation degrades some criteria advantages and causes a new disadvantage to appear. This negative impact increases as test variation increases and as more tests are added to the protocol. Best protocol performance is obtained when individual tests are uncorrelated and have the same performance. In general, the greater the variation in the performance of tests in the protocol, the more detrimental this variation is to protocol performance. Since this negative impact is increased as

  13. Alpha Fuels Environmental Test Facility impact gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C.G.

    1978-01-01

    The Alpha Fuels Environmental Test Facility (AFETF) impact gun is a unique tool for impact testing 238 PuO 2 -fueled heat sources of up to 178-mm dia at velocities to 300 m/s. An environmentally-sealed vacuum chamber at the muzzle of the gun allows preheating of the projectile to 1,000 0 C. Immediately prior to impact, the heat source projectile is completely sealed in a vacuum-tight catching container to prevent escape of its radioactive contents should rupture occur. The impact velocity delivered by this gas-powered gun can be regulated to within +-2%

  14. Conventional fuel tank blunt impact tests : test and analysis results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-02

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research : and Development is conducting research into fuel tank : crashworthiness. A series of impact tests are planned to : measure fuel tank deformation under two types of dynamic : loading conditi...

  15. Test requirements of locomotive fuel tank blunt impact tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research : and Development is conducting research into passenger : locomotive fuel tank crashworthiness. A series of impact tests : are planned to measure fuel tank deformation under two types : of dy...

  16. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; T. E. Rahl; S. D. Snow

    2005-01-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates (10 to 200 per second) during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these materials under dynamic (impact) loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. The goal of the work presented in this paper was to improve understanding of moderate strain rate phenomena on these materials. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and relatively large test specimens (1/2-inch thick), initial test efforts focused on the tensile behavior of specific stainless steel materials during impact loading. Impact tests of 304L and 316L stainless steel test specimens at two different strain rates, 25 per second (304L and 316L material) and 50 per second (304L material) were performed for comparison to their quasi-static tensile test properties. Elevated strain rate stress-strain curves for the two materials were determined using the impact test machine and a ''total impact energy'' approach. This approach considered the deformation energy required to strain the specimens at a given strain rate. The material data developed was then utilized in analytical simulations to validate the final elevated stress-strain curves. The procedures used during testing and the results obtained are described in this paper

  17. Impact testing of transportation-flasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, A.J.

    1985-07-01

    The literature describing flask testing is reviewed and it is concluded that, even though there are numerous references to instrumented impact testing of flasks, there remains a need for a collection of data from carefully constructed and fully instrumented model tests for thorough validation of analytical tools. (author)

  18. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  19. Structural Behavior Under Precision Impact Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-08-01

    ASPECTS OF IMPACT TESTING The problem of impact between two bodies has been studied extensively (for example, Eibl 1987, Feyerabend 1988, Krauthammer...Concrete for Hazard Protection, Edinburgh, Scotland, pp. 175-186. Feyerabend , M., 1988, "Der harte Querstoss auf Stützen aus Stahl und Stahlbeton

  20. Tests of the Giant Impact Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The giant impact hypothesis has gained popularity as a means of explaining a volatile-depleted Moon that still has a chemical affinity to the Earth. As Taylor's Axiom decrees, the best models of lunar origin are testable, but this is difficult with the giant impact model. The energy associated with the impact would be sufficient to totally melt and partially vaporize the Earth. And this means that there should he no geological vestige of Barber times. Accordingly, it is important to devise tests that may be used to evaluate the giant impact hypothesis. Three such tests are discussed here. None of these is supportive of the giant impact model, but neither do they disprove it.

  1. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    REVIEW. Introduction. Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal ... that affect the skin and mucous membranes. ... Open Access article distributed under the terms of the .... pathogenic components are removed from plasma. The.

  2. Two autographs: Cecile Dewitt and Robert Hawking (for Steven Hawking)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaina, Alex

    2007-12-01

    Two autographs given to author by professor Cecile Dewitt and Robert Hawking (the son of Steven Hawking for his father) in 1987 during the Quantum Gravity Seminar in Moscow are presented. The first was given during a visit to Physical Institute of the Academy of sciences of the USSR, where a seminar held in the Theoretical department. the second was given during a lunch with Steven Hawking, Andrei Linde and Robert Hawking at the 2-nd floor of the Conference floor.

  3. Pipe-to-pipe impact tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bampton, M C.C.; Alzheimer, J M; Friley, J R; Simonen, F A

    1985-11-01

    Existing licensing criteria express what damage shall be assumed for various pipe sizes as a consequence of a postulated break in a high energy system. The criteria are contained in Section 3.6.2 of the Standard Review Plan, and the purpose of the program described with this paper is to evaluate the impact criteria by means of a combined experimental and analytical approach. A series of tests has been completed. Evaluation of the test showed a deficiency in the range of test parameters. These deficiencies are being remedied by a second series of tests and a more powerful impact machine. A parallel analysis capability has been developed. This capability has been used to predict the damage for the first test series. The quality of predictions has been improved by tests that establish post-crush and bending relationships. Two outputs are expected from this project: data that may, or may not, necessitate changes to the criteria after appropriate value impact evaluations and an analytic capability for rapidly evaluating the potential for pipe whip damage after a postulated break. These outputs are to be contained in a value-impact document and a program final report. (orig.).

  4. Impact test for solid waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, R.M.; Kelley, J.A.

    1976-03-01

    Samples of concretes and glasses being considered for incorporation of radioactive waste sludge were subjected to impact tests to determine the relationship between the energy of the impact and the resulting increase in surface area of the damaged sample. Test results indicate that the increased surface area per unit of energy input for glass waste forms is less by a factor of about three than that for concretes containing 40 wt percent simulated sludge (average values of 9.6 cm 2 /Joule and 24.7 cm 2 /Joule for glass and concrete, respectively)

  5. Dynamic tests on metallic impact limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagartz, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    Three different types of metallic impact limiters were tested; plain fins, laterally stiffened fins and tubes whose axes were aligned with the direction of impact. All specimens were made of 304 stainless steel and were annealed before testing. A heavy steel drop table of variable mass and moving at about 13.4 m/s (44 ft/s) was used to impact the specimens which were mounted on a stationary base. Impact velocity, drop table acceleration vs. time and force vs. time were measured on each test and were used to calculate the energy absorbed by the impact limiters. Results showed that the peak stress that a plain fin can transmit to the cask body can be several times the static yield stress of the fin. Also as buckling proceeds the load in a plain fin drops significantly and the rate at which it absorbs energy falls off dramatically, making the fin a rather inefficient energy absorber overall. The laterally stiffened fin and the cylinders did not exhibit this rapid decrease in load-carrying capacity with deformation and hence were able to absorb relatively more energy per unit volume of material

  6. Cefepime Associated With Phenytoin Induced Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Del Río, José; Domingo-Chiva, Esther; Cuesta-Montero, Pablo; Valladolid-Walsh, Ana; García-Martínez, Eva María

    We describe a recent case of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome. A 49-year-old man was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of an Anaesthesia and Resuscitation Department because of a Fournier gangrene that derived in a sepsis, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and renal failure. He was under treatment with cefepime and suffered a generalized status epilepticus, so started treatment with phenytoin. The next day he developed a "maculous cutaneous eruption in trunk and lower limbs" compatible with a Stevens-Johnson Syndrome. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome is a very severe and potentially fatal multiorganic disease, especially when present in critically ill patients, with a strong drug-related etiology, especially with antiepileptic drugs.

  7. Tables of Products of Tensor Operators and Stevens Operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1975-01-01

    Numerical tables of products of tensor (Racah) operators, Rl,m(J), and Stevens operators Olm(J), working within a J-multiplet are given as a function of X=J(J+1). Examples of the use of the tables, such as the calculation of commutation relations and thermal averages are given.......Numerical tables of products of tensor (Racah) operators, Rl,m(J), and Stevens operators Olm(J), working within a J-multiplet are given as a function of X=J(J+1). Examples of the use of the tables, such as the calculation of commutation relations and thermal averages are given....

  8. Orion Ground Test Article Water Impact Tests: Photogrammetric Evaluation of Impact Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Mark, Stephen D.

    2018-01-01

    The Ground Test Article (GTA) is an early production version of the Orion Crew Module (CM). The structural design of the Orion CM is being developed based on LS-DYNA water landing simulations. As part of the process of confirming the accuracy of LS-DYNA water landing simulations, the GTA water impact test series was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to gather data for comparison with simulations. The simulation of the GTA water impact tests requires the accurate determination of the impact conditions. To accomplish this, the GTA was outfitted with an array of photogrammetry targets. The photogrammetry system utilizes images from two cameras with a specialized tracking software to determine time histories for the 3-D coordinates of each target. The impact conditions can then be determined from the target location data.

  9. Comparative Testing for Corporate Impact Assessment Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farsang, Andrea; Reisch, Lucia A.

    of our study are: poverty, water and sanitation, education, food and agriculture, climate change, and human rights in three industries, namely: footwear, coffee, and paper and pulp. The paper develops a protocol for the selection and quantification of indicators that can be used in selecting...... the appropriate tools for measuring impacts in the selected sectors on SDGs. Background: In the Global Value Project, a long list of indicators was compiled covering the main thematic areas and challenges of sustainability. In a second step, this long list was reduced using predefined criteria as well as other...... criteria, such as the feasibility and scalability of different tools. As a result, a protocol was developed to help compare the different tools that measure corporate impact and to interpret the results in relation to the SDGs. The protocol was pre-tested with a limited number of tools in two case studies...

  10. Justice John Paul Stevens and the Erotic Boomerang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Marc

    Justice John Paul Stevens of the United States Supreme Court has ruled on obscenity cases in seven instances since his appointment. His rulings reveal that he regards obscenity as a nuisance rather than as a danger threatening to undermine the nation's morality, that he supports a nationwide standard to adjudicate obscenity cases, and that he…

  11. Risk of nevirapine-associated Stevens-Johnson syndrome among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is an acute life-threatening condition often elicited by drugs. The government's indecisiveness in deciding to stop the use of nevirapine (NVP) in HIV-infected pregnant women owing to the increase of SJS among this population group in South Africa prompted this investigation ...

  12. Gamification is broken. An interview with Steven Poole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Benoit Carbone

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Steven Poole is the author of Trigger Happy (2000. New York, NY: Arcade Publish, Unspeak (2006. New York, NY: Grove Press, and You Aren’t What You Eat (2012. In press. He has written extensively on books, culture, and videogames for The Guardian and other publications.

  13. Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions: Steven F. Maier

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Steven F. Maier, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions, is cited for his work in the fields of learned helplessness; cytokines, depressed mood, and cognitive interference; and the brain structures that produce and counteract learned helplessness. In addition to the citation, a biography and selected bibliography of Maier's…

  14. Holokaust Steven Spielbergi pilgu läbi / Andres Laasik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laasik, Andres, 1960-2016

    2000-01-01

    Oscari võitnud dokumentaalfilm "Need viimased päevad" ("The Last Days") : režissöör James Moll : Tootja Steven Spielbergi loodud Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation : Ameerika Ühendriigid 1999. Filmi esitlusest Eesti Vabariigi Välisministeeriumis

  15. Steven Vogel was an eminent American biophysicist. He made ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Steven Vogel was a pinoneer in applying principles of mechanics to diverse living systems. This article first provides a brief overview of his career. It then reviews the concepts of P´eclet number and Reynolds number which are helpful in appreciating the Classics article by Vogel reproduced in this issue.

  16. Born To Draw: A Profile of Steven Kellogg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleman, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Presents a profile of Steven Kellogg, an illustrator of children's books. Gives an overview of his career discussing how he got started and broke into the scene. Describes some of the books he has illustrated and relates his experiences with those books. (SG)

  17. Steven MacCall: Winner of LJ's 2010 Teaching Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, John N., III

    2010-01-01

    This article profiles Steven L. MacCall, winner of "Library Journal's" 2010 Teaching Award. An associate professor at the School of Library and Information Studies (SLIS) at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, MacCall was nominated by Kathie Popadin, known as "Kpop" to the members of her cohort in the online MLIS program at SLIS. Sixteen of…

  18. Fatal nevirapine-induced Stevens- Johnson syndrome with HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... of Stevens-Johnson syndrome highlights the dilemmas and complications that may arise when prescribing multiple medications in HIV-associated ... HIV enters the central nervous system early in the course of HIV ... Affected individuals with SJS/TEN are genetically predisposed to developing severe ...

  19. Acoustic emission measurement during instrumented impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crostack, H.A.; Engelhardt, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    Results of instrumented impact tests are discussed. On the one hand the development of the loading process at the hammer tup was recorded by means of a piezoelectric transducer. This instrumentation supplied a better representation of the load versus time than the conventional strain gauges. On the other hand the different types of acoustic emission occurring during a test could be separated. The acoustic emission released at the impact of the hammer onto the specimen is of lower frequency and its spectrum is strongly decreasing with increasing frequency. Plastic deformation also emits signals of lower frequency that are of quasi-continuous character. Both signal types can be discriminated by filtering. As a consequence typical burst signal were received afterwards that can be correlated with crack propagation. Their spectra exhibit considerable portions up to about 1.9 MHz. The development in time of the burst signals points to the kind of crack propagation resp. its sequence of appearance. However, definitive comparison between load and acoustic emission should become possible, only when the disadvantages of the common load measurement can be reduced, e.g. by determining the load directly at the specimen instead of the hammer tup

  20. Galileo battery testing and the impact of test automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertuch, W. T.; Dils, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Test complexity, changes of test specifications, and the demand for tight control of tests led to the development of automated testing used for Galileo and other projects. The use of standardized interfacing, i.e., IEEE-488, with desktop computers and test instruments, resulted in greater reliability, repeatability, and accuracy of both control and data reporting. Increased flexibility of test programming has reduced costs by permitting a wide spectrum of test requirements at one station rather than many stations.

  1. Stevens-Johnson syndrome associated with antimicrobial agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Cavalcanti Pita Neto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the severe reactions to medications, immune-mediated Mucocutaneous Disorders are widely represented. Steven-Johnson’s syndrome, or great multiform erythema, appears as a systemic disturbance, involving the skin and mucous membranes, and is related to several factors, such as, viral or bacterial infections and particularly the administration of medicines, in general painkillers and antibiotics. The objective of this article is report the onset of ulcerative vesicle –blister lesions in the regions of the lips, gums, tongue and genital mucosa membrane in a 26 year-old patient, a leukoderm man, being treated with sulfamethoxazole trimethoprim for a respiratory infection, after being diagnosed as having the Steven-Johnson syndrome. SSJ1 558187121279.

  2. Nuclear test at Semipalatinsk test site and their environmental impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logachev, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper present classification of nuclear tests conducted at the Semipalatinsk test site by tier radiation hazards. The Institute of Biophysics of the Russian Ministry of Health established a data base the archival data on radiation situation parameters and compiled an album of radioactive plum footprints. The paper states that external and internal exposure doses received by population lived in the test vicinity can sufficiently reliably assesses using archival data. (author)

  3. HLA-B Sequencing in Patients with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-03

    Stevens -Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Brittany L. Lenz, MD, Andrew T. Patterson, MD, Amanda J . Laska, MD, Patrick J . Brown, MD, and...59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 8 DEC 2016 1. Your paper, entitled HLA-B Sequencing in Patients with Stevens -Johnson...PATIENTS WITH STEVENS -JOHNSON SYNDROME AND TOXIC EPIDERMAL NECROL YSIS 2. FUNDING RECEIVED FOR THIS STUDY? DYES rgj NO FUNDING SOURCE: I I 3. IS THIS

  4. Test System Impact on System Availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pau, L. F.

    1987-01-01

    The specifications are presented for an imperfect automatic test system (ATS) (test frequency distribution, reliability, false alarm rate, nondetection rate) in order to account for the availability, readiness, mean time between unscheduled repairs (MTBUR), reliability, and maintenance of the sys......The specifications are presented for an imperfect automatic test system (ATS) (test frequency distribution, reliability, false alarm rate, nondetection rate) in order to account for the availability, readiness, mean time between unscheduled repairs (MTBUR), reliability, and maintenance...... of the system subject to monitoring and test. A time-dependent Markov model is presented, and applied in three cases, with examples of numerical results provided for preventive maintenance decisions, design of an automatic test system, buffer testing in computers, and data communications....

  5. Musical Metaphors in the Poetry of Wallace Stevens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Kennedy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wallace Stevens’s “The Man with the Blue Guitar” (1937 is widely recognized as one of the most important and influential poems of the 20th century. Inspired by Picasso’s painting The Old Guitarist, the poem in turn inspired Michael Tippett’s sonata for solo guitar, “The Blue Guitar” (Tippett 1983 and David Hockney’s The Blue Guitar: Etchings by David Hockney who was inspired by Wallace Stevens who was inspired by Pablo Picasso (Hockney and Stevens 1977. Central to “The Man with the Blue Guitar,” the metaphor of the musical instrument as a transformational symbol of the imagination is common in Stevens’s poems. The structure of “The Man with the Blue Guitar,” according to J. Hillis Miller, is the structure of stream-of-consciousness. Stevens’s poem creates what has been called “the deconstructed moment in modern poetry,” “an attempt to project a spatialized time that can be viewed from the privileged position of a timeless, static moment capable of encompassing a life at a glance” (Jackson 1982. This consciousness, which Derrida refers to as the “trace,” Stevens calls “the evasive movement of language.” The trace is the perception of the absence of meaning after the word or perception has passed, the glimpse of a hidden meaning that immediately vanishes. Stevens’s poem influenced not only other poets, artists and composers; references to and echoes of his ideas and techniques can be seen in popular music and culture well into the 21st century.

  6. Bedside paediatric HIV testing in Malawi: Impact on testing rates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-25

    May 25, 2017 ... Malawi Integrated Guidelines on 'Clinical Management of ... referred by nursing staff to attend the HIV counsellor's ... Implementation of a bedside testing service at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital significantly increased HIV ...

  7. Stevens-Johnson syndrome associated with Malarone antimalarial prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emberger, Michael; Lechner, Arno Michael; Zelger, Bernhard

    2003-07-01

    To the best of our knowledge, Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) has not been reported previously as an adverse reaction to Malarone, which is a combination of atovaquone and proguanil hydrochloride used for antimalarial prophylaxis and therapy. We describe a 65-year-old patient who had SJS with typical clinical and histopathological findings associated with the use of Malarone prophylaxis for malaria. This report should alert physicians to this severe cutaneous reaction, and Malarone should be added to the list of drugs that can potentially cause SJS.

  8. Impact Testing for Materials Science at NASA - MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikapizye, Mitch

    2010-01-01

    The Impact Testing Facility (ITF) at NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center is host to different types of guns used to study the effects of high velocity impacts. The testing facility has been and continues to be utilized for all NASA missions where impact testing is essential. The Facility has also performed tests for the Department of Defense, other corporations, as well as universities across the nation. Current capabilities provided by Marshall include ballistic guns, light gas guns, exploding wire gun, and the Hydrometeor Impact Gun. A new plasma gun has also been developed which would be able to propel particles at velocities of 20km/s. This report includes some of the guns used for impact testing at NASA Marshall and their capabilities.

  9. Statistical analysis and planning of multihundred-watt impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martz, H.F. Jr.; Waterman, M.S.

    1977-10-01

    Modular multihundred-watt (MHW) radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) are used as a power source for spacecraft. Due to possible environmental contamination by radioactive materials, numerous tests are required to determine and verify the safety of the RTG. There are results available from 27 fueled MHW impact tests regarding hoop failure, fingerprint failure, and fuel failure. Data from the 27 tests are statistically analyzed for relationships that exist between the test design variables and the failure types. Next, these relationships are used to develop a statistical procedure for planning and conducting either future MHW impact tests or similar tests on other RTG fuel sources. Finally, some conclusions are given

  10. Using Lunar Impact Basin Relaxation to Test Impact Flux Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; Conrad, J. W.; Neumann, G. A.; Kamata, S.; Fassett, C.

    2017-12-01

    Gravity data obtained by the GRAIL mission [1] has constrained the number and distribution of lunar impact basins [2]. We analyzed crater densities for newly-proposed basins to assign relative ages. The extent to which a basin is relaxed is calculated using GRAIL-derived crustal thickness models [3] by comparing the mantle uplift under basins to the surrounding region. With our catalog we can investigate the distribution of basin properties through relative time. We identify a relaxation state transition (RT) around the pre-Nectarian 4 relative age group for basins with diameters > 450 km, similar to previous results using a pre-GRAIL basin catalog [4]. This RT likely signals a change in the global thermal state of the crust, representing the time at which the lunar moho temperature fell below 1400 K [4]. This transition happens 50-100 million years (Myr) after the lunar magma ocean (LMO) solidifies [4]. Based on models and inferences of LMO solidification [5, 6] the RT is expected to occur at 4.25-4.50 Ga, depending on the rate of cooling once a crustal lid has formed [5] and the amount of tidal heating in the early crust [6]. Monotonically declining impact flux models, such as [7] and [8] predict a younger RT; 4.07-4.08 and 4.24-4.27 Ga respectively. A scaled-down version of [8] can fit the RT but fails to match the observed number of younger, unrelaxed basins. Models that invoke a later transient increase in impact flux can reproduce the inferred RT time; for instance, the model of [9] gives a RT age of 4.43-4.46 Ga. This model matches the number of younger basins and implies that basin preservation started at 4.49 Ga, likely before the LMO completely solidified. [1] Zuber M.T. et al. (2013) Science, 339, 668-671. [2] Neumann G.A. et al. (2015) Science Advances, 1, e1500852. [3] Wieczorek M.A. (2013) Science, 339, 671-675. [4] Kamata S. et al. (2015) Icarus, 250, 492-504. [5] Elkins-Tanton L.T. et al. (2011) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 304, 326-336. [6] Meyer, J

  11. 75 FR 24549 - Merchant Marine Act and Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (Magnuson...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... Management Act (Magnuson-Stevens Act) Provisions; Fishing Vessel, Fishing Facility and Individual Fishing... Fisheries Finance Program (FFP or the Program) provides long-term financing to the commercial fishing and...) lending program, 16 U.S.C. 1855(i)(1). The Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management...

  12. The evaluation and impact of diagnostic tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royal, H.D.; McNeil, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe the usefulness of the techniques that are applied to study the role of tests and point out their limitations. In many instances, complex tasks must be oversimplified in order to use currently available analytic tools. Certain tools, such as decision analysis, are useful not only because they can provide insight regarding the most favorable diagnostic/therapeutic strategies but also because they can identify areas where present knowledge is inadequate and thereby help put priorities on areas of research

  13. The use of scale models in impact testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donelan, P.J.; Dowling, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical analysis, component testing and model flask testing are employed to investigate the validity of scale models for demonstrating the behaviour of Magnox flasks under impact conditions. Model testing is shown to be a powerful and convenient tool provided adequate care is taken with detail design and manufacture of models and with experimental control. (author)

  14. INTER LABORATORY COMBAT HELMET BLUNT IMPACT TEST METHOD COMPARISON

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-26

    data by Instrumentation for Impact  Test , SAE standard J211‐1 [4]. Although the entire curve is collected, the interest of this  project  team  solely...HELMET BLUNT IMPACT TEST METHOD COMPARISON by Tony J. Kayhart Charles A. Hewitt and Jonathan Cyganik March 2018 Final...INTER-LABORATORY COMBAT HELMET BLUNT IMPACT TEST METHOD COMPARISON 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  15. Instrumented impact testing machine with reduced specimen oscillation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintamaa, R.; Rahka, K.; Wallin, K.

    1984-07-01

    Owing to small and inexpensive specimens the Charpy impact test is widely used in quality control and alloy development. Limitations in power reactor survellance capsules it is also widely used for safety analysis purposes. Instrumenting the tup and computerizing data acquisition, makes dynamic fracture mechanics data measurement possible and convenient. However, the dynamic effects (inertia forces, specimen oscillations) in the impact test cause inaccuracies in the recorded load-time diagram and hence diminish the reliability of the calculated dynamic fracture mechanics parameters. To decrease inaccuracies a new pendulum type of instrumented impact test apparatus has been developed and constructed in the Metals Laboratory of the Technical Research Centre of Finland. This tester is based on a new principle involving inverted test geometry. The purpose of the geometry inversion is to reduce inertia load and specimen oscillation effects. Further, the new impact tester has some other novel features: e.g. the available initia impact energy is about double compared to the conventional standard (300 J) impact tester allowing the use of larger (10 x 20 x 110 mm) bend specimens than normal Charpy specimens. Also, the rotation asix in the three point bending is nearly stationary making COD-measurements possible. An experimental test series is described in which the inertia effects and specimen oscillations are compared in the conventional and new impact tester utilizing Charpy V-notch specimens. Comparison of the two test geometries is also made with the aid of an analytical model using finite element method (FEM) analysis. (author)

  16. Autoimmune Progesterone Dermatitis Presenting as Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayer, Sara M; Laufer, Larry R; Farrell, Maureen E

    2017-10-01

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis is an uncommon disease presenting with cyclical skin eruptions corresponding with the menstrual cycle luteal phase. Because symptoms are precipitated by rising progesterone levels, treatment relies on hormone suppression. A 22-year-old nulligravid woman presented with symptoms mistaken for Stevens-Johnson syndrome. A cyclic recurrence of her symptoms was noted, and the diagnosis of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis was made by an intradermal progesterone challenge. After 48 months, she remained refractory to medical management and definitive surgical treatment with bilateral oophorectomy was performed. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis is a challenging diagnosis owing to its rarity and variety of clinical presentations. Treatment centers on suppression of endogenous progesterone and avoidance of exogenous triggers. When these modalities fail, surgical management must be undertaken.

  17. Specimen size effects in Charpy impact testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.; Klueh, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    Full-size , half-size, and third-size specimens from several different steels have been tested as part of an ongoing alloy development program. The smaller specimens permit more specimens to be made from small trail heats and are much more efficient for irradiation experiments. The results of several comparisons between the different specimen sizes have shown that the smaller specimens show qualitatively similar behavior to large specimens, although the upper-shelf energy level and ductile-to-ductile transition temperature are reduced. The upper-shelf energy levels from different specimen sizes can be compared by using a simple volume normalization method. The effect of specimen size and geometry on the ductile-to-ductile transition temperature is more difficult to predict, although the available data suggest a simple shift in the transition temperature due to specimen size changes.The relatively shallower notch used in smaller specimens alters the deformation pattern, and permits yielding to spread back to the notched surface as well as through to the back. This reduces the constraint and the peak stresses, and thus the initiation of cleavage is more difficult. A better understanding of the stress and strain distributions is needed. 19 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Numerical simulation of small scale soft impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varpasuo, Pentti

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the small scale soft missile impact tests. The purpose of the test program is to provide data for the calibration of the numerical simulation models for impact simulation. In the experiments, both dry and fluid filled missiles are used. The tests with fluid filled missiles investigate the release speed and the droplet size of the fluid release. This data is important in quantifying the fire hazard of flammable liquid after the release. The spray release velocity and droplet size are also input data for analytical and numerical simulation of the liquid spread in the impact. The behaviour of the impact target is the second investigative goal of the test program. The response of reinforced and pre-stressed concrete walls is studied with the aid of displacement and strain monitoring. (authors)

  19. Blunt impact tests of retired passenger locomotive fuel tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Transportation Technology Center, Inc. conducted impact tests on three locomotive fuel tanks as part of the Federal Railroad Administrations locomotive fuel tank crashworthiness improvement program. Three fuel tanks, two from EMD F40PH locomot...

  20. Results of a conventional fuel tank blunt impact test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-23

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research : and Development is conducting research into passenger : locomotive fuel tank crashworthiness. A series of impact tests is : being conducted to measure fuel tank deformation under two : type...

  1. Pendulum impact tests of wooden and steel highway guardrail posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles J. Gatchell; Jarvis D. Michie

    1974-01-01

    Impact strength characteristics of southern pine, red oak, and steel highway guardrail posts were evaluated in destructive impact testing with a 4,000-pound pendulum at the Southwest Research Institute. Effects were recorded with high-speed motion-picture equipment. Comparisons were based on reactions to the point of major post failure. Major comparisons of 6x6-inch...

  2. Impact Testing of Orbiter Thermal Protection System Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Justin

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the impact testing of the materials used in designing the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system (TPS). Pursuant to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board recommendations a testing program of the TPS system was instituted. This involved using various types of impactors in different sizes shot from various sizes and strengths guns to impact the TPS tiles and the Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS). The observed damage is shown, and the resultant lessons learned are reviewed.

  3. Testing of materials and scale models for impact limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maji, A.K.; Satpathi, D.; Schryer, H.L.

    1991-01-01

    Aluminum Honeycomb and Polyurethane foam specimens were tested to obtain experimental data on the material's behavior under different loading conditions. This paper reports the dynamic tests conducted on the materials and on the design and testing of scale models made out of these open-quotes Impact Limiters,close quotes as they are used in the design of transportation casks. Dynamic tests were conducted on a modified Charpy Impact machine with associated instrumentation, and compared with static test results. A scale model testing setup was designed and used for preliminary tests on models being used by current designers of transportation casks. The paper presents preliminary results of the program. Additional information will be available and reported at the time of presentation of the paper

  4. Impact test on natural fiber reinforced polymer composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Chandramohan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, natural fibers like Sisal (Agave sisalana, Banana (Musa sepientum & Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa , Sisal and banana (hybrid , Roselle and banana (hybrid and Roselle and sisal (hybrid are fabricated with bio epoxy resin using molding method. In this work, impact strength of Sisal and banana (hybrid, Roselle and banana (hybridand Roselle and sisal (hybrid composite at dry and wet conditions were studied. Impact test were conducted izod impact testing machine. In this work micro structure of the specimens are scanned by the Scanning Electron Microscope.

  5. The Impact of IPv6 on Penetration Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottow, Christiaan; van Vliet, Frank; de Boer, Pieter-Tjerk; Pras, Aiko

    In this paper we discuss the impact the use of IPv6 has on remote penetration testing of servers and web applications. Several modifications to the penetration testing process are proposed to accommodate IPv6. Among these modifications are ways of performing fragmentation attacks, host discovery and

  6. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Evans, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility s unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. The current and proposed ITF capabilities range from rain to micrometeoroids allowing the widest test parameter range possible for materials investigations in support of space, atmospheric, and ground environments. These test capabilities including hydrometeor, single/multi-particle, ballistic gas guns, exploding wire gun, and light gas guns combined with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) simulations represent the widest range of impact test capabilities in the country.

  7. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and atypical Stevens-Johnson syndrome: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Karen A; Rappaport, Lara D; Zuckerbraun, Noel S; Wadowsky, Robert M; Wald, Ellen R; Michaels, Marian M

    2007-04-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired respiratory illness in the adolescent population. Stevens-Johnson syndrome is an extrapulmonary manifestation that has been associated with M. pneumoniae infections. Three adolescent males presented within a 1-month period with M. pneumoniae respiratory illnesses and severe mucositis but without the classic rash typical of Stevens-Johnson. Diagnosis was facilitated by the use of a polymerase chain reaction-based assay. This case series highlights the potential for M. pneumoniae-associated Stevens-Johnson syndrome to occur without rash and supports the use of polymerase chain reaction for early diagnosis.

  8. The Impact of an Electronic Expensive Test Notification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jacquelyn D; Stanley, Glenn; Wyllie, Robert; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Procop, Gary W

    2018-04-25

    The impact of clinical decision support tools (CDSTs) that display test cost information has been variable. We retrospectively analyzed the 3-year impact of a passive CDST that notified providers when the test order cost was $1,000 or more. We determined the most common expensive tests ordered, the frequency with which providers abandoned the order after notification, and the costs saved through this intervention. The average monthly abandonment rate was 12.5% (2014), 12.9% (2015), and 14.3% (2016). The cost savings from tests not performed for this 3-year period was $696,007. Molecular hematopathology assays were the most frequently ordered tests, with variable abandonment rates. Although this CDST was passive (ie, could be overridden at the point of order entry) and was associated with a relatively low abandonment rate, it achieved a considerable cost savings each year since each abandoned test saved the institution $1,000 or more.

  9. Tests of spinning turbine fragment impact on casing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbeck, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Ten 1/11-scale model turbine missile impact tests were conducted at a Naval spin chamber test facility to assess turbine missile effects in nuclear plant design. The objective of the tests was to determine the effects of missile spin, blade crush, and target edge conditions on the impact of turbine disk fragments on the steel casing. The results were intended for use in making realistic estimates for the initial conditions of fragments that might escape the casing in the event of a disk burst in a nuclear plant. The burst of a modified gas turbine rotor in a high-speed spin chamber provided three missiles with the proper rotational and translational velocities of actual steam turbine fragments. Tests of bladed, spinning missiles were compared with previous tests of unbladed, nonspinning missiles. The total residual energy of the spinning missiles, as observed from high-speed photographs of disk burst, was the same as that of the nonspinning missiles launched in a piercing orientation. Tests with bladed missiles showed that for equal burst speeds, the residual energy of bladed missiles is less than that of unbladed missiles. Impacts of missiles near the edge of targets resulted in residual missile velocities greater than for central impact. (orig.)

  10. Full-scale Tornado-missile impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-04-01

    Initial tests with four types of hypothetical tornado-borne missiles impacting reinforced concrete panels have been completed. Panel thicknesses are typical of walls in nuclear power facilities. In the seven tests, the missiles were rocket propelled to velocities currently postulated as being attainable by debris in tornadoes. The objective of the 18-test program is to ascertain the vulnerability of test panels to penetration and backface scabbing. The four missile types being tested are: a 1500-pound 35-foot long utility pole, an 8-pound 1-inch Grade 60 reinforcing bar, a 78-pound 3-inch Schedule 40 pipe, and a 743-pound 12-inch Schedule 40 pipe. The test panels are 12, 18, and 24 inches thick with 15 by 15 foot free spans. They were constructed to current minimum ACI standards: 3000 psi design strength (actual strength about 3600 psi) and 0.2 percent reinforcing steel area each way, each face (actual area is about 0.27 percent with bars on 12-inch centers). The 12-inch pipe has been identified as the critical missile for design of nuclear facility walls under currently specified impact conditions. The utility poles splintered upon impact causing virtually no impact damage, and the 3-inch pipe and 1-inch rebar were comparatively ineffectual because of their light weight

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hung SI. Recent advances in the genetics and immunology of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrosis. ... 2012 May 29. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central More from Genetics Home Reference ...

  12. Microstructural characterization of Charpy-impact-tested nanostructured bainite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Y.T.; Chang, H.T.; Huang, B.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, C.Y. [Iron and Steel R& D Department, China Steel Corporation, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yang, J.R., E-mail: jryang@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-09-15

    In this work, a possible cause of the extraordinary low impact toughness of nanostructured bainite has been investigated. The microstructure of nanostructured bainite consisted chiefly of carbide-free bainitic ferrite with retained austenite films. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) measurement indicated that no retained austenite existed in the fractured surface of the Charpy-impact-tested specimens. Fractographs showed that cracks propagated mainly along bainitic ferrite platelet boundaries. The change in microstructure after impact loading was verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, confirming that retained austenite was completely transformed to strain-induced martensite during the Charpy impact test. However, the zone affected by strained-induced martensite was found to be extremely shallow, only to a depth of several micrometers from the fracture surface. It is appropriately concluded that upon impact, as the crack forms and propagates, strain-induced martensitic transformation immediately occurs ahead of the advancing crack tip. The successive martensitic transformation profoundly facilitates the crack propagation, resulting in the extremely low impact toughness of nanostructured bainite. Retained austenite, in contrast to its well-known beneficial role, has a deteriorating effect on toughness during the course of Charpy impact. - Highlights: • The microstructure of nanostructured bainite consisted of nano-sized bainitic ferrite subunits with retained austenite films. • Special sample preparations for SEM, XRD and TEM were made, and the strain-affected structures have been explored. • Retained austenite films were found to transform into martensite after impact loading, as evidenced by XRD and TEM results. • The zone of strain-induced martensite was found to extend to only several micrometers from the fracture surface. • The poor Charpy impact toughness is associated with the fracture of martensite at a high strain rate during

  13. Developing the impact testing module with labVIEW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ki Soo; Jeon, Soo Hong; Jeong, Weui Bong

    2007-01-01

    Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) is one of the most useful way to analyze response signal for the purpose of grasping the dynamic characteristics of system. Vibration test using impact hammer is typical and simple experimental method widely used for catching hold of dynamic peculiar characters and modal behaviors of system. In this thesis, impact testing module for NI-PXI equipment is developed. The analyzing and visualizing module are developed with labVIEW tool. A user can see quickly and easily modal shape of system after analyzing acquired data. This developed module will be expected to build up more convenient and serviceable measurement system

  14. T. Rapatsikou on  Bart and Ragg’s Wallace Stevens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Eeckhout, Bart and Edward Ragg, eds. Wallace Stevens Across the Atlantic (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008. Pp. xvii + 246. ISBN 978-0-230-53584-8.Bart Eeckhout and Edward Ragg’s edited collection of essays entitled Wallace Stevens Across the Atlantic is a diverse, well-informed and excellently conceptualized volume offering fresh insights into Wallace Stevens’ poetry. This book can serve as a good introduction to Wallace Stevens’ oeuvre for the general reader, university s...

  15. Bronchiolitis obliterans in children with Stevens-Johnson syndrome: follow-up with high resolution CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.J.; Lee, K.Y.

    1996-01-01

    About one third of children with Stevens-Johnson syndrome have pulmonary involvement. As a consequence of airway epithelial injury, bronchiolitis obliterans can occur in these patients. Two cases of Stevens-Johnson syndrome-associated bronchiolitis obliterans in children were diagnosed and followed by high resolution CT without open lung biopsy. Serial changes of high resolution CT features of bronchiolitis obliterans are discussed and the literature is reviewed. (orig.)

  16. Steven johnsons syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri ram Anne

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN and Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS are severe adverse cutaneous drug reactions that predominantly involve the skin and mucous membranes. They are characterized by mucocutaneous tenderness and typically hemorrhagic erosions, erythema and more or less severe epidermal detachment presenting as blisters and areas of denuded skin. Drugs are assumed or identified as the main cause of SJS/TEN in most cases, but Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Herpes simplex virus infections are well documented causes alongside rare cases in which the etiology remains unknown. Several drugs are at "high" risk of inducing TEN/SJS including: Allopurinol, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other sulfonamide-antibiotics, aminopenicillins, cephalosporins, quinolones, carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and NSAID's of the oxicam-type. Differential diagnosis includes linear IgA dermatosis and paraneoplastic pemphigus, pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP, disseminated fixed bullous drug eruption and staphyloccocal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS. Due to the high risk of mortality, management of patients with SJS/TEN requires rapid diagnosis, identification and interruption of the culprit drug, specialized supportive care ideally in an intensive care unit, and consideration of immunomodulating agents such as high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy.

  17. Erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2007-01-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) are thought to be hypersensitivity syndromes with various causes, and radiotherapy might be one of the causes of these syndromes. We herein report two cases of EM/SJS following radiotherapy. The first case was a 63-year-old woman with breast cancer. At the end of postoperative radiotherapy with 60 Gy, severe pruritic erythema appeared in the irradiated area and spread over the whole body. She was diagnosed with EM by a skin biopsy. The second case was a 77-year-old woman with uterine cervical cancer who underwent postoperative radiotherapy. At a dose of 30.6 Gy, pruritic redness appeared in the irradiated area and the precordial region, and it became widespread rapidly with polymorphic transformation. Although without any histological confirmation, SJS was strongly suspected because of her pruritic conjunctivitis. Because both patients were given medicines during irradiation, radiotherapy may not be the only cause of EM/SJS. However, it should be noted that radiotherapy might trigger EM/SJS. (author)

  18. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of Nickel Hydrogen Battery Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frate, David T.; Nahra, Henry K.

    1996-01-01

    Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni/H2) battery cells have been used on several satellites and are planned for use on the International Space Station. In January 1992, the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) conducted hypervelocity impact testing on Ni/H2 cells to characterize their failure modes. The cell's outer construction was a 24 mil-thick Inconel 718 pressure vessel. A sheet of 1.27 cm thick honeycomb was placed in front of the battery cells during testing to simulate the on-orbit box enclosure. Testing was conducted at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). The hypervelocity gun used was a 7.6 mm (0.30 caliber) two-stage light gas gun. Test were performed at speeds of 3, 6, and 7 km/sec using aluminum 2017 spherical particles of either 4.8 or 6.4 mm diameter as the projectile. The battery cells were electrically charged to about 75 percent of capacity, then back-filled with hydrogen gas to 900 psi simulating the full charge condition. High speed film at 10,000 frames/sec was taken of the impacts. Impacts in the dome area (top) and the electrode area (middle) of the battery cells were investigated. Five tests on battery cells were performed. The results revealed that in all of the test conditions investigated, the battery cells simply vented their hydrogen gas and some electrolyte, but did not burst or generate any large debris fragments.

  19. Extra-regulatory impact tests and analyses of the structural evaluation test unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwigsen, J.S.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The structural evaluation test unit is roughly equivalent to a 1/3 scale model of a high level waste rail cask. The test unit was designed to just meet the requirements of NRC Regulatory Guide 7.6 when subjected to a 9 m (30 ft) free drop resulting in an impact velocity of 13.4 m/s (30 mph) onto an unyielding target in the end-on orientation. The test unit was then subjected to impacts with higher velocities to determine the amount of built-in conservatism in this design approach. Test impacts of 13.4, 20.1 and 26.8 m/s (30, 45, and 60 mph) were performed. This paper will describe the design, testing, and comparison of measured strains and deformations to the equivalent analytical predictions

  20. Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

  1. End-on radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Hhinckley, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure

  2. Developing of impact and fatigue property test database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. J.; Jun, I.; Kim, D. H.; Ryu, W. S.

    2003-01-01

    The impact and fatigue characteristics database systems were constructed using the data produced from impact and fatigue test and designed to hold in common the data and programs of tensile characteristics database that was constructed on 2001 and others characteristics databases that will be constructed in future. We can easily get the basic data from the impact and fatigue characteristics database systems when we prepare the new experiment and can produce high quality result by compare the previous data. The development part must be analysis and design more specific to construct the database and after that, we can offer the best quality to customers various requirements. In this thesis, we describe the procedure about analysis, design and development of the impact and fatigue characteristics database systems developed by internet method using jsp(Java Server pages) tool

  3. Horizontal impact testing of quarter scale flasks using masonry targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tufton, E.P.S.

    1985-01-01

    The programme leading up to the Train Crash Demonstration included investigation of flask impacts, in horizontal motion, against masonry targets representing abutment structures. An outline is given of a series of eight tests, of which five are described in detail. All the tests used quarter-scale flasks, and the design and construction of the appropriate brick and stone masonry targets is described. A summary of results is given in terms of damage to the model flask compared with the more severe damage seen in regulatory drop tests. (author)

  4. High rate loading tests and impact tests of concrete and reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, J.I.; Tachikawa, H.; Fujimoto, K.

    1982-01-01

    The responses of reinforced concrete structural members and structures subjected to impact or impulsive loadings are affected by the behavior of constituent concrete and reinforcement which are the synthesis of the rate effects and the contribution of propagating stress waves of them. The rate effects and the contribution of stress waves do not have the same tendency in the variation of magnitude of them with speed of impact or impulsive loadings. Therefore the rate effects, mentioned above, should be obtained by the tests minimized the effect of stress waves (high rate loading test). This paper deals with the testing techniques with high rate loadings and impact, and also reports the main results of these tests. (orig.) [de

  5. Data Mining FAERS to Analyze Molecular Targets of Drugs Highly Associated with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Keith K; Abernethy, Darrell; Jackson, David

    2015-06-01

    Drug features that are associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) have not been fully characterized. A molecular target analysis of the drugs associated with SJS in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) may contribute to mechanistic insights into SJS pathophysiology. The publicly available version of FAERS was analyzed to identify disproportionality among the molecular targets, metabolizing enzymes, and transporters for drugs associated with SJS. The FAERS in-house version was also analyzed for an internal comparison of the drugs most highly associated with SJS. Cyclooxygenases 1 and 2, carbonic anhydrase 2, and sodium channel 2 alpha were identified as disproportionately associated with SJS. Cytochrome P450 (CYPs) 3A4 and 2C9 are disproportionately represented as metabolizing enzymes of the drugs associated with SJS adverse event reports. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP-1), organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1), and PEPT2 were also identified and are highly associated with the transport of these drugs. A detailed review of the molecular targets identifies important roles for these targets in immune response. The association with CYP metabolizing enzymes suggests that reactive metabolites and oxidative stress may have a contributory role. Drug transporters may enhance intracellular tissue concentrations and also have vital physiologic roles that impact keratinocyte proliferation and survival. Data mining FAERS may be used to hypothesize mechanisms for adverse drug events by identifying molecular targets that are highly associated with drug-induced adverse events. The information gained may contribute to systems biology disease models.

  6. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  7. Two new tropolonic alkaloids from Colchicum speciosum Steven bulbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tayyeb*

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The genus Colchicum belongs to the family Colchicaceae, which comprises of 19 genera, and 225 species worldwide. They have been recognized for more than 2000 years for their noticeable biological properties. The Colchicum species are well known for presence of tropolonic alkaloids, mainly colchicine. Colchicine, is still the drug of choice for treatment of gout, and is used for the treatment of a number of proinflammatory disorders, such as familial Mediterranean fever, and Behcet’s disease. Clinical studies have proved colchicine to posses potent anti-tumor activity. Colchicum speciosum Steven is an indigenous perennial herbaceous plant widely distributed in northern, central and western regions of Iran.  Methods: In the present study, the phytochemical composition of MeOH extract from bulbs of C. speciosum collected fromSavadkouh region, Iranwas investigated by combination of HPLC-PDA-MS spectrometry and NMR specroscopy. The fractionation of MeOH extract was carried out by partitioning on CH2Cl2, EtOAc and water. Results: The isolation and purification of CH2Cl2 portion by combination of reverse and normal phase chromatography resulted in the isolation, purification and identification of two new tropolonic alkaloids, compounds (1 and (2, as well as two known compound colchicine (3 and demecolcine (4. Their structures were established by extensive spectroscopic methods, including 1D (1H NMR and 2D-NMR (COSY, HSQC and HMBC. The absolute configurations of isolated compounds were established by aid of circular dichroism. Conclusion: Phytochemical investigation of CH2Cl2 extract of C. speciosum by combination of HPLC, column chromatography and hyphenated spectroscopic techniques led to identification two new alkaloids with potential as lead compounds.

  8. The psychological impact of genetic testing on parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinc, Leyla; Terzioglu, Fusun

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this descriptive study was to explore the psychological impact of genetic testing on parents whose children have been referred for genetic testing. Genetic tests enable individuals to be informed about their health status and to have the opportunity of early diagnosis and treatment of their diseases. However undergoing genetic testing and receiving a positive test result may also cause stress and anxiety. This descriptive study was carried out at the genetic departments of two university hospitals in Ankara. The sample of this study consisted of 128 individuals whose children have been referred for chromosomal analysis. Data were collected through using a semi-structured interview method with a data collection form and the anxiety inventory and analysed using the percentages and independent samples t-test. The majority of our participants experienced distress before genetic testing. Their general trait anxiety score before receiving the test results was 47.38, and following the test results the state anxiety score was 50.65. Having a previous child with an abnormality, a positive test result, and being a mother elevated the anxiety of individuals. This paper supports the findings of previous studies, which indicated that genetic test results might lead to anxiety in individuals and reveals the importance of genetic counselling. As the results of this study indicated, genetic testing causes distress and anxiety in individuals. Nurses can play an important role in minimizing anxiety of parents whose children undergo genetic testing by providing information about genetic testing and by taking part in the counselling process.

  9. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Hinckley, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of 238 Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system (PMS). The results of this test indicated that impact of the RTG by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the convertor housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel

  10. Full-scale tornado-missile impact tests. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, A.E.

    1976-04-01

    Seven completed initial tests are described with 4 types of hypothetical tornado-borne missiles (impacting reinforced concrete panels that are typical of walls in nuclear power facilities). The missiles were rocket propelled to velocities currently postulated as being attainable by debris in tornadoes. (1500-pound 35-foot long utility pole; 8-pound 1-inch Grade 60 reinforcing bar; 78-pound 3-inch Schedule 40 pipe; and 743-pound 12-inch Schedule 40 pipe;) The results show that a minimum thickness of 24 inches is sufficient to prevent backface scabbing from normal impacts of currently postulated tornado missiles and that existing power plant walls are adequate for the most severe conditions currently postulated by regulatory agencies. This report gives selected detailed data on the tests completed thus far, including strain, panel velocity, and reaction histories

  11. Simulated hail impact testing of photovoltaic solar panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D.; Wilson, A.; Ross, R.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques used to simulate and study the effect of hail on photovoltaic solar panels are described. Simulated hail stones (frozen ice spheres projected at terminal velocity) or steel balls were applied by air guns, gravity drop, or static loading. Tests with simulated hail and steel balls yielded different results. The impact strength of 10 commercially available flat-plate photovoltaic modules was tested. It was found that none of the six panel designs incorporating clear potting silicone material as the outermost layer remained undamaged by 1-in. simulated hailstones, while a photovoltaic module equipped with a 0.188-in.-thick acrylic cover sheet would be able to withstand the impact of a 2-in.-diameter hailstone.

  12. A semiautomated computer-interactive dynamic impact testing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.; Nanstad, R.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Hutton, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    A computer-assisted semiautomated system has been developed for testing a variety of specimen types under dynamic impact conditions. The primary use of this system is for the testing of Charpy specimens. Full-, half-, and third-size specimens have been tested, both in the lab and remotely in a hot cell for irradiated specimens. Specimens are loaded into a transfer device which moves the specimen into a chamber, where a hot air gun is used to heat the specimen, or cold nitrogen gas is used for cooling, as required. The specimen is then quickly transferred from the furnace to the anvils and then broken. This system incorporates an instrumented tup to determine the change in voltage during the fracture process. These data are analyzed by the computer system after the test is complete. The voltage-time trace is recorded with a digital oscilloscope, transferred to the computer, and analyzed. The analysis program incorporates several unique features. It interacts with the operator and identifies the maximum voltage during the test, the amount of rapid fracture during the test (if any), and the end of the fracture process. The program then calculates the area to maximum voltage and the total area under the voltage-time curve. The data acquisition and analysis part of the system can also be used to conduct other dynamic testing. Dynamic tear and precracked specimens can be tested with an instrumented tup and analyzed in a similar manner. 3 refs., 7 figs

  13. Understanding the impact of genetic testing for inherited retinal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Ryan; McAllister, Marion; Payne, Katherine; Lowndes, Jo; Devery, Sophie; Webster, Andrew R; Downes, Susan M; Moore, Anthony T; Ramsden, Simon; Black, Graeme; Hall, Georgina

    2013-11-01

    The capability of genetic technologies is expanding rapidly in the field of inherited eye disease. New genetic testing approaches will deliver a step change in the ability to diagnose and extend the possibility of targeted treatments. However, evidence is lacking about the benefits of genetic testing to support service planning. Here, we report qualitative data about retinal dystrophy families' experiences of genetic testing in United Kingdom. The data were part of a wider study examining genetic eye service provision. Twenty interviewees from families in which a causative mutation had been identified by a genetic eye clinic were recruited to the study. Fourteen interviewees had chosen to have a genetic test and five had not; one was uncertain. In-depth telephone interviews were conducted allowing a thorough exploration of interviewees' views and experiences of the benefits of genetic counselling and testing. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Both affected and unaffected interviewees expressed mainly positive views about genetic testing, highlighting benefits such as diagnostic confirmation, risk information, and better preparation for the future. Negative consequences included the burden of knowledge, moral dilemmas around reproduction, and potential impact on insurance. The offer of genetic testing was often taken up, but was felt unnecessary in some cases. Interviewees in the study reported many benefits, suggesting genetic testing should be available to this patient group. The benefits and risks identified will inform future evaluation of models of service delivery. This research was part of a wider study exploring experiences of families with retinal dystrophy.

  14. Single specimen fracture toughness determination procedure using instrumented impact test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintamaa, R.

    1993-04-01

    In the study a new single specimen test method and testing facility for evaluating dynamic fracture toughness has been developed. The method is based on the application of a new pendulum type instrumented impact tester equipped with and optical crack mouth opening displacement (COD) extensometer. The fracture toughness measurement technique uses the Double Displacement Ratio (DDR) method, which is based on the assumption that the specimen is deformed as two rigid arms that rotate around an apparent centre of rotation. This apparent moves as the crack grows, and the ratio of COD versus specimen displacement changes. As a consequence the onset ductile crack initiation can be detected on the load-displacement curve. Thus, an energy-based fracture toughness can be calculated. In addition the testing apparatus can use specimens with the Double ligament size as compared with the standard Charpy specimen which makes the impact testing more appropriate from the fracture mechanics point of view. The novel features of the testing facility and the feasibility of the new DDR method has been verified by performing an extensive experimental and analytical study. (99 refs., 91 figs., 27 tabs.)

  15. Sand Impact Tests of a Half-Scale Crew Module Boilerplate Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Hardy, Robin C.

    2012-01-01

    Although the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is being designed primarily for water landings, a further investigation of launch abort scenarios reveals the possibility of an onshore landing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). To gather data for correlation against simulations of beach landing impacts, a series of sand impact tests were conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Both vertical drop tests and swing tests with combined vertical and horizontal velocity were performed onto beds of common construction-grade sand using a geometrically scaled crew module boilerplate test article. The tests were simulated using the explicit, nonlinear, transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA. The material models for the sand utilized in the simulations were based on tests of sand specimens. Although the LSDYNA models provided reasonable predictions for peak accelerations, they were not always able to track the response through the duration of the impact. Further improvements to the material model used for the sand were identified based on results from the sand specimen tests.

  16. Optimal design and dynamic impact tests of removable bollards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Suwen; Liu, Tianyi; Li, Guoqiang; Liu, Qing; Sun, Jianyun

    2017-10-01

    Anti-ram bollard systems, which are installed around buildings and infrastructure, can prevent unauthorized vehicles from entering, maintain distance from vehicle-borne improvised explosive devices (VBIED) and reduce the corresponding damage. Compared with a fixed bollard system, a removable bollard system provides more flexibility as it can be removed when needed. This paper first proposes a new type of K4-rated removable anti-ram bollard system. To simulate the collision of a vehicle hitting the bollard system, a finite element model was then built and verified through comparison of numerical simulation results and existing experimental results. Based on the orthogonal design method, the factors influencing the safety and economy of this proposed system were examined and sorted according to their importance. An optimal design scheme was then produced. Finally, to validate the effectiveness of the proposed design scheme, four dynamic impact tests, including two front impact tests and two side impact tests, have been conducted according to BSI Specifications. The residual rotation angles of the specimen are smaller than 30º and satisfy the requirements of the BSI Specification.

  17. Toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    French Lars E

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN and Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS are severe adverse cutaneous drug reactions that predominantly involve the skin and mucous membranes. Both are rare, with TEN and SJS affecting approximately 1or 2/1,000,000 annually, and are considered medical emergencies as they are potentially fatal. They are characterized by mucocutaneous tenderness and typically hemorrhagic erosions, erythema and more or less severe epidermal detachment presenting as blisters and areas of denuded skin. Currently, TEN and SJS are considered to be two ends of a spectrum of severe epidermolytic adverse cutaneous drug reactions, differing only by their extent of skin detachment. Drugs are assumed or identified as the main cause of SJS/TEN in most cases, but Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Herpes simplex virus infections are well documented causes alongside rare cases in which the aetiology remains unknown. Several drugs are at "high" risk of inducing TEN/SJS including: Allopurinol, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other sulfonamide-antibiotics, aminopenicillins, cephalosporins, quinolones, carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and NSAID's of the oxicam-type. Genetic susceptibility to SJS and TEN is likely as exemplified by the strong association observed in Han Chinese between a genetic marker, the human leukocyte antigen HLA-B*1502, and SJS induced by carbamazepine. Diagnosis relies mainly on clinical signs together with the histological analysis of a skin biopsy showing typical full-thickness epidermal necrolysis due to extensive keratinocyte apoptosis. Differential diagnosis includes linear IgA dermatosis and paraneoplastic pemphigus, pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP, disseminated fixed bullous drug eruption and staphyloccocal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS. Due to the high risk of mortality, management of patients with SJS/TEN requires rapid diagnosis, evaluation of the prognosis

  18. Machine for development impact tests in sports seats and similar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonçalves, R M

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the stages of development of a machine to perform impact tests in sport seats, seats for spectators and multiple seats. This includes reviews and recommendations for testing laboratories that have needs similar to the laboratory where unfolded this process.The machine was originally developed seeking to meet certain impact tests in accordance with the NBR15925 standards; 15878 and 16031. The process initially included the study of the rules and the election of the tests for which the machine could be developed and yet all reports and outcome of interaction with service providers and raw materials.For operating facility, it was necessary to set entirely the machine control, which included the concept of dialogue with operator, the design of the menu screens and the procedures for submission and registration of results. To ensure reliability in the process, the machine has been successfully calibrated according to the requirements of the Brazilian network of calibration.The criticism to this enterprise covers the technical and economic aspects involved and points out the main obstacles that were needed to overcome. (paper)

  19. Target Soil Impact Verification: Experimental Testing and Kayenta Constitutive Modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broome, Scott Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flint, Gregory Mark [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dewers, Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newell, Pania [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This report details experimental testing and constitutive modeling of sandy soil deformation under quasi - static conditions. This is driven by the need to understand constitutive response of soil to target/component behavior upon impact . An experimental and constitutive modeling program was followed to determine elastic - plastic properties and a compressional failure envelope of dry soil . One hydrostatic, one unconfined compressive stress (UCS), nine axisymmetric compression (ACS) , and one uniaxial strain (US) test were conducted at room temperature . Elastic moduli, assuming isotropy, are determined from unload/reload loops and final unloading for all tests pre - failure and increase monotonically with mean stress. Very little modulus degradation was discernable from elastic results even when exposed to mean stresses above 200 MPa . The failure envelope and initial yield surface were determined from peak stresses and observed onset of plastic yielding from all test results. Soil elasto - plastic behavior is described using the Brannon et al. (2009) Kayenta constitutive model. As a validation exercise, the ACS - parameterized Kayenta model is used to predict response of the soil material under uniaxial strain loading. The resulting parameterized and validated Kayenta model is of high quality and suitable for modeling sandy soil deformation under a range of conditions, including that for impact prediction.

  20. Final report on special impact tests of plutonium shipping containers description of test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonzon, L.L.

    1977-02-01

    The results from tests conducted to determine the structural response of the LLD-1, Model 1518-6M, and FL-10 plutonium shipping packages when subjected to high-speed impacts (170 to 760 ft/sec) onto unyielding, concrete, and soil targets are presented

  1. Computer-based tests: The impact of test design and problem of equivalency

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Květon, Petr; Jelínek, Martin; Vobořil, Dalibor; Klimusová, H.

    -, č. 23 (2007), s. 32-51 ISSN 0747-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA406/99/1052; GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK9058117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7025918 Keywords : Computer-based assessment * speeded test * equivalency Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 1.344, year: 2007

  2. An assessment of testing requirement impacts on nuclear thermal propulsion ground test facility design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipers, L.R.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    Programs to develop solid core nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been under way at the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). These programs have recognized the need for a new ground test facility to support development of NTP systems. However, the different military and civilian applications have led to different ground test facility requirements. The Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as landlord and operator of the proposed research reactor test facilities has initiated an effort to explore opportunities for a common ground test facility to meet both DoD and NASA needs. The baseline design and operating limits of the proposed DoD NTP ground test facility are described. The NASA ground test facility requirements are reviewed and their potential impact on the DoD facility baseline is discussed

  3. [Fatal toxic respiratory epitheliolysis. Subacute tracheo-bronchial desquamation in Stevens-Johnson syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L; Hazouard, E; Michalak-Provost, S; Maurage, C; Machet, L

    2001-09-01

    Acute bronchial mucosal sloughing related to Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (Lyell syndrome) is widely reported in literature. On the contrary severe respiratory involvement is rare in post-infectious or toxic Epitheliolysis (Stevens-Johnson syndrome). There is no well-known predictive sign of bronchial epithelium involvement. An 18-year-old patient was admitted for Stevens-Johnson syndrome related to sulfasalazine (salazosulfapyridine). There were no respiratory signs. An acute respiratory failure occurred 36 hours after from admission due to an obstructive and desquamative necrosis of the tracheobronchial epithelium. We purpose that a fiberoptic laryngoscopy should be performed even in non-dyspneic patients suffering from Stevens-Johnson syndrome if hypersecretion is present. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy can be helpful in these cases.

  4. Numerical simulation of impact tests on reinforced concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Xiaowo; He, Shuanhai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Predictions using advanced concrete model compare well with the impact test results. ► Several important behavior of concrete is discussed. ► Two mesh ways incorporating rebar into concrete mesh is also discussed. ► Gives a example of using EPDC model and references to develop new constitutive models. -- Abstract: This paper focuses on numerical simulation of impact tests of reinforced concrete (RC) beams by the LS-DYNA finite element (FE) code. In the FE model, the elasto-plastic damage cap (EPDC) model, which is based on continuum damage mechanics in combination with plasticity theory, is used for concrete, and the reinforcement is assumed to be elasto-plastic. The numerical results compares well with the experimental values reported in the literature, in terms of impact force history, mid-span deflection history and crack patterns of RC beams. By comparing the numerical and experimental results, several important behavior of concrete material is investigated, which includes: damage variable to describe the strain softening section of stress–strain curve; the cap surface to describe the plastic volume change; the shape of the meridian and deviatoric plane to describe the yield surface as well as two methods of incorporating rebar into concrete mesh. This study gives a good example of using EPDC model and can be utilized for the development new constitutive models for concrete in future.

  5. Instrumented Impact Testing: Influence of Machine Variables and Specimen Position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, E.; McCowan, C. N.; Santoyo, R. A.

    2008-09-15

    An investigation has been conducted on the influence of impact machine variables and specimen positioning on characteristic forces and absorbed energies from instrumented Charpy tests. Brittle and ductile fracture behavior has been investigated by testing NIST reference samples of low, high and super-high energy levels. Test machine variables included tightness of foundation, anvil and striker bolts, and the position of the center of percussion with respect to the center of strike. For specimen positioning, we tested samples which had been moved away or sideways with respect to the anvils. In order to assess the influence of the various factors, we compared mean values in the reference (unaltered) and altered conditions; for machine variables, t-test analyses were also performed in order to evaluate the statistical significance of the observed differences. Our results indicate that the only circumstance which resulted in variations larger than 5 percent for both brittle and ductile specimens is when the sample is not in contact with the anvils. These findings should be taken into account in future revisions of instrumented Charpy test standards.

  6. Instrumented Impact Testing: Influence of Machine Variables and Specimen Position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucon, E.; McCowan, C. N.; Santoyo, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted on the influence of impact machine variables and specimen positioning on characteristic forces and absorbed energies from instrumented Charpy tests. Brittle and ductile fracture behavior has been investigated by testing NIST reference samples of low, high and super-high energy levels. Test machine variables included tightness of foundation, anvil and striker bolts, and the position of the center of percussion with respect to the center of strike. For specimen positioning, we tested samples which had been moved away or sideways with respect to the anvils. In order to assess the influence of the various factors, we compared mean values in the reference (unaltered) and altered conditions; for machine variables, t-test analyses were also performed in order to evaluate the statistical significance of the observed differences. Our results indicate that the only circumstance which resulted in variations larger than 5 percent for both brittle and ductile specimens is when the sample is not in contact with the anvils. These findings should be taken into account in future revisions of instrumented Charpy test standards.

  7. Impact of Laboratory Test Use Strategies in a Turkish Hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Meriç Yılmaz

    Full Text Available Eliminating unnecessary laboratory tests is a good way to reduce costs while maintain patient safety. The aim of this study was to define and process strategies to rationalize laboratory use in Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital (ANH and calculate potential savings in costs.A collaborative plan was defined by hospital managers; joint meetings with ANHTA and laboratory professors were set; the joint committee invited relevant staff for input, and a laboratory efficiency committee was created. Literature was reviewed systematically to identify strategies used to improve laboratory efficiency. Strategies that would be applicable in local settings were identified for implementation, processed, and the impact on clinical use and costs assessed for 12 months.Laboratory use in ANH differed enormously among clinics. Major use was identified in internal medicine. The mean number of tests per patient was 15.8. Unnecessary testing for chloride, folic acid, free prostate specific antigen, hepatitis and HIV testing were observed. Test panel use was pinpointed as the main cause of overuse of the laboratory and the Hospital Information System test ordering page was reorganized. A significant decrease (between 12.6-85.0% was observed for the tests that were taken to an alternative page on the computer screen. The one year study saving was equivalent to 371,183 US dollars.Hospital-based committees including laboratory professionals and clinicians can define hospital based problems and led to a standardized approach to test use that can help clinicians reduce laboratory costs through appropriate use of laboratory tests.

  8. Impact of Vaccination History on Serological Testing in Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Michaël; Boucoiran, Isabelle; Paquet, Caroline; Laferrière, Céline; Gosselin-Brisson, Anne; Labbé, Annie-Claude; Martel-Laferrière, Valérie

    2018-04-01

    Serological testing guidelines for vaccine-preventable infectious diseases in pregnant women are heterogeneous. It is unclear how vaccination history influences health care workers' (HCWs) attitudes about testing. The aim of this study was to describe current practices in screening for rubella, hepatitis B, and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in pregnant women in the province of Québec. In 2015, an electronic survey was distributed to HCWs who followed the case of at least one pregnant woman in the previous year and who could be contacted by email by their professional association. A total of 363 of 1084 (33%) participants were included in the analysis: general practitioners (57%), obstetrician-gynaecologists (20%), midwives (41%), and nurse practitioners (31%). For rubella, 48% of participants inquired about vaccination status, and of these, 98% offered serological testing for unvaccinated women versus 44% for vaccinated women. Similarly, of the 48% of participants who asked about hepatitis B vaccination status before offering testing, 96% ordered testing for hepatitis B surface antigen, 28% ordered testing for hepatitis B surface antibody, and 1% ordered no serological testing to unvaccinated women versus 72%, 46%, and 8%, respectively, for vaccinated women. Among the 81% of respondents who discussed VZV during prenatal care, 13% ordered serological testing if patients had a history of VZV infection, 87% if the VZV history was uncertain, and 19% if patients had a positive history of vaccination. Asking about vaccination status influences HCWs' attitudes about serological testing for rubella, hepatitis B, and VZV. In the context of increasing vaccination coverage in women of child-bearing age, it is important to clarify the impact of vaccination status in serological screening guidelines in pregnant women. Copyright © 2018 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Blind Test of the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vance Holliday

    Full Text Available The Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis (YDIH states that North America was devastated by some sort of extraterrestrial event ~12,800 calendar years before present. Two fundamental questions persist in the debate over the YDIH: Can the results of analyses for purported impact indicators be reproduced? And are the indicators unique to the lower YD boundary (YDB, i.e., ~12.8k cal yrs BP? A test reported here presents the results of analyses that address these questions. Two different labs analyzed identical splits of samples collected at, above, and below the ~12.8ka zone at the Lubbock Lake archaeological site (LL in northwest Texas. Both labs reported similar variation in levels of magnetic micrograins (>300 mg/kg >12.8ka and <11.5ka, but <150 mg/kg 12.8ka to 11.5ka. Analysis for magnetic microspheres in one split, reported elsewhere, produced very low to nonexistent levels throughout the section. In the other split, reported here, the levels of magnetic microspherules and nanodiamonds are low or nonexistent at, below, and above the YDB with the notable exception of a sample <11,500 cal years old. In that sample the claimed impact proxies were recovered at abundances two to four orders of magnitude above that from the other samples. Reproducibility of at least some analyses are problematic. In particular, no standard criteria exist for identification of magnetic spheres. Moreover, the purported impact proxies are not unique to the YDB.

  10. Full scale aircraft impact test for evaluation of impact forces-Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Riesemann, W.A.; Parrish, R.L.; Bickel, D.C.; Heffelfinger, S.R.; Muto, K.; Sugano, T.; Tsubota, H.; Koshika, N.; Suzuki, M.; Ohrui, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a test conducted at an existing rocket sled facility in which an actual F-4 Phantom aircraft was impacted at a nominal velocity of 215 m/s into an essentially rigid block of concrete. This was accomplished by supporting the F-4 on four struts that were attached to the sled track by carriage shoes to direct the path of the aircraft. Propulsion was accomplished by two stages of rockets. The concrete target was floated on a set of air bearings. Data acquisition consisted of measurements of the acceleration of the fuselage and engines of the F-4, and measurements of the displacement, velocity and acceleration of the concrete target. High-speed photograph recorded the impact process and also permitted the determination of the impact velocity. This paper describes the test plan, method and results

  11. Dynamic Impact Analysis and Test of Concrete Overpack Segment Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Ki Young; Jeon, Je Eon; Seo, Ki Seog [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Concrete cask is an option for spent nuclear fuel interim storage which is used mainly in US. The concrete overpack of the cask provides radiation shielding as well as physical protection for inner canister against external mechanical shock. When the overpack undergoes a severe missile impact which might be caused by tornado or aircraft crash, it should sustain minimal level of structural integrity so that the radiation shielding and the retrievability of canister are maintained. Empirical formulas have been developed for the evaluation of concrete damage but those formulas can be used only for local damage evaluation and not for global damage evaluation. In this research, a series of numerical simulations and tests have been performed to evaluate the damage of two types of concrete overpack segment models under high speed missile impact. It is shown that appropriate modeling of material failure is crucial in this kind of analyses and finding the correct failure parameters may not be straightforward

  12. Utility of the ImPACT test with deaf adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reesman, Jennifer; Pineda, Jill; Carver, Jenny; Brice, Patrick J; Zabel, T Andrew; Schatz, Philip

    2016-02-01

    The goals of the study included empirical examination of the utility of the Immediate and Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) test with adolescents who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and to investigate patterns of performance at baseline that may arise in the assessment of this population. Baseline assessment of student-athletes has been conducted on a widespread scale with focus on performance of typically developing student-athletes and some clinical groups, though to date no studies have examined adolescents who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. Retrospective and de-identified ImPACT baseline test used with deaf and hard-of-hearing high-school student-athletes (N = 143; 66% male, mean age = 16.11) was examined. Review indicated significant differences in some composite scores between the deaf and hard-of-hearing group and hearing normative comparisons. A possible marker of task misunderstanding was identified to occur more frequently within the deaf and hard-of-hearing sample (13% in deaf sample vs. .31% in hearing sample). Results may provide support for the consideration and use of additional measures to ensure comprehension of task demands when considering this tool for use with deaf and hard-of-hearing adolescents.

  13. Dynamic Open-Rotor Composite Shield Impact Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Silvia; Frankenberger, Charles; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, J. Michael; Carney, Kelly S.; Emmerling, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency to determine the certification base for proposed new engines that would not have a containment structure on large commercial aircraft. Equivalent safety to the current fleet is desired by the regulators, which means that loss of a single fan blade will not cause hazard to the aircraft. NASA Glenn and Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) China Lake collaborated with the FAA Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program to design and test a shield that would protect the aircraft passengers and critical systems from a released blade that could impact the fuselage. This report documents the live-fire test from a full-scale rig at NAWC China Lake. NASA provided manpower and photogrammetry expertise to document the impact and damage to the shields. The test was successful: the blade was stopped from penetrating the shield, which validates the design analysis method and the parameters used in the analysis. Additional work is required to implement the shielding into the aircraft.

  14. 77 FR 27436 - Stevens Institute of Technology, et al.; Notice of Consolidated Decision on Applications for Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... Number: 12-014. Applicant: California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125. Instrument: Nova Nano... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Stevens Institute of Technology, et al... Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC Docket Number: 12-008. Applicant: Stevens Institute of Technology...

  15. 77 FR 69929 - Western Carolina Railway Service Corporation, Steven C. Hawkins and Cheryl R. Hawkins-Continuance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... Railway Service Corporation, Steven C. Hawkins and Cheryl R. Hawkins--Continuance in Control Exemption--Aiken Railway Company, LLC Western Carolina Railway Service Corporation (WCRS) and Steven C. Hawkins and Cheryl R. Hawkins (the Hawkins) (collectively, Applicants) have filed a verified notice of exemption...

  16. Synthesis of (±)-amathaspiramide F and discovery of an unusual stereocontrolling element for the [2,3]-Stevens rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheili, Arash; Tambar, Uttam K

    2013-10-04

    A formal total synthesis of (±)-amathaspiramide F through a tandem palladium-catalyzed allylic amination/[2,3]-Stevens rearrangement is reported. The unexpected diastereoselectivity of the [2,3]-Stevens rearrangement was controlled by the substitution patterns of an aromatic ring. This discovery represents a new stereocontrolling element for [2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangements in complex molecular settings.

  17. The DT-19 container design, impact testing and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramayo, G.A.; Goins, M.L.

    1995-01-01

    Containers used by the Department of Energy (DOE) for the transport of radioactive material components, including components and special assemblies, are required to meet certain impact and thermal requirements that are demonstrated by performance or compliance testing, analytical procedures or a combination of both. The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 49, Section 173.7(d) stipulates that, 'Packages (containers) made by or under direction of the US DOE may be used for the transportation of radioactive materials when evaluated, approved, and certified by the DOE against packaging standards equivalent to those specified in 10 CFR Part 71. This paper describes the details of the design, analysis and testing efforts undertaken to improve the overall structural and thermal integrity of the DC-19 shipping container

  18. Dynamic Impact Analyses and Tests of Concrete Overpacks - 13638

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sanghoon; Cho, Sang-Soon; Kim, Ki-Young; Jeon, Je-Eon; Seo, Ki-Seog [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Concrete cask is an option for spent nuclear fuel interim storage which is prevailingly used in US. A concrete cask usually consists of metallic canister which confines the spent nuclear fuel and concrete overpack. When the overpack undergoes a severe missile impact which might be caused by a tornado or an aircraft crash, it should sustain acceptable level of structural integrity so that its radiation shielding capability and the retrievability of canister are maintained. Missile impact against a concrete overpack involves two damage modes, local damage and global damage. Local damage of concrete is usually evaluated by empirical formulas while the global damage is evaluated by finite element analysis. In many cases, those two damage modes are evaluated separately. In this research, a series of numerical simulations are performed using finite element analysis to evaluate the global damage of concrete overpack as well as its local damage under high speed missile impact. We consider two types of concrete overpack, one with steel in-cased concrete without reinforcement and the other with partially-confined reinforced concrete. The numerical simulation results are compared with test results and it is shown that appropriate modeling of material failure is crucial in this analysis and the results are highly dependent on the choice of failure parameters. (authors)

  19. Dynamic Impact Analyses and Tests of Concrete Overpacks - 13638

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sanghoon; Cho, Sang-Soon; Kim, Ki-Young; Jeon, Je-Eon; Seo, Ki-Seog

    2013-01-01

    Concrete cask is an option for spent nuclear fuel interim storage which is prevailingly used in US. A concrete cask usually consists of metallic canister which confines the spent nuclear fuel and concrete overpack. When the overpack undergoes a severe missile impact which might be caused by a tornado or an aircraft crash, it should sustain acceptable level of structural integrity so that its radiation shielding capability and the retrievability of canister are maintained. Missile impact against a concrete overpack involves two damage modes, local damage and global damage. Local damage of concrete is usually evaluated by empirical formulas while the global damage is evaluated by finite element analysis. In many cases, those two damage modes are evaluated separately. In this research, a series of numerical simulations are performed using finite element analysis to evaluate the global damage of concrete overpack as well as its local damage under high speed missile impact. We consider two types of concrete overpack, one with steel in-cased concrete without reinforcement and the other with partially-confined reinforced concrete. The numerical simulation results are compared with test results and it is shown that appropriate modeling of material failure is crucial in this analysis and the results are highly dependent on the choice of failure parameters. (authors)

  20. 78 FR 21114 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; General Provisions for Domestic Fisheries; Application for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-09

    ... for Sustainable Fisheries, Northeast Region, NMFS (Assistant Regional Administrator), has made a... University Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County, NY. Regulations under the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery... limits to conduct onboard sampling. This project proposes to evaluate bottom trawl modifications as a...

  1. Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis during long-term etanercept therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarczyk-Saczonek, Agnieszka; Zdanowska, Natalia; Znajewska-Pander, Aleksandra; Placek, Waldemar

    2016-03-31

    Etanercept and other anti-TNF-alpha agents have been indicated as a therapeutic option in severe drug reactions, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Etanercept has been shown to quickly reduce the detachment of the epidermis and shorten healing time. Cases of etanercept-induced severe adverse drug reactions were also described. A 27-year-old woman with a 4-year history of etanercept and sulfasalazine treatment for rheumatoid arthritis was admitted with Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The patient received one dose of an OTC drug containing acetaminophen, phenylephrine and pheniramine two days prior to developing fist mucocutaneous symptoms. The most probable causative agent was paracetamol. Throughout the successful routine therapy of Stevens-Johnson syndrome etanercept therapy was continued. Sulfosalazin administration was stopped and administered again after recovery with no recurrence of the skin and mucosal symptoms. This case indicates that there is no justification for discontinuation of long-term anti-TNF-alpha treatment in patients who develop Stevens- Johnson syndrome / toxic epidermal necrolysis.

  2. 76 FR 56985 - Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act Provisions; Fisheries of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... to estimate total haddock catch by the herring midwater trawl fleet in these herring management areas.... 110627355-1539-02] RIN 0648-BB08 Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act Provisions... the NE Multispecies Fishery Management Plan (FMP), which increases the haddock incidental catch cap...

  3. 76 FR 43745 - Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA) Provisions; Fisheries of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... during the course of the FY. Management uncertainty for the LAGC IFQ fleet is considered very low because... incorporate ACT into the LAGC IFQ fleet allocation, but chose not to apply any management uncertainty buffer... Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA...

  4. What Recourse for the Principal Abused by Community Activists? The Case of "Stevens v. Tillman."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menacker, Julius

    1990-01-01

    "Stevens v. Tillman" illustrates the limited reach of federal law in controversies where community activists use extreme, even illegal, methods to exert their will over objecting school officials. Defamation charges against activists for verbal abuses will apparently be very difficult to sustain, given court views that being called a…

  5. Eliminating cancer stem cells: an interview with CCR’s Steven Hou | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven Hou, Ph.D., senior investigator in the Basic Research Laboratory at the Center for Cancer Research describes his latest research that has uncovered potential ways to eliminate cancer stem cells and may offer hope to patients with reoccurring tumors.  Learn more...

  6. Alfred Russel Wallace’s record of his consignments to Samuel Stevens, 1854-1861

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, D.B.

    2001-01-01

    An annotated facsimile of those pages of Alfred Russel Wallace’s notebook recording his consignments from the Malay Archipelago to his London agent, Samuel Stevens, is provided. Records of individual consignments are linked with the stages of Wallace’s and Charles Allen’s itineraries to which they

  7. 78 FR 63892 - Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act Provisions; Fisheries of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    .../13monkeia.html . Copies of the small entity compliance guide are available at the following internet address... Procedure Act (APA). Pursuant to section 305(c)(3)(B) of the Magnuson-Stevens Act, management measures... APA. Comments and Responses Fifteen comments were received during the public comment period on the...

  8. Steven Spielberg peab oma uut filmi koostööks Stanley Kubrickuga

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2001-01-01

    30. juunil üheaegselt Jaapanis ja USAs esilinastub Steven Spielbergi "Tehisintellekt" ("A.I. Artificial Intelligence"), mille kohta režissöör Tokyos pressikonverentsil väitis, et see on õieti Stanley Kubricku film, kuna põhineb temast järelejäänud 90-leheküljelisel ideeprojektil

  9. 78 FR 38693 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; General Provisions for Domestic Fisheries; Application for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... Massachusetts, Dartmouth, School for Marine Science and Technology. Regulations under the Magnuson-Stevens..., 978-281-9177. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, School for Marine... preliminary determination that an exempted fishing permit application contains all of the required information...

  10. 78 FR 21913 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; General Provisions for Domestic Fisheries; Application for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... Massachusetts, Dartmouth, School for Marine Science and Technology. Regulations under the Magnuson-Stevens... preliminary determination that an exempted fishing permit application contains all of the required information....'' Fax: (978) 281-9135. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jason Berthiaume, Fishery Management Specialist...

  11. Stevens-Johnson syndrome progressing to toxic epidermal necrolysis with haloperidol and carbamazepine combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbamazepine and other anticonvulsants are commoner cause of severe adverse cutaneous drug reactions such as erythema multiforme, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS. We report a case of SJS rapidly progressing to TEN with a combination of haloperidol and carbamazepine in a patient with bipolar affective disorder. The pathophysiological mechanism underlying this reaction is discussed.

  12. 78 FR 32375 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; General Provisions for Domestic Fisheries; Application for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ..., Dartmouth, School for Marine Science and Technology. Regulations under the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, School for Marine Science and Technology... study and examining the influence of temperature. To facilitate compensation fishing in support of this...

  13. Steven Spielberg's "Amistad": Film as History and the Trivializing of History Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butchart, Ronald E.

    1999-01-01

    Asserts that Steven Spielberg's film "Amistad" fictionalizes the overall facts of the case by inaccurately portraying many of the events that occurred. Explains that the myth-making tradition of Hollywood changes the messages derived from the Amistad court case. Critiques the teaching kit that corresponds to the movie. (CMK)

  14. 78 FR 25685 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Implementation of the Shark Conservation Act of 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    .... 111014628-3329-01] RIN 0648-BB54 Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Implementation of the Shark Conservation... implement the provisions of the Shark Conservation Act of 2010 (SCA) and prohibit any person from removing any of the fins of a shark at sea, possessing shark fins on board a fishing vessel unless they are...

  15. 77 FR 16942 - Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act Provisions; Fisheries of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... Multispecies Fishery Management Plan which was approved on March 8, 2012. This action amends the Northeast Multispecies Fishery Management Plan to explicitly define and facilitate the effective operation of state.... 110901552-20494-02] RIN 0648-BB34 Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act Provisions...

  16. Steven Spielberg: My Primary Purpose in Making "Schindler's List" Was for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Stephen; Totten, Samuel

    1995-01-01

    Presents an interview with Steven Spielberg on his goals and methods for making "Schindler's List." Maintains that the important lessons of truth and tolerance will help prevent the Holocaust from happening again. Describes cooperative ventures with educational groups to develop instructional materials associated with the film. (CFR)

  17. Experimental impact testing and analysis of composite fan cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Klok, Andrew Joe

    For aircraft engine certification, one of the requirements is to demonstrate the ability of the engine to withstand a fan blade-out (FBO) event. A FBO event may be caused by fatigue failure of the fan blade itself or by impact damage of foreign objects such as bird strike. An un-contained blade can damage flight critical engine components or even the fuselage. The design of a containment structure is related to numerous parameters such as the blade tip speed; blade material, size and shape; hub/tip diameter; fan case material, configuration, rigidity, etc. To investigate all parameters by spin experiments with a full size rotor assembly can be prohibitively expensive. Gas gun experiments can generate useful data for the design of engine containment cases at much lower costs. To replicate the damage modes similar to that on a fan case in FBO testing, the gas gun experiment has to be carefully designed. To investigate the experimental procedure and data acquisition techniques for FBO test, a low cost, small spin rig was first constructed. FBO tests were carried out with the small rig. The observed blade-to-fan case interactions were similar to those reported using larger spin rigs. The small rig has the potential in a variety of applications from investigating FBO events, verifying concept designs of rotors, to developing spin testing techniques. This rig was used in the developments of the notched blade releasing mechanism, a wire trigger method for synchronized data acquisition, high speed video imaging and etc. A relationship between the notch depth and the release speed was developed and verified. Next, an original custom designed spin testing facility was constructed. Driven by a 40HP, 40,000rpm air turbine, the spin rig is housed in a vacuum chamber of phi72inx40in (1829mmx1016mm). The heavily armored chamber is furnished with 9 viewports. This facility enables unprecedented investigations of FBO events. In parallel, a 15.4ft (4.7m) long phi4.1inch (105mm

  18. Finite element analysis of car hood for impact test by using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finite element analysis of car hood for impact test by using solidworks software ... high safety and at the same time can be built according to market demands. ... Keywords: finite element analysis; impact test; Solidworks; automation, car hood.

  19. Low temperature impact testing of welded structural wrought iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Zachary

    During the second half of the 19th century, structural wrought iron was commonly used in construction of bridges and other structures. Today, these remaining structures are still actively in use and may fall under the protection of historic preservation agencies. Continued use and protection leads to the need for inspection, maintenance, and repair of the wrought iron within these structures. Welding can be useful to achieve the appropriate repair, rehabilitation, or replacement of wrought iron members. There is currently very little published on modern welding techniques for historic wrought iron. There is also no pre-qualified method for this welding. The demand for welding in the repair of historic structural wrought iron has led to a line of research investigating shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) of historic wrought iron at the University of Colorado Denver. This prior research selected the weld type and other weld specifications to try and achieve a recognized specific welding procedure using modern SMAW technology and techniques. This thesis continues investigating SMAW of historic wrought iron. Specifically, this thesis addresses the toughness of these welds from analysis of the data collected from performing Charpy V-Notch (CVN) Impact Tests. Temperature was varied to observe the material response of the welds at low temperature. The wrought iron used in testing was from a historic vehicle bridge in Minnesota, USA. This area, and many other areas with wrought iron structures, can experience sustained or fluctuating temperatures far below freezing. Investigating the toughness of welds in historic wrought iron at these temperatures is necessary to fully understand material responses of the existing structures in need of maintenance and repair. It was shown that welded wrought iron is tougher and more ductile than non-welded wrought iron. In regards to toughness, welding is an acceptable repair method. Information on wrought iron, low temperature failure

  20. Impact Strength of Natural Fibre Composites Measured by Different Test Methods: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navaranjan Namasivayam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Different types of impact test methods have been used in recent years to measure the impact resistance of natural fibre composites (NFCs. After reviewing the literature, the impact resistance of flax, hemp, sisal, wood and jute fibre composites that were measured using different test methods have been compared and discussed. It has been learned that the test methods were selected for research interest, industry requirement or availability of test equipment. Each method had its own advantages and limitations. The result from a particular test could be compared but not with the result from other test methods. Most impact test methods were developed for testing ductile-brittle transition of metals. However, each NFC has a different morphology and cannot be comparable to metals in failure mode and energy absorption characteristic during an impact test. A post evaluation of morphology of an NFC sample after an impact test is important to characterise the material.

  1. Test Directions as a Critical Component of Test Design: Best Practices and the Impact of Examinee Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Joni M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of test directions is to familiarize examinees with a test so that they respond to items in the manner intended. However, changes in educational measurement as well as the U.S. student population present new challenges to test directions and increase the impact that differential familiarity could have on the validity of test score…

  2. Investigation of Monnose-Binding Lectin gene Polymorphism in Patients with Erythema Multiforme, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Toka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Monnose-Binding lectin (MBL appears to play an important role in the immune system. The genetic polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene can result in a reduction of serum levels, leading to a predisposition to recurrent infection. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of a polymorphism in codon 54 of the MBL2 gene on the susceptibility to Erythema Multiforme, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap Syndrome (EM, SJS and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome. Material and Methods: Our study included 64 patients who were clinically and/or histopathologically diagnosed with EM, SJS, and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome and 66 healthy control subjects who were genotyped for the MBL2 gene codon 54 polymorphism using the PCR-RFLP method. For all statistical analyses, the level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results: The prevalence of the B allele was 18% in the EM, SJS and SJS/TEN patient groups and 13% in the control group. No significant differences in allele frequencies of any polymorphism were observed between the patient and control groups, although the B allele was more frequent in the patient groups (p=0.328.Conclusion: Our results provide no evidence of a relationship between MBL2 gene codon 54 polymorphism and the susceptibility to EM, SJS and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome. However, these findings should be confirmed in studies with a larger sample size.

  3. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Fireside Chat with Steven Chu and Bill Gates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Steven; Gates, Bill; Podesta, John

    2012-02-28

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. This video captures a session called Fireside Chat that featured Steven Chu, the Secretary of Energy, and Bill Gates, Chairman of Microsoft Corporation. The session is moderated by John Podesta, Chair of the Center for American Progress. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Microsoft Founder and Chairman Bill Gates exchanged ideas about how small businesses and innovators can overcome the challenges that face many startups.

  4. Stevens Johnson Syndrome in a patient undergoing gynaecological brachytherapy: An association or an incident?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M. R.; Amado, A.; Jorge, M.; Grillo, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Stevens Johnson Syndrome and Erythema Multiforme are hypersensitivity skin reactions generally arising in the context of multiple causes. Radiation therapy is considered to be one of these causes, although most reports are hindered by concomitant medications. Aim: The aim of this paper was to present a case of Stevens Johnson Syndrome arising in a patient undergoing gynaecological brachytherapy with an unusual presentation. Case:We describe a case of a 56-year-old woman with endometrial cancer undergoing adjuvant gynaecological radiotherapy. While undergoing a gynaecological brachytherapy boost, she developed bilateral conjunctivitis that progressed to oral mucositis and pruritic erythema with sloughing of the skin on her arms and legs but not the torso or irradiated fields (namely the vaginal mucosa). Conclusion: This case illustrates the association of RT/SJS; however, it also raises the question of patients undergoing RT being more susceptible to SJS as opposed to a direct cause of the disease. (authors)

  5. Concurrence of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Bilateral Parotitis after Minocycline Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimi Yoon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Minocycline is an antibiotic of tetracycline derivatives that is commonly used in the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris. It has been reported to cause rare adverse events from mild cutaneous eruption to severe forms including drug-induced lupus, serum sickness-like reaction, and hypersensitivity reactions, etc. The risks of adverse events attributed to minocycline have not been ascertained reliably and there are concerns about the safety of minocycline which could possibly result in life-threatening events such as the Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Here we demonstrate an unusual case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in conjunction with bilateral parotitis after the intake of minocycline in a Korean boy suggesting discreet use of the drug.

  6. Síndrome de Stevens-Johnson: Presentación de 1 caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa María Pacheco Álvarez

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de Stevens-Johnson, es una enfermedad inflamatoria aguda, originada por una hipersensibilidad, que incluye la piel y las membranas mucosas; en una forma mayor pone en peligro la vida del paciente. Puede ser inducida por muchos factores precipitantes, desde los medicamentos hasta una infección. La afección se caracteriza por una súbita erupción morfológicamente variable, acompañada de estomatitis y oftalmia. En este trabajo se presenta un niño de 8 años de edad, con la entidad clínica en forma muy severa, el síndrome de Stevens-Johnson, que involucra manifestaciones cutáneas, oculares y de la mucosa oral, acompañada de otras complicaciones graves, por lo que requirió terapéutica en cuidados intensivos, y se logró una evolución satisfactoria del paciente.Stevens-Johnson syndrome is an acute inflammatory disease caused by a hypersensibility that includes the skin and the mucous membranes and that in a severe form endangers the patient’s life. It may be induced by many precipitating factors, from drugs to infection. The affection is characterized by a sudden morphologically variable rash, accompanied with stomatitis and ophthalmia. An 8-year-old boy suffering from this clinical entity in a very severe form, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, with skin , ocular and oral mucosa manifestations and with other serious complications, is presented in this paper. He had to be treated at the ICU and a satisfactory evolution was attained.

  7. Pediatric Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Halted by Etanercept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavigan, Geneviève M; Kanigsberg, Nordau D; Ramien, Michele L

    2018-02-01

    We report a case of an 11-year-old female with Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) overlap, most likely triggered by sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, who was treated with the combination of methylprednisolone, cyclosporine, and etanercept. Her condition stabilized and her skin involvement did not progress after the addition of etanercept. To our knowledge, this is the first report of etanercept for pediatric SJS/TEN.

  8. Evaluation of conjunctival bacterial flora in patients with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Frizon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the conjunctival bacterial flora present in patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome. METHODS: A prospective study of the conjunctival bacterial flora was performed in 41 eyes of 22 patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The information gathered included the patient's sex and age, the duration of disease, the cause of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and treatments. Scrapings of the inferior conjunctival fornix were performed in both eyes. Fourteen days before scraping, the patients were asked to interrupt all topical medication and start using 0.5% nonpreserved methylcellulose. The microbiological evaluation included microorganism identification and determination of antibiotic sensitivity. RESULTS: Of 22 patients (41 eyes, 14 (64% were females, and eight (36% were males. The mean age was 33.2 years, and the mean duration of disease was 15.6 years. Visual acuity ranged from light perception to 20/25 (1.57 logMar. The treatment received by most patients consisted of tear substitutes, topical antibiotics, and contact lenses. Bacterial identification was positive in 39 eyes (95% and negative in two eyes (5%. Gram-positive cocci accounted for 55.5% of the microorganisms, whereas gram-positive bacilli and gram-negative bacilli accounted for 19% and 25.5%, respectively. Half of the patients (54% had multiple bacterial species in their flora, and only one bacterial species was identified in the other half. Resistant bacteria were isolated from four eyes. The antibiotic sensitivity results for the Streptococcus group showed the lowest sensitivity and the highest microbial resistance identified. CONCLUSION: Patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome have a diverse conjunctival flora that includes many pathogenic species.

  9. Data Mining FAERS to Analyze Molecular Targets of Drugs Highly Associated with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhart, Keith K.; Abernethy, Darrell; Jackson, David

    2015-01-01

    Drug features that are associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) have not been fully characterized. A molecular target analysis of the drugs associated with SJS in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) may contribute to mechanistic insights into SJS pathophysiology. The publicly available version of FAERS was analyzed to identify disproportionality among the molecular targets, metabolizing enzymes, and transporters for drugs associated with SJS. The FAERS in-house version was al...

  10. Stevens-Johnson syndrome following use of metronidazole in a dental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, Goutameswar; Shome, Koushik

    2014-01-01

    Metronidazole alone rarely causes Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS). We present a case of an elderly male patient who, following metronidazole use, developed neurological symptoms followed by pain and blisters on both soles, erythema of face and neck, scrotal itching and erosion, and hemorrhagic encrustation around the lips and oral mucous membrane. Initial neurological symptoms followed by mucocutaneous manifestation of SJS following metronidazole use is probably a new presentation of this case.

  11. Comparison of Olive Tipped and Conventional Steven's Cannula for Sub-Tenon Ophthalmic Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Motowa, Saeed; Ahmad, Nauman; Khandekar, Rajiv; Zahoor, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of the olive tipped (OT) cannula to the conventional Steven's cannula for sub-Tenon block (STB) before cataract surgery. This prospective, randomized, double-masked compared STB delivered in cataract surgery patients with an OT cannula or a conventional Steven's cannula (ST). Outcome variables included the akinesia score and lid movement scores at 5 and 10 min. The patient perception of pain during delivery of the STB and surgery were also compared between groups. Surgeon satisfaction with anesthesia was compared between groups. P <0.05 was statistically significant. There were sixty patients in each group. The age between groups was not statistically different ( P = 0.4). The body mass index was higher in the ST group compared to the OT group ( P < 0.001). The akinesia score at 5 and 10 min did not differ between groups ( P = 0.07 and P = 0.6, respectively). The patient perception of pain during STB and surgery were similar between groups ( P = 0.1 and P = 0.06, respectively). There were six patients with mild chemosis and redness in the OT group and 15 patients in the ST group. An OT cannula is equally effective as the conventional Steven's cannula for delivering STB anesthesia before cataract surgery.

  12. Simulation and low velocity impact testing on confined explosives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtes, J.H.G.; Verbeek, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    TNO Defence Security and Safety, performs in depth research in energetic material responses to several Insensitive Munitions (IM) stimuli like cook-off, bullet-fragment impact and shaped charge impact. The response of energetic materials to these stimuli depends strongly on the properties of these

  13. Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    This environmental statement for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) considers underground nuclear detonations with yields of one megaton or less, along with the preparations necessary for such detonations. The testing activities considered also include other continuing and intermittent activities, both nuclear and nonnuclear, which can best be conducted in the remote and controlled area of the Nevada Test Site. These activities are listed, with emphasis on weapons testing programs which do not remain static

  14. Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-09-01

    This environmental statement for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) considers underground nuclear detonations with yields of one megaton or less, along with the preparations necessary for such detonations. The testing activities considered also include other continuing and intermittent activities, both nuclear and nonnuclear, which can best be conducted in the remote and controlled area of the Nevada Test Site. These activities are listed, with emphasis on weapons testing programs which do not remain static.

  15. Nine years of a single referral center management of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (Lyell's syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Diana; Egipto, Paula; Barbosa, Julia; Horta, Ricardo; Amarante, Jose; Silva, Pedro; Silva, Alvaro

    2017-06-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) corresponds to a rare and acute life-threatening mucocutaneous reactions characterized by extensive necrosis and epidermal detachment. There are no efficacious pharmaceutical interventions proven through large clinical trials. We sought to study clinical cases admitted in our institution in order to determine which drugs and medical comorbidities or treatments impacted the mortality. In a retrospective study over 9 years we evaluated all patients presenting biopsy-proven SJS or TEN for age, gender, total body surface area involved, causing agents, SCORTEN score, blood transfusion, steroid administration, intubation, length of intensive care stay and death rate. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS statistical software. The highest incidence of SJS and TEN was in age group of 71-80 years. Of the 30 patients, 30% died from SJS/TEN, mainly due sepsis. For each subgroup SJS/TEN overlap had the highest mortality. The highest mortality was from antibiotic treatment as causing agent. Step-wise regression analysis identified mechanical ventilation requirement and age over 65 years as mortality high-risk factors. The most crucial interventions are discontinuation of the offending drug and prompt referral to a burn unit, which helps in early diagnosis and decrease mortality in these diseases. When SJS/TEN is caused by antibiotics suspicion of developing fatal sepsis should be high, independently of patients' medical condition.

  16. 16 CFR 1203.17 - Impact attenuation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... instrumentation shall be checked before and after each series of tests (at least at the beginning and end of each... aluminum plate. The geometric center of the MEP pad shall be aligned with the center vertical axis of the... performed at the beginning and end of the test series (at a minimum at the beginning and end of each test...

  17. The Impact of Gender in Oral Proficiency Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, Kieran

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the role of gender in speaking tests and suggests that in oral interviews it is possible that both interviewing and rating may be highly gendered processes. Audiotaped female and male test-takers who undertook practice IELTS interviews, one with a female interviewer and once with a male interviewer. Results from discourse and test score…

  18. GA-4/GA-9 honeycomb impact limiter tests and analytical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koploy, M.A.; Taylor, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) has a test program underway to obtain data on the behavior of a honeycomb impact limiter. The program includes testing of small samples to obtain basic information, as well as testing of complete 1/4-scale impact limiters to obtain load-versus-deflection curves for different crush orientations. GA has used the test results to aid in the development of an analytical model to predict the impact limiter loads. The results also helped optimize the design of the impact limiters for the GA-4 and GA-9 Casks

  19. Soft Soil Impact Testing and Simulation of Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2008-01-01

    In June 2007, a 38-ft/s vertical drop test of a 5-ft-diameter, 5-ft-long composite fuselage section that was retrofitted with a novel composite honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA) was conducted onto unpacked sand. This test was one of a series of tests to evaluate the multi-terrain capabilities of the DEA and to generate test data for model validation. During the test, the DEA crushed approximately 6-in. and left craters in the sand of depths ranging from 7.5- to 9-in. A finite element model of the fuselage section with DEA was developed for execution in LS-DYNA, a commercial nonlinear explicit transient dynamic code. Pre-test predictions were generated in which the sand was represented initially as a crushable foam material MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63). Following the drop test, a series of hemispherical penetrometer tests were conducted to assist in soil characterization. The penetrometer weighed 20-lb and was instrumented with a tri-axial accelerometer. Drop tests were performed at 16-ft/s and crater depths were measured. The penetrometer drop tests were simulated as a means for developing a more representative soil model based on a soil and foam material definition MAT_SOIL_AND FOAM (Mat 5) in LS-DYNA. The model of the fuselage with DEA was reexecuted using the updated soil model and test-analysis correlations are presented.

  20. Tracking the progress of HIV: the impact of point-of-care tests on antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid SD

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Steven D Reid, Sarah J Fidler, Graham S Cooke Department of Infectious Diseases, St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: It is now around 30 years since the discovery of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. More than 70 million people have been infected in that time and around 35 million have died. The majority of those currently living with HIV/AIDS are in low- and middle-income countries, with sub-Saharan Africa bearing a disproportionate burden of the global disease. In high-income countries, the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART has drastically reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with HIV. Patients on ART are now predicted to have near-normal life expectancy and the role of treatment is increasingly recognized in preventing new infections. In low- and middle-income countries, treatment is now more widely available and around half of those who need ART are currently receiving it. Early diagnosis of HIV is essential if ART is to be optimally implemented. Lab-based diagnostics for screening, diagnosis, treatment initiation, and the monitoring of treatment efficacy are critical in managing the disease and reducing the number of new infections each year. The introduction of point-of-care HIV rapid tests has transformed the epidemic, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. For the first time, these point-of-care tests allow for the rapid identification of infected individuals outside the laboratory who can undergo counseling and treatment and, in the case of pregnant women, allow the timely initiation of ART to reduce the risk of vertical transmission. Although survival is markedly improved with ART even in the absence of laboratory monitoring, long-term management of people living with HIV on ART, and their partners, is essential to ensure successful viral suppression. The burden of disease in many resource-poor settings with high HIV prevalence has challenged the ability of local laboratories

  1. Hybrid III anthropomorphic test device (ATD) response to head impacts and potential implications for athletic headgear testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Adam; Benzel, Edward; Miele, Vincent; Morr, Douglas; Prakash, Vikas

    2012-09-01

    The Hybrid III 50th percentile male anthropomorphic test device (ATD) is the most widely used human impact testing surrogate and has historically been used in automotive or military testing. More recently, this ATD is finding use in applications evaluating athletic helmet protectivity, quantifying head impact dosage and estimating injury risk. But ATD head-neck response has not been quantified in omnidirectional athletic-type head impacts absent axial preload. It is probable that headgear injury reduction that can be quantified in a laboratory, including in American football, boxing, hockey, lacrosse and soccer, is related to a number of interrelated kinetic and kinematic factors, such as head center of gravity linear acceleration, head angular acceleration, head angular velocity, occipito-cervical mechanics and neck stiffness. Therefore, we characterized ATD head-neck dynamic response to direct head impacts in a series of front, oblique front and lateral head impacts. Key findings were: (1) impacts producing highest ATD resultant center of gravity linear acceleration resulted in the lowest resultant occipito-cervical spine bending moment/force. (2) Resultant ATD head angular velocity and angular acceleration did not appear coupled to impact direction at lower impact energy levels; these parameters were coupled at higher energy levels. (3) The ATD had progressively increasing occipito-cervical stiffness in extension, torsion and lateral bending, respectively. Because the ATD neck influenced head and neck impact dosage parameters, testing agencies, manufacturers and researchers should consider using the Hybrid III head form attached to a neck as a means to quantify head and neck injury risks as opposed to systems that do not utilize a neck. This heightened understanding of Hybrid III ATD head-neck response, and consideration of order of stiffest axes in the lateral, oblique and extension directions, respectively, should aid in the development of head and neck injury

  2. Impact of BRCA1/2 Testing on Marital Relationships

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manne, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    ... responses influence participant distress during the testing process. Participants were members of families in which a disease conferring mutation was been identified and their partners of either gender...

  3. Unconfirmed reactive screening tests and their impact on donor management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.; Khan, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the percentage of false positive testing for transfusion transmitted infections (TTIs) using immunochromatographic test (ICT) as first line of screening tests and its effect on loss of volunteer blood donors. Over a period of three months, samples from blood bags of donors undergoing phlebotomy at teaching hospital blood banks in Lahore were screened for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) by immunochromatographic tests. Those found positive on initial screening were re-tested by ELISA method at the screening laboratory of the Institute of Haematology and Blood Transfusion Service, Punjab. Lahore. Out of a total of 62090 voluntary blood donors, 469 donors were found to be initially reactive for either HIV, HBV or HCV. Amongst these 96 (0.15%) blood donors were found to have tested falsely positive for HIV, HBV or HCV as compared to testing by ELISA. False positive testing rate of 0.15% or 96 out of a total of 62090 donors is rather small in terms of loss of voluntary donors and appropriate utilization of available resources. Although immunochromatographic testing is not the gold standard, however it serves an important purpose of initial donor screening. (author)

  4. Structural identification of short/middle span bridges by rapid impact testing: theory and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jian; Wu, Z S; Zhang, Q Q; Guo, S L; Xu, D W

    2015-01-01

    A structural strain flexibility identification method by processing the multiple-reference impact testing data is proposed. First, a kind of novel long-gauge fiber optic sensor is developed for structural macro-strain monitoring. Second, the multiple-reference impact testing technology is employed, during which both the impacting force and structural strain responses are measured. The impact testing technology has unique merit because it is able to extract exact structural frequency response functions (FRFs), while other test methods, for instance ambient tests, can only output the FRFs with scaled magnitudes. Most importantly, the originality of the article is that a method of identifying the structural strain flexibility characteristic from the impact test data has been proposed, which is useful for structural static strain prediction and capacity evaluation. Examples of a six meter simple supported beam and a multiple-span continuous beam bridge have successfully verified the effectiveness of the proposed method. (paper)

  5. Structural identification of short/middle span bridges by rapid impact testing: theory and verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Q. Q.; Guo, S. L.; Xu, D. W.; Wu, Z. S.

    2015-06-01

    A structural strain flexibility identification method by processing the multiple-reference impact testing data is proposed. First, a kind of novel long-gauge fiber optic sensor is developed for structural macro-strain monitoring. Second, the multiple-reference impact testing technology is employed, during which both the impacting force and structural strain responses are measured. The impact testing technology has unique merit because it is able to extract exact structural frequency response functions (FRFs), while other test methods, for instance ambient tests, can only output the FRFs with scaled magnitudes. Most importantly, the originality of the article is that a method of identifying the structural strain flexibility characteristic from the impact test data has been proposed, which is useful for structural static strain prediction and capacity evaluation. Examples of a six meter simple supported beam and a multiple-span continuous beam bridge have successfully verified the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. 16 CFR 1203.11 - Marking the impact test line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 1203.11 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT... (HPI), with the brow parallel to the basic plane. Place a 5-kg (11-lb) preload ballast on top of the... helmet coinciding with the intersection of the surface of the helmet with the impact line planes defined...

  7. Developing and Testing a Method to Measure Academic Societal Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Paul; Moutinho, Luiz; Godinho, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    This paper aims to extend understanding of the business and societal impact of academic research. From a business school perspective, it has taken stock of the role of academic research and relevance in business and society. The proposed conceptual framework highlights the forces influencing the pursuit of academic rigour and relevance in…

  8. Dynamic behavior of porous concretes under drop weight impact testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agar Ozbek, A.S.; Weerheijm, J.; Schlangen, E.; Breugel, K. van

    2013-01-01

    Porous concrete is used as a construction material in various applications mainly as a permeable cementitious material. However, its response under impact loading is generally not considered. Due to the high percentage of its intentional meso-size air pores, porous concrete has a moderate static

  9. Impact of Inclusion or Exclusion of Repeaters on Test Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhan, Gautam

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effect of including or excluding repeaters on the equating process and results. New forms of two tests were equated to their respective old forms using either all examinees or only the first timer examinees in the new form sample. Results showed that for both tests used in this study, including or excluding repeaters in the…

  10. High Stakes Testing and Its Impact on Rural Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, V. Pauline

    2002-01-01

    The movement to standardization and high-stakes testing has been driven by ideological and political concerns and has adversely affected teaching/learning, democratic discourse, and educational equity. Rural schools are hit harder because of geographic isolation and insufficient staff and resources. Testing used for purposes other than measuring…

  11. The Impact of High Stakes Testing: The Australian Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenowski, Val; Wyatt-Smith, Claire

    2012-01-01

    High stakes testing in Australia was introduced in 2008 by way of the National Assessment Program--Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). Currently, every year all students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 are assessed on the same days using national tests in Reading, Writing, Language Conventions (Spelling, Grammar and Punctuation) and Numeracy. In 2010 the…

  12. Impact of Educational Level on Performance on Auditory Processing Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Cristina F B; Rabelo, Camila M; Silagi, Marcela L; Mansur, Letícia L; Schochat, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that a higher level of education is associated with better performance on cognitive tests among middle-aged and elderly people. However, the effects of education on auditory processing skills have not yet been evaluated. Previous demonstrations of sensory-cognitive interactions in the aging process indicate the potential importance of this topic. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of middle-aged and elderly people with different levels of formal education on auditory processing tests. A total of 177 adults with no evidence of cognitive, psychological or neurological conditions took part in the research. The participants completed a series of auditory assessments, including dichotic digit, frequency pattern and speech-in-noise tests. A working memory test was also performed to investigate the extent to which auditory processing and cognitive performance were associated. The results demonstrated positive but weak correlations between years of schooling and performance on all of the tests applied. The factor "years of schooling" was also one of the best predictors of frequency pattern and speech-in-noise test performance. Additionally, performance on the working memory, frequency pattern and dichotic digit tests was also correlated, suggesting that the influence of educational level on auditory processing performance might be associated with the cognitive demand of the auditory processing tests rather than auditory sensory aspects itself. Longitudinal research is required to investigate the causal relationship between educational level and auditory processing skills.

  13. Is the psychological impact of genetic testing moderated by support and sharing of test results to family and friends?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Julie; Dorval, Michel; Noguès, Catherine; Fabre, Roxane; Julian-Reynier, Claire

    2013-12-01

    Receiving the results of genetic tests for a breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility can be a stressful experience. Here we studied the effects of social support (SS) and the sharing of test results on the psychological impact of BRCA1/2 test result disclosure. We also compared carriers and non-carriers on sharing, SS and psychological impact. Five-hundred and twenty-two unaffected women were followed prospectively for 2 years after receiving their test results. Psychological impact was measured on the impact of event scale. Multivariate multi-level models were used, and all the analyses were stratified depending on mutation status (carriers vs non-carriers). Two weeks after receiving their BRCA1/2 results, carriers had shared their test results less frequently than non-carriers (p test results was not significantly associated with psychological impact. Availability of SS was significantly associated with better psychological adjustment across time among carriers (p importance of SS should be stressed, and possible ways of enlisting people in their entourage for this purpose should be discussed in the context of clinical encounters.

  14. 78 FR 32374 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; General Provisions for Domestic Fisheries; Application for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... surfclam/ocean quahog cage, and would allow project participants to test alternatives to the industry... applicant stated that offloading into cages can be burdensome and dangerous and the extra handling and the... proposed research and have minimal impacts that do not change the scope or impact of the initially approved...

  15. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN): could retinoids play a causative role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, Anthony R; Eriator, Ike; Karre, Sridhar

    2015-01-12

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) are overlapping manifestations on a spectrum of acute drug-induced conditions associated with severe blistering, skin peeling, and multi-organ damage. TEN is an eruption resembling severe scalding, with ≥30% skin detachment. SJS is a mild form of TEN, characterized histologically by epidermal keratinocyte apoptosis with dermo-epidermal separation and extensive small blisters with <10% body surface skin detachment. The syndrome can be induced by numerous medications and typically occurs 1-4 weeks after the initiation of therapy. Granulysin is found in the lesions of patients with SJS/TEN and plays a significant pathogenic role in the condition, but the overall mechanisms linking medications, granulysin, and disease manifestations remain obscure. This paper reviews evidence suggesting that the different medications implicated in SJS/TEN have the common property of interacting and synergizing with endogenous retinoids (vitamin A and its congeners), in many instances causing the latter to accumulate in and damage the liver, the main storage organ for vitamin A. It is hypothesized that liver damage leads to the spillage of toxic retinoid compounds into the circulation, resulting in an endogenous form of hypervitaminosis A and cytotoxicity with widespread apoptosis, mediated by granulysin and recognized as SJS/TEN. Subject to testing, the model suggests that symptom worsening could be arrested at onset by lowering the concentration of circulating retinoids and/or granulysin via phlebotomy or plasmapheresis or by pharmacological measures to limit their expression.

  16. Fundamental Flaws In The Derivation Of Stevens' Law For Taste Within Norwich's Entropy Theory of Perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizami, Lance

    2010-01-01

    Norwich's Entropy Theory of Perception (1975-present) is a general theory of perception, based on Shannon's Information Theory. Among many bold claims, the Entropy Theory presents a truly astounding result: that Stevens' Law with an Index of 1, an empirical power relation of direct proportionality between perceived taste intensity and stimulus concentration, arises from theory alone. Norwich's theorizing starts with several extraordinary hypotheses. First, 'multiple, parallel receptor-neuron units' without collaterals 'carry essentially the same message to the brain', i.e. the rate-level curves are identical. Second, sensation is proportional to firing rate. Third, firing rate is proportional to the taste receptor's 'resolvable uncertainty'. Fourth, the 'resolvable uncertainty' is obtained from Shannon's Information Theory. Finally, 'resolvable uncertainty' also depends upon the microscopic thermodynamic density fluctuation of the tasted solute. Norwich proves that density fluctuation is density variance, which is proportional to solute concentration, all based on the theory of fluctuations in fluid composition from Tolman's classic physics text, 'The Principles of Statistical Mechanics'. Altogether, according to Norwich, perceived taste intensity is theoretically proportional to solute concentration. Such a universal rule for taste, one that is independent of solute identity, personal physiological differences, and psychophysical task, is truly remarkable and is well-deserving of scrutiny. Norwich's crucial step was the derivation of density variance. That step was meticulously reconstructed here. It transpires that the appropriate fluctuation is Tolman's mean-square fractional density fluctuation, not density variance as used by Norwich. Tolman's algebra yields a 'Stevens Index' of -1 rather than 1. As 'Stevens Index' empirically always exceeds zero, the Index of -1 suggests that it is risky to infer psychophysical laws of sensory response from information theory

  17. Inter population variability of frost-resistance in provenances of scot pines (Pinusylvestris L.R. hamata Steven in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özel Halil Barış

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Frost-resistance variability of Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris L. var. hamata Steven seedlings grown in nurseries conditions, originated from 10 provenances, have been analyzed. The provenances from Black Sea region, Central Anatolian region and Eastern Anatolian region in Turkey have been used in selection of seed zones. The results of frost-resistance tests indicated a strong relationship of implemented freezing degrees with injury degrees of Scotch pine needles and photosynthetic productivities. On the other hand, another significant relationship has been determined between chlorophyll fluorescence and ion leakage methods (r=-0.801. This result shows that those two methods can be safely used in determining the damages due to low temperatures. In frost resistance tests, Scotch pine seedlings from different provenances have been frozen at -10, -20, -30 and -40°C. According to the Duncan test results, it has been determined that damage increased as temperature decreased. The damage level at -10°C implementation is 3.5% which can be tolerated by plants. But when the temperature has been decreased to -20°C, the level of damage has increased to 51.25%. As a result of photosynthetic analyses in this phase, it has been determined that there is a statistically significant relationship between provenances and temperature levels. Under the light of those findings, they have determined that the photosynthetic productivity has significantly decreased at temperatures between -20°C and -40°C. This situation conforms to injury index values determined in this study. As a result of injury index and photosynthetic productivity tests used for determining the damage after frost-resistance tests, it has been determined that the provenances of Amasya-Kunduz, Bolu-Aladağ, Düzce-Yığılca, Samsun-Vezirköprü and Eskişehir-Çatacık are more sensitive to frost than other provenances.

  18. Materials Characterization Center meeting on impact testing of waste forms. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, M.D.; Atteridge, D.; Dudder, G.

    1981-10-01

    A meeting was held on March 25-26, 1981 to discuss impact test methods for waste form materials to be used in nuclear waste repositories. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) in preparing the MCC-10 Impact Test Method to be approved by the Materials Review Board. The meeting focused on two essential aspects of the test method, namely the mechanical process, or impact, used to effect rapid fracture of a waste form and the analysis technique(s) used to characterize particulates generated by the impact

  19. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis and Treatment With a Biologic: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Ian; Chao, Alice

    2017-01-01

    One of the most dangerous dermatologic emergencies is Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Although a rare disease, it can often lead to significant mortality. In this case report, we present a 77-year-old man who developed a sloughing rash that was secondary to a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. In addition to the recommended supportive care, the patient was treated with etanercept, a new, less commonly used intervention. We provide a brief review of SJS/TEN. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are a rare cause of SJS/TEN, and additionally, the use of biologics is a novel treatment modality for SJS/TEN.

  20. Tandem catalytic allylic amination and [2,3]-Stevens rearrangement of tertiary amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheili, Arash; Tambar, Uttam K

    2011-08-24

    We have developed a catalytic allylic amination involving tertiary aminoesters and allylcarbonates, which is the first example of the use of tertiary amines as intermolecular nucleophiles in metal-catalyzed allylic substitution chemistry. This process is employed in a tandem ammonium ylide generation/[2,3]-rearrangement reaction, which formally represents a palladium-catalyzed Stevens rearrangement. Low catalyst loadings and mild reaction conditions are compatible with an unprecedented substrate scope for the ammonium ylide functionality, and products are generated in high yields and diastereoselectivities. Mechanistic studies suggested the reversible formation of an ammonium intermediate.

  1. Guidelines for the management of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis: An Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lalit Kumar; Martin, Abhay Mani; Agarwal, Nidheesh; D'Souza, Paschal; Das, Sudip; Kumar, Rajesh; Pande, Sushil; Das, Nilay Kanti; Kumaresan, Muthuvel; Kumar, Piyush; Garg, Anubhav; Singh, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are severe, life-threatening mucocutaneous adverse drug reactions with a high morbidity and mortality that require immediate medical care. The various immunomodulatory treatments include systemic corticosteroids, cyclosporine, intravenous immunoglobulin, cyclophosphamide, plasmapheresis and tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors. The ideal therapy of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis still remains a matter of debate as there are only a limited number of studies of good quality comparing the usefulness of different specific treatments. The aim of this article is to comprehensively review the published medical literature and frame management guidelines suitable in the Indian perspective. The Indian Association of Dermatologists, Venereologists and Leprologists (IADVL) assigned the task of preparing these guidelines to its special interest group on cutaneous adverse drug reactions. The group performed a comprehensive English language literature search for management options in Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis across multiple databases (PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE and Cochrane) for keywords (alone and in combination) and MeSH items such as "guidelines," "Stevens-Johnson syndrome," "toxic epidermal necrolysis," "corticosteroids," "intravenous immunoglobulin," "cyclosporine" and "management." The available evidence was evaluated using the strength of recommendation taxonomy and graded using a three-point scale. A draft of clinical recommendations was developed on the best available evidence which was also scrutinized and critically evaluated by the IADVL Academy of Dermatology. Based on the inputs received, this final consensus statement was prepared. A total of 104 articles (meta-analyses, prospective and retrospective studies, reviews [including chapters in books], previous guidelines [including Indian guidelines of 2006] and case series) were critically evaluated and the evidence

  2. Mycoplasma pneumoniae-Induced-Stevens Johnson Syndrome: Rare Occurrence in an Adult Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad Rasul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS is an uncommon occurrence in Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae infection (1–5% and has been mainly reported in children and young adults. We present a case of SJS in a 32-year-old male induced by M. pneumoniae infection. This patient presented with fever, cough, and massive occupation of mucus membranes with swelling, erythema, and necrosis accompanied by a generalized cutaneous rash. He clinically responded after treatment with antibiotics and IVIG. SJS is usually a drug-induced condition; however, M. pneumoniae is the commonest infectious cause and should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  3. Síndrome de Stevens-Johnson: presentación de un caso

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Brizuela, Ener de Jesús; Morales Díaz, Felicia

    2011-01-01

    Fundamento: el síndrome de Stevens-Johnson, también llamado eritema multiforme mayor, se caracteriza por una serie de lesiones cutáneas de diversa morfología, es una grave lesión en la cual están afectadas al menos dos membranas mucosas y la piel. La patogenia de esta enfermedad es desconocida aunque generalmente se considera que es provocada por una reacción de hipersensibilidad a drogas, infecciones y exposición a sustancias tóxicas. Caso clínico: esta afección fue diagnosticada en un niño ...

  4. Low velocity instrumented impact testing of four new damage tolerant carbon/epoxy composite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, D. G.; Nettles, A. T.

    1990-01-01

    Low velocity drop weight instrumented impact testing was utilized to examine the damage resistance of four recently developed carbon fiber/epoxy resin systems. A fifth material, T300/934, for which a large data base exists, was also tested for comparison purposes. A 16-ply quasi-isotropic lay-up configuration was used for all the specimens. Force/absorbed energy-time plots were generated for each impact test. The specimens were cross-sectionally analyzed to record the damage corresponding to each impact energy level. Maximum force of impact versus impact energy plots were constructed to compare the various systems for impact damage resistance. Results show that the four new damage tolerant fiber/resin systems far outclassed the T300/934 material. The most damage tolerant material tested was the IM7/1962 fiber/resin system.

  5. Impact testing and analysis for structural code benchmarking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with industry and other national laboratories, has been benchmarking computer codes (''Structural Code Benchmarking for the Analysis of Impact Response of Nuclear Material Shipping Cask,'' R.E. Glass, Sandia National Laboratories, 1985; ''Sample Problem Manual for Benchmarking of Cask Analysis Codes,'' R.E. Glass, Sandia National Laboratories, 1988; ''Standard Thermal Problem Set for the Evaluation of Heat Transfer Codes Used in the Assessment of Transportation Packages, R.E. Glass, et al., Sandia National Laboratories, 1988) used to predict the structural, thermal, criticality, and shielding behavior of radioactive materials packages. The first step in the benchmarking of the codes was to develop standard problem sets and to compare the results from several codes and users. This step for structural analysis codes has been completed as described in ''Structural Code Benchmarking for the Analysis of Impact Response of Nuclear Material Shipping Casks,'' R.E. Glass, Sandia National Laboratories, 1985. The problem set is shown in Fig. 1. This problem set exercised the ability of the codes to predict the response to end (axisymmetric) and side (plane strain) impacts with both elastic and elastic/plastic materials. The results from these problems showed that there is good agreement in predicting elastic response. Significant differences occurred in predicting strains for the elastic/plastic models. An example of the variation in predicting plastic behavior is given, which shows the hoop strain as a function of time at the impacting end of Model B. These differences in predicting plastic strains demonstrated a need for benchmark data for a cask-like problem. 6 refs., 5 figs

  6. Shock Testing the SEAWOLF Submarine, Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    relevant experience. Phil Barfield. Operational requirements. B.S. Mechanical Engineering. 14 years relevant experience. James Craig . Appendix D. B.S...Atlantic Biodiversity Center Nassau, Delaware Russell DeConti Center for Coastal Studies Provincetown, Massachusetts Robert Deegan Sierra Club...either area. C-9 APPENDIX D PHYSICAL IMPACTS OF EXPLOSIONS ON MARINE MAMMALS AND TURTLES James C. Craig Christian W. Hearn Naval Surface Warfare

  7. Impact testing and analysis for structural code benchmarking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with industry and other national laboratories, has been benchmarking computer codes used to predict the structural, thermal, criticality, and shielding behavior of radioactive materials packages. The first step in the benchmarking of the codes was to develop standard problem sets and to compare the results from several codes and users. This step for structural analysis codes has been completed as described in Structural Code Benchmarking for the Analysis of Impact Response of Nuclear Material Shipping Casks, R.E. Glass, Sandia National Laboratories, 1985. The problem set is shown in Fig. 1. This problem set exercised the ability of the codes to predict the response to end (axisymmetric) and side (plane strain) impacts with both elastic and elastic/plastic materials. The results from these problems showed that there is good agreement in predicting elastic response. Significant differences occurred in predicting strains for the elastic/plastic models. An example of the variation in predicting plastic behavior is given, which shows the hoop strain as a function of time at the impacting end of Model B. These differences in predicting plastic strains demonstrated a need for benchmark data for a cask-like problem

  8. Tests for determining impact resistance and strength of glass used for nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnell, L.R.

    1979-05-01

    Tests are described for determining the impact resistance (Section A) and static tensile strength (Section B) of glasses containing simulated or actual nuclear wastes. This report describes the development and use of these tests to rank different glasses, to assess effects of devitrification, and to examine the effect of impact energy on resulting surface area. For clarity this report is divided into two sections, Impact Resistance and Tensile Strength

  9. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

  10. Full-scale tornado-missile impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, A.E.; Sliter, G.E.; Burdette, E.G.

    1978-01-01

    Full-scale poles, pipes, and rods, representing postulated tornado-borne missiles, were rocket-propelled into reinforced concrete panels with thicknesses typical of walls and roofs in the auxillary buildings of nuclear power plants. Data from the 18 tests can be used directly for structural design or for validating design and analysis techniques. The test panels, constructed with 3000-psi design strength concrete and minimum allowable reinforcement, were 12, 18 and 24 in. thick with 15 X 15-ft unsupported spans. (Auth.)

  11. Personal Narratives of Genetic Testing: Expectations, Emotions, and Impact on Self and Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emily E; Wasson, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    The stories in this volume shed light on the potential of narrative inquiry to fill gaps in knowledge, particularly given the mixed results of quantitative research on patient views of and experiences with genetic and genomic testing. Published studies investigate predictors of testing (particularly risk perceptions and worry); psychological and behavioral responses to testing; and potential impact on the health care system (e.g., when patients bring DTC genetic test results to their primary care provider). Interestingly, these themes did not dominate the narratives published in this issue. Rather, these narratives included consistent themes of expectations and looking for answers; complex emotions; areas of contradiction and conflict; and family impact. More narrative research on patient experiences with genetic testing may fill gaps in knowledge regarding how patients define the benefits of testing, changes in psychological and emotional reactions to test results over time, and the impact of testing on families.

  12. IMPACT_S: integrated multiprogram platform to analyze and combine tests of selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Maldonado

    Full Text Available Among the major goals of research in evolutionary biology are the identification of genes targeted by natural selection and understanding how various regimes of evolution affect the fitness of an organism. In particular, adaptive evolution enables organisms to adapt to changing ecological factors such as diet, temperature, habitat, predatory pressures and prey abundance. An integrative approach is crucial for the identification of non-synonymous mutations that introduce radical changes in protein biochemistry and thus in turn influence the structure and function of proteins. Performing such analyses manually is often a time-consuming process, due to the large number of statistical files generated from multiple approaches, especially when assessing numerous taxa and/or large datasets. We present IMPACT_S, an easy-to-use Graphical User Interface (GUI software, which rapidly and effectively integrates, filters and combines results from three widely used programs for assessing the influence of selection: Codeml (PAML package, Datamonkey and TreeSAAP. It enables the identification and tabulation of sites detected by these programs as evolving under the influence of positive, neutral and/or negative selection in protein-coding genes. IMPACT_S further facilitates the automatic mapping of these sites onto the three-dimensional structures of proteins. Other useful tools incorporated in IMPACT_S include Jmol, Archaeopteryx, Gnuplot, PhyML, a built-in Swiss-Model interface and a PDB downloader. The relevance and functionality of IMPACT_S is shown through a case study on the toxicoferan-reptilian Cysteine-rich Secretory Proteins (CRiSPs. IMPACT_S is a platform-independent software released under GPLv3 license, freely available online from http://impact-s.sourceforge.net.

  13. IMPACT_S: integrated multiprogram platform to analyze and combine tests of selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Emanuel; Sunagar, Kartik; Almeida, Daniela; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2014-01-01

    Among the major goals of research in evolutionary biology are the identification of genes targeted by natural selection and understanding how various regimes of evolution affect the fitness of an organism. In particular, adaptive evolution enables organisms to adapt to changing ecological factors such as diet, temperature, habitat, predatory pressures and prey abundance. An integrative approach is crucial for the identification of non-synonymous mutations that introduce radical changes in protein biochemistry and thus in turn influence the structure and function of proteins. Performing such analyses manually is often a time-consuming process, due to the large number of statistical files generated from multiple approaches, especially when assessing numerous taxa and/or large datasets. We present IMPACT_S, an easy-to-use Graphical User Interface (GUI) software, which rapidly and effectively integrates, filters and combines results from three widely used programs for assessing the influence of selection: Codeml (PAML package), Datamonkey and TreeSAAP. It enables the identification and tabulation of sites detected by these programs as evolving under the influence of positive, neutral and/or negative selection in protein-coding genes. IMPACT_S further facilitates the automatic mapping of these sites onto the three-dimensional structures of proteins. Other useful tools incorporated in IMPACT_S include Jmol, Archaeopteryx, Gnuplot, PhyML, a built-in Swiss-Model interface and a PDB downloader. The relevance and functionality of IMPACT_S is shown through a case study on the toxicoferan-reptilian Cysteine-rich Secretory Proteins (CRiSPs). IMPACT_S is a platform-independent software released under GPLv3 license, freely available online from http://impact-s.sourceforge.net.

  14. Common Core Standards and their Impact on Standardized Test Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polleck, J.N.; Jeffery, J.V.

    2017-01-01

    With adoption of the Common Core (CCSS) in a majority of U.S. states came developmentof new high-stakes exams. Though researchers have investigated CCSS andrelated policies, less attention has been directed toward understanding how standardsare translated into testing. Due to the influence that

  15. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bergey, Daniel [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  16. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Bergey, Daniel [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  17. Some assembly required: Contributions of Tom Stevens' lab to the V-ATPase field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Laurie A; Finnigan, Gregory C; Kane, Patricia M

    2018-06-01

    Tom Stevens' lab has explored the subunit composition and assembly of the yeast V-ATPase for more than 30 years. Early studies helped establish yeast as the predominant model system for study of V-ATPase proton pumps and led to the discovery of protein splicing of the V-ATPase catalytic subunit. The Vma - phenotype, characteristic of loss-of-V-ATPase activity in yeast was key in determining the enzyme's subunit composition via yeast genetics. V-ATPase subunit composition proved to be highly conserved among eukaryotes. Genetic screens for new vma mutants led to identification of a set of dedicated V-ATPase assembly factors and helped unravel the complex pathways for V-ATPase assembly. In later years, exploration of the evolutionary history of several V-ATPase subunits provided new information about the enzyme's structure and function. This review highlights V-ATPase work in the Stevens' lab between 1987 and 2017. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Are steroids effective in toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Meza

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen La necrólisis epidérmica tóxica y el síndrome de Stevens-Johnson son reacciones cutáneas adversas graves a medicamentos e infecciones. Los corticoides se describen como una alternativa terapéutica, sin embargo, su uso es aún controvertido. Utilizando la base de datos Epistemonikos, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en múltiples bases de datos, identificamos cuatro revisiones sistemáticas que en conjunto incluyen once estudios primarios que responden la pregunta de interés. Extrajimos los datos y preparamos una tabla de resumen de los resultados utilizando el método GRADE. Concluimos que no está claro si los corticoides disminuyen la mortalidad o la estadía hospitalaria en la necrólisis epidérmica tóxica y el síndrome de Stevens-Johnson porque la certeza de la evidencia es muy baja.

  19. Impact test characterization of carbon-carbon composites for the thermoelectric space power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanoski, G.R.; Pih, Hui.

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-eight unique carbon-carbon composite materials of cylindrical architecture were fabricated by commercial vendors for evaluation as alternative impact shell materials for the modular heat source of the thermoelectric space power system. Characterization of these materials included gas gun impact tests where cylindrical specimens containing a mass simulant were fired at 55 m/s to impact a target instrumented to measure force. The force versus time output was analyzed to determine: peak force, acceleration, velocity, and displacement. All impact tests exhibited an equivalence between preimpact momentum and measured impulse. In addition, energy was conserved based on a comparison of preimpact kinetic energy and measured work. Impact test results showed that the currently specified material provided impact energy absorption comparable to the best alternatives considered to date

  20. Reconsidering the Impact of High-stakes Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Braun

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last fifteen years, many states have implemented high-stakes tests as part of an effort to strengthen accountability for schools, teachers, and students. Predictably, there has been vigorous disagreement regarding the contributions of such policies to increasing test scores and, more importantly, to improving student learning. A recent study by Amrein and Berliner (2002a has received a great deal of media attention. Employing various databases covering the period 1990-2000, the authors conclude that there is no evidence that states that implemented high-stakes tests demonstrated improved student achievement on various external measures such as performance on the SAT, ACT, AP, or NAEP. In a subsequent study in which they conducted a more extensive analysis of state policies (Amrein & Berliner, 2002b, they reach a similar conclusion. However, both their methodology and their findings have been challenged by a number of authors. In this article, we undertake an extended reanalysis of one component of Amrein and Berliner (2002a. We focus on the performance of states, over the period 1992 to 2000, on the NAEP mathematics assessments for grades 4 and 8. In particular, we compare the performance of the high-stakes testing states, as designated by Amrein and Berliner, with the performance of the remaining states (conditioning, of course, on a state’s participation in the relevant NAEP assessments. For each grade, when we examine the relative gains of states over the period, we find that the comparisons strongly favor the high-stakes testing states. Moreover, the results cannot be accounted for by differences between the two groups of states with respect to changes in percent of students excluded from NAEP over the same period. On the other hand, when we follow a particular cohort (grade 4, 1992 to grade 8, 1996 or grade 4, 1996 to grade 8, 2000, we find the comparisons slightly favor the low-stakes testing states, although the discrepancy can

  1. Human-Robot Collaboration Dynamic Impact Testing and Calibration Instrument for Disposable Robot Safety Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagalakis, Nicholas G; Yoo, Jae Myung; Oeste, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Dynamic Impact Testing and Calibration Instrument (DITCI) is a simple instrument with a significant data collection and analysis capability that is used for the testing and calibration of biosimulant human tissue artifacts. These artifacts may be used to measure the severity of injuries caused in the case of a robot impact with a human. In this paper we describe the DITCI adjustable impact and flexible foundation mechanism, which allows the selection of a variety of impact force levels and foundation stiffness. The instrument can accommodate arrays of a variety of sensors and impact tools, simulating both real manufacturing tools and the testing requirements of standards setting organizations. A computer data acquisition system may collect a variety of impact motion, force, and torque data, which are used to develop a variety of mathematical model representations of the artifacts. Finally, we describe the fabrication and testing of human abdomen soft tissue artifacts, used to display the magnitude of impact tissue deformation. Impact tests were performed at various maximum impact force and average pressure levels.

  2. Impact Testing of Aluminum 2024 and Titanium 6Al-4V for Material Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Ruggeri, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the difficulties with developing and verifying accurate impact models is that parameters such as high strain rate material properties, failure modes, static properties, and impact test measurements are often obtained from a variety of different sources using different materials, with little control over consistency among the different sources. In addition there is often a lack of quantitative measurements in impact tests to which the models can be compared. To alleviate some of these problems, a project is underway to develop a consistent set of material property, impact test data and failure analysis for a variety of aircraft materials that can be used to develop improved impact failure and deformation models. This project is jointly funded by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center. Unique features of this set of data are that all material property data and impact test data are obtained using identical material, the test methods and procedures are extensively documented and all of the raw data is available. Four parallel efforts are currently underway: Measurement of material deformation and failure response over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures and failure analysis of material property specimens and impact test articles conducted by The Ohio State University; development of improved numerical modeling techniques for deformation and failure conducted by The George Washington University; impact testing of flat panels and substructures conducted by NASA Glenn Research Center. This report describes impact testing which has been done on aluminum (Al) 2024 and titanium (Ti) 6Al-4vanadium (V) sheet and plate samples of different thicknesses and with different types of projectiles, one a regular cylinder and one with a more complex geometry incorporating features representative of a jet engine fan blade. Data from this testing will be used in validating material models developed under this program. The material

  3. Impact of Gamification of Vision Tests on the User Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodduluri, Lakshmi; Boon, Mei Ying; Ryan, Malcolm; Dain, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    Gamification has been incorporated into vision tests and vision therapies in the expectation that it may increase the user experience and engagement with the task. The current study aimed to understand how gamification affects the user experience, specifically during the undertaking of psychophysical tasks designed to estimate vision thresholds (chromatic and achromatic contrast sensitivity). Three tablet computer-based games were developed with three levels of gaming elements. Game 1 was designed to be a simple clinical test (no gaming elements), game 2 was similar to game 1 but with added gaming elements (i.e., feedback, scores, and sounds), and game 3 was a complete game. Participants (N = 144, age: 9.9-42 years) played three games in random order. The user experience for each game was assessed using a Short Feedback Questionnaire. The median (interquartile range) fun level for the three games was 2.5 (1.6), 3.9 (1.7), and 2.5 (2.8), respectively. Overall, participants reported greater fun level and higher preparedness to play the game again for game 2 than games 1 and 3 (P < 0.05). There were significant positive correlations observed between fun level and preparedness to play the game again for all the games (p < 0.05). Engagement (assessed as completion rates) did not differ between the games. Gamified version (game 2) was preferred to the other two versions. Over the short term, the careful application of gaming elements to vision tests was found to increase the fun level of users, without affecting engagement with the vision test.

  4. Normalization of Impact Energy by Laminate Thickness for Compression After Impact Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T.; Hromisin, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    The amount of impact energy used to damage a composite laminate is a critical parameter when assessing residual strength properties. The compression after impact (CAI) strength of impacted laminates is dependent upon how thick the laminate is and this has traditionally been accounted for by normalizing (dividing) the impact energy by the laminate's thickness. However, when comparing CAI strength values for a given lay-up sequence and fiber/resin system, dividing the impact energy by the specimen thickness has been noted by the author to give higher CAI strength values for thicker laminates. A study was thus undertaken to assess the comparability of CAI strength data by normalizing the impact energy by the specimen thickness raised to a power to account for the higher strength of thicker laminates. One set of data from the literature and two generated in this study were analyzed by dividing the impact energy by the specimen thickness to the 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 powers. Results show that as laminate thickness and damage severity decreased, the value which the laminate thickness needs to be raised to in order to yield more comparable CAI data increases.

  5. Review of The Joy of x: A Guided Tour of Math, from One to Infinity by Steven Strogatz

    OpenAIRE

    Michael T. Catalano

    2014-01-01

    Strogatz, Steven. The Joy of x: A Guided Tour of Math, from One to Infinity, (New York, NY, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012). 316 pp. ISBN 978-0-547-51765-0 The Joy of x: A Guided Tour of Math, from One to Infinity, by Steven Strogatz, is an engaging and example-filled argument for mathematics as a valuable and enjoyable activity. The thirty chapters are divided into six parts, entitled Numbers, Relationships, Shapes, Change, Data, and Frontiers. The discussion ranges from intuitive expl...

  6. Held Back: The Impact of Curricular and Pedagogical Factors on Tested Achievement in High School Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agvanian, Zara

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of curricular factors and teaching practices on students' tested achievement in mathematics, explored the best predictors of the tested achievement, and examined differences in the tested achievement among student subgroups. The study utilized qualitative and quantitative methods and triangulated findings from…

  7. Use of a 33 MJ high-energy rotary impact testing machine for investigations into material behaviour under impact loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issler, W.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate material behaviour under impact loads, previously very different testing machines have been developed. One of these concepts is the rotary impact testing machine which stores rotational energy and on which a tension impact test can be performed with almost unchanged trigger speed. With this device maximum trigger speeds can be achieved by using mechanical, elastically stored or hydraulic energy. Usable sample geometries include in particular smooth or notched round or flat tensile specimen up to 30 mm in diameter and CT10 or CT15 mechanical strength test specimen, permitting a direct comparison with results from quasi-static tests. For present speeds of load application the elastic modulus of steel can be considered as being constant. For Poisson's ratio, measurements indicated changes by approximately -8% to +20%. Early tests to investigate the strain rate showed that the strain rate under purely elastic loads applied to smooth round tensile specimen is approximately 3-10 times slower than the strain rate under plastic deformation, while this ratio may have an order of magnitude of 1:100 for notched tensile specimen. Therefore it is unreasonable to indicate only one value for the strain rate as a test characterising parameter. (orig./MM) [de

  8. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 2 36-Inch Aluminum Tank Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA simulations of water landing impacts. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. EWIT Phase 2 featured a 36-inch aluminum tank head. The tank head was outfitted with one accelerometer, twelve pressure transducers, three string potentiometers, and four strain gages. The tank head was dropped from heights of 1 foot and 2 feet. The focus of this report is the correlation of analytical models against test data. As a measure of prediction accuracy, peak responses from the baseline LS-DYNA model were compared to peak responses from the tests.

  9. Development of estimation algorithm of loose parts and analysis of impact test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Soo; Ham, Chang Sik; Jung, Chul Hwan; Hwang, In Koo; Kim, Tak Hwane; Kim, Tae Hwane; Park, Jin Ho

    1999-11-01

    Loose parts are produced by being parted from the structure of the reactor coolant system or by coming into RCS from the outside during test operation, refueling, and overhaul time. These loose parts are mixed with reactor coolant fluid and collide with RCS components. When loose parts are occurred within RCS, it is necessary to estimate the impact point and the mass of loose parts. In this report an analysis algorithm for the estimation of the impact point and mass of loose part is developed. The developed algorithm was tested with the impact test data of Yonggwang-3. The estimated impact point using the proposed algorithm in this report had 5 percent error to the real test data. The estimated mass was analyzed within 28 percent error bound using the same unit's data. We analyzed the characteristic frequency of each sensor because this frequency effected the estimation of impact point and mass. The characteristic frequency of the background noise during normal operation was compared with that of the impact test data. The result of the comparison illustrated that the characteristic frequency bandwidth of the impact test data was lower than that of the background noise during normal operation. by the comparison, the integrity of sensor and monitoring system could be checked, too. (author)

  10. Survey of Nonprescription Medication and Antibiotic Use in Patients with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis, and Overlap Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J. Sullivan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN, and overlap syndrome (SJS-TEN are rare, serious skin and mucosa break-down conditions frequently associated with antibiotic use. The role of nonprescription medications alone, or in combination with antibiotics in triggering SJS/TEN, is largely unknown. This study summarized data collected from patient surveys about nonprescription and antibiotic use prior to a SJS/TEN diagnosis. The survey was administered online to members of the U.S. SJS Foundation who had been diagnosed with SJS/TEN or were the parent of a child who had been diagnosed with SJS/TEN. Respondents were asked about nonprescription medications taken within the year before diagnosis, and the approximate point in time before diagnosis that they had taken them. They were also asked about specific prescription medications, including antibiotics, that they took before diagnosis. An estimated 4500 patients received an invitation to complete the survey. 251 patients completed it, resulting in a response rate of 5.6%. The mean age of respondents was 43 years (SD (standard deviation = 17.3 and 70% were female. 32.3% of respondents indicated that a prescription antibiotic triggered their reaction. 14.1% indicated a nonprescription medication had triggered their SJS/TEN, and 18.1% said a nonprescription medication may have triggered their SJS/TEN. 85.5% of respondents said they took a nonprescription medication within three months of their SJS/TEN diagnosis. Of those respondents who reported that an antibiotic triggered their SJS/TEN, 35.2% reported taking a nonprescription medication within the three months prior to their diagnosis. This survey captured valuable information about nonprescription and antibiotic use in SJS/TEN patients. It is important for future studies to estimate the impact of antibiotics on SJS/TEN, and account for nonprescription medication use in that relationship.

  11. Evaluation of the Impact Resistance of Various Composite Sandwich Beams by Vibration Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Shahdin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact resistance of different types of composite sandwich beams is evaluated by studying vibration response changes (natural frequency and damping ratio. This experimental works will help aerospace structural engineer in assess structural integrity using classification of impact resistance of various composite sandwich beams (entangled carbon and glass fibers, honeycomb and foam cores. Low velocity impacts are done below the barely visible impact damage (BVID limit in order to detect damage by vibration testing that is hardly visible on the surface. Experimental tests are done using both burst random and sine dwell testing in order to have a better confidence level on the extracted modal parameters. Results show that the entangled sandwich beams have a better resistance against impact as compared to classical core materials.

  12. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: A Concise Review with a Comprehensive Summary of Therapeutic Interventions Emphasizing Supportive Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jeremy A; Cohen, Philip R

    2017-06-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are two of the most severe dermatologic conditions occurring in the inpatient setting. There is a lack of consensus regarding appropriate management of SJS and TEN. The scientific literature pertaining to SJS and TEN (subsequently referred to as SJS/TEN) is summarized and assessed. In addition, an interventional approach for the clinician is provided. PubMed was searched with the key words: corticosteroids, cyclosporine, etanercept, intravenous immunoglobulin, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. The papers generated by the search, and their references, were reviewed. Supportive care is the most universally accepted intervention for SJS/TEN. Specific guidelines differ from the care required for patients with thermal burns. Adjuvant therapies are utilized in most severe cases, but the data are thus far underwhelming and underpowered. Using systemic corticosteroids as sole therapy is not supported. A consensus regarding combined corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has not been reached. Data regarding IVIG, currently the standard of care for most referral centers, is conflicting. Newer studies regarding cyclosporine and tumor necrosis factor inhibitors are promising, but not powered to provide definitive evidence of efficacy. Data regarding plasmapheresis is equivocal. Thalidomide increases mortality. Clinicians who manage SJS/TEN should seek to employ interventions with the greatest impact on their patients' condition. While supportive care measures may seem an obvious aspect of SJS/TEN patient care, providers should understand that these interventions are imperative and that they differ from the care recommended for other critically ill or burn patients. While adjuvant therapies are frequently discussed and debated for hospitalized patients with SJS/TEN, a standardized management approach is not yet clear based on the current data. Therefore, until further data

  13. Potential clinical impact of normal-tissue intrinsic radiosensitivity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentzen, Soeren M.

    1997-01-01

    A critical appraisal is given of the possible benefit from a reliable pre-treatment knowledge of individual normal-tissue sensitivity to radiotherapy. The considerations are in part, but not exclusively, based on the recent experience with in vitro colony-forming assays of the surviving fraction at 2 Gy, the SF 2 . Three strategies are reviewed: (1) to screen for rare cases with extreme radiosensitivity, so-called over-reactors, and treat these with reduced total dose, (2) to identify the sensitive tail of the distribution of 'normal' radiosensitivities, refer these patients to other treatment, and to escalate the dose to the remaining patients, or (3) to individualize dose prescriptions based on individual radiosensitivity, i.e. treating to isoeffect rather than to a specific dose-fractionation schedule. It is shown that these strategies will have a small, if any, impact on routine radiotherapy. Screening for over-reactors is hampered by the low prevalence of these among otherwise un-selected patients that leads to a low positive predictive value of in vitro radiosensitivity assays. It is argued, that this problem may persist even if the noise on current assays could be reduced to (the unrealistic value of) zero, simply because of the large biological variation in SF 2 . Removing the sensitive tail of the patient population, will only have a minor effect on the dose that could be delivered to the remaining patients, because of the sigmoid shape of empirical dose-response relationships. Finally, individualizing dose prescriptions based exclusively on information from a normal-tissue radiosensitivity assay, leads to a nearly symmetrical distribution of dose-changes that would produce a very small gain, or even a loss, of tumor control probability if implemented in the clinic. From a theoretical point of view, other strategies could be devised and some of these are considered in this review. Right now the most promising clinical use of in vitro radiosensitivity

  14. Permeability Testing of Impacted Composite Laminates for Use on Reusable Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T.

    2001-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite, and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented, and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a nonlinear fashion for almost all the specimens tested.

  15. Cycom 977-2 Composite Material: Impact Test Results (workshop presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Carl; Herald, Stephen; Watkins, Casey

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Ambient (13A) tests of Cycom 977-2 impact characteristics by the Brucenton and statistical method at MSFC and WSTF. Repeat (13A) tests of tested Cycom from phase I at MSFC to expended testing statistical database. Conduct high-pressure tests (13B) in liquid oxygen (LOX) and GOX at MSFC and WSTF to determine Cycom reaction characteristics and batch effect. Conduct expended ambient (13A) LOX test at MSFC and high-pressure (13B) testing to determine pressure effects in LOX. Expend 13B GOX database.

  16. Testing the impact of miniaturization on phylogeny: Paleozoic dissorophoid amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröbisch, Nadia B; Schoch, Rainer R

    2009-06-01

    Among the diverse clade of Paleozoic dissorophoid amphibians, the small, terrestrial amphibamids and the neotenic branchiosaurids have frequently been suggested as possible antecedents of either all or some of the modern amphibian clades. Classically, amphibamids and branchiosaurids have been considered to represent distinct, but closely related clades within dissorophoids, but despite their importance for the controversial lissamphibian origins, a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of small dissorophoids has thus far not been attempted. On the basis of an integrated data set, the relationships of amphibamids and branchiosaurids were analyzed using parsimony and Bayesian approaches. Both groups represent miniaturized forms and it was tested whether similar developmental pathways, associated with miniaturization, lead to an artificial close relationship of branchiosaurids and amphibamids. Moreover, the fit of the resulting tree topologies to the distribution of fossil taxa in the stratigraphic rock record was assessed as an additional source of information. The results show that characters associated with a miniaturized morphology are not responsible for the close clustering of branchiosaurids and amphibamids. Instead, all analyses invariably demonstrate a monophyletic clade of branchiosaurids highly nested within derived amphibamids, indicating that branchiosaurids represent a group of secondarily neotenic amphibamid dissorophoids. This understanding of the phylogenetic relationships of small dissorophoid amphibians provides a new framework for the discussion of their evolutionary history and the evolution of characters shared by branchiosaurids and/or amphibamids with modern amphibian taxa.

  17. Impact of presymptomatic genetic testing for hereditary ataxia and neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Corrine O; Lipe, Hillary P; Bird, Thomas D

    2004-06-01

    With the exception of Huntington disease, the psychological and psychosocial impact of DNA testing for neurogenetic disorders has not been well studied. To evaluate the psychosocial impact of genetic testing for autosomal dominant forms of hereditary ataxia and neuromuscular disorders. Patients Fifty subjects at risk for autosomal dominant forms of spinocerebellar ataxia (n = 11), muscular dystrophy (n = 28), and hereditary neuropathy (n = 12). A prospective, descriptive, observational study in a university setting of individuals who underwent genetic counseling and DNA testing. Participants completed 3 questionnaires before testing and at regular intervals after testing. The questionnaire set included the Revised Impact of Event Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, demographic information, and an assessment of attitudes and feelings about genetic testing. Thirty-nine subjects (78%) completed 6 months to 5 years of posttest follow-up. Common reasons for pursuing genetic testing were to provide an explanation for symptoms, emotional relief, and information for future planning. Thirty-four (68%) had positive and 16 (32%) had negative genetic results. In those with a positive result, 26 (76%) had nonspecific signs or symptoms of the relevant disorder. Forty-two participants (84%) felt genetic testing was beneficial. Groups with positive and negative test results coped well with results. However, 13 subjects (10 with positive and 3 with negative results) reported elevated anxiety levels, and 3 (1 with positive and 2 with negative results) expressed feelings of depression during the follow-up period. The test result was not predictive of anxiety or depression. Most individuals find neurogenetic testing to be beneficial, regardless of the result. Anxiety or depression may persist in some persons with positive or negative test results. Testing can have a demonstrable impact on family planning and interpersonal relationships. Further studies are needed to

  18. Ballistic Impact Testing of Aluminum 2024 and Titanium 6Al-4V for Material Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Emmerling, William C.; Altobelli, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental program is underway to develop a consistent set of material property and impact test data, and failure analysis, for a variety of materials that can be used to develop improved impact failure and deformation models. Unique features of this set of data are that all material property information and impact test results are obtained using identical materials, the test methods and procedures are extensively documented and all of the raw data is available. This report describes ballistic impact testing which has been conducted on aluminum (Al) 2024 and titanium (Ti) 6Al-4vanadium (V) sheet and plate samples of different thicknesses and with different types of projectiles, one a regular cylinder and one with a more complex geometry incorporating features representative of a jet engine fan blade.

  19. Impact of changed legislation on skin tests: the present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimek, Ludger; Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen; Kugler, Alexa; Muraro, Antonella; Hellings, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    To discuss the impact of current European Union regulations on the availability of commercially available skin test allergens in European member states. European Union legislations now define diagnostic allergens to be medicine requiring market authorization of every individual diagnostic allergen

  20. Results of a diesel multiple unit fuel tank blunt impact test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-04

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research and Development is conducting research into passenger locomotive fuel tank crashworthiness. A series of impact tests is being conducted to measure fuel tank deformation under two types of dyn...

  1. Topics in the Analysis of Shear-Wave Propagation in Oblique-Plate Impact Tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scheidler, Mike

    2007-01-01

    This report addresses several topics in the theoretical analysis of shock waves, acceleration waves, and centered simple waves, with emphasis on the propagation of shear waves generated in oblique-plate impact tests...

  2. A framework for testing the ability of models to project climate change and its impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, J. C.; Madsen, H.; Andréassian, V.

    2014-01-01

    Models used for climate change impact projections are typically not tested for simulation beyond current climate conditions. Since we have no data truly reflecting future conditions, a key challenge in this respect is to rigorously test models using proxies of future conditions. This paper presents...... a validation framework and guiding principles applicable across earth science disciplines for testing the capability of models to project future climate change and its impacts. Model test schemes comprising split-sample tests, differential split-sample tests and proxy site tests are discussed in relation...... to their application for projections by use of single models, ensemble modelling and space-time-substitution and in relation to use of different data from historical time series, paleo data and controlled experiments. We recommend that differential-split sample tests should be performed with best available proxy data...

  3. Testing of the Impact Load and Tribological Behaviour of W-C:H Hard Composite Coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fořt, Tomáš; Vítů, T.; Novák, R.; Grossman, Jan; Sobota, Jaroslav; Vyskočil, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 14 (2011), s102-s104 ISSN 0009-2770 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/031 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : PVD * DLC * impact test * pin-on-disc * friction coefficient Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 0.529, year: 2011

  4. A new tensile impact test for the toughness characterization of sheet material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könemann, Markus; Lenz, David; Brinnel, Victoria; Münstermann, Sebastian

    2018-05-01

    In the past, the selection of suitable steels has been carried out primarily based on the mechanical properties of different steels. One of these properties is the resistance against crack propagation. For many constructions, this value plays an important role, because it can compare the impact toughness of different steel grades easily and gives information about the loading capacity of the specific materials. For thin sheets, impact toughness properties were usually not considered. One of the reasons for this is that the Charpy-impact test is not applicable for sheets with thicknesses below 2 mm. For a long time, this was not relevant because conventional steels had a sufficient impact toughness in a wide temperature range. However, since new multiphase steel grades with improved mechanical property exploitations are available, it turned out that impact toughness properties need to be considered during the component design phase, as the activation of the cleavage fracture mechanism is observed under challenging loading conditions. Therefore, this work aims to provide a new and practical testing procedure for sheet material or thin walled structures. The new testing procedure is based on tensile tests conducted in an impact pendulum similar to the Charpy impact hammer. A new standard geometry is provided, which enables a comparison between different steels or steel grades. A connection to the conventional Charpy test is presented using a damage mechanics model, which predicts material failure with consideration of to the stress state at various temperatures. Different specimen geometries are analysed to cover manifold stress states. A special advantage of the damage mechanics model is also the possibility to predict the materials behaviour in the transition area. To verify the method a conventional steel was tested in Charpy tests as well as in the new tensile impact test.

  5. Impact testing of polymer-filled auxetics using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fíla, T.; Zlámal, P.; Jiroušek, O.; Falta, J.; Koudelka_ml., P.; Kytýř, D.; Doktor, T.; Valach, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 1700076. ISSN 1438-1656 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : bridge decks * filled polymers * filling * honeycomb structures * impact testing * mechanical testing * Poisson ratio * polyurethanes Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 2.319, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adem.201700076/abstract

  6. Full-scale impact test data for tornado-missile design of nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, A.E.; Sliter, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    It is standard practice to consider the effects of low-probability impacts of tornado-borne debris (''tornado missiles'' such as utility poles and steel pipes) in the structural design of nuclear power plants in the United States. To provide data that can be used directly in the design procedure, a series of full-scale tornado-missile impact tests was performed. This paper is a brief summary of the results and conclusions from these tests. The tests consisted of reinforced concrete panels impacted by poles, pipes, and rods propelled by a rocket sled. The panels were constructed to current minimum standards and had thicknesses typical of auxiliary buildings of nuclear power plants. A specific objective was the determination of the impact velocities below which the panels do not experience backface scabbing. Another objective was to assess the adequacy of (1) conventional design formulae for penetration and scabbing and (2) conventional design methods for overall structural response. Test missiles and velocities represented those in current design standards. Missiles included utility poles, steel pipes, and steel bars. It is important to interpret the data in this paper in recognition that the test conditions represent conservative assumptions regarding maximum wind speeds, injection of the missile into the wind stream, aerodynamic trajectory, and orientation of missile at impact. Even with the severe assumptions made, the full-scale tests described demonstrate the ability of prototypical nuclear plant walls and roofs to provide adequate protection against postulated tornado-missile impact

  7. 78 FR 36149 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Implementation of the Shark Conservation Act of 2010; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    .... 111014628-3329-01] RIN 0648-BB54 Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Implementation of the Shark Conservation.... SUMMARY: NMFS published a proposed rule on May 2, 2013, to implement provisions of the Shark Conservation Act of 2010 (SCA) that prohibit any person from removing any of the fins of a shark at sea, possessing...

  8. 78 FR 40687 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Implementation of the Shark Conservation Act of 2010; Extension...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    .... 111014628-3329-01] RIN 0648-BB54 Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Implementation of the Shark Conservation... period. SUMMARY: NMFS published a proposed rule on May 2, 2013, to implement provisions of the Shark Conservation Act of 2010 (SCA) that prohibit any person from removing any of the fins of a shark at sea...

  9. Erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients receiving cranial irradiation and phenytoin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delattre, J.Y.; Safai, B.; Posner, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    In 15 months we encountered eight patients with intracranial tumors who developed erythema multiforme (EM) or erythema multiforme bullosa (Stevens-Johnson syndrome). All occurred shortly after use of phenytoin (DPH) and brain radiation therapy (WBRT). The clinical picture differed from the classic form of EM in that the erythema began on the scalp and spread to the extremities, progressing in three cases to extensive bullous formation. There were no cases of EM among patients who received either DPH or radiotherapy alone. The combination of DPH, WBRT, and tapering of steroids seems to predispose to EM. The pathogenesis of the disorder is probably immunologic. In the absence of seizures, anticonvulsants should not be given routinely to patients with brain tumors. When anticonvulsants are necessary in patients scheduled for WBRT, DPH may not be the drug of choice

  10. Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients on phenytoin and cranial radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khafaga, Y.M.; Jamshed, A.; Allam, A.A.K.; Ezzat, A.; Gray, A.J.; Schultz, H.; Mourad, W.A.; Al Eisa, A.

    1999-01-01

    The use of phenytoin as a prophylactic anticonvulsant after brain surgery, particularly for brain tumors, is a common practice, regardless of whether the patient has a previous history of convulsions. This treatment policy assumes that the benefits exceed the risks. Four cases are described of adverse reactions of phenytoin during the cocomitant use of cranial radiotherapy. In one patient this proved fatal. There is increasing anecdotal support in the literature for a synergistic effect between phenytoin therapy and cranial radiotherapy that can result in the life-threatening Stevens-Johnson syndrome. While the association is uncommon, four cases within 24 months in one department suggest that the routine use of postoperative phenytoin as a prophylactic anticonvulsant in the absence of a history of seizures may not be warranted, particularly if the patient is to receive cranial radiotherapy. (orig.)

  11. Irradiated fields spared Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient undergoing radiotherapy for bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musio, D.; Parisi, E.; Dionisi, F.

    2009-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are two of the most severe, rare, and life-threatening adverse reactions to medications. Their incidence is approximately two patients per million population per year. Several cases have been reported in the literature in which SJS and TEN have occurred in patients with a neoplasm undergoing radiation therapy and who are taking an anticonvulsant. We report a case of SJS-TEN that developed in a 51-year-old woman with nonresectable non-small-cell lung cancer during treatment with phenobarbital plus radiation therapy for bone metastases but in whom the irradiated areas did not exhibit the SJS skin reaction. To our knowledge, no similar cases have been reported in the literature. (author)

  12. Representations of nurses and individuals in psychological distress in the photographic exhibit USAnatomy, by Steven Klein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Evanilda Souza de Santana; Araújo, Edna Maria de; Santos, Silvone Santa Bárbara da Silva; Santos, Alexandro Gesner Gomes Dos

    2016-06-01

    Objectives To analyze the representations of the nurse and individual in mental suffering portrayed in the photographic work by Steven Klein, in the USAnatomy exhibit held at the Museum of Sculpture (Museu da escultura) in São Paulo, in 2011. Methods Qualitative study carried out in 2012. Three photographs were submitted to iconographic analysis. The interpretation of the findings was based on theoretical frameworks of Foucault and Bourdieu on power relations. Results The nurse is represented as a sensual, insensitive person, with the power to control and torture while the person in psychological distress is represented as dirty, imprisoned and subjected to an asymmetrical relationship of power with the nurse. Final considerations Relationships of submission and symbolic dominance, in which the person in psychological distress has their body molded by discipline imposed by the nurse. Stereotypes of the image of the nurse oppose the ideology of the profession, which is to ensure the integrity of those being cared for.

  13. Acoustic emission measurements during impacts tests for determining ductile fracture data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, H.

    2000-09-01

    The document reports work for further development of methods and tests to obtain better information on the crack initiation toughness (J id ) under impact loading conditions, by acoustic emission measurements. The applicability of the acoustic emission tests for the given purpose was proven by instrumented Charpy tests using modified ISO-V specimens. The physical crack initiation toughness served as the reference value for reliable evaluation of the characteristic data obtained. This reference value is derived from the crack resistance curve determined by the multi-specimen cleavage fracture method combined with data from measurements of the stretching zone width. Verification of the acoustic emission-defined initiation value included a variety of tests, as e.g. additional dynamic single-specimen methods (L-COD, magnetic emission), and supplementary tests (D3PB, pendulum impact testing machine). The test materials are various steels with different strength/toughness properties. (orig./CB) [de

  14. Comprehensive approach to ocular consequences of Stevens Johnson Syndrome - the aftermath of a systemic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Geetha; Srinivasan, Bhaskar; Agarwal, Shweta; Kamala Muralidharan, Seema; Arumugam, Sumathi

    2014-03-01

    Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS) can lead to end stage corneal blindness. This study describes the comprehensive treatment measures and their outcomes in the management of ocular sequelae and complications of SJS. Four hundred sixty-four eyes of 232 patients of SJS who underwent surgical intervention (punctal cautery, mucus membrane grafting for lid margin keratinisation, fornix reconstructive procedures, tectonic procedures, keratoplasty and keratoprosthesis) were studied. It was a non-comparative, retrospective, interventional case series. The primary outcome was the change in the best corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Secondary outcome measures included an improvement in the ocular surface status as indicated by corneal epithelial fluorescein staining and Schirmer's I strip wetting. The BCVA and the ocular surface status improved and/or stabilized in > 70 % of eyes following punctal cautery (n = 160) and > 80 % of eyes following lid margin mucus membrane grafting (n = 238). BCVA improved in 50 % of eyes following fornix reconstructive procedures (n = 24) with COMET (n = 6), in 63.9 % eyes with the Prosthetic Replacement of the Ocular Surface Ecosystem (PROSE) lens (n = 36), in 81.8 % of eyes after cataract surgery (n = 22). A BCVA of ≥20/200 was achieved in 72.34 % of eyes following keratoprostheses procedures (n = 47). The mean duration of follow up was 53.3 ± 15.2 months. The ocular sequelae of Stevens Johnson Syndrome can be blinding. They need to be identified and addressed early to retard the continued deterioration of the ocular surface. Our study aims to highlight the problem as well as the importance of comprehensive measures in the management of this potentially blinding disorder.

  15. Soft projectile impacts analysis on thin reinforced concrete slabs: Tests, modelling and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontiroli, C.; Rouquand, A.; Daudeville, L.; Baroth, J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of reinforced concrete structures subjected to high velocity impacts and explosions remain a difficult task today. For 10 years and more now, the CEA-Gramat has maintained a continuous research effort with the help of different French universities in order to overcome encountered difficulties in modelling the behaviour of concrete structures under severe loading. To get more data on aircraft impact problems and then validate numerical models, soft projectile impacts tests at small scale on thin reinforced concrete slabs has been carried out at CEA-Gramat. Numerical simulations of these tests have been carried out and compared with experimental results to validate our numerical approach. (authors)

  16. Application of computer techniques to charpy impact testing of irradiated pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landow, M.P.; Fromm, E.O.; Perrin, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    A Rockwell AIM 65 microcomputer has been modified to control a remote Charpy V-notch impact test machine. It controls not only handling and testing of the specimen but also transference and storage of instrumented Charpy test data. A system of electrical solenoid activated pneumatic cylinders and switches provides the interface between the computer and the test apparatus. A command language has been designated that allows the operator to command checkout, test procedure, and data storage via the computer. Automatic compliance with ASTM test procedures is built into the program

  17. Hybrid composite laminates reinforced with Kevlar/carbon/glass woven fabrics for ballistic impact testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randjbaran, Elias; Zahari, Rizal; Jalil, Nawal Aswan Abdul; Majid, Dayang Laila Abang Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Current study reported a facile method to investigate the effects of stacking sequence layers of hybrid composite materials on ballistic energy absorption by running the ballistic test at the high velocity ballistic impact conditions. The velocity and absorbed energy were accordingly calculated as well. The specimens were fabricated from Kevlar, carbon, and glass woven fabrics and resin and were experimentally investigated under impact conditions. All the specimens possessed equal mass, shape, and density; nevertheless, the layers were ordered in different stacking sequence. After running the ballistic test at the same conditions, the final velocities of the cylindrical AISI 4340 Steel pellet showed how much energy was absorbed by the samples. The energy absorption of each sample through the ballistic impact was calculated; accordingly, the proper ballistic impact resistance materials could be found by conducting the test. This paper can be further studied in order to characterise the material properties for the different layers.

  18. Influence of fall height on high impact polystyrene deformation and characteristics of drop weight test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizera Ales

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with high impact polystyrene (HIPS which was subjected the drop-weight test. HIPS is a polymer produced by the reaction between butadiene synthetic elastomer and styrene (5–14 % which contains the crystal polymer in certain amounts and is commonly used in mechanical engineering applications where machine parts are exposed to impact loading. The injection moulded HIPS samples were subjected the penetration test at different fall heights and the results were subsequently evaluated and discussed. It was found out that all fall heights are suitable for HIPS penetration, but the optimal one is 50 J because of the smallest variation range. Higher heights are not needed because of increasing power consumption of the test device. From the results, it is clear, that HIPS is not so highly impact resistant material as for example HDPE, because of that is this material suitable for applications where is not often exposed to too big impacts at high velocities.

  19. Hybrid Composite Laminates Reinforced with Kevlar/Carbon/Glass Woven Fabrics for Ballistic Impact Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Randjbaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current study reported a facile method to investigate the effects of stacking sequence layers of hybrid composite materials on ballistic energy absorption by running the ballistic test at the high velocity ballistic impact conditions. The velocity and absorbed energy were accordingly calculated as well. The specimens were fabricated from Kevlar, carbon, and glass woven fabrics and resin and were experimentally investigated under impact conditions. All the specimens possessed equal mass, shape, and density; nevertheless, the layers were ordered in different stacking sequence. After running the ballistic test at the same conditions, the final velocities of the cylindrical AISI 4340 Steel pellet showed how much energy was absorbed by the samples. The energy absorption of each sample through the ballistic impact was calculated; accordingly, the proper ballistic impact resistance materials could be found by conducting the test. This paper can be further studied in order to characterise the material properties for the different layers.

  20. The impact of predictive genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: three years after testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Veronica R; Meiser, Bettina; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Gaff, Clara; St John, D James; Halliday, Jane L

    2007-05-01

    To fully assess predictive genetic testing programs, it is important to assess outcomes over periods of time longer than the 1-year follow-up reported in the literature. We conducted a 3-year study of individuals who received predictive genetic test results for previously identified familial mutations in Australian Familial Cancer Clinics. Questionnaires were sent before attendance at the familial cancer clinic and 2 weeks, 4 months, 1 year, and 3 years after receiving test results. Psychological measures were included each time, and preventive behaviors were assessed at baseline and 1 and 3 years. Psychological measures were adjusted for age, gender, and baseline score. The study included 19 carriers and 54 non-carriers. We previously reported an increase in mean cancer-specific distress in carriers at 2 weeks with a return to baseline levels by 12 months. This level was maintained until 3 years. Non-carriers showed sustained decreases after testing with a significantly lower level at 3 years compared with baseline (P depression and anxiety scores did not differ between carriers and non-carriers and, at 3 years, were similar to baseline. All carriers and 7% of non-carriers had had a colonoscopy by 3 years, and 69% of 13 female carriers had undergone gynecological screening in the previous 2 years. Prophylactic surgery was rare. This report of long-term data indicates appropriate screening and improved psychological measures for non-carriers with no evidence of undue psychological distress in carriers of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer mutations.

  1. Investigation on impact resistance of steel plate reinforced concrete barriers against aircraft impact. Pt.2: Simulation analysis of scale model impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun Mizuno; Norihide Koshika; Hiroshi Morikawa; Kentaro Wakimoto; Ryusuke Fukuda

    2005-01-01

    Steel plate reinforced concrete (SC) structure is one in which the rebars of conventional reinforced concrete (RC) structures are replaced with external steel plates attached to inner concrete with headed studs. SC structures are considered to be more effective than RC structures against aircraft impact, so their application to outer walls and roofs of risk-sensitive structures such as nuclear-related structures is expected to mitigate damage to critical components. The objective of this study was to investigate the fracture behavior and perforation thickness of SC panels against aircraft impact through impact tests and simulation analyses. Objectives of this paper are to analytically investigate the protection performance of SC panels against aircraft model impact through simulation analyses of 1/7.5 scale aircraft model impact tests presented in Part 1 of this study using a discrete element method (DEM), and to examine the applicability and validity of the DEM. Simulation analyses by a finite element method (FEM) were also performed to evaluate its applicability. The fracture process and damage to the SC test panels as well as the aircraft models are closely simulated by the discrete element analyses. The various impact responses and failure mechanisms, such as deceleration curves of projectile, velocity of debris from rear face and deformation mode of SC panels, are also simulated closely by the DEM analyses. The results of analyses confirm the shock-proof performance of SC panels against aircraft impact, and the applicability and validity of DEM for evaluating the complex phenomena of an aircraft impact against an SC panel. The finite element analysis closely simulates the deformation of the SC test panel and strains of rear steel plate where the global bending deformation mode is dominant. (authors)

  2. The Impact of Linking Distinct Achievement Test Scores on the Interpretation of Student Growth in Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airola, Denise Tobin

    2011-01-01

    Changes to state tests impact the ability of State Education Agencies (SEAs) to monitor change in performance over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Standardized Performance Growth Index (PGIz), a proposed statistical model for measuring change in student and school performance, across transitions in tests. The PGIz is a…

  3. The Impact of Time-Series Diagnostic Tests on the Writing Ability of Iranian EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atashgahi, Bahareh Molazem

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to show whether administering a battery of time-series diagnostic tests (screening) has any impact on Iranian EFL learners' writing ability. The study was conducted on the intermediate EFL learners at Islamic Azad University North Tehran branch. The researcher administered a homogenizing test in order to exclude the exceptional…

  4. An Exploration of the Impact of Accountability Testing on Teaching in Urban Elementary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisland, Beverly Milner

    2015-01-01

    This study explores accountability testing in the elementary schools of New York City with particular emphasis on the impact of a statewide social studies test on the value given to social studies instruction in comparison to other subjects. The attitudes of a group of elementary teachers are examined. Some of the teachers taught all subjects in…

  5. Mesoscopic analyses of porous concrete under static compression and drop weight impact tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agar Ozbek, A.S.; Pedersen, R.R.; Weerheijm, J.

    2008-01-01

    was considered as a four-phase material incorporating aggregates, bulk cement paste, interfacial transition zones and meso-size air pores. The stress-displacement relations obtained from static compression tests, the stress values, and the corresponding damage levels provided by the drop weight impact tests were......The failure process in highly porous concrete was analyzed experimentally and numerically. A triaxial visco-plastic damage model and a mesoscale representation of the material composition were considered to reproduce static compression and drop weight impact tests. In the mesoscopic model, concrete...

  6. High-silicon 238PuO2 fuel characterization study: Half module impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, M.A.H.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs to a variety of fragment- impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and Earth-impact conditions. The evaluations documented in this report are part of an ongoing program to determine the effect of fuel impurities on the response of the heat source to conditions baselined during the Galileo/Ulysses test program. In the first two tests in this series, encapsulated GPHS fuel pellets containing high levels of silicon were aged, loaded into GPHS module halves, and impacted against steel plates. The results show no significant differences between the response of these capsules and the behavior of relatively low-silicon fuel pellets tested previously

  7. The impact of training process on the stress tests results of women cross country skiing representation.

    OpenAIRE

    Fusková, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Title: The impact of training process on the stress tests results of women cross country skiing representation. Aim: The aim of this thesis is the comparison of the results of stress tests carried out preparatory period before and after the preparation period and whether the results were influenced by the applied training process. Methods: In this thesis was used background research of professional publications, content analyzes of documents and comparison of the results of stress tests and c...

  8. Determine ISS Soyuz Orbital Module Ballistic Limits for Steel Projectiles Hypervelocity Impact Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Frankel

    2013-01-01

    A new orbital debris environment model (ORDEM 3.0) defines the density distribution of the debris environment in terms of the fraction of debris that are low-density (plastic), medium-density (aluminum) or high-density (steel) particles. This hypervelocity impact (HVI) program focused on assessing ballistic limits (BLs) for steel projectiles impacting the enhanced Soyuz Orbital Module (OM) micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shield configuration. The ballistic limit was defined as the projectile size on the threshold of failure of the OM pressure shell as a function of impact speeds and angle. The enhanced OM shield configuration was first introduced with Soyuz 30S (launched in May 2012) to improve the MMOD protection of Soyuz vehicles docked to the International Space Station (ISS). This test program provides HVI data on U.S. materials similar in composition and density to the Russian materials for the enhanced Soyuz OM shield configuration of the vehicle. Data from this test program was used to update ballistic limit equations used in Soyuz OM penetration risk assessments. The objective of this hypervelocity impact test program was to determine the ballistic limit particle size for 440C stainless steel spherical projectiles on the Soyuz OM shielding at several impact conditions (velocity and angle combinations). This test report was prepared by NASA-JSC/ HVIT, upon completion of tests.

  9. Procedure on the Impact Characteristic Test for the One-sided and Thru-grid Spacer Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Kyung Ho; Kim, Jae Yong; Lee, Kang Hee; Song, Kee Nam

    2006-09-01

    In order to perform the one-sided and the through-grid impact tests for a new developed spacer grid, the drop type impact test machines were established. The dynamic impact test is to get some basic data for accident analysis such as impact strength, stiffness, and coefficient of the restitution. Furthermore, these developed test methods and procedures will be qualified standard for increasing the reliability of the test results. Chapter 2 provides an introduction to the test facilities and instrumentations. Chapter 3 describes on how spacer grid and the single span fuel assembly specimen will be prepared. In addition to this, how to set up these testing machines. Chapter 4 illustrates detail test procedure on how to acquire impact signal of the two kinds of the specimen. Chapter 5 deals with signal processing and analysis for the test data. Finally, chapter 6 summarise the overall test procedure and the test method

  10. Guidelines for conducting impact tests on shipping packages for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mok, G.C.; Carlson, R.W.; Lu, S.C.; Fischer, L.E.

    1995-09-01

    Federal regulation (10 CFR Part 71) specifies a number of impact conditions (free-drop, penetration, and puncture), under which a package for the transport of radioactive materials must be tested or evaluated to demonstrate compliance with the regulation. This report is a comprehensive guide to the planning and execution of these impact tests. The report identifies the required considerations for both the design, pre-, and post-test inspections of the test model and the measurement, recording, analysis, and reporting of the test data. The report also presents reasons for the requirements, identifies the major difficulties in meeting these requirements, and suggests possible methods to overcome the difficulties. Discussed in substantial detail is the use of scale models and instrumented measurements

  11. Development of a tornado safe room door from wood Products: door design and impact testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. Falk; James J. Bridwell

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a tornado safe room door built from wood products and steel sheeting was developed and impact-tested according to tornado safe room standards. Results indicate that an door constructed from as few as two sheets of 23/32-in. (18.26-mm) construction-grade plywood and overlaid with 18-gauge (0.05-in.- (1.27- mm-) thick) steel can pass the required impact...

  12. Review of Evidence of Environmental Impacts of Animal Research and Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Groff

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Millions of animals are used in research and toxicity testing, including in drug, medical device, chemical, cosmetic, personal care, household, and other product sectors, but the environmental consequences are yet to be adequately addressed. Evidence suggests that their use and disposal, and the associated use of chemicals and supplies, contribute to pollution as well as adverse impacts on biodiversity and public health. The objective of this review is to examine such evidence. The review includes examinations of (1 resources used in animal research; (2 waste production in laboratories; (3 sources of pollution; (4 impacts on laboratory workers’ health; and (5 biodiversity impacts. The clear conclusion from the review is that the environmental implications of animal testing must be acknowledged, reported, and taken into account as another factor in addition to ethical and scientific reasons weighing heavily in favor of moving away from allowing and requiring animal use in research and testing.

  13. Impact of proof test interval and coverage on probability of failure of safety instrumented function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Jianghong; Pang, Lei; Hu, Bin; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Introduction of proof test coverage makes the calculation of the probability of failure for SIF more accurate. • The probability of failure undetected by proof test is independently defined as P TIF and calculated. • P TIF is quantified using reliability block diagram and simple formula of PFD avg . • Improving proof test coverage and adopting reasonable test period can reduce the probability of failure for SIF. - Abstract: Imperfection of proof test can result in the safety function failure of safety instrumented system (SIS) at any time in its life period. IEC61508 and other references ignored or only elementarily analyzed the imperfection of proof test. In order to further study the impact of the imperfection of proof test on the probability of failure for safety instrumented function (SIF), the necessity of proof test and influence of its imperfection on system performance was first analyzed theoretically. The probability of failure for safety instrumented function resulted from the imperfection of proof test was defined as probability of test independent failures (P TIF ), and P TIF was separately calculated by introducing proof test coverage and adopting reliability block diagram, with reference to the simplified calculation formula of average probability of failure on demand (PFD avg ). Research results show that: the shorter proof test period and the higher proof test coverage indicate the smaller probability of failure for safety instrumented function. The probability of failure for safety instrumented function which is calculated by introducing proof test coverage will be more accurate.

  14. The impact of usability reports and user test observations on developers understanding of usability data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høegh, Rune Thaarup; Nielsen, Christian Monrad; Pedersen, Michael Bach

    2006-01-01

    of the system. This article presents results from an exploratory study of 2 ways of providing feedback from a usability evaluation: observation of user tests and reading usability reports. A case study and a field experiment were used to explore how observation and usability reports impact developers......' understanding of usability data. The results indicate that observation of user tests facilitated a rich understanding of usability problems and created empathy with the users and their work. The usability report had a strong impact on the developers' understanding of specific usability problems and supported...

  15. Quantitative studies on impact resistance of reinforced concrete panels with steel liners under impact loading. Part 1: Scaled model impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, H.; Kasai, Y.; Koshika, N.; Morikawa, H.; Uchida, T.; Ohno, T.; Kogure, K.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, extensive analytical and experimental studies have been carried out to establish a rational structural design method for nuclear power plants against local damage caused by various external missiles. Through these studies, several techniques for improving die impact resistance of reinforced concrete slabs have been proposed. Of these techniques, attaching a thin steel liner onto the impacted and/or rear face of the slab is considered to be one of the most effective methods. Muto et. al. carried out full-scale impact tests using actual aircraft engines and reported that a thin corrugated steel liner attached to the rear face of a concrete panel has a significant effect in preventing scattering of scabbed concrete debris from the rear face of the target. Based on many experimental and analytical studies, UKAEA reported that a steel liner attached to a reinforced concrete slab improves its perforation and scabbing resistance, and Walter et. al. proposed a formula for predicting the equivalent thickness of a slab with a steel liner attached. The object of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the effect of a steel liner attached to a reinforced concrete slab in preventing local damage caused by rigid missiles. To achieve the object, extensive impact tests were carried out. This paper summarizes the results of these tests

  16. Endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation in refractory glaucoma after osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis in Stevens-Johnson syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlini, Matteo; Adabache-Guel, Tania; Bratu, Adriana; Rossini, Paolo; Mingaine, Mpekethu Sam; Cavallini, Gian Maria; Forlini, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    To report successful treatment of refractive glaucoma in a patient submitted to osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis surgery for Stevens-Johnson syndrome. An interventional case report. The patient is a 62-year-old Indian man with known Stevens-Johnson syndrome since 1972 secondary to tetracycline therapy, with bilateral dry eye and corneal blindness. He underwent symblepharon release surgery with mucous membrane graft in both eyes. Osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis surgery was later performed on the left eye. He was submitted to 2 Ahmed valve implants to control secondary glaucoma but visual fields continued to worsen; hence, he underwent endoscopic 140° cyclophotocoagulation with a good control of IOP. Endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation as alternative treatment provides good results in refractory glaucoma after osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis surgery.

  17. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: an update on pharmacogenetics studies in drug-induced severe skin reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufini, Sara; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Politi, Cristina; Giardina, Emiliano; Novelli, Giuseppe; Borgiani, Paola

    2015-11-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are severe, life-threatening drug reactions involving skin and membranes mucous, which are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and triggered, especially by drug exposure. Different studies have demonstrated that drug response is a multifactorial character and that the interindividual variability in this response depends on both environmental and genetic factors. The last ones have a relevant significance. In fact, the identification of new specific genetic markers involved in the response to drugs, will be of great utility to establish a more personalized therapeutic approach and to prevent the appearance of these adverse reactions. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the Pharmacogenetics studies related to Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis reporting the major genetic factors identified in the last years as associated with the disease and highlighting the use of some of these genomic variants in the clinical practice.

  18. Ecological impacts of invasive alien species along temperature gradients: testing the role of environmental matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacarella, Josephine C; Dick, Jaimie T A; Alexander, Mhairi E; Ricciardi, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    Invasive alien species (IAS) can cause substantive ecological impacts, and the role of temperature in mediating these impacts may become increasingly significant in a changing climate. Habitat conditions and physiological optima offer predictive information for IAS impacts in novel environments. Here, using meta-analysis and laboratory experiments, we tested the hypothesis that the impacts of IAS in the field are inversely correlated with the difference in their ambient and optimal temperatures. A meta-analysis of 29 studies of consumptive impacts of IAS in inland waters revealed that the impacts of fishes and crustaceans are higher at temperatures that more closely match their thermal growth optima. In particular, the maximum impact potential was constrained by increased differences between ambient and optimal temperatures, as indicated by the steeper slope of a quantile regression on the upper 25th percentile of impact data compared to that of a weighted linear regression on all data with measured variances. We complemented this study with an experimental analysis of the functional response (the relationship between predation rate and prey supply) of two invasive predators (freshwater mysid shrimp, Hemimysis anomala and Mysis diluviana) across. relevant temperature gradients; both of these species have previously been found to exert strong community-level impacts that are corroborated by their functional responses to different prey items. The functional response experiments showed that maximum feeding rates of H. anomala and M. diluviana have distinct peaks near their respective thermal optima. Although variation in impacts may be caused by numerous abiotic or biotic habitat characteristics, both our analyses point to temperature as a key mediator of IAS impact levels in inland waters and suggest that IAS management should prioritize habitats in the invaded range that more closely match the thermal optima of targeted invaders.

  19. Quality assurance testing on video games : The importance and impact of a misunderstood industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ruuska, Essi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to provide a more holistic insight of the video game quality assurance industry to video game industry professionals and prospective employees in order to promote the importance and impact of quality assurance testing in video games. The motive for this thesis came from the author's work experience in video game quality assurance testing, and from realizing how little is known about the industry. The research question was defined as 'what is video game quality ass...

  20. Finding of No Significant Impact and Environmental Assessment for Flight Test to the Edge of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Runway 22 or on Rogers Dry Lakebed at Edwards AFB. 17 On the basis of the findings of the Environmental Assessment, no significant impact to human...FLIGHT TEST CENTER Environmental Assessment for Flight Test to the Edge of Space Page 5-3 Bowles, A.E., S. Eckert, L . Starke, E. Berg, L . Wolski, and...Numbers. Anne Choate, Laura 20 Pederson , Jeremy Scharfenberg, Henry Farland. Washington, D.C. September. 21 Jeppesen Sanderson, Incorporated 22

  1. Stevens - Johnson Syndrome Induced by Combination of Lamotrigine and Valproic Acid in a 9-Year-Old Boy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maduemem, K

    2017-06-01

    We describe the case history of a 9-year-old boy who developed Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) following concomitant use of valproic acid and lamotrigine. He presented with rash and fever several weeks after introduction of lamotrigine, having been on valproic acid for seizure disorder. SJS happens to be one of the rare adverse reactions of antiepilepsy drugs (AED). Management is mainly supportive with care escalation when necessary because of the significant morbidity.

  2. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Induced by Carbamazepine Treatment in a Patient Who Previously Had Carbamazepine Induced Pruritus - A Case Report -

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Hyun Min; Park, Yoo Jung; Kim, Young Hoon; Moon, Dong Eon

    2013-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a rare but life-threatening skin reaction disease and carbamazepine is one of its most common causes. We report a case of SJS secondary to carbamazepine in a patient with previous pruritus due to carbamazepine which was given for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. We would like to caution all providers that carbamazepine readministration should be avoided in the patient with a previous history of SJS or adverse skin reaction. In addition, we strongly recommen...

  3. Soft impact testing of a wall-floor-wall reinforced concrete structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vepsä, Ari, E-mail: ari.vepsa@vtt.fi; Calonius, Kim; Saarenheimo, Arja; Aatola, Seppo; Halonen, Matti

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A wall-floor-wall reinforced concrete structure was built. • The structure was subjected to three almost identical soft impact tests. • Response was measured with accelerometers, displacement sensors and strain gauges. • Modal tests was also carried out with the same structure in different conditions. • The results are meant to be used for validation of computational methods and models. - Abstract: Assessing the safety of the reactor building of a nuclear power plant against the crash of an airplane calls for valid computational tools such as finite element models and material constitutive models. Validation of such tools and models in turn calls for reliable and relevant experimental data. The problem is that such data is scarcely available. One of the aspects of such a crash is vibrations that are generated by the impact. These vibrations tend to propagate from the impact point to the internal parts of the building. If strong enough, these vibrations may cause malfunction of the safety-critical equipment inside the building. To enable validation of computational models for this type of behaviour, we have conducted a series of three tests with a wall-floor-wall reinforced concrete structure under soft impact loading. The response of the structure was measured with accelerometers, displacement sensors and strain gauges. In addition to impact tests, the structure was subjected to modal tests under different conditions. The tests yielded a wealth of useful data for validation of computational models and better understanding about shock induced vibration physics especially in reinforced concrete structures.

  4. The impact of cognitive testing on the welfare of group housed primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Whitehouse

    Full Text Available Providing cognitive challenges to zoo-housed animals may provide enriching effects and subsequently enhance their welfare. Primates may benefit most from such challenges as they often face complex problems in their natural environment and can be observed to seek problem solving opportunities in captivity. However, the extent to which welfare benefits can be achieved through programmes developed primarily for cognitive research is unknown. We tested the impact of voluntary participation cognitive testing on the welfare of a socially housed group of crested macaques (Macaca nigra at the Macaque Study Centre (Marwell Zoo. First, we compared the rate of self-directed and social behaviours on testing and non-testing days, and between conditions within testing days. Minimal differences in behaviour were found when comparing testing and non-testing days, suggesting that there was no negative impact on welfare as a result of cognitive testing. Lipsmacking behaviours were found to increase and aggressive interaction was found to decrease in the group as a result of testing. Second, social network analysis was used to assess the effect of testing on associations and interactions between individuals. The social networks showed that testing subjects increased their association with others during testing days. One interpretation of this finding could be that providing socially housed primates with an opportunity for individuals to separate from the group for short periods could help mimic natural patterns of sub-group formation and reunion in captivity. The findings suggest, therefore, that the welfare of captive primates can be improved through the use of cognitive testing in zoo environments.

  5. Integrated assessment of pedestrian head impact protection in testing secondary safety and autonomous emergency braking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searson, D J; Anderson, R W G; Hutchinson, T P

    2014-02-01

    Pedestrian impact testing is used to provide information to the public about the relative level of protection provided by different vehicles to a struck pedestrian. Autonomous Emergency Braking (AEB) is a relatively new technology that aims to reduce the impact speed of such crashes. It is expected that vehicles with AEB will pose less harm to pedestrians, and that the benefit will come about through reductions in the number of collisions and a change in the severity of impacts that will still occur. In this paper, an integration of the assessment of AEB performance and impact performance is proposed based on average injury risk. Average injury risk is calculated using the result of an impact test and a previously published distribution of real world crash speeds. A second published speed distribution is used that accounts for the effects of AEB, and reduced average risks are implied. This principle allows the effects of AEB systems and secondary safety performance to be integrated into a single measure of safety. The results are used to examine the effect of AEB on Euro NCAP and ANCAP assessments using previously published results on the likely effect of AEB. The results show that, given certain assumptions about AEB performance, the addition of AEB is approximately the equivalent of increasing Euro NCAP test performance by one band, which corresponds to an increase in the score of 25% of the maximum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Putting social impact assessment to the test as a method for implementing responsible tourism practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCombes, Lucy, E-mail: l.mccombes@leedsbeckett.ac.uk [International Centre for Research in Events, Tourism and Hospitality (ICRETH), Leeds Beckett University, Headingley Campus, Macaulay Hall 103, Leeds LS6 3QS (United Kingdom); Vanclay, Frank, E-mail: frank.vanclay@rug.nl [Professor of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, PO Box 800, 9700AV Groningen (Netherlands); Evers, Yvette, E-mail: y.evers@tft-earth.org [The Forest Trust, Chemin de Chantavril 2, 1260 Nyon (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    The discourse on the social impacts of tourism needs to shift from the current descriptive critique of tourism to considering what can be done in actual practice to embed the management of tourism's social impacts into the existing planning, product development and operational processes of tourism businesses. A pragmatic approach for designing research methodologies, social management systems and initial actions, which is shaped by the real world operational constraints and existing systems used in the tourism industry, is needed. Our pilot study with a small Bulgarian travel company put social impact assessment (SIA) to the test to see if it could provide this desired approach and assist in implementing responsible tourism development practice, especially in small tourism businesses. Our findings showed that our adapted SIA method has value as a practical method for embedding a responsible tourism approach. While there were some challenges, SIA proved to be effective in assisting the staff of our test case tourism business to better understand their social impacts on their local communities and to identify actions to take. - Highlights: • Pragmatic approach is needed for the responsible management of social impacts of tourism. • Our adapted Social impact Assessment (SIA) method has value as a practical method. • SIA can be embedded into tourism businesses existing ‘ways of doing things’. • We identified challenges and ways to improve our method to better suit small tourism business context.

  7. Putting social impact assessment to the test as a method for implementing responsible tourism practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCombes, Lucy; Vanclay, Frank; Evers, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    The discourse on the social impacts of tourism needs to shift from the current descriptive critique of tourism to considering what can be done in actual practice to embed the management of tourism's social impacts into the existing planning, product development and operational processes of tourism businesses. A pragmatic approach for designing research methodologies, social management systems and initial actions, which is shaped by the real world operational constraints and existing systems used in the tourism industry, is needed. Our pilot study with a small Bulgarian travel company put social impact assessment (SIA) to the test to see if it could provide this desired approach and assist in implementing responsible tourism development practice, especially in small tourism businesses. Our findings showed that our adapted SIA method has value as a practical method for embedding a responsible tourism approach. While there were some challenges, SIA proved to be effective in assisting the staff of our test case tourism business to better understand their social impacts on their local communities and to identify actions to take. - Highlights: • Pragmatic approach is needed for the responsible management of social impacts of tourism. • Our adapted Social impact Assessment (SIA) method has value as a practical method. • SIA can be embedded into tourism businesses existing ‘ways of doing things’. • We identified challenges and ways to improve our method to better suit small tourism business context

  8. Impact Foam Testing for Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicle Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Agrawal, Paul; Hawbaker, James

    2013-01-01

    Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEVs) are blunt-body vehicles designed with the purpose of transporting payloads from outer space to the surface of the Earth. To achieve high-reliability and minimum weight, MMEEVs avoid use of limited-reliability systems, such as parachutes and retro-rockets, instead using built-in impact attenuators to absorb energy remaining at impact to meet landing loads requirements. The Multi-Mission Systems Analysis for Planetary Entry (M-SAPE) parametric design tool is used to facilitate the design of MMEEVs and develop the trade space. Testing was conducted to characterize the material properties of several candidate impact foam attenuators to enhance M-SAPE analysis. In the current effort, two different Rohacell foams were tested to determine their thermal conductivity in support of MMEEV design applications. These applications include thermal insulation during atmospheric entry, impact attenuation, and post-impact thermal insulation in support of thermal soak analysis. Results indicate that for these closed-cell foams, the effect of impact is limited on thermal conductivity due to the venting of the virgin material gas and subsequent ambient air replacement. Results also indicate that the effect of foam temperature is significant compared to data suggested by manufacturer's specifications.

  9. Dynamic impact testing of hedgehog spines using a dual-arm crash pendulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Nathan B; Hsiung, Bor-Kai; Kennedy, Emily B; Tan, Kwek-Tze

    2016-08-01

    Hedgehog spines are a potential model for impact resistant structures and material. While previous studies have examined static mechanical properties of individual spines, actual collision tests on spines analogous to those observed in the wild have not previously been investigated. In this study, samples of roughly 130 keratin spines were mounted vertically in thin substrates to mimic the natural spine layout on hedgehogs. A weighted crash pendulum was employed to induce and measure the effects of repeated collisions against samples, with the aim to evaluate the influence of various parameters including humidity effect, impact energy, and substrate hardness. Results reveal that softer samples-due to humidity conditioning and/or substrate material used-exhibit greater durability over multiple impacts, while the more rigid samples exhibit greater energy absorption performance at the expense of durability. This trend is exaggerated during high-energy collisions. Comparison of the results to baseline tests with industry standard impact absorbing foam, wherein the spines exhibit similar energy absorption, verifies the dynamic impact absorption capabilities of hedgehog spines and their candidacy as a structural model for engineered impact technology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Osteo-odonto keratoprosthesis in Stevens-Johnson syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sc, Reddy; I, Tajunisah; T, Tan D

    2011-01-01

    To report a successful osteo-odonto keratoprosthesis (OOKP) procedure in a case of end stage of corneal blindness due to Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS). An interventional case report. We describe a 35-year-old Indian woman, a known case of SJS with bilateral dry eyes and corneal blindness (failed corneal graft with vascularised total corneal opacity in the right eye and non-healing corneal ulcer in the left eye). Vision was hand movement only in both eyes. The corneal ulcer healed with medical treatment resulting in vascularised total corneal opacity with no improvement in vision. OOKP was performed in the right eye and the vision was improved from hand movement to 6/6. The same vision was maintained in the right eye at the last follow-up 5 years after surgery. OOKP provides good visual rehabilitation with long-term anatomically stable prosthesis in patients with end-stage of ocular surface disorders and corneal blindness secondary to SJS.

  11. A Tribute to Professor Steven L. Wechsler (1948-2016): The Man and the Scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesburn, Anthony B; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2017-01-01

    Professor Steven L. Wechsler, a world-renowned eye researcher and virologist, passed away unexpectedly on June 12, 2016 at the age of 68. Many scientists came to know Professor Wechsler as a gifted researcher in the field of ocular Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) latency, reactivation, and pathogenesis. Professor Wechsler published over 150 peer-reviewed scientific papers during his career, pushing forward the frontiers of his field eye research. His colleagues would say, 'Steve literally wrote the book on herpes latency and reactivation.' He was the first to show that the HSV-1 latency-associated transcript (LAT) is essential for the HSV-1 high spontaneous reactivation phenotype and that LAT has anti-apoptosis activity. This discovery of LAT's anti-apoptosis activity, which is a key factor in how the LAT gene enhances reactivation, was published in Science in 2000 and created a new paradigm that greatly increased understanding of HSV-1 latency and reactivation. In collaboration with Professor Lbachir BenMohamed, an immunologist, they later demonstrated that LAT also acts as an immune evasion gene. He was a caring scientist who truly enjoyed working and sharing his experience and expertise with young researchers. He will be remembered as a significant pillar within scientific and ocular herpes research communities worldwide. Professor Wechsler's dedication to science, his compassionate character, and wonderful sense of humor were exemplary. We, who were his friends and colleagues, will mourn his passing deeply.

  12. Mucous membrane grafting for the post-Steven-Johnson syndrome symblepharon: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanta Kumar Das

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year-old woman was referred with late sequelae of chloroquine-induced Steven-Johnson syndrome. At the time of presentation, the symblepharon was involving the upper lids to almost the whole of the cornea, and part of the lower bulbar conjunctiva with the lower lid bilaterally. Other ocular examinations were not possible due to the symblepharon. B-scan ultrasonography revealed acoustically clear vitreous, normal chorioretinal thickness, and normal optic nerve head, with an attached retina. Conjunctivo-corneal adhesion released by superficial lamellar dissection of the cornea. Ocular surface reconstruction was carried out with a buccal mucous membrane. A bandage contact lens was placed over the cornea followed by the symblepharon ring to prevent further adhesion. The mucosal graft was well taken up along with corneal re-epithelization. Best corrected visual acuity of 20/120 in both sides after 1 month and 20/80 after 3 months was achieved and maintained till the 2.5-year follow-up.

  13. The Epidemiology of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Chen Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN are life-threatening disease. However, there are only few epidemiologic studies of SJS/TEN from China. To analyze the clinical characteristics, causality, and outcome of treatment for SJS/TEN in China, we reviewed case reports of patients with SJS/TEN from the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI and Wanfang database from 2006 to 2016 and patients with SJS/TEN who were admitted to the First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University during the same period. There were 166 patients enrolled, including 70 SJS, 2 SJS/TEN overlap, and 94 TEN. The most common offending drugs were antibiotics (29.5% and anticonvulsants (24.1%. Carbamazepine, allopurinol, and penicillins were the most common single offending drugs (17.5%, 9.6%, and 7.2%. Chinese patent medicines accounted for 5.4%. There were 76 (45.8% patients receiving systemic steroid and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG in combination therapy, especially for TEN (80.3%, and others were treated with systemic steroids alone. Mortality rate of combination treatment comparing with steroid alone in TEN patients had no statistical significance. In conclusion, carbamazepine and allopurinol were the leading causative drugs for SJS/TEN in China. Combination of IVIG and steroids is a common treatment for TEN, but its efficacy in improving mortality needs further investigation.

  14. Contemporary perspectives in aesthetic theory: Steven Connor, Sianne Ngai and the edible world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article interprets the work of cultural theorists Steven Connor and Sianne Ngai in terms of their efforts to reevaluate certain key presumptions of aesthetic theory that inherits the surprisingly resilient biases of the 18th century, in particular the work of Immanuel Kant and Edmund Burke. Focusing on the work of Ngai and Connor, I think through the implications this recent theory has for the previously peripheral position occupied by gustatory taste and the cultural objects and experiences it implicates. I discuss the possibility that ideas and examples drawn from the work of Connor and Ngai might form the basis for an alternative area of analysis that is better adapted to the peculiarities of gustatory taste and the culinary. In particular, I argue that the visceral element, which tends to accompany gustatory taste, ought to be interpreted in terms of its generative contribution to the creation of concepts through metaphor, rather than as a muddying influence that prevents clarity of discrimination. Similarly, the close relationship between the edible and the domestic is deserving of a more generous reading than is commonly found in aesthetic theory underwritten by the categories of the sublime and the beautiful.

  15. Genetic Markers and Danger Signals in Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hung Chung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN are life-threatening adverse reactions, which could be induced by a variety of drugs. It was proposed that human leukocyte antigen (HLA-restricted presentation of antigens (drugs or their metabolites to T lymphocytes initiates the immune reactions of SJS/ TEN. However, the genetic susceptibility and the exact pathogenesis were not clear until the recent studies. We first identified that HLA-B*1502 is strongly associated with carbamazepine (CBZ-induced SJS/TEN and HLA-B*5801 with allopurinol-SJS/TEN in Han Chinese. The same associations had been validated across different human populations. For the downstream danger signals, Fas-Fas ligand (FasL and perforin/granzyme B had been advocated as cytotoxic mediators for keratinocyte death in SJS/TEN. However, expression levels of these cytotoxic proteins from the skin lesions were too low to explain the distinct and extensive epidermal necrosis. Our recent study identified that the granulysin, a cytotoxic protein released from cytotoxic T cells or natural killer (NK cells, is a key mediator for disseminated keratinocyte death in SJS/TEN. This article aims to provide an overview of both of the genomic and immunologic perspectives of SJS/TEN. These studies give us a better understanding of the immune mechanisms, biomarkers for disease prevention and early diagnosis, as well as providing the therapeutic targets for the treatments of SJS/TEN.

  16. Bicycles, Airplanes and Peter Pans: Flying Scenes in Steven Spielberg's Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Audissino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In Steven Spielberg's cinema the flight is a recurring theme. Flying scenes can be sorted into two classes: those involving a realistic flight – by aircraft – and those involving a magical flight – by supernatural powers. The realistic flight is influenced by the war stories of Spielberg's father – a radio man in U.S. Air-force during WWII – and it is featured in such films as Empire of the Sun (1987, Always (1989, and 1941 (1979. The magical flight is influenced by James M. Barries' character Peter Pan (Peter and Wendy, 1911, which is quoted directly in E.T. the Extraterrestrial (1982 and, above all, in Hook (1991, which is a sequel to Barrie's story. These two types of flying scenes are analysed as to their meanings, compared to the models that influenced them, and surveyed as to their evolution across Spielberg's films. A central case study is the episode The Mission from Amazing Stories (1985, in which the realistic and the magical flights overlap.

  17. Testing the Generalizability of a Career Commitment Measure and Its Impact on Employee Turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Gary

    1989-01-01

    Tested generalizability of career commitment measure and its impact on employee turnover using longitudinally tracked sample of bank tellers (N=133). Found career commitment could be reliably operationalized and was distinct from job involvement and organizational commitment. Discusses findings in terms of identifying threshold level for…

  18. The Impact of Success Maker Software on Grade 4 Math Proficiency on State Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geer, Brandon Terrell

    2014-01-01

    Success Maker is an educational software that differentiates and personalizes K-8 reading and math. Limited research has been conducted on the impact of Success Maker on Grade 4 math state tests. At the research site, located in southeastern United States, 33.7% of fourth grade students did not pass the Palmetto Assessment of State Standards…

  19. Measuring the Impact of Language-Learning Software on Test Performance of Chinese Learners of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholes, Justin

    2016-01-01

    This classroom quasi-experiment aimed to learn if and to what degree supplementing classroom instruction with Rosetta Stone (RS), Tell Me More (TMM), Memrise (MEM), or ESL WOW (WOW) impacted high-stakes English test performance in areas of university-level writing, reading, speaking, listening, and grammar. Seventy-eight (N = 78) Chinese learners…

  20. A simulation test of the impact on soil moisture by agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To study the impact by agricultural machinery on changes in soil moisture, we used a simulated test method employing round iron plate based on the ground pressure ratio between the front and rear wheels of wheeled tractors and crawler tractors. We conducted soil compactions with five pressure loads (35, 98, 118, 196 ...

  1. Prediction of fracture toughness K/sub Ic/ of steel from Charpy impact test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwadate, Tadao; Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Takemata, Hiroyuki; Terashima, Shuhei

    1986-08-01

    This paper presents a method to predict the fracture toughness K/sub Ic/ and/or K/sub Id/ of steels using their Charpy impact test results and tensile properties. The fracture toughness, Charpy impact and tensile properties of 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo, ASTM A508 Cl.1, A508 Cl.2 A508 Cl.3 and A533 Gr.B Cl.1 steels were measured and analysed on the basis of the excess temperature (test temperature minus FATT) and Rolfe-Novak correlation. The relationship between K/sub Ic//K/sub Ic-us/ and the excess temperature, where K/sub Ic-us/ is the upper-shelf fracture toughness K/sub Ic/ predicted by Rolfe-Novak correlation, discloses that the K/sub Ic/ transition curves of several steels are representable by only one trend curve of K/sub Ic//K/sub Ic-us/ or K/sub Id//K/sub Id-us/ versus excess temperature relation. This curve is denoted as a ''master curve''. By using this curve, the fracture toughness of steel can be predicted using Charpy impact and tensile test results. By taking account of the scattering of both the fracture toughness and Charpy impact test results, the confidence limits of the master curve were also determined. Another approach to develop more general procedure of predicting the fracture toughness K/sub Ic/ is also discussed.

  2. The Impact of the 2004 Hurricanes on Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test Scores: Implications for School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggerly, Jennifer; Ferretti, Larissa K.

    2008-01-01

    What is the impact of natural disasters on students' statewide assessment scores? To answer this question, Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) scores of 55,881 students in grades 4 through 10 were analyzed to determine if there were significant decreases after the 2004 hurricanes. Results reveal that there was statistical but no practical…

  3. A review of current practices and the future for deep well injection in the upper Miocene Stevens sand, Kern County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiser, S.C.; Chenot, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Waste-water disposal is a major concern of the petroleum business, especially because of complications associated with many produced-water surface-impoundment percolation facilities. In the San Joaquin Valley, California, the current environmental regulations protecting the potentially usable groundwaters are stringent. the Stevens has significant potential as a disposal zone that may offer considerable capacity when the project is designed using proper geologic and engineering studies. The Stevens sands are well known for their oil-producing capabilities, however, not much has been published regarding its suitability as a zone for deep well injection. Conditions that make the Stevens potentially suitable include (1) adequate confinement providing geologic separation from the groundwater sources in the basin, (2) storage capacity, and (3) large areal extent. Because the search for acceptable disposal options is becoming critical, the current class II disposal options is becoming critical, the current class II disposal activities in the Stevens sands were reviewed and the areas offering the greatest future potential were identified. The authors then discuss class II disposal projects in Stevens sands in the West Bellevue and Midway Sunset oil fields and estimate the ultimate basin-wide disposal capacity of the Stevens

  4. Pedestrian headform testing: inferring performance at impact speeds and for headform masses not tested, and estimating average performance in a range of real-world conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, T Paul; Anderson, Robert W G; Searson, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    Tests are routinely conducted where instrumented headforms are projected at the fronts of cars to assess pedestrian safety. Better information would be obtained by accounting for performance over the range of expected impact conditions in the field. Moreover, methods will be required to integrate the assessment of secondary safety performance with primary safety systems that reduce the speeds of impacts. Thus, we discuss how to estimate performance over a range of impact conditions from performance in one test and how this information can be combined with information on the probability of different impact speeds to provide a balanced assessment of pedestrian safety. Theoretical consideration is given to 2 distinct aspects to impact safety performance: the test impact severity (measured by the head injury criterion, HIC) at a speed at which a structure does not bottom out and the speed at which bottoming out occurs. Further considerations are given to an injury risk function, the distribution of impact speeds likely in the field, and the effect of primary safety systems on impact speeds. These are used to calculate curves that estimate injuriousness for combinations of test HIC, bottoming out speed, and alternative distributions of impact speeds. The injuriousness of a structure that may be struck by the head of a pedestrian depends not only on the result of the impact test but also the bottoming out speed and the distribution of impact speeds. Example calculations indicate that the relationship between the test HIC and injuriousness extends over a larger range than is presently used by the European New Car Assessment Programme (Euro NCAP), that bottoming out at speeds only slightly higher than the test speed can significantly increase the injuriousness of an impact location and that effective primary safety systems that reduce impact speeds significantly modify the relationship between the test HIC and injuriousness. Present testing regimes do not take fully into

  5. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 3 Plunge Depth of a 36-Inch Aluminum Tank Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA water landing simulations. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. Phase 3 featured a composite tank head that was tested at a range of heights to verify the ability to predict structural failure of composites. To support planning for Phase 3, a test series was conducted with an aluminum tank head dropped from heights of 2, 6, 10, and 12 feet to verify that the test article would not impact the bottom of the test pool. This report focuses on the comparisons of the measured plunge depths to LS-DYNA predictions. The results for the tank head model demonstrated the following. 1. LS-DYNA provides accurate predictions for peak accelerations. 2. LS-DYNA consistently under-predicts plunge depth. An allowance of at least 20% should be added to the LS-DYNA predictions. 3. The LS-DYNA predictions for plunge depth are relatively insensitive to the fluid-structure coupling stiffness.

  6. Stevens Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: Maternal and Foetal Outcomes in Twenty-Two Consecutive Pregnant HIV Infected Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Knight

    Full Text Available Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN form a spectrum of a rare and life-threatening cutaneous drug reaction. SJS/TEN in pregnancy poses largely unknown risk factors and outcomes for both the mother and foetus compared to the general population.We conducted a study of consecutive pregnant women admitted to single tertiary referral centre in South Africa with SJS/TEN over a 3 year period. They were all managed by the same medical team using the same protocols. We evaluated their underlying illnesses, offending drugs and the course of pregnancy and outcomes to determine factors influencing maternal and foetal outcomes.We identified twenty-two women who developed SJS/TEN while pregnant, all of them HIV-infected. Their median age was 29 years. The majority 16/22 (73% had SJS, the milder variant of the disease affecting < 10% body surface area. Nevirapine was the offending drug in 21/22 (95% cases. All 22 of the mothers survived with 3/22 (14% developing postpartum sepsis. Pregnancy outcomes were known in 18/22 women and 9/18 (50% babies were delivered by caesarean section. There were 2 foetal deaths at 21 and 31 weeks respectively and both were associated with post-partum sepsis. Postnatal complications occurred in 5 cases, 3 involving the respiratory system and the other two being low birth weight deliveries. Eight placentae and one foetus were sent for histology and none showed macroscopic or microscopic features of SJS/TEN. On follow-up, only 12/20 children were tested for HIV at 6 weeks post-delivery and none of them were HIV-infected. All had received prophylactic ARVs including nevirapine.TEN, the severe form of the disease, was associated with poorer foetal outcomes. SJS/TEN-associated mortality is not increased in HIV-infected pregnant women. Maternal SJS/TEN does not seem to commonly manifest in the foetus.

  7. Estimation of integrity of cast-iron cask against impact due to free drop test, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Chihiro

    1988-01-01

    Ductile cast iron is examined to use for shipping and storage cask from a economic point of view. However, ductile cast iron is considered to be a brittle material in general. Therefore, it is very important to estimate the integrity of cast iron cask against brittle failure due to impact load at 9 m drop test and 1 m derop test on to pin. So, the F.E.M. analysis which takes nonlinearity of materials into account and the estimation against brittle failure by the method which is proposed in this report were carried out. From the analysis, it is made clear that critical flaw depth (the minimum depth to initiate the brittle failure) is 21.1 mm and 13.1 mm in the case of 9 m drop test and 1 m drop test on to pin respectively. These flaw depth can be detected by ultrasonic test. Then, the cask is assured against brittle failure due to impact load at 9 m drop test and 1 m drop test on to pin. (author)

  8. Advances in impact resistance testing for explosion-proof electrical equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasculescu Vlad Mihai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The design, construction and exploitation of electrical equipment intended to be used in potentially explosive atmospheres presents a series of difficulties. Therefore, the approach of these phases requires special attention concerning technical, financial and occupational health and safety aspects. In order for them not to generate an ignition source for the explosive atmosphere, such equipment have to be subjected to a series of type tests aiming to decrease the explosion risk in technological installations which operate in potentially explosive atmospheres. Explosion protection being a concern of researchers and authorities worldwide, testing and certification of explosion-proof electrical equipment, required for their conformity assessment, are extremely important, taking into account the unexpected explosion hazard due to potentially explosive atmospheres, risk which has to be minimized in order to ensure the occupational health and safety of workers, for preventing material losses and for decreasing the environmental pollution. Besides others, one of the type tests, which shall be applied, for explosion-proof electrical equipment is the impact resistance test, described in detail in EN 60079 which specifies the general requirements for construction, testing and marking of electrical equipment and Ex components intended for use in explosive atmospheres. This paper presents an analysis on the requirements of the impact resistance test for explosion-proof electrical equipment and on the possibilities to improve this type of test, by making use of modern computer simulation tools based on finite element analysis, techniques which are widely used nowadays in the industry and for research purposes.

  9. Minor salivary glands and labial mucous membrane graft in the treatment of severe symblepharon and dry eye in patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant' Anna, Ana Estela B P P; Hazarbassanov, Rossen M; de Freitas, Denise; Gomes, José Álvaro P

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate minor salivary glands and labial mucous membrane graft in patients with severe symblepharon and dry eye secondary to Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS). A prospective, non-comparative, interventional case series of 19 patients with severe symblepharon and dry eye secondary to SJS who underwent labial mucous membrane and minor salivary glands transplantation. A complete ophthalmic examination including the Schirmer I test was performed prior to and following surgery. All patients had a preoperative Schirmer I test value of zero. Nineteen patients with severe symblepharon and dry eye secondary to SJS were included in the study. There was a statistically significant improvement in the best spectacle-corrected visual acuity in eight patients (t test; p=0.0070). Values obtained in the Schirmer I test improved significantly in 14 eyes (73.7%) 6 months following surgery (χ(2) test; p=0.0094). A statistically significant increase in tear production (Schirmer I test) was found in eyes that received more than 10 glands per graft compared with eyes that received fewer glands (χ(2) test; p=0.0096). Corneal transparency improved significantly in 11 (72.2%) eyes and corneal neovascularisation improved significantly in five eyes (29.4%) (McNemar test; p=0.001 and p=0.0005). The symptoms questionnaire revealed improvement in foreign body sensation in 53.6% of the patients, in photophobia in 50.2% and in pain in 54.8% (Kruskal-Wallis test; p=0.0167). Labial mucous membrane and minor salivary glands transplantation were found to constitute a good option for the treatment of severe symblepharon and dry eye secondary to SJS. This may be considered as a step prior to limbal stem cell and corneal transplantation in these patients.

  10. The impacts of computer adaptive testing from a variety of perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Kimura

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Computer adaptive testing (CAT is a kind of tailored testing, in that it is a form of computer-based testing that is adaptive to each test-taker’s ability level. In this review, the impacts of CAT are discussed from different perspectives in order to illustrate crucial points to keep in mind during the development and implementation of CAT. Test developers and psychometricians often emphasize the efficiency and accuracy of CAT in comparison to traditional linear tests. However, many test-takers report feeling discouraged after taking CATs, and this feeling can reduce learning self-efficacy and motivation. A trade-off must be made between the psychological experiences of test-takers and measurement efficiency. From the perspective of educators and subject matter experts, nonstatistical specifications, such as content coverage, content balance, and form length are major concerns. Thus, accreditation bodies may be faced with a discrepancy between the perspectives of psychometricians and those of subject matter experts. In order to improve test-takers’ impressions of CAT, the author proposes increasing the target probability of answering correctly in the item selection algorithm even if doing so consequently decreases measurement efficiency. Two different methods, CAT with a shadow test approach and computerized multistage testing, have been developed in order to ensure the satisfaction of subject matter experts. In the shadow test approach, a full-length test is assembled that meets the constraints and provides maximum information at the current ability estimate, while computerized multistage testing gives subject matter experts an opportunity to review all test forms prior to administration.

  11. Budget impact analysis of chronic kidney disease mass screening test in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Masahide; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Hoshi, Shu-Ling; Saito, Chie; Asahi, Koichi; Moriyama, Toshiki; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Konta, Tsuneo; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Narita, Ichiei; Kimura, Kenjiro; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Our recently published cost-effectiveness study on chronic kidney disease mass screening test in Japan evaluated the use of dipstick test, serum creatinine (Cr) assay or both in specific health checkup (SHC). Mandating the use of serum Cr assay additionally, or the continuation of current policy mandating dipstick test only was found cost-effective. This study aims to examine the affordability of previously suggested reforms. Budget impact analysis was conducted assuming the economic model would be good for 15 years and applying a population projection. Costs expended by social insurers without discounting were counted as budgets. Annual budget impacts of mass screening compared with do-nothing scenario were calculated as ¥79-¥-1,067 million for dipstick test only, ¥2,505-¥9,235 million for serum Cr assay only and ¥2,517-¥9,251 million for the use of both during a 15-year period. Annual budget impacts associated with the reforms were calculated as ¥975-¥4,129 million for mandating serum Cr assay in addition to the currently used mandatory dipstick test, and ¥963-¥4,113 million for mandating serum Cr assay only and abandoning dipstick test. Estimated values associated with the reform from ¥963-¥4,129 million per year over 15 years are considerable amounts of money under limited resources. The most impressive finding of this study is the decreasing additional expenditures in dipstick test only scenario. This suggests that current policy which mandates dipstick test only would contain medical care expenditure.

  12. Rapid impact testing for quantitative assessment of large populations of bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yun; Prader, John; DeVitis, John; Deal, Adrienne; Zhang, Jian; Moon, Franklin; Aktan, A. Emin

    2011-04-01

    Although the widely acknowledged shortcomings of visual inspection have fueled significant advances in the areas of non-destructive evaluation and structural health monitoring (SHM) over the last several decades, the actual practice of bridge assessment has remained largely unchanged. The authors believe the lack of adoption, especially of SHM technologies, is related to the 'single structure' scenarios that drive most research. To overcome this, the authors have developed a concept for a rapid single-input, multiple-output (SIMO) impact testing device that will be capable of capturing modal parameters and estimating flexibility/deflection basins of common highway bridges during routine inspections. The device is composed of a trailer-mounted impact source (capable of delivering a 50 kip impact) and retractable sensor arms, and will be controlled by an automated data acquisition, processing and modal parameter estimation software. The research presented in this paper covers (a) the theoretical basis for SISO, SIMO and MIMO impact testing to estimate flexibility, (b) proof of concept numerical studies using a finite element model, and (c) a pilot implementation on an operating highway bridge. Results indicate that the proposed approach can estimate modal flexibility within a few percent of static flexibility; however, the estimated modal flexibility matrix is only reliable for the substructures associated with the various SIMO tests. To overcome this shortcoming, a modal 'stitching' approach for substructure integration to estimate the full Eigen vector matrix is developed, and preliminary results of these methods are also presented.

  13. Pipe whip: a summary of the damage observed in BNL pipe-on-pipe impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes examples of the damage resulting from the impact of a whipping pipe on a nearby pressurised pipe. The work is a by-product of a study of the motion of a whipping pipe. The tests were conducted with small-diameter pipes mounted in rigid supports and hence the results are not directly applicable to large-scale plant applications where flexible support mountings are employed. The results illustrate the influence of whipping pipe energy, impact position and support type on the damage sustained by the target pipe. (author)

  14. Mega-impacts and mantle-melting episodes: tests of possible correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glikson, A.Y.

    1996-01-01

    The criteria for recognising the effects of impacts by large-diameter extraterrestrial projectiles (D p >>10 km) on thin, geothermally active crust must vary fundamentally from those pertaining to impacts on thick, cooler continental crust. Although the bulk of the terrestrial cratering records has been destroyed by both erosion of elevated terrains and plate subduction, or obscured by burial, a search for Precambrian mega-impacts is facilitated by the preservation of their likely secondary effects: mega-earthquake-triggered faults; ensuing diamictites, and the deposits of turbidity currents; microtektites; spherulitic condensates of vaporised asteroid and target materials; and distal tectonic and igeneous effects. Clues to the origin of thermal events are provided by peaks on isotopic-age histograms of precise U-Pb, Ar-Ar, amd Sm-Nd mineral-whole-rock ages. These peaks, spatially corroborated by detailed mapping of Precambrian terrains, support an episodic nature of at least certain major Precambrian events and some correlations with impact events. Preliminary time-series analyses of Precambrian events yield values consistent with the Phanerozoic galactic rotation period (250 ± 50 Ma), and the solar system's cross-galactic-plane oscillation period (33 ± 3 Ma). It has been demonstrated that possible correlations between mega-impacts and tectonic/thermal events are capable of being tested through isotopic-age studies of diamictites and spherule units of impact origin and of rifting and mafic igneous events. 123 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  15. Testing and injury potential analysis of rollovers with narrow object impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Steven E; Forrest, Stephen; Herbst, Brian; Hayden, Joshua; Orton, Tia; Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam

    2004-01-01

    Recent statistics highlight the significant risk of serious and fatal injuries to occupants involved in rollover collisions due to excessive roof crush. The government has reported that in 2002. Sports Utility Vehicle rollover related fatalities increased by 14% to more than 2400 annually. 61% of all SUV fatalities included rollovers [1]. Rollover crashes rely primarily upon the roof structures to maintain occupant survival space. Frequently these crashes occur off the travel lanes of the roadway and, therefore, can include impacts with various types of narrow objects such as light poles, utility poles and/or trees. A test device and methodology is presented which facilitates dynamic, repeatable rollover impact evaluation of complete vehicle roof structures with such narrow objects. These tests allow for the incorporation of Anthropomorphic Test Dummies (ATDs) which can be instrumented to measure accelerations, forces and moments to evaluate injury potential. High-speed video permits for detailed analysis of occupant kinematics and evaluation of injury causation. Criteria such as restraint performance, injury potential, survival space and the effect of roof crush associated with various types of design alternatives, countermeasures and impact circumstances can also be evaluated. In addition to presentation of the methodology, two representative vehicle crash tests are also reported. Results indicated that the reinforced roof structure significantly reduced the roof deformation compared to the production roof structure.

  16. Topical Treatment for Stevens - Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schandra Purnamawati

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stevens - Johnson syndrome (SJS and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN are currently regarded to be same disease entity which differs only in the extent and severity of epidermal sloughing. Both are potentially life-threatening mucocutaneous immunologic reaction, which are most frequently induced by drug consumption. The epithelial destruction of skin and mucosal membrane can cause both acute as well as chronic/ long term outcomes in term of  late sequelae during the course of the disease. Sequelae often occur during the late phase of SJS/TEN and become a significant problem due its chronicity and severe degree of impairment, which leads to deterioration of quality of life for the patients. This may prevented or decreased in terms of intensity if the patient’s received prompt and sufficient topical therapy, particularly in managing lesions on the mucosa of the eye, oral, and genital. Objective : This review underlines topical therapies which could be delivered for management of mucocutaneous lesions from SJS/ TEN, aimed to prevent late sequelae due to SJS – TEN in order to improve the life quality of SJS – TEN survivors. Conclusion: SJS/ TEN frequently lead to late sequeale which includes skin, ocular, oral, and genital involvement. These sequelaes are often severe and chonic. Thus, may cause significant decrease in quality of life of SJS/TEN survivors. It is therefore most important to detect them early in order to manage them adequately. To date, we still have an impression that the specific sequelae of SJS – TEN are often late diagnosed and insufficiently treated. Finally, we want to emphasize that for mucosal involvement in particular, such as ocular, genital and oral involvement, a careful topical treatment have to be taken into special consideration in order to prevent severe late sequelae. 

  17. Mucosal complications of modified osteo-odonto keratoprosthesis in chronic Stevens-Johnson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sayan; Pillai, Vinay Sukumara; Sangwan, Virender S

    2013-11-01

    To describe clinical outcomes of complications afflicting the autologous oral mucous membrane graft after modified osteo-odonto keratoprosthesis surgery in chronic Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS). Prospective case series. This study included 30 eyes of 30 patients with SJS-induced dry keratinized ocular surfaces; the patients underwent various stages of this procedure between August 2009 and February 2012. Mucosal complications were classified as either necrosis or overgrowth. Mucosal necrosis was managed according to a predesigned algorithm based on timing (pre- and postimplantation) and location (central or peripheral) of necrosis. Cases with mucosal overgrowth underwent mucosal debulking and trimming. Mucosal necrosis developed in 15 (50%) eyes and overgrowth in 4 (13.3%) eyes. Preimplantation necrosis (n = 7) was initially managed conservatively, but 2 eyes required free labial-mucous membrane grafting for persistent corneal exposure. Free labial-mucous membrane grafting was performed in all cases of postimplantation necrosis (n = 10), but 8 eyes required additional tarsal pedicle flaps (n = 6, for peripheral necrosis) or through-the-lid revisions (n = 2, for central necrosis). Debulking and trimming effectively managed all cases of mucosal overgrowth, but 3 eyes required repeat procedures. At 24.1 ± 6.5 months postimplantation, the keratoprosthesis was retained in all eyes, and the probability of maintaining 20/60 or better vision was similar in eyes with or without mucosal necrosis (86 ± 8.8% vs 80 ± 10.3%). Mucosal complications, especially necrosis, occurred commonly following modified osteo-odonto keratoprosthesis surgery in dry keratinized post-SJS eyes. The algorithm-based management approach described in this study was successful in treating these complications, retaining the prosthesis and preserving useful vision. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Improving mortality outcomes of Stevens Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis: A regional burns centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamoglu, M; Ward, J A; Frew, Q; Gerrish, H; Martin, N; Shaw, A; Barnes, D; Shelly, O; Philp, B; El-Muttardi, N; Dziewulski, P

    2018-05-01

    Stevens Johnson Syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) are rare, potentially fatal desquamative disorders characterised by large areas of partial thickness skin and mucosal loss. The degree of epidermal detachment that occurs has led to SJS/TEN being described as a burn-like condition. These patients benefit from judicious critical care, early debridement and meticulous wound care. This is best undertaken within a multidisciplinary setting led by clinicians experienced in the management of massive skin loss and its sequelae. In this study, we examined the clinical outcomes of SJS/TEN overlap & TEN patients managed by our regional burns service over a 12-year period. We present our treatment model for other burn centres treating SJS/TEN patients. A retrospective case review was performed for all patients with a clinical diagnosis of TEN or SJS/TEN overlap admitted to our paediatric and adult burns centre between June 2004 and December 2016. Patient demographics, percentage total body surface area (%TBSA), mucosal involvement, causation, severity of illness score (SCORTEN), length of stay and survival were appraised with appropriate statistical analysis performed using Graph Pad Prism 7.02 Software. During the study period, 42 patients (M26; F: 16) with TEN (n=32) and SJS/TEN overlap (n=10) were managed within our burns service. Mean %TBSA of cutaneous involvement was 57% (range 10-100%) and mean length of stay (LOS) was 27 days (range 1-144 days). We observed 4 deaths in our series compared to 16 predicted by SCORTEN giving a standardised mortality ratio (SMR) of 24%. Management in our burns service with an aggressive wound care protocol involving debridement of blistered epidermis and wound closure with synthetic and biological dressings seems to have produced benefits in mortality when compared to predicted outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Sedimentology of a surficial uranium deposit on North Flodelle Creek, Stevens County, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macke, D.L.; Johnson, S.Y.; Otton, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Surficial accumulations of uranium (up to 0.2 wt. % U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, dry basis) are currently forming in organic-rich, poorly drained sediments deposited in fluvial-lacustrine environments. Known occurrences are in northeastern Washington, northern Idaho, the Sierra Nevada, the Colorado Front Range, New Hampshire, and several areas in Canada. The first accumulation of this type to be mined is in postglacial sediments of a 10-acre boggy meadow along North Flodelle Creek in Stevens County, Washington. The meadow is flanked by hills of fine- to medium-grained two-mica quartz monzonite that are mantled by glacial drift of late Wisconsin age (about 18,000 to 11,500 yr B.P.). Relatively thick, hummocky deposits of this same glacial drift impede drainage at the lower end of the meadow. Following ice retreat, glacial sediments on the meadow floor were reworked by fluvial processes, and patches of organic-rich sediment may have formed in ice-melt depressions. About 6700 yr B.P., a blanket of Mazama ash from the Crater Lake eruption was deposited in the meadow. Shortly thereafter, a beaver dam across the lower end of the meadow further restricted drainage, and peat and organic mud accumulated in the pond behind the dam. The dam is preserved in the stratigraphic record as a sheet-like body of woody peat (with beaver-gnawed sticks) about 100m wide and 60 cm thick. After the gradual influx of sand and coarse silt had filled the pond, and the beavers had abandoned the site, fluvial deposition was reestablished

  20. Qualidade de vida dos pacientes portadores de síndrome de Stevens-Johnson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira Ruth

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a qualidade de vida dos pacientes portadores de síndrome de Stevens-Johnson. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 14 pacientes com SSJ no período de 1998 e 1999 no Setor de Córnea do Departamento de Oftalmologia da UNIFESP. Empregou-se o questionário S. F. 36 - pesquisa em saúde. A pontuação indica melhor condição de saúde. A mesma avaliação foi repetida quatro vezes em intervalo de três meses. RESULTADOS: As médias das médias das 4 avaliações dos 14 pacientes apresentaram importante redução dos seus valores em todos os subitens do S.F. 36 (41,04±22,38 para aspectos físicos, 53,82±22,82 para aspectos sociais, 26,24±22,46 para aspectos emocionais, 34,95±25,45 para capacidade funcional, 42,03±31,85 para dor, 46,33±18,37 para vitalidade, 46,18±24,83 para saúde mental e 50,26±16,29 para saúde geral. CONCLUSÃO: O questionário S.F. 36 representa método adequado de avaliação de aspectos físicos e emocionais em pacientes com baixa de acuidade visual, que nos permitiu detectar comprometimento importante nas funções básicas dos pacientes com SSJ. Mais pacientes com maior tempo de seguimento são necessários para aprimorar a análise de qualidade de vida nesses pacientes e avaliar os efeitos do acompanhamento psicológico.

  1. Dynamic Impact Testing and Model Development in Support of NASA's Advanced Composites Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Pereira, J. Michael; Goldberg, Robert; Rassaian, Mostafa

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an executive overview of the HEDI effort for NASA's Advanced Composites Program and establish the foundation for the remaining papers to follow in the 2018 SciTech special session NASA ACC High Energy Dynamic Impact. The paper summarizes the work done for the Advanced Composites Program to advance our understanding of the behavior of composite materials during high energy impact events and to advance the ability of analytical tools to provide predictive simulations. The experimental program carried out at GRC is summarized and a status on the current development state for MAT213 will be provided. Future work will be discussed as the HEDI effort transitions from fundamental analysis and testing to investigating sub-component structural concept response to impact events.

  2. Mechanical resistance of UO{sub 2} pellet by means of free-fall-impact testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Tae-sik; Lee, Seung-jae; Kim, Jae-ik; Jo, Young-ho; Park, Bo-yong; Ko, Sang-ern [KEPCO NF, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A fuel rod failed during a power transient can be seen in Fig 1. and conjunction of a chipped pellet with a cladding crack has been observed in commercial reactors through the post-irradiation examinations. It revealed that missing-pellet-surface(MPS) was one of the reasons of the fuel failure. The mechanism of this failure mode that MPS induces the asymmetry of the pellet-cladding mechanical system mainly comprises a stress concentration at the inner surface resulting in non-classical PCI. The fracture toughness is largely close to material property. It is assumed that by optimizing surface design of UO{sub 2} pellet, the strength arises because theoretical strength is considerably affected by geometry as one of a parameter of factor 'f'. Pellet research for design optimization to achieve better resistance to external load should be accompanied with volumetric approach to the improvement of mechanical behavior of pellet being still ongoing. At this work, the resistance to external load is analyzed varying with the geometry of pellets and angles of impact on UO{sub 2} pellet surface by the free-fall-impact test method. The tested specimens were equivalently produced and sintered for having the same volumetric property such as sinter density and grain size expect the surface with different geometry design at the end face and shoulder which includes dish, chamfer and land in dimension and angle. Missing-pellet-surface(MPS) on UO{sub 2} pellet is inevitable behavior during manufacturing, handling and burning in reactor and brings about non-classical PCI behavior that could damage fuel rod integrity. For this reason, the free-fall-drop tester was developed by KEPCO NF Material Development laboratory in Daejeon for quantitatively investigating the mechanical behavior of UO{sub 2}. The free-fall-impact test is performed by dropping hammer on pellet shoulder with certain impact energy and at various angles. The result is quantitatively measured with weighing

  3. Modeling and simulation of Charpy impact test of maraging steel 300 using Abaqus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhan, D.; Chand, Suresh; Ganesh, S.; Saibhargavi, U.

    2018-03-01

    This work emphasizes the modeling and simulation of Charpy impact test to evaluate fracture energy at different pendulum velocities of armor maraging steel 300 using ABAQUS. To evaluate the fracture energy, V-notch specimen is fractured using the Johnson and Cook Damage model. The Charpy impact tests are of great importance related to fracture properties of steels. The objective of this work is to present absorbed energy variation at pendulum velocities of 5 m/sec, 6 m/sec, 7 m/sec and 9 m/sec in addition to stress distribution at v-notch. Finite Element Method of modeling for three dimensional specimens is used for simulation in commercial software of ABAQUS.

  4. Compaction comparison testing using a modified impact soil tester and nuclear density gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erchul, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare test results of a modified Impact Soil Tester (IST) on compacted soil with data obtained from the same soil using a nuclear density gauge at the US Army Corp of Engineer's Buena Vista Flood Wall project in Buena Vista, Virginia. The tests were run during construction of the earth flood wall during the summer of 1996. This comparison testing demonstrated the credibility of the procedure developed for the IST as a compacting testing device. The comparison data was obtained on a variety of soils ranging from silty sands to clays. The Flood Wall comparison compaction data for 90% Standard Proctor shows that the results of the IST as modified are consistent with the nuclear density gauge 89% of the time for all types of soil tested. However, if the soils are more cohesive than the results are consistent with the nuclear density gauge 97% of the time. In addition these comparison tests are in general agreement with comparison compaction testing using the same testing techniques and methods of compacted backfill in utility trenches conducted earlier for the Public Works Department, Chesterfield County, Virginia.

  5. Compaction comparison testing using a modified impact soil tester and nuclear density gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erchul, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare test results of a modified Impact Soil Tester (IST) on compacted soil with data obtained from the same soil using a nuclear density gauge at the US Army Corp of Engineer's Buena Vista Flood Wall project in Buena Vista, Virginia. The tests were run during construction of the earth flood wall during the summer of 1996. This comparison testing demonstrated the credibility of the procedure developed for the IST as a compacting testing device. The comparison data was obtained on a variety of soils ranging from silty sands to clays. The Flood Wall comparison compaction data for 90% Standard Proctor shows that the results of the IST as modified are consistent with the nuclear density gauge 89% of the time for all types of soil tested. However, if the soils are more cohesive than the results are consistent with the nuclear density gauge 97% of the time. In addition these comparison tests are in general agreement with comparison compaction testing using the same testing techniques and methods of compacted backfill in utility trenches conducted earlier for the Public Works Department, Chesterfield County, Virginia

  6. The Impact of Partial Measurement Invariance on Testing Moderation for Single and Multi-Level Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Yu Hsiao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Moderation effect is a commonly used concept in the field of social and behavioral science. Several studies regarding the implication of moderation effects have been done; however, little is known about how partial measurement invariance influences the properties of tests for moderation effects when categorical moderators were used. Additionally, whether the impact is the same across single and multilevel data is still unknown. Hence, the purpose of the present study is twofold: (a To investigate the performance of the moderation test in single-level studies when measurement invariance does not hold; (b To examine whether unique features of multilevel data, such as intraclass correlation (ICC and number of clusters, influence the effect of measurement non-invariance on the performance of tests for moderation. Simulation results indicated that falsely assuming measurement invariance lead to biased estimates, inflated Type I error rates, and more gain or more loss in power (depends on simulation conditions for the test of moderation effects. Such patterns were more salient as sample size and the number of non-invariant items increase for both single- and multi-level data. With multilevel data, the cluster size seemed to have a larger impact than the number of clusters when falsely assuming measurement invariance in the moderation estimation. ICC was trivially related to the moderation estimates. Overall, when testing moderation effects with categorical moderators, employing a model that accounts for the measurement (noninvariance structure of the predictor and/or the outcome is recommended.

  7. The Impact of Partial Measurement Invariance on Testing Moderation for Single and Multi-Level Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yu-Yu; Lai, Mark H C

    2018-01-01

    Moderation effect is a commonly used concept in the field of social and behavioral science. Several studies regarding the implication of moderation effects have been done; however, little is known about how partial measurement invariance influences the properties of tests for moderation effects when categorical moderators were used. Additionally, whether the impact is the same across single and multilevel data is still unknown. Hence, the purpose of the present study is twofold: (a) To investigate the performance of the moderation test in single-level studies when measurement invariance does not hold; (b) To examine whether unique features of multilevel data, such as intraclass correlation (ICC) and number of clusters, influence the effect of measurement non-invariance on the performance of tests for moderation. Simulation results indicated that falsely assuming measurement invariance lead to biased estimates, inflated Type I error rates, and more gain or more loss in power (depends on simulation conditions) for the test of moderation effects. Such patterns were more salient as sample size and the number of non-invariant items increase for both single- and multi-level data. With multilevel data, the cluster size seemed to have a larger impact than the number of clusters when falsely assuming measurement invariance in the moderation estimation. ICC was trivially related to the moderation estimates. Overall, when testing moderation effects with categorical moderators, employing a model that accounts for the measurement (non)invariance structure of the predictor and/or the outcome is recommended.

  8. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozowyk, P R B; Langejans, G H J; Poulis, J A

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives.

  9. Impact of family language and testing language on reading performance in a bilingual educational context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elosua Oliden, Paula; Mujika Lizaso, Josu

    2014-01-01

    When different languages co-exist in one area, or when one person speaks more than one language, the impact of language on psychological and educational assessment processes can be considerable. The aim of this work was to study the impact of testing language in a community with two official languages: Spanish and Basque. By taking the PISA 2009 Reading Comprehension Test as a basis for analysis, four linguistic groups were defined according to the language spoken at home and the test language. Psychometric equivalence between test forms and differences in results among the four language groups were analyzed. The comparison of competence means took into account the effects of the index of socioeconomic and cultural status (ISEC) and gender. One reading unit with differential item functioning was detected. The reading competence means were considerably higher in the monolingual Spanish-Spanish group. No differences were found between the language groups based on family language when the test was conducted in Basque. The study illustrates the importance of taking into account psychometric, linguistic and sociolinguistic factors in linguistically diverse assessment contexts.

  10. IMPACT TESTING OF MATERIALS USING AN EIGHT-INCH AIR GUN AND COMPUTER REDUCTION OF DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorne, L. F.

    1973-10-01

    A mechanical shock actuator has been converted into an air gun capable of firing 8-inch-·diameter (20.32 cm) projectiles to velocities exceeding 1000 fps (304.8 m/ s). This new capability has been used to study the effect of impact velocity upon the energy.absorbed by crushable materials. Shockpulse data is reduced by computer techniques and test results are displayed in either tabular or graphic format by use of the C DC 6600 Calcomp plotter.

  11. Review of Evidence of Environmental Impacts of Animal Research and Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Katherine Groff; Eric Bachli; Molly Lansdowne; Theodora Capaldo

    2014-01-01

    Millions of animals are used in research and toxicity testing, including in drug, medical device, chemical, cosmetic, personal care, household, and other product sectors, but the environmental consequences are yet to be adequately addressed. Evidence suggests that their use and disposal, and the associated use of chemicals and supplies, contribute to pollution as well as adverse impacts on biodiversity and public health. The objective of this review is to examine such evidence. The review in...

  12. Change of notch impact strength depending on radiation dose and test temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Bednarik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper has been determine the effect of radiation crosslinking on the notch impact strength of polyamides filled with fiberglass. These properties were examined in dependence on the dosage of the ionizing beta radiation (non-irradiated samples and those irradiated by dosage 66 and 132 kGy were compared and on the test temperature (23–150 °C.

  13. An investigation on impacts of scheduling configurations on Mississippi biology subject area testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchette, Frances Lenora

    The purpose of this mixed modal study was to compare the results of Biology Subject Area mean scores of students on a 4 x 4 block schedule, A/B block schedule, and traditional year-long schedule for 1A to 5A size schools. This study also reviewed the data to determine if minority or gender issues might influence the test results. Interviews with administrators and teachers were conducted about the type of schedule configuration they use and the influence that the schedule has on student academic performance on the Biology Subject Area Test. Additionally, this research further explored whether schedule configurations allow sufficient time for students to construct knowledge. This study is important to schools, teachers, and administrators because it can assist them in considering the impacts that different types of class schedules have on student performance and if ethnic or gender issues are influencing testing results. This study used the causal-comparative method for the quantitative portion of the study and constant comparative method for the qualitative portion to explore the relationship of school schedules on student academic achievement on the Mississippi Biology Subject Area Test. The aggregate means of selected student scores indicate that the Mississippi Biology Subject Area Test as a measure of student performance reveals no significant difference on student achievement for the three school schedule configurations. The data were adjusted for initial differences of gender, minority, and school size on the three schedule configurations. The results suggest that schools may employ various schedule configurations and expect student performance on the Mississippi Biology Subject Area Test to be unaffected. However, many areas of concern were identified in the interviews that might impact on school learning environments. These concerns relate to effective classroom management, the active involvement of students in learning, the adequacy of teacher education

  14. Explaining the black-white gap in cognitive test scores: Toward a theory of adverse impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Jonathan M; Newman, Daniel A; Roisman, Glenn I

    2015-11-01

    In understanding the causes of adverse impact, a key parameter is the Black-White difference in cognitive test scores. To advance theory on why Black-White cognitive ability/knowledge test score gaps exist, and on how these gaps develop over time, the current article proposes an inductive explanatory model derived from past empirical findings. According to this theoretical model, Black-White group mean differences in cognitive test scores arise from the following racially disparate conditions: family income, maternal education, maternal verbal ability/knowledge, learning materials in the home, parenting factors (maternal sensitivity, maternal warmth and acceptance, and safe physical environment), child birth order, and child birth weight. Results from a 5-wave longitudinal growth model estimated on children in the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development from ages 4 through 15 years show significant Black-White cognitive test score gaps throughout early development that did not grow significantly over time (i.e., significant intercept differences, but not slope differences). Importantly, the racially disparate conditions listed above can account for the relation between race and cognitive test scores. We propose a parsimonious 3-Step Model that explains how cognitive test score gaps arise, in which race relates to maternal disadvantage, which in turn relates to parenting factors, which in turn relate to cognitive test scores. This model and results offer to fill a need for theory on the etiology of the Black-White ethnic group gap in cognitive test scores, and attempt to address a missing link in the theory of adverse impact. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefel, Denis, E-mail: Denis.Kiefel@airbus.com, E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Stoessel, Rainer, E-mail: Denis.Kiefel@airbus.com, E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com [Airbus Group Innovations, Munich (Germany); Grosse, Christian, E-mail: Grosse@tum.de [Technical University Munich (Germany)

    2015-03-31

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT) system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented.

  16. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefel, Denis; Stoessel, Rainer; Grosse, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT) system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented

  17. Uniform Foam Crush Testing for Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicle Impact Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Byron W.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEVs) are blunt-body vehicles designed with the purpose of transporting payloads from outer space to the surface of the Earth. To achieve high-reliability and minimum weight, MMEEVs avoid use of limited-reliability systems, such as parachutes and retro-rockets, instead using built-in impact attenuators to absorb energy remaining at impact to meet landing loads requirements. The Multi-Mission Systems Analysis for Planetary Entry (M-SAPE) parametric design tool is used to facilitate the design of MMEEVs and develop the trade space. Testing was conducted to characterize the material properties of several candidate impact foam attenuators to enhance M-SAPE analysis. In the current effort, four different Rohacell foams are tested at three different, uniform, strain rates (approximately 0.17, approximately 100, approximately 13,600%/s). The primary data analysis method uses a global data smoothing technique in the frequency domain to remove noise and system natural frequencies. The results from the data indicate that the filter and smoothing technique are successful in identifying the foam crush event and removing aberrations. The effect of strain rate increases with increasing foam density. The 71-WF-HT foam may support Mars Sample Return requirements. Several recommendations to improve the drop tower test technique are identified.

  18. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of the drop impact test for helicopter fuel tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianfeng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yang, Jialing; Sun, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    The crashworthiness of helicopter fuel tank is vital to the survivability of the passengers and structures. In order to understand and improve the crashworthiness of the soft fuel tank of helicopter during the crash, this paper investigated the dynamic behavior of the nylon woven fabric composite fuel tank striking on the ground. A fluid-structure interaction finite element model of the fuel tank based on the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method was constructed to elucidate the dynamic failure behavior. The drop impact tests were conducted to validate the accuracy of the numerical simulation. Good agreement was achieved between the experimental and numerical results of the impact force with the ground. The influences of the impact velocity, the impact angle, the thickness of the fuel tank wall and the volume fraction of water on the dynamic responses of the dropped fuel tank were studied. The results indicated that the corner of the fuel tank is the most vulnerable location during the impact with ground.

  19. A prospective study of the psychosocial impact of a positive Chlamydia trachomatis laboratory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Sami L; Stoner, Bradley P; Zaidi, Akbar A; Buckel, Christina; Tran, Molly; Leichliter, Jami S; Berman, Stuart M; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2011-11-01

    Few data exist on potential harms of chlamydia screening. We assessed the psychosocial impact of receiving a positive Chlamydia trachomatis test result. We prospectively studied women ≥16 years of age undergoing chlamydia testing in 2 Midwestern family planning clinics. We surveyed women at baseline and about 1 month after receiving test results, using 9 validated psychosocial scales/subscales and chlamydia-specific questions. Changes in scale scores were calculated for each woman. Mean percent changes in scores for chlamydia-positive and -negative women were compared using a t test. We enrolled 1807 women (response rate, 84%). Of the 1688 women with test results, 149 (8.8%) tested positive. At follow-up, chlamydia-positive women (n = 71) had a 75% increase in anxiety about sexual aspects of their life on the Multidimensional Sexual Self-Concept Questionnaire (P < 0.001), significantly greater than the 26% increase among 280 randomly selected chlamydia-negative women (P = 0.02). There were no differences for the other 8 scales/subscales, including general measures of anxiety, depression, and self-esteem. Chlamydia-positive women were more likely than chlamydia-negative women to be "concerned about chlamydia" (80% vs. 40%, P < 0.001) and to report breaking up with a main partner (33% vs. 11%, P < 0.001) at follow-up. Women testing positive reported a range of chlamydia-specific concerns. Chlamydia-positive women had significant increases in anxiety about sex and concern about chlamydia, but did not have marked changes in more general measures of psychosocial well-being about 1 month after diagnosis. Chlamydia diagnoses were associated with some disruption of relationships with main partners. Chlamydia-specific concerns may guide counseling messages to minimize psychosocial impact.

  20. Impact of Enterovirus Testing on Resource Use in Febrile Young Infants: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Sowdhamini S; Lopez, Michelle A; Caviness, A Chantal

    2017-02-01

    Enterovirus infection commonly causes fever in infants aged 0 to 90 days and, without testing, is difficult to differentiate from serious bacterial infection. To determine the cost savings of routine enterovirus testing and identify subgroups of infants with greater potential impact from testing among infants 0 to 90 days old with fever. Studies were identified systematically from published and unpublished literature by using Embase, Medline, the Cochrane database, and conference proceedings. Inclusion criteria were original studies, in any language, of enterovirus infection including the outcomes of interest in infants aged 0 to 90 days. Standardized instruments were used to appraise each study. The evidence quality was evaluated using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation criteria. Two investigators independently searched the literature, screened and critically appraised the studies, extracted the data, and applied the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation criteria. Of the 257 unique studies identified and screened, 32 were completely reviewed and 8 were included. Routine enterovirus testing was associated with reduced hospital length of stay and cost savings during peak enterovirus season. Cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis was a poor predictor of enterovirus meningitis. The studies were all observational and the evidence was of low quality. Enterovirus polymerase chain reaction testing, independent of cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, can reduce length of stay and achieve cost savings, especially during times of high enterovirus prevalence. Additional study is needed to identify subgroups that may achieve greater cost savings from testing to additionally enhance the efficiency of testing. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Economic impact of rapid diagnostic methods in Clinical Microbiology: Price of the test or overall clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantón, Rafael; Gómez G de la Pedrosa, Elia

    2017-12-01

    The need to reduce the time it takes to establish a microbiological diagnosis and the emergence of new molecular microbiology and proteomic technologies has fuelled the development of rapid and point-of-care techniques, as well as the so-called point-of-care laboratories. These laboratories are responsible for conducting both techniques partially to response to the outsourcing of the conventional hospital laboratories. Their introduction has not always been accompanied with economic studies that address their cost-effectiveness, cost-benefit and cost-utility, but rather tend to be limited to the unit price of the test. The latter, influenced by the purchase procedure, does not usually have a regulated reference value in the same way that medicines do. The cost-effectiveness studies that have recently been conducted on mass spectrometry in the diagnosis of bacteraemia and the use of antimicrobials have had the greatest clinical impact and may act as a model for future economic studies on rapid and point-of-care tests. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  2. Tensile and impact testing of an HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] control rod follower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.J.; Schuster, M.H.; Roberts, T.C.; Milian, L.W.

    1989-08-01

    The Materials Technology Group of the Department of Nuclear Energy (DNE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) undertook a program to machine and test specimens from a control rod follower from the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). Tensile and Charpy impact specimens were machined and tested from non-irradiated aluminum alloys in addition to irradiated 6061-T6 from the HFBR. The tensile test results on irradiated material showed a two-fold increase in tensile strength to a maximum of 100.6 ksi. The impact resistance of the irradiated material showed a six-fold decrease in values (3 in-lb average) compared to similar non-irradiated material. Fracture toughness (K I ) specimens were tested on an unirradiated compositionally and dimensionally similar (to HFBR follower) 6061 T-6 material with K max values of 24.8 ± 1.0 Ksi√in (average) being obtained. The report concludes that the specimens produced during the program yielded reproducible and believable results and that proper quality assurance was provided throughout the program. 9 figs., 6 tabs

  3. Steven E. Miller and Dmitri V. Trenin, eds., The Russian Military: Power and Policy, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2004.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Tsypkin

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The Russian military largely went below the radar of Western interest after the disintegration of the Soviet Union.  More than a decade after the creation of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation, they have become again the object of interest for scholars – this time, both Western and Russian, as demonstrated by the reviewed volume, whose editors assembled a group of extraordinarily knowledgeable experts from Russia and the West.  In his introduction, Steven Miller explains that the purp...

  4. Stereoselective synthesis of functionalized cyclic amino acid derivatives via a [2,3]-Stevens rearrangement and ring-closing metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Aaron; Soheili, Arash; Tambar, Uttam K

    2013-09-20

    Unnatural cyclic amino acids are valuable tools in biomedical research and drug discovery. A two-step stereoselective strategy for converting simple glycine-derived aminoesters into unnatural cyclic amino acid derivatives has been developed. The process includes a palladium-catalyzed tandem allylic amination/[2,3]-Stevens rearrangement followed by a ruthenium-catalyzed ring-closing metathesis. The [2,3]-rearrangement proceeds with high diastereoselectivity through an exo transition state. Oppolzer's chiral auxiliary was utilized to access an enantiopure cyclic amino acid by this approach, which will enable future biological applications.

  5. High Level Human Herpesvirus-6 Viremia Associated with onset of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome: Report of 2 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppercorn, Amanda F.; Miller, Melissa B.; Fitzgerald, David; Weber, David J.; Groben, Pamela A.; Cairns, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS) remains obscure but it has been associated with various infectious agents, including members of the Herpes virus family. We present the first report of high level human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) viremia at the onset of SJS suggesting a possible new association. This finding supports the need for further investigation into the possible relationship between HHV-6 and SJS which may illuminate the pathogenesis of SJS and bring us closer to achieving enhanced prevention and treatment of this rare disease. PMID:20182379

  6. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Awards Ceremony for 2011 Award Winners (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The winners for 2011 of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award were recognized in a ceremony held May 21, 2012. Dr. Steven Chu and others spoke of the importance of the accomplishments and the prestigious history of the award. The recipients of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for 2011 are: Riccardo Betti (University of Rochester); Paul C. Canfield (Ames Laboratory); Mark B. Chadwick (Los Alamos National Laboratory); David E. Chavez (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Amit Goyal (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Thomas P. Guilderson (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Lois Curfman McInnes (Argonne National Laboratory); Bernard Matthew Poelker (Thomas Jeffereson National Accelerator Facility); and Barry F. Smith (Argonne National Laboratory).

  7. An 810 ft/sec soil impact test of a 2-foot diameter model nuclear reactor containment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthoff, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    A soil impact test was conducted on a 880-pound 2-foot diameter sphere model. The impact area consisted of back filled desert earth and rock. The impact generated a crater 5 feet in diameter by 5 feet deep. It buried itself a total of 15 feet - as measured to the bottom of the model. After impact the containment vessel was pressure checked. No leaks were detected nor cracks observed.

  8. The WRAIR projectile concussive impact model of mild traumatic brain injury: re-design, testing and preclinical validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Lai Yee; Larimore, Zachary; Holmes, Larry; Cartagena, Casandra; Mountney, Andrea; Deng-Bryant, Ying; Schmid, Kara; Shear, Deborah; Tortella, Frank

    2014-08-01

    The WRAIR projectile concussive impact (PCI) model was developed for preclinical study of concussion. It represents a truly non-invasive closed-head injury caused by a blunt impact. The original design, however, has several drawbacks that limit the manipulation of injury parameters. The present study describes engineering advancements made to the PCI injury model including helmet material testing, projectile impact energy/head kinematics and impact location. Material testing indicated that among the tested materials, 'fiber-glass/carbon' had the lowest elastic modulus and yield stress for providing an relative high percentage of load transfer from the projectile impact, resulting in significant hippocampal astrocyte activation. Impact energy testing of small projectiles, ranging in shape and size, showed the steel sphere produced the highest impact energy and the most consistent impact characteristics. Additional tests confirmed the steel sphere produced linear and rotational motions on the rat's head while remaining within a range that meets the criteria for mTBI. Finally, impact location testing results showed that PCI targeted at the temporoparietal surface of the rat head produced the most prominent gait abnormalities. Using the parameters defined above, pilot studies were conducted to provide initial validation of the PCI model demonstrating quantifiable and significant increases in righting reflex recovery time, axonal damage and astrocyte activation following single and multiple concussions.

  9. Full scale test results for ship ice impact forces and pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoneim, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    A set of full scale impact tests were carried out for the icebreakers Canmar Kigoriak and Robert LeMeur in first and multi-year ice conditions in the southern Beaufort Sea. Preliminary results of the testing program were published in Ghoneim et al. (1984). This paper presents some salient results of further analysis of the data. This includes a description of the different types of ice ramming mechanisms and the corresponding ice force time histories and ship response. A comparison between the bow force peak values for the kigoriak and the Robert LeMeur is made and the reasons for the difference are evaluated. The question of dynamic magnification of the response is investigated. The relationship between the peak impact force and the ramming velocity is evaluated for both ships and compared with theoretical and empirical formulations. Other parametric relationships are presented, including such parameters as force duration and relative magnitude of the impact and beaching bow forces. The added mass is evaluated from measured accelerations and calculated bow forces and are shown to be time dependent. The relationship between ice pressure and corresponding contact area is discussed. Finally, conclusions and recommendations are presented

  10. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Lightning-Damaged CFRP Laminates during Compression-after-Impact Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Oh Yang; Shin, Jae Ha [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Carbon-fiber reinforced plastic(CFRP) laminates made of nano-particle-coated carbon fibers and damaged by a simulated lightning strike were tested under compression-after-impact(CAI) mode, during which the damage progress due to compressive loading has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). The impact damage was induced not by mechanical loading but by a simulated lightning strike. Conductive nano-particles were coated directly on the fibers, from which CFRP coupons were made. The coupon were subjected to the strikes with a high voltage/current impulse of 10-40 kA within a few . The effects of nano-particle coating and the degree of damage induced by the simulated lightning strikes on AE activities were examined, and the relationship between the compressive residual strength and AE behavior has been evaluated in terms of AE event counts and the onset of AE activity with the compressive loading. The degree of impact damage was also measured in terms of damage area by using ultrasonic C-scan images. The assessment during the CAI tests of damaged CFRP showed that AE monitoring appeared to be useful to differentiate the degree of damage hence the mechanical integrity of composite structures damaged by lightning strikes.

  11. Crash test rating and likelihood of major thoracoabdominal injury in motor vehicle crashes: the new car assessment program side-impact crash test, 1998-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figler, Bradley D; Mack, Christopher D; Kaufman, Robert; Wessells, Hunter; Bulger, Eileen; Smith, Thomas G; Voelzke, Bryan

    2014-03-01

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) implemented side-impact crash testing on all new vehicles since 1998 to assess the likelihood of major thoracoabdominal injuries during a side-impact crash. Higher crash test rating is intended to indicate a safer car, but the real-world applicability of these ratings is unknown. Our objective was to determine the relationship between a vehicle's NCAP side-impact crash test rating and the risk of major thoracoabdominal injury among the vehicle's occupants in real-world side-impact motor vehicle crashes. The National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System contains detailed crash and injury data in a sample of major crashes in the United States. For model years 1998 to 2010 and crash years 1999 to 2010, 68,124 occupants were identified in the Crashworthiness Data System database. Because 47% of cases were missing crash severity (ΔV), multiple imputation was used to estimate the missing values. The primary predictor of interest was the occupant vehicle's NCAP side-impact crash test rating, and the outcome of interest was the presence of major (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score ≥ 3) thoracoabdominal injury. In multivariate analysis, increasing NCAP crash test rating was associated with lower likelihood of major thoracoabdominal injury at high (odds ratio [OR], 0.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7-0.9; p NCAP side-impact crash test rating is associated with a lower likelihood of major thoracoabdominal trauma. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  12. Ubiquitous testing using tablets: its impact on medical student perceptions of and engagement in learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Hwang, Jee-Young

    2016-03-01

    Ubiquitous testing has the potential to affect medical education by enhancing the authenticity of the assessment using multimedia items. This study explored medical students' experience with ubiquitous testing and its impact on student learning. A cohort (n=48) of third-year students at a medical school in South Korea participated in this study. The students were divided into two groups and were given different versions of 10 content-matched items: one in text version (the text group) and the other in multimedia version (the multimedia group). Multimedia items were delivered using tablets. Item response analyses were performed to compare item characteristics between the two versions. Additionally, focus group interviews were held to investigate the students' experiences of ubiquitous testing. The mean test score was significantly higher in the text group. Item difficulty and discrimination did not differ between text and multimedia items. The participants generally showed positive responses on ubiquitous testing. Still, they felt that the lectures that they had taken in preclinical years did not prepare them enough for this type of assessment and clinical encounters during clerkships were more helpful. To be better prepared, the participants felt that they needed to engage more actively in learning in clinical clerkships and have more access to multimedia learning resources. Ubiquitous testing can positively affect student learning by reinforcing the importance of being able to understand and apply knowledge in clinical contexts, which drives students to engage more actively in learning in clinical settings.

  13. An impact test system design and its applications to dynamic buckling of a spacer grid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Sheng, E-mail: liusheng_05@126.com; Fan, Chenguang; Yang, Yiren

    2016-11-15

    This study is aimed at investigating the dynamic buckling load, dynamic stiffness, damping and buckling characteristics of the spacer grid assembly (SGA). A pendulum impact test system is designed to experiment the buckling of SGAs. Three criterions are discussed and compared to determine the buckling loads of SGAs: B-R criterion, energy criterion and extreme value criterion. Two approaches are applied to calculate the dynamic stiffness of SGAs: One method is natural period method based on the hypothesis of harmonic motion of the pendulum whose period is approximated because of the passivation and tailing of the impact force time history; and the other is energy method based on the conservation of mechanical energy. The equivalent viscous damping is defined as the resultant cause of dissipation and is obtained by the energy principle. The impact force time history loses its approximate symmetry after buckling occurs. The impact force and displacement reach their maxima almost at the same time at pre-buckling states but not post-buckling states. Vertical straps in SGA are found to be transversely shared by horizontal straps at the buckling position. The buckling of SGA results from the lack of strength of complete structure; and the strength of material has no effects on the buckling.

  14. A study on the evaluation of dynamic stress intensity factor in repeated impact bending test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Jae Ki; Cho, Gyu Jae; Han, Gill Young

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to establish the evaluation of the dynamic stress intensity factor in repeated impact three point bending test. Contact force between the impact bar and the cracked beam (simple supported beam) was analyzed by the using Hertz's contact law. In order to clarify the validity of theoretical analysis, experiments of dynamic stress intensity factir k I (t) are made on the cracked beam. The results obtained from this study are as follow: 1. In case of impact force analysis the theoretical result was obtained by the use of the Hertz's contact law. It's result was agreemant with the experimental result. Particularly, it was good agreement in the low impact velocity range. 2. The time variation of the dynamic stress intensity was determined by using the simple formula developed in this pqper. And the validity of it's result can be confirmed by experiment. Particlarly, this theoretical analysis was a good agreement to actual phenomena on from 0.3 msec to 0.65 msec. (Author)

  15. Test and Analysis Correlation of Form Impact onto Space Shuttle Wing Leading Edge RCC Panel 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Gabrys, Jonathan; Melis, Matthew; Carney, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Soon after the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) began their study of the space shuttle Columbia accident, "physics-based" analyses using LS-DYNA were applied to characterize the expected damage to the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) leading edge from high-speed foam impacts. Forensic evidence quickly led CAIB investigators to concentrate on the left wing leading edge RCC panels. This paper will concentrate on the test of the left-wing RCC panel 8 conducted at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and the correlation with an LS-DYNA analysis. The successful correlation of the LS-DYNA model has resulted in the use of LS-DYNA as a predictive tool for characterizing the threshold of damage for impacts of various debris such as foam, ice, and ablators onto the RCC leading edge for shuttle return-to-flight.

  16. Verification of maximum impact force for interim storage cask for the Fast Flux Testing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.W.; Chang, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform an impact analysis of the Interim Storage Cask (ISC) of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) for a 4-ft end drop. The ISC is a concrete cask used to store spent nuclear fuels. The analysis is to justify the impact force calculated by General Atomics (General Atomics, 1994) using the ILMOD computer code. ILMOD determines the maximum force developed by the concrete crushing which occurs when the drop energy has been absorbed. The maximum force, multiplied by the dynamic load factor (DLF), was used to determine the maximum g-level on the cask during a 4-ft end drop accident onto the heavily reinforced FFTF Reactor Service Building's concrete surface. For the analysis, this surface was assumed to be unyielding and the cask absorbed all the drop energy. This conservative assumption simplified the modeling used to qualify the cask's structural integrity for this accident condition

  17. On the validity of Ksub(Id)-measurements in instrumented impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalthoff, J.F.; Winkler, S.; Klemm, W.; Beinert, J.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of inertia effects in determining the dynamic fracture toughness Ksub(Id) by instrumented impact testing is investigated. Model experiments in the brittle fracture regime are carried out with precracked bend specimens machined from the epoxy resin Araldite B. As is usual in these tests, the loads at the tup of the impinging striker are recorded as a function of time during the impact process. For reference purposes, the dynamic fracture toughness value Ksub(Id)sup(m1) is derived from the measured maximum load utilizing static stress intensity factor formulas. In addition to this conventional procedure, the actual stress intensity factors are measured directly at the tip of the crack by means of the shadow optical method of caustics applied in combination with high speed photography. The critical value of these optically measured stress intensity factors (for onset of crack propagation), Ksub(Id)sup(opt), is the true dynamic fracture toughness. In the experiments, the specimen size and the impact velocity were varied. In accordance with expectations, it is found that the hammer load signal is not correlated with the actual crack tip stress intensity factor values by a simple proportionality. The conventionally determined Ksub(Id)sup(m1)-value overestimates the true dynamic fracture toughness Ksub(Id)sup(opt). This overestimation becomes larger for larger specimen sizes and larger impact velocities. The results demonstrate the dominating influence inertia effects can have on hammer load measurements and emphasize the importance of eliminating these effects in order to determine non-erroneous dynamic fracture toughness values. (orig.)

  18. Development of Drop/Shock Test in Microelectronics and Impact Dynamic Analysis for Uniform Board Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallolimath, Sharan Chandrashekar

    For the past several years, many researchers are constantly developing and improving board level drop test procedures and specifications to quantify the solder joint reliability performance of consumer electronics products. Predictive finite element analysis (FEA) by utilizing simulation software has become widely acceptable verification method which can reduce time and cost of the real-time test process. However, due to testing and metrological limitations it is difficult not only to simulate exact drop condition and capture critical measurement data but also tedious to calibrate the system to improve test methods. Moreover, some of the important ever changing factors such as board flexural rigidity, damping, drop height, and drop orientation results in non-uniform stress/strain distribution throughout the test board. In addition, one of the most challenging tasks is to quantify uniform stress and strain distribution throughout the test board and identify critical failure factors. The major contributions of this work are in the four aspects of the drop test in electronics as following. First of all, an analytical FEA model was developed to study the board natural frequencies and responses of the system with the consideration of dynamic stiffness, damping behavior of the material and effect of impact loading condition. An approach to find the key parameters that affect stress and strain distributions under predominate mode responses was proposed and verified with theoretical solutions. Input-G method was adopted to study board response behavior and cut boundary interpolation methods was used to analyze local model solder joint stresses with the development of global/local FEA model in ANSYS software. Second, no ring phenomenon during the drop test was identified theoretically when the test board was modeled as both discrete system and continuous system. Numerical analysis was then conducted by FEA method for detailed geometry of attached chips with solder

  19. HIV testing and counselling in Estonian prisons, 2012 to 2013: aims, processes and impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimets, K; Uuskula, A

    2014-11-27

    We present data from an observational cohort study on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention and control measures in prisons in Estonia to assess the potential for HIV transmission in this setting. HIV testing and retesting data from the Estonian prison health department were used to estimate HIV prevalence and incidence in prison. Since 2002, voluntary HIV counselling and testing has routinely been offered to all prisoners and has been part of the new prisoners health check. At the end of 2012, there were 3,289 prisoners in Estonia, including 170 women: 28.5% were drug users and 15.6% were infected with HIV. Of the HIV-positive inmates, 8.3% were newly diagnosed on prison entry. In 2012, 4,387 HIV tests (including retests) were performed in Estonian prisons. Among 1,756 initially HIV-negative prisoners who were in prison for more than one year and therefore tested for HIV twice within 12 months (at entry and annual testing), one new HIV infection was detected, an incidence of 0.067 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.025–5.572). This analysis indicates low risk of HIV transmission in Estonian prisons. Implementation of HIV management interventions could impact positively on the health of prisoners and the communities to which they return.

  20. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as 'Low Impact Soil Sites' and consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site: CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt; CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2); CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm; CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area; CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area; CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area; CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a; CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site; CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil; CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10; and CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky). Closure activities were conducted from February through April 2009 according to the FFACO (1996; as amended February 2008) and Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 107 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2009). The corrective action alternatives included No Further Action and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. Closure activities are summarized.

  1. Impact on participation and autonomy: test of validity and reliability for older persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Ottenvall Hammar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In research and healthcare it is important to measure older persons’ self-determination in order to improve their possibilities to decide for themselves in daily life. The questionnaire Impact on Participation and Autonomy (IPA assesses self-determination, but is not constructed for older persons. The aim of this study was to examine the validity and reliability of the IPA-S questionnaire for persons aged 70 years and older. The study was performed in two steps; first a validity test of the Swedish version of the questionnaire, IPA-S, followed by a reliability test-retest of an adjusted version. The validity was tested with focus groups and individual interviews on persons aged 77-88 years, and the reliability on persons aged 70-99 years. The validity test result showed that IPA-S is valid for older persons but it was too extensive and the phrasing of the items needed adjustments. The reliability test-retest on the adjusted questionnaire, IPA-Older persons (IPA-O, showed that 15 of 22 items had high agreement. IPA-O can be used to measure older persons’ self-determination in their care and rehabilitation.

  2. The emotional impact of genetic testing and aspects of counseling prior to prescription of oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, Verena; Weber, Michael; Eichinger, Sabine

    2008-11-01

    Oral contraceptives increase the thrombotic risk in women with factor V Leiden. Emotional aspects of genetic testing prior to the prescription of oral contraceptives (OC), aspects of counseling and referral patterns are widely unknown. Two hundred forty-seven women with and 132 women without factor V Leiden were interviewed by questionnaire. One hundred sixty-one women (65%) with factor V Leiden and 63 (48%) with wild-type factor V responded. One hundred seventy-one women (76%) reported being emotionally disturbed by genetic testing. Eighty percent of women with factor V Leiden and 16% of women with wild-type factor V were discouraged from OC use. Three percent of women with factor V Leiden were encouraged to take OC. Forty-one percent of women with factor V Leiden used at least one hormone contraceptive method after diagnosis. Only 46 women (29%) with factor V Leiden were counseled about the relevance of the mutation in case of pregnancy. Testing for factor V Leiden has considerable emotional impact. Recommendations after testing are not consistently driven by the test result.

  3. Testing the impact on natural risks' awareness of visual communication through an exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrière, Marie; Bogaard, Thom; Junier, Sandra; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Mostert, Erik

    2014-05-01

    The need to communicate about natural disasters in order to improve the awareness of communities at risk is not a matter for debate anymore. However, communication can be implemented using different media and tools, and their effectiveness may be difficult to grasp. Current research on the topic is usually focused on assessing whether communication practices meet users' needs, whereas impact assessment is mostly left out. It can be explained by difficulties arising from (1) the definition of the impact to measure, i.e. awareness, and the appropriate indicators to measure it and its variations, and (2) the implementation of a research design that allows assessing these impacts without bias. This research aims at both developing a methodology to measure risk awareness and to use it for testing the effectiveness of visual communication. The testing was conducted in the Ubaye Valley in France, an alpine area affected by multiple hazards, from December 2013 to mid-February 2014. The setting consisted of an exhibition in the public library of the main town, Barcelonnette. The main natural hazards of the study case (i.e. landslides, avalanches, flooding, debris flows and earthquakes), as well as structural and non-structural measures were presented to the general public using local examples of hazards events and mitigation. Various visualization tools were used: videos, Google earth map, interactive timeline, objects, mock-ups, technical devices as well as posters with pictures, drawings and graphs. In order to assess the effects of the exhibition on risk awareness, several groups of children and adults were submitted to a research design, consisting of 1) a pre-test, 2) the visit of the exhibition and 3) a post-test similar to the pre-test. Close-ended questions addressed the awareness indicators according to the literature, i.e. worry level, previous experiences with natural hazards events, exposure to awareness raising, ability to mitigate/respond/prepare, attitude to

  4. Impact to non-destructive testing (NDT) companies of PNRI/PSNT trained NDT personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jesus, Teresita G.

    2002-12-01

    This research discusses the impact to non-destructive testing (NDT) companies of PNRI/PSNT trained NDT personnel to the individual and to the organization that the individual belongs in the midst of competitive, demanding and fast-paced workplace in the NDT industry. Related literature and studies were carefully chosen and reviewed to validate the consistencies of the research design and data gathering relationship to the present undertaking to previous studies were also discussed and analyzed. The research design used were the descriptive-normative survey method together with a questionnaire consisting of six (6) parts. The first part includes queries on personal/demographic profiles of respondents. The second part contains queries on the level of expectation of the respondents of the job-related variables. The third part contains queries on the levels of adequacy of the organization-related variables. The fourth part consists of questions on the impact of the PNRI/PSNT trained NDT personnel before and after the training. It is divided into two sections, first was for the organization and second was for the individual development. The fifth part was on the analysis of the personal-related factors that influence the impact of the PNRI/PSNT trained NDT personnel. The last part was to find out the significant differences on the impact of the training as to methods. A five-point scale was used to quantify the degree of respondents' responses to queries in the questionnaires. In addition, the following statistical formula were used for treatment of gathered data were frequency percentage, ranking, wilcoxon signed ranks test and spearman rho. The null hypotheses that were presented for acceptance or rejection were also tested. Presentation of findings, analysis and interpretations were presented based on the data gathered and the computations. Recommendations were discussed based on the findings. It is recommended that training of NDT personnel in the different NDT

  5. On the impact bending test technique for high-strength pipe steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenkin, A. M.; Odesskii, P. D.; Shabalov, I. P.; Likhachev, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    It is shown that the impact toughness (KCV-40 = 250 J/cm2) accepted for pipe steels of strength class K65 (σy ≥ 550 MPa) intended for large-diameter gas line pipes is ineffective to classify steels in fracture strength. The results obtained upon testing of specimens with a fatigue crack and additional sharp lateral grooves seem to be more effective. In energy consumption, a macrorelief with splits is found to be intermediate between ductile fracture and crystalline brittle fracture. A split formation mechanism is considered and a scheme is proposed for split formation.

  6. Pressure scaled water impact test of a 12.5 inch diameter model of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    A total of 59 tail first drops were made. Model entry conditions simulated full scale vertical velocities of approximately 75 to 110 ft/sec with horizontal velocities up to 45 ft/sec and impact angles to + or - 10 deg. These tests were conducted at scaled atmospheric pressures (1.26 psia or 65 mm.Hg). The model, test program, test facility, test equipment, instrumentation system, data reduction procedures, and test results are described.

  7. Honoring the work and life of Leroy C. Stevens. A symposium as part of the International Stem Cell Initiative Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Christopher F; Solter, Davor; Gearhart, John D; Nadeau, Joseph H; Knowles, Barbara B

    2016-01-01

    In 2016, a symposium was convened in Leroy C. Stevens' honor, in association with a meeting of the International Stem Cell Initiative (ISCI). ISCI, funded internationally, is composed of a group of ~100 scientists from many countries, under the leadership of Peter Andrews, who have worked together to characterize a significant number of human pluripotent stem cell lines, to monitor their genetic stability and their differentiation into mature cell types and tissues in vitro and in vivo. Those at the ISCI meeting puzzled through one of the thorniest problems in the therapeutic use of the differentiated derivatives of pluripotent stem cells for human therapy; namely, pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into any cell type in the adult organism, but they also have the capacity for unlimited self-renewal, hence if mutated they may have tumorigenic potential. The meeting considered how these cells might become genetically or epigenetically abnormal and how the safety of these cells for human therapeutic uses could be assessed and assured. The symposium was an opportunity to pay tribute to Leroy Stevens and to the basic science origins of this newest aspect of regenerative medicine. It was a time to reflect on the past and on how it can influence the future of our field.

  8. Review of The Joy of x: A Guided Tour of Math, from One to Infinity by Steven Strogatz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Catalano

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Strogatz, Steven. The Joy of x: A Guided Tour of Math, from One to Infinity, (New York, NY, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012. 316 pp. ISBN 978-0-547-51765-0 The Joy of x: A Guided Tour of Math, from One to Infinity, by Steven Strogatz, is an engaging and example-filled argument for mathematics as a valuable and enjoyable activity. The thirty chapters are divided into six parts, entitled Numbers, Relationships, Shapes, Change, Data, and Frontiers. The discussion ranges from intuitive explanations of basic concepts such as place value, the four arithmetic operations, percentage increase and decrease, and solving equations, to “higher” levels of mathematics such as calculus, probability and statistics, group theory, and the nature of infinity. As in John Allen Paulos’ work, Beyond Numeracy, the chapters are short and punchy, and they can be read independently. While the book is not specifically devoted to numeracy, several chapters, especially those in Part Five on Data, address ideas and examples relevant to quantitative literacy.

  9. Areas of Agreement and Disagreement Regarding Ponderosa Pine and Mixed Conifer Forest Fire Regimes: A Dialogue with Stevens et al.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis C Odion

    Full Text Available In a recent PLOS ONE paper, we conducted an evidence-based analysis of current versus historical fire regimes and concluded that traditionally defined reference conditions of low-severity fire regimes for ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa and mixed-conifer forests were incomplete, missing considerable variability in forest structure and fire regimes. Stevens et al. (this issue agree that high-severity fire was a component of these forests, but disagree that one of the several sources of evidence, stand age from a large number of forest inventory and analysis (FIA plots across the western USA, support our findings that severe fire played more than a minor role ecologically in these forests. Here we highlight areas of agreement and disagreement about past fire, and analyze the methods Stevens et al. used to assess the FIA stand-age data. We found a major problem with a calculation they used to conclude that the FIA data were not useful for evaluating fire regimes. Their calculation, as well as a narrowing of the definition of high-severity fire from the one we used, leads to a large underestimate of conditions consistent with historical high-severity fire. The FIA stand age data do have limitations but they are consistent with other landscape-inference data sources in supporting a broader paradigm about historical variability of fire in ponderosa and mixed-conifer forests than had been traditionally recognized, as described in our previous PLOS paper.

  10. Areas of Agreement and Disagreement Regarding Ponderosa Pine and Mixed Conifer Forest Fire Regimes: A Dialogue with Stevens et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odion, Dennis C; Hanson, Chad T; Baker, William L; DellaSala, Dominick A; Williams, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    In a recent PLOS ONE paper, we conducted an evidence-based analysis of current versus historical fire regimes and concluded that traditionally defined reference conditions of low-severity fire regimes for ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and mixed-conifer forests were incomplete, missing considerable variability in forest structure and fire regimes. Stevens et al. (this issue) agree that high-severity fire was a component of these forests, but disagree that one of the several sources of evidence, stand age from a large number of forest inventory and analysis (FIA) plots across the western USA, support our findings that severe fire played more than a minor role ecologically in these forests. Here we highlight areas of agreement and disagreement about past fire, and analyze the methods Stevens et al. used to assess the FIA stand-age data. We found a major problem with a calculation they used to conclude that the FIA data were not useful for evaluating fire regimes. Their calculation, as well as a narrowing of the definition of high-severity fire from the one we used, leads to a large underestimate of conditions consistent with historical high-severity fire. The FIA stand age data do have limitations but they are consistent with other landscape-inference data sources in supporting a broader paradigm about historical variability of fire in ponderosa and mixed-conifer forests than had been traditionally recognized, as described in our previous PLOS paper.

  11. Does health intervention research have real world policy and practice impacts: testing a new impact assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Gillian; Schroeder, Jacqueline; Newson, Robyn; King, Lesley; Rychetnik, Lucie; Milat, Andrew J; Bauman, Adrian E; Redman, Sally; Chapman, Simon

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing emphasis on the importance of research having demonstrable public benefit. Measurements of the impacts of research are therefore needed. We applied a modified impact assessment process that builds on best practice to 5 years (2003-2007) of intervention research funded by Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council to determine if these studies had post-research real-world policy and practice impacts. We used a mixed method sequential methodology whereby chief investigators of eligible intervention studies who completed two surveys and an interview were included in our final sample (n = 50), on which we conducted post-research impact assessments. Data from the surveys and interviews were triangulated with additional information obtained from documentary analysis to develop comprehensive case studies. These case studies were then summarized and the reported impacts were scored by an expert panel using criteria for four impact dimensions: corroboration; attribution, reach, and importance. Nineteen (38%) of the cases in our final sample were found to have had policy and practice impacts, with an even distribution of high, medium, and low impact scores. While the tool facilitated a rigorous and explicit criterion-based assessment of post-research impacts, it was not always possible to obtain evidence using documentary analysis to corroborate the impacts reported in chief investigator interviews. While policy and practice is ideally informed by reviews of evidence, some intervention research can and does have real world impacts that can be attributed to single studies. We recommend impact assessments apply explicit criteria to consider the corroboration, attribution, reach, and importance of reported impacts on policy and practice. Impact assessments should also allow sufficient time between impact data collection and completion of the original research and include mechanisms to obtain end-user input to corroborate claims and reduce biases

  12. A 640 foot per second impact test of a two foot diameter model nuclear reactor containment system without fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthoff, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    An impact test was conducted on an 1142 pound 2 foot diameter sphere model. The purpose of this test was to determine the feasibility of containing the fission products of a mobile reactor in an impact. The model simulated the reactor core, energy absorbing gamma shielding, neutron shielding and the containment vessel. It was impacted against an 18,000 pound reinforced concrete block. The model was significantly deformed and the concrete block demolished. No leaks were detected nor cracks observed in the model after impact.

  13. [Impact of a training model for the Child Development Evaluation Test in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli-Córdoba, Antonio; Delgado-Ginebra, Ismael; Cruz-Ortiz, Leopoldo Alfonso; Baqueiro-Hernández, César Iván; Martain-Pérez, Itzamara Jacqueline; Palma-Tavera, Josuha Alexander; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; O'Shea-Cuevas, Gabriel; Aceves-Villagrán, Daniel; Carrasco-Mendoza, Joaquín; Antillón-Ocampo, Fátima Adriana; Villagrán-Muñoz, Víctor Manuel; Halley-Castillo, Elizabeth; Vargas-López, Guillermo; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre

    The Child Development Evaluation (CDE) Test is a screening tool designed and validated in Mexico for the early detection of child developmental problems. For professionals who will be administering the test in primary care facilities, previous acquisition of knowledge about the test is required in order to generate reliable results. The aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of a training model for primary care workers from different professions through the comparison of knowledge acquired during the training course. The study design was a before/after type considering the participation in a training course for the CDE test as the intervention. The course took place in six different Mexican states from October to December 2013. The same questions were used before and after. There were 394 participants included. Distribution according to professional profile was as follows: general physicians 73.4%, nursing 7.7%, psychology 7.1%, nutrition 6.1% and other professions 5.6%. The questions with the lowest correct answer rates were associated with the scoring of the CDE test. In the initial evaluation, 64.9% obtained a grade lower than 20 compared with 1.8% in the final evaluation. In the initial evaluation only 1.8% passed compared with 75.15% in the final evaluation. The proposed model allows the participants to acquire general knowledge about the CDE Test. To improve the general results in future training courses, it is required to reinforce during training the scoring and interpretation of the test together with the previous lecture of the material by the participants. Copyright © 2015 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. The Impact of Time-Series Diagnostic Tests on the Writing Ability of Iranian EFL learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Molazem Atashgahi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to show whether administering a battery of time-series diagnostic tests (screening has any impact on Iranian EFL learners’ writing ability. The study was conducted on the intermediate EFL learners at Islamic Azad University North Tehran branch.  The researcher administered a homogenizing test in order to exclude the exceptional scores, among all the testers, only those whose scores were nearly within one standard deviation above or below the mean were selected as the participants of this study. After the assignment of the participants to the control and experimental groups- 30 students in each group- they were asked to write five-paragraph-essays on two topics. Such a pretest was given to both groups to test their initial writing ability. Once scoring of the students’ writings (five- paragraph essay was finished the two means of the groups were calculated and compared with each other through the t-test analysis. The result demonstrated that there was no statistically significant difference between those two groups regarding the variable under investigation. Four sets of diagnostic tests were given to the experimental group every two weeks and after each test both the result of the exam and suitable feedback regarding students’ errors were given to them by the teacher, while the Current-Traditional Rhetoric method was administered in the control group. In the posttest which was run after giving the treatment and placebo to experimental group and control group respectively, students took another writing test with the same characteristics in administration, topics and scoring as the one in pretest. Thereafter, the significance of the difference between the obtained means of experimental and control groups in the posttest was determined through the t-test.  The result of the t-test analysis indicated a significant difference between the two groups which consequently rejected the null hypothesis of the study. Therefore, any

  15. Economic impact of tissue testing and treatments of metastatic NSCLC in the era of personalized medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Marie Graham

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A paradigm-shift in the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has resulted in many new therapies becoming available for patients with advanced disease. Stratification of treatment by histologic and molecular subtype is recommended in order to obtain the greatest clinical benefit for patients while minimizing adverse effects of treatment. However, these advances in diagnosis and treatment of NSCLC have come at a financial cost. This review highlights the economic impact of screening for molecular abnormalities and targeted treatment for advanced NSCLC. Major determinants of cost are drug acquisition and molecular testing. As technologies advance, molecular testing costs may reduce. However, we must collaborate with payers and manufacturers to ensure that high drug costs do not limit patient accessibility to potentially beneficial treatment.

  16. Investigation of irradiation embrittlement and annealing behaviour of JRQ pressure vessel steel by instrumented impact tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valo, M; Rintamaa, R; Nevalainen, M; Wallin, K; Torronen, K [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Tipping, P [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1994-12-31

    Seven series of A533-B type pressure vessel steel specimens irradiated as well as irradiated - annealed - re-irradiated to different fast neutron fluences (up to 5.10{sup 19}/cm{sup 2}) have been tested with a new type of instrumented impact test machine. The radiation embrittlement and the effect of the intermediate annealing was assessed by using the ductile and cleavage fracture initiation toughness. Although the ductile fracture initiation toughness exhibited scatter, the transition temperature shift corresponding to the dynamic cleavage fracture initiation agreed well with the 41 J Charpy-V shift. The results indicate that annealing is beneficial in restoring mechanical properties in an irradiated nuclear pressure vessel steel. (authors). 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Validating Material Modelling of OFHC Copper Using Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) Test at Different Impact Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, Nicola; Testa, Gabriel; Ruggiero, Andrew; Iannitti, Gianluca; Hörnqvist, Magnus; Mortazavi, Nooshin

    2015-06-01

    In the Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) test, the material is subjected to very large strain, high strain rate and elevated temperature. Numerical simulation, validated comparing with measurements obtained on soft-recovered extruded fragments, can be used to probe material response under such extreme conditions and to assess constitutive models. In this work, the results of a parametric investigation on the simulation of DTE test of annealed OFHC copper - at impact velocity ranging from 350 up to 420 m/s - using phenomenological and physically based models (Johnson-Cook, Zerilli-Armstrong and Rusinek-Klepaczko), are presented. Preliminary simulation of microstructure evolution was performed using crystal plasticity package CPFEM, providing, as input, the strain history obtained with FEM at selected locations along the extruded fragments. Results were compared with EBSD investigation.

  18. Numerical Evaluation of a Light-Gas Gun Facility for Impact Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rahner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental tests which match the application conditions might be used to properly evaluate materials for specific applications. High velocity impacts can be simulated using light-gas gun facilities, which come in different types and complexities. In this work different setups for a one-stage light-gas gun facility have been numerically analyzed in order to evaluate their suitability for testing materials and composites used as armor protection. A maximal barrel length of 6 m and a maximal reservoir pressure of a standard industrial gas bottle (20 MPa were chosen as limitations. The numerical predictions show that it is not possible to accelerate the projectile directly to the desired velocity with nitrogen, helium, or hydrogen as propellant gas. When using a sabot corresponding to a higher bore diameter, the necessary velocity is achievable with helium and hydrogen gases.

  19. The interpretation of Charpy impact test data using hyper-logistic fitting functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The hyperbolic tangent function is used almost exclusively for computer assisted curve fitting of Charpy impact test data. Unfortunately, there is no physical basis to justify the use of this function and it cannot be generalized to test data that exhibits asymmetry. Using simple physical arguments, a semi-empirical model is derived and identified as a special case of the so called hyper-logistic equation. Although one solution of this equation is the hyperbolic tangent, other more physically interpretable solutions are provided. From the mathematics of the family of functions derived from the hyper-logistic equation, several useful generalizations are made such that asymmetric and wavy Charpy data can be physically interpreted

  20. Assessing the Impact of Clothing and Individual Equipment (CIE) on Soldier Physical, Biomechanical, and Cognitive Performance Part 1: Test Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    29 during Soldier Equipment Configuration Impact on Performance: Establishing a Test Methodology for the...during ACSM’S resource manual for exercise testing and prescription Human Movement Science, 31(2), Proceedings of the 2016 American Biomechanics...Performance of Medium Rucksack Prototypes An investigation: Comparison of live-fire and weapon simulator test methodologies and the of three extremity armor

  1. Assessing the Impact of Testing Aids on Post-Secondary Student Performance: A Meta-Analytic Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larwin, Karen H.; Gorman, Jennifer; Larwin, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Testing aids, including student-prepared testing aids (a.k.a., cheat sheets or crib notes) and open-textbook exams, are common practice in post-secondary assessment. There is a considerable amount of published research that discusses and investigates the impact of these testing aids. However, the findings of this research are contradictory and…

  2. Seismic response prediction for cabinets of nuclear power plants by using impact hammer test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Ki Young [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Gook Cho, Sung [JACE KOREA, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Cui, Jintao [Department of Civil Engineering, Kunsan National University, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dookie, E-mail: kim2kie@kunsan.ac.k [Department of Civil Engineering, Kunsan National University, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    An effective method to predict the seismic response of electrical cabinets of nuclear power plants is developed. This method consists of three steps: (1) identification of the earthquake-equivalent force based on the idealized lumped-mass system of the cabinet, (2) identification of the state-space equation (SSE) model of the system using input-output measurements from impact hammer tests, and (3) seismic response prediction by calculating the output of the identified SSE model under the identified earthquake-equivalent force. A three-dimensional plate model of cabinet structures is presented for the numerical verification of the proposed method. Experimental validation of the proposed method is carried out on a three-story frame which represents the structure of a cabinet. The SSE model of the frame is accurately identified by impact hammer tests with high fitness values over 85% of the actual frame characteristics. Shaking table tests are performed using El Centro, Kobe, and Northridge earthquakes as input motions and the acceleration responses are measured. The responses of the model under the three earthquakes are predicted and then compared with the measured responses. The predicted and measured responses agree well with each other with fitness values of 65-75%. The proposed method is more advantageous over other methods that are based on finite element (FE) model updating since it is free from FE modeling errors. It will be especially effective for cabinet structures in nuclear power plants where conducting shaking table tests may not be feasible. Limitations of the proposed method are also discussed.

  3. Summary and evaluation of low-velocity impact tests of solid steel billet onto concrete pads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, M.C.; Hovingh, W.J.; Mok, G.C.; Murty, S.S.; Chen, T.F.; Fischer, L.E.

    1998-02-01

    Spent fuel storage casks intended for use at independent spent fuel storage installations are evaluated during the application and review process for low-velocity impacts representative of possible handling accidents. In the past, the analyses involved in these evaluations have assumed that the casks dropped or tipped onto an unyielding surface - a conservative and simplifying assumption. Since 10 CFR Part 72, the regulation imposed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), does not require this assumption, applicants are currently seeking a more realistic model for the analyses to predict the effect of a cask dropping onto a reinforced concrete pad, including energy absorbing aspects such as cracking and flexure. To develop data suitable for benchmarking these analyses, the NRC has conducted several series of drop-test studies of a solid steel billet and of a near-full-scale empty cask. This report contains a summary and evaluation of all steel billet testing conducted by Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A series of finite element analyses of the billet testing is described and benchmarked against the test data. A method to apply the benchmarked finite element model of the soil and concrete pad to an analysis of a full-size storage cask is provided. In addition, an application to a open-quotes genericclose quotes full-size cask is presented for side and end drops, and tipover events. The primary purpose of this report is to provide applicants for an NRC license under 10 CFR Part 72 with a method for evaluating storage casks for low-velocity impact conditions

  4. Exploratory behaviour in the open field test adapted for larval zebrafish: impact of environmental complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Farooq; Richardson, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and characterize a novel (standard) open field test adapted for larval zebrafish. We also developed and characterized a variant of the same assay consisting of a colour-enriched open field; this was used to assess the impact of environmental complexity on patterns of exploratory behaviours as well to determine natural colour preference/avoidance. We report the following main findings: (1) zebrafish larvae display characteristic patterns of exploratory behaviours in the standard open field, such as thigmotaxis/centre avoidance; (2) environmental complexity (i.e. presence of colours) differentially affects patterns of exploratory behaviours and greatly attenuates natural zone preference; (3) larvae displayed the ability to discriminate colours. As reported previously in adult zebrafish, larvae showed avoidance towards blue and black; however, in contrast to the reported adult behaviour, larvae displayed avoidance towards red. Avoidance towards yellow and preference for green and orange are shown for the first time, (4) compared to standard open field tests, exposure to the colour-enriched open field resulted in an enhanced expression of anxiety-like behaviours. To conclude, we not only developed and adapted a traditional rodent behavioural assay that serves as a gold standard in preclinical drug screening, but we also provide a version of the same test that affords the possibility to investigate the impact of environmental stress on behaviour in larval zebrafish while representing the first test for assessment of natural colour preference/avoidance in larval zebrafish. In the future, these assays will improve preclinical drug screening methodologies towards the goal to uncover novel drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: insert SI title. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Lactose tolerance test shortened to 30 minutes: an exploratory study of its feasibility and impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Domínguez-Jiménez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lactose malabsorption (LM is a very common condition with a high prevalence in our setting. Lactose tolerance test (LTT is a basic, affordable test for diagnosis that requires no complex technology. It has been recently shown that this test can be shortened to 3 measurements (baseline, 30 min, 60 min with no impact on final results. The purpose of our study was to assess the feasibility and benefits of LTT simplification and shortening to 30 min, as well as the financial impact entailed. Material and methods: A multicenter, observational study of consecutive patients undergoing LTT for LM suspicion. Patients received 50 g of lactose following a fasting period of 12 h, and had blood collected from a vein at all 3 time points for the measurement of blood glucose (mg/dl. Differences between the shortened and complete test forms were analyzed using McNemar's test. A comparison of blood glucose levels between patients with normal and abnormal results was performed using Student's T-test for independent mean values. Consistency was assessed using the kappa index. A p < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: A total of 270 patients (69.6% females were included, with a mean age of 39.9 ± 16 years. LTT was abnormal for 151 patients (55.9%. We observed no statistically significant differences in baseline blood glucose levels between patients with normal and abnormal LTT results (p = 0.13; however, as was to be expected, such differences were obvious for the remaining time points (p < 0.01. Deleting blood glucose measurements at 60 minutes only led to overdiagnose LM (false positive results in 6 patients (2.22 %, with a kappa index of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.92-0.99 (p < 0.001 versus the complete test. Suppressing measurements at 60 min would have saved at least € 7,726. Conclusion: The shortening of LTT to only 2 measurements (baseline and 30-min hardly leads to any differences in final results, and would entail savings in

  6. Detection of an ylide intermediate in the electrochemically-induced Stevens rearrangement of an ammonium salt by in situ UV–vis spectroelectrochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capobianco, Amedeo; Caruso, Tonino; Palombi, Laura; Peluso, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mechanistic insights of the electro-induced Stevens rearrangement are provided. ► The reduction of PhCOCH 2 N + (CH 3 ) 2 CH 2 Ph is ascribed to a one-electron transfer process. ► An electrogenerated ammonium ylide has been detected by UV-spectroelectrochemistry. -- Abstract: The electrochemically-induced Stevens rearrangement of 2-(benzyldimethyl)ammonium acetophenone has been investigated by in situ UV–vis spectroelectrochemistry. Voltammetric analysis and absorption spectra recorded during the potentiostatic reduction indicate that the reaction proceeds via a one-electron transfer with a Platinum cathode and generation of an ammonium ylide intermediate

  7. Design and testing of miniaturized plasma sensor for measuring hypervelocity impact plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goel, A., E-mail: ashish09@stanford.edu; Tarantino, P. M.; Lauben, D. S.; Close, S. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    An increasingly notable component of the space environment pertains to the impact of meteoroids and orbital debris on spacecraft and the resulting mechanical and electrical damages. Traveling at speeds of tens of km/s, when these particles, collectively referred to as hypervelocity particles, impact a satellite, they vaporize, ionize, and produce a radially expanding plasma that can generate electrically harmful radio frequency emission or serve as a trigger for electrostatic discharge. In order to measure the flux, composition, energy distribution, and temperature of ions and electrons in this plasma, a miniaturized plasma sensor has been developed for carrying out in-situ measurements in space. The sensor comprises an array of electrostatic analyzer wells split into 16 different channels, catering to different species and energy ranges in the plasma. We present results from numerical simulation based optimization of sensor geometry. A novel approach of fabricating the sensor using printed circuit boards is implemented. We also describe the test setup used for calibrating the sensor and show results demonstrating the energy band pass characteristics of the sensor. In addition to the hypervelocity impact plasmas, the plasma sensor developed can also be used to carry out measurements of ionospheric plasma, diagnostics of plasma propulsion systems, and in other space physics experiments.

  8. Impact Analyses and Tests of Concrete Overpacks of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sanghoon; Cho, Sangsoon; Jeon, Jeeon; Kim, Kiyoung; Seo, Kiseog [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    A concrete cask is an option for spent nuclear fuel interim storage. A concrete cask usually consists of a metallic canister which confines the spent nuclear fuel assemblies and a concrete overpack. When the overpack undergoes a missile impact, which might be caused by a tornado or an aircraft crash, it should sustain an acceptable level of structural integrity so that its radiation shielding capability and the retrievability of the canister are maintained. A missile impact against a concrete overpack produces two damage modes, local damage and global damage. In conventional approaches, those two damage modes are decoupled and evaluated separately. The local damage of concrete is usually evaluated by empirical formulas, while the global damage is evaluated by finite element analysis. However, this decoupled approach may lead to a very conservative estimation of both damages. In this research, finite element analysis with material failure models and element erosion is applied to the evaluation of local and global damage of concrete overpacks under high speed missile impacts. Two types of concrete overpacks with different configurations are considered. The numerical simulation results are compared with test results, and it is shown that the finite element analysis predicts both local and global damage qualitatively well, but the quantitative accuracy of the results are highly dependent on the fine-tuning of material and failure parameters.

  9. Impact Analyses and Tests of Concrete Overpacks of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sanghoon; Cho, Sangsoon; Jeon, Jeeon; Kim, Kiyoung; Seo, Kiseog

    2014-01-01

    A concrete cask is an option for spent nuclear fuel interim storage. A concrete cask usually consists of a metallic canister which confines the spent nuclear fuel assemblies and a concrete overpack. When the overpack undergoes a missile impact, which might be caused by a tornado or an aircraft crash, it should sustain an acceptable level of structural integrity so that its radiation shielding capability and the retrievability of the canister are maintained. A missile impact against a concrete overpack produces two damage modes, local damage and global damage. In conventional approaches, those two damage modes are decoupled and evaluated separately. The local damage of concrete is usually evaluated by empirical formulas, while the global damage is evaluated by finite element analysis. However, this decoupled approach may lead to a very conservative estimation of both damages. In this research, finite element analysis with material failure models and element erosion is applied to the evaluation of local and global damage of concrete overpacks under high speed missile impacts. Two types of concrete overpacks with different configurations are considered. The numerical simulation results are compared with test results, and it is shown that the finite element analysis predicts both local and global damage qualitatively well, but the quantitative accuracy of the results are highly dependent on the fine-tuning of material and failure parameters

  10. Stress transmission through Ti-Ni alloy, titanium and stainless steel in impact compression test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, T; Doi, H; Kobayashi, E; Hamanaka, H; Tanabe, Y; Bonfield, W

    2000-06-01

    Impact stress transmission of Ti-Ni alloy was evaluated for biomedical stress shielding. Transformation temperatures of the alloy were investigated by means of DSC. An impact compression test was carried out with use of split-Hopkinson pressure-bar technique with cylindrical specimens of Ti-Ni alloy, titanium and stainless steel. As a result, the transmitted pulse through Ti-Ni alloy was considerably depressed as compared with those through titanium and stainless steel. The initial stress reduction was large through Ti-Ni alloy and titanium, but the stress reduction through Ti-Ni alloy was more continuous than titanium. The maximum value in the stress difference between incident and transmitted pulses through Ti-Ni alloy or titanium was higher than that through stainless steel, while the stress reduction in the maximum stress through Ti-Ni alloy was statistically larger than that through titanium or stainless steel. Ti-Ni alloy transmitted less impact stress than titanium or stainless steel, which suggested that the loading stress to adjacent tissues could be decreased with use of Ti-Ni alloy as a component material in an implant system. Copyright 2000 Kluwer Academic Publishers

  11. How Well Does the Latest Anthropomorphic Test Device Mimic Human Impact Responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Nate; Somers, Jeff; Caldewll, Erin; Gernhardt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    One of the goals of the NASA Occupant Protection Group is to understand the human tolerance to dynamic loading. This knowledge has to come through indirect approaches such as existing human response databases, anthropometric test devices (ATD), animal testing, post-­-mortem human subjects, and models. This study investigated the biofidelity of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's ATD named the THOR (test device for human occupant restraint). If THOR responds comparably to humans, then it could potentially be used as a human surrogate to help validate space vehicle requirements for occupant protection. The THOR responses to frontal and spinal impacts (ranging from 8 to 12 G with rise times of 40, 70, and 100 ms) were measured and compared to human volunteer responses (95 trials in frontal and 58 in spinal) previously collected by the U. S. Air Force on the same horizontal impact accelerator. The impact acceleration profiles tested are within the expected range of multi-­-purpose crew vehicle (MPCV) landing dynamics. A correlation score was calculated for each THOR to human comparison using CORA (CORrelation and Analysis) software. A two-­-parameter beta distribution model fit was obtained for each dependent variable using maximum likelihood estimation. For frontal impacts, the THOR head x-­-acceleration peak response correlated with the human response at 8 and 10-­-G 100 ms but not 10-­-G 70 ms. The phase lagged the human response. Head z-­-acceleration was not correlated. Chest x-­-acceleration was in phase, had a higher peak response, and was well correlated with lighter subjects (Cora = 0.8 for 46 kg vs. Cora = 0.4 for 126 kg). Head x-­-displacement had a leading phase. Several subjects responded with the same peak displacement but the mean of the group was lower. The shoulder x-­-displacement was in phase but had higher peaks than the human response. For spinal impacts, the THOR head x-­-acceleration was not well correlated. Head and

  12. A new method for testing pile by single-impact energy and P-S curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhao-Yong; Duan, Yong-Kang; Wang, Bin; Hu, Yi-Li; Yang, Run-Hai; Xu, Jun; Zhao, Jin-Ming

    2004-11-01

    By studying the pile-formula and stress-wave methods ( e.g., CASE method), the authors propose a new method for testing piles using the single-impact energy and P-S curves. The vibration and wave figures are recorded, and the dynamic and static displacements are measured by different transducers near the top of piles when the pile is impacted by a heavy hammer or micro-rocket. By observing the transformation coefficient of driving energy (total energy), the consumed energy of wave motion and vibration and so on, the vertical bearing capacity for single pile is measured and calculated. Then, using the vibration wave diagram, the dynamic relation curves between the force ( P) and the displacement ( S) is calculated and the yield points are determined. Using the static-loading test, the dynamic results are checked and the relative constants of dynamic-static P-S curves are determined. Then the subsidence quantity corresponding to the bearing capacity is determined. Moreover, the shaped quality of the pile body can be judged from the formation of P-S curves.

  13. Quasi-static characterisation and impact testing of auxetic foam for sports safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, Olly; Alderson, Andrew; Foster, Leon; Senior, Terry; Allen, Tom

    2016-01-01

    This study compared low strain rate material properties and impact force attenuation of auxetic foam and the conventional open-cell polyurethane counterpart. This furthers our knowledge with regards to how best to apply these highly conformable and breathable auxetic foams to protective sports equipment. Cubes of auxetic foam measuring 150 × 150 × 150 mm were fabricated using a thermo–mechanical conversion process. Quasi-static compression confirmed the converted foam to be auxetic, prior to being sliced into 20 mm thick cuboid samples for further testing. Density, Poisson’s ratio and the stress–strain curve were all found to be dependent on the position of each cuboid from within the cube. Impact tests with a hemispherical drop hammer were performed for energies up to 6 J, on foams covered with a polypropylene sheet between 1 and 2 mm thick. Auxetic samples reduced peak force by ∼10 times in comparison to the conventional foam. This work has shown further potential for auxetic foam to be applied to protective equipment, while identifying that improved fabrication methods are required. (paper)

  14. Decomposing the Site Frequency Spectrum: The Impact of Tree Topology on Neutrality Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Luca; Ledda, Alice; Wiehe, Thomas; Achaz, Guillaume; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastian E

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the dependence of the site frequency spectrum on the topological structure of genealogical trees. We show that basic population genetic statistics, for instance, estimators of θ or neutrality tests such as Tajima's D , can be decomposed into components of waiting times between coalescent events and of tree topology. Our results clarify the relative impact of the two components on these statistics. We provide a rigorous interpretation of positive or negative values of an important class of neutrality tests in terms of the underlying tree shape. In particular, we show that values of Tajima's D and Fay and Wu's H depend in a direct way on a peculiar measure of tree balance, which is mostly determined by the root balance of the tree. We present a new test for selection in the same class as Fay and Wu's H and discuss its interpretation and power. Finally, we determine the trees corresponding to extreme expected values of these neutrality tests and present formulas for these extreme values as a function of sample size and number of segregating sites. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  15. Evaluation of impact factors on VOC emissions and concentrations from wooden flooring based on chamber tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chi-Chi [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, No. 700, Kaohsiung University Rd., Kaohsiung (China); Yu, Kuo-Pin [Institute of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, No.155, Sec.2, Linong Street, Taipei (China); Zhao, Ping [Filtration Group Inc., 912 E. Washington Street, Joliet, IL 60433 (United States); Whei-May Lee, Grace [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, 71, Chou-Shan Rd., Taipei (China)

    2009-03-15

    In this study, the impact factors of temperature, relative humidity (RH), air exchange rate, and volatile organic compound (VOC) properties on the VOC (toluene, n-butyl acetate, ethylbenzene, and m,p-xylene) specific emission rates (SERs) and concentrations from wooden flooring were investigated by chamber test for 8 days. The tested wood in this study is not common solid wood, but composite wood made of combined wood fibers. The experiments were conducted in a stainless-steel environmental test chamber coated with Teflon. The experimental results within 8 days of testing showed that, when the temperature increased from 15 to 30 C, the VOC SERs and concentrations increased 1.5-129 times. When the RH increased from 50% to 80%, the VOC concentrations and SERs increased 1-32 times. When the air change rate increased from 1 to 2 h{sup -1}, the VOC concentrations decreased 9-40%, while the VOC SERs increased 6-98%. The relations between the boiling points of the VOCs and each of the normalized VOC SERs and concentrations were linear with negative slopes. The relations between the vapor pressures of the VOCs and each of the normalized VOC SERs and concentrations were linear with positive slopes. At 15 C, RH50%, the relations between the diffusivities of VOCs and each of the normalized VOC equilibrium SERs and concentrations were linear with a positive slope. (author)

  16. Dynamic testing of horseshoe designs at impact on synthetic and dirt Thoroughbred racetrack materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, C A; Peterson, M L; Thomason, J J; McIlwraith, C W

    2016-01-01

    Different horseshoe designs have been developed in an attempt to optimise footing for equine athletes. Horseshoe performance is assumed to be dependent on the surface and gait, but there are limited data on horseshoe performance on different surfaces, independent of gait variation. To quantify the dynamic loading for 3 aluminium racing shoe designs on Thoroughbred racetrack surface materials, using a biomechanical surface tester. A flat racing plate, a serrated V-Grip and a shoe with a 6 mm toe grab and 10 mm heel calks were tested on synthetic and dirt surfaces under typical operating conditions of temperature and moisture content for the respective material samples. Samples were tested under laboratory conditions, replicating a track surface by compacting material into a latex-lined mould surrounded by silica sand for representative boundary conditions. Peak loading and loading rates were measured vertically and horizontally (craniocaudal), simulating aspects of primary and secondary impacts of the hoof in a galloping horse. Maximum vertical and shear loads and loading rates were not significantly different between shoe types, with the exception of a reduced craniocaudal loading rate for the V-Grip shoe on the synthetic surface. All other statistical significance was related to the surface material. These 3 different Thoroughbred racing shoes do not have a significant impact on loading and loading rate, with the exception of the V-Grip shoe on a synthetic surface. Although the V-Grip may reduce craniocaudal peak load rates in a synthetic material with relatively high wax and/or low oil content, the reduction in load rate is less than the difference found between materials. This study indicates that shoeing has little effect, and that a track's surface material and its preparation have a significant effect on the dynamic loading during the impact phase of the stance. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  17. Nano-impact testing of TiFeN and TiFeMoN films for dynamic toughness evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beake, B D [Micro Materials Ltd, Willow House, Ellice Way, Yale Business Village, Wrexham LL13 7YL (United Kingdom); Vishnyakov, V M; Colligon, J S, E-mail: ben@micromaterials.co.uk [Dalton Research Institute, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-02

    TiFeN and TiFeMoN films were deposited on silicon wafers by ion-beam-assisted deposition. Their mechanical properties were measured by nanoindentation (quasi-static) and nano-impact (dynamic) techniques. Nano-impact testing enabled assessment of their toughness and resistance to fatigue fracture under repetitive loading. At low impact forces, films with a higher resistance to plastic deformation (H{sup 3}/E{sup 2}) were much more resistant to the formation of cracks throughout the test. At higher impact forces, these films initially show impact resistance but with continued impacts they are unable to protect the Si substrate, performing as poorly as films with lower H{sup 3}/E{sup 2} and suffer delamination from the Si substrate over a large area.

  18. Identification of exponent from load-deformation relation for soft materials from impact tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciornei, F. C.; Alaci, S.; Romanu, I. C.; Ciornei, M. C.; Sopon, G.

    2018-01-01

    When two bodies are brought into contact, the magnitude of occurring reaction forces increase together with the amplitude of deformations. The load-deformation dependency of two contacting bodies is described by a function having the form F = Cxα . An accurate illustration of this relationship assumes finding the precise coefficient C and exponent α. This representation proved to be very useful in hardness tests, in dynamic systems modelling or in considerations upon the elastic-plastic ratio concerning a Hertzian contact. The classical method for identification of the exponent consists in finding it from quasi-static tests. The drawback of the method is the fact that the accurate estimation of the exponent supposes precise identification of the instant of contact initiation. To overcome this aspect, the following observation is exploited: during an impact process, the dissipated energy is converted into heat released by internal friction in the materials and energy for plastic deformations. The paper is based on the remark that for soft materials the hysteresis curves obtained for a static case are similar to the ones obtained for medium velocities. Furthermore, utilizing the fact that for the restitution phase the load-deformation dependency is elastic, a method for finding the α exponent for compression phase is proposed. The maximum depth of the plastic deformations obtained for a series of collisions, by launching, from different heights, a steel ball in free falling on an immobile prism made of soft material, is evaluated by laser profilometry method. The condition that the area of the hysteresis loop equals the variation of kinetical energy of the ball is imposed and two tests are required for finding the exponent. Five collisions from different launching heights of the ball were taken into account. For all the possible impact-pair cases, the values of the exponent were found and close values were obtained.

  19. Testing the Impact of a Pre-Instructional Digital Game on Middle-Grade Students' Understanding of Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Katherine McMillan; Martin, Wendy; Clements, Margaret; Lewis Presser, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Rigorous studies of the impact of digital games on student learning remain relatively rare, as do studies of games as supports for learning difficult, core curricular concepts in the context of normal classroom practices. This study uses a blocked, cluster randomized controlled trial design to test the impact of a digital game, played as homework…

  20. Standard Test Method for Determining Resistance of Photovoltaic Modules to Hail by Impact with Propelled Ice Balls

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method provides a procedure for determining the ability of photovoltaic modules to withstand impact forces of falling hail. Propelled ice balls are used to simulate falling hailstones. 1.2 This test method defines test specimens and methods for mounting specimens, specifies impact locations on each test specimen, provides an equation for determining the velocity of any size ice ball, provides a method for impacting the test specimens with ice balls, provides a method for determining changes in electrical performance, and specifies parameters that must be recorded and reported. 1.3 This test method does not establish pass or fail levels. The determination of acceptable or unacceptable levels of ice ball impact resistance is beyond the scope of this test method. 1.4 The size of the ice ball to be used in conducting this test is not specified. This test method can be used with various sizes of ice balls. 1.5 This test method may be applied to concentrator and nonconcentrator modules. 1.6 The v...

  1. Mandating the offer of HIV testing in New York: simulating the epidemic impact and resource needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Erika G; MacDonald, Roderick H; Smith, Lou C; Gordon, Daniel E; Tesoriero, James M; Laufer, Franklin N; Leung, Shu-Yin J; Rowe, Kirsten A; OʼConnell, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    A 2010 New York law requires that patients aged 13-64 years be offered HIV testing in routine medical care settings. Past studies report the clinical outcomes, cost-effectiveness, and budget impact of expanded HIV testing nationally and within clinics but have not examined how state policies affect resource needs and epidemic outcomes. A system dynamics model of HIV testing and care was developed, where disease progression and transmission differ by awareness of HIV status, engagement in care, and disease stage. Data sources include HIV surveillance, Medicaid claims, and literature. The model projected how alternate implementation scenarios would change new infections, diagnoses, linkage to care, and living HIV cases over 10 years. Without the law, the model projects declining new infections, newly diagnosed cases, individuals newly linked to care, and fraction of undiagnosed cases (reductions of 62.8%, 59.7%, 54.1%, and 57.8%) and a slight increase in living diagnosed cases and individuals in care (2.2% and 6.1%). The law will further reduce new infections, diagnosed AIDS cases, and the fraction undiagnosed and initially increase and then decrease newly diagnosed cases. Outcomes were consistent across scenarios with different testing offer frequencies and implementation times but differed according to the level of implementation. A mandatory offer of HIV testing may increase diagnoses and avert infections but will not eliminate the epidemic. Despite declines in new infections, previously diagnosed cases will continue to need access to antiretroviral therapy, highlighting the importance of continued funding for HIV care.

  2. What is the impact of commercial test preparation courses on medical examination performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaghie, William C; Downing, Steven M; Kubilius, Ramune

    2004-01-01

    Commercial test preparation courses are part of the fabric of U.S. medical education. They are also big business with 2,000 sales for 1 firm listed at nearly $250 million. This article systematically reviews and evaluates research published in peer-reviewed journals and in the "grey literature" that addresses the impact of commercial test preparation courses on standardized, undergraduate medical examinations. Thirteen computerized English language databases were searched using 29 search terms and search concepts from their onset to October 1, 2002. Also manually searched was medical education conference proceedings and publications after the end date; and medical education journal editors were contacted about articles accepted for publication, but not yet in print, that were deemed pertinent to this review. Studies that met three criteria were selected: (a) a commercial test preparation course or service was an educational intervention, (b) the outcome variable was one of several standardized medical examinations, and (c) results are published in a peer-reviewed journal or another outlet that insures scholarly scrutiny. The criteria were applied and data extracted by consensus of 2 reviewers. The search identified 11 empirical studies, of which 10 (8 journal articles, 2 unpublished reports) are included in this review. Qualitative data synthesis and tabular presentation of research methods and outcomes are used. The articles and unpublished reports reveal that current research lacks control and rigor; the incremental validity of the commercial courses on medical examination performance, if any, is extremely small; and evidence in support of the courses is weak or nonexistent; almost no details are given about the form and conduct of the commercial test preparation courses; studies are confined to courses in preparation for the Medical College Admission Test, the former National Board of Medical Examiners Part 1, and the United States Medical Licensing Examination

  3. Review of the Air-Coupled Impact-Echo Method for Non-Destructive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotarski, Piotr; Dubas, Sebastian; Milwicz, Roman

    2017-10-01

    The article presents the general idea of Air-Coupled Impact-Echo (ACIE) method which is one of the non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques used in the construction industry. One of the main advantages of the general Impact Echo (IE) method is that it is sufficient to access from one side to that of the structure which greatly facilitate research in the road facilities or places which are difficult to access and diagnose. The main purpose of the article is to present state-of-the-art related to ACIE method based on the publications available at Thomson Reuters Web of Science Core Collection database (WOS) with the further analysis of the mentioned methods. Deeper analysis was also performed for the newest publications published within last 3 years related to ACIE for investigation on the subject of main focus of the researchers and scientists to try to define possible regions where additional examination and work is necessary. One of the main conclusions that comes from the performed analysis is that ACIE methods can be widely used for performing NDT of concrete structures and can be performed faster than standard IE method thanks to the Air-coupled sensors. What is more, 92.3% of the analysed recent research described in publications connected with ACIE was performed in laboratories, and only 23.1% in-situ on real structures. This indicates that method requires further research to prepare test stand ready to perform analysis on real objects outside laboratory conditions. Moreover, algorithms that are used for data processing and later presentation in ACIE method are still being developed and there is no universal solution available for all kinds of the existing and possible to find defects, which indicates possible research area for further works. Authors are of the opinion that emerging ACIE method could be good opportunity for ND testing especially for concrete structures. Development and refinement of test stands that will allow to perform in-situ tests could

  4. Hypervelocity Impact Test Fragment Modeling: Modifications to the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouge, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests on test satellites are performed by members of the orbital debris scientific community in order to understand and typify the on-orbit collision breakup process. By analysis of these test satellite fragments, the fragment size and mass distributions are derived and incorporated into various orbital debris models. These same fragments are currently being put to new use using emerging technologies. Digital models of these fragments are created using a laser scanner. A group of computer programs referred to as the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve code uses these digital representations in a multitude of ways that describe, measure, and model on-orbit fragments and fragment behavior. The Dynamic Rotation subroutine generates all of the possible reflected intensities from a scanned fragment as if it were observed to rotate dynamically while in orbit about the Earth. This calls an additional subroutine that graphically displays the intensities and the resulting frequency of those intensities as a range of solar phase angles in a Probability Density Function plot. This document reports the additions and modifications to the subset of the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve concerned with the Dynamic Rotation and Probability Density Function plotting subroutines.

  5. Impact test data obtained by analysis of high speed camera films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquaro, D.; Forasassi, G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper deals with a high speed film elaboration procedure concerning 9m International Atomic Energy Agency free drop tests of a spent nuclear fuel cask. Drop tests of reduced-scale cask models, performed at the Dipartimento di Construzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari of Pisa, are described. The high speed films recorded during the impact test enabled the authors to obtain the motion law of the cask models. A numerical method implemented in order to perform the first and second differentiation of the displacement-time recorded data is shown. The experimental displacement-time discrete data are approximated with a Langrange interpolation polynomial, and the obtained curve is smoothed with a Butterworth digital low pass filter with M poles, in order to reduce the spurious oscillations caused by different kinds of errors which might be unacceptably amplified in the differentiation processes. Good agreement is obtained between the accelerations derived by the film data analysis and the experimentally-measured ones. The reported technique may be a valuable tool for the analysis of transient dynamic phenomena. (author)

  6. Analysis of PHEBUS FPT1 test with IMPACT/SAMPSON code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Masafumi; Ikeda, Takashi; Naitoh, Masanori

    2003-01-01

    IMPACT is a simulation software developed at the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation, which includes the severe accident analysis code, SAMPSON. SAMPSON consists of twelve modules and is capable of simulating hypothesized severe accidents in LWR. Phebus-FPT1 test, which was selected as the International Standard Problem-46, was analyzed with SAMPSON for the verification of the code. The Phebus-FPT1 test was an integral in-pile experiment for studying mainly degradation of fuel bundle and subsequent FP behavior under a LWR severe accident condition, using irradiated fuel as a source of real FP. The following analyses of the Phebus-FPT1 test, which are also the subjects of the ISP-46, were performed: (1) In-core thermal hydraulics, core degradation and FP release from the fuel, (2) FP gas and aerosol transport in the primary circuit, (3) Thermal hydraulics and FP aerosol physics in the containment and (4) Iodine chemistry in the containment. The analysis results of the thermal hydraulics and core degradation showed good agreement with experimental data, except shroud temperatures which were higher than the experiment. The difference may be due to insufficient modeling of the gap closure in the shroud. FP release from fuel, FP transport rate in the primary circuit, FP aerosol physics and iodine chemistry in the containment were also well predicted. Through the analyses, the modules of SAMPSON used were proved to be capable for evaluating thermal hydraulics and FP behaviors under LWR severe accident conditions

  7. Economic impact of clinical variability in preoperative testing for major outpatient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Borrelli, Christian Carlo; Agustí, Salomé; Pla, Rosa; Díaz-Redondo, Alicia; Zaballos, Matilde

    2016-05-01

    With the purpose of decreasing the existing variability in the criteria of preoperative evaluation and facilitating the clinical decision-making process, our hospital has a protocol of preoperative tests to use with ASA I and ASA II patients. The aim of the study was to calculate the economic impact caused by clinicians' non-adherence to the protocol for the anaesthesiological evaluation of ASA 1 and ASA II patients. A retrospective study of costs with a random sample of 353 patients that were seen in the consultation for Anesthesiology over a period of one year. Aspects related to the costs, patient's profiles and specialties were analysed, according to the degree of fulfillment of the protocol. The lack of adherence to the the protocol was 70%. 130 chest X-rays and 218 ECG were performed without indication. This generated an excess costs of 34 € per patient. Taking into account the expenses of both tests and the attended population undergoing ambulatory surgery during the one-year period, an excess spending for the hospital of between 69.164 € and 83.312 € was estimated. Clinical variability should be reduced and the creation of synergies between the different departments should be enhanced in order to adjust the request for unnecessary complementary tests to decrease health care and to improve the quality of patient care. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. The impact of milk handling procedures on Ostertagia ostertagi antibody ELISA test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstichel, Raphaël; Dohoo, Ian; Stryhn, Henrik

    2010-04-19

    The impact of various milk handling stressors were analyzed using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test measuring Ostertagia ostertagi antibodies in milk from dairy cattle (Svanovir). An indirect ELISA has the ability to determine the amount of milk production losses related to intestinal parasitism. The ELISA test recommends fresh defatted milk, however, milk collected from Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) programs in North America undergo many stressors, including, heating, freezing and are not defatted. Normalized optical density ratios (ODRs) were compared between fresh defatted milk and milk subjected to one or more stressors with a linear mixed model accounting for differences in variation between the fresh and the frozen samples. Concordance correlation coefficients were also analyzed for comparisons to other similar studies. After accounting for random cow and container effects, the treatment factors interacted with each other (p<0.001). Biologically interesting contrasts were created to explain the interaction. The estimated difference in ODR between the milk samples handled according to recommendations of the manufacturers of Svanovir and the whole milk samples that were subjected to the most extreme treatment (heated, frozen, thawed, and re-frozen for 4 weeks) was 0.062 (p<0.001). This difference represented less than 5% of the range, and was thus considered biologically negligible. Frozen whole milk processed by DHI programs, the most likely method of collecting on-farm samples in North America, will likely yield reliable results for the indirect ELISA tests, particularly, Svanovir.

  9. Instrumented impact testing as a way to obtain further information on the behaviour of steel in welded constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, A.

    1976-05-01

    Based on experience gained from instrumented impact testing of ten different mild steels using test pieces of different geometrical shape (Charpy V-notch, Charpy knife-notch, DVM, Schnadt K 0 , Ksub(0.5), K 1 and K 2 ), some general features of the fracture process during impact testing are discussed. Steels can be divided into two main groups that are significantly different with respect to the behaviour during Charpy V-notch testing. The difference vanishes when a crack-like notch is used, and other properties of steel are revealed. It is evident that, even when modified impact testing bears little resemblance to what is happening in an actual steel construction. For the purpose of investigating the fracture conditions in welds, it seems more significant to relate the dynamic aspects to the speed of propagation of the crack when it starts to penetrate the volume considered at a certain stress level. (author)

  10. Evaluation of geometrically personalized THUMS pedestrian model response against sedan-pedestrian PMHS impact test data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huipeng; Poulard, David; Forman, Jason; Crandall, Jeff; Panzer, Matthew B

    2018-07-04

    Evaluating the biofidelity of pedestrian finite element models (PFEM) using postmortem human subjects (PMHS) is a challenge because differences in anthropometry between PMHS and PFEM could limit a model's capability to accurately capture cadaveric responses. Geometrical personalization via morphing can modify the PFEM geometry to match the specific PMHS anthropometry, which could alleviate this issue. In this study, the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) PFEM (Ver 4.01) was compared to the cadaveric response in vehicle-pedestrian impacts using geometrically personalized models. The AM50 THUMS PFEM was used as the baseline model, and 2 morphed PFEM were created to the anthropometric specifications of 2 obese PMHS used in a previous pedestrian impact study with a mid-size sedan. The same measurements as those obtained during the PMHS tests were calculated from the simulations (kinematics, accelerations, strains), and biofidelity metrics based on signals correlation (correlation and analysis, CORA) were established to compare the response of the models to the experiments. Injury outcomes were predicted deterministically (through strain-based threshold) and probabilistically (with injury risk functions) and compared with the injuries reported in the necropsy. The baseline model could not accurately capture all aspects of the PMHS kinematics, strain, and injury risks, whereas the morphed models reproduced biofidelic response in terms of trajectory (CORA score = 0.927 ± 0.092), velocities (0.975 ± 0.027), accelerations (0.862 ± 0.072), and strains (0.707 ± 0.143). The personalized THUMS models also generally predicted injuries consistent with those identified during posttest autopsy. The study highlights the need to control for pedestrian anthropometry when validating pedestrian human body models against PMHS data. The information provided in the current study could be useful for improving model biofidelity for vehicle-pedestrian impact scenarios.

  11. Impact of ANSI 2009 criteria for performance testing in TLD personnel monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MeenaI, P.; Rakesh, R.B.; Srivastava, Kshama; KoIambe, D.H.; Sapra, B.K.

    2014-01-01

    External Quality Assurance in TLD Personnel Monitoring Service was initiated in 1985, for periodic performance evaluation of various TLD Laboratories through postal exercise. Presently, all the 16 laboratories involved in Personnel Monitoring Service are covered under QA exercise. Since beginning, American National Standards Institute (ANSI) criteria have been adopted for performance testing in QA exercise. Presently, ANSI 2001 performance criteria along with ISO trumpet curve analysis method are being used for performance evaluation. In 2009, ANSI modified the performance evaluation criteria and this study evaluates its impact and feasibility of implementation of ANSI 2009 criteria in the quality assurance program for personnel monitoring. The performance of some laboratories evaluated using both ANSI 2001 and ANSI 2009 criteria have been discussed. The study shows that the ANSI 2009 criteria is more stringent and encourages even distribution of bias and standard deviation. This can be implemented with suitable modifications for performance evaluation

  12. Testing the potential for improving quality of sediments impacted by mussel farms using bioturbating polychaete worms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Per; Carlsson, Marita S; Lindegarth, Mats

    2017-01-01

    Biodeposits from farmed mussels severely influence the biogeochemistry of sediments by increasing the levels of organic matter (OM). Mitigation of such negative impacts is important for the development of sustainable aquaculture operations. As a step towards developing methods for remediation...... of coastal sediments affected by mussel farming, the effects of the polychaete, Hediste diversicolor was evaluated experimentally. In a series of field- and laboratory experiments we tested hypotheses about the effects of polychaetes on sediment oxygen consumption, nutrient fluxes and sulphide pools under...... different polychaete densities and sedimentation regimes. The experimental results support the idea that polychaetes can mitigate negative effects on the benthic environment beneath mussel farms. H. diversicolor oxidized the sediment and generally enhanced the oxygen consumption, and thus the decomposition...

  13. Variation of Modal Characteristics of Electrical Cabinet According to the Excitation Level in Impact Hammer Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sung Gook; So, Gi Hwan; Kim, Doo Kie

    2010-01-01

    There are many electrical cabinets in nuclear power plants. Safety-related equipment is typically seismic qualified before installation. Seismic qualification of equipment is possible when identifying the accurate dynamic characteristics of the equipment. According to the nature of the cabinet, the dynamic characteristics of the electrical cabinet vary nonlinearly with excitation level. This study analyzed the nonlinear variation of the dynamic properties of an actual cabinet. For the purpose of this study, a seismic monitoring system cabinet was selected as a specimen. The impact hammer tests were conducted to identify a variation of the dynamic characteristics of the specimen by increasing the impulse level. Modal identification technique was used to extract the modal properties of the cabinet from the measurements

  14. HIV Testing Among Young People Aged 16-24 in South Africa: Impact of Mass Media Communication Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Mai; Figueroa, Maria Elena; Lawrence Kincaid, D

    2016-09-01

    Knowing one's serostatus is critical in the HIV prevention, care and treatment continuum. This study examines the impact of communication programs on HIV testing in South Africa. Data came from 2204 young men and women aged 16-24 who reported to be sexually active in a population based survey. Structural equation modeling was used to test the directions and causal pathways between communication program exposure, HIV testing discussion, and having a test in the last 12 months. Bivariate and multivariate probit regressions provided evidence of exogeneity of communication exposure and the two HIV-related outcomes. One in three sampled individuals had been tested in the last 12 months. Communication program exposure only had an indirect effect on getting tested by encouraging young people to talk about testing. The study suggests that communication programs may create an environment that supports open HIV-related discussions and may have a long-term impact on behavior change.

  15. Numerical simulation of impact bend tests on araldite B and steel specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeckl, H.; Boehme, W.

    1983-09-01

    As a preliminary stage in the numerical simulation of impact bend tests on elastic-plastic sample materials some simpler experiments were calculated for this report, some of which occured without crack propagation, others with linear elastic crack propagation. These calculations were performed with an own program based on the method of finite differences and also with the finite element program ADINA. In the numerical models plane stress was assumed. Crack propagation was governed by a relation between crack velocity and stress intensity factor. As load input the measured hammer load was used in some cases, mass and initial velocity of the hammer in others. The sample looses contact to the anvils and to the hammer for some time, which had to be considered in model building. The stiffening of the model in the contact region caused by the discretization had to be compensated by springs inserted between the sample and the anvils. The simulation reproduces the experimentally observed behaviour of the sample quite well. Furthermore, additional information can be extracted from the experiment, e.g. concerning the partition of the impact energy. (orig.) [de

  16. Impact of Participatory Health Research: A Test of the Community-Based Participatory Research Conceptual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Oetzel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. A key challenge in evaluating the impact of community-based participatory research (CBPR is identifying what mechanisms and pathways are critical for health equity outcomes. Our purpose is to provide an empirical test of the CBPR conceptual model to address this challenge. Methods. A three-stage quantitative survey was completed: (1 294 US CBPR projects with US federal funding were identified; (2 200 principal investigators completed a questionnaire about project-level details; and (3 450 community or academic partners and principal investigators completed a questionnaire about perceived contextual, process, and outcome variables. Seven in-depth qualitative case studies were conducted to explore elements of the model not captured in the survey; one is presented due to space limitations. Results. We demonstrated support for multiple mechanisms illustrated by the conceptual model using a latent structural equation model. Significant pathways were identified, showing the positive association of context with partnership structures and dynamics. Partnership structures and dynamics showed similar associations with partnership synergy and community involvement in research; both of these had positive associations with intermediate community changes and distal health outcomes. The case study complemented and extended understandings of the mechanisms of how partnerships can improve community conditions. Conclusions. The CBPR conceptual model is well suited to explain key relational and structural pathways for impact on health equity outcomes.

  17. Organizational Heritage and Entrepreneurship: Steven Klepper’s Theories Reflected in the Emergence and Growth of the Plastic Molds Industry in Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, Carla

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of the emergence of the molds and plastics industries in Portugal, finding that this history fits nicely with the accounts—originally proposed in Steven Klepper’s various works—of new industries emerging from older, related industries, and regional clusters emerging

  18. Hydraulic impact end effector final test report. Automation and robotics section, ER/WM-AT Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couture, S.

    1994-01-01

    One tool being developed for dislodging and fragmenting the hard salt cake waste in the single-shell nuclear waste tanks at the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington, is the hydraulic impact end effector (HIEE). This total operates by discharging 11-in. slugs of water at ultrahigh pressures. The HIEE was designed, built, and initially tested in 1992. Work in 1993 included advanced developments of the HIEE to further investigate its fragmentation abilities and to determine more effective operating procedures. These tests showed that more fragmentation can be achieved by increasing the charge pressure of 40 kpsi to 55 kpsi and by the use of different operating procedures. The size of the material and the impact energy of the water slug fired from the HIEE are believed to be major factors in material fragmentation. The material's ability to fracture also appears to depend on the distance a fracture or crack line must travel to a free surface. Thus, larger material is more difficult to fracture than smaller material. Discharge pressures of 40 kpsi resulted in little penetration or fracturing of the material. At 55 kpsi, however, the size and depth of the fractures increased. Nozzle geometry had a significant effect on fragment size and quantity. Fragmentation was about an order of magnitude greater when the HIEE was discharged into drilled holes rather than onto the material surface. Since surface shots tend to create craters, a multi-shot procedure, coupled with an advanced nozzle design, was used to drill (crater) deep holes into large material. With this procedure, a 600-lb block was reduced to smaller pieces without the use of any additional equipment. Through this advanced development program, the HIEE has demonstrated that it can quickly fragment salt cake material into small, easily removable fragments. The HIEE's material fragmentation ability can be substantially increased through the use of different nozzle geometries and operating procedures

  19. The Impact of Data-Based Science Instruction on Standardized Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, Tia W.

    Increased teacher accountability efforts have resulted in the use of data to improve student achievement. This study addressed teachers' inconsistent use of data-driven instruction in middle school science. Evidence of the impact of data-based instruction on student achievement and school and district practices has been well documented by researchers. In science, less information has been available on teachers' use of data for classroom instruction. Drawing on data-driven decision making theory, the purpose of this study was to examine whether data-based instruction impacted performance on the science Criterion Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) and to explore the factors that impeded its use by a purposeful sample of 12 science teachers at a data-driven school. The research questions addressed in this study included understanding: (a) the association between student performance on the science portion of the CRCT and data-driven instruction professional development, (b) middle school science teachers' perception of the usefulness of data, and (c) the factors that hindered the use of data for science instruction. This study employed a mixed methods sequential explanatory design. Data collected included 8th grade CRCT data, survey responses, and individual teacher interviews. A chi-square test revealed no improvement in the CRCT scores following the implementation of professional development on data-driven instruction (chi 2 (1) = .183, p = .67). Results from surveys and interviews revealed that teachers used data to inform their instruction, indicating time as the major hindrance to their use. Implications for social change include the development of lesson plans that will empower science teachers to deliver data-based instruction and students to achieve identified academic goals.

  20. Prediction of psychological functioning one year after the predictive test for Huntington's disease and impact of the test result on reproductive decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decruyenaere, M; Evers-Kiebooms, G; Boogaerts, A; Cassiman, J J; Cloostermans, T; Demyttenaere, K; Dom, R; Fryns, J P; Van den Berghe, H

    1996-01-01

    For people at risk for Huntington's disease, the anxiety and uncertainty about the future may be very burdensome and may be an obstacle to personal decision making about important life issues, for example, procreation. For some at risk persons, this situation is the reason for requesting predictive DNA testing. The aim of this paper is two-fold. First, we want to evaluate whether knowing one's carrier status reduces anxiety and uncertainty and whether it facilitates decision making about procreation. Second, we endeavour to identify pretest predictors of psychological adaptation one year after the predictive test (psychometric evaluation of general anxiety, depression level, and ego strength). The impact of the predictive test result was assessed in 53 subjects tested, using pre- and post-test psychometric measurement and self-report data of follow up interviews. Mean anxiety and depression levels were significantly decreased one year after a good test result; there was no significant change in the case of a bad test result. The mean personality profile, including ego strength, remained unchanged one year after the test. The study further shows that the test result had a definite impact on reproductive decision making. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were used to select the best predictors of the subject's post-test reactions. The results indicate that a careful evaluation of pretest ego strength, depression level, and coping strategies may be helpful in predicting post-test reactions, independently of the carrier status. Test result (carrier/ non-carrier), gender, and age did not significantly contribute to the prediction. About one third of the variance of post-test anxiety and depression level and more than half of the variance of ego strength was explained, implying that other psychological or social aspects should also be taken into account when predicting individual post-test reactions. PMID:8880572

  1. Från outsiderfilmmakare till etablerad indieregissör : David Lynch, Jim Jarmusch och Steven Soderbergh

    OpenAIRE

    Simberg, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Det här arbetet behandlar kreativ frihet och konstnärligt oberoende i filmskapande, utgående från begreppet independent film och regissörerna David Lynch, Jim Jarmusch och Steven Soderbergh. Den centrala frågeställningen är hur det har varit möjligt för en filmkonstnär att uppnå konstnärligt oberoende och samtidigt ha en långlivad och framgångsrik karriär. Arbetets fokus ligger på de tre regissörernas genombrottsfilmer; Eraserhead, Stranger Than Paradise och sex, lies, and videotape, och förs...

  2. Síndrome de Stevens-Johnson e necrólise epidérmica tóxica

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Inês Dionísio

    2013-01-01

    Trabalho final de mestrado integrado em Medicina (Dermatologia), apresentado à Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Coimbra. A Síndrome de Stevens-Johnson (SSJ) e a necrólise epidérmica tóxica (NET) são reacções mucocutâneas raras consideradas emergências médicas, podendo tornar-se fatais. Constituem dois extremos do mesmo espectro clínico das reacções cutâneas severas adversas a fármacos com necrose epidérmica, diferindo apenas na extensão do descolamento epidérmico. A gra...

  3. Stevens Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis and SJS-TEN overlap: A retrospective study of causative drugs and clinical outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Vinod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Stevens Johnson syndrome (SJS, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN and SJS-TEN overlap are serious adverse cutaneous drug reactions. Drugs are often implicated in these reactions. Methods: A retrospective analysis of inpatients′ data with these dermatological diagnoses were carried out for three years, to study the causative drugs, clinical outcome, and mortality in these conditions. Results: Thirty patients (15 TEN, nine SJS-TEN overlap, and six SJS were admitted. In 21 cases, multiple drugs were implicated whereas single drugs were responsible in nine. Anticonvulsants (35.08% were the most commonly implicated drugs followed by antibiotics (33.33% and NSAIDS (24.56%. Twenty-five patients recovered whereas five died (four TEN, one SJS-TEN overlap. Conclusion: Anticonvulsants, antibiotics and NSAIDs were the most frequently implicated drugs. TEN causes higher mortality than both SJS and SJS-TEN overlap.

  4. Association of HLA-BFNx011502 allele and carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome among Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Timir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis are severe cutaneous reactions caused by certain drugs, including antiepileptic carbamazepine. A strong association has been reported between human leucocyte antigen (HLA-BFNx011502 and carbamazepine-induced SJS in Han Chinese patients. European studies suggested that HLA-BFNx011502 is not a universal marker but is ethnicity-specific for Asians. Aim: To study the association between HLA-BFNx011502 and carbamazepine-induced SJS in Indian patients. Methods: Eight individuals who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of SJS induced by carbamazepine were identified and HLA-B molecular typing was performed. HLA-B genotyping was carried out by polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific primers. Results: Out of eight patients studied for genotype, six patients were found to have the HLA-BFNx011502 allele. Conclusion: This study suggests an association between HLA-BFNx011502 and carbamazepine-induced SJS in Indian patients.

  5. Steven Pinker. The Better Angels of Our Nature. Why violence has declined. Viking Adult, New York, 2011, 832 p.

    OpenAIRE

    Jairo Antonio Melo Flórez

    2011-01-01

    Aunque ya es una tesis bastante aceptada por los historiadores y sociólogos, la posibilidad de que, al contrario de la creencia popular, vivamos en tal vez una de las épocas más pacíficas de la historia es aún controvertida, más aún cuando llega un trabajo de una de las figuras públicas de la academia como es el profesor de Harvard Steven Pinker. Sin embargo, Pinker se había dedicado a psicología cognitiva y ganó fama al presentar al lenguaje como un instinto de la humanidad, y más aún al pre...

  6. Steven Pinker. The Better Angels of Our Nature. Why violence has declined. Viking Adult, New York, 2011, 832 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Antonio Melo Flórez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aunque ya es una tesis bastante aceptada por los historiadores y sociólogos, la posibilidad de que, al contrario de la creencia popular, vivamos en tal vez una de las épocas más pacíficas de la historia es aún controvertida, más aún cuando llega un trabajo de una de las figuras públicas de la academia como es el profesor de Harvard Steven Pinker. Sin embargo, Pinker se había dedicado a psicología cognitiva y ganó fama al presentar al lenguaje como un instinto de la humanidad, y más aún al presentar sus resultados en libros dirigidos al público en general, algo bastante común entre los científicos norteamericanos.

  7. 78 FR 43066 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; National Standard 2-Scientific Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... definition of BSIA should be avoided due to the dynamic nature of science. Therefore, as recommended by the... impact of this action on current Council peer review practices should be minimal because the peer review..., social and economic impacts of management measures, and sustainability of fishing practices.'' Id. 16 U.S...

  8. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis due to anticonvulsants share certain clinical and laboratory features with drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, despite differences in cutaneous presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraki, Y; Shibuya, M; Izaki, S

    2010-10-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS)/drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is characterized by late disease onset, fever, rash, hepatic dysfunction, haematological abnormalities, lymphadenopathy and often, human herpesvirus (HHV) reactivation. The diagnosis of DIHS is based on the combined presence of these findings. Anticonvulsants are a major cause of DIHS and may also cause Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). We examined whether SJS/TEN due to anticonvulsants display similar clinical and laboratory features seen in DIHS. Patients diagnosed with SJS or TEN due to anticonvulsants (n = 8) were examined and their clinical features and laboratory findings were compared with patients with anticonvulsant-related DIHS (n = 6). Seven of the eight patients with SJS/TEN developed symptoms > 3 weeks after starting anticonvulsants. Hepatic dysfunction was present in six patients with SJS/TEN and five patients with DIHS. Leucocytosis and/or eosinophilia was noted in seven patients with SJS/TEN and four patients with DIHS. Only one patient in the SJS/TEN group had atypical lymphocytosis; this was present in four patients with DIHS. Reactivation of HHV-6 was detected in one of the four patients tested in the SJS/TEN group, although it was seen in five of the six patients with DIHS. TSJS/TEN due to anticonvulsants may exhibit some clinical and laboratory features of DIHS. The nature of the cutaneous involvement should be emphasized in the diagnosis of DIHS. © 2009 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2009 British Association of Dermatologists.

  9. Chicxulub: testing for post-impact hydrothermal inputs into the Tertiary ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, A.; Wilkinson, J.; Morgan, J.

    2003-04-01

    Large terrestrial impacts produce intense fracturing of the crust and large melt sheets, providing ideal conditions for extensive hydrothermal circulation. In marine settings, such as Chicxulub, there is the potential for downward penetration of cold seawater, heating by the thermal anomaly at the impact site and leaching of metals, prior to buoyancy driven flow back to the surface. There, fluids may undergo venting into the water column. A large proportion of the metals in such vent fluids precipitate close to the site of discharge; however, a proportion of the fluid is dispersed as a hydrothermal plume. Dissolved and particulate materials (in particular manganese and iron oxyhydroxides) can be carried for several hundreds of kilometers, before falling out to form metal-rich sediments. A series of Tertiary core samples has been obtained from the International Continental Drilling Program at Chicxulub (CSDP). These comprise fine-grained cream coloured carbonate sediments with fine laminations. Transmitted light and cathodoluminescence petrography have been used to carry out a preliminary characterization of the samples. Multi-element analysis has also been undertaken by ICP-AES. Samples were reduced to powder and digested using a nitric-perchloric-hydrofluoric acid attack. Rare earth elements (REE) have been analysed by ICP-MS and solutions were prepared using a modified nitric-perchloric-hydrofluoric acid attack. Geochemical analyses have been carried out to test for characteristic signals of hydrothermal input, such as enrichments in Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Mg, Ba, Co, Cr and Ni. The REE are scavenged from seawater onto iron oxide surfaces in the plume; hence anomalous REE concentrations are also indicative of hydrothermal addition. Furthermore, the type of anomaly can differentiate between sediments proximal (+ve Eu) distal (-ve Ce) to the vent site. The stratigraphic extent of any anomalies can be used to constrain the duration of any post-impact circulation. The

  10. The effects of revised barrier and dummy specification in the side impact test procedure of EURO NCAP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waagmeester, C.D.; Zuljar, R.; Versmissen, A.C.M.; Ratingen, M.R. van

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the effects of potential changes to the side impact test in EuroNCAP are studied. Research in Europe has come to the point that enhanced alternatives will soon become available for the test tools used, in the form of the EUROSID-2 (ES-2), Q child dummies and the progressive MDB

  11. A prospective study of the impact of genetic susceptibility testing for BRCA1/2 or HNPCC on family relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, Iris; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; Brocker-Vriends, Annette H. J. T.; van Asperen, Chhstl J.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Gool, Arthur R.; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Riedijk, Samantha R.; van Dooren, Silvia; Tibben, Aad

    This study assessed the impact of genetic testing for cancer susceptibility on family relationships and determinants of adverse consequences for family relationships. Applicants for genetic testing of a known familial pathogenic mutation in BRCA1/2 or a HNPCC related gene (N = 271) rated the

  12. A prospective study of the impact of genetic susceptibility testing for BRCA1/2 or HNPCC on family relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, Iris; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; Bröcker-Vriends, Annette H. J. T.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Gool, Arthur R.; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Riedijk, Samantha R.; van Dooren, Silvia; Tibben, Aad

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of genetic testing for cancer susceptibility on family relationships and determinants of adverse consequences for family relationships. Applicants for genetic testing of a known familial pathogenic mutation in BRCA1/2 or a HNPCC related gene (N=271) rated the

  13. A prospective study of the impact of genetic susceptibility testing for BRCA1/2 or HNPCC on family relationships.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostrom, I.I.H. van; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Brocker-Vriends, A.H.; Asperen, C.J. van; Sijmons, R.H.; Seynaeve, C.; Gool, A.R. van; Klijn, J.G.M.; Riedijk, S.R.; Dooren, S. van; Tibben, A.

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of genetic testing for cancer susceptibility on family relationships and determinants of adverse consequences for family relationships. Applicants for genetic testing of a known familial pathogenic mutation in BRCA1/2 or a HNPCC related gene (N=271) rated the

  14. DebriSat: The New Hypervelocity Impact Test for Satellite Breakup Fragment Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, Heather

    2015-01-01

    To replicate a hyper-velocity fragmentation event using modern-day spacecraft materials and construction techniques to better improve the existing DoD and NASA breakup models: DebriSat is intended to be representative of modern LEO satellites. Major design decisions were reviewed and approved by Aerospace subject matter experts from different disciplines. DebriSat includes 7 major subsystems. Attitude determination and control system (ADCS), command and data handling (C&DH), electrical power system (EPS), payload, propulsion, telemetry tracking and command (TT&C), and thermal management. To reduce cost, most components are emulated based on existing design of flight hardware and fabricated with the same materials. center dotA key laboratory-based test, Satellite Orbital debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), supporting the development of the DoD and NASA satellite breakup models was conducted at AEDC in 1992. Breakup models based on SOCIT have supported many applications and matched on-orbit events reasonably well over the years.

  15. Standard Test Method for Impact Resistance of Monolithic Polycarbonate Sheet by Means of a Falling Weight

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1995-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the energy required to initiate failure in monolithic polycarbonate sheet material under specified conditions of impact using a free falling weight. 1.2 Two specimen types are defined as follows: 1.2.1 Type A consists of a flat plate test specimen and employs a clamped ring support. 1.2.2 Type B consists of a simply supported three-point loaded beam specimen (Fig. 1) and is recommended for use with material which can not be failed using the Type A specimen. For a maximum drop height of 6.096 m (20 ft) and a maximum drop weight of 22.68 kg (50 lb), virgin polycarbonate greater than 12.70 mm (1/2 in.) thick will probably require use of the Type B specimen. Note 1 - See also ASTM Methods: D 1709, D 2444 and D 3029. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of reg...

  16. Psychological impact of genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, B; Collins, V; Warren, R; Gaff, C; St John, D J B; Young, M-A; Harrop, K; Brown, J; Halliday, J

    2004-12-01

    The psychological impact of predictive genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was assessed in 114 individuals (32 carriers and 82 non-carriers) attending familial cancer clinics, using mailed self-administered questionnaires prior to, 2 weeks, 4 months and 12 months after carrier status disclosure. Compared to baseline, carriers showed a significant increase in mean scores for intrusive and avoidant thoughts about colorectal cancer 2 weeks (t = 2.49; p = 0.014) and a significant decrease in mean depression scores 2 weeks post-notification of result (t = -3.98; p depression scores 2 weeks, 4 months and 12 months post-notification. Significant decreases from baseline for mean state anxiety scores were also observed for non-carriers 2 weeks post-notification (t = -3.99; p < 0.001). These data indicate that predictive genetic testing for HNPCC leads to psychological benefits amongst non-carriers, and no adverse psychological outcomes were observed amongst carriers.

  17. Impact assessment of treated wastewater on water quality of the receiver using the Wilcoxon test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofman Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater treatment is a process which aims to reduce the concentration of pollutants in wastewater to the level allowed by current regulations. This is to protect the receivers which typically are rivers, streams, lakes. Examination of the quality of treated wastewater allows for quick elimination of possible negative effects, and the study of water receiver prevents from excessive contamination. The paper presents the results of selected physical and chemical parameters of treated wastewater from the largest on the region in north-eastern Poland city of Bialystok municipal wastewater treatment and Biała River, the receiver. The samples for research were taken 3–4 a month in 2015 from two points: before and after discharge. The impact of the wastewater treatment plant on the quality of the receiver waters was studied by using non-parametric Wilcoxon test. This test determined whether the analyzed indicators varied significantly depending on different sampling points of the river, above and below place of discharge of treated wastewater. These results prove that the treated wastewater does not affect the water quality in the Biała River.

  18. The impact of shape memory test on degradation profile of a bioresorbable polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musioł, Marta; Jurczyk, Sebastian; Kwiecień, Michał; Smola-Dmochowska, Anna; Domański, Marian; Janeczek, Henryk; Włodarczyk, Jakub; Klim, Magdalena; Rydz, Joanna; Kawalec, Michał; Sobota, Michał

    2018-05-01

    The semicrystalline poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) belongs to the materials with shape memory effect (SME) and as a bioresorbable and biocompatible polymer it have found many applications in medical and pharmaceutical field. Assessment of the SME impact on the polymer degradation profile plays crucial role in applications such as drug release systems or in regenerative medicine. Herein, the results of in vitro degradation studies of PLLA samples after SME full test cycle are presented. The samples were loaded and deformed in two manners: progressive and non-progressive. The performed experiments illustrate also influence of the material mechanical damages, caused e.g. during incorrect implantation of PLLA product, on hydrolytic degradation profile. Apparently, degradation profiles are significantly different for the material which was not subjected to the deformation and the deformed ones. The materials after deformation of 50% (in SME cycle) was characterized by non-reversible morphology changes. The effect was observed in deformed samples during the SME test which were carried out ten times. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact parameter determination for the passage of cosmic heavy ions through mesoscopic biological test organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facius, R.; Reitz, G.; Buecker, H.; Nevzgodina, L.V.; Maximova, E.N.

    1992-01-01

    Seeds of the plant Lactuca sativa as a prototype of a mesoscopic, i.e. neither micro- nor truly macroscopic, biological test organism, were exposed during the Biocosmos 9 mission to cosmic heavy ions within stacks of visual track detectors in order to explore the not yet properly understood radiobiological effects of single heavy ions. In such an investigation, the establishment of the geometrical correlation between the ion trajectories and the location of radiation-sensitive biological substructures is an essential task. We describe how this was achieved for biological test organisms, whose location and orientation had to be derived from contact photographs displaying their outlines and those of the holder plates only. The overall qualitative and quantitative precision achieved, as well as the contributing sources of uncertainties are discussed in detail. A precision of ≅ 10μm was accomplished for the coordinates of particle trajectories, which is near the limit set by the mechanical precision and stability of the detector material. The precision of the impact parameter is limited by the uncertainty in the location of the internal structures, which at best is around 50 and at worst around 150 μm, but is still acceptable when compared with the extension of the sensitive structures. (author)

  20. Impact parameter determination for the passage of cosmic heavy ions through mesoscopic biological test organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facius, R.; Reitz, G.; Buecker, H. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Koeln (Germany)); Nevzgodina, L.V.; Maximova, E.N. (Institute of Biomedical Problems, Moscow (USSR))

    1992-01-01

    Seeds of the plant Lactuca sativa as a prototype of a mesoscopic, i.e. neither micro- nor truly macroscopic, biological test organism, were exposed during the Biocosmos 9 mission to cosmic heavy ions within stacks of visual track detectors in order to explore the not yet properly understood radiobiological effects of single heavy ions. In such an investigation, the establishment of the geometrical correlation between the ion trajectories and the location of radiation-sensitive biological substructures is an essential task. We describe how this was achieved for biological test organisms, whose location and orientation had to be derived from contact photographs displaying their outlines and those of the holder plates only. The overall qualitative and quantitative precision achieved, as well as the contributing sources of uncertainties are discussed in detail. A precision of {approx equal} 10{mu}m was accomplished for the coordinates of particle trajectories, which is near the limit set by the mechanical precision and stability of the detector material. The precision of the impact parameter is limited by the uncertainty in the location of the internal structures, which at best is around 50 and at worst around 150 {mu}m, but is still acceptable when compared with the extension of the sensitive structures. (author).

  1. Investigating the Impact of Convergent vs. Divergent Assessment on ESL Students’ Anxiety and Test Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Saeedi Nasab

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Language assessment with its eye-catching nature, casts its spell on many researchers, spurring on them to study its telling role in different arenas. The present study with a closer look to the realm, keeps one eye on two fresh approaches in assessment, namely convergent and divergent, and the other one on anxiety in a bid to slash its negative impact on students’ performance. The researchers resort to a correlational method with Ex Post Facto design, along with different tests, to forward the foregoing aim; discovering and appraising the degree of relationship stands between the two variables. Analyzing data gathered in this hybrid research on 55 young Iranian male and female students in two schools, located in United Arab Emirates (UAE, the researchers reaped findings which bore witness to the main proposed hypotheses, illustrating that divergent assessment (DA was more effective in reducing learners’ test anxiety level in comparison with convergent assessment (CA which, in turn, led up to better performance in the participants. Some implications for EFL teachers, to include the similar strategies in their lesson plan, offered at the very end which is followed by proposing some new horizons for further studies and investigations.

  2. Neurocognitive performance and symptom profiles of Spanish-speaking Hispanic athletes on the ImPACT test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Summer; Schatz, Philip; Solomon, Gary; Ryan, Joseph J

    2014-03-01

    This study documented baseline neurocognitive performance of 23,815 athletes on the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) test. Specifically, 9,733 Hispanic, Spanish-speaking athletes who completed the ImPACT test in English and 2,087 Hispanic, Spanish-speaking athletes who completed the test in Spanish were compared with 11,955 English-speaking athletes who completed the test in English. Athletes were assigned to age groups (13-15, 16-18). Results revealed a significant effect of language group (p Spanish-speaking athletes completing the test in Spanish scored more poorly than Spanish-speaking and English-speaking athletes completing the test in English, on all Composite scores and Total Symptom scores. Spanish-speaking athletes completing the test in English also performed more poorly than English-speaking athletes completing the test in English on three Composite scores. These differences in performance and reported symptoms highlight the need for caution in interpreting ImPACT test data for Hispanic Americans.

  3. Impacts of transportation on a test and evaluation facility for nuclear waste disposal: a systems analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varadarajan, R.V.; Peterson, R.W.; Joy, D.S.; Gibson, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    An essential element of the Test and Evaluation Facility (TEF) is a waste packaging facility capable of producing a small number Test and Evaluation Facility of packages consisting of several different waste forms. The study envisions three scenarios for such a packaging facility: (1) modify an existing hot cell facility such as the Engine Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly (EMAD) facility at the Nevada Test Site so that it can serve as a packaging facility for the TEF. This scenario is referred to as the EMAD Option. (2) Build a new generic packaging facility (GPF) at the site of the TEF. In other words, colocate the GPF and the TEF. This scenario is referred to as the GPF Option, and (3) utilize the EMAD facility in conjunction with a colocated GPF (of minimal size and scope) at the TEF. This scenario is referred to as the Split Option. The results of the system study clearly bring out the fact that transportation has a significant impact on the selection and siting of the waste packaging facility. Preliminary conclusions, subject to the assumptions of the study, include the following: (1) regardless of the waste form, the GPF option is preferable to the other two in minimizing both transportation costs and logistical problems, (2) for any given scenario and choice of waste forms, there exists a candidate TEF location for which the transportation costs are at a minimum compared to the other locations, (3) in spite of the increased transportation costs and logistical complexity, the study shows that the overall system costs favor modification of an existing hot cell facility for the particular case considered

  4. Impact of HFE genetic testing on clinical presentation of hereditary hemochromatosis: new epidemiological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka Chandran

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is a common inherited disorder of iron metabolism in Northern European populations. The discovery of a candidate gene in 1996 (HFE, and of its main mutation (C282Y, has radically altered the way to diagnose this disease. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the HFE gene discovery on the clinical presentation and epidemiology of HH. Methods We studied our cohort of 415 patients homozygous for the C282Y allele and included in a phlebotomy program in a blood centre in western Brittany, France. Results In this cohort, 56.9% of the patients were male and 21.9% began their phlebotomy program before the implementation of the genetic test. A significant decrease in the sex ratio was noticed following implementation of this DNA test, from 3.79 to 1.03 (p -5, meaning that the proportion of diagnosed females relatives to males greatly increased. The profile of HH patients at diagnosis changed after the DNA test became available. Serum ferritin and iron values were lower and there was a reduced frequency of clinical signs displayed at diagnosis, particularly skin pigmentation (20.1 vs. 40.4%, OR = 0.37, p Conclusion This study highlights the importance of the HFE gene discovery, which has simplified the diagnosis of HH and modified its clinical presentation and epidemiology. This study precisely measures these changes. Enhanced diagnosis of HFE-related HH at an early stage and implementation of phlebotomy treatment are anticipated to maintain normal life expectancy for these patients.

  5. 78 FR 69943 - Anthropomorphic Test Devices; Q3s 3-Year-Old Child Side Impact Test Dummy, Incorporation by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... airbag tests, Stapp Car Crash Journal, V44: 25-50. Since the Q3 had yet to show it was suitable for side... on May 2, 2002, 67 FR 21836. In early 2002, NHTSA tested a prototype version of the Q3s.\\6\\ NHTSA..., durability, and biofidelity. We determined that the thorax of the prototype appeared biofidelic and...

  6. Response to Dr Stevens' letter ref. Visitisen et al: "Short-term effects of night shift work on breast cancer risk: a cohort study of payroll data".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolstad, Henrik A; Garde, Anne Helene; Hansen, Åse Marie; Frydenberg, Morten; Christiansen, Peer; Vistisen, Helene Tilma; Bonde, Jens Peter E

    2017-01-01

    We thank Dr Richard Stevens for his comments (1) on our recent article that showed no increased risk of breast cancer following recent night shift work when compared with recent day shift work (2). This finding was based on linkage of day-by-day information on working hours and breast cancer incidence data. Results are thus less likely to have been biased by differential misclassification than findings from earlier studies relying on self-report (3). We defined a night shift as ≥3 hours of work between 24:00-05:00 hours and a day shift as ≥3 hours work between 6:00-20:00 hours. This day shift definition did not exclude shifts starting before 05:00 or ending after 24:00 hours. However, this affected only 0.02% and 0.3% of all day shifts, respectively. This diminutive misclassification, that is expected to be non-differential, can hardly explain our negative findings. It is suggested that shifts that begin after 07:00 and end before 18:00 would constitute a more sensible baseline comparison group. Since the biological mechanism is not certain, it is not obvious to us if this will be a more appropriate reference than the present. However, we agree that future studies should test how different definitions of shifts affect the risk of breast cancer, which will be possible using this type of data. We only had information on working hours from 2007 and onwards, and night shift work prior to 2007 could have confounded our analyses towards no effect but only if inversely associated with night shift work in 2007 or later. We find this unlikely. Left truncation could also have biased findings towards the null. We therefore supplemented analyses of the total study population with analyses of the one-third of the population with first recorded employment in 2008 or later (the inception population). Even if the mean age was 35.5 years - and many undoubtedly had been working (with and without night shifts) prior to 2008 - this population should be less affected by such

  7. 75 FR 38030 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... disruption to summer fisheries, as no additional restrictions to fishery management measures are necessary at... impacts within the lowered yelloweye rockfish OY in accordance with the court's order; makes routine in...

  8. The performance assessment impacts of disposal of high-moisture, low-level radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.M.; Hansen, W.; Hechnova, A.; Voss, C.; Waters, R.; Sully, M.; Levitt, D.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of independent scientists was convened by the Department of Energy to assess the performance impacts of disposal of low-level radioactive waste from the Fernald Environmental Management Project. This waste stream was involved in a transportation incident in December 1997. A resulting outgrowth of investigations of the transportation incident was the recognition that the waste was transported and disposed in stress-fractured metal boxes and some of the waste contained excess moisture (high volumetric water contents). The panel was charged with determining whether disposal of this waste in the Area 5 radioactive waste management site on the Nevada Test Site has impacted the conclusions of the completed performance assessment. Three questions were developed by the panel to assess performance impacts: (1) the performance impacts of reduced container integrity, (2) the impact of reduced container integrity on subsidence of waste in the disposal pits and (3) the performance impacts of excess moisture. No performance or subsidence impacts were noted from disposal of the Fernald waste. The impacts of excess moisture were assessed through simulation modeling of the movement of moisture in the vadose zone assuming high water contents (wet waste) for different percentages of the waste inventory. No performance impacts were noted for either the base-case scenario (ambient conditions) or a scenario involving subsidence and flooding of the waste cells. The absence of performance impacts results form the extreme conservatism used in the Area 5-performance assessment and the robust nature of the disposal site

  9. Structural evaluation of spent nuclear fuel storage facilities under aircraft crash impact (2). Horizontal impact test onto reduced scale metal cask due to aircraft engine missile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namba, Kosuke; Shirai, Koji; Saegusa, Toshiari

    2009-01-01

    In this study, to confirm the sealing performance of a metal cask subjected to impact force due to possible commercial aircraft crash against a spent fuel storage facility, the horizontal impact test was carried out. In the test, an aircraft engine missile with a speed of 57.3 m/s attacked the reduced scale metal cask containing helium gas, which stands vertically. Then the leak rate and sliding displacement of the lid were measured. The leak rate increased rapidly and reached to 4.0 x 10 -6 Pa·m 3 /sec. After that, the leak rate decreased slowly and converged to 1.0x10 -6 Pa·m 3 /sec after 20 hours from the impact test. The leak rate of a full scale cask was evaluated using that of reduced scale cask obtained by the test. Then the leak rate of the full scale cask was 3.5x10 -5 Pa·m 3 /sec. This result showed that the sealing performance of the full scale metal cask would not be affected immediately by the horizontal impact of the aircraft engine with a speed of 57.3 m/s. (author)

  10. When we test, do we stress? Impact of the testing environment on cortisol secretion and memory performance in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindi, Shireen; Fiocco, Alexandra J; Juster, Robert-Paul; Pruessner, Jens; Lupien, Sonia J

    2013-08-01

    The majority of studies find that older adults have worse memory performance than young adults. However, contextual features in the testing environment may be perceived as stressful by older adults, increasing their stress hormone levels. Given the evidence that older adults are highly sensitive to the effects of stress hormones (cortisol) on memory performance, it is postulated that a stressful testing environment in older adults can lead to an acute stress response and to memory impairments. The current study compared salivary cortisol levels and memory performance in young and older adults tested in environments manipulated to be stressful (unfavourable condition) or not stressful (favourable condition) for each age group. 28 young adults and 32 older adults were tested in two testing conditions: (1) a condition favouring young adults (constructed to be less stressful for young adults), and (2) a condition favouring older adults (constructed to be less stressful for older adults). The main outcome measure was salivary cortisol levels. Additionally, immediate and delayed memory performances were assessed during each condition. In older adults only, we found significantly high cortisol levels and low memory performance in the condition favouring young adults. In contrast, cortisol levels were lower and memory performance was better when older adults were tested in conditions favouring them. There was no effect of testing condition in young adults. The results demonstrate that older adults' memory performance is highly sensitive to the testing environment. These findings have important implications for both research and clinical settings in which older adults are tested for memory performance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Preliminary draft: environmental impact statement for Hot Engineering Test Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, J.W.; Baxter, B.J.; Carpenter, J.A.

    1978-08-01

    The project considered is the Hot Engineering Test Project (HETP), which is to be located in largely existing facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The project is a part of the National High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Fuel Recycle Program, which seeks to demonstrate the technological feasibility of the recycle processes. The HETP will attempt to confirm the operability of the processes (proven feasible in cold or nonradioactive, benchtop experimentation) under the more realistic radioactive condition. As such, the operation will involve the reprocessing and refabrication of spent HTGR fuel rods obtained from the Fort St. Vrain reactor. The reference fuel is highly enriched uranium. No significant radiological impacts are expected from routine operation of the facility to any biota or ecosystem. Concentrations of one or more radionuclides in Whiteoak Lake will increase as a result of the combination of HETP wastes with other ORNL wastes. Nonradiological effects from construction activities and routine operation should be insignificant on land and water use and on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. No significant socioeconomic impacts should occur from either construction or operation of the facility. Some conservative accident scenarios depict significant releases of radioactivity. Effects should be localized and would not be severe for all but the most unlikely of such incidents. No significant long-term commitment of resources is expected to be required for the project. Nor are any large quantities of scarce or critical resources likely to be irreversibly or irretrievably committed to the project. Principal alternatives considered were: relocation of the project site, postponement of the project schedule, project cancellation, and chemical process variations

  12. Climate Analogues for agricultural impact projection and adaptation – a reliability test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swen P.M. Bos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The climate analogue approach is often considered a valuable tool for climate change impact projection and adaptation planning, especially for complex systems that cannot be modelled reliably. Important examples are smallholder farming systems using agroforestry or other mixed-cropping approaches. For the projected climate at a particular site of interest, the analogue approach identifies locations where the current climate is similar to these projected conditions. By comparing baseline-analogue site pairs, information on climate impacts and opportunities for adaptation can be obtained. However, the climate analogue approach is only meaningful, if climate is a dominant driver of differences between baseline and analogue site pairs. For a smallholder farming setting on Mt. Elgon in Kenya, we tested this requirement by comparing yield potentials of maize and coffee (obtained from the IIASA Global Agro-ecological Zones dataset among 50 close analogue sites for different future climate scenarios and models, and by comparing local ecological knowledge and farm characteristics for one baseline-analogue pair.Yield potentials among the 50 closest analogue locations varied strongly within all climate scenarios, hinting at factors other than climate as major drivers of what the analogue approach might interpret as climate effects. However, on average future climatic conditions seemed more favourable to maize and coffee cultivation than current conditions. The detailed site comparison revealed substantial differences between farms in important characteristics, such as farm size and presence of cash crops, casting doubt on the usefulness of the comparison for climate change analysis. Climatic constraints were similar between sites, so that no apparent lessons for adaptation could be derived. Pests and diseases were also similar, indicating that climate change may not lead to strong changes in biotic constraints at the baseline site in the near future. From

  13. The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2008-11-01

    The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with

  14. Ethics Standards Impacting Test Development and Use: A Review of 31 Ethics Codes Impacting Practices in 35 Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Mark M.; Oakland, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Ethics codes are designed to protect the public by prescribing behaviors professionals are expected to exhibit. Although test use is universal, albeit reflecting strong Western influences, previous studies that examine the degree issues pertaining to test development and use and that are addressed in ethics codes of national psychological…

  15. Impact of closed Brayton cycle test results on gas cooled reactor operation and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, St.A.; Pickard, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the measurements and model predictions for a series of tests supported by the U.S. Department of Energy that were performed using the recently constructed Sandia Brayton Loop (SBL-30). From the test results we have developed steady-state power operating curves, controls methodologies, and transient data for normal and off-normal behavior, such as loss of load events, and for decay heat removal conditions after shutdown. These tests and models show that because the turbomachinery operates off of the temperature difference (between the heat source and the heat sink), that the turbomachinery can continue to operate (off of sensible heat) for long periods of time without auxiliary power. For our test hardware, operations up to one hour have been observed. This effect can provide significant operations and safety benefits for nuclear reactors that are coupled to a Brayton cycles because the operating turbomachinery continues to provide cooling to the reactor. These capabilities mean that the decay-heat removal can be accommodated by properly managing the electrical power produced by the generator/alternator. In some conditions, it may even be possible to produce sufficient power to continue operating auxiliary systems including the waste heat circulatory system. In addition, the Brayton plant impacts the consequences of off-normal and accident events including loss of load and loss of on-site power. We have observed that for a loss of load or a loss of on-site power event, with a reactor scram, the transient consists initially of a turbomachinery speed increase to a new stable operating point. Because the turbomachinery is still spinning, the reactor is still being cooled provided the ultimate heat sink remains available. These highly desirable operational characteristics were observed in the Sandia Brayton loop. This type of behavior is also predicted by our models. Ultimately, these results provide the designers the opportunity to design gas

  16. Test Report for MSFC Test No. 83-2: Pressure scaled water impact test of a 12.5 inch diameter model of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster filament wound case and external TVC PCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Water impact tests using a 12.5 inch diameter model representing a 8.56 percent scale of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster configuration were conducted. The two primary objectives of this SRB scale model water impact test program were: 1. Obtain cavity collapse applied pressure distributions for the 8.56 percent rigid body scale model FWC pressure magnitudes as a function of full-scale initial impact conditions at vertical velocities from 65 to 85 ft/sec, horizontal velocities from 0 to 45 ft/sec, and angles from -10 to +10 degrees. 2. Obtain rigid body applied pressures on the TVC pod and aft skirt internal stiffener rings at initial impact and cavity collapse loading events. In addition, nozzle loads were measured. Full scale vertical velocities of 65 to 85 ft/sec, horizontal velocities of 0 to 45 ft/sec, and impact angles from -10 to +10 degrees simulated.

  17. Lab-scale impact test to investigate the pipe-soil interaction and comparative study to evaluate structural responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Man Ryu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the dynamic response of a subsea pipeline under an impact load to determine the effect of the seabed soil. A laboratory-scale soil-based pipeline impact test was carried out to investigate the pipeline deformation/strain as well as the interaction with the soil-pipeline. In addition, an impact test was simulated using the finite element technique, and the calculated strain was compared with the experimental results. During the simulation, the pipeline was described based on an elasto-plastic analysis, and the soil was modeled using the Mohr-Coulomb fail-ure criterion. The results obtained were compared with ASME D31.8, and the differences between the analysis results and the rules were specifically investigated. Modified ASME formulae were proposed to calculate the precise structural behavior of a subsea pipeline under an impact load when considering sand- and clay-based seabed soils.

  18. Impact assessment of fly ash on ground water quality: An experimental study using batch leaching tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandautiya, Rahul; Singh, Ajit Pratap; Kundu, Sanghamitra

    2018-05-01

    The fly ash, generated at the coal-based thermal power plant, is always a cause of concern to environmentalists owing to its adverse impact on air, water and land. There exists a high environmental risk when it is disposed to the environment. Thus, two different type of fly ash samples (FA-1 and FA-2) have been considered in this study to examine the leaching potential of the elements magnesium, aluminium, silicon, calcium, titanium, vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, nickel, cobalt, copper, zinc, arsenic, selenium, strontium, cadmium, barium and lead for different types of leachant. Toxicity characteristics leaching procedure and ASTM tests have been performed in the laboratory to simulate different natural leaching scenarios. Characterisation of samples have been done through X-ray diffraction and field emission gun scanning electron microscope. The effect of different liquid to solid ratios (i.e. 5, 10, 20 and 50) on the mobilisation of elements has been analysed. The results indicated that the maximum leaching of all elements occurred at a liquid to solid ratio of 5 except for arsenic, barium and silicon. The groundwater analysis has also been done to understand the actual effects of leachate. The elements presenting the highest leachability in the two fly ash samples under all tested conditions were magnesium, aluminium, silicon and calcium. It has been observed that calcium exhibits greater leaching effects than all other constituents. The study presented here has been found very useful for assessing contamination levels in groundwater owing to leaching effects of fly ash under different scenarios, which can be helpful to prevent spreading of the contaminants by efficient management of fly ash.

  19. Impact on colorectal cancer mortality of screening programmes based on the faecal immunochemical test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Manuel; Fedeli, Ugo; Schievano, Elena; Bovo, Emanuela; Guzzinati, Stefano; Baracco, Susanna; Fedato, Chiara; Saugo, Mario; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programmes based on the guaiac faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) reduce CRC-specific mortality. Several studies have shown higher sensitivity with the faecal immunochemical test (FIT) compared with gFOBT. We carried out an ecological study to evaluate the impact of FIT-based screening programmes on CRC mortality. In the Veneto Region (Italy), biennial FIT-based screening programmes that invited 50-69-year-old residents were introduced in different areas between 2002 and 2009. We compared CRC mortality rates from 1995 to 2011 between the areas where screening started in 2002-2004 (early screening areas (ESA)) and areas that introduced the screening in 2008-2009 (late screening areas (LSA)) using Poisson regression models. We also compared available data on CRC incidence rates (1995-2007) and surgical resection rates (2001-2012). Before the introduction of screening, CRC mortality and incidence rates in the two areas were similar. Compared with 1995-2000, 2006-2011 mortality rates were 22% lower in the ESA than in the LSA (rate ratio (RR)=0.78; 95% CI 0.68 to 0.89). The reduction was larger in women (RR=0.64; CI 0.51 to 0.80) than in men (RR=0.87; CI 0.73 to 1.04). In the ESA, incidence and surgery rates peaked during the introduction of the screening programme and then returned to the baseline (2006-2007 incidence) or dropped below initial values (surgery after 2007). FIT-based screening programmes were associated with a significant reduction in CRC mortality. This effect took place much earlier than reported by gFOBT-based trials and observational studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Dual axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 2: Public comments and responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    On May 12, 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the draft Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility Environmental Impact Statement (DARHT EIS) for review by the State of New Mexico, Indian Tribes, local governments, other Federal agencies, and the general public. DOE invited comments on the accuracy and adequacy of the draft EIS and any other matters pertaining to their environmental reviews. The formal comment period ran for 45 days, to June 26, 1995, although DOE indicated that late comments would be considered to the extent possible. As part of the public comment process, DOE held two public hearings in Los Alamos and Santa Fe, New Mexico, on May 31 and June 1, 1995. In addition, DOE made the draft classified supplement to the DARHT EIS available for review by appropriately cleared individuals with a need to know the classified information. Reviewers of the classified material included the State of New Mexico, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense, and certain Indian Tribes. Volume 2 of the final DARHT EIS contains three chapters. Chapter 1 includes a collective summary of the comments received and DOE`s response. Chapter 2 contains the full text of the public comments on the draft DARHT EIS received by DOE. Chapter 3 contains DOE`s responses to the public comments and an indication as to how the comments were considered in the final EIS.

  1. Reducing health impacts of biomass burning for cooking. The need for cookstove performance testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeliotis, K. [Department of Home Economics and Ecology, Harokopio University, Athens (Greece); Pakula, C. [Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Section Household and Appliance Technology, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms University, Bonn (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Biomass is a renewable energy source that is routinely used for cooking in the developing world, especially in rural areas. The World Health Organization estimates that about 2.5 billion people globally rely on biomass, such as wood, agricultural waste and animal dung to meet their energy needs for cooking utilising traditional low-efficiency cookstoves. However, certain human health risks are associated with the inhalation of off-gases resulting from the indoor use of biomass for cooking, especially for women and children who spend more of their time at home. On the other hand, use of energy-efficient cookstoves is considered to reduce those risks. Thus, qualitative and quantitative measurements of cookstove performance are necessary in order to make different stoves and different cooking processes comparable. The aim of this paper is the presentation of the current situation regarding biomass use for cooking with emphasis placed on the developing world, the brief of the adverse health impacts of biomass burning based on the review of literature, the presentation of the merits of improved efficiency cookstoves and to highlight the need for stove performance tests. The demand of different types of biomass is not likely to change in the near future in the developing world since biomass is readily available and cheap. Thus, the efforts to improve household air quality must concentrate on improving cookstoves efficiency and ventilation of the flue gases outdoors. Programmes for the improvement of the cookstoves efficiency in the developing world should be part of the development agenda.

  2. Radiation impact on the characteristics of optical glasses test results on a selected set of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit, Michel; Gussarov, Andrei; Berghmans, Francis; Doyle, Dominic; Ulbrich, Gerd

    2017-11-01

    It is well known within the Space optics community that radiation may significantly affect transmittance of glasses. To overcome this drawback, glass manufacturers have developed Cerium doped counterparts of classical glasses. This doped glasses display much less transmittance sensitivity to radiation. Still, the impact of radiation on refractive index is less known and may affect indifferently classical or Cerium doped glasses. ESTEC has initialised an R&D program with the aim of establishing a comprehensive data base gathering radiation sensitivity data, called Dose coefficients, for all the glass optical parameters (transmittance / refractive index / compaction……). The first part of this study, to define the methodology for such a data base, is run by ASTRIUM SAS in co-operation with SCK CEN. This covers theoretical studies associated to testing of a selected set of classical and "radiation hardened" glasses. It is proposed here to present first the theoretical backgrounds of this study and then to give results which have been obtained so far.

  3. The impact of the orbital decay of the LAGEOS satellites on the frame-dragging tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The laser-tracked geodetic satellites LAGEOS, LAGEOS II and LARES are currently employed, among other things, to measure the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect in the gravitomagnetic field of the spinning Earth with the hope of providing a more accurate test of such a prediction of the Einstein's theory of gravitation than the existing ones. The secular decay a ˙ of the semimajor axes a of such spacecrafts, recently measured in an independent way to a σȧ ≈ 0.1-0.01 m yr-1 accuracy level, may indirectly impact the proposed relativistic experiment through its connection with the classical orbital precessions induced by the Earth's oblateness J2 . Indeed, the systematic bias due to the current measurement errors σȧ is of the same order of magnitude of, or even larger than, the expected relativistic signal itself; moreover, it grows linearly with the time span T of the analysis. Therefore, the parameter-fitting algorithms must be properly updated in order to suitably cope with such a new source of systematic uncertainty. Otherwise, an improvement of one-two orders of magnitude in measuring the orbital decay of the satellites of the LAGEOS family would be required to reduce this source of systematic uncertainty to a percent fraction of the Lense-Thirring signature.

  4. Terahertz and Thermal Testing of Glass-Fiber Reinforced Composites with Impact Damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Chady

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The studies on glass-fiber reinforced composites, due to their growing popularity and high diversity of industrial applications, are becoming an increasingly popular branch of the nondestructive testing. Mentioned composites are used, among other applications, in wind turbine blades and are exposed to various kinds of damages. The equipment reliability requirements force the development of accurate methods of their health monitoring. In this paper we present the study of composite samples with impact damages, using three methods: terahertz time domain inspection, active thermography with convective excitation, and active thermography with microwave excitation. The results of discrete Fourier transform of obtained time sequences of signals will be presented as well as some image processing of resulting amplitude and phase images. Proposed experimental methods combined with harmonic analysis are efficient tool of defects detection and allowed to detect flaws in examined specimens. Reader may find it interesting that in spite of differences in nature of applied experimental methods, one technique of signal processing (harmonic analysis gave adequate and comparable results in each case.

  5. The Validity of Value-Added Estimates from Low-Stakes Testing Contexts: The Impact of Change in Test-Taking Motivation and Test Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Sara J.; Sundre, Donna L.; Swain, Matthew S.; Williams, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    Accountability mandates often prompt assessment of student learning gains (e.g., value-added estimates) via achievement tests. The validity of these estimates have been questioned when performance on tests is low stakes for students. To assess the effects of motivation on value-added estimates, we assigned students to one of three test consequence…

  6. 78 FR 25214 - Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act Provisions; Fisheries of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... longer, which could increase interactions with protected resources and trigger additional management... action is necessary to help mitigate expected adverse economic and social harm resulting from substantial... biological, economic, and social impact analysis for this action are contained in the environmental...

  7. Simulation analysis of impact tests of steel plate reinforced concrete and reinforced concrete slabs against aircraft impact and its validation with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, Muhammad; Xiu Yun, Zhu; Rong, Pan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Simulation analysis is carried out with two constitutive concrete models. • Winfrith model can better simulate nonlinear response of concrete than CSCM model. • Performance of steel plate concrete is better than reinforced concrete. • Thickness of safety related structures can be reduced by adopting steel plates. • Analysis results, mainly concrete material models should be validated. - Abstract: The steel plate reinforced concrete and reinforced concrete structures are used in nuclear power plants for protection against impact of an aircraft. In order to compare the impact resistance performance of steel plate reinforced concrete and reinforced concrete slabs panels, simulation analysis of 1/7.5 scale model impact tests is carried out by using finite element code ANSYS/LS-DYNA. The damage modes of all finite element models, velocity time history curves of the aircraft engine and damage to aircraft model are compared with the impact test results of steel plate reinforced concrete and reinforced concrete slab panels. The results indicate that finite element simulation results correlate well with the experimental results especially for constitutive winfrith concrete model. Also, the impact resistance performance of steel plate reinforced concrete slab panels is better than reinforced concrete slab panels, particularly the rear face steel plate is very effective in preventing the perforation and scabbing of concrete than conventional reinforced concrete structures. In this way, the thickness of steel plate reinforced concrete structures can be reduced in important structures like nuclear power plants against impact of aircraft. It also demonstrates the methodology to validate the analysis procedure with experimental and analytical studies. It may be effectively employed to predict the precise response of safety related structures against aircraft impact

  8. Impacts Analyses Supporting the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, Annette L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Brown, LLoyd C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carathers, David C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Christensen, Boyd D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dahl, James J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Mark L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Farnum, Cathy Ottinger [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peterson, Steven [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sondrup, A. Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Subaiya, Peter V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wachs, Daniel M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Weiner, Ruth F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This document contains the analysis details and summary of analyses conducted to evaluate the environmental impacts for the Resumption of Transient Fuel and Materials Testing Program. It provides an assessment of the impacts for the two action alternatives being evaluated in the environmental assessment. These alternatives are (1) resumption of transient testing using the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and (2) conducting transient testing using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico (SNL/NM). Analyses are provided for radiologic emissions, other air emissions, soil contamination, and groundwater contamination that could occur (1) during normal operations, (2) as a result of accidents in one of the facilities, and (3) during transport. It does not include an assessment of the biotic, cultural resources, waste generation, or other impacts that could result from the resumption of transient testing. Analyses were conducted by technical professionals at INL and SNL/NM as noted throughout this report. The analyses are based on bounding radionuclide inventories, with the same inventories used for test materials by both alternatives and different inventories for the TREAT Reactor and ACRR. An upper value on the number of tests was assumed, with a test frequency determined by the realistic turn-around times required between experiments. The estimates provided for impacts during normal operations are based on historical emission rates and projected usage rates; therefore, they are bounding. Estimated doses for members of the public, collocated workers, and facility workers that could be incurred as a result of an accident are very conservative. They do not credit safety systems or administrative procedures (such as evacuation plans or use of personal protective equipment) that could be used to limit worker doses. Doses estimated for transportation are conservative and are based on

  9. Validation Testing of a Peridynamic Impact Damage Model Using NASA's Micro-Particle Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baber, Forrest E.; Zelinski, Brian J.; Guven, Ibrahim; Gray, Perry

    2017-01-01

    Through a collaborative effort between the Virginia Commonwealth University and Raytheon, a peridynamic model for sand impact damage has been developed1-3. Model development has focused on simulating impacts of sand particles on ZnS traveling at velocities consistent with aircraft take-off and landing speeds. The model reproduces common features of impact damage including pit and radial cracks, and, under some conditions, lateral cracks. This study focuses on a preliminary validation exercise in which simulation results from the peridynamic model are compared to a limited experimental data set generated by NASA's recently developed micro-particle gun (MPG). The MPG facility measures the dimensions and incoming and rebound velocities of the impact particles. It also links each particle to a specific impact site and its associated damage. In this validation exercise parameters of the peridynamic model are adjusted to fit the experimentally observed pit diameter, average length of radial cracks and rebound velocities for 4 impacts of 300 µm glass beads on ZnS. Results indicate that a reasonable fit of these impact characteristics can be obtained by suitable adjustment of the peridynamic input parameters, demonstrating that the MPG can be used effectively as a validation tool for impact modeling and that the peridynamic sand impact model described herein possesses not only a qualitative but also a quantitative ability to simulate sand impact events.

  10. Opportunities for the Reduction of Substances and Equipment Impact on Personnel in Penetrant and Magnetic Particles Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Yaremenko, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    Penetrant testing (PT) and magnetic particles inspection (MPI) are widespread methods of non-destructive testing which are not required a lot of investments for manual application and are simple in terms of discontinuous interpretation. On the other hand, work with chemicals requires special precautions, safety instructions and disposal limitations. Growing demand among customers to decrease impact of consumables and equipment on personnel and environment, shift producers’ priorities to devel...

  11. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  12. Attention Network Test in adults with ADHD - the impact of affective fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundervold Astri J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Attention Network Test (ANT generates measures of different aspects of attention/executive function. In the present study we investigated whether adults with ADHD performed different from controls on measures of accuracy, variability and vigilance as well as the control network. Secondly, we studied subgroups of adults with ADHD, expecting impairment on measures of the alerting and control networks in a subgroup with additional symptoms of affective fluctuations. Methods A group of 114 adults (ADHD n = 58; controls n = 56 performed the ANT and completed the Adult ADHD Rating Scale (ASRS and the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ. The latter was used to define affective fluctuations. Results The sex distribution was similar in the two groups, but the ADHD group was significantly older (p = .005 and their score on a test of intellectual function (WASI significantly lower than in the control group (p = .007. The two groups were not significantly different on measures of the three attention networks, but the ADHD group was generally less accurate (p = .001 and showed a higher variability through the task (p = .033. The significance was only retained for the accuracy measure when age and IQ scores were controlled for. Within the ADHD group, individuals reporting affective fluctuations (n = 22 were slower (p = .015 and obtained a lower score on the alerting network (p = .018 and a higher score on the conflict network (p = .023 than those without these symptoms. The significance was retained for the alerting network (p = .011, but not the conflict network (p = .061 when we controlled for the total ASRS and IQ scores. Discussion Adults with ADHD were characterized by impairment on accuracy and variability measures calculated from the ANT. Within the ADHD group, adults reporting affective fluctuations seemed to be more alert (i.e., less impacted by alerting cues, but slower and more distracted by conflicting stimuli than the

  13. Comparison of the U-233 dog data of Stevens et al. with uranium retention functions in ICRP Publication 30 and a 3-compartment mammillary model for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    Stevens measured the distribution, retention, and excretion of U-233 in seven beagles each given a single injection of U-233 citrate [2.8 μCi/kg U-233 (VI) (approx.3 mg/dog)]. These data, when plotted together with results obtained with the ICRP (Pub. 30) retention functions for purposes of comparison, are seen to differ only slightly from the ICRP-30 model. The number of transformations in the body, over a fifty-year period agree within a factor of 2. A three-compartment mammillary model has been parameterized from the data of Stevens by the method of Bernard. Retention in tissues of the body is represented by a linear combination of three compartments. The data plots for the dogs and ICRP-30 model will be presented and discussed together with the three compartment mammillary model for U-233 retention, distribution, and excretion. 3 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Charpy impact test results of ferritic alloys from the HFIR[High Flux Isotope Reactor]-MFE-RB2 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-03-01

    Miniature Charpy specimens of HT-9 in base metal, weld metal and heat affected zone (HAZ) metal conditions, and 9Cr-1Mo in base metal and weld metal conditions have been tested following irradiation in HFIR-MFE-RB2 at 55 0 C to ≅10 dpa. All specimen conditions have degraded properties (both DBTT and USE) in comparison with specimens irradiated to lower dose. 9Cr-Mo degraded more than HT-9 and weld metal performed worse than base metal which performed worse than HAZ material. Property degradation was approximately linear as a function of dose, indicating that degradation response had not saturated by 10 dpa

  15. Debris flow risk mitigation by the means of rigid and flexible barriers – experimental tests and impact analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Canelli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The impact of a debris flow on a structure can have disastrous effects because of the enormous destructive potential of this type of phenomenon. Although the introduction of risk mitigation structures such as the Sabo Dam, the filter dam and more recently flexible barriers is usual, there are very few methods that are universally recognized for the safe design of such structures. This study presents the results of experimental tests, conducted with the use of a specifically created flume, in order to obtain detailed knowledge of the mechanical aspects, and to analyze the dynamics of the impact of a debris flow on different types of structures. The analyses of the tests, together with the calculation of the thrust caused by the flow, have made it possible to analyze the dynamics of the impact, which has shown differing effects, on the basis of the type of barrier that has been installed.

  16. Evaluation of Dynamic Deformation Behaviors in Metallic Materials under High Strain-Rates Using Taylor Bar Impact Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Kyung Oh; Shin, Hyung Seop [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To ensure the reliability and safety of various mechanical systems in accordance with their high-speed usage, it is necessary to evaluate the dynamic deformation behavior of structural materials under impact load. However, it is not easy to understand the dynamic deformation behavior of the structural materials using experimental methods in the high strain-rate range exceeding 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. In this study, the Taylor bar impact test was conducted to investigate the dynamic deformation behavior of metallic materials in the high strain-rate region, using a high-speed photography system. Numerical analysis of the Taylor bar impact test was performed using AUTODYN S/W. The results of the analysis were compared with the experimental results, and the material behavior in the high strain-rate region was discussed.

  17. Budget Impact of Increasing Market Share of Patient Self-Testing and Patient Self-Management in Anticoagulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevanović, Jelena; Postma, Maarten J.; Le, Hoa H.

    Background: Patient self-testing (PST) and/or patient self-management (PSM) might provide better coagulation care than monitoring at specialized anticoagulation centers. Yet, it remains an underused strategy in the Netherlands. Methods: Budget-impact analyses of current and new market-share

  18. Report on Beryllium Strength Experiments Conducted at the TA-55 40 mm Impact Test Facility, Fiscal Year 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, William Wyatt [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hollowell, Benjamin Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Todd P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Owens, Charles Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rivera, Joseph Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-10

    A series of experiments is currently in progress at eth 40 mm Impact Test Facility (ITF), located at TA-55, to understand the strength behavior of Beryllium metal at elevated temperature and pressure. In FY 2017, three experiments were conducted as a part of this project.

  19. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and off- site locations in the state of Nevada: Reader's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This Reader's Guide is designed to help you find information in the US Departments of Energy's Nevada Test Site Environmental Impact Statement (NTS EIS). This Guide is divided into four sections: an introduction to the NTS EIS, specific topics, number conversions and scientific notations and public reading room locations

  20. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: A Concise Review with a Comprehensive Summary of Therapeutic Interventions Emphasizing Supportive Measures

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Jeremy A.; Cohen, Philip R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are two of the most severe dermatologic conditions occurring in the inpatient setting. There is a lack of consensus regarding appropriate management of SJS and TEN. Purpose The scientific literature pertaining to SJS and TEN (subsequently referred to as SJS/TEN) is summarized and assessed. In addition, an interventional approach for the clinician is provided. Methods PubMed was searched with the key words: cortic...

  1. Q&A with Steven Spencer: Speaker in the Women and STEM Series Talks About How He Became Interested in Studying Psychology, Dissonance, and Stereotype Threat

    OpenAIRE

    Hooker, Courtney

    2011-01-01

    As I talked with Steven Spencer, Professor at the University of Waterloo and a groundbreaking researcher in the field of stereotype threat, I was impressed by his kind demeanor and effective speaking style. He shared information about his academic career, advice for graduate students as well as discussing this research on how to dismantle the negative stereotypes that inhibit women’s progression in science, technology, engineering, and math fields (STEM).

  2. Putting social impact assessment to the test as a method for implementing responsible tourism practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCombes, Lucy; Vanclay, Frank; Evers, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    The discourse on the social impacts of tourism needs to shift from the current descriptive critique of tourism to considering what can be done in actual practice to embed the management of tourism's social impacts into the existing planning, product development and operational processes of tourism

  3. Putting social impact assessment to the test as a method for implementing responsible tourism practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCombes, Lucy; Vanclay, Frank; Evers, Yvette

    The discourse on the social impacts of tourism needs to shift from the current descriptive critique of tourism to considering what can be done in actual practice to embed the management of tourism's social impacts into the existing planning, product development and operational processes of tourism

  4. Tried and tested: The impact of online hotels on consumer consideration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, I.E.; Seegers, D.

    2008-01-01

    Many consumers consult online reviews before making (online) travel arrangements. Yet, little is known about the impact of these reviews on consumer decision making. This research applies consideration set theory to model the impact of online hotel reviews on consumer choice. An experimental study

  5. The Impact of Test Case Summaries on Bug Fixing Performance : An Empirical Investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panichella, S.; Panichella, A.; Beller, M.; Zaidman, A.E.; Gall, H.

    2015-01-01

    Automated test generation tools have been widely investigated with the goal of reducing the cost of testing activities. However, generated tests have been shown not to help developers in detecting and finding more bugs even though they reach higher structural coverage compared to manual testing. The

  6. The Impact of Test Case Summaries on Bug Fixing Performance : An Empirical Investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panichella, Sebastiano; Panichella, A.; Beller, M.M.; Zaidman, A.E.; Gall, Harald C.

    2016-01-01

    Automated test generation tools have been widely investigated with the goal of reducing the cost of testing activities. However, generated tests have been shown not to help developers in detecting and finding more bugs even though they reach higher structural coverage compared to manual testing.

  7. “Inspired by real events”—Media (and Memory in Steven Spielberg’s MUNICH (2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Nachreiner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Steven Spielberg’s 2005 film Munich tells the story of an Israeli counter-terrorist team in the aftermath of the hijacking and massacre at the Olympic Games in 1972. The film spawned broad discussion about its historical accuracy and its political standpoint. While criticism primarily focused on the historiographical representation of the actions depicted, this paper analyzes in two steps the genuinely filmic mode of historical representation ofMunich. First, the analysis discusses the interplay of two conflicting narrative strategies that negotiate the character development with the political struggle. And second, analysis focuses on the two formal devices at the core of the narrative conflict: The reflexive framing of television in the depiction of the Munich massacre as a traumatic media event and the excessive transformation of its memory in a series of flashbacks. Such elaboration of the narrative and formal strategies reveals the implicit historiographical structures of the film and suggests that the notion of ‘cultural trauma’ serves as the preferential—but problematic—template in telling the history of terrorism and violence.

  8. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis--A Comprehensive Review and Guide to Therapy. I. Systemic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohanim, Sahar; Palioura, Sotiria; Saeed, Hajirah N; Akpek, Esen K; Amescua, Guillermo; Basu, Sayan; Blomquist, Preston H; Bouchard, Charles S; Dart, John K; Gai, Xiaowu; Gomes, José A P; Gregory, Darren G; Iyer, Geetha; Jacobs, Deborah S; Johnson, Anthony J; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Mantagos, Iason S; Mehta, Jodhbir S; Perez, Victor L; Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Sangwan, Virender S; Sippel, Kimberly C; Sotozono, Chie; Srinivasan, Bhaskar; Tan, Donald T H; Tandon, Radhika; Tseng, Scheffer C G; Ueta, Mayumi; Chodosh, James

    2016-01-01

    The intent of this review is to comprehensively appraise the state of the art with regard to Stevens Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), with particular attention to the ocular surface complications and their management. SJS and TEN represent two ends of a spectrum of immune-mediated, dermatobullous disease, characterized in the acute phase by a febrile illness followed by skin and mucous membrane necrosis and detachment. The widespread keratinocyte death seen in SJS/TEN is rapid and irreversible, and even with early and aggressive intervention, morbidity is severe and mortality not uncommon. We have divided this review into two parts. Part I summarizes the epidemiology and immunopathogenesis of SJS/TEN and discusses systemic therapy and its possible benefits. We hope this review will help the ophthalmologist better understand the mechanisms of disease in SJS/TEN and enhance their care of patients with this complex and often debilitating disease. Part II (April 2016 issue) will focus on ophthalmic manifestations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Síndrome de Stevens Johnson, presentación de un caso en edad pediátrica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Morales Solís

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de Stevens-Johnson (SSJ es una variante severa del eritema multiforme, consistente en una reacción de hipersensibilización que afecta piel y mucosa, además de otros órganos internos, y que se manifiesta con lesiones en zonas genitales, bucales y cutáneas, es idiopático en el 50% de los casos, generalmente producido por alergia a medicamentos. La muerte sobreviene en el 5-15% de los casos sin tratar. El riesgo de recurrencia es del 37% o más.  Al Hospital Pediátrico Provincial Docente “Mártires de Las Tunas”  fue  traído un niño de seis años  de edad, que tras el uso del Sulfaprín comenzó con lesiones que afectaban la piel y  todas las mucosas, además de toma del estado general. Inmediatamente fue admitido en la Unidad de Cuidados  Intensivos Pediátricos, donde fueron tomadas medidas que incluyeron supresión del agente causal,  corticoterapia endovenosa, antibioticoterapia endovenosa, tratamiento de las lesiones, vigilancia del balance hidromineral y atención oftalmológica, respondiendo favorablemente. Se presenta el caso, por ser una enfermedad poco frecuente y de muy mal pronóstico.

  10. The Pitfalls of Picturing Atlantic Slavery: Steven Spielberg’s Amistad vs Guy Deslauriers’s The Middle Passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Eckstein

    2011-04-01

    On the one hand, the arts are particularly called for in this situation to fill the documentary gaps and silences through acts of experiment and imagination, and they may indeed have a redemptive effect by offering, in Hayden White’s terms, successful ‘emplotments’ of a traumatic past. One the other hand, this redemptive potential simultaneously poses a serious ethical challenge: As Theodor W. Adorno has warned with reference to the Holocaust, it is precisely by making ‘sense’ of human suffering, and by making accessible to the ‘senses’ what is utterly senseless and incomprehensible, that injustice may be done to the victims. In this paper, I will try to illustrate this problematic by looking at two recent films that have attempted to represent the horrors of the middle passage – Steven Spielberg’s canonical Amistad (a terrible failure, in my view, and Guy Deslauriers’ film The Middle Passage [Passage du Milieu]. Based on a script by the Martiniquean novelist and poet Patrick Chamoiseau, the latter example uses an aesthetic approach which may point at a way out of the dilemma outlined above.

  11. Iridium concentration and noble gas composition of Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary clay from Stevens Klint, Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osawa, Takahito; Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Nagao, Keisuke; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Oshima, Masumi; Toh, Yosuke; Kimura, Atsushi; Furutaka, Kazuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    The Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary about 65 million years ago records a mass extinction event caused by a bolide impact. K-T boundary clay collected from Stevns Klint, Denmark was investigated in this work. Iridium concentrations of eight clays across the K-T boundary were determined using a multiple gamma-ray analysis system after neutron activation. Anomalously high Ir concentrations were detected in five marl samples, with the highest concentration being 29.9 ppb. Four samples were analyzed for all noble gases. NO extraterrestrial Ar, Kr, and Xe were discovered in any of the samples, although most of the 3 He which was detected was extraterrestrial. Solar-like Ne was observed only in the sample SK4, which had an Ir concentration of 14.3 ppb, indicating the presence of micrometeorites. The solar-like Ne clearly did not originate from an asteroid/comet associated with the bolide impact, as that asteroid is thought to have been extremely large. Also, because there was no sign of a high accretion rate of micrometeorites at the boundary it could not be ascertained whether the solar-like Ne was related to a catastrophic event that led to the extinction of the dinosaurs. (author)

  12. 77 FR 5492 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; General Provisions for Domestic Fisheries; Application for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... the Atlantic surfclam and ocean quahog Georges Bank Closure Area. This would continue research to... testing to obtain additional data in locations where toxin levels may be higher than were present during the pilot phase of the study. NMFS has made a preliminary determination that the exempted fishing...

  13. 76 FR 65698 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; General Provisions for Domestic Fisheries; Application for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... Atlantic surfclam and ocean quahog Georges Bank Closure Area to continue testing the safety and efficacy of... research project that has been ongoing since 2006. NMS has made a preliminary determination that the...: http://www.nero.noaa.gov/sfd/clams . This project is a pilot program with the goal of determining if...

  14. 75 FR 75417 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ... more heavily towards the most recent year, to predict how current management measures will affect the... bycatch rate of co-occurring overfished species, primarily widow rockfish and canary rockfish, in the... initial testing of the jig gear, some additional catch of widow rockfish and canary rockfish is...

  15. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  16. Impact of a personal CYP2D6 testing workshop on physician assistant student attitudes toward pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Travis J; LeLacheur, Susan; Ward, Caitlin; Lee, Norman H; Callier, Shawneequa; Harralson, Arthur F

    2016-03-01

    We assessed the impact of personal CYP2D6 testing on physician assistant student competency in, and attitudes toward, pharmacogenetics (PGx). Buccal samples were genotyped for CYP2D6 polymorphisms. Results were discussed during a 3-h PGx workshop. PGx knowledge was assessed by pre- and post-tests. Focus groups assessed the impact of the workshop on attitudes toward the clinical utility of PGx. Both student knowledge of PGx, and its perceived clinical utility, increased immediately following the workshop. However, exposure to PGx on clinical rotations following the workshop seemed to influence student attitudes toward PGx utility. Personal CYP2D6 testing improves both knowledge and comfort with PGx. Continued exposure to PGx concepts is important for transfer of learning.

  17. Impacts Analyses Supporting the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annette L. Schafer; Lloyd C. Brown; David C. Carathers; Boyd D. Christensen; James J. Dahl; Mark L. Miller; Cathy Ottinger Farnum; Steven Peterson; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Peter V. Subaiya; Daniel M. Wachs; Ruth F. Weiner

    2013-11-01

    Environmental and health impacts are presented for activities associated with transient testing of nuclear fuel and material using two candidate test reactors. Transient testing involves irradiation of nuclear fuel or materials for short time-periods under high neutron flux rates. The transient testing process includes transportation of nuclear fuel or materials inside a robust shipping cask to a hot cell, removal from the shipping cask, pre-irradiation examination of the nuclear materials, assembly of an experiment assembly, transportation of the experiment assembly to the test reactor, irradiation in the test reactor, transport back to the hot cell, and post-irradiation examination of the nuclear fuel or material. The potential for environmental or health consequences during the transportation, examination, and irradiation actions are assessed for normal operations, off-normal (accident) scenarios, and transportation. Impacts to the environment (air, soil, and groundwater), are assessed during each phase of the transient testing process. This report documents the evaluation of potential consequences to the general public. This document supports the Environmental Assessment (EA) required by the U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 USC Subsection 4321 et seq.).

  18. Impact of using a local protocol in preoperative testing: blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Mônica Loureiro; Iglesias, Antônio Carlos

    2017-01-01

    to evaluate the impact of the use of a local protocol of preoperative test requests in reducing the number of exams requested and in the occurrence of changes in surgical anesthetic management and perioperative complications. we conducted a randomized, blinded clinical trial at the Gaffrée and Guinle University Hospital with 405 patients candidates for elective surgery randomly divided into two groups, according to the practice of requesting preoperative exams: a group with non-selectively requested exams and a protocol group with exams requested according to the study protocol. Studied exams: complete blood count, coagulogram, glycemia, electrolytes, urea and creatinine, ECG and chest X-ray. Primary outcomes: changes in surgical anesthetic management caused by abnormal exams, reduction of the number of exams requested after the use of the protocol and perioperative complications. there was a significant difference (pgrupos segundo a prática de solicitação de exames pré-operatórios: grupo Rotina com exames solicitados de maneira não seletiva e grupo Protocolo com exames solicitados de acordo com o protocolo em estudo. Exames em estudo: hemograma, coagulograma, glicemia, eletrólitos, ureia e creatinina, ECG e radiografia de tórax. Desfechos primários: alterações na conduta anestésico-cirúrgica motivadas por exames anormais, redução do número de exames solicitados após o uso do protocolo e complicações perioperatórias. foi observada diferença significativa (pgrupos (14,9% x 29,1%) e redução de 57,3% no número de exames pedidos entre os dois grupos (pgrupos. Na análise multivariada hemograma e coagulograma foram os únicos exames capazes de modificar a conduta anestésico-cirúrgica. o protocolo proposto foi efetivo em eliminar um quantitativo significativo de exames complementares sem indicação clínica, sem que houvesse aumento na morbidade e mortalidades perioperatórias.

  19. Impact of providing fee data on laboratory test ordering: a controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Leonard S; Shihab, Hasan M; Thiemann, David; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Ardolino, Margaret; Mandell, Steven; Brotman, Daniel J

    2013-05-27

    Inpatient care providers often order laboratory tests without any appreciation for the costs of the tests. To determine whether we could decrease the number of laboratory tests ordered by presenting providers with test fees at the time of order entry in a tertiary care hospital, without adding extra steps to the ordering process. Controlled clinical trial. Tertiary care hospital. All providers, including physicians and nonphysicians, who ordered laboratory tests through the computerized provider order entry system at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. We randomly assigned 61 diagnostic laboratory tests to an "active" arm (fee displayed) or to a control arm (fee not displayed). During a 6-month baseline period (November 10, 2008, through May 9, 2009), we did not display any fee data. During a 6-month intervention period 1 year later (November 10, 2009, through May 9, 2010), we displayed fees, based on the Medicare allowable fee, for active tests only. We examined changes in the total number of orders placed, the frequency of ordered tests (per patient-day), and total charges associated with the orders according to the time period (baseline vs intervention period) and by study group (active test vs control). For the active arm tests, rates of test ordering were reduced from 3.72 tests per patient-day in the baseline period to 3.40 tests per patient-day in the intervention period (8.59% decrease; 95% CI, -8.99% to -8.19%). For control arm tests, ordering increased from 1.15 to 1.22 tests per patient-day from the baseline period to the intervention period (5.64% increase; 95% CI, 4.90% to 6.39%) (P fee data to providers at the time of order entry resulted in a modest decrease in test ordering. Adoption of this intervention may reduce the number of inappropriately ordered diagnostic tests.

  20. The RID2 biofidelic rear impact dummy: a pilot study using human subjects in low speed rear impact full scale crash tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Arthur C; Philippens, Mathieu M G M

    2007-03-01

    Human subjects and the recently developed RID2 rear impact crash test dummy were exposed to a series of full scale, vehicle-to-vehicle crash tests. To evaluate the biofidelity of the RID2 anthropometric test dummy on the basis of calculated neck injury criterion (NIC) values by comparing these values to those obtained from human subjects exposed in the very same crashes. The widely used and familiar hybrid III dummy has been said to lack biofidelity in the special application of low speed rear impact crashes. Several attempts have been made to modify this dummy with only marginal success. Two completely new dummies have been developed; the BioRID and the RID2. Neither have been tested under real world crash boundary conditions in side-by-side comparisons with live human subjects. Volunteer subjects, including a 50th percentile male, a 95th percentile male, and a 50th percentile female, were placed in the driver's seat of a vehicle and subjected to a series of three low speed rear impact crashes each. The RID2 dummy, which is modeled after a 50th percentile male, was placed in the passenger seat in each case. Both subjects and dummy were fully instrumented and acceleration-time histories were recorded. From this data, velocities of the heads and torsos were determined and both were used to calculate the NIC values for both crash test subjects and the RID2. The RID2 demonstrated generally higher head accelerations and NIC values than those of the human subjects. Most of the observed variations might be explained on the basis of differing head restraint geometry, posture, and body size. The RID2 NIC values compared most favorably with those of the 50th percentile male subject. For the whole group, the correlations between RID2 and human subjects did not reach statistical significance. The small number of test subjects and crash tests limited the statistical power of this pilot study, and the correlation between the RID2 and human subject NIC values were not