WorldWideScience

Sample records for stereotactic radiotherapy treatment

  1. Treatment accuracy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Shaleen; Burke, Kevin; Nalder, Colin; Jarrett, Paula; Mubata, Cephas; A'Hern, Roger; Humphreys, Mandy; Bidmead, Margaret; Brada, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the geometric accuracy of the delivery of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for brain tumours using the Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) relocatable frame. Accuracy of treatment delivery was measured via portal images acquired with an amorphous silicon based electronic portal imager (EPI). Results were used to assess the existing verification process and to review the current margins used for the expansion of clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV). Patients and methods: Patients were immobilized in a GTC frame. Target volume definition was performed on localization CT and MRI scans and a CTV to PTV margin of 5 mm (based on initial experience) was introduced in 3D. A Brown-Roberts-Wells (BRW) fiducial system was used for stereotactic coordinate definition. The existing verification process consisted of an intercomparison of the coordinates of the isocentres and anatomy between the localization and verification CT scans. Treatment was delivered with 6 MV photons using four fixed non-coplanar conformal fields using a multi-leaf collimator. Portal imaging verification consisted of the acquisition of orthogonal images centred through the treatment isocentre. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) created from the CT localization scans were used as reference images. Semi-automated matching software was used to quantify set up deviations (displacements and rotations) between reference and portal images. Results: One hundred and twenty six anterior and 123 lateral portal images were available for analysis for set up deviations. For displacements, the total errors in the cranial/caudal direction were shown to have the largest SD's of 1.2 mm, while systematic and random errors reached SD's of 1.0 and 0.7 mm, respectively, in the cranial/caudal direction. The corresponding data for rotational errors (the largest deviation was found in the sagittal plane) was 0.7 deg. SD (total error), 0.5 deg. (systematic) and 0

  2. Treatment by stereotactic radiotherapy of tumoral injuries after implant placement: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meingan, P.; Rio, E.; Labbe-Devilliers, C.; Geffroy, D.; Ricaud-Couprie, M.; Doutriaux-Dumoulin, I.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the interest and the place of stereotactic radiotherapy in the treatment of primitive or secondary tumoral injuries of the liver. To describe the technique of implants placement. Conclusion: the liver stereotactic radiotherapy, after implant placement, seems to be an alternative or complementary therapy to the radiofrequency for patients refused for surgery, with moderated side effects and a noticeable survival. Complementary studies, especially associated to radiofrequency must be considered. (N.C.)

  3. Stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzevic, Dario; Legcevic, Jelena; Splavski, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vestibular schwannomas (acoustic neuromas) are common benign tumours that arise from the Schwann cells of the vestibular nerve. Management options include observation with neuroradiological follow-up, microsurgical resection and stereotactic radiotherapy. OBJECTIVES: To assess...... the effect of stereotactic radiotherapy compared to observation, microsurgical resection, any other treatment modality, or a combination of two or more of the above approaches for vestibular schwannoma. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL......; Web of Science; CAB Abstracts; ISRCTN and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 24 July 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) exploring the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy compared with observation alone, microsurgical...

  4. Clinical treatment planning for stereotactic radiotherapy, evaluation by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairn, T.; Aland, T.; Kenny, J.; Knight, R.T.; Crowe, S.B.; Langton, C.M.; Franich, R.D.; Johnston, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: This study uses re-evaluates the doses delivered by a series of clinical stereotactic radiotherapy treatments, to test the accuracy of treatment planning predictions for very small radiation fields. Stereotactic radiotherapy treatment plans for meningiomas near the petrous temporal bone and the foramen magnum (incorp rating fields smaller than I c m2) were examined using Monte Carlo simulations. Important differences between treatment planning predictions and Monte Carlo calculations of doses delivered to stereotactic radiotherapy patients are apparent. For example, in one case the Monte Carlo calculation shows that the delivery a planned meningioma treatment would spare the patient's critical structures (eyes, brainstem) more effectively than the treatment plan predicted, and therefore suggests that this patient could safely receive an increased dose to their tumour. Monte Carlo simulations can be used to test the dose predictions made by a conventional treatment planning system, for dosimetrically challenging small fields, and can thereby suggest valuable modifications to clinical treatment plans. This research was funded by the Wesley Research Institute, Australia. The authors wish to thank Andrew Fielding and David Schlect for valuable discussions of aspects of this work. The authors are also grateful to Muhammad Kakakhel, for assisting with the design and calibration of our linear accelerator model, and to the stereotactic radiation therapy team at Premion, who designed the treatment plans. Computational resources and services used in this work were provided by the HPC and Research Support Unit, QUT, Brisbane, Australia. (author)

  5. Stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy: Dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlienger, M.; Lartigau, E.; Nataf, F.; Mornex, F.; Latorzeff, I.; Lisbona, A.; Mahe, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was the study of the successive steps permitting the prescription of dose in stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy, which includes radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The successive steps studied are: the choice of stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy among the therapeutic options, based on curative or palliative treatment intent, then the selection of lesions according to size/volume, pathological type and their number permitting the choice between radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, which have the same methodological basis. Clinical experience has determined the level of dose to treat the lesions and limit the irradiation of healthy adjacent tissues and organs at risk structures. The last step is the optimization of the different parameters to obtain a safe compromise between the lesion dose and healthy adjacent structures. Study of dose-volume histograms, coverage indices and 3D imaging permit the optimization of irradiation. For lesions close to or included in a critical area, the prescribed dose is planned using the inverse planing method. Implementation of the successively described steps is mandatory to insure the prescription of an optimized dose. The whole procedure is based on the delineation of the lesion and adjacent healthy tissues. There are sometimes difficulties to assess the delineation and the volume of the target, however improvement of local control rates and reduction of secondary effects are the proof that the totality of the successive procedures are progressively improved. In practice, stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy is a continually improved treatment method, which constantly benefits from improvements in the choice of indications, imaging, techniques of irradiation, planing/optimization methodology and irradiation technique and from data collected from prolonged follow-up. (authors)

  6. Stereotactic body radiotherapy a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Gaya, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collecting the key information in this burgeoning field into a single volume, this handbook for clinical oncology trainees and consultants covers all of the basic aspects of stereotactic radiotherapy systems and treatment and includes plenty of case studies.

  7. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for skull base tumors: analysis of treatment accuracy using a stereotactic mask fixation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montagnoli Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the accuracy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT using a stereotactic mask fixation system. Patients and Methods Sixteen patients treated with FSRT were involved in the study. A commercial stereotactic mask fixation system (BrainLAB AG was used for patient immobilization. Serial CT scans obtained before and during FSRT were used to assess the accuracy of patient immobilization by comparing the isocenter position. Daily portal imaging were acquired to establish day to day patient position variation. Displacement errors along the different directions were calculated as combination of systematic and random errors. Results The mean isocenter displacements based on localization and verification CT imaging were 0.1 mm (SD 0.3 mm in the lateral direction, 0.1 mm (SD 0.4 mm in the anteroposterior, and 0.3 mm (SD 0.4 mm in craniocaudal direction. The mean 3D displacement was 0.5 mm (SD 0.4 mm, being maximum 1.4 mm. No significant differences were found during the treatment (P = 0.4. The overall isocenter displacement as calculated by 456 anterior and lateral portal images were 0.3 mm (SD 0.9 mm in the mediolateral direction, -0.2 mm (SD 1 mm in the anteroposterior direction, and 0.2 mm (SD 1.1 mm in the craniocaudal direction. The largest displacement of 2.7 mm was seen in the cranio-caudal direction, with 95% of displacements Conclusions The results indicate that the setup error of the presented mask system evaluated by CT verification scans and portal imaging are minimal. Reproducibility of the isocenter position is in the best range of positioning reproducibility reported for other stereotactic systems.

  8. Stereotactic radiotherapy in pediatric indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernier-Chastagner, V.; Supiot, S.; Carrie, C.; Helfre, S.

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a very high precision procedure, which has been limited to radiosurgery for a long time. Technological improvements allowed the development of radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions, leading to a lot of innovations. Previously indicated for cerebral pathologies, this procedure is now developed for extra-cerebral locations. In paediatrics, stereotactic radiotherapy is still limited, delivered precociously, due to the possibility of long-term late effects that needs to be addressed. This review reports the different useful conditions, technical evolutions, and the current validated paediatric indications, with differences from adults, and future directions. (authors)

  9. Stereotactic Fractionated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma: The McGill University Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Wassia, Rolina; Dal Pra, Alan; Shun, Kitty; Shaban, Ahmed [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Corriveau, Christine [Department of Ophthalmology, Notre Dame Hospital, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Edelstein, Chaim; Deschenes, Jean [Department of Ophthalmology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Ruo, Russel; Patrocinio, Horacio [Department of Medical Physics, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cury, Fabio L.B. [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); DeBlois, Francois [Department of Medical Physics, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Shenouda, George, E-mail: george.shenouda@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report our experience with linear accelerator-based stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of 50 consecutive patients diagnosed with juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma and treated with linear accelerator-based stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy between April 2003 and December 2009. Patients with small to medium sized lesions (Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study classification) located within 2 mm of the optic disc were included. The prescribed radiation dose was 60 Gy in 10 fractions. The primary endpoints included local control, enucleation-free survival, and complication rates. Results: The median follow-up was 29 months (range, 1-77 months). There were 31 males and 29 females, with a median age of 69 years (range, 30-92 years). Eighty-four percent of the patients had medium sized lesions, and 16% of patients had small sized lesions. There were four cases of local progression (8%) and three enucleations (6%). Actuarial local control rates at 2 and 5 years were 93% and 86%, respectively. Actuarial enucleation-free survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 94% and 84%, respectively. Actuarial complication rates at 2 and 5 years were 33% and 88%, respectively, for radiation-induced retinopathy; 9.3% and 46.9%, respectively, for dry eye; 12% and 53%, respectively, for cataract; 30% and 90%, respectively, for visual loss [Snellen acuity (decimal equivalent), <0.1]; 11% and 54%, respectively, for optic neuropathy; and 18% and 38%, respectively, for neovascular glaucoma. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy using 60 Gy in 10 fractions is safe and has an acceptable toxicity profile. It has been shown to be an effective noninvasive treatment for juxtapapillary choroidal melanomas.

  10. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O.; Andratschke, N.; Alheit, H.; Holy, R.; Moustakis, C.; Nestle, U.

    2014-01-01

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [de

  11. Successful treatment of tumor-induced osteomalacia due to an intracranial tumor by fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, Valentina D; Trepp-Carrasco, Alejandro G; Thompson, Robert; Recker, Robert R; Chong, William H; Collins, Michael T; Armas, Laura A G

    2013-11-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome, characterized by tumor secretion of fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) causing hypophosphatemia due to renal phosphate wasting. TIO is usually caused by small, benign, difficult-to-localize, mesenchymal tumors. Although surgery with wide excision of tumor borders is considered the "gold standard" for definitive therapy, it can be associated with considerable morbidity depending on the location. To date, radiation therapy has not been considered as an effective treatment modality in TIO. A 67-year-old female presented with multiple nontraumatic fractures, progressive bone pain, and muscle weakness for 4 years. She was found to have biochemical evidence of urinary phosphate wasting with low serum phosphorus, low-normal serum calcium, normal 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and high serum FGF23 levels. TIO was diagnosed. Selective venous sampling for FGF23 confirmed that a 1.7-cm left frontal mass, radiographically similar to a meningioma, was the causative tumor. She declined surgery due to fear of complications and instead underwent fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for 6 weeks. In less than 4 years after radiation therapy, she was successfully weaned off phosphorus and calcitriol, starting from 2 g of oral phosphorus daily and 1 μg of calcitriol daily. Her symptoms have resolved, and she has not had any new fractures. Stereotactic radiotherapy was an effective treatment modality for TIO in our patient. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy represents an alternative to surgery for patients with TIO who are not surgical candidates or who decline surgery.

  12. Stereotactic radiotherapy in oligometastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Thomas A C; Corkum, Mark T; Louie, Alexander V

    2017-09-01

    Oligometastatic cancer describes a disease state somewhere between localized and metastatic cancer. Proposed definitions of oligometastatic disease have typically used a cut-off of five or fewer sites of disease. Treatment of oligometastatic disease should have the goal of long-term local control, and in selected cases, disease remission. While several retrospective cohorts argue for surgical excision of limited metastases (metastasectomy) as the preferred treatment option for several clinical indications, limited randomized data exists for treating oligometastases. Alternatively, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a radiotherapy technique that combines high radiation doses per fraction with precision targeting with the goal of achieving long-term local control of treated sites. Published cohort studies of SABR have demonstrated excellent local control rates of 70-90% in oligometastatic disease, with long-term survival in some series approaching 20-40%. A recent randomized phase 2 clinical trial by Gomez et al. demonstrated significantly improved progression free survival with aggressive consolidative therapy (surgery, radiotherapy ± chemotherapy or SABR) in oli-gometastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). As additional randomized controlled trials are ongoing to determine the efficacy of SABR in oligometastatic disease, SABR is increasingly being used within routine clinical practice. This review article aims to sum-marize the history and current paradigm of the oligometastatic state, review recently pub-lished literature of SABR in oligometastatic cancer and discuss ongoing trials and future directions in this context.

  13. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy as a boost treatment for tumors in the head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Takashi; Isobe, Kouichi; Ueno, Naoyuki; Ito, Hisao; Fukuda, Ataru; Sudo, Satoshi; Shirotori, Hiroaki; Kitahara, Isao; Fukushima, Takanori

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to report initial results of CyberKnife stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) boost for tumors in the head and neck area. Between March 2008 and August 2009, 10 patients were treated with SRT boost using CyberKnife system due mainly to unfavorable condition such as tumors in close proximity to serial organs or former radiotherapy fields. Treatment sites were the external auditory canal in two, the nasopharynx in one, the oropharynx in three, the nasal cavity in one, the maxillary sinus in two, and the oligometastatic cervical lymph node in one. All patients underwent preceding conventional radiotherapy of 40 to 60 Gy. Dose and fractionation scheme of the Cyberknife SRT boost was individualized, and prescribed dose ranged from 9 Gy to 16 Gy in 3 to 4 fractions. Among four patients for whom dose to the optic pathway was concerned, the maximum dose was only about 3 Gy for three patients whereas 9.6 Gy in the remaining one patient. The maximum dose for the mandible in one of three patients with oropharyngeal cancer was 19.7 Gy, whereas majority of the bone can be spared by using non-isocentric conformal beams. For a patient with nasopharyngeal cancer, the highest dose in the brain stem was 15 Gy. However, majority of the brain stem received less than 40% of the maximum dose. Although a small volume high dose area within the normal structure could be observed in several patients, results of the present study showed potential benefits of the CyberKnife SRT boost. (author)

  14. Megavoltage conebeam CT cine as final verification of treatment plan in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudithipudi, Vijay; Gayou, Olivier; Colonias, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the clinical impact of megavoltage conebeam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) cine on internal target volume (ITV) coverage in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). One hundred and six patients received lung SBRT. All underwent 4D computed tomography simulation followed by treatment via image guided 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiation. Prior to SBRT, all patients underwent MV-CBCT cine, in which raw projections are displayed as beam's-eye-view fluoroscopic series with the planning target volume (PTV) projected onto each image, enabling verification of tumour motion relative to the PTV and assessment of adequacy of treatment margin. Megavoltage conebeam computed tomography cine was completed 1–2 days prior to SBRT. Four patients (3.8%) had insufficient ITV coverage inferiorly at cine review. All four plans were changed by adding 5 mm on the PTV margin inferiorly. The mean change in PTV volumes was 3.9 cubic centimetres (cc) (range 1.85–6.32 cc). Repeat cine was performed after plan modification to ensure adequate PTV coverage in the modified plans. PTV margin was adequate in the majority of patients with this technique. MV-CBCT cine did show insufficient coverage in a small subset of patients. Insufficient PTV margins may be a function of 4D CT simulation inadequacies or deficiencies in visualizing the ITV inferior border in the full-inhale phase. MV-CBCT cine is a valuable tool for final verification of PTV margins.

  15. Preliminary experience with frameless stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buatti, John M.; Bova, Frank J.; Friedman, William A.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Marcus, Robert B.; Zuofeng, Li; Mendenhall, William M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To report our initial clinical experience using a novel high-precision frameless stereotactic radiotherapy system in 50 patients who have received 1271 treatments. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients ranging in age from 2 to 72 yr were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Thirty-two were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy alone, and 18 had stereotactic radiotherapy interdigitated as a boost in addition to standard irradiation. Pathologies treated included meningioma (13), low grade astrocytoma (10), germinoma (9), craniopharyngioma (4), schwannoma (2), and pituitary adenoma (2). Two additional patients had miscellaneous benign neoplasms and 8 patients had the technique used as a dose escalation strategy for malignant lesions including chordoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor, sarcoma, and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. Treatment reproducibility was initially gauged by comparing the bite plate position using infrared light emitting diodes (irleds) with the stereotactic radiosurgery reference system. This test of accuracy consisted of 10 bite plate repositionings for each patient and 100 readings of each of the 6 irleds on the bite plate at each new position. Each of the 1271 patient treatments was monitored for continuous digital position, and a reading was made before treating each arc of radiation. We chose 0.3 mm translation and 0.3 degrees rotation as the maximum tolerated misalignment before treating each arc. Results: With a mean follow-up of 9 mo, no patient had a marginal or distal failure. One patient with a malignant glioma had central disease progression. Acute side effects were minimal. In 3 of 9 low grade astrocytomas, a marked increase in imaging enhancement and edema occurred in the first year after treatment that resolved with steroids. The initial test of accuracy revealed bite plate reproducibility as follows. Translational errors (mm): Anterior-posterior, 0.06 ± 0.06; lateral, 0.03 ± 0.05; axial, 0.07 ± 0

  16. Stereotactic Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Lung Metastases from Bone and Soft-tissue Sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frakulli, Rezarta; Salvi, Fabrizio; Balestrini, Damiano; Parisi, Alessandro; Palombarini, Marcella; Cammelli, Silvia; Rocca, Michele; Salone, Mariacristina; Longhi, Alessandra; Ferrari, Stefano; Morganti, Alessio G; Frezza, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate local control and toxicity in a group of patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung metastases (LM) from bone and soft tissue sarcomas. From October 2010 to July 2014, patients with LM from sarcomas not suitable for surgery were treated with daily cone-beam computed tomography-guided SBRT. The dose administered ranged from 30 to 60 Gy in 3-8 fractions. Acute and late toxicity were scored according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. A total of 24 patients with 68 LM from sarcomas were treated with SBRT. The median follow-up after SBRT was 17 months (range=11-51 months). Two-year actuarial lesion local control and overall survival were 85.9% and 66.4%, respectively. No G3 or greater acute and late toxicities were observed. SBRT is a safe and effective treatment for LM from sarcoma and might be used as an alternative option in patients unfit for surgery. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. Optimization of stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment planning using a multicriteria optimization algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghandour, Sarah; Cosinschi, Adrien; Mazouni, Zohra; Pachoud, Marc; Matzinger, Oscar [Riviera-Chablais Hospital, Vevey (Switzerland). Cancer Center, Radiotherapy Dept.

    2016-07-01

    To provide high-quality and efficient dosimetric planning for various types of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for tumor treatment using a multicriteria optimization (MCO) technique fine-tuned with direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO). Eighteen patients with lung (n = 11), liver (n = 5) or adrenal cell cancer (n = 2) were treated using SBRT in our clinic between December 2014 and June 2015. Plans were generated using the RayStation trademark Treatment Planning System (TPS) with the VMAT technique. Optimal deliverable SBRT plans were first generated using an MCO algorithm to find a well-balanced tradeoff between tumor control and normal tissue sparing in an efficient treatment planning time. Then, the deliverable plan was post-processed using the MCO solution as the starting point for the DMPO algorithm to improve the dose gradient around the planning target volume (PTV) while maintaining the clinician's priorities. The dosimetric quality of the plans was evaluated using dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters, which account for target coverage and the sparing of healthy tissue, as well as the CI100 and CI50 conformity indexes. Using a combination of the MCO and DMPO algorithms showed that the treatment plans were clinically optimal and conformed to all organ risk dose volume constraints reported in the literature, with a computation time of approximately one hour. The coverage of the PTV (D99% and D95%) and sparing of organs at risk (OAR) were similar between the MCO and MCO + DMPO plans, with no significant differences (p > 0.05) for all the SBRT plans. The average CI100 and CI50 values using MCO + DMPO were significantly better than those with MCO alone (p < 0.05). The MCO technique allows for convergence on an optimal solution for SBRT within an efficient planning time. The combination of the MCO and DMPO techniques yields a better dose gradient, especially for lung tumors.

  18. Optimization of Stereotactic Radiotherapy Treatment Delivery Technique for Base-Of-Skull Meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Brenda G.; Candish, Charles; Vollans, Emily; Gete, Ermias; Lee, Richard; Martin, Monty; Ma, Roy; McKenzie, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This study compares static conformal field (CF), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and dynamic arcs (DA) for the stereotactic radiotherapy of base-of-skull meningiomas. Twenty-one cases of base-of-skull meningioma (median planning target volume [PTV] = 21.3 cm 3 ) previously treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were replanned with each technique. The plans were compared for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI), and doses to normal structures at 6 dose values from 50.4 Gy to 5.6 Gy. The mean CI was 1.75 (CF), 1.75 (DA), and 1.66 (IMRT) (p 3 , the CI (IMRT) was always superior to CI (DA) and CI (CF). At PTV sizes below 25 cm 3 , there was no significant difference in CI between each technique. There was no significant difference in HI between plans. The total volume of normal tissue receiving 50.4, 44.8, and 5.6 Gy was significantly lower when comparing IMRT to CF and DA plans (p 3 , due to improved conformity and normal tissue sparing, in particular for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe

  19. Preliminary experience with frameless stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buatti, John M.; Bova, Francis J.; Friedman, William A.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mickle, J. Parker; Ellis, Thomas L.; Mendenhall, William M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To report initial clinical experience with a novel high-precision stereotactic radiotherapy system. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients ranging in age from 2 to 82 years received a total of 1426 treatments with the University of Florida frameless stereotactic radiotherapy system. Of the total, 39 (65%) were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) alone, and 21 (35%) received SRT as a component of radiotherapy. Pathologic diagnoses included meningiomas (15 patients), low-grade astrocytomas (11 patients), germinomas (9 patients), and craniopharyngiomas (5 patients). The technique was used as means of dose escalation in 11 patients (18%) with aggressive tumors. Treatment reproducibility was measured by comparing bite plate positioning registered by infrared light-emitting diodes (IRLEDs) with the stereotactic radiosurgery reference system, and with measurements from each treatment arc for the 1426 daily treatments (5808 positions). We chose 0.3 mm vector translation error and 0.3 deg. rotation about each axis as the maximum tolerated misalignment before treating each arc. Results: With a mean follow-up of 11 months, 3 patients had recurrence of malignant disease. Acute side effects were minimal. Of 11 patients with low grade astrocytomas, 4 (36%) had cerebral edema and increased enhancement on MR scans in the first year, and 2 required steroids. All had resolution and marked tumor involution on follow-up imaging. Bite plate reproducibility was as follows. Translational errors: anterior-posterior, 0.01 ± 0.10; lateral, 0.02 ± 0.07; axial, 0.01 ± 0.10. Rotational errors (degrees): anterior-posterior, 0.00 ± 0.03; lateral, 0.00 ± 0.06; axial, 0.01 ± 0.04. No patient treatment was delivered beyond the maximum tolerated misalignment. Daily treatment was delivered in approximately 15 min per patient. Conclusion: Our initial experience with stereotactic radiotherapy using the infrared camera guidance system was good. Patient selection and treatment

  20. Megavoltage conebeam CT cine as final verification of treatment plan in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudithipudi, Vijay; Gayou, Olivier; Colonias, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    To analyse the clinical impact of megavoltage conebeam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) cine on internal target volume (ITV) coverage in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). One hundred and six patients received lung SBRT. All underwent 4D computed tomography simulation followed by treatment via image guided 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiation. Prior to SBRT, all patients underwent MV-CBCT cine, in which raw projections are displayed as beam's-eye-view fluoroscopic series with the planning target volume (PTV) projected onto each image, enabling verification of tumour motion relative to the PTV and assessment of adequacy of treatment margin. Megavoltage conebeam computed tomography cine was completed 1-2 days prior to SBRT. Four patients (3.8%) had insufficient ITV coverage inferiorly at cine review. All four plans were changed by adding 5 mm on the PTV margin inferiorly. The mean change in PTV volumes was 3.9 cubic centimetres (cc) (range 1.85-6.32 cc). Repeat cine was performed after plan modification to ensure adequate PTV coverage in the modified plans. PTV margin was adequate in the majority of patients with this technique. MV-CBCT cine did show insufficient coverage in a small subset of patients. Insufficient PTV margins may be a function of 4D CT simulation inadequacies or deficiencies in visualizing the ITV inferior border in the full-inhale phase. MV-CBCT cine is a valuable tool for final verification of PTV margins. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  1. Noninvasive patient fixation for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohr, Frank; Debus, Juergen; Frank, Claudia; Herfarth, Klaus; Pastyr, Otto; Rhein, Bernhard; Bahner, Malte L.; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Wannenmacher, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the setup accuracy that can be achieved with a novel noninvasive patient fixation technique based on a body cast attached to a recently developed stereotactic body frame during fractionated extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one CT studies (≥ 20 slices, thickness: 3 mm) from 5 patients who were immobilized in a body cast attached to a stereotactic body frame for treatment of para medullary tumors in the thoracic or lumbar spine were evaluated with respect to setup accuracy. The immobilization device consisted of a custom-made wrap-around body cast that extended from the neck to the thighs and a separate head mask, both made from Scotchcast. Each CT study was performed immediately before or after every second or third actual treatment fraction without repositioning the patient between CT and treatment. The stereotactic localization system was mounted and the isocenter as initially located stereo tactically was marked with fiducials for each CT study. Deviation of the treated isocenter as compared to the planned position was measured in all three dimensions. Results: The immobilization device can be easily handled, attached to and removed from the stereotactic frame and thus enables treatment of multiple patients with the same stereotactic frame each day. Mean patient movements of 1.6 mm ± 1.2 mm (laterolateral [LL]), 1.4 mm ± 1.0 mm (anterior-posterior [AP]), 2.3 mm ± 1.3 mm (transversal vectorial error [VE]) and < slice thickness = 3 mm (cranio caudal [CC]) were recorded for the targets in the thoracic spine and 1.4 mm ± 1.0 mm (LL), 1.2 mm ± 0.7 mm (AP), 1.8 mm ± 1.2 mm (VE), and < 3 mm (CC) for the lumbar spine. The worst case deviation was 3.9 mm for the first patient with the target in the thoracic spine (in the LL direction). Combining those numbers (mean transversal VE for both locations and maximum CC error of 3 mm), the mean three-dimensional vectorial patient movement and thus the mean overall

  2. Treatment and technical intervention time analysis of a robotic stereotactic radiotherapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop, F; Lacornerie, T; Szymczak, H; Felin, A; Bailleux, C; Mirabel, X; Lartigau, E

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to obtain a better operational knowledge of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) treatments with CyberKnife(r). An analysis of both In-room Times (IRT) and technical interventions of 5 years of treatments was performed, during which more than 1600 patients were treated for various indications, including liver (21%), lung (29%), intracranial (13%), head and neck (11%) and prostate (7%). Technical interventions were recorded along with the time of the failure, time to the intervention, and the complexity and duration of the repair. Analyses of Time Between Failures (TBF) and Service Disrupting TBF(disr) were performed. Treatment time data and variability per indication and following different system upgrades were evaluated. Large variations of IRTs were found between indications, but also large variations for each indication. The combination of the time reduction Tool (using Iris(r)) and Improved Stop Handling was of major impact to shortening of treatment times. The first implementation of the Iris collimator alone did not lead to significantly shorter IRTs for us except during prostate treatments. This was mostly due to the addition at the same time of larger rotational compensation for prostate treatments (58 instead of 1.58). Significant differences of duration between the first fraction and following fractions of a treatment, representing the necessity of defining imaging parameters and explanation to patients, were found for liver (12 min) and lung treatments using Xsight(r) Spine (5 min). Liver and lung treatments represent the longest IRT's and involve the largest variability's in IRT. The malfunction rate of the system followed a Weibull distribution with the shape and scale parameters of 0.8 and 39.7. Mean TBF(disr) was 68 work hours. 60 to 80% of the service disrupting interventions were resolved within 30-60 min, 5% required external intervention and 30% occurred in the morning. The presented results can be applied in the

  3. A neurosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dedicated PACS for conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefkopoulos, D.; Bocquiault, P.; Levrier, M.; Merienne, L.; Schlienger, M.

    1995-01-01

    To realise conformal cerebral stereotactic irradiations we use a Neurosurgery/stereotactic dedicated PACS between two distant hospitals. It connects the stereotactic neurosurgery planification imaging system NEUROAXIS (Sopelem-Sofretec/Ste Anne Hospital) with the dosimetric TPS ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray (Tenon Hospital). NEUROAXIS is a computer aided stereotactic biopsies and stereo-electroencephalographies, used by surgeons in operating room. The system determines the precise location data for Talairach radiological equipment (X ray source at 5 meters from film) and the geometry of scanner and MRI stereotactical referentials. It provides a full set of features for lesion localization, geometrical computations, surgical planifications, picture archiving, stereotactic angiography, CT and MRI image processing and networking. It sends images through the French public digital network ISDN (NUMERIS/France Telecom : 2x64 Kbits/s) from Ste Anne to Tenon Hospital. Stereotactic angiographic and CT images are reformatted into the DOSIGRAY image processing environment where 3-D dose distributions, displays and DVHs are computed to determine the optimal treatment. ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray is a TPS for stereotactic radiotherapy devised by the Tenon Hospital for clinical methodology and 3D dose calculations, optimization software development and the Dosigray company for multimodality imaging, (2D(3D)) computer graphics for dose and anatomical representation and data networking. Communication within the radiation oncology department is provided by local area ETHERNET network, linking heterogeneous systems (Vaxstations-3200; Decstation (5000(240))) by means of different protocols. The works in progress are to send back via the same network the 3-D dose matrix to Neurosurgery department NEUROAXIS system. Our PACS is used since six months to treat patients. It has permitted to improve the treatment quality in comparison with our first version TPS ARTEMIS-3D

  4. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in the treatment of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Carolyn H; Ling, Diane C; Wegner, Rodney E; Flickinger, John C; Heron, Dwight E; Zeh, Herbert; Moser, Arthur J; Burton, Steven A

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in the elderly is often complicated by comorbidities that preclude surgery, chemotherapy and/or conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has thus garnered interest in this setting. A retrospective review of 26 patients of age ≥ 80 with pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with definitive SBRT+/-chemotherapy from 2007–2011 was performed. Twenty-seven percent of patients were stage I, 38% were stage II, 27% were stage III and 8% were stage IV. Patients most commonly received 24 Gy/1 fraction or 30-36 Gy/3 fractions. Kaplan-Meier was used to estimate overall survival (OS), local control (LC), cause specific survival (CSS) and freedom-from-metastatic disease (FFMD). The median age was 86 (range 80–91), and median follow-up was 11.6 months (3.5-24.6). The median planning target volume was 21.48 cm 3 (6.1-85.09). Median OS was 7.6 months with 6/12 month OS rates of 65.4%/34.6%, respectively. Median LC was 11.5 months, 6-month and 12-month actuarial LC rates were 60.1% and 41.2%, respectively. There were no independent predictors for LC, but there was a trend for improved LC with prescription dose greater than 20 Gy (p = 0.063). Median CSS was 6.3 months, and 6-month and 12-month actuarial CSS were 53.8% and 23.1%, respectively. Median FFMD was 8.4 months, and 6-month and 12-month actuarial rates were 62.0% and 41.4%, respectively. Nine patients (47%) had local failures, 11 (58%) had distant metastasis, and 7 (37%) had both. There were no acute or late grade 3+ toxicities. Definitive SBRT is feasible, safe and effective in elderly patients who have unresectable disease, have comorbidities precluding surgery or decline surgery

  5. Case report of a near medical event in stereotactic radiotherapy due to improper units of measure from a treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, D J; Li, S; Jarvis, L A; Hartford, A C

    2011-07-01

    The authors hereby notify the Radiation Oncology community of a potentially lethal error due to improper implementation of linear units of measure in a treatment planning system. The authors report an incident in which a patient was nearly mistreated during a stereotactic radiotherapy procedure due to inappropriate reporting of stereotactic coordinates by the radiation therapy treatment planning system in units of centimeter rather than in millimeter. The authors suggest a method to detect such errors during treatment planning so they are caught and corrected prior to the patient positioning for treatment on the treatment machine. Using pretreatment imaging, the authors found that stereotactic coordinates are reported with improper linear units by a treatment planning system. The authors have implemented a redundant, independent method of stereotactic coordinate calculation. Implementation of a double check of stereotactic coordinates via redundant, independent calculation is simple and accurate. Use of this technique will avoid any future error in stereotactic treatment coordinates due to improper linear units, transcription, or other similar errors. The authors recommend an independent double check of stereotactic treatment coordinates during the treatment planning process in order to avoid potential mistreatment of patients.

  6. Case report of a near medical event in stereotactic radiotherapy due to improper units of measure from a treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladstone, D. J.; Li, S.; Jarvis, L. A.; Hartford, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors hereby notify the Radiation Oncology community of a potentially lethal error due to improper implementation of linear units of measure in a treatment planning system. The authors report an incident in which a patient was nearly mistreated during a stereotactic radiotherapy procedure due to inappropriate reporting of stereotactic coordinates by the radiation therapy treatment planning system in units of centimeter rather than in millimeter. The authors suggest a method to detect such errors during treatment planning so they are caught and corrected prior to the patient positioning for treatment on the treatment machine. Methods: Using pretreatment imaging, the authors found that stereotactic coordinates are reported with improper linear units by a treatment planning system. The authors have implemented a redundant, independent method of stereotactic coordinate calculation. Results: Implementation of a double check of stereotactic coordinates via redundant, independent calculation is simple and accurate. Use of this technique will avoid any future error in stereotactic treatment coordinates due to improper linear units, transcription, or other similar errors. Conclusions: The authors recommend an independent double check of stereotactic treatment coordinates during the treatment planning process in order to avoid potential mistreatment of patients.

  7. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy and LINAC radiosurgery in the treatment of vestibular schwannoma-report about both stereotactic methods from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Christine; Fauser, Claudius; Müller, Axel; Astner, Sabrina T; Jacob, Vesna; Lumenta, Christianto; Meyer, Bernhard; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Molls, Michael; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate tumor control and side effects associated with radiosurgery (RS) and stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SFR) for vestibular schwannomas (VSs) in a group of patients treated at the same institution. Between May 1997 and June 2007, 115 consecutive cases of VS were treated in our department. The SFR group (47 patients), including larger tumors (maximum diameter >1.5 cm), received a total dose of 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction. The RS group (68 patients, maximum diameter new trigeminal neuropathy occurred in 9 of 68 patients (13%). A high tumor control rate and low number of side effects are registered after SFR and RS of VS. These results confirm that considering tumor diameter, both RS and SFR are good treatment modalities for VS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Stereotactic treatment. Definitions and literature overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontenla, D.P.

    2008-01-01

    The topics discussed include, among others, the following: Radiosurgery definitions; Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT); Available uncertainties in SRS; Gamma knife; Linac-based SRS; Components of a radiosurgery system; Stereotactic hardware (brain lab); m3 linac attachment; Radiosurgery - clinical procedure; Cancer management; Rationale for SRT; Role of radiosurgery in the management of intracranial tumors; Indications for stereotactic SRS/SRT; Physical components required for SRS/SRT; Stereotactic patient set-up; Stereotactic CT scan for SRS; Physical components required for SRT: Relocatable head frame (GTC); Patient immobilization; Treatment planning system; Basic requirements for SRS dosimetry (Linac based); Stereotactic set-up QA (Linac); Stereotactic frames and QA; Beam dose measurements; Dose evaluation tools; Phantoms. (P.A.)

  9. Linac based radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, T.R.

    2008-01-01

    The following topics were discussed: Definition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT); Stereo market; Indications for SRS/SRT; History of linac-based SRS/SRT; Variety of systems; QA for SRS; Localization; and Imaging. (P.A.)

  10. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: a promising treatment option for the boost of oropharyngeal cancers not suitable for brachytherapy: a single-institutional experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Mamgani, A.; Tans, L.; Teguh, D.N.; Rooij, P. van; Zwijnenburg, E.M.; Levendag, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively assess the outcome and toxicity of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a treatment option for boosting primary oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) in patients who not suitable for the standard brachytherapy boost (BTB). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 2005 and 2010,

  11. Stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of acoustic schwannomas: comparative observations of 125 patients treated at one institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, David W.; Suarez, Oscar; Goldman, H. Warren; Downes, M. Beverly; Bednarz, Greg; Corn, Benjamin W.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Rosenstock, Jeffrey; Curran, Walter J.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and, more recently, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) have been recognized as noninvasive alternatives to surgery for the treatment of acoustic schwannomas. We review our experience of acoustic tumor treatments at one institution using a gamma knife for SRS and the first commercial world installation of a dedicated linac for SRT. Methods: Patients were treated with SRS on the gamma knife or SRT on the linac from October 1994 through August 2000. Gamma knife technique involved a fixed-frame multiple shot/high conformality single treatment, whereas linac technique involved daily conventional fraction treatments involving a relocatable frame, fewer isocenters, and high conformality established by noncoplanar arc beam shaping and differential beam weighting. Results: Sixty-nine patients were treated on the gamma knife, and 56 patients were treated on the linac, with 1 NF-2 patient common to both units. Three patients were lost to follow-up, and in the remaining 122 patients, mean follow-up was 119±67 weeks for SRS patients and 115±96 weeks for SRT patients. Tumor control rates were high (≥97%) for sporadic tumors in both groups but lower for NF-2 tumors in the SRT group. Cranial nerve morbidities were comparably low in both groups, with the exception of functional hearing preservation, which was 2.5-fold higher in patients who received conventional fraction SRT. Conclusion: SRS and SRT represent comparable noninvasive treatments for acoustic schwannomas in both sporadic and NF-2 patient groups. At 1-year follow-up, a significantly higher rate of serviceable hearing preservation was achieved in SRT sporadic tumor patients and may therefore be preferable to alternatives including surgery, SRS, or possibly observation in patients with serviceable hearing

  12. Treatment of pituitary adenomas by fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy: A prospective study of 110 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin, Philippe; Jovenin, Nicolas; Delemer, Brigitte; Caron, Jean; Grulet, Herve; Hecart, Annie-Claude; Lukas, Celine; Bazin, Arnaud; Bernard, Mary-Helene; Scherpereel, Bernard; Peruzzi, Philippe; Nakib, Iab; Redon, Charles; Rousseaux, Pascal

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To optimize and reduce the toxicity of pituitary adenoma irradiation by assessing the feasibility and effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR). Methods and Materials: Between 1990 and 1999, 110 consecutive patients, 47 with a functioning adenoma, were treated according to a strategy of either early surgery and FSR (n = 89) or FSR only (n = 21). Of the 110 patients, 75 had persistent macroscopic tumor and 47 persistent hormonal secretions; 15 were treated in the prophylactic setting. The linear accelerator-delivered dose was 50.4 Gy (5 x 1.8 Gy weekly), with a 2-mm safety margin. Results: After a minimal follow-up of 48 months, only 1 patient had developed progression. Of the 110 patients, 27 (36%) had a complete tumor response, 67 (89.3%) had an objective tumor response, 20 (42%) had a hormonal complete response, and 47 (100%) had a hormonal objective tumor response. The proportion of patients without a complete tumor response, objective tumor response, complete hormonal response, and objective hormonal response was 85.1%, 62%, 83%, and 59.3% at 4 years and 49.3%, 9%, 59.3%, and 10.6% at 8 years, respectively. The sole unfavorable predictive factor was preoperative SSE >20 mm for tumor response (p = 0.01) and growth hormone adenoma for the hormonal response (p <0.001). No late complications, except for pituitary deficiency, were reported, with a probability of requiring hormonal replacement of 28.5% and 35% at 4 and 8 years, respectively. Nonfunctioning status was the sole unfavorable factor (p = 0.0016). Conclusions: Surgery plus FSR is safe and effective. FSR focused to the target volume seems more suitable than standard radiotherapy, and standard fractionation reduces the risk of optic neuropathy sometimes observed after single-dose radiosurgery. Therefore, FSR allows us to consider combined transrhinoseptal surgery and early radiotherapy, with a curative goal without patient selection

  13. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy in treatment of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer: Unsolved questions and frontiers ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingze; Kong, Li; Jiao, Qinghua; Li, Minghuan; Yu, Jingming

    2017-08-10

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has been recognized as a standard alternative treatment to surgery for inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Guaranteed local control rates over 90% makes oncologists wonder whether SABR is qualified enough to challenge surgery in operable patients. The role of SABR for centrally located lesions would be another question because of the increased risk of severe toxic effect. Plenty of studies suggest that optimization of dose regimen and appropriate case selection would be helpful. Additionally, the effect of adjuvant therapy following SABR in selected patients is worth looking forward, given that it significantly reduced risk of recurrence after complete resection. A consensus about salvage treatment after SABR also needs, given the current diversity of options. Finally, witnessing the emergence of proton therapy and immunotherapy, we believe that the future of SABR lay behind these novel forms of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pulmonary oligometastases: Metastasectomy or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widder, Joachim; Klinkenberg, Theo J.; Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Groen, Harry J.M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR; or stereotactic body radiotherapy, SBRT) emerges as treatment option for pulmonary oligometastatic disease (OMD), but there are no studies comparing SABR with pulmonary metastasectomy (PME). We analysed consecutive patients referred via a university-hospital based multidisciplinary team. Material and methods: Patients were offered PME as first choice and SABR in case they were considered to be less suitable surgical candidates. Overall survival was the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints were progression-free-survival, local control of treated metastases, and freedom-from-failure of a local-only treatment strategy without systemic therapy. Results: From 2007 until 2010, 110 patients were treated and analysed (PME, n = 68; SABR, n = 42). Median follow-up time was 43 months (minimally, 25). Estimated overall survival rates at one, three, and five years were 87%, 62%, and 41% for PME, and 98%, 60%, and 49% for SABR, respectively (logrank-test, p = 0.43). Local control at two years was 94% for SABR and 90% for PME. Progression-free survival was 17% at three years, but 43% of the patients still had not failed a local-only treatment strategy. Conclusions: Although SABR was second choice after PME, survival after PME was not better than after SABR. Prospective comparative studies are clearly required to define the role of both, SABR and PME in OMD

  15. Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) / Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT): Benefit to Irish patients and Irish Healthcare Economy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cagney, DN

    2017-01-01

    Cancer incidence across Europe is projected to rise rapidly over the next decade. This rising cancer incidence is mirrored by increasing use of and indications for stereotactic radiation. This paper seeks to summarize the exponential increase in indications for stereotactic radiotherapy as well as the evolving economic advantages of stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy

  16. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for delivery of hypofractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy: A dosimetric and treatment efficiency analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, Samuel D.; Matuszak, Martha M.; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Grills, Inga S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/objective(s): Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) allows for intensity-modulated radiation delivery during gantry rotation with dynamic MLC motion, variable dose rates and gantry speed modulation. We compared VMAT plans with 3D-CRT for hypofractionated lung radiotherapy. Materials/methods: Twenty-one 3D-CRT plans for Stage IA lung cancer previously treated stereotactically were selected. VMAT plans were generated by optimizing machine aperture shape and radiation intensity at 10 deg. intervals. A partial arc range of 180 deg. was manually selected to coincide with tumor location. The arc was resampled down to 5 deg. intervals to ensure dose calculation accuracy. Identical planning objectives were used for VMAT/3D-CRT. Parameters assessed included dose to PTV and organs-at-risk (OAR), monitor units, and multiple conformity and homogeneity indices. Plans were delivered to a phantom for time comparison. Results: Lung V 20/12.5/10/5 were less with VMAT (relative reduction 4.5%, p = .02; 3.2%, p = .01; 2.6%, p = .01; 4.2%, p = .03, respectively). Mean/maximum-doses to PTV, dose to additional OARs, 95% isodose line conformity, and target volume homogeneity were equivalent. VMAT improved conformity at both the 80% (1.87 vs. 1.93, p = .08) and 50% isodose lines (5.19 vs. 5.65, p = .01). Treatment times were reduced significantly with VMAT (mean 6.1 vs. 11.9 min, p < .01). Conclusions: Single arc VMAT planning achieves highly conformal dose distributions while controlling dose to critical structures, including significant reduction in lung dose volume parameters. Employing a VMAT technique decreases treatment times by 37-63%, reducing the chance of error introduced by intrafraction variation. The quality and efficiency of VMAT is ideally suited for stereotactic lung radiotherapy delivery.

  17. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in lung cancer: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Ferreira, Paula Pratti Rodrigues; Moraes, Fabio Ynoe de; Neves Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade, E-mail: heloisa.carvalho@hc.fm.usp.br [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Gadia, Rafael [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia. Servico de Radioterapia

    2015-07-15

    For early-stage lung cancer, the treatment of choice is surgery. In patients who are not surgical candidates or are unwilling to undergo surgery, radiotherapy is the principal treatment option. Here, we review stereotactic body radiotherapy, a technique that has produced quite promising results in such patients and should be the treatment of choice, if available. We also present the major indications, technical aspects, results, and special situations related to the technique. (author)

  18. Stereotactic Fractionated Radiotherapy and LINAC Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma-Report About Both Stereotactic Methods From a Single Institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, Christine; Fauser, Claudius; Mueller, Axel; Astner, Sabrina T.; Jacob, Vesna; Lumenta, Christianto; Meyer, Bernhard; Tonn, Joerg-Christian; Molls, Michael; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor control and side effects associated with radiosurgery (RS) and stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SFR) for vestibular schwannomas (VSs) in a group of patients treated at the same institution. Methods and Materials: Between May 1997 and June 2007, 115 consecutive cases of VS were treated in our department. The SFR group (47 patients), including larger tumors (maximum diameter >1.5 cm), received a total dose of 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction. The RS group (68 patients, maximum diameter <1.5 cm) received a total dose of 12 Gy at the 100% isodose. Evaluation included serial imaging tests (magnetic resonance imaging) and neurologic and functional hearing examinations. Results: The tumor control rate was 97.9% in the SFR group for a mean follow-up time of 32.1 months and 98.5% in the RS group for a mean follow-up time of 30.1 months. Hearing function was preserved after RS in 85% of the patients and after SFR in 79%. Facial and trigeminal nerve function remained mostly unaffected after SFR. After RS, new trigeminal neuropathy occurred in 9 of 68 patients (13%). Conclusions: A high tumor control rate and low number of side effects are registered after SFR and RS of VS. These results confirm that considering tumor diameter, both RS and SFR are good treatment modalities for VS.

  19. The role of stereotactic radiation therapy and whole-brain radiotherapy in the treatment of multiple brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiujun; Xiao Jianping; Li Xiangpan; Jiang Xuesong; Zhang Ye; Xu Yingjie; Dai Jianrong; Li Yexiong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the results of stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) with or without whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in the treatment of multiple brain metastasis. Methods: From May 1995 to April 2010, totally 98 newly diagnosed multiple (2 - 13 lesions) brain metastases patients were treated in our centre. Forty-four patients were treated with SRT alone and 54 with SRT + WBRT. Dose fractionation schemes were 15 -26 Gy in 1 fraction or 24.0 -52.5 Gy in 2 - 15 fractions with 3.5 - 12.0 Gy per fraction, depending on the tumor volume, location, and history of prior irradiation. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used for survival analysis. The median age of the whole group was 55 years. The survival time was calculated from the date of radiation treatment to the day of death by any cause. Results: The median follow-up time for the whole group was 12 months, and the follow-up rate was 100%. The median overall survival time was 13.5 months for the whole group, there was no difference between SRT alone group and SRT + WBRT group (13.0 months vs. 13.5 months, χ 2 =0.31, P =0.578). The Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) at the time of treatment (χ 2 =6.25, P =0.012), the interval between the diagnosis of the primary tumor and brain metastases (χ 2 =7.34, P =0.025) and the status of extracranial metastases (χ 2 =4.20, P =0.040) were independent prognosis factors for survival in multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiation therapy is an effective and alternative treatment choice for multiple brain metastases. (authors)

  20. Stereotactic radiotherapy for choroidal melanoma: analysis of eye movement during treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Felipe Marques Lucas de; Gonçalves, Odair Dias; Cardoso, Simone Coutinho; Batista, Delano V.S.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the eye’s movement during radiotherapy treatment for choroidal melanoma, as well as the methodology used in the repositioning of the patient between treatments sessions. For this purpose, the procedures used by the hospital staff were analyzed on site and videos were recorded during the treatments. The methodology for the fixation of the eye is correct in its objective. However, the repositioning needs improvements in its reproducibility. It is recommended the study to fix the eye by the healthy eye and the feasibility study for the development of a software that assists in patient repositioning. (author)

  1. Stereotactic radiotherapy for choroidal melanoma: analysis of eye movement during treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, F. M. L.; Gonçalves, O. D.; Batista, D. V. S.; Cardoso, S. C.

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to analyse the eye’s movement during radiotherapy treatment for choroidal melanoma, as well as the methodology used in the repositioning of the patient between treatments sessions. For this purpose, the procedures used by the hospital staff were analysed on site and videos were recorded during the treatments. The methodology for the fixation of the eye is correct in its objective. However, the repositioning needs improvements in its reproducibility. It is recommended the study to fix the eye by the healthy eye and the feasibility study for the development of a software that assists in patient repositioning.

  2. The early adoption of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation treatment among older Medicare beneficiaries with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Bruce L; Yabes, Jonathan G; Lopa, Samia H; Heron, Dwight E; Chang, Chung-Chou H; Schroeck, Florian R; Bekelman, Justin E; Kahn, Jeremy M; Nelson, Joel B; Barnato, Amber E

    2017-08-01

    Several new prostate cancer treatments have emerged since 2000, including 2 radiotherapies with similar efficacy at the time of their introduction: intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The objectives of this study were to compare their early adoption patterns and identify factors associated with their use. By using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database, patients who received radiation therapy during the 5 years after IMRT introduction (2001-2005) and the 5 years after SBRT introduction (2007-2011) were identified. The outcome of interest was the receipt of new radiation therapy (ie, IMRT or SBRT) compared with the existing standard radiation therapies at that time. The authors fit a series of multivariable, hierarchical logistic regression models accounting for patients nested within health service areas to examine the factors associated with the receipt of new radiation therapy. During 2001 to 2005, 5680 men (21%) received IMRT compared with standard radiation (n = 21,555). Men who received IMRT were older, had higher grade tumors, and lived in more populated areas (P adoption rate for IMRT was substantially higher than that for SBRT (44% vs 4%; P adoption rates of IMRT and SBRT at the time of their introduction. Further investigation of the nonclinical factors associated with this difference is warranted. Cancer 2017;123:2945-54. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  3. Emerging technologies in stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijun; Wang, Lei; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) stems from the initial developments of intra-cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Despite similarity in their names and clinical goals of delivering a sufficiently high tumoricidal dose, maximal sparing of the surrounding normal tissues and a short treatment course, SBRT technologies have transformed from the early days of body frame-based treatments with X-ray verification to primarily image-guided procedures with cone-beam CT or stereoscopic X-ray systems and non-rigid body immo-bilization. As a result of the incorporation of image-guidance systems and multi-leaf col-limators into mainstream linac systems, and treatment planning systems that have also evolved to allow for routine dose calculations to permit intensity modulated radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), SBRT has disseminated rapidly in the community to manage many disease sites that include oligometastases, spine lesions, lung, prostate, liver, renal cell, pelvic tumors, and head and neck tumors etc. In this article, we review the physical principles and paradigms that led to the widespread adoption of SBRT practice as well as technical caveats specific to individual SBRT technologies. From the perspective of treatment delivery, we categorically described (I) C-arm linac-based SBRT technologies; (II) robotically manipulated X-band CyberKnife® technology; and (III) emerging specialized systems for SBRT that include integrated MRI-linear accelerators and the imaged-guided Gamma Knife Perfexion Icon system with expanded multi-isocenter treatments of skull-based tumors, head-and-neck and cervical-spine lesions.

  4. SU-C-17A-07: The Development of An MR Accelerator-Enabled Planning-To-Delivery Technique for Stereotactic Palliative Radiotherapy Treatment of Spinal Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogcarspel, S J; Kontaxis, C; Velden, J M van der; Bol, G H; Vulpen, M van; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an MR accelerator-enabled online planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases. The technical challenges include; automated stereotactic treatment planning, online MR-based dose calculation and MR guidance during treatment. Methods: Using the CT data of 20 patients previously treated at our institution, a class solution for automated treatment planning for spinal bone metastases was created. For accurate dose simulation right before treatment, we fused geometrically correct online MR data with pretreatment CT data of the target volume (TV). For target tracking during treatment, a dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR sequence was developed. An in house developed GPU based IMRT optimization and dose calculation algorithm was used for fast treatment planning and simulation. An automatically generated treatment plan developed with this treatment planning system was irradiated on a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator and evaluated using a Delta4 dosimeter. Results: The automated treatment planning method yielded clinically viable plans for all patients. The MR-CT fusion based dose calculation accuracy was within 2% as compared to calculations performed with original CT data. The dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR Sequence was able to provide an update of the anatomical location of the TV every 10 seconds. Dose calculation and optimization of the automatically generated treatment plans using only one GPU took on average 8 minutes. The Delta4 measurement of the irradiated plan agreed with the dose calculation with a 3%/3mm gamma pass rate of 86.4%. Conclusions: The development of an MR accelerator-enabled planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases was presented. Future work will involve developing an intrafraction motion adaptation strategy, MR-only dose calculation, radiotherapy quality-assurance in a magnetic field, and streamlining the entire treatment

  5. Local control of brain metastases after stereotactic radiosurgery: the impact of whole brain radiotherapy and treatment paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Paul J.; Page, Brandi R.; Lucas, John T.; Qasem, Shadi A.; Watabe, Kounosuke; Ruiz, Jimmy; Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Debinski, Waldemar; Chan, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigate clinical, pathologic, and treatment paradigm-related factors affecting local control of brain metastases after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with or without whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Methods and materials Patients with brain metastases treated with SRS alone, before or after WBRT were considered to determine predictors of local failure (LF), time to failure and survival. Results Among 137 patients, 411 brain metastases were analyzed. 23% of patients received SRS alone, 51% received WBRT prior to SRS, and 26% received SRS followed by WBRT. LF occurred in 125 metastases: 63% after SRS alone, 20% after WBRT then SRS, and 22% after SRS then WBRT. Median time to local failure was significantly less after SRS alone compared to WBRT then SRS (12.1 v. 22.7 months, p=0.003). Tumor volume was significantly associated with LF (HR:5.2, p<0.001, 95% CI:3.4-7.8). Conclusions WBRT+SRS results in reduced LF. Local control was not significantly different after SRS as salvage therapy versus upfront SRS. PMID:29296433

  6. Lung tumor tracking during stereotactic radiotherapy treatment with the CyberKnife: Marker placement and early results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuyttens, J.J.; Prevost, J.B.; Praag, J.; Hoogeman, M.; Levendag, P.C.; Klaveren, R.J. van; Pattynama, P.M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Lung tumor tracking during stereotactic radiotherapy with the CyberKnife requires the insertion of markers in or close to the tumor. To reduce the risk of pneumothorax, three methods of marker placement were used: 1) intravascular coil placement, 2) percutaneous intrathoracal, and 3) percutaneous extrathoracal placement. We investigated the toxicity of marker placement and the tumor response of the lung tumor tracking treatment. Markers were placed in 20 patients with 22 tumors: 13 patients received a curative treatment, seven a palliative. The median Charlson Comorbidity Score was 4 (range: 1-8). Platinum fiducials and intravascular embolisation coils were used as markers. In total, 78 markers were placed: 34 intrathoracal, 23 intravascular and 21 extrathoracal. The PTV equaled the GTV + 5 mm. A median dose of 45 Gy (range: 30-60 Gy, in 3 fractions) was prescribed to the 70-85% isodose. The response was evaluated with a CTscan performed 6-8 weeks after the last treatment and routinely thereafter. The median follow-up was 4 months (range: 2-11). No severe toxicity due to the marker placement was seen. Pneumothorax was not seen. The local control was 100%. Four tumors in four patients showed a complete response, 15 tumors in 14 patients a partial response, and three tumors in two patients with metastatic disease had stable disease. No severe toxicity of marker placement was seen due to the appropriate choice of one of the three methods. CyberKnife tumor tracking with markers is feasible and resulted in excellent tumor response. Longer follow-up is needed to validate the local control

  7. Quality assurance in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrington, A.P.; Laing, R.W.; Brada, M.

    1994-01-01

    The recent development of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), which utilises the relocatable Gill-Thomas-Cosman frame (GTC 'repeat localiser'), requires comprehensive quality assurance (QA). This paper focuses on those QA procedures particularly relevant to fractionated SRT treatments, and which have been derived from the technique used at the Royal Marsden Hospital. They primarily relate to the following: (i) GTC frame fitting, initially in the mould room, and then at each imaging session and treatment fraction; (ii) checking of the linear accelerator beam geometry and alignment lasers; and (iii) setting up of the patient for each fraction of treatment. The precision of the fractionated technique therefore depends on monitoring the GTC frame relocation at each fitting, checking the accuracy of the radiation isocentre of the treatment unit, its coincidence with the patient alignment lasers and the adjustments required to set the patient up accurately. The results of our quality control checks show that setting up to a mean radiation isocentre using precisely set-up alignment lasers can be achievable to within 1 mm accuracy. When this is combined with a mean GTC frame relocatability of 1 mm on the patient, a 2-mm allowance between the prescribed isodose surface and the defined target volume is a realistic safety margin for this technique

  8. A simple method for 3D lesion reconstruction from two projected angiographic images: implementation to a stereotactic radiotherapy treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorou, K.; Kappas, C.; Gaboriaud, G.; Mazal, A.D.; Petrascu, O.; Rosenwald, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: The most used imaging modality for diagnosis and localisation of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) treated with stereotactic radiotherapy is angiography. The fact that the angiographic images are projected images imposes the need of the 3D reconstruction of the lesion. This, together with the 3D head anatomy from CT images could provide all the necessary information for stereotactic treatment planning. We have developed a method to combine the complementary information provided by angiography and 2D computerized tomography, matching the reconstructed AVM structure with the reconstructed head of the patient. Materials and methods: The ISIS treatment planning system, developed at Institute Curie, has been used for image acquisition, stereotactic localisation and 3D visualisation. A series of CT slices are introduced in the system as well as two orthogonal angiographic projected images of the lesion. A simple computer program has been developed for the 3D reconstruction of the lesion and for the superposition of the target contour on the CT slices of the head. Results and conclusions: In our approach we consider that the reconstruction can be made if the AVM is approximated with a number of adjacent ellipses. We assessed the method comparing the values of the reconstructed and the actual volumes of the target using linear regression analysis. For treatment planning purposes we overlapped the reconstructed AVM on the CT slices of the head. The above feature is to our knowledge a feature that the majority of the commercial stereotactic radiotherapy treatment planning system could not provide. The implementation of the method into ISIS TPS shows that we can reliably approximate and visualize the target volume

  9. WE-E-BRE-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Renal Sympathetic Ablation for the Treatment of Refractory Hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxim, P; Wheeler, M; Loo, B [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Maguire, P [Cyberheart, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy as a novel treatment for patients with refractory hypertension in a swine model. Uncontrolled hypertension is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality, substantially increasing the risk of ischemic stroke, ischemic heart disease, and kidney failure. Methods: High-resolution computed tomography (CT) images of anesthetized pigs were acquired and treatment plans for each renal artery and nerve were developed using our clinically implemented treatment planning system. Stereotactic radiotherapy, 40Gy in single fraction was delivered bilaterally to the renal nerves using a state-of-the-art medical linear accelerator under image guidance utilizing dynamic conformal arcs. Dose to nearby critical organs was evaluated by dosevolume histogram analysis and correlated to toxicity data obtained through follow up pathology analysis. The animals were observed for six months with serial measurements of blood pressure, urine analysis, serum laboratories, and overall clinical and behavioral status. Results: All animals survived to the follow-up point without evidence of renal dysfunction (stable serum creatinine), skin changes, or behavioral changes that might suggest animal discomfort. Plasma norepinephrine levels (ng/ml) were followed monthly for 6 months. The average reduction observed was 63%, with the median reduction at 73.5%. Microscopic evaluation 4–6 weeks after treatment showed evidence of damage to the nerves around treated renal arteries. Considerable attenuation in pan neurofilament expression by immunohistochemistry was observed with some vacuolar changes indicative of injury. There was no histological or immunohistochemical evidence of damage to nearby spinal cord or spinal nerve root structures. Conclusion: Our preclinical studies have shown stereotactic radiotherapy to the renal sympathetic plexus to be safe and effective in reducing blood pressure, thus this approach holds great

  10. Progression-free Survival Following Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer Treatment-naive Recurrence: A Multi-institutional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ost, Piet; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; As, Nicholas Van; Zilli, Thomas; Muacevic, Alexander; Olivier, Kenneth; Henderson, Daniel; Casamassima, Franco; Orecchia, Roberto; Surgo, Alessia; Brown, Lindsay; Tree, Alison; Miralbell, Raymond; De Meerleer, Gert

    2016-01-01

    The literature on metastasis-directed therapy for oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa) recurrence consists of small heterogeneous studies. This study aimed to reduce the heterogeneity by pooling individual patient data from different institutions treating oligometastatic PCa recurrence with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We focussed on patients who were treatment naive, with the aim of determining if SBRT could delay disease progression. We included patients with three or fewer metastases. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate distant progression-free survival (DPFS) and local progression-free survival (LPFS). Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. In total, 163 metastases were treated in 119 patients. The median DPFS was 21 mo (95% confidence interval, 15-26 mo). A lower radiotherapy dose predicted a higher local recurrence rate with a 3-yr LPFS of 79% for patients treated with a biologically effective dose ≤100Gy versus 99% for patients treated with >100Gy (p=0.01). Seventeen patients (14%) developed toxicity classified as grade 1, and three patients (3%) developed grade 2 toxicity. No grade ≥3 toxicity occurred. These results should serve as a benchmark for future prospective trials. This multi-institutional study pools all of the available data on the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy for limited prostate cancer metastases. We concluded that this approach is safe and associated with a prolonged treatment progression-free survival. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. The Confluence of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy and Tumor Immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Eric Finkelstein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic radiation approaches are gaining more popularity for the treatment of intracranial as well as extracranial tumors in organs such as the liver and lung. Technology, rather than biology, is driving the rapid adoption of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT, also known as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR, in the clinic due to advances in precise positioning and targeting. Dramatic improvements in tumor control have been demonstrated; however, our knowledge of normal tissue biology response mechanisms to large fraction sizes is lacking. Herein, we will discuss how SABR can induce cellular expression of MHC I, adhesion molecules, costimulatory molecules, heat shock proteins, inflammatory mediators, immunomodulatory cytokines, and death receptors to enhance antitumor immune responses.

  12. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of small intracranial malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuuye, Koichi; Akine, Yasuyuki; Sumi, Minako; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Minoru; Shibui, Soichiro; Nomura, Kazuhiro

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients with small intracranial malignancies. Methods and Materials: From July 1991 to March 1997, 80 patients with a total of 121 brain or skull-base tumors were treated with FSRT alone, and were followed for periods ranging from 3 to 62 months (median 9.8). The majority of patients received 42 Gy in 7 fractions over 2.3 weeks, but in July 1993, protocols using smaller fraction doses were introduced for patients whose radiation-field diameters were larger than 3 cm or whose tumors were close to critical normal tissues. Results: For 64 patients with metastatic brain tumors the overall median survival was 8.3 months and 1-year actuarial survival rate was 33%. Significant prognostic factors were: the presence of extracranial tumors, pre-treatment performance status, and the lung as a primary site. Patients without extracranial tumors prior to FSRT had a median survival of 21.2 months. For seven patients with high-grade glioma, 1-year actuarial local control rate was 75%, with a median survival of 10.3 months. For patients with skull-base tumors the local control was achieved in 6 of 6 patients (100%), with a median survival of 30.7 months. No one suffered from acute complications, but three patients, two of whom had undergone FSRT as the third course of radiotherapy, developed late radiation injuries. Conclusion: Overall high local control and low morbidity rates suggest that FSRT is an effective and safe modality, even for those with a history of prior irradiation. However, patients with risk factors should be treated with smaller fraction doses

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norihisa, Yoshiki; Nagata, Yasushi; Takayama, Kenji; Matsuo, Yukinori; Sakamoto, Takashi; Sakamoto, Masato; Mizowaki, Takashi; Yano, Shinsuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Since 1998, we have treated primary and oligometastatic lung tumors with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The term 'oligometastasis' is used to indicate a small number of metastases limited to an organ. We evaluated our clinical experience of SBRT for oligometastatic lung tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 patients with oligometastatic lung tumors were included in this study. The primary involved organs were the lung (n = 15), colorectum (n = 9), head and neck (n = 5), kidney (n = 3), breast (n = 1), and bone (n = 1). Five to seven, noncoplanar, static 6-MV photon beams were used to deliver 48 Gy (n = 18) or 60 Gy (n = 16) at the isocenter, with 12 Gy/fraction within 4-18 days (median, 12 days). Results: The overall survival rate, local relapse-free rate, and progression-free rate at 2 years was 84.3%, 90.0%, and 34.8%, respectively. No local progression was observed in tumors irradiated with 60 Gy. SBRT-related pulmonary toxicities were observed in 4 (12%) Grade 2 cases and 1 (3%) Grade 3 case. Patients with a longer disease-free interval had a greater overall survival rate. Conclusion: The clinical result of SBRT for oligometastatic lung tumors in our institute was comparable to that after surgical metastasectomy; thus, SBRT could be an effective treatment of pulmonary oligometastases

  14. Efficient and accurate stereotactic radiotherapy using flattening filter free beams and HexaPOD robotic tables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Hansen, C. R.; Brink, C.

    2016-01-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) high dose rate beam technique was introduced for brain stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT). Furthermore, a HexaPOD treatment table was introduced for the brain SRS to enable correction of rotational setup errors. 19 filter fl.......3 degrees (SD1.2 degrees) to 0.06 degrees (SD 0.3 degrees)....

  15. Multimedia educational services in stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazioglou, M.; Theodorou, K.; Kappas, C.

    1999-01-01

    The computer-based learning methods in medicine have been well established as stand-alone learning systems. Recently, these systems were enriched with the use of telematics technology to provide distance learning capabilities. Stereotactic radiotherapy is more of the most representative advanced radiotherapy techniques. Due to the multidisciplinary character of the technique and the rapid evolution of technology implemented, the demands in training have increased. The potential of interactive multimedia and Internet technologies for the achievement of distance learning capabilities in this domain are investigated. The realization of a computer-based educational program in stereotactic radiotherapy in a multimedia format is a new application in the computer-aided distance learning field. The system is built according to a client and server architecture, based on the Internet infrastructure, and composed of server nodes. The impact of the system may be described in terms of: time and transportation costs saving, flexibility in training (scheduling, rate and subject selection), online communication and interaction with experts, cost effective access to material (delivery or access by a large number of users and revision of the material by avoiding and database development. (authors)

  16. Treatment with stereotactic radiotherapy body in lung cancer using tomography with taper beam of megavoltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crispin Contreras, V.; Pastor i Sanchis, V.; Abad Mocholi, D.; Bartres Salido, A.; Mut Dolera, A.; Aznar Santamaria, M.; Dolores Alemany, V. de los; Gonzalez Perez, V.; Guardino de la Flor, C.

    2013-01-01

    Analyzes variations inter and intra fraction and their corrections online, for this case and for the 13 first. We study the dosimetric parameters recommended in the RTOG 0813 Protocol. Reported global dosimetry of treatments; discussed pros and cons of this methodology. (Author)

  17. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for multiple pulmonary oligometastases: Analysis of number and timing of repeat SBRT as impact factors on treatment safety and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, R J; Hoerner-Rieber, J; Adebahr, S; Andratschke, N; Blanck, O; Boda-Heggemann, J; Duma, M; Eble, M J; Eich, H C; Flentje, M; Gerum, S; Hass, P; Henkenberens, C; Hildebrandt, G; Imhoff, D; Kahl, K H; Klass, N D; Krempien, R; Lohaus, F; Petersen, C; Schrade, E; Wendt, T G; Wittig, A; Guckenberger, M

    2018-03-03

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for oligometastatic disease is characterized by an excellent safety profile; however, experiences are mostly based on treatment of one single metastasis. It was the aim of this study to evaluate safety and efficacy of SBRT for multiple pulmonary metastases. This study is based on a retrospective database of the DEGRO stereotactic working group, consisting of 637 patients with 858 treatments. Cox regression and logistic regression were used to analyze the association between the number of SBRT treatments or the number and the timing of repeat SBRT courses with overall survival (OS) and the risk of early death. Out of 637 patients, 145 patients were treated for multiple pulmonary metastases; 88 patients received all SBRT treatments within one month whereas 57 patients were treated with repeat SBRT separated by at least one month. Median OS for the total patient population was 23.5 months and OS was not significantly influenced by the overall number of SBRT treatments or the number and timing of repeat SBRT courses. The risk of early death within 3 and 6 months was not increased in patients treated with multiple SBRT treatments, and no grade 4 or grade 5 toxicity was observed in these patients. In appropriately selected patients, synchronous SBRT for multiple pulmonary oligometastases and repeat SBRT may have a comparable safety and efficacy profile compared to SBRT for one single oligometastasis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Utility Estimation of the Manufactured Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Ahn, Jong Ho; Seo, Jeong Min; Shin, Eun Hyeak; Choi, Byeong Gi; Song, Gi Won

    2011-01-01

    Immobilizations used in order to maintain the reproducibility of a patient set-up and the stable posture for a long period are important more than anything else for the accurate treatment when the stereotactic body radiotherapy is underway. So the purpose of this study is to adapt the optimum immobilizations for the stereotactic body radiotherapy by comparing two commercial immobilizations with the self-manufactured immobilizations. Five people were selected for the experiment and three different immobilizations (A: Wing-board, B: BodyFix system, C: Arm up holder with vac-lock) were used to each target. After deciding on the target's most stable respiratory cycles, the targets were asked to wear a goggle monitor and maintain their respiration regularly for thirty minutes to obtain the respiratory signals. To analyze the respiratory signal, the standard deviation and the variation value of the peak value and the valley value of the respiratory signal were separated by time zone with the self-developed program at the hospital and each tie-downs were compared for the estimation by calculating a comparative index using the above. The stability of each immobilizations were measured in consideration of deviation changes studied in each respiratory time lapse. Comparative indexes of each immobilizations of each experimenter are shown to be A: 11.20, B: 4.87, C: 1.63 / A: 3.94, B: 0.67, C: 0.13 / A: 2.41, B: 0.29, C: 0.04 / A: 0.16, B: 0.19, C: 0.007 / A: 35.70, B: 2.37, C: 1.86. And when all five experimenters wore the immobilizations C, the test proved the most stable value while four people wearing A and one man wearing D expressed relatively the most unstable respiratory outcomes. The self-developed immobilizations, so called the arm up holder vac-lock for the stereotactic body radiotherapy is expected to improve the effect of the treatment by decreasing the intra-fraction organ motions because it keeps the respiration more stable than other two immobilizations

  19. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Adrenal Gland Metastases: University of Florence Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casamassima, Franco; Livi, Lorenzo; Masciullo, Stefano; Menichelli, Claudia; Masi, Laura; Meattini, Icro; Bonucci, Ivano; Agresti, Benedetta; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Doro, Raffaela

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a retrospective single-institution outcome after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for adrenal metastases. Methods and Materials: Between February 2002 and December 2009, we treated 48 patients with SBRT for adrenal metastases. The median age of the patient population was 62.7 years (range, 43–77 years). In the majority of patients, the prescription dose was 36 Gy in 3 fractions (70% isodose, 17.14 Gy per fraction at the isocenter). Eight patients were treated with single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery and forty patients with multi-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy. Results: Overall, the series of patients was followed up for a median of 16.2 months (range, 3–63 months). At the time of analysis, 20 patients were alive and 28 patients were dead. The 1- and 2-year actuarial overall survival rates were 39.7% and 14.5%, respectively. We recorded 48 distant failures and 2 local failures, with a median interval to local failure of 4.9 months. The actuarial 1-year disease control rate was 9%; the actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rate was 90%. Conclusion: Our retrospective study indicated that SBRT for the treatment of adrenal metastases represents a safe and effective option with a control rate of 90% at 2 years.

  20. Cyberknife stereotactic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lief, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The topic discussed included, among others, the following: cyberknife capabilities; autonomous robotics; continuous image guidance; flexible robotics maneuverability; Dynamic motion targeting; intelligent patient positioning; 4D treatment optimization and planning system; X-ray sources; robotic manipulator; linear accelerator; MultiPlan treatment planning system; radiosurgery vs radiotherapy; radiation system delivery comparison; simplified contouring; plan optimization; QA and commissioning. (P.A.)

  1. Guideline of stereotactic radiotherapy of body trunk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashino, Yasuo; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Ito, Akira

    2006-01-01

    The guideline is issued for safe and effective practice of the stereotactic radiotherapy of body trunk by giving appropriate methodologies and their theoretical backgrounds to radiological stuff concerned, such as doctors, technologists, physicists, quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) personnel, and nurses. The issue is motivated by the recent and expected increase of facilities conducting the therapy popularized from its approval by health insurance authorities in 2004, is based on the drafts by the Study Group for improving prognosis of the accurate 3-D radiotherapy organized in the MHLW and by Jap. 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group and, after edition by QA committee of Jap. Soc. Ther. Radiol. Oncol., is herein published by the Society. The guideline is composed mainly from 4 chapters of Introduction, Clinical practice, Physics and technology, and QA/QC of equipments and systems. The second chapter contains, concerning the therapy, its definition, contraindication, application to health insurance (applicable diseases and requirement), target setting, radiation dose and fractionation, risk organs (serial and parallel ones) and dose limits, and progress observation post therapy. The third chapter, its definition and methods, therapeutic planning, and actual performance, and the forth, the principle, essential concept, items particularly needed (dosimetry and mechanical/geometrical accuracy of equipments, equipments for therapy planning, and QA/QC of the system). The guideline is to be revised within 2-3 years hereafter. (R.T.)

  2. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in brain tumors and cervical region. Experience of the Dean Funes Medical Center, first experience in stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery inside the country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Vita, H.; Brunetto, M.; Derechinsky, V; Derechinsky, G.; Derechinsky, M.; Gonzalez, S.; Marinello, A.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study to analyze the results of 53 patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy in 'Centro Medico Dean Funes' was performed. The patients had brain and head and neck tumors. Patients and methods: From November 1997 to March 2003, 53 patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy in 'Centro Medico Dean Funes'. The daily dose administered varied from 1.8 to 2 Gy and the total dose from 30 to 70 Gy. The minimal follow up was 2 months, and the medium follow up 32 months. Local control and survival were analyzed in all patients, as well as tolerance and the complications of the treatment. Results: Since these series represented a very heterogeneous group of patients, the final results were very difficult to compare with other alternative treatments. However, an excellent tolerance to therapy was observed. Some subsets of patients had good results to treatment: patients with metastasis to the orbit, patients with lesions to the sellar and parasellar regions and some who relapsed following conventional radiotherapy, mainly lymphomas. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiotherapy is a valid therapeutic method to treat tumors of the brain and head and neck, as long as the tumor has a moderate size (6 cm. or less) and the shape is cylindrical or ellipsoid. Stereotactic radiation improves the therapeutic ratio as compared with the conventional radiotherapy. It has advantages over the 3D technique, and could compete with IMRT (Intensity modulated radiation therapy). (author) [es

  3. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  4. Successful treatment of hepatic oligometastases with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation in an anaplastic lymphoma kinase fusion-positive lung cancer patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Britta; Liu, Mitchell; Sobkin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Local ablative therapy with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy may improve survival in oncogene‐addicted lung cancer patients with extracranial oligometastatic disease treated with targeted therapies. There is limited data on the use of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in this same setting. We present...

  5. Registration of DRRs and portal images for verification of stereotactic body radiotherapy: a feasibility study in lung cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künzler, Thomas; Grezdo, Jozef; Bogner, Joachim; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Georg, Dietmar

    2007-04-01

    Image guidance has become a pre-requisite for hypofractionated radiotherapy where the applied dose per fraction is increased. Particularly in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumours, one has to account for set-up errors and intrafraction tumour motion. In our feasibility study, we compared digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of lung lesions with MV portal images (PIs) to obtain the displacement of the tumour before irradiation. The verification of the tumour position was performed by rigid intensity based registration and three different merit functions such as the sum of squared pixel intensity differences, normalized cross correlation and normalized mutual information. The registration process then provided a translation vector that defines the displacement of the target in order to align the tumour with the isocentre. To evaluate the registration algorithms, 163 test images were created and subsequently, a lung phantom containing an 8 cm3 tumour was built. In a further step, the registration process was applied on patient data, containing 38 tumours in 113 fractions. To potentially improve registration outcome, two filter types (histogram equalization and display equalization) were applied and their impact on the registration process was evaluated. Generated test images showed an increase in successful registrations when applying a histogram equalization filter whereas the lung phantom study proved the accuracy of the selected algorithms, i.e. deviations of the calculated translation vector for all test algorithms were below 1 mm. For clinical patient data, successful registrations occurred in about 59% of anterior-posterior (AP) and 46% of lateral projections, respectively. When patients with a clinical target volume smaller than 10 cm3 were excluded, successful registrations go up to 90% in AP and 50% in lateral projection. In addition, a reliable identification of the tumour position was found to be difficult for clinical target volumes

  6. SU-E-T-547: A Method to Correlate Treatment Planning Issue with Clinical Analysis for Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K; Jung, E; Newton, J; Cornell, D; Able, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the algorithms and calculation setting effect and contribution weighing on prostate Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) based SBRT were evaluated for clinical analysis. Methods: A low risk prostate patient under SBRT was selected for the treatment planning evaluation. The treatment target was divided into low dose prescription target volume (PTV) and high Dose PTV. Normal tissue constraints include urethra and femur head, and rectum was separated into anterior, lateral and posterior parts. By varying the constraint limit of treatment plan calculation setting and algorithms, the effect on dose coverage and normal tissue dose constraint parameter carried effective comparison for the nominal prescription and constraint. For each setting, their percentage differences to the nominal value were calculated with geometric mean and harmonic mean. Results: In the arbitrary prostate SBRT case, 14 variables were selected for this evaluation by using nominal prescription and constraint. Six VMAT planning settings were anisotropic analytic algorithm stereotactic beam with and without couch structure in grid size of 1mm and 2mm, non stereotactic beam, Acuros algorithm . Their geometry means of the variable sets for these plans were 112.3%, 111.9%, 112.09%, 111.75%, 111.28%, and 112.05%. And the corresponding harmonic means were 2.02%, 2.16%, 3.15%, 4.74%, 5.47% and 5.55%. Conclusions: In this study, the algorithm difference shows relatively larger harmonic mean between prostate SBRT VMAT plans. This study provides a methodology to find sensitive combined variables related to clinical analysis, and similar approach could be applied to the whole treatment procedure from simulation to treatment in radiotherapy for big clinical data analysis

  7. SU-E-T-547: A Method to Correlate Treatment Planning Issue with Clinical Analysis for Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, K; Jung, E; Newton, J [Associates In Medical Physics, Lanham, MD (United States); John R Marsh Cancer Center, Hagerstown, MD (United States); Cornell, D [John R Marsh Cancer Center, Hagerstown, MD (United States); Able, A [Associates In Medical Physics, Lanham, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, the algorithms and calculation setting effect and contribution weighing on prostate Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) based SBRT were evaluated for clinical analysis. Methods: A low risk prostate patient under SBRT was selected for the treatment planning evaluation. The treatment target was divided into low dose prescription target volume (PTV) and high Dose PTV. Normal tissue constraints include urethra and femur head, and rectum was separated into anterior, lateral and posterior parts. By varying the constraint limit of treatment plan calculation setting and algorithms, the effect on dose coverage and normal tissue dose constraint parameter carried effective comparison for the nominal prescription and constraint. For each setting, their percentage differences to the nominal value were calculated with geometric mean and harmonic mean. Results: In the arbitrary prostate SBRT case, 14 variables were selected for this evaluation by using nominal prescription and constraint. Six VMAT planning settings were anisotropic analytic algorithm stereotactic beam with and without couch structure in grid size of 1mm and 2mm, non stereotactic beam, Acuros algorithm . Their geometry means of the variable sets for these plans were 112.3%, 111.9%, 112.09%, 111.75%, 111.28%, and 112.05%. And the corresponding harmonic means were 2.02%, 2.16%, 3.15%, 4.74%, 5.47% and 5.55%. Conclusions: In this study, the algorithm difference shows relatively larger harmonic mean between prostate SBRT VMAT plans. This study provides a methodology to find sensitive combined variables related to clinical analysis, and similar approach could be applied to the whole treatment procedure from simulation to treatment in radiotherapy for big clinical data analysis.

  8. Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: Evaluation of PTV coverage and dose conformity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haedinger, U.; Thiele, W.; Wulf, J.

    2002-01-01

    During the past few years the concept of cranial sterotactic radiotherapy has been successfully extended to extracranial tumoral targets. In our department, hypofractionated treatment of tumours in lung, liver, abdomen, and pelvis is performed in the Stereotactic Body Frame (ELEKTA Instrument AB) since 1997. We present the evaluation of 63 consecutively treated targets (22 lung, 21 liver, 20 abdomen/pelvis) in 58 patients with respect to dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) as well as conformity of the dose distribution. The mean PTV coverage was found to be 96.3%±2.3% (lung), 95.0%±4.5% (liver), and 92.1%±5.2% (abdomen/pelvis). For the so-called conformation number we obtained values of 0.73±0.09 (lung), 0.77±0.10 (liver), and 0.70±0.08 (abdomen/pelvis). The results show that highly conformal treatment techniques can be applied also in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. This is primarily due to the relatively simple geometrical shape of most of the targets. Especially lung and liver targets turned out to be approximately spherically/cylindrically shaped, so that the dose distribution can be easily tailored by rotational fields. (orig.) [de

  9. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Timothy W.; Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-01-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management

  10. Hypofractionation Regimens for Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Large Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jiankui; Wang, Jian Z.; Lo, Simon; Grecula, John C.; Ammirati, Mario; Montebello, Joseph F.; Zhang Hualin; Gupta, Nilendu; Yuh, William T.C.; Mayr, Nina A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate equivalent regimens for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) for brain tumor treatment and to provide dose-escalation guidance to maximize the tumor control within the normal brain tolerance. Methods and Materials: The linear-quadratic model, including the effect of nonuniform dose distributions, was used to evaluate the HSRT regimens. The α/β ratio was estimated using the Gammaknife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) and whole-brain radiotherapy experience for large brain tumors. The HSRT regimens were derived using two methods: (1) an equivalent tumor control approach, which matches the whole-brain radiotherapy experience for many fractions and merges it with the GKSRS data for few fractions; and (2) a normal-tissue tolerance approach, which takes advantages of the dose conformity and fractionation of HSRT to approach the maximal dose tolerance of the normal brain. Results: A plausible α/β ratio of 12 Gy for brain tumor and a volume parameter n of 0.23 for normal brain were derived from the GKSRS and whole-brain radiotherapy data. The HSRT prescription regimens for the isoeffect of tumor irradiation were calculated. The normal-brain equivalent uniform dose decreased as the number of fractions increased, because of the advantage of fractionation. The regimens for potential dose escalation of HSRT within the limits of normal-brain tolerance were derived. Conclusions: The designed hypofractionated regimens could be used as a preliminary guide for HSRT dose prescription for large brain tumors to mimic the GKSRS experience and for dose escalation trials. Clinical studies are necessary to further tune the model parameters and validate these regimens

  11. Stability of percutaneously implanted markers for lung stereotactic radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Gitte Bjørnsen Fredberg; Josipovic, Mirjana; Von Der Recke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stability of complex markers implanted into lung tumors throughout a course of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen patients referred for lung SBRT were prospectively included. Radio-opaque markers were implanted percutaneously, guided...... by computed tomography (CT). Deep inspiration breath-hold CT scans (BHCT) were acquired at planning and on three treatment days. The treatment days' BHCTs were registered to the planning BHCT. Intraobserver uncertainty in both tumor and marker registration was determined. Deviations in the difference between...... tumor and marker-based image registrations of the BHCT scans during treatment quantified the marker stability. Marker position deviation relative to tumor position of less than 2 mm in all three dimensions was considered acceptable for treatment delivery precision. Intra observer uncertainties for image...

  12. Reirradiation of recurrent node-positive non-small cell lung cancer after previous stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I disease. A multi-institutional treatment recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, Carsten [Nordland Hospital, Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Bodoe (Norway); University of Tromsoe, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway); Ruysscher, Dirk de [MAASTRO Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Gaspar, Laurie E. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aurora, CO (United States); Guckenberger, Matthias [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Mehta, Minesh P. [Miami Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Miami, FL (United States); Cheung, Patrick; Sahgal, Arjun [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto (Canada)

    2017-07-15

    Practice guidelines have been developed for early-stage and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, many common clinical scenarios still require individualized decision making. This is true for locoregional relapse after initial stereotactic radiotherapy (stereotactic body radiation therapy or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy; SBRT or SABR), an increasingly utilized curative treatment option for stage I NSCLC. A consortium of expert radiation oncologists was established with the aim of providing treatment recommendations. In this scenario, a case was distributed to six radiation oncologists who provided their institutions' treatment recommendations. In this case, a patient developed local and mediastinal relapse after SABR (45 Gy, 3 fractions), comparable to the tumor burden in de novo stage IIIA NSCLC. Treatment recommendations were tabulated and a consensus conclusion was developed. Three institutions recommended evaluation for surgery. If the patient was not a surgical candidate, and/or refused surgery, definitive chemoradiation was recommended, including retreating the primary to full dose. European participants were more in favor of a non-surgical approach. None of the participants were reluctant to prescribe reirradiation, but two institutions prescribed doses lower than 60 Gy. Platinum-based doublets together with intensity-modulated radiotherapy were preferred. The institutional recommendations reflect the questions and uncertainties discussed in current stage III guidelines. All institutions agreed that previous SABR is not a contraindication for salvage chemoradiation. In the absence of high-quality prospective trials for recurrent NSCLC, all treatment options recommended in current guidelines for stage III disease can be considered in clinical scenarios such as this. (orig.) [German] Fuer fruehe und lokal fortgeschrittene Stadien des nicht-kleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinoms (NSCLC) wurden Behandlungsleitlinien publiziert

  13. Stereotactic body radiotherapy and treatment at a high volume facility is associated with improved survival in patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshy, Matthew; Malik, Renuka; Mahmood, Usama; Husain, Zain; Sher, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study examined the comparative effectiveness of no treatment (NoTx), conventional fractionated radiotherapy (ConvRT), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. This population based cohort also allowed us to examine what facility level characteristics contributed to improved outcomes. Methods: We included patients in the National Cancer Database from 2003 to 2006 with T1-T2N0M0 inoperable lung cancer (n = 13,036). Overall survival (OS) was estimated using Kaplan–Meier methods and Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: The median follow up was 68 months (interquartile range: 35–83 months) in surviving patients. Among the cohort, 52% received NoTx, 41% received ConvRT and 6% received SBRT. The 3-year OS was 28% for NoTx, 36% for ConvRT radiotherapy, and 48% for the SBRT cohort (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio for SBRT and ConvRT were 0.67 and 0.77, respectively, as compared to NoTx (1.0 ref) (p < 0.0001). Patients treated at a high volume facility vs. low volume facility had a hazard ratio of 0.94 vs. 1.0 (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with early stage inoperable lung cancer treated with SBRT and at a high volume facility had a survival benefit compared to patients treated with ConvRT or NoTx or to those treated at a low volume facility

  14. Cerebral control and survival after stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Elmar Till

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective study, including 275 patients who underwent stereotactic radiotherapy due to brain metastases between 2003 and 2008, investigates influencing factors regarding cerebral control and survival, symptomatic effects and a potential benefit for patients older than 70 years. We were able to identify risk factors for remote brain failure which leads to a therapeutic recommendation. Furthermore we confirm a positive symptomatic effect and a benefit of stereotactic readiotherapy for patients over 70 years.

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as Treatment for Organ Confined Low and Intermediate Risk Prostate Carcinoma, a Seven Year Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Jay Katz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT takes advantage of the prostate’s low α/β ratio to deliver a large radiation dose in few fractions. Initial studies on small groups of low-risk patients support SBRT’s potential for clinical efficacy while limiting treatment-related morbidity and maintained quality of life (QOL. This prospective study expands upon prior studies to further evaluate SBRT efficacy for a large patient population with organ confined, low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods: 477 patients with prostate cancer received CyberKnife SBRT. The median age was 68.6 years and the median PSA was 5.3 ng/ml. 324 patients were low-risk (PSA 10, or Gleason 3+4 with PSA <10; n=106 had a significantly higher bDFS than patients with high intermediate-risk (Gleason 3+4 with PSA 10-20 or Gleason 4+3; n=47, with bDFS of 93.5% versus 79.3%, respectively. For the low and low intermediate-risk groups, there was no difference in median PSA nadir or biochemical disease control between doses of 35 and 36.25 Gy. Conclusions: CyberKnife SBRT produces excellent biochemical control rates. Median PSA levels compare f

  16. Complications from Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kylie H. [School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Okoye, Christian C.; Patel, Ravi B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Siva, Shankar [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Biswas, Tithi; Ellis, Rodney J.; Yao, Min; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S., E-mail: Simon.Lo@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has become a standard treatment option for early stage, node negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are either medically inoperable or refuse surgical resection. SBRT has high local control rates and a favorable toxicity profile relative to other surgical and non-surgical approaches. Given the excellent tumor control rates and increasing utilization of SBRT, recent efforts have focused on limiting toxicity while expanding treatment to increasingly complex patients. We review toxicities from SBRT for lung cancer, including central airway, esophageal, vascular (e.g., aorta), lung parenchyma (e.g., radiation pneumonitis), and chest wall toxicities, as well as radiation-induced neuropathies (e.g., brachial plexus, vagus nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve). We summarize patient-related, tumor-related, dosimetric characteristics of these toxicities, review published dose constraints, and propose strategies to reduce such complications.

  17. Stereotactic radiotherapy of benign meningioma in the elderly: Clinical outcome and toxicity in 121 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Henzel, Martin; Surber, Gunar; Hamm, Klaus; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the outcome of definitive stereotactic-based radiotherapy in elderly patients (⩾70 years of age) with benign intracranial meningiomas. Materials and methods: 121 patients were treated with either fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FRTS; n = 74), hypofractionated FSRT (hFSRT; n = 35) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS; n = 12), depending on tumor size and location. Local control (LC), overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), symptomatology and acute and late toxicity were assessed. The prognostic value of factors such as age, sex, tumor location, Karnofsky performance scale, target volume and radiotherapy schedule was examined. Results: The median follow-up was 40 months (range, 12–124 months). LC, OS and CSS at 3 years were 98.3%, 92% and 99% and at 5 years they accounted 94.7%, 79% and 94.3%, respectively. We failed to identify any significant prognostic factor for outcome. Only Grade I–II toxicity was observed, whereas no new neurologic deficits or treatment-related mortality were encountered. Conclusion: This is the first study to assess the outcome following radiotherapy in elderly patients with intracranial meningiomas. The high local control, the low toxicity and the lack of treatment-associated mortality make stereotactic radiotherapy an attractive option in an age population where neurosurgery is often correlated with some mortality

  18. Disease volume and distribution as drivers of treatment decisions in metastatic prostate cancer: From chemohormonal therapy to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of oligometastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluja, Ronak; Cheung, Patrick; Zukotynski, Katherine; Emmenegger, Urban

    2016-05-01

    The prognosis of men with metastatic, castration-sensitive prostate cancer (CSPC) depends on both the distribution and extent of metastases, among other things. Patients with low-volume or oligometastatic disease have improved survival compared with those with high-volume metastases. While chemohormonal therapy is the new standard of care for men with high-volume metastatic CSPC, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is emerging as a promising treatment option with low toxicity for the management of oligometastatic CSPC. Our review summarizes the current evidence on the role of SABR in oligometastatic prostate cancer. SABR shows control rates of metastases ranging from 88% to 100% at 6 months to 3 years, and progression-free survival commonly reported as >50% for the first 12 months. In addition, SABR may allow androgen-deprivation therapy to be delayed by more than 2 years in selected patients, minimizing the chronic side effects associated with such therapy. However, much still needs to be learned before SABR can be implemented as standard treatment for oligometastatic prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Volumetric Modulated Arc-Based Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Selected Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations: Dosimetric Report and Early Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Sai; Srinivas, Chilukuri; Ramalingam, K.; Babaiah, M.; Swamy, S. Thirumalai; Arun, G.; Kathirvel, M.; Ashok, S. [Yashoda Super Specialty Hospital, Hyderabad (India); Clivio, Alessandro [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Fogliata, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.fogliata-cozzi@eoc.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Nicolini, Giorgia [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Rao, K. Srinivasa; Reddy, T. Pratap; Amit, Jotwani [Yashoda Super Specialty Hospital, Hyderabad (India); Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, with a dosimetric and clinical feasibility study, RapidArc (a volumetric modulated arc technique) for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of large arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were subject to multimodality imaging (magnetic resonance, computed tomography, and digital subtraction angiography) to determine nidus and target volumes, as well as involved organs at risk (optical structures, inner ear, brain stem). Plans for multiple intensity-modulated arcs with a single isocenter were optimized for a fractionation of 25 Gy in 5 fractions. All plans were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. Dose-volume histograms were analyzed to assess plan quality. Delivery parameters were reported to appraise technical features of RapidArc, and pretreatment quality assurance measurements were carried out to report on quality of delivery. Results: Average size of AVM nidus was 26.2 cm{sup 3}, and RapidArc plans provided complete target coverage with minimal overdosage (V{sub 100%} = 100% and V{sub 110%} < 1%) and excellent homogeneity (<6%). Organs at risk were highly spared. The D{sub 1%} to chiasm, eyes, lenses, optic nerves, and brainstem (mean {+-} SD) was 6.4 {+-} 8.3, 1.9 {+-} 3.8, 2.3 {+-} 2.2, 0.7 {+-} 0.9, 4.4 {+-} 7.2, 12.2 {+-} 9.6 Gy, respectively. Conformity index (CI{sub 95%}) was 2.2 {+-} 0.1. The number of monitor units per gray was 277 {+-} 45, total beam-on time was 2.5 {+-} 0.3 min. Planning vs. delivery {gamma} pass rate was 98.3% {+-} 0.9%. None of the patients developed acute toxicity. With a median follow-up of 9 months, 3 patients presented with deterioration of symptoms and were found to have postradiation changes but responded symptomatically to steroids. These patients continue to do well on follow-up. One patient developed headache and seizures, which was attributed to intracranial bleed, confirmed on imaging. Conclusion: Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy can be

  20. A treatment planning comparison between a novel rotating gamma system and robotic linear accelerator based intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareed, Muhammad M.; Eldib, Ahmed; Weiss, Stephanie E.; Hayes, Shelly B.; Li, Jinsheng; C-M Ma, Charlie

    2018-02-01

    To compare the dosimetric parameters of a novel rotating gamma ray system (RGS) with well-established CyberKnife system (CK) for treating malignant brain lesions. RGS has a treatment head of 16 cobalt-60 sources focused to the isocenter, which can rotate 360° on the ring gantry and swing 35° in the superior direction. We compared several dosimetric parameters in 10 patients undergoing brain stereotactic radiosurgery including plan normalization, number of beams and nodes for CK and shots for RGS, collimators used, estimated treatment time, D 2 cm and conformity index (CI) among two modalities. The median plan normalization for RGS was 56.7% versus 68.5% (p  =  0.002) for CK plans. The median number of shots from RGS was 7.5 whereas the median number of beams and nodes for CK was 79.5 and 46. The median collimator’s diameter used was 3.5 mm for RGS as compared to 5 mm for CK (p  =  0.26). Mean D 2 cm was 5.57 Gy for CyberKnife whereas it was 3.11 Gy for RGS (p  =  0.99). For RGS plans, the median CI was 1.4 compared to 1.3 for the CK treatment plans (p  =  0.98). The average minimum and maximum doses to optic chiasm were 21 and 93 cGy for RGS as compared to 32 and 209 cGy for CK whereas these were 0.5 and 364 cGy by RGS and 18 and 399 cGy by CK to brainstem. The mean V12 Gy for brain predicting for radionecrosis with RGS was 3.75 cm3 as compared to 4.09 cm3 with the CK (p  =  0.41). The dosimetric parameters of a novel RGS with a ring type gantry are comparable with CyberKnife, allowing its use for intracranial lesions and is worth exploring in a clinical setting.

  1. Inverse planned stereotactic intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of incompletely and completely resected adenoid cystic carcinomas of the head and neck: initial clinical results and toxicity of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Münter, MW; Schulz-Ertner, D; Hof, H; Nikoghosyan, A; Jensen, A; Nill, S; Huber, P; Debus, J

    2006-01-01

    Presenting the initial clinical results in the treatment of complex shaped adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC) of the head and neck region by inverse planned stereotactic IMRT. 25 patients with huge ACC in different areas of the head and neck were treated. At the time of radiotherapy two patients already suffered from distant metastases. A complete resection of the tumor was possible in only 4 patients. The remaining patients were incompletely resected (R2: 20; R1: 1). 21 patients received an integrated boost IMRT (IBRT), which allow the use of different single doses for different target volumes in one fraction. All patients were treated after inverse treatment planning and stereotactic target point localization. The mean folllow-up was 22.8 months (91 – 1490 days). According to Kaplan Meier the three year overall survival rate was 72%. 4 patients died caused by a systemic progression of the disease. The three-year recurrence free survival was according to Kaplan Meier in this group of patients 38%. 3 patients developed an in-field recurrence and 3 patient showed a metastasis in an adjacent lymph node of the head and neck region. One patient with an in-field recurrence and a patient with the lymph node recurrence could be re-treated by radiotherapy. Both patients are now controlled. Acute side effects >Grade II did only appear so far in a small number of patients. The inverse planned stereotactic IMRT is feasible in the treatment of ACC. By using IMRT, high control rates and low side effects could by achieved. Further evaluation concerning the long term follow-up is needed. Due to the technical advantage of IMRT this treatment modality should be used if a particle therapy is not available

  2. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of vestibular schwannomas accelerates hearing loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Claesson, Magnus; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea...... and hearing preservation was also investigated....

  3. Stereotactic radiotherapy for wet age-related macular degeneration: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neffendorf JE

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available James E Neffendorf, Timothy L Jackson Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom Abstract: Neovascular age-related macular degeneration is a leading cause of blindness in the developed world. Currently, the treatment of choice is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF medications. These require frequent dosing, up to monthly, and impose a substantial burden on patients and the health economy. Ionizing radiation was proposed as a possible treatment for age-related macular degeneration due to its anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties. Stereotactic radiotherapy is an outpatient-based radiotherapy platform that provides stereotactic application of low energy X-ray to the retina in three highly collimated beams that cross the inferior sclera to overlap at the macula. A randomized, double-masked, sham-controlled trial of 230 patients (INTREPID showed that a single dose of stereotactic radiotherapy significantly reduces the number of intravitreal anti-VEGF injections needed over 2 years. A larger randomized controlled trial (STAR is underway. Keywords: wet age-related macular degeneration, radiation therapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, vascular endothelial growth factor

  4. A dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and dynamic conformal arc therapy in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer using stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenbach, Bradley M; Mackowiak, Luke; Malhotra, Harish K

    2014-09-08

    This study evaluates three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT) planning techniques using dosimetric indices from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocols 0236, 0813, and 0915 for the treatment of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Twenty-five clinical patients, five per lung lobe, previously treated for NSCLC using 3D CRT SBRT under respective RTOG protocols were replanned with VMAT and DCAT techniques. All plans were compared using respective RTOG dosimetric indices. High- and low-dose spillage improved for VMAT and DCAT plans, though only VMAT was able to improve dose to all organs at risk (OARs). DCAT was only able to provide a minimal improvement in dose to the heart and ipsilateral brachial plexus. Mean bilateral, contralateral, and V20 (percentage of bilateral lung receiving at least 20 Gy dose) doses were reduced with VMAT in comparison with respective 3D CRT clinical plans. Though some of the DCAT plans had values for the above indices slightly higher than their respective 3D CRT plans, they still were able to meet the RTOG constraints. VMAT and DCAT were able to offer improved skin dose by 1.1% and 11%, respectively. Monitor units required for treatment delivery increased with VMAT by 41%, but decreased with DCAT by 26%. VMAT and DCAT provided improved dose distributions to the PTV, but only VMAT was consistently superior in sparing dose to OARs in all the five lobes. DCAT should still remain an alternative to 3D CRT in facilities that do not have VMAT or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) capabilities.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: A Promising Treatment Option for the Boost of Oropharyngeal Cancers Not Suitable for Brachytherapy: A Single-Institutional Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim, E-mail: a.al-mamgani@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Tans, Lisa; Teguh, David N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rooij, Peter van [Department of Biostatistics, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Zwijnenburg, Ellen M.; Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the outcome and toxicity of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a treatment option for boosting primary oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) in patients who not suitable for the standard brachytherapy boost (BTB). Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2010, 51 patients with Stage I to IV biopsy-proven OPC who were not suitable for BTB received boosts by means of SBRT (3 times 5.5 Gy, prescribed to the 80% isodose line), after 46 Gy of IMRT to the primary tumor and neck (when indicated). Endpoints of the study were local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and acute and late toxicity. Results: After a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 6-65 months), the 2-year actuarial rates of LC, DFS, and OS were 86%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, and the 3-year rates were 70%, 66%, and 54%, respectively. The treatment was well tolerated, as there were no treatment breaks and no Grade 4 or 5 toxicity reported, either acute or chronic. The overall 2-year cumulative incidence of Grade {>=}2 late toxicity was 28%. Of the patients with 2 years with no evidence of disease (n = 20), only 1 patient was still feeding tube dependent and 2 patients had Grade 3 xerostomia. Conclusions: According to our knowledge, this study is the first report of patients with primary OPC who received boosts by means of SBRT. Patients with OPC who are not suitable for the standard BTB can safely and effectively receive boosts by SBRT. With this radiation technique, an excellent outcome was achieved. Furthermore, the SBRT boost did not have a negative impact regarding acute and late side effects.

  6. Dose calculation of Acuros XB and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment with flattening filter free beams and the potential role of calculation grid size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Baotian; Wu, Lili; Lin, Peixian; Chen, Chuangzhen

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to appraise the dose differences between Acuros XB (AXB) and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment for lung cancer with flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Additionally, the potential role of the calculation grid size (CGS) on the dose differences between the two algorithms was also investigated. SBRT plans with 6X and 10X FFF beams produced from the CT scan data of 10 patients suffering from stage I lung cancer were enrolled in this study. Clinically acceptable treatment plans with AAA were recalculated using AXB with the same monitor units (MU) and identical multileaf collimator (MLC) settings. Furthermore, different CGS (2.5 mm and 1 mm) in the two algorithms was also employed to investigate their dosimetric impact. Dose to planning target volumes (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) between the two algorithms were compared. PTV was separated into PTV-soft (density in soft-tissue range) and PTV-lung (density in lung range) for comparison. The dose to PTV-lung predicted by AXB was found to be 1.33 ± 1.12% (6XFFF beam with 2.5 mm CGS), 2.33 ± 1.37% (6XFFF beam with 1 mm CGS), 2.81 ± 2.33% (10XFFF beam with 2.5 mm CGS) and 3.34 ± 1.76% (10XFFF beam with 1 mm CGS) lower compared with that by AAA, respectively. However, the dose directed to PTV-soft was comparable. For OARs, AXB predicted a slightly lower dose to the aorta, chest wall, spinal cord and esophagus, regardless of whether the 6XFFF or 10XFFF beam was utilized. Exceptionally, dose to the ipsilateral lung was significantly higher with AXB. AXB principally predicts lower dose to PTV-lung compared to AAA and the CGS contributes to the relative dose difference between the two algorithms

  7. Stereotactic radiotherapy reduces treatment cost while improving overall survival and local control over standard fractionated radiation therapy for medically inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanni, Thomas B; Grills, Inga S; Kestin, Larry L; Robertson, John M

    2011-10-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the standard alternative curative treatment option for medically inoperable early stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Recently, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has shown substantial promise to improve local control rates as compared with conventional fractionated RT [external beam RT (EBRT)]. We compare treatment outcomes and costs between SBRT and EBRT in this patient population. A total of 86 patients with Stage I (Tl-2 N0) NSCLC were treated with either EBRT (n=41) or SBRT (n=45) between January 2002 and April 2008. EBRT patients were treated to a median dose of 70 Gy with 3-dimensional conformal RT (n=39) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (n=2). SBRT was delivered in 4 or 5 fractions to 48 (Tl, n=44) or 60 (T2, n=1) Gy. The actual cost was calculated using 2010 Medicare hospital-based Ambulatory Payment Classification and hospital-based physician fee screen reimbursement rates for both the technical and professional components. On the basis of a median number of fractions for this patient population, SBRT was significantly less expensive ($13,639 EBRT vs. $10,616 SBRT, P < 0.01). Survival analysis demonstrated superior 36-month overall survival using SBRT, 71% versus 42% for EBRT (P < 0.05). SBRT also reduced local failure by nearly 3 times compared with EBRT (12% vs. 34%, P=0.10). In this study of Stage I NSCLC patients, SBRT was found to be less expensive than standard fractionated EBRT, with the cost savings highly dependent on the number of SBRT fractions and EBRT technique (3-dimensional conformal RT vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy). SBRT was also associated with superior local control and overall survival.

  8. Curative Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Severe COPD: Stereotactic Radiotherapy Outcomes and Systematic Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, David, E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Lagerwaard, Frank [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rodrigues, George [Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Haasbeek, Cornelis; Senan, Suresh [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Objectives: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of lung cancer and of postsurgical complications. We studied outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with severe COPD, as defined by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria, and performed a systematic review of the literature on outcomes after SBRT or surgery in these patients. Methods: A single-institution cohort of 176 patients with COPD GOLD III-IV and Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SBRT was evaluated. A systematic review identified studies reporting outcomes after SBRT or surgery for Stage I NSCLC in patients with GOLD III-IV or a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of {<=}40%. Results: In the single-institution cohort, median follow-up was 21 months and median overall survival (OS) was 32 months. Actuarial 3-year local control was 89%, and 1- and 3-year OS were 79% and 47%, respectively. COPD severity correlated with OS (p = 0.01). The systematic review identified four other studies (two surgical, two SBRT, n = 196 patients). SBRT studies were published more recently and included older patients than surgical studies. Mean 30-day mortality was 0% post-SBRT and 10% after surgery. Local or locoregional control was high ({>=}89%) after both treatments. Post-SBRT, actuarial OS was 79-95% at 1 year and 43-70% at 3 years. Postsurgical actuarial OS was 45-86% at 1 year and 31-66% at 3 years. Conclusions: SBRT and surgery differ in risk of 30-day mortality in patients with severe COPD. Despite the negative selection of SBRT patients, survival at 1 and 3 years is comparable between the two treatments.

  9. Primary lung sarcoma treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeo SG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Seung-Gu Yeo Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Cheonan, Republic of Korea Abstract: Primary lung sarcoma (PLS is an extremely rare, very aggressive malignancy. Surgical removal is considered the treatment of choice, and patients who have been given conventional radiotherapy have had inferior outcomes. This study is the first describing a case of PLS treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR, which precisely targets a small tumor with a markedly higher biologically effective dose than conventional radiotherapy. The patient was an 82-year-old man who was diagnosed with primary lung leiomyosarcoma based on radiology, pathology, and immunohistochemical examinations. The PLS was located in the right lower lobe and measured 2.5 cm. No regional nodal or distant organ metastasis was observed. He was inoperable medically. The SABR was performed using volumetric modulated arc therapy and a dose of 56 Gy in four fractions. Follow-up computed tomography 2 months after SABR revealed a complete tumor response. The toxicity was limited to mild respiratory symptoms. The patient is alive and has had no evidence of disease for 2 years. This study suggests that SABR can be a safe and effective treatment option for PLS. Keywords: primary lung sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, stereotactic body radiotherapy, radiation therapy, sarcoma 

  10. Clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary and oligometastatic lung tumors: a single institutional study with almost uniform dose with different five treatment schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Ono, Shuichi; Tsushima, Eiki; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized primary and oligometastatic lung tumors by assessing efficacy and safety of 5 regimens of varying fraction size and number. One-hundred patients with primary lung cancer (n = 69) or oligometastatic lung tumors (n = 31), who underwent SBRT between May 2003 and August 2010, were included. The median age was 75 years (range, 45–88). Of them, 98 were judged to have medically inoperable disease, predominantly due to chronic illness or advanced age. SBRT was performed using 3 coplanar and 3 non-coplanar fixed beams with a standard linear accelerator. Fraction sizes were escalated by 1 Gy, and number of fractions given was decreased by 1 for every 20 included patients. Total target doses were between 50 and 56 Gy, administered as 5–9 fractions. The prescribed dose was defined at the isocenter, and median overall treatment duration was 10 days (range, 5–22). The median follow-up was 51.1 months for survivors. The 3-year local recurrence rates for primary lung cancer and oligometastasis was 6 % and 3 %, respectively. The 3-year local recurrence rates for tumor sizes ≤3 cm and >3 cm were 3 % and 14 %, respectively (p = 0.124). Additionally, other factors (fraction size, total target dose, and BED 10 ) were not significant predictors of local control. Radiation pneumonia (≥ grade 2) was observed in 2 patients. Radiation-induced rib fractures were observed in 22 patients. Other late adverse events of greater than grade 2 were not observed. Within this dataset, we did not observe a dose response in BED 10 values between 86.4 and 102.6 Gy. SBRT with doses between 50 and 56 Gy, administered over 5–9 fractions achieved acceptable tumor control without severe complications

  11. Treatment of acromegaly patients with risk-adapted single or fractionated stereotactic high-precision radiotherapy. High local control and low toxicity in a pooled series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostroem, Jan Patrick [Mediclin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Kinfe, Thomas; Pintea, Bogdan [University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Meyer, Almuth [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Endocrinology, Erfurt (Germany); Gerlach, Ruediger [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Neurosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Surber, Gunnar; Hamm, Klaus [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Radiosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Lammering, Guido [Mediclin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University of Duesseldorf, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2015-01-10

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate a prospectively initiated two-center protocol of risk-adapted stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with acromegaly. In total 35 patients (16 men/19 women, mean age 54 years) were prospectively included in a treatment protocol of SRS [planning target volume (PTV) < 4 ccm, > 2 mm to optic pathways = low risk] or SRT (PTV ≥ 4 ccm, ≤ 2 mm to optic pathways = high risk). The mean tumor volume was 3.71 ccm (range: 0.11-22.10 ccm). Based on the protocol guidelines, 21 patients were treated with SRS and 12 patients with SRT, 2 patients received both consecutively. The median follow-up (FU) reached 8 years with a 5-year overall survival (OS) of 87.3 % [confidence interval (CI): 70.8-95.6 %] and 5-year local control rate of 97.1 % (CI: 83.4-99.8 %). Almost 80 % (28/35) presented tumor shrinkage during FU. Endocrinological cure was achieved in 23 % and IGF-1 normalization with reduced medication was achieved in 40 % of all patients. An endocrinological response was generally achieved within the first 3 years, but endocrinological cure can require more than 8 years. A new adrenocorticotropic hypopituitarism occurred in 13 patients (46.4 %). A new visual field disorder and a new oculomotor palsy occurred in 1 patient, respectively. Patients with occurrence of visual/neurological impairments had a longer FU (p = 0.049). Our SRS/SRT protocol proved to be safe and successful in terms of tumor control and protection of the visual system. The timing and rate of endocrine improvements are difficult to predict. One has to accept an unavoidable rate of additional adrenocorticotropic hypopituitarism in the long term. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung dieser Arbeit ist die Evaluation eines prospektiv angelegten Behandlungsprotokolls einer risikoadaptierten stereotaktischen Radiochirurgie (SRS) oder stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (SRT) von Patienten mit Akromegalie aus 2 Zentren. Insgesamt 35 Patienten (16

  12. Initial clinical results of linac stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsumori, Michihide; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Alexander, Eben; Kaiser, Ursula B.; Richardson, Gary E.; McL Black, Peter; Loeffler, Jay S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the initial clinical results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for pituitary adenomas with regard to tumor control and toxicity of the treatment, thus evaluate the feasibility of these technique for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. Subjects and Methods: 48 patients with either inoperable, recurrent or residual pituitary adenoma who underwent either SRS or SRT at the Brigham and Women's Hospital between 9/89 and 9/95 were analyzed. Of these, 18 received treatment with SRS, and 30 received SRT. SRS was contraindicated for the patients in whom the minimal distance of the target and optic chiasm or optic nerve was less than 5 mm. Patient characteristics were similar in the two groups, with the exception of tumor volume and previous irradiation. Median tumor volumes were 1.8 cm 3 and 7.7 cm 3 for SRS and SRT, respectively. Three of the SRS and none of the SRT patients had a history of previous external radiation therapy. Both SRS and SRT were performed by the use of dedicated stereotactic 6-MV linear accelerator with a treatment plan designed using a dedicated software. Doses were prescribed to the isodose distribution that covered the identified target. Dose and normalization used for SRS varied from 1000 cGy at 85 % isodose line to 1800 cGy at 80 % isodose line. For SRT patients, total dose of 4500 cGy was normalized at 90 or 95 % isodose line and this was delivered in 25 fractions of 180 cGy daily dose. Results: Local control: There was 1 case of local failure in each of SRS and SRT series (median follow up 42.5 months and 22 month, respectively). CNS adverse effects: There were 3 SRS cases in whom a ring enhancement in the temporal lobe was observed in follow-up MRI. (median follow up 32 months). Of these, one resolved spontaneously, whereas the other 2 lesion persisted and considered to be radiation necrosis. None of them required surgical intervention to date. These were observed in the

  13. Initial clinical results of linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsumori, Michihide; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Alexander, Eben; Kaiser, Ursula B.; Richardson, Gary E.; Black, Peter McL.; Loeffler, Jay S.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the initial clinical results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for pituitary adenomas with regard to tumor and hormonal control and adverse effects of the treatment. Subjects and Methods: Forty-eight patients with pituitary adenoma who underwent SRS or SRT between September 1989 and September 1995 were analyzed. Of these, 18 received SRS and 30 received SRT. The median tumor volumes were 1.9 cm 3 for SRS and 5.7 cm 3 for SRT. Eleven of the SRS and 18 of the SRT patients were hormonally active at the time of the initial diagnosis. Four of the SRS and none of the SRT patients had a history of prior radiation therapy. Both SRS and SRT were performed using a dedicated stereotactic 6-MV linear accelerator (LINAC). The dose and normalization used for the SRS varied from 1000 cGy at 85% of the isodose line to 1500 cGy at 65% of the isodose line. For SRT patients, a total dose of 4500 cGy at 90% or 95% of the isodose line was delivered in 25 fractions of 180 cGy daily doses. Results: Disease control--The three year tumor control rate was 91.1% (100% for SRS and 85.3% for SRT). Normalization of the hormonal abnormality was achieved in 47% of the 48 patients (33% for SRS and 54% for SRT). The average time required for normalization was 8.5 months for SRS and 18 months for SRT. Adverse effects--The 3-year rate of freedom from central nervous system adverse effects was 89.7% (72.2% for SRS and 100% for SRT). Three patients who received SRS for a tumor in the cavernous sinus developed a ring enhancement in the temporal lobe as shown by follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. Two of these cases were irreversible and were considered to be radiation necrosis. None of the 48 patients developed new neurocognitive or visual disorders attributable to the irradiation. The incidence of endocrinological adverse effects were similar in the two groups, resulting in 3-year rates of freedom from newly

  14. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary prostate cancer: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Tze-Jian; Foroudi, Farsgad; Gill, Suki; Siva, Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer allows overall treatment times to be reduced to as little as 1 week while maintaining a non-invasive approach. This study provides a comprehensive summary of the literature relating to SBRT in prostate cancer. A systematic review of the relevant literature was performed using structured search terms. Fourteen phase I–II trials and retrospective studies using SBRT for the treatment of prostate cancer were used. Three studies were identified which addressed cost. Dose fractionation, radiotherapy procedures, biochemical progression-free survival, toxicity, cost and quality of life were critically appraised. A total of 1472 patients were examined across studies. Median follow-up ranged from 11 to 60 months. The most common dose fractionation was 35–36.25Gy in five fractions, used in nine out of 14 studies. Ten of 14 studies used CyberKnife. The overall biochemical progression-free survival ranged 81–100%. Acute grade 2 urinary and rectal toxicities were reported in 5–42% and 0–27% of patients, respectively. Acute grade 3 or more urinary and rectal toxicity were 0.5% and 0%, respectively. Late grade 2 urinary toxicity was reported in 0–29% of patients, while 1.3% had a late grade 3 urinary toxicity. There were no late grade 4 urinary toxicities seen. Late grade 2 rectal toxicity was reported in 0–11%, while 0.5% had a late grade 3 rectal toxicity. Late grade 4 rectal toxicity was reported in 0.2% of patients.

  15. Prospective study on stereotactic radiotherapy of limited-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To test the effect of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in       the treatment of medically inoperable patients with limited-stage       non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a Phase II trial. Methods and       Materials: Forty patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with SBRT......%. At 2       years, 54% were without local or distant progression, and overall survival       was 47%. Within 6 months after treatment, one or more Grade >/=2 reactions       were observed in 48% of the patients. Conclusions: Stereotactic body       radiotherapy in patients with limited-stage NSCLC...

  16. Targeting tumour hypoxia to improve outcome of stereotactic radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittenborn, Thomas R; Horsman, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia is a characteristic feature of solid tumours that significantly reduces the efficacy of conventional radiation therapy. In this study we investigated the role of hypoxia in a stereotactic radiation schedule by using a variety of hypoxic modifiers in a preclinical tumour model...... OXi4503 and heat with the final 15 Gy had a significantly larger effect (TCD50 = 2 Gy). CONCLUSIONS: Clinically relevant modifiers of hypoxia effectively enhanced an equivalent stereotactic radiation treatment confirming the importance of hypoxia in such schedules....

  17. Role of stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastasis from colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2014-04-21

    Systemic chemotherapy has enabled prolongation of survival in patients with stage IV colorectal cancer. This has subsequently increased the relative significance of local therapy for patients with oligometastases because they can be cured by removal of oligometastatic lesions. One of the most frequently reported tumor histologies for oligometastases is colorectal cancer. Resection is the standard therapy in most settings of oligometastases. Recently, studies have shown that stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) may become a treatment option that provides high local control with minimal morbidity. Two-year local control rates following SBRT for hepatic and pulmonary oligometastases are almost over 80% and are even higher for patients treated with high-dose regimens. The indications of SBRT for other metastatic sites or conditions include isolated lymph nodes, spinal and adrenal metastasis, and post-surgical pelvic recurrence. Many retrospective studies have indicated that SBRT for various lesions results in good outcomes with low morbidity, both in the curative and palliative setting. However, few reports with a high level of evidence have indicated the efficacy of SBRT compared to standard therapy. Hereafter, the optimal indication of SBRT needs to be prospectively investigated to obtain convincing evidence.

  18. Target migration from re-inflation of adjacent atelectasis during lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Bijing; Verma, Vivek; Zheng, Dandan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Bennion, Nathan R; Bhirud, Abhijeet R; Poole, Maria A; Zhen, Weining

    2017-06-10

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a widely accepted option for the treatment of medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Herein, we highlight the importance of interfraction image guidance during SBRT. We describe a case of early-stage NSCLC associated with segmental atelectasis that translocated 15 mm anteroinferiorly due to re-expansion of the adjacent segmental atelectasis following the first fraction. The case exemplifies the importance of cross-sectional image-guided radiotherapy that shows the intended target, as opposed to aligning based on rigid anatomy alone, especially in cases associated with potentially "volatile" anatomic areas.

  19. Analysis of Electronic Densities and Integrated Doses in Multiform Glioblastomas Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron-Aznar, C.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Celis, M. A.; Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Integrated dose is the total energy delivered in a radiotherapy target. This physical parameter could be a predictor for complications such as brain edema and radionecrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy treatments for brain tumors. Integrated Dose depends on the tissue density and volume. Using CT patients images from the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery and BrainScan(c) software, this work presents the mean density of 21 multiform glioblastomas, comparative results for normal tissue and estimated integrated dose for each case. The relationship between integrated dose and the probability of complications is discussed

  20. Evaluation of time, attendance of medical staff, and resources during stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery. QUIRO-DEGRO trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabel-du Bois, A.; Milker-Zabel, S.; Debus, J. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology; Henzel, M.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Popp, W. [Prime Networks AG, Basel (Switzerland); Sack, H. [Essen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-09-15

    Background: The German Society of Radiation Oncology ('Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie', DEGRO) initiated a multicenter trial to develop and evaluate adequate modules to assert core processes and subprocesses in radiotherapy. The aim of this prospective evaluation was to methodical assess the required resources (technical equipment and medical staff) for stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery. Material and methods: At two radiotherapy centers of excellence (University Hospitals of Heidelberg and Marburg/Giessen), the manpower and time required for the implementation of intra- and extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy was prospectively collected consistently over a 3-month period. The data were collected using specifically developed process acquisition tools and standard forms and were evaluated using specific process analysis tools. Results: For intracranial (extracranial) fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and radiosurgery (RS), a total of 1,925 (270) and 199 (36) records, respectively, could be evaluated. The approximate time needed to customize the immobilization device was median 37 min (89 min) for FRST and 31 min (26 min) for RS, for the contrast enhanced planning studies 22 and 27 min (25 and 28 min), for physical treatment planning 122 and 59 min (187 and 27 min), for the first and routine radiotherapy sessions for FSRT 40 and 13 min (58 and 31 min), respectively. The median time needed for the RS session was 58 min (45 min). The corresponding minimal manpower needed was 2 technicians for customization of the immobilization device, 2.5 technicians and 1 consultant for the contrast-enhanced planning studies, 1 consultant, 0.5 resident and 0.67 medical physics expert (MPE) for physical treatment planning, as well as 1 consultant, 0.5 resident, and 2.5 technicians for the first radiotherapy treatment and 2.33 technicians for routine radiotherapy sessions. Conclusion: For the first time, the resource requirements for a

  1. A Bayesian network meta-analysis of whole brain radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xi; Liu, Wen-Jie; Li, Bing; Shen, Ze-Tian; Shen, Jun-Shu; Zhu, Xi-Xu

    2017-08-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effects of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRS) in treatment of brain metastasis.A systematical retrieval in PubMed and Embase databases was performed for relative literatures on the effects of WBRT and SRS in treatment of brain metastasis. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed by using the ADDIS software. The effect sizes included odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). A random effects model was used for the pooled analysis for all the outcome measures, including 1-year distant control rate, 1-year local control rate, 1-year survival rate, and complication. The consistency was tested by using node-splitting analysis and inconsistency standard deviation. The convergence was estimated according to the Brooks-Gelman-Rubin method.A total of 12 literatures were included in this meta-analysis. WBRT + SRS showed higher 1-year distant control rate than SRS. WBRT + SRS was better for the 1-year local control rate than WBRT. SRS and WBRT + SRS had higher 1-year survival rate than the WBRT. In addition, there was no difference in complication among the three therapies.Comprehensively, WBRT + SRS might be the choice of treatment for brain metastasis.

  2. Image-Guided Radiotherapy via Daily Online Cone-Beam CT Substantially Reduces Margin Requirements for Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grills, Inga S.; Hugo, Geoffrey; Kestin, Larry L.; Galerani, Ana Paula; Chao, K. Kenneth; Wloch, Jennifer; Yan Di

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine treatment accuracy and margins for stereotactic lung radiotherapy with and without cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance. Methods and Materials: Acquired for the study were 308 CBCT of 24 patients with solitary peripheral lung tumors treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. Patients were immobilized in a stereotactic body frame (SBF) or alpha-cradle and treated with image guidance using daily CBCT. Four (T1) or five (T2/metastatic) 12-Gy fractions were prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) edge. The PTV margin was ≥5 mm depending on a pretreatment estimate of tumor excursion. Initial daily setup was according to SBF coordinates or tattoos for alpha-cradle cases. A CBCT was performed and registered to the planning CT using soft tissue registration of the target. The initial setup error/precorrection position, was recorded for the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and medial-lateral directions. The couch was adjusted to correct the tumor positional error. A second CBCT verified tumor position after correction. Patients were treated in the corrected position after the residual errors were ≤2 mm. A final CBCT after treatment assessed intrafraction tumor displacement. Results: The precorrection systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) for the population ranged from 2-3 mm for SBF and 2-6 mm for alpha-cradle patients; postcorrection errors ranged from 0.4-1.0 mm. Calculated population margins were 9 to 13 mm (SBF) and 10-14 mm (cradle) precorrection, 1-2 mm (SBF), and 2-3 mm (cradle) postcorrection, and 2-4 mm (SBF) and 2-5 mm (cradle) posttreatment. Conclusions: Setup for stereotactic lung radiotherapy using a SBF or alpha-cradle alone is suboptimal. CBCT image guidance significantly improves target positioning and substantially reduces required target margins and normal tissue irradiation

  3. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsen, Frank, E-mail: frank.paulsen@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Doerr, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Wilhelm, Helmut [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Becker, Gerd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinik am Eichert, Goeppingen (Germany); Bamberg, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Classen, Johannes [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincentius-Kliniken, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SFRT) in the treatment of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 109 patients (113 eyes) with primary (n = 37) or secondary (n = 76) ONSM were treated according to a prospective protocol with SFRT to a median dose of 54 Gy. All patients underwent radiographic, ophthalmologic, and endocrine analysis before and after SFRT. Radiographic response, visual control, and late side effects were endpoints of the analysis. Results: Median time to last clinical, radiographic, and ophthalmologic follow up was 30.2 months (n = 113), 42.7 months (n = 108), and 53.7 months (n = 91), respectively. Regression of the tumor was observed in 5 eyes and progression in 4 eyes, whereas 104 remained stable. Visual acuity improved in 12, deteriorated in 11, and remained stable in 68 eyes. Mean visual field defects reduced from 33.6% (n = 90) to 17.8% (n = 56) in ipsilateral and from 10% (n = 94) to 6.7% (n = 62) in contralateral eyes. Ocular motility improved in 23, remained stable in 65, and deteriorated in 3 eyes. Radiographic tumor control was 100% at 3 years and 98% at 5 years. Visual acuity was preserved in 94.8% after 3 years and in 90.9% after 5 years. Endocrine function was normal in 90.8% after 3 years and in 81.3% after 5 years. Conclusions: SFRT represents a highly effective treatment for ONSM. Interdisciplinary counseling of the patients is recommended. Because of the high rate of preservation of visual acuity we consider SFRT the standard approach for the treatment of ONSM. Prolonged observation is warranted to more accurately assess late visual impairment. Moderate de-escalation of the radiation dose might improve the preservation of visual acuity and pituitary gland function.

  4. Treatment of large stage I-II lung tumors using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT): Planning considerations and early toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Chin Loon; Palma, David; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric predictors of early clinical toxicity following SBRT in patients with lung tumors and planning target volumes (PTV) exceeding 80 cm 3 . Methods: Eighteen consecutive patients who were treated using volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc TM ) were assessed. All were either unfit or refused to undergo surgery or chemoradiotherapy. PTV planning objectives were as used in the ROSEL study protocol. Clinical toxicity was scored using Common Toxicity Criteria AE4.0. Lung volumes receiving 5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy (V 5 , V 10 , V 15 and V 20 ) and mean lung dose were assessed and correlated to symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP). Results: Median age, age-adjusted Charlson-comorbidity score and PTV size were 74, 7.5 and 137 cm 3 , respectively. At a median follow-up of 12.8 months, 8 deaths were recorded: 5 arising from comorbidity, 2 were potentially treatment-related and 1 had local recurrence. RP was reported in 5 patients (grade 2 in 3 and grade 3 in 2). All RP occurred in plans without a high priority optimization objective on contralateral lung. Acute RP was best predicted by contralateral lung V 5 (p 80 cm 3 , the contralateral lung V 5 best predicts RP. Limiting contralateral lung V 5 to <26% may reduce acute toxicity.

  5. Geometric accuracy of field alignment in fractionated stereotactic conformal radiotherapy of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kortmann, Rolf D.; Becker, Gerd; Perelmouter, Jury; Buchgeister, Markus; Meisner, Christoph; Bamberg, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of field alignment in patients undergoing three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy of brain tumors, and to evaluate the impact on the definition of planning target volume and control procedures. Methods and Materials: Geometric accuracy was analyzed in 20 patients undergoing fractionated stereotactic conformal radiotherapy for brain tumors. Rigid head fixation was achieved by using cast material. Transfer of stereotactic coordinates was performed by an external positioning device. The accuracy during treatment planning was quantitatively assessed by using repeated computed tomography (CT) examinations in treatment position (reproducibility of isocenter). Linear discrepancies were measured between treatment plan and CT examination. In addition, for each patient, a series of 20 verifications were taken in orthogonal projections. Linear discrepancies were measured between first and all subsequent verifications (accuracy during treatment delivery). Results: For the total group of patients, the distribution of deviations during treatment setup showed mean values between -0.3-1.2 mm, with standard deviations (SD) of 1.3-2.0 mm. During treatment delivery, the distribution of deviations revealed mean values between 0.7-0.8 mm, with SDs of 0.5-0.6 mm, respectively. For all patients, deviations for the transition to the treatment machine were similar to deviations during subsequent treatment delivery, with 95% of all absolute deviations between less than 2.8 and 4.6 mm. Conclusion: Random fluctuations of field displacements during treatment planning and delivery prevail. Therefore, our quantitative data should be considered when prescribing the safety margins of the planning target volume. Repeated CT examination are useful to detect operator errors and large random or systematic deviations before start of treatment. Control procedures during treatment delivery appear to be of limited importance. In addition, our findings should help to

  6. Optimization of the primary collimator settings for fractionated IMRT stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobler, Matt; Leavitt, Dennis D.; Watson, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Advances in field-shaping techniques for stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy have allowed dynamic adjustment of field shape with gantry rotation (dynamic conformal arc) in an effort to minimize dose to critical structures. Recent work evaluated the potential for increased sparing of dose to normal tissues when the primary collimator setting is optimized to only the size necessary to cover the largest shape of the dynamic micro multi leaf field. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is now a treatment option for patients receiving stereotactic radiotherapy treatments. This multisegmentation of the dose delivered through multiple fixed treatment fields provides for delivery of uniform dose to the tumor volume while allowing sparing of critical structures, particularly for patients whose tumor volumes are less suited for rotational treatment. For these segmented fields, the total number of monitor units (MUs) delivered may be much greater than the number of MUs required if dose delivery occurred through an unmodulated treatment field. As a result, undesired dose delivered, as leakage through the leaves to tissues outside the area of interest, will be proportionally increased. This work will evaluate the role of optimization of the primary collimator setting for these IMRT treatment fields, and compare these results to treatment fields where the primary collimator settings have not been optimized

  7. The feasibility of utilizing pseudo CT-data for online MRI based treatment plan adaptation for a stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of spinal bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogcarspel, Stan J; Van der Velden, Joanne M; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Van Vulpen, Marco; Raaymakers, Bas W

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate what pseudo-CT (pCT) strategy is sufficient for online MRI based treatment plan adaptation of a stereotactic treatment for spinal bone metastases. For this purpose, the dosimetric accuracy of five increasingly complex pCT strategies was evaluated using the planning CT data of 20 patients suffering from spinal metastases. For each pCT, a treatment plan was developed and simulated on both the pCT and the original CT data of the patient. The two resulting dose distributions were compared using gamma analysis of 2%/2 mm. In this paper, a Gamma Pass Rate (GPR) of ⩾95% within the Target Volume (TV) was considered clinically acceptable. We additionally demonstrated in this paper the automatic generation of each investigated pCT strategy with the use of dedicated MRI data complemented with pre-treatment CT data of a patient in treatment position. The dosimetric accuracy of a pCT increases when additional bulk densities are utilized for a pCT. However, the dosimetric accuracy of even the most complex ‘bulk density’ pCT strategy used in this study had an average GPR of only 78% within the TV. However, if information on the heterogeneous electron density distribution within the affected vertebral body was available, a clinically acceptable 99% mean GPR was observed. All pCTs could successfully be generated using the MRI data in combination with the CT data of a patient in treatment position. The results presented in this study show that a simple ‘bulk density’ pseudo-CT strategy is not feasible for online MRI based treatment plan adaptation for spinal bone metastases. However, a clinically acceptable result is generated if the information on the heterogeneous electron density (ED) distribution within the affected vertebral bone is available. Therefore, any pCT strategy for this tumor site should include a method which can estimate the heterogeneous ED of the affected vertebral bone. (paper)

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadevan, Anand; Jain, Sanjay; Goldstein, Michael; Miksad, Rebecca; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Brennan, Darren M.D.; Callery, Mark; Vollmer, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis. Conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy requires 6 weeks of daily treatment and can be arduous. We explored the safety and effectiveness of a 3-day course of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) followed by gemcitabine in this population. Patients and Methods: A total of 36 patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with ≥12 months of follow-up were included. They received three fractions of 8, 10, or 12 Gy (total dose, 24-36 Gy) of SBRT according to the tumor location in relation to the stomach and duodenum, using fiducial-based respiratory motion tracking on a robotic radiosurgery system. The patients were then offered gemcitabine for 6 months or until tolerance or disease progression. Results: With an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 12-33), the local control rate was 78%, the median overall survival time was 14.3 months, the median carbohydrate antigen 19-9-determined progression-free survival time was 7.9 months, and the median computed tomography-determined progression-free survival time was 9.6 months. Of the 36 patients, 28 (78%) eventually developed distant metastases. Six patients (17%) were free of progression at the last follow-up visit (range, 13-30 months) as determined by normalized tumor markers with stable computed tomography findings. Nine Grade 2 (25%) and five Grade 3 (14%) toxicities attributable to SBRT occurred. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT can be delivered quickly and effectively in patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with acceptable side effects and minimal interference with gemcitabine chemotherapy.

  9. Dose delivery verification and accuracy assessment of stereotaxy in stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelagade, S.M.; Bopche, T.T.; Namitha, K.; Munshi, M.; Bhola, S.; Sharma, H.; Patel, B.K.; Vyas, R.K.

    2008-01-01

    The outcome of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in both benign and malignant tumors within the cranial region highly depends on precision in dosimetry, dose delivery and the accuracy assessment of stereotaxy associated with the unit. The frames BRW (Brown-Roberts-Wells) and GTC (Gill- Thomas-Cosman) can facilitate accurate patient positioning as well as precise targeting of tumours. The implementation of this technique may result in a significant benefit as compared to conventional therapy. As the target localization accuracy is improved, the demand for treatment planning accuracy of a TPS is also increased. The accuracy of stereotactic X Knife treatment planning system has two components to verify: (i) the dose delivery verification and the accuracy assessment of stereotaxy; (ii) to ensure that the Cartesian coordinate system associated is well established within the TPS for accurate determination of a target position. Both dose delivery verification and target positional accuracy affect dose delivery accuracy to a defined target. Hence there is a need to verify these two components in quality assurance protocol. The main intention of this paper is to present our dose delivery verification procedure using cylindrical wax phantom and accuracy assessment (target position) of stereotaxy using Geometric Phantom on Elekta's Precise linear accelerator for stereotactic installation

  10. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for renal cell cancer and pancreatic cancer. Literature review and practice recommendations of the DEGRO Working Group on Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panje, Cedric; Andratschke, Nikolaus; Guckenberger, Matthias; Brunner, Thomas B.; Niyazi, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    This report of the Working Group on Stereotactic Radiotherapy of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) aims to provide a literature review and practice recommendations for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of primary renal cell cancer and primary pancreatic cancer. A literature search on SBRT for both renal cancer and pancreatic cancer was performed with focus on prospective trials and technical aspects for clinical implementation. Data on renal and pancreatic SBRT are limited, but show promising rates of local control for both treatment sites. For pancreatic cancer, fractionated SBRT should be preferred to single-dose treatment to reduce the risk of gastrointestinal toxicity. Motion-compensation strategies and image guidance are paramount for safe SBRT delivery in both tumor entities. SBRT for renal cancer and pancreatic cancer have been successfully evaluated in phase I and phase II trials. Pancreatic SBRT should be practiced carefully and only within prospective protocols due to the risk of severe gastrointestinal toxicity. SBRT for primary renal cell cancer appears a viable option for medically inoperable patients but future research needs to better define patient selection criteria and the detailed practice of SBRT. (orig.) [de

  11. Quality of Life After Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Prevost, Jean-Briac; Holt, Bronno van der; Braat, Cora; Klaveren, Robertus J. van; Pattynama, Peter M.; Levendag, Peter C.; Nuyttens, Joost J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of stereotactic radiotherapy on the quality of life of patients with inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Overall survival, local tumor control, and toxicity were also evaluated in this prospective study. Methods and Materials: From January 2006 to February 2008, quality of life, overall survival, and local tumor control were assessed in 39 patients with pathologically confirmed T1 to 2N0M0 NSCLC. These patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ) C30 and the QLQ LC13 lung cancer-specific questionnaire were used to investigate changes in quality of life. Assessments were done before treatment, at 3 weeks, and at 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 months after treatment, until death or progressive disease. Toxicity was evaluated using common terminology criteria for adverse events version 3.0. Results: Emotional functioning improved significantly after treatment. Other function scores and QLQ C30 and QLQ LC13 lung symptoms (such as dyspnea and coughing) showed no significant changes. The overall 2-year survival rate was 62%. After a median follow-up of 17 months, 1 patient had a local recurrence (3%). No grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicity occurred. Grade 3 toxicity consisted of thoracic pain, which occurred in 1 patient within 4 months of treatment, while it occurred thereafter in 2 patients. Conclusions: Quality of life was maintained, and emotional functioning improved significantly after stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I NSCLC, while survival was acceptable, local tumor control was high, and toxicity was low.

  12. Stereotactic Robotic Body Radiotherapy for Patients With Unresectable Hepatic Oligorecurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovic, Patrick; Gulyban, Akos; Nguyen, Paul Viet; Dechambre, David; Martinive, Philippe; Jansen, Nicolas; Lakosi, Ferenc; Janvary, Levente; Coucke, Philippe A

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze local control (LC), liver progression-free survival (PFS), and distant PFS (DFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicity in a cohort of patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with fiducial tracking for oligorecurrent liver lesions; and to evaluate the potential influence of lesion size, systemic treatment, physical and biologically effective dose (BED), treatment calculation algorithms and other parameters on the obtained results. Unoperable patients with sufficient liver function had [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography and liver magnetic resonance imaging to confirm the oligorecurrent nature of the disease and to further delineate the gross tumor volume (GTV). An intended dose of 45 Gy in 3 fractions was prescribed on the 80% isodose and adapted if risk-related. Treatment was executed with the CyberKnife system (Accuray Inc) platform using fiducials tracking. Initial plans were recalculated using the Monte Carlo algorithm. Patient and treatment data were processed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log rank test for survival analysis. Between 2010 and 2015, 42 patients (55 lesions) were irradiated. The mean GTV and planning target volume (PTV) were 30.5 cc and 96.8 cc, respectively. Treatments were delivered 3 times per week in a median of 3 fractions to a PTV median dose of 54.6 Gy. The mean GTV and PTV D98% were 51.6 Gy and 51.2 Gy, respectively. Heterogeneity corrections did not influence dose parameters. After a median follow-up of 18.9 months, the 1- and 2-year LC/liver PFS/DFS/OS were 81.3%/55%/62.4%/86.9%, and 76.3%/42.3%/52%/78.3%, respectively. Performance status and histology had a significant effect on LC, whereas age (older than 65 years) marginally influenced liver PFS. Clinical target volume physical dose V45 Gy > 95%, generalized equivalent uniform dose (a = -30) > 45 Gy and a BED (α/β = 10) V105 Gy > 96% showed statistically significant effect on

  13. Phase-II study on stereotactic radiotherapy of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Sengeløv, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    in the present phase-II trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-two patients with locally advanced and surgically non-resectable, histological proven pancreatic carcinoma were included into the trial. The patients were immobilized by the Elekta stereotactic body frame (SBF) or a custom made body frame. SRT was given......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The majority of patients with pancreatic cancer have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis and are not amenable for surgery. Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) may be an alternative treatment for patients with locally advanced disease. The effect of SRT was investigated...... on standard LINAC with standard multi-leaf collimator. Central dose was 15 Gyx3 within 5-10 days. RESULTS: Evaluation of response was found to be very difficult due to radiation and tumour related tissue reaction. Only two patients (9%) were found to have a partial response (PR), the remaining had no change...

  14. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for organ-confined prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diblasio Ferdinand

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improved understanding of prostate cancer radiobiology combined with advances in delivery of radiation to the moving prostate offer the potential to reduce treatment-related morbidity and maintain quality of life (QOL following prostate cancer treatment. We present preliminary results following stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT treatment for organ-confined prostate cancer. Methods SBRT was performed on 304 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer: 50 received 5 fractions of 7 Gy (total dose 35 Gy and 254 received 5 fractions of 7.25 Gy (total dose 36.25 Gy. Acute and late toxicity was assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. The Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaire was used to assess QOL. Prostate-specific antigen response was monitored. Results At a median 30-month (26 - 37 month, range follow-up there were no biochemical failures for the 35-Gy dose level. Acute Grade II urinary and rectal toxicities occurred in 4% of patients with no higher Grade acute toxicities. One Grade II late urinary toxicity occurred with no other Grade II or higher late toxicities. At a median 17-month (8 - 27 month, range follow-up the 36.25 Gy dose level had 2 low- and 2 high-risk patients fail biochemically (biopsy showed 2 low- and 1 high-risk patients were disease-free in the gland. Acute Grade II urinary and rectal toxicities occurred in 4.7% (12/253 and 3.6% (9/253 of patients, respectively. For those patients with a minimum of 12 months follow-up, 5.8% (12/206 had late Grade II urinary toxicity and 2.9% (6/206 had late Grade II rectal toxicities. One late Grade III urinary toxicity occurred; no Grade IV toxicities occurred. For both dose levels at 17 months, bowel and urinary QOL returned to baseline values; sexual QOL decreased by 10%. Conclusions The low toxicity and maintained QOL are highly encouraging. Additional follow-up is needed to determine long-term biochemical control and

  15. Reirradiation of brain and skull base tumors with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuuye, Koichi; Akine, Yasuyuki; Sumi, Minako; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Inou, Yasushi; Shibui, Soichiro; Nomura, Kazuhiro

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the feasibility of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for small intracranial recurrences after conventional radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients who had initially undergone conventional radiotherapy to intracranial lesions, receiving a median total dose of 50 Gy in 5 weeks, were retreated with stereotactic radiotherapy for their recurrences and received a median total dose of 42 Gy in seven fractions over 2.3 weeks. Results: Of the 19 patients, 15 achieved local control 3-51 months after reirradiation. No patient suffered from acute reaction, but one patient with a history of extensive radiotherapy developed progressive radionecrosis 9 months after reirradiation. Conclusions: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of intracranial recurrences appears to be effective in achieving in local control with negligible morbidity. We believe it merits further investigation in a prospective study

  16. Stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery in pediatric patients: analysis of indications and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Bilal; Mønsted, Anne; Jensen, Josephine Harding

    2010-01-01

    We describe indications, outcomes, and risk profiles of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and single fraction "radiosurgery" (SRS) in pediatric patients compared to the adult population and evaluate the causal role of SRS and SRT in inducing new neurological complications....

  17. Pulmonary Function Testing After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to the Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishawi, Muath [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Kim, Bong [Division of Radiology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Moore, William H. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Bilfinger, Thomas V., E-mail: Thomas.bilfinger@stonybrook.edu [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical resection remains the standard of care for operable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, some patients are not fit for surgery because of comorbidites such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other medical conditions. We aimed to evaluate pulmonary function and tumor volume before and after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with and without COPD in early-stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A review of prospectively collected data of Stage I and II lung cancers, all treated with SBRT, was performed. The total SBRT treatment was 60 Gy administered in three 20 Gy fractions. The patients were analyzed based on their COPD status, using their pretreatment pulmonary function test cutoffs as established by the American Thoracic Society guidelines (forced expiratory volume [FEV]% {<=}50% predicted, FEV%/forced vital capacity [FVC]% {<=}70%). Changes in tumor volume were also assessed by computed tomography. Results: Of a total of 30 patients with Stage I and II lung cancer, there were 7 patients in the COPD group (4 men, 3 women), and 23 in t he No-COPD group (9 men, 14 women). At a mean follow-up time of 4 months, for the COPD and No-COPD patients, pretreatment and posttreatment FEV% was similar: 39 {+-} 5 vs. 40 {+-} 9 (p = 0.4) and 77 {+-} 0.5 vs. 73 {+-} 24 (p = 0.9), respectively. The diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DL{sub CO}) did significantly increase for the No-COPD group after SBRT treatment: 60 {+-} 24 vs. 69 {+-} 22 (p = 0.022); however, DL{sub CO} was unchanged for the COPD group: 49 {+-} 13 vs. 50 {+-} 14 (p = 0.8). Although pretreatment tumor volume was comparable for both groups, tumor volume significantly shrank in the No-COPD group from 19 {+-} 24 to 9 {+-} 16 (p < 0.001), and there was a trend in the COPD patients from 12 {+-} 9 to 6 {+-} 5 (p = 0.06). Conclusion: SBRT did not seem to have an effect on FEV{sub 1} and FVC, but it shrank tumor volume and

  18. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy boost after post-operative radiotherapy in patients with high-grade gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumert, Brigitta G.; Lutterbach, Johannes; Bernays, Rene; Davis, J. Bernard; Heppner, Frank L.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the value and the toxicity of an additional fractionated stereotactic boost as used in the joint randomized EORTC-22972/MRC-BR10 study in patients with malignant gliomas. Materials and methods: Seventeen patients (11 male, six female) with a high-grade glioma (two WHO III, 15 WHO IV) ≤4 cm in maximum diameter, with a good performance status (WHO ≥2), were treated with a fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) boost to 20 Gy in four fractions following partial brain irradiation to a dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. This patient group was compared with historical data in a matched-pair analysis. Results: All patients were treated by conventional radiotherapy and a SRT boost (15 patients received 20 Gy and two patients 10 Gy). Acute side effects included fatigue (two), impairment of short-term memory (one) and worsening of pre-existing symptoms (one). No patient developed steroid dependence after SRT. One patient was re-operated for radiation necrosis. At a median follow-up of 25 months (9-50 months) 14 patients recurred locally. Survival was 77% at 1 year and 42% at 2 years; progression-free survival was 70% at 1 year and 35% at 2 years for all patients, respectively. Median survival for the whole patient group is 20 months. Comparison with a matched historical group showed a significantly better survival for the group treated with a stereotactic boost (P<0.0001). Conclusion: A fractionated stereotactic boost after standard external beam radiotherapy in selected patients with high-grade glioma is feasible and well tolerated with low toxicity. Compared to historical data survival is significantly better with an additional SRT boost. However, its effectiveness has to be proven in a randomized trial

  19. A phase II trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy with concurrent anti-PD1 treatment in metastatic melanoma: evaluation of clinical and immunologic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wolf, Katrien; Kruse, Vibeke; Sundahl, Nora; van Gele, Mireille; Chevolet, Ines; Speeckaert, Reinhart; Brochez, Lieve; Ost, Piet

    2017-01-31

    Antibodies blocking programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) have encouraging responses in patients with metastatic melanoma. Response to anti-PD-1 treatment requires pre-existing CD8+ T cells that are negatively regulated by PD-1-mediated adaptive immune resistance. Unfortunately, less than half of melanoma tumours have these characteristics. Combining anti-PD-1 treatment with other immunomodulating treatments to activate CD8+ T cells is therefore of vital importance to increase response rates and long-term survival benefit in melanoma patients. Both preclinical and retrospective clinical data support the hypothesis that radiotherapy increases the response rates to anti-PD-1 treatment by stimulating the accumulation and activation of CD8+ T cells in the tumour microenvironment. Combining radiotherapy with a PD-1 blocking antibody might therefore increase response rates and even induce long-term survival. The current phase II study will be testing these hypotheses and aims to improve local and distant tumour responses by exploiting the pro-immunogenic effects of radiotherapy in addition to anti-PD-1 treatment. The trial will be conducted in patients with metastatic melanoma. Nivolumab or pembrolizumab, both antibodies that target PD-1, will be administrated according to the recommended dosing schedule. Prior to the 2nd cycle, radiotherapy will be delivered in three fractions of 8 Gy to the largest FDG-avid metastatic lesion. The primary endpoint is the proportion of patients with a partial or complete response in non-irradiated metastases according to RECIST v1.1. Secondary endpoints include response rate according to immune related response criteria, metabolic response, local control and survival. To identify peripheral blood biomarkers, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and serum samples will be collected prospectively before, during and after treatment and subjected to flow cytometry and cytokine measurement. The current phase II trial aims at exploring the suggested

  20. Is stereotactic ablative radiotherapy an alternative to surgery in operable stage I non-small cell lung cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Ricardi, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Surgery is the gold therapeutic standard for patients affected with stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy is currently considered the preferred treatment option for inoperable patients, representing approximately 25%. Limited data are available directly comparing surgery and SABR in operable patients, none of them prospective. Preliminary results are encouraging, showing that the two treatment modalities are equally effective in terms of tumour control, with e...

  1. Re-irradiation of recurrent anaplastic ependymoma using radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Taro; Sato, Kengo; Iwabuchi, Michio; Manabe, Yoshihiko; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Tatewaki, Koshi; Yokota, Naoki; Ohta, Seiji; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent ependymomas were retreated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). The efficacy, toxicities, and differences between SRS and FSRT were analyzed. Eight patients with recurrent ependymomas fulfilling the criteria described below were evaluated. Inclusion criteria were: (1) the patient had previously undergone surgery and conventional radiotherapy as first-line treatment; (2) targets were located in or adjacent to the eloquent area or were deep-seated; and (3) the previously irradiated volume overlapped the target lesion. FSRT was delivered to 18 lesions, SRS to 20 lesions. A median follow-up period was 23 months. The local control rate was 76 % at 3 years. No significant differences in local control were observed due to tumor size or fractionation schedule. Lesions receiving >25 Gy/5 fr or 21 Gy/3 fr did not recur within 1 year, whereas no dose-response relationship was observed in those treated with SRS. No grade ≥2 toxicity was observed. Our treatment protocol provided an acceptable LC rate and minimal toxicities. Because local recurrence of tumors may result in patient death, a minimum dose of 21 Gy/3 fr or 25 Gy/5 fr or higher may be most suitable for treatment of these cases.

  2. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Disease in Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myungsoo Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver metastasis in solid tumors, including colorectal cancer, is the most frequent and lethal complication. The development of systemic therapy has led to prolonged survival. However, in selected patients with a finite number of discrete lesions in liver, defined as oligometastatic state, additional local therapies such as surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation, cryotherapy, and radiotherapy can lead to permanent local disease control and improve survival. Among these, an advance in radiation therapy made it possible to deliver high dose radiation to the tumor more accurately, without impairing the liver function. In recent years, the introduction of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR has offered even more intensive tumor dose escalation in a few fractions with reduced dose to the adjacent normal liver. Many studies have shown that SABR for oligometastases is effective and safe, with local control rates widely ranging from 50% to 100% at one or two years. And actuarial survival at one and two years has been reported ranging from 72% to 94% and from 30% to 62%, respectively, without severe toxicities. In this paper, we described the definition and technical aspects of SABR, clinical outcomes including efficacy and toxicity, and related parameters after SABR in liver oligometastases from colorectal cancer.

  3. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy: results in pituitary adenomas, acoustic neuromas and cavernous meningiomas; Radiotherapie stereotaxique fractionnee: resultats dans les adenomes hypophysaires, les neurinomes de l`acoustique et les meningiomes du sinus caverneux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin, P.; Redon, C. [Polyclinique Courlancy, 51 - Reims (France); Scavarda, D.; Delemer, B.; Nakib, I.; Caron, J.; Bazin, A.; Bernard, M.H.; Peruzzi, P.; Scherpereel, B.; Rousseaux, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 51 - Reims (France); Fauchon, V. [Centre de Hautes Energies, 06 - Teymeinade (France); Delannes, M. [Centre Claudius-Regaud, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    1998-03-01

    In order to optimize cerebral benign tumor irradiation, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy allows a focused-volume irradiation (2.1 cm{sup 3}, 16 mm diameter) under standard fractionation conditions. Results of a retrospective and multicentric analysis are presented. For these benign tumors, the focused target volume obtained by the fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy seems to be better adapted to the treatment of limited benign tumors than standard radiotherapy. The use of standard fractionation reduces the risk of severe normal tissue damage, sometimes observed for radiosurgery and inherent in the use of single fraction. (authors)

  4. The university of Florida frameless high-precision stereotactic radiotherapy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bova, Francis J.; Buatti, John M.; Friedman, William A.; Mendenhall, William M.; Yang, Ching-Chong; Liu, Chihray

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and test a system for high precision fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy that separates immobilization and localization devices. Methods and Materials: Patient localization is achieved through detection and digital registration of an independent bite plate system. The bite plate is made and linked to a set of six infrared light emitting diodes (IRLEDs). These IRLEDs are detected by an infrared camera system that identifies the position of each IRLED within 0.1 to 0.15 mm. Calibration of the camera system defines isocenter and translational X, Y, and Z axes of the stereotactic radiosurgery subsystem and thereby digitally defines the virtual treatment room space in a computer linked to the camera system. Positions of the bite plate's IRLEDs are processed digitally using a computer algorithm so that positional differences between an actual bite plate position and a desired position can be resolved within 0.1 mm of translation (X, Y, and Z distance) and 0.1 degree of rotation. Furthermore, bite plate misalignment can be displayed digitally in real time with translational (x, y, and z) and rotational (roll, pitch, and yaw) parameters for an actual bite plate position. Immobilization is achieved by a custom head mold and thermal plastic mask linked by hook-and-loop fastener tape. The head holder system permits rotational and translational movements for daily treatment positioning based on the bite plate localization system. Initial testing of the localization system was performed on 20 patients treated with radiosurgery. The system was used to treat 11 patients with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Results: Assessment of bite plate localization in radiosurgery patients revealed that the patient's bite plate could be positioned and repositioned within 0.5 ± 0.3 mm (standard deviation). After adjustments, the first 11 patients were treated with the bite plate repositioning error reduced to 0.2 ± 0.1 mm. Conclusions: High precision

  5. Predictors of Radiotherapy Induced Bone Injury (RIBI after stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taremi Mojgan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to identify clinical and dosimetric factors associated with radiotherapy induced bone injury (RIBI following stereotactic lung radiotherapy. Methods Inoperable patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer, treated with SBRT, who received 54 or 60 Gy in 3 fractions, and had a minimum of 6 months follow up were reviewed. Archived treatment plans were retrieved, ribs delineated individually and treatment plans re-computed using heterogeneity correction. Clinical and dosimetric factors were evaluated for their association with rib fracture using logistic regression analysis; a dose-event curve and nomogram were created. Results 46 consecutive patients treated between Oct 2004 and Dec 2008 with median follow-up 25 months (m (range 6 – 51 m were eligible. 41 fractured ribs were detected in 17 patients; median time to fracture was 21 m (range 7 – 40 m. The mean maximum point dose in non-fractured ribs (n = 1054 was 10.5 Gy ± 10.2 Gy, this was higher in fractured ribs (n = 41 48.5 Gy ± 24.3 Gy (p 0.5, and the volume of the rib receiving at least 25 Gy (V25, were significantly associated with RIBI. As D0.5 and V25 were cross-correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.57, p 0.5 as a representative dose parameter. On multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio: 1.121, 95% CI: 1.04 – 1.21, p = 0.003, female gender (odds ratio: 4.43, 95% CI: 1.68 – 11.68, p = 0.003, and rib D0.5 (odds ratio: 1.0009, 95% CI: 1.0007 – 1.001, p  Using D0.5, a dose-event curve was constructed estimating risk of fracture from dose at the median follow up of 25 months after treatment. In our cohort, a 50% risk of rib fracture was associated with a D0.5 of 60 Gy. Conclusions Dosimetric and clinical factors contribute to risk of RIBI and both should be included when modeling risk of toxicity. A nomogram is presented using D0.5, age, and female gender to

  6. A new non-invasive and relocatable immobilization frame for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorou, K.; Kappas, C.; Tsokas, C.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: A newly developed non-invasive immobilization frame for stereotactic radiotherapy is presented, which is intended to be used for both imaging (computed tomography (CT) and angiography) and radiotherapeutic procedures. Materials and methods: The frame is made of duraluminium so as to be stable and light and it has an elliptical shape. The immobilization is achieved using three stable locations on the patient's head, i.e. the upper dentition, the nose and the back of the neck. The fixation on the three locations ensures complete immobilization in all directions. Results: The immobilization frame can be fitted as many times as is needed to most heads. In order to assess the accuracy of relocation, repeated fittings on two volunteers and on 22 patients undergoing stereotactic treatment were performed (more than 200 mountings in total), which showed maximum anterior-posterior, inferior-superior and lateral reproducibility in positioning of less than 1 mm in all cases. Conclusions and discussion: The in-house-constructed stereotactic frame is simple to use, easily made, non-invasive, relocatable and well tolerated by the patients, providing the possibility of multiple fractions. The major advantage of using such a non-invasive stereotactic frame is the flexibility in timing the different diagnostic procedures (CT and angiography) as well as providing the possibility to extend the use to large brain lesions (treatment without an additional collimator) where a high precision is also required. It also offers significant labour and cost saving over the invasive frames and the majority of the non-invasive frames. To date, 22 patients with ages varying between 12 and 70 years have been treated using this method. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  7. Single dose versus fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, S.S.; Cho, K.H.; Hall, W.A.

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) compared to fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) for meningiomas treated over a seven year period. Of the 53 patients (15 male and 38 female) with 63 meningiomas, 35 were treated with SRS and the 18 patients with tumors adjacent to critical structures or with large tumors were treated with FSRT. The median doses for the SRS and the FSRT groups were 1400 cGy (500- 4500 cGy) and 5400 cGy (4000-6000 cGy) respectively. Median target volumes for SRS and FSRT were 6.8 ml and 8.8 ml respectively. The median follow-up for the SRS and FSRT groups were 38 months (4.1-97 months) and 30.5 months (6.0-63 months) respectively. The five-year tumor control probability (TC) for benign versus atypical meningiomas were 92.7% vs. 31% (P=.006). The three-year TC were 92.7% vs. 93.3% for SRS vs. FSRT groups respectively (P=.62). For benign meningiomas, the three-year TC were 92.9% vs. 92.3% for the SRS group (29 patients) vs. FSRT group (14 patients) respectively (P=.77). Two patients in the SRS group and one in the FSRT group developed late complications. Preliminary data suggest that SRS is a safe and effective treatment for patients with benign meningiomas. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy with conventional fractionation appeared to be an effective and safe treatment alternative for patients not appropriate for SRS. A longer follow-up is required to determine the long-term efficacy and the toxicity of these treatment modalities. (author)

  8. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary renal cell carcinoma and adrenal metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Gargi; Louie, Alexander V; Pryor, David; Vela, Ian; Lo, Simon S; Teh, Bin S; Siva, Shankar

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and metastatic adrenal lesions continues to rise and present evolving complexities in terms of management. Technical challenges in treatment delivery are compounded by the setting of an ageing patient population with multiple medical co-morbidities. While the standard of care treatment for both primary RCC and oligometastatic adrenal lesions has typically been surgery, a number of patients may be medically or surgically inoperable, and for whom alternative options require consideration. Additionally, in metastatic disease, surgery presents an invasive option, sometimes with unacceptable risks of perioperative morbidity and therefore is considered a less desirable option to some. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an established radiotherapy technique that is rapidly being incorporated into many radiotherapy departments, particu-larly with the increasing availability and capabilities of modern linear accelerators to deliver precise image guided treatment. There are considerable advantages of SBRT including its ability to provide a non-invasive ablative treatment with very few treatment sessions, with emerging evidence showing promising rates of local control (LC) and low associated mor-bidity. This review details the use of SBRT for primary RCC as well as adrenal metastases, focusing on issues including patient selection, technical considerations, and patient out-comes. Furthermore, this review explores some recent insights into the radiobiology of RCC, the immunomodulatory effects of SBRT, and the use of systemic agents with SBRT.

  9. To SABR or not to SABR? Indications and contraindications for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy in the treatment of early-stage, oligometastatic, or oligoprogressive non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, David Benjamin; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a highly effective treatment for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Although direct comparisons from randomized trials are not available, rates of both primary tumor control and distant metastasis are similar between SABR and surgery. Overall survival is lower after SABR compared with surgery, largely reflecting that a primary selection criterion for SABR has been medical inoperability because of decreased cardiopulmonary function and other comorbidities that lead to decreased survival independent of non-small cell lung cancer. Survival outcomes between SABR and surgery are much more similar in propensity-matched cohorts. Newer potential indications for SABR include treatment of operable patients; of oligometastatic lung cancer, in which SABR has emerged as an alternative to metastasectomy; and of oligoprogressive lung cancer, an attractive concept especially as improved personalized systemic therapies emerge, and prospective trials are currently being conducted in these settings. Although toxicity in modern series is low, SABR is clearly capable of producing fatal complications, and understanding the risk factors and approaches for mitigating them has been emerging in recent years. Thus, appropriate patient selection is a vital, evolving, and controversial topic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy (FSRT) for children with head-and-neck-rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Behnisch, Wolfgang; Kulozik, Andreas E; Huber, Peter E; Debus, Jürgen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluates the outcome of 19 children with rhabdomyosarcoma of the head-and-neck region treated with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) or Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy (FSRT) between August 1995 and November 2005. We treated 19 children with head-and-neck rhabdomyosarcoma with FSRT (n = 14) or IMRT (n = 5) as a part of multimodal therapy. Median age at the time of radiation therapy was 5 years (range 2–15 years). All children received systemic chemotherapy according to the German Soft Tissue Sarcoma Study protocols. Median size of treatment volume for RT was 93,4 ml. We applied a median total dose of 45 Gy (range 32 Gy – 54 Gy) using a median fractionation of 5 × 1,8 Gy/week (range 1,6 Gy – 1,8 Gy). The median time interval between primary diagnosis and radiation therapy was 5 months (range 3–9 months). After RT, the 3- and 5-year survival rate was 94%. The 3- and 5-year actuarial local control rate after RT was 89%. The actuarial freedom of distant metastases rate at 3- and 5-years was 89% for all patients. Radiotherapy was well tolerated in all children and could be completed without interruptions > 4 days. No toxicities >CTC grade 2 were observed. The median follow-up time after RT was 17 months. IMRT and FSRT lead to excellent outcome in children with head-and-neck RMS with a low incidence of treatment-related side effects

  11. Percutaneous fiducial marker placement prior to stereotactic body radiotherapy for malignant liver tumors: an initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Kengo; Shimohira, Masashi; Murai, Taro; Nishimura, Junichi; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Hashizume, Takuya; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe our initial experience with a gold flexible linear fiducial marker and to evaluate the safety and technical and clinical efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy using this marker for malignant liver tumors. Between July 2012 and February 2015, 18 patients underwent percutaneous fiducial marker placement before stereotactic body radiotherapy for malignant liver tumors. We evaluated the technical and clinical success rates of the procedure and the associated complications. Technical success was defined as successful placement of the fiducial marker at the target site, and clinical success was defined as the completion of stereotactic body radiotherapy without the marker dropping out of position. All 18 fiducial markers were placed successfully, so the technical success rate was 100% (18/18). All 18 patients were able to undergo stereotactic body radiotherapy without marker migration. Thus, the clinical success rate was 100% (18/18). Slight pneumothorax occurred as a minor complication in one case. No major complications such as coil migration or bleeding were observed. The examined percutaneous fiducial marker was safely placed in the liver and appeared to be useful for stereotactic body radiotherapy for malignant liver tumors

  12. Effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for uveal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, Karin; Nowak, Peter; Pan, Connie de; Marijnissen, Johannes P.; Paridaens, Dion A.; Levendag, Peter; Luyten, Gre P.M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effectiveness and acute side effects of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (fSRT) for uveal melanoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2003, 38 patients (21 male, 17 female) were included in a prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial (mean follow-up of 25 months). A total dose of 50 Gy was given in 5 consecutive days. A blinking light and a camera (to monitor the position of the diseased eye) were fixed to a noninvasive relocatable stereotactic frame. Primary end points were local control, best corrected visual acuity, and toxicity at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively. Results: After 3 months (38 patients), the local control was 100%; after 12 months (32 patients) and 24 months (15 patients), no recurrences were seen. The best corrected visual acuity declined from a mean of 0.21 at diagnosis to 0.06 2 years after therapy. The acute side effects after 3 months were as follows: conjunctival symptoms (10), loss of lashes or hair (6), visual symptoms (5), fatigue (5), dry eye (1), cataract (1), and pain (4). One eye was enucleated at 2 months after fSRT. Conclusions: Preliminary results demonstrate that fSRT is an effective and safe treatment modality for uveal melanoma with an excellent local control and mild acute side effects. The follow-up should be prolonged to study both long-term local control and late toxicity

  13. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for renal cell cancer and pancreatic cancer. Literature review and practice recommendations of the DEGRO Working Group on Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panje, Cedric; Andratschke, Nikolaus; Guckenberger, Matthias [Zurich University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Brunner, Thomas B. [Freiburg University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Niyazi, Maximilian [University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    This report of the Working Group on Stereotactic Radiotherapy of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) aims to provide a literature review and practice recommendations for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of primary renal cell cancer and primary pancreatic cancer. A literature search on SBRT for both renal cancer and pancreatic cancer was performed with focus on prospective trials and technical aspects for clinical implementation. Data on renal and pancreatic SBRT are limited, but show promising rates of local control for both treatment sites. For pancreatic cancer, fractionated SBRT should be preferred to single-dose treatment to reduce the risk of gastrointestinal toxicity. Motion-compensation strategies and image guidance are paramount for safe SBRT delivery in both tumor entities. SBRT for renal cancer and pancreatic cancer have been successfully evaluated in phase I and phase II trials. Pancreatic SBRT should be practiced carefully and only within prospective protocols due to the risk of severe gastrointestinal toxicity. SBRT for primary renal cell cancer appears a viable option for medically inoperable patients but future research needs to better define patient selection criteria and the detailed practice of SBRT. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeitsgruppe ''Stereotaktische Radiotherapie'' der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) legt eine Zusammenfassung der aktuellen Literatur und daraus resultierende Empfehlungen zur Durchfuehrung der stereotaktischen Strahlentherapie (SBRT) beim Nierenzellkarzinom und beim Pankreaskarzinom vor. Es erfolgte eine Literaturrecherche zur Evidenz der SBRT beim Nierenzell- und Pankreaskarzinom, wobei der Schwerpunkt auf prospektive Studien und technische Aspekte fuer die klinische Umsetzung gelegt wurde. Fuer die SBRT beim Pankreaskarzinom und Nierenzellkarzinom sind bisher nur wenige Studien veroeffentlicht worden, die jedoch konsistent eine hohe Rate an lokaler Tumorkontrolle

  14. Comparing conVEntional RadioTherapy with stereotactIC body radiotherapy in patients with spinAL metastases: study protocol for an randomized controlled trial following the cohort multiple randomized controlled trial design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velden, Joanne M. van der; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Seravalli, Enrica; Hes, Jochem; Gerlich, A. Sophie; Kasperts, Nicolien; Eppinga, Wietse S. C.; Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan; Vulpen, Marco van

    2016-01-01

    Standard radiotherapy is the treatment of first choice in patients with symptomatic spinal metastases, but is only moderately effective. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is increasingly used to treat spinal metastases, without randomized evidence of superiority over standard radiotherapy. The VERTICAL study aims to quantify the effect of stereotactic radiation therapy in patients with metastatic spinal disease. This study follows the ‘cohort multiple Randomized Controlled Trial’ design. The VERTICAL study is conducted within the PRESENT cohort. In PRESENT, all patients with bone metastases referred for radiation therapy are enrolled. For each patient, clinical and patient-reported outcomes are captured at baseline and at regular intervals during follow-up. In addition, patients give informed consent to be offered experimental interventions. Within PRESENT, 110 patients are identified as a sub cohort of eligible patients (i.e. patients with unirradiated painful, mechanically stable spinal metastases who are able to undergo stereotactic radiation therapy). After a protocol amendment, also patients with non-spinal bony metastases are eligible. From the sub cohort, a random selection of patients is offered stereotactic radiation therapy (n = 55), which patients may accept or refuse. Only patients accepting stereotactic radiation therapy sign informed consent for the VERTICAL trial. Non-selected patients (n = 55) receive standard radiotherapy, and are not aware of them serving as controls. Primary endpoint is pain response after three months. Data will be analyzed by intention to treat, complemented by instrumental variable analysis in case of substantial refusal of the stereotactic radiation therapy in the intervention arm. This study is designed to quantify the treatment response after (stereotactic) radiation therapy in patients with symptomatic spinal metastases. This is the first randomized study in palliative care following the cohort multiple Randomized

  15. EORTC 22972-26991/MRC BR10 trial: Fractionated stereotactic boost following conventional radiotherapy of high grade gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumert, Brigitta G.; Brada, Michael; Bernier, Jacques; Kortmann, Rolf D.; Dehing-Oberije, Cary; Collette, Laurence; Davis, J. Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The EORTC trial No. 22972 investigated the role of an additional fractionated stereotactic boost (fSRT) to conventional radiotherapy for patients with high grade gliomas. A quality-assurance (QA) programme was run in conjunction with the study and was the first within the EORTC addressing the quality of a supposedly highly accurate treatment technique such as stereotactic radiotherapy. A second aim was to investigate a possible relation between the clinical results of the stereotactic boost arm and the results of the QA. Materials and methods: The trial was closed in 2001 due to low accrual. In total, 25 patients were randomized: 14 into the experimental arm and 11 into the control arm. Six centres randomized patients, 8 centres had completed the dummy run (DR) for the stereotactic boost part. All participating centres (9) were asked to complete a quality-assurance questionnaire. The DR consisted of treatment planning according to the guidelines of the protocol on 3 different tumour volumes drawn on CT images of a humanized phantom. The SRT technique to be used was evaluated by the questionnaire. Clinical data from patients recruited to the boost arm from 6 participating centres were analysed. Results: There was a full compliance to the protocol requirements for 5 centres. Major and minor deviations in conformality were observed for 2 and 3 centres, respectively. Of the 8 centres which completed the DR, one centre did not comply with the requirements of stereotactic radiotherapy concerning accuracy, dosimetry and planning. Median follow-up and median overall survival were 39.2 and 21.4 months, respectively. Acute and late toxicities of the stereotactic boost were low. One radiation necrosis was seen for a patient who has not received the SRT boost. Three reported serious adverse events were all seizures and probably therapy-related. Conclusions: Overall compliance was good but not ideal from the point of view of this highly precise radiation

  16. Results of patient specific quality assurance for patients undergoing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for lung lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Clements, Natalie; Cramb, Jim; Wanigaratne, Derrick M.; Chesson, Brent; Aarons, Yolanda; Siva, Shankar; Ball, David; Kron, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Hypofractionated image guided radiotherapy of extracranial targets has become increasingly popular as a treatment modality for inoperable patients with one or more small lesions, often referred to as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). This report details the results of the physical quality assurance (QA) program used for the first 33 lung cancer SABR radiotherapy 3D conformal treatment plans in our centre. SABR involves one or few fractions of high radiation dose delivered in many small fields or arcs with tight margins to mobile targets often delivered through heterogeneous media with non-coplanar beams. We have conducted patient-specific QA similar to the more common intensity modulated radiotherapy QA with particular reference to motion management. Individual patient QA was performed in a Perspex phantom using point dose verification with an ionisation chamber and radiochromic film for verification of the dose distribution both with static and moving detectors to verify motion management strategies. While individual beams could vary by up to 7 %, the total dose in the target was found to be within ±2 % of the prescribed dose for all 33 plans. Film measurements showed qualitative and quantitative agreement between planned and measured isodose line shapes and dimensions. The QA process highlighted the need to account for couch transmission and demonstrated that the ITV construction was appropriate for the treatment technique used. QA is essential for complex radiotherapy deliveries such as SABR. We found individual patient QA helpful in setting up the technique and understanding potential weaknesses in SABR workflow, thus providing confidence in SABR delivery.

  17. Preliminary Experience in Treatment of Papillary and Macular Retinoblastoma: Evaluation of Local Control and Local Complications After Treatment With Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiotherapy With Micromultileaf Collimator as Second-Line or Salvage Treatment After Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pica, Alessia, E-mail: Alessia.Pica@chuv.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Moeckli, Raphael [University Institute for Radiation Physics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Balmer, Aubin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Beck-Popovic, Maja [Unit of Pediatric Oncology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Chollet-Rivier, Madeleine [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Do, Huu-Phuoc [University Institute for Radiation Physics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Weber, Damien C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Munier, Francis L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the local control and complication rates for children with papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma progressing after chemotherapy and undergoing stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a micromultileaf collimator. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 11 children (15 eyes) with macular and/or papillary retinoblastoma were treated with SRT. The mean age was 19 months (range, 2-111). Of the 15 eyes, 7, 6, and 2 were classified as International Classification of Intraocular Retinoblastoma Group B, C, and E, respectively. The delivered dose of SRT was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions using a dedicated micromultileaf collimator linear accelerator. Results: The median follow-up was 20 months (range, 13-39). Local control was achieved in 13 eyes (87%). The actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rates were both 82%. SRT was well tolerated. Late adverse events were reported in 4 patients. Of the 4 patients, 2 had developed focal microangiopathy 20 months after SRT; 1 had developed a transient recurrence of retinal detachment; and 1 had developed bilateral cataracts. No optic neuropathy was observed. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SRT for papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma in children resulted in excellent tumor control rates with acceptable toxicity. Additional research regarding SRT and its intrinsic organ-at-risk sparing capability is justified in the framework of prospective trials.

  18. Sexual Function After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; King, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study the sexual quality of life for prostate cancer patients after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC)-validated quality-of-life questionnaire, the sexual function of 32 consecutive patients who received prostate SBRT in a prospective Phase II clinical trial were analyzed at baseline, and at median times of 4, 12, 20, and 50 months after treatment. SBRT consisted of 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy using the Cyberknife. No androgen deprivation therapy was given. The use of erectile dysfunction (ED) medications was monitored. A comprehensive literature review for radiotherapy-alone modalities based on patient self-reported questionnaires served as historical comparison. Results: Median age at treatment was 67.5 years, and median follow-up was 35.5 months (minimum 12 months). The mean EPIC sexual domain summary score, sexual function score, and sexual bother score decreased by 45%, 49%, and 25% respectively at 50 months follow-up. These differences reached clinical relevance by 20 months after treatment. Baseline ED rate was 38% and increased to 71% after treatment (p = 0.024). Use of ED medications was 3% at baseline and progressed to 25%. For patients aged <70 years at follow-up, 60% maintained satisfactory erectile function after treatment compared with only 12% aged ≥70 years (p = 0.008). Penile bulb dose was not associated with ED. Conclusions: The rates of ED after treatment appear comparable to those reported for other modalities of radiotherapy. Given the modest size of this study and the uncertainties in the physiology of radiotherapy-related ED, these results merit further investigations.

  19. Emerging radiotherapy technology in a developing country: A single Brazilian institution assessment of stereotactic body radiotherapy application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Fabio Ynoe; Bonifacio, Lorine Arias; Neves-Junior, Wellington Pimenta; Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Arruda, Fernando Freire; Silva, Joao Luis Fernandes; Carvalho, Heloisa Andrade, E-mail: fymoraes@gmail.com [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP(Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    Objective: To provide a quantitative profile of the indications and use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in a developing country oncology-based institution. In addition, to describe the patient and treatment characteristics, and to provide a temporal analysis. Method: SBRT patients treated from 2007 to 2015 were retrospectively evaluated by two independently investigators. Data were stratified and compared in two periods: first experience (FE) (May 2007 to April 2011), and following experience (FollowE) (May 2011 to April 2015). The following parameters were compared between the groups: total number of treated patients and lesions, treatment site, additional image fusion used, formal protocol adoption, and SBRT planning technique. Results: One hundred and seventy-six (176) patients with 191 lesions were treated: 34 (18%) lesions in the FE and 157 (82%) lesions in FollowE. The majority of lesions were metastases (60.3%), and lung (60.2%) was the most common treatment site, followed by spine (31%), and others (8.8%). An average of 1.4 (±0.6) additional imaging exams for delineation was performed. Conformal 3D radiotherapy planning technique was used in 64.4%, and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in the remaining 35.6% (p=0.0001). Higher rates of curative treatments were observed in FE, as well as more lung lesions, patients ≥ 70 years, 3D conformal, number of additional images and ECOG 0, and all presented p<0.05. The global rate of protocol statement was 79%, lung treatment being the most stated. Conclusion: SBRT application is rapidly increasing in our setting. Treatment sites and planning techniques are becoming more diversified and complex. (author)

  20. Phantom dosimetry for conformal stereotactic radiotherapy with a Head and Neck Localizer frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindran, B. Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore (India)]. E-mail: paul@cmcvellore.ac.in; Fairclough, Lee [Department of Radiation Therapy, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Jaywant, Satish M. [Department of Clinical Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    Linear accelerator based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with the Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) re-locatable frame has been in use for several years. The use of the frame is limited to treating lesions above the hard palate. For treating tumours in the head and neck region, the Head and Neck Localizer (HNL) frame has been designed by Radionics Inc. for use with their XPlan treatment planning software. In this study we have used a spherical acrylic phantom commercially known as the 'Lucy' phantom (Sandstrom Sandstrom Trade and Technology Inc.) to perform thermoluminiscent as well as film dosimetry for the HNL frame. A radio-opaque marker was placed in the phantom and a film test carried out to verify the accuracy in isocentre positioning. The results of the dosimetry with TLD were within 2% for points near the isocentre and 5% (or 2 mm in steep gradients) in the planning target volume (PTV). In regions of low dose, larger percentage differences in local dose were observed, but all differences were within 5% of isocentre dose. The film dosimetry provided dose distributions that matched well with those generated by the XPlan stereotactic treatment planning software. (author)

  1. Salvage whole brain radiotherapy or stereotactic radiosurgery after initial stereotactic radiosurgery for 1-4 brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yufei; Alexander, Brian M; Chen, Yu-Hui; Horvath, Margaret C; Aizer, Ayal A; Claus, Elizabeth B; Dunn, Ian F; Golby, Alexandra J; Johnson, Mark D; Friesen, Scott; Mannarino, Edward G; Wagar, Matthew; Hacker, Fred L; Arvold, Nils D

    2015-09-01

    Patients with limited brain metastases are often candidates for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Among patients who receive SRS, the likelihood and timing of salvage WBRT or SRS remains unclear. We examined rates of salvage WBRT or SRS among 180 patients with 1-4 newly diagnosed brain metastases who received index SRS from 2008-2013. Competing risks multivariable analysis was used to examine factors associated with time to WBRT. Patients had non-small cell lung (53 %), melanoma (23 %), breast (10 %), renal (6 %), or other (8 %) cancers. Median age was 62 years. Patients received index SRS to 1 (60 %), 2 (21 %), 3 (13 %), or 4 (7 %) brain metastases. Median survival after SRS was 9.7 months (range, 0.3-67.6 months). No further brain-directed radiotherapy was delivered after index SRS in 55 % of patients. Twenty-seven percent of patients ever received salvage WBRT, and 30 % ever received salvage SRS; 12 % of patients received both salvage WBRT and salvage SRS. Median time to salvage WBRT or salvage SRS were 5.6 and 6.1 months, respectively. Age ≤60 years (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 2.80; 95 % CI 1.05-7.51; P = 0.04) and controlled/absent extracranial disease (AHR = 6.76; 95 % CI 1.60-28.7; P = 0.01) were associated with shorter time to salvage WBRT. Isolated brain progression caused death in only 11 % of decedents. In summary, most patients with 1-4 brain metastases receiving SRS never require salvage WBRT or SRS, and the remainder do not require salvage treatment for a median of 6 months.

  2. Dosimetry comparison of irradiation with conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, conformal radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions and robotic stereotactic radiotherapy for benign brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasic, E.; Noel, A.; Buchheit, I.; Bernier, V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - To compare several techniques in order to determine the best treatment for benign brain tumours. Methods and patients. - A retrospective study was performed for five patients who received 3D-conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy or CyberKnife R . These patients had a meningioma, a pituitary tumour, a cranio-pharyngioma or a neurinoma. In each case, these treatment plans were optimised and compared with the three other dosimetries. Radiobiological or positioning parameters were evaluated, as well as dosimetric parameters, in order to compare treatments with different characteristics. Results. - The dosimetric parameters showed that the choice of treatment seemed to be determined mostly by tumour size, shape and proximity with organs at risk (not tumour localisation). Whereas the results showed no significant deviations with regards to the radiobiological parameters. Therefore, with these parameters, it was difficult to give priority to a treatment. Conclusions. - With regards to benign brain tumours of medium or large size, intensity modulated radiotherapy seemed the recommended treatment. It enabled to obtain a good ratio between efficacy and toxicity for tumours that are really close to organs at risk. Concerning small benign brain tumours, the CyberKnife R was probably the best treatment. (authors)

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Operable Stage I Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Can SBRT Be Comparable to Surgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Shirato, Hiroki; Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Fujino, Masaharu; Gomi, Kotaro; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Yuzuru; Takai, Yoshihiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Takeda, Atsuya; Ouchi, Atsushi; Hareyama, Masato; Kokubo, Masaki; Kozuka, Takuyo; Arimoto, Takuro; Hara, Ryusuke; Itami, Jun; Araki, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To review treatment outcomes for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in medically operable patients with Stage I non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), using a Japanese multi-institutional database. Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2004, a total of 87 patients with Stage I NSCLC (median age, 74 years; T1N0M0, n = 65; T2N0M0, n = 22) who were medically operable but refused surgery were treated using SBRT alone in 14 institutions. Stereotactic three-dimensional treatment was performed using noncoplanar dynamic arcs or multiple static ports. Total dose was 45–72.5 Gy at the isocenter, administered in 3–10 fractions. Median calculated biological effective dose was 116 Gy (range, 100–141 Gy). Data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), cumulative local control rates for T1 and T2 tumors at 5 years after SBRT were 92% and 73%, respectively. Pulmonary complications above Grade 2 arose in 1 patient (1.1%). Five-year overall survival rates for Stage IA and IB subgroups were 72% and 62%, respectively. One patient who developed local recurrences safely underwent salvage surgery. Conclusion: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is safe and promising as a radical treatment for operable Stage I NSCLC. The survival rate for SBRT is potentially comparable to that for surgery.

  4. Impact on four dimensional dose accumulation using deformable image registration in liver stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seong Hee; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Dong Su; Seong, Cheon Keum; Cho, Min Seok; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept of. Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Hyun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Uijeongbu ST Mary' s Hospital, the Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Si Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (United States)

    2014-11-15

    This study aims to evaluate the dosimetric effect of four-dimensional dose accumulation (4D dose) compared to 3D dose in liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Currently, SBRTT has been widely used to deliver highly conformal dose to target while sparing normal tissue. So, SBRT need accurate target delineation, dose calculation and motion management techniques such as breath-hold or abdominal compressor. In spite of the benefits about these techniques, there are still deformation and movement which could lead to reduce the probability for tumor control, imprecise prediction of normal tissue complication. 4D dose accumulation which can consider dosimetric effect of respiratory motion has a possibility to predict the more accurate delivered dose to target and normal organs and improve treatment accuracy.

  5. Salvage Reirradiaton With Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Head-and-Neck Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cengiz, Mustafa; Ozyigit, Goekhan; Yazici, Goezde; Dogan, Ali; Yildiz, Ferah; Zorlu, Faruk; Guerkaynak, Murat; Gullu, Ibrahim H.; Hosal, Sefik; Akyol, Fadil

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we present our results of reirradiation of locally recurrent head-and-neck cancer with image-guided, fractionated, frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy technique. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to February 2009, 46 patients were treated using the CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. All patients had recurrent, unresectable, and previously irradiated head-and-neck cancer. The most prominent site was the nasopharynx (32.6%), and the most common histopathology was epidermoid carcinoma. The planning target volume was defined as the gross tumor volume identified on magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. There were 22 female and 24 male patients. Median age was 53 years (range, 19-87 years). The median tumor dose with stereotactic body radiotherapy was 30 Gy (range, 18-35 Gy) in a median of five (range, one to five) fractions. Results: Of 37 patients whose response to therapy was evaluated, 10 patients (27%) had complete tumor regression, 11 (29.8%) had partial response, and 10 (27%) had stable disease. Ultimate local disease control was achieved in 31 patients (83.8%). The overall survival was 11.93 months in median (ranged, 11.4 - 17.4 months), and the median progression free survival was 10.5 months. One-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 41% and 46%, respectively. Grade II or greater long-term complications were observed in 6 (13.3%) patients. On follow-up, 8 (17.3%) patients had carotid blow-out syndrome, and 7 (15.2%) patients died of bleeding from carotid arteries. We discovered that this fatal syndrome occurred only in patients with tumor surrounding carotid arteries and carotid arteries receiving all prescribed dose. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an appealing treatment option for patients with recurrent head-and-neck cancer previously treated with radiation to high doses. Good local control with

  6. Endocrine and visual function after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of perioptic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, M.; Semrau, R.; Mueller, R.P. [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Treuer, H.; Hoevels, M.; Sturm, V. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To find out whether the use of stereotactic techniques for fractionated radiotherapy reduces toxicity to the endocrine and visual system in patients with benign perioptic tumors. Patients and methods: From 1993 to 2009, 29 patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The most frequent tumor types were grade I meningioma (n = 11) and pituitary adenoma (n = 10, 7 nonfunctioning, 3 growth hormone-producing). Patients were immobilized with the GTC frame (Radionics, USA) and the planning target volume (PTV; median 24.7, 4.6-58.6 ml) was irradiated with a total dose of 52.2 Gy (range, 45.0-55.8 Gy) in 1.8-Gy fractions using a linear accelerator (6 MeV photons) equipped with a micro-multileaf collimator. Maximum doses to the optic system and pituitary gland were 53.4 Gy (range, 11.5-57.6 Gy) and 53.6 Gy (range, 12.0-57.9 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 45 months (range, 10-105 months). Local control was achieved in all but 1 patient (actuarial rate 92% at 5 years and 10 years). In 9 of 29 patients (31%), partial remission was observed (actuarial response rate 40% at 5 years and 10 years). In 4 of 26 patients (15%) with at least partial pituitary function, new hormonal deficits developed (actuarial rate 21% at 5 years and 10 years). This rate was significantly higher in patients treated for a larger PTV ( 25 ml: 0% vs. 42% at 5 years and 10 years, p = 0.028). Visual function improved in 4 of 15 patients (27%) who had prior impairment. None of the patients developed treatment-related optic neuropathy, but 2 patients experienced new disease-related visual deficits. Conclusion: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for benign tumors of the perioptic and sellar region results in satisfactory response and local control rates and does not affect the visual system. The assumption that patients can be spared hypophyseal insufficiency only holds for small tumors. (orig.)

  7. Cone-beam computed tomography in hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrosso Gianluca

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess interfraction translational and rotational setup errors, in patients treated with image-guded hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, immobilized by a thermoplastic mask and a bite-block and positioned using stereotactic coordinates. Methods 37 patients with 47 brain metastases were treated with hypofractionated stererotactic radiotherapy. All patients were immobilized with a combination of a thermoplastic mask and a bite-block fixed to a stereotactic frame support. Daily cone-beam CT scans were acquired for every patient before the treatment session and were matched online with planning CT images, for 3D image registration. The mean value and standard deviation of all translational (X, Y, Z and rotational errors (θx, θy, θz were calculated for the matching results of bone matching algorithm. Results A total of 194 CBCT scans were analyzed. Mean +/- standard deviation of translational errors (X, Y, Z were respectively 0.5 +/- 1.6 mm (range -5.7 and 5.9 mm in X; 0.4 +/- 2.7 mm (range -8.2 and 12.1 mm in Y; 0.4 +/- 1.9 mm (range -7.0 and 14 mm in Z; median and 90th percentile were respectively within 0.5 mm and 2.4 mm in X, 0.3 mm and 3.2 mm in Y, 0.3 mm and 2.2 mm in Z. Mean +/- standard deviation of rotational errors (θx, θy, θz were respectively 0.0 degrees+/- 1.3 degrees (θx (range -6.0 degrees and 3.1 degrees; -0.1 degrees +/- 1.1 degrees (θy (range -3.0 degrees and 2.4 degrees; -0.6 degrees +/- 1.4 degrees (θz (range -5.0 degrees and 3.3 degrees. Median and 90th percentile of rotational errors were respectively within 0.1 degrees and 1.4 degrees (θx, 0.0 degrees and 1.2 degrees (θy, 0.0 degrees and 0.9 degrees (θz. Mean +/- SD of 3D vector was 3.1 +/- 2.1 mm (range 0.3 and 14.9 mm; median and 90th percentile of 3D vector was within 2.7 mm and 5.1 mm. Conclusions Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy have the significant limitation of uncertainty in interfraction repeatability of the patient

  8. Dosimetry for synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy: from a macroscopic approach to microscopic energy deposits consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edouard, M.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic strategies are currently being evaluated to find a curative treatment for high grade glioma. Among them, radiation therapy is partially effective but limited by the insufficient differential effect that can be reached between the dose delivered to the tumor compared to the one received by the healthy tissues. Synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy aims at increasing this differential effect with a localized dose boost obtained by low energy x-rays stereotactic irradiations (≤ 100 keV) in presence of heavy elements restricted to the target area. This PhD work takes place in the general context of the future clinical trials foreseen at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The first objective was to optimize the dose delivery to the target, at a macroscopic scale. We have demonstrated in particular that an even number of weighted beams was required to homogenize the tumor dose distribution. Microdosimetry studies were then performed to evaluate the dose delivered at the cellular level, taking into account the fine high-Z element distribution. These theoretical results have been compared to in vitro studies. Cell survival studies were performed using either a 3D glioma model (spheroids) or cells irradiated in suspension in an iodinated medium. (author) [fr

  9. Optimizing dose prescription in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumours using Monte Carlo dose calculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, Joachim; Hollander, Miranda; Ubbels, Jan F.; Bolt, Rene A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    Purpose: To define a method of dose prescription employing Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumours aiming at a dose as low as possible outside of the PTV. Methods and materials: Six typical T1 lung tumours - three small, three large - were

  10. The integral biologically effective dose to predict brain stem toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, B. G.; Souhami, L.; Pla, C.; Al-Amro, A.; Bahary, J-P.; Villemure, J-G.; Caron, J-L.; Podgorsak, E. B.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this work is to develop a parameter for use during hypofractionated stereotactic treatment planning to predict brain stem toxicity prior to treatment and to aid in the determination of the appropriate treatment volume and fractionation regimen which will minimize risk of late damage to normal tissue. Materials and Methods: We have used the linear quadratic model to provide a simple and convenient method for assessing the dose in volumes with rapidly changing dose gradients. Although the steep dose fall-off at the edge of stereotactic radiotherapy treatment volumes provides a measure of protection for normal tissue surrounding the target, accurate dose-volume analysis prior to treatment is essential to assess clinical tolerance. In cases where the treatment volume is very close to or in contact with sensitive structures, relatively small portions of these structures may receive high doses and appropriate methods of analysis have not yet been established. This paper reports a retrospective study of 57 patients with malignant and benign intracranial lesions treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The treatments were delivered between June 1989 and February 1993 with the dynamic rotation technique in 6 fractions over a period of 2 weeks, to a total dose of 42 Gy prescribed at the 90% isodose surface. All treatment volumes were spherical, irradiated with a single isocentre and circular collimators ranging in diameter from 2 to 4 cm. The treatment plans were repeated using a new planning system considerably more sophisticated than that used at the time of treatment. On each axial image slice, the tumor and the normal structures at risk for each patient were delineated. We calculated differential dose volume histograms to divide the structures into dose-bands and to determine the fractional volume within each dose band. Using the linear quadratic model, a biologically effective dose (BED) was evaluated for each of these dose

  11. Reproducibility of organ position using voluntary breath-hold method with spirometer for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Hirokawa, Yutaka; Murakami, Yuji; Tsujimura, Masatsugu; Nakashima, Tateo; Ohno, Yoshimi; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Wadasaki, Koichi; Ito, Katsuhide

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in healthy volunteers the reproducibility of organ position using a voluntary breath-hold method with a spirometer and the feasibility of this method for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy in a clinical setting. Methods and materials: For this study, 5 healthy volunteers were enrolled. After training sessions, they held their breath at the end-inspiration and the end-expiration phase under spirometer-based monitoring. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed twice at each respiratory phase, with a 10-min interval, on 2 separate days. The total number of CT scans was four at each respiratory phase. After CT volume data were transferred to a three-dimensional treatment-planning system, digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were calculated for anterior-posterior and left-right beams. Verification was performed with DRRs relative to the diaphragm position, bony landmarks, and the isocenter in each healthy volunteer at each respiratory phase. To evaluate intrafraction reproducibility, we measured the distance between diaphragm position and bony landmarks. To evaluate interfraction reproducibility, we measured the distance between diaphragm position and the isocenter. Reproducibility and setup error were defined as the average value of the differences between each DRR with regard to the first DRR. Results: Intrafraction reproducibility of the caudal-cranial direction was 4.0 ± 3.5 mm at the end-inspiration phase and 2.2 ± 2.0 mm at the end-expiration phase. Interfraction reproducibility of the caudal-cranial direction was 5.1 ± 4.8 mm at the end-inspiration phase and 2.1 ± 1.8 mm at the end-expiration phase. The end-expiration phase was more stable than the end-inspiration phase. Conclusions: The voluntary breath-hold method with a spirometer is feasible, with relatively good reproducibility. We are encouraged about the use of this technique clinically for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy

  12. Reproducibility of a Noninvasive System for Eye Positioning and Monitoring in Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Ocular Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskanderani, Omar; Béliveau-Nadeau, Dominique; Doucet, Robert; Coulombe, Geneviève; Pascale, Deborah; Roberge, David

    2017-06-01

    Our preferred treatment for juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma is stereotactic radiotherapy. We aim to describe our immobilization system and quantify its reproducibility. Patients were identified in our radiosurgery database. Patients were imaged at computed tomography simulator with an in-house system which allows visual monitoring of the eye as the patient fixates a small target. All patients were reimaged at least once prior to and/or during radiotherapy. The patients were treated on the CyberKnife system, 60 Gy in 10 daily fractions, using skull tracking in conjunction with our visual monitoring system. In order to quantify the reproducibility of the eye immobilization system, computed tomography scans were coregistered using rigid 6-dimensional skull registration. Using the coregistered scans, x, y, and z displacements of the lens/optic nerve insertion were measured. From these displacements, 3-dimensional vectors were calculated. Thirty-four patients were treated from October 2010 to September 2015. Thirty-nine coregistrations were performed using 73 scans (2-3 scans per patient). The mean displacements of lens and optic nerve insertion were 0.1 and 0.0 mm. The median 3-dimensional displacements (absolute value) of lens and nerve insertion were 0.8 and 0.7 mm (standard deviation: 0.5 and 0.6 mm). Ninety-eight percent of 3-dimensional displacements were below 2 mm (maximum 2.4 mm). The calculated planning target volume (PTV) margins were 0.8, 1.4, and 1.5 mm in the anterior-posterior, craniocaudal, and right-left axes, respectively. Following this analysis, no further changes have been applied to our planning margin of 2 to 2.5 mm as it is also meant to account for uncertainties in magnetic resonance imaging to computed tomography registration, skull tracking, and also contouring variability. We have found our stereotactic eye immobilization system to be highly reproducible (<1 mm) and free of systematic error.

  13. Adaptive fractionated stereotactic Gamma Knife radiotherapy of meningioma using integrated stereotactic cone-beam-CT and adaptive re-planning (a-gkFSRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieler, F.; Wenz, F.; Abo-Madyan, Y.; Schweizer, B.; Polednik, M.; Herskind, C.; Giordano, F.A.; Mai, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) allows frameless stereotactic treatment using a combination of cone beam computer tomography (CBCT), a thermoplastic mask system, and an infrared-based high-definition motion management (HDMM) camera system for patient tracking during treatment. We report on the first patient with meningioma at the left petrous bone treated with adaptive fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (a-gkFSRT). The first patient treated with Gamma Knife Icon at our institute received MR imaging for preplanning before treatment. For each treatment fraction, a daily CBCT was performed to verify the actual scull/tumor position. The system automatically adapted the planned shot positions to the daily position and recalculated the dose distribution (online adaptive planning). During treatment, the HDMM system recorded the intrafractional patient motion. Furthermore, the required times were recorded to define a clinical treatment slot. Total treatment time was around 20 min. Patient positioning needed 0.8 min, CBCT positioning plus acquisition 1.65 min, CT data processing and adaptive planning 2.66 min, and treatment 15.6 min. The differences for the five daily CBCTs compared to the reference are for rotation: -0.59 ± 0.49 /0.18 ± 0.20 /0.05 ± 0.36 and for translation: 0.94 ± 0.52 mm/-0.08 ± 0.08 mm/-1.13 ± 0.89 mm. Over all fractions, an intrafractional movement of 0.13 ± 0.04 mm was observed. The Gamma Knife Icon allows combining the accuracy of the stereotactic Gamma Knife system with the flexibility of fractionated treatment with the mask system and CBCT. Furthermore, the Icon system introduces a new online patient tracking system to the clinical routine. The interfractional accuracy of patient positioning was controlled with a thermoplastic mask and CBCT. (orig.) [de

  14. A review of stereotactic body radiotherapy – is volumetric modulated arc therapy the answer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapkaroski, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.sapkaroski@gmail.com; Osborne, Catherine; Knight, Kellie A [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Vic. (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a high precision radiotherapy technique used for the treatment of small to moderate extra-cranial tumours. Early studies utilising SBRT have shown favourable outcomes. However, major disadvantages of static field SBRT include long treatment times and toxicity complications. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may potentially mitigate these disadvantages. This review aims to assess the feasibility of emerging VMAT and IMRT-based SBRT treatment techniques and qualify which offers the best outcome for patients, whilst identifying any emerging and advantageous SBRT planning trends. A review and synthesis of data from current literature up to September 2013 was conducted on EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, Science Direct, Proquest central, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews. Only full text papers comparing VMAT and or IMRT and or Static SBRT were included. Ten papers were identified that evaluated the results of VMAT/IMRT SBRT. Five related to medically inoperable stage 1 and 2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three to spinal metastasis, one related to abdominal lymph node malignancies, with the final one looking at pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall treatment times with VMAT were reduced by 66–70% for lung, 46–58% for spine, 42% and 21% for lymph node and pancreatic metastasis respectively, planning constraints were met with several studies showing improved organs at risk sparing with IMRT/VMAT to static SBRT. Both IMRT and VMAT were able to meet all planning constraints in the studies reviewed, with VMAT offering the greatest treatment efficiency. Early clinical outcomes with VMAT and IMRT SBRT have demonstrated excellent local control and favourable survival outcomes.

  15. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy (FSRT for children with head-and-neck-rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Peter E

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study evaluates the outcome of 19 children with rhabdomyosarcoma of the head-and-neck region treated with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT or Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy (FSRT between August 1995 and November 2005. Methods We treated 19 children with head-and-neck rhabdomyosarcoma with FSRT (n = 14 or IMRT (n = 5 as a part of multimodal therapy. Median age at the time of radiation therapy was 5 years (range 2–15 years. All children received systemic chemotherapy according to the German Soft Tissue Sarcoma Study protocols. Median size of treatment volume for RT was 93,4 ml. We applied a median total dose of 45 Gy (range 32 Gy – 54 Gy using a median fractionation of 5 × 1,8 Gy/week (range 1,6 Gy – 1,8 Gy. The median time interval between primary diagnosis and radiation therapy was 5 months (range 3–9 months. Results After RT, the 3- and 5-year survival rate was 94%. The 3- and 5-year actuarial local control rate after RT was 89%. The actuarial freedom of distant metastases rate at 3- and 5-years was 89% for all patients. Radiotherapy was well tolerated in all children and could be completed without interruptions > 4 days. No toxicities >CTC grade 2 were observed. The median follow-up time after RT was 17 months. Conclusion IMRT and FSRT lead to excellent outcome in children with head-and-neck RMS with a low incidence of treatment-related side effects.

  16. Stereotactic radiotherapy of targets in the lung and liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulf, J.; Haedinger, U.; Oppitz, U.; Thiele, W.; Ness-Dourdoumas, R.; Flentje, M. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2001-12-01

    Background: Stereotactic irradiation of extracranial targets offers a non-invasive treatment modality for patients with localized tumors, which are not amenable for surgery or other invasive approaches because of age or impaired medical condition. The purpose of the study was the evaluation of the method to achieve local control of irradiated targets in relation to treatment toxicity. Patients and Methods: Irradiation was performed as hypofractionated treatment in three fractions of 10 Gy each, normalized to the PTV enclosing 65% isodose with patient fixation in a stereotactic body frame. The isocenter was localized by stereotactic coordinates. Targets were circumscribed tumors in the lung (n = 27) and liver (n = 24) not amenable for other treatment modalities: primary lung cancer (n = 12), local recurrences of lung cancer (n = 4), lung metastases (n = 11), liver metastases (n = 23) and one cholangiocellular carcinoma. Median CTV/PTV for targets in the lung was 57/113 cm{sup 3} (min/max 5-277 cm{sup 3}/17-343 cm{sup 3}) and for targets in the liver 50/102 cm{sup 3} (min/max 9-516 cm{sup 3}/42-772 cm{sup 3}). Median follow-up for targets in the lung was 8 months (2-33) and 9 months (2-28) for liver targets. Local control was defined as complete or partial remission and stable disease, measured by repeated CT scans after 6 weeks and in 3 months intervals. Treatment toxicity was evaluated according to the WHO score. Results: Crude local control was 85% for pulmonary targets and 83% for hepatic targets. Actuarial local control after 1 and 2 years was 76% and 76% for lung tumors and 76% and 61% for liver tumors. Actuarial overall patient survival was 48% after 1 year and 21% after 2 years for targets in the lung and 71% and 43% for targets in the liver. No acute grade 3-5 side effects were observed. Serious late toxicity occurred in two patients: a chronic ulceration of the esophagus at a target close to the mediastinum after 3 months (grade 3) and fatal bleeding from

  17. Management of Spinal Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Using Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Shiu, Almon S.; Rhines, Laurence D.; Wang He; Allen, Pamela K.; Wang, Xin Shelley; Chang, Eric L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the management of spinal metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods and Materials: SBRT was used in the treatment of patients with spinal metastases from RCC. Patients received either 24 Gy in a single fraction, 27 Gy in three fractions, or 30 Gy delivered in five fractions. Effectiveness of SBRT with respect to tumor control and palliation of pain was assessed using patient-reported outcomes. Results: A total of 48 patients with 55 spinal metastases were treated with SBRT with a median follow-up time of 13.1 months (range, 3.3-54.5 months). The actuarial 1-year spine tumor progression free survival was 82.1%. At pretreatment baseline, 23% patients were pain free; at 1 month and 12 months post-SBRT, 44% and 52% patients were pain free, respectively. No Grade 3-4 neurologic toxicity was observed. Conclusions: The data support SBRT as a safe and effective treatment modality that can be used to achieve good tumor control and palliation of pain associated with RCC spinal metastases. Further evaluation with randomized trials comparing SBRT to conventional radiotherapy may be warranted.

  18. Phase-II study on stereotactic radiotherapy of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Sengelov, Lisa; Traberg, Anders; Ohlhuis, Lars; Pedersen, Jorgen; Nellemann, Hanne; Kiil Berthelsen, Anne; Eberholst, Frey; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Maase, Hans von der

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The majority of patients with pancreatic cancer have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis and are not amenable for surgery. Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) may be an alternative treatment for patients with locally advanced disease. The effect of SRT was investigated in the present phase-II trial. Patients and methods: Twenty-two patients with locally advanced and surgically non-resectable, histological proven pancreatic carcinoma were included into the trial. The patients were immobilized by the Elekta stereotactic body frame (SBF) or a custom made body frame. SRT was given on standard LINAC with standard multi-leaf collimator. Central dose was 15 Gyx3 within 5-10 days. Results: Evaluation of response was found to be very difficult due to radiation and tumour related tissue reaction. Only two patients (9%) were found to have a partial response (PR), the remaining had no change (NC) or progression (PD) after treatment. Six patients had local tumour progression, but only one patient had an isolated local failure without simultaneous distant metastasis. Median time to local or distant progression was 4.8 months. Median survival time was 5.7 months and only 5% were alive 1 year after treatment. Acute toxicity reported 14 days after treatment was pronounced. There was a significant deterioration of performance status (P=0.008), more nausea (P=0.001) and more pain (P=0.008) after 14 days compared with base-line. However, 8 of 12 patients (66%) improved in performance status, scored less nausea, pain, or needed less analgesic drugs at 3 months after treatment. Four patients suffered from severe mucositis or ulceration of the stomach or duodenum and one of the patients had a non-fatal ulcer perforation of the stomach. Conclusions: SRT was associated with poor outcome, unacceptable toxicity and questionable palliative effect and cannot be recommended for patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma

  19. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lesions of the Spine and Paraspinal Regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, John W.; Yoo, David S.; Sampson, John H.; Isaacs, Robert E.; Larrier, Nicole A.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Yin Fangfang; Wu, Q. Jackie; Wang Zhiheng; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience and clinical strategy for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of spinal lesions. Methods and Materials: Thirty-two patients with 33 spinal lesions underwent computed tomography-based simulation while free breathing. Gross/clinical target volumes included involved portions of the vertebral body and paravertebral/epidural tumor. Planning target volume (PTV) expansion was 6 mm axially and 3 mm radially; the cord was excluded from the PTV. Biologic equivalent dose was calculated using the linear quadratic model with α/β = 3 Gy. Treatment was linear accelerator based with on-board imaging; dose was adjusted to maintain cord dose within tolerance. Survival, local control, pain, and neurologic status were monitored. Results: Twenty-one patients are alive at 1 year (median survival, 14 months). Median follow-up is 6 months for all patients (7 months for survivors). Mean previous radiotherapy dose to 22 patients was 35 Gy, and median interval was 17 months. Renal (31%), breast, and lung (19% each) were the most common histologic sites. Three SBRT fractions (range, one to four fractions) of 7 Gy (range, 5-16 Gy) were delivered. Median cord and target biologic equivalent doses were 70 Gy 3 and 34.3 Gy 10 , respectively. Thirteen patients reported complete and 17 patients reported partial pain relief at 1 month. There were four failures (mean, 5.8 months) with magnetic resonance imaging evidence of in-field progression. No dosimetric parameters predictive of failure were identified. No treatment-related toxicity was seen. Conclusions: Spinal SBRT is effective in the palliative/re-treatment setting. Volume expansion must ensure optimal PTV coverage while avoiding spinal cord toxicity. The long-term safety of spinal SBRT and the applicability of the linear-quadratic model in this setting remain to be determined, particularly the time-adjusted impact of prior radiotherapy.

  20. Postoperative modified stereotactic radiotherapy using a micro-multileaf collimator in patients with malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaka, Toshihiko; Nishiyama, Kinji; Nakagawa, Hidemitsu; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Kouichi

    2002-06-01

    To achieve local control of malignant glioma, we designed a postoperative stereotactic radiotherapy using a micro-multileaf collimator (micro-MLC). The purpose of this study was to clarify the feasibility of this treatment. The treatment was performed in six patients who met the following eligibility criteria: (1) supratentorial tumor, (2) residual tumor volume or = 70. The three planning target volumes (PTVs), which consisted of restricted PTV (RPTV), intermediate PTV (IPTV), and extended PTV (EPTV), defined as the residual tumor plus a 1 cm, 2 cm, and 3 cm margins, respectively, and total dose delivery of 60-68 Gy, 52-60 Gy, and 44-52 Gy to the isocenters of RPTV, IPTV, and EPTV, respectively, in 4 Gy per fraction at five fractions per week, were established. The beam arrangement and the conformal blockade with a micro-MLC for the optimal treatment plan were designed. The treatment plans showed the high dose conformation to EPTV, the appropriate dose gradients in the three PTVs with the high dose homogeneity to RPTV, and the tolerated dose to critical structures. Following the plans, treatment was performed. The clinical findings more than 12 months after the treatment supported its possible use. We conclude that this treatment is feasible at least in selected patients.

  1. Polymer gel dosimetry for synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy and iodine dose-enhancement measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudou, C; Tropres, I; Rousseau, J; Lamalle, L; Adam, J F; Esteve, F; Elleaume, H

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy (SSR) is a radiotherapy technique that makes use of the interactions of monochromatic low energy x-rays with high atomic number (Z) elements. An important dose-enhancement can be obtained if the target volume has been loaded with a sufficient amount of a high-Z element, such as iodine. In this study, we compare experimental dose measurements, obtained with normoxic polymer gel (nPAG), with Monte Carlo computations. Gels were irradiated within an anthropomorphic head phantom and were read out by magnetic resonance imaging. The dose-enhancement due to the presence of iodine in the gel (iodine concentration: 5 and 10 mg ml -1 ) was measured at two radiation energies (35 and 80 keV) and was compared to the calculated factors. nPAG dosimetry was shown to be efficient for measuring the sharp dose gradients produced by SSR. The agreement between 3D gel dosimetry and calculated dose distributions was found to be within 4% of the dose difference criterion and a distance to agreement of 2.1 mm for 80% of the voxels. Polymer gel doped with iodine exhibited higher sensitivity, in good agreement with the calculated iodine-dose enhancement. We demonstrate in this preliminary study that iodine-doped nPAG could be used for measuring in situ dose distributions for iodine-enhanced SSR treatment

  2. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for metastatic and recurrent ewing sarcoma and osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lindsay C; Lester, Rachael A; Grams, Michael P; Haddock, Michael G; Olivier, Kenneth R; Arndt, Carola A S; Rose, Peter S; Laack, Nadia N

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy has been utilized for metastatic and recurrent osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma (ES), in order to provide palliation and possibly prolong overall or progression-free survival. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is convenient for patients and offers the possibility of increased efficacy. We report our early institutional experience using SBRT for recurrent and metastatic osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. Methods. We reviewed all cases of osteosarcoma or ES treated with SBRT between 2008 and 2012. Results. We identified 14 patients with a total of 27 lesions from osteosarcoma (n = 19) or ES (n = 8). The median total curative/definitive SBRT dose delivered was 40 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 30-60 Gy in 3-10 fractions). The median total palliative SBRT dose delivered was 40 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 16-50 Gy in 1-10 fractions). Two grade 2 and 1 grade 3 late toxicities occurred, consisting of myonecrosis, avascular necrosis with pathologic fracture, and sacral plexopathy. Toxicity was seen in the settings of concurrent chemotherapy and reirradiation. Conclusions. This descriptive report suggests that SBRT may be a feasible local treatment option for patients with osteosarcoma and ES. However, significant toxicity can result, and thus systematic study is warranted to clarify efficacy and characterize long-term toxicity.

  3. Stereotactic radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricardi, Umberto; Badellino, Serena; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo [Dept. of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) represents a consolidated treatment option for patients with medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The clinical evidence accumulated in the past decade supports its use as an alternative to surgery with comparable survival outcomes. Due to its limited toxicity, SBRT is also applicable to elderly patients with very poor baseline pulmonary function or other severe comorbidities. Recent comparative studies in operable patients raised the issue of the possible use of SBRT also for this subgroup, with quite promising results that still should be fully confirmed by prospective trials with long-term follow-up. Aim of this review is to summarize and discuss the major studies conducted over the years on SBRT and to provide data on the efficacy and toxicity of this radiotherapy technique for stage I NSCLC. Technical aspects and quality of life related issues are also discussed, with the goal to provide information on the current role and limitations of SBRT in clinical practice.

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Metastatic and Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma and Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay C. Brown

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Radiotherapy has been utilized for metastatic and recurrent osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma (ES, in order to provide palliation and possibly prolong overall or progression-free survival. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is convenient for patients and offers the possibility of increased efficacy. We report our early institutional experience using SBRT for recurrent and metastatic osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. Methods. We reviewed all cases of osteosarcoma or ES treated with SBRT between 2008 and 2012. Results. We identified 14 patients with a total of 27 lesions from osteosarcoma (n=19 or ES (n=8. The median total curative/definitive SBRT dose delivered was 40 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 30–60 Gy in 3–10 fractions. The median total palliative SBRT dose delivered was 40 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 16–50 Gy in 1–10 fractions. Two grade 2 and 1 grade 3 late toxicities occurred, consisting of myonecrosis, avascular necrosis with pathologic fracture, and sacral plexopathy. Toxicity was seen in the settings of concurrent chemotherapy and reirradiation. Conclusions. This descriptive report suggests that SBRT may be a feasible local treatment option for patients with osteosarcoma and ES. However, significant toxicity can result, and thus systematic study is warranted to clarify efficacy and characterize long-term toxicity.

  5. Reliability of the bony anatomy in image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Baier, Kurt; Guenther, Iris; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Sauer, Otto; Vordermark, Dirk; Flentje, Michael

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate whether the position of brain metastases remains stable between planning and treatment in cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Eighteen patients with 20 brain metastases were treated with single-fraction (17 lesions) or hypofractionated (3 lesions) image-guided SRT. Median time interval between planning and treatment was 8 days. Before treatment a cone-beam CT (CBCT) and a conventional CT after application of i.v. contrast were acquired. Setup errors using automatic bone registration (CBCT) and manual soft-tissue registration of the brain metastases (conventional CT) were compared. Tumor size was not significantly different between planning and treatment. The three-dimensional setup error (mean +/- SD) was 4.0 +/- 2.1 mm and 3.5 +/- 2.2 mm according to the bony anatomy and the lesion itself, respectively. A highly significant correlation between automatic bone match and soft-tissue registration was seen in all three directions (r >/= 0.88). The three-dimensional distance between the isocenter according to bone match and soft-tissue registration was 1.7 +/- 0.7 mm, maximum 2.8 mm. Treatment of intracranial pressure with steroids did not influence the position of the lesion relative to the bony anatomy. With a time interval of approximately 1 week between planning and treatment, the bony anatomy of the skull proved to be an excellent surrogate for the target position in image-guided SRT.

  6. Stereotactic radiosurgery in the palliative treatment of brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Souhami, Luis; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Clark, Brenda; Adamson, Nelson; Podgorsak, Ervin B.; Caron, Jean-Louis; Villemure, Jean-Guy; Olivier, Andre

    1995-01-01

    Between October, 1988 and November, 1993, 57 patients with metastatic brain disease underwent stereotactic radiosurgery at McGill University, canada. Four patients were excluded from this analysis leaving a total of 53 evaluable patients (with 57 lesions). Radiosurgery was performed with the dynamic rotation technique which uses an isocentric, 10 MV, linear accelerator. A median dose of 1,800 c Gy was given in a single session. In 89% of the cases radiosurgery was used after failure to conventional brain radiotherapy. With a median follow-up of 6 months, the response rate was 65% . Treatments were well tolerated and only 4 patients (7%) developed late complications related to the therapy, with one patient requiring a surgical resection of an area of radionecrose. Radiosurgery appears to be and effective and safe treatment for selected patients with metastatic brain disease, recurrent post-conventional radiotherapy. Its value as a single treatment modality for patients with isolated brain metastasis is now being studied in prospective trials. (author). 29 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Credentialing of radiotherapy centres in Australasia for TROG 09.02 (Chisel), a Phase III clinical trial on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy of early stage lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Tomas; Chesson, Brent; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Crain, Melissa; Clements, Natalie; Burns, Mark; Ball, David

    2018-03-06

    A randomised clinical trial comparing stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) with conventional radiotherapy for early stage lung cancer has been conducted in Australia and New Zealand under the auspices of the TransTasman Radiation Oncology Group (NCT01014130). We report on the technical credentialing program as prerequisite for centres joining the trial. Participating centres were asked to develop treatment plans for two test cases to assess their ability to create plans according to protocol. Dose delivery in the presence of inhomogeneity and motion was assessed during a site visit using a phantom with moving inserts. Site visits for the trial were conducted in 16 Australian and 3 New Zealand radiotherapy facilities. The tests with low density inhomogeneities confirmed shortcomings of the AAA algorithm for dose calculation. Dose was assessed for a typical treatment delivery including at least one non-coplanar beam in a stationary and moving phantom. This end-to-end test confirmed that all participating centres were able to deliver stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy with the required accuracy while the planning study demonstrated that they were able to produce acceptable plans for both test cases. The credentialing process documented that participating centres were able to deliver dose as required in the trial protocol. It also gave an opportunity to provide education about the trial and discuss technical issues such as four-dimensional CT, small field dosimetry and patient immobilisation with staff in participating centres. Advances in knowledge: Credentialing is an important quality assurance tool for radiotherapy trials using advanced technology. In addition to confirming technical competence, it provides an opportunity for education and discussion about the trial.

  8. A verification methodology for in vivo dosimetry in stereotactic radiotherapy; Uma metodologia para verificacao dosimetrica in vivo em radioterapia estereotaxica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Leonardo L.; Oliveira, Harley F.; Fairbanks, Leandro R., E-mail: leonardo.fis@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Nicolucci, Patricia; Netto, Thomaz G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Departamento de Fisica

    2012-12-15

    Radiotherapy of brain lesions near critical structures requires a high accuracy in the location and dose. The high precision is achieved by the location of the stereotactic apparatus. The accuracy in dose delivery should be accompanied by an accurate quality control in devices that involve the practice, however, still does not guarantee the dose at the time of therapy. The large number of fields and the small size of these conventional methods difficult dosimetry during treatment. The objective of this work was to develop a verification methodology in vivo dosimetry in stereotactic radiotherapy with the aid of the film radiochromic Linear Accelerator with multi leaf collimators Moduleaf. The technique uses film segments radiochromic Gafchromic EBT2, with dimensions of 1x1 cm{sup 2} in area outside the coupled micro-multileaf Moduleaf Siemens. These films were inserted in the region of the central axis of the beam. The films were irradiated and calibrated to obtain the factors that determine the size dependence of the dosimetric field. With these data, we designed a computer program which calculates the density of a film must acquire when subjected to an exposure in this setting. This study evaluated five non-coplanar plans, the first with 15 fields and the other with 25 fields. Before starting the procedure, the film segment is coupled to the device, and after the treatment, the relative density is evaluated and compared with the calculated. The average value of the verification at the time of radiation dosimetry compared with the calculated by the sheet was 1.5%. The data collected in this study showed a satisfactory agreement between measured and calculated by the program in the densitometer. Thus, a methodology was developed to verify in vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy and stereotactic linear accelerator collimators Moduleaf. (author)

  9. Immediate side effects of stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner-Wasik, Maria; Rudoler, Shari; Preston, Peter E.; Downes, Beverly M.; Andrews, David; Corn, Benjamin W.; Rosenstock, Jeffrey; Curran, Walter J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Despite increased utilization of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), the incidence and nature of immediate side effects (ISE) associated with these treatment techniques is not well defined. Materials and Methods: Intracranial lesions in 78 adult patients were treated with SRT or SRS, using a dedicated linear accelerator. They comprised 13 gliomas, 2 ependymomas, 19 metastatic tumors, 15 meningiomas, 12 acoustic neuromas, 4 pituitary adenomas, 1 optic neuroma, 1 chondrosarcoma and 11 arteriovenous malformations (AVM). SRT was used in 51 and SRS in 27 patients. Mean target volume was 9.0 cc. Eleven patients received prior external beam radiation therapy within 2 months before SRT/SRS. Any side effects occurring during and up to two weeks after radiation course were defined as ISE and were graded as mild, moderate or severe. The incidence of ISE and the significance of their association with several pretreatment variables were analyzed. Results: Overall, (28(78)) (35%) patients experienced one or more ISE. Most of ISE (87%) were mild and consisted of nausea (5), dizziness/vertigo (5), seizures (7) and new persistent headaches (17). Two episodes of worsening neurological deficit and 2 of orbital pain were graded as moderate. Two patients experienced severe ISE, requiring hospitalization (1 seizure and 1 worsening neurological deficit). ISE in 5 cases prompted computerized tomography of the brain which revealed increased perilesional edema in 3 cases. The incidence of ISE by diagnosis was as follows: 46% ((6(13))) for gliomas, 50% ((6(12))) for acoustic neuromas, 36% ((4(11))) for AVM, 33% ((5(15))) for meningiomas and 21% ((4(19))) for metastases. Increasing dose to the margin and increasing maximum dose were associated with a higher incidence of ISE (p=0.02 and 0.005, respectively). Prior recent conventional external beam radiation therapy, target volume, number of isocenters, collimator size, dose

  10. Immediate side effects of stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner-Wasik, Maria; Rudoler, Shari; Preston, Peter E.; Hauck, Walter W.; Downes, Beverly M.; Leeper, Dennis; Andrews, David; Corn, Benjamin W.; Curran, Walter J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Despite increased utilization of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), the incidence and nature of immediate side effects (ISE) associated with these treatment techniques are not well defined. We report immediate side effects from a series of 78 patients. Materials and Methods: Intracranial lesions in 78 adult patients were treated with SRT or SRS, using a dedicated linear accelerator. Those lesions included 13 gliomas, 2 ependymomas, 19 metastatic tumors, 15 meningiomas, 12 acoustic neuromas, 4 pituitary adenomas, 1 optic neuroma, 1 chondrosarcoma, and 11 arteriovenous malformations (AVM). SRT was used in 51 and SRS in 27 patients. Mean target volume was 9.0 cc. Eleven patients received prior external-beam radiation therapy within 2 months before SRT/SRS. Any side effects occurring during and up to 2 weeks after the course of radiation were defined as ISE and were graded as mild, moderate, or severe. The incidence of ISE and the significance of their association with several treatment and pretreatment variables were analyzed. Results: Overall, 28 (35%) of 78 patients experienced one or more ISE. Most of the ISE (87%) were mild, and consisted of nausea (in 5), dizziness/vertigo (in 5), seizures (in 6), and new persistent headaches (in 17). Two episodes of worsening neurological deficit and 2 of orbital pain were graded as moderate. Two patients experienced severe ISE, requiring hospitalization (1 seizure and 1 worsening neurological deficit). ISE in 6 cases prompted computerized tomography of the brain, which revealed increased perilesional edema in 3 cases. The incidence of ISE by diagnosis was as follows: 46% (6 of 13) for gliomas, 50% (6 of 12) for acoustic neuromas, 36% (4 of 11) for AVM, 33% (5 of 15) for meningiomas, and 21% (4 of 19) for metastases. A higher incidence of dizziness/vertigo (4 of 12 = 33%) was seen among acoustic neuroma patients than among other patients (p < 0.01). There was no

  11. Dosimetric effect of intrafraction tumor motion in phase gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Bo; Yang Yong; Li Tianfang; Li Xiang; Heron, Dwight E.; Huq, M. Saiful

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A major concern for lung intensity modulated radiation therapy delivery is the deviation of actually delivered dose distribution from the planned one due to simultaneous movements of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves and tumor. For gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment (SBRT), the situation becomes even more complicated because of SBRT's characteristics such as fewer fractions, smaller target volume, higher dose rate, and extended fractional treatment time. The purpose of this work is to investigate the dosimetric effect of intrafraction tumor motion during gated lung SBRT delivery by reconstructing the delivered dose distribution with real-time tumor motion considered. Methods: The tumor motion data were retrieved from six lung patients. Each of them received three fractions of stereotactic radiotherapy treatments with Cyberknife Synchrony (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). Phase gating through an external surrogate was simulated with a gating window of 5 mm. The resulting residual tumor motion curves during gating (beam-on) were retrieved. Planning target volume (PTV) was defined as physician-contoured clinical target volume (CTV) surrounded by an isotropic 5 mm margin. Each patient was prescribed with 60 Gy/3 fractions. The authors developed an algorithm to reconstruct the delivered dose with tumor motion. The DMLC segments, mainly leaf position and segment weighting factor, were recalculated according to the probability density function of tumor motion curve. The new DMLC sequence file was imported back to treatment planning system to reconstruct the dose distribution. Results: Half of the patients in the study group experienced PTV D95% deviation up to 26% for fractional dose and 14% for total dose. CTV mean dose dropped by 1% with tumor motion. Although CTV is almost covered by prescribed dose with 5 mm margin, qualitative comparison on the dose distributions reveals that CTV is on the verge of underdose. The discrepancy happens due to tumor

  12. Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja, E-mail: barbara.jereczek@ieo.it [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Beltramo, Giancarlo [CyberKnife Center CDI, Milan (Italy); Fariselli, Laura [Radiotherapy Unit, Carlo Besta Neurological Institute Foundation, Milan (Italy); Fodor, Cristiana [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Santoro, Luigi [Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Gherardi, Federica [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Ascione, Carmen [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna [CyberKnife Center CDI, Milan (Italy); De Cobelli, Ottavio [Department of Urology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor

  13. Neural stem cell sparing by linac based intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy in intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehler, Julia; Brachwitz, Tim; Wendt, Thomas G; Banz, Nico; Walther, Mario; Wiezorek, Tilo

    2013-01-01

    Neurocognitive decline observed after radiotherapy (RT) for brain tumors in long time survivors is attributed to radiation exposure of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). The potential of sparing capabilities for both structures by optimized intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) is investigated. Brain tumors were irradiated by stereotactic 3D conformal RT or IMSRT using m3 collimator optimized for PTV and for sparing of the conventional OARs (lens, retina, optic nerve, chiasm, cochlea, brain stem and the medulla oblongata). Retrospectively both hippocampi and SVZ were added to the list of OAR and their dose volume histograms were compared to those from two newly generated IMSRT plans using 7 or 14 beamlets (IMSRT-7, IMSRT-14) dedicated for optimized additional sparing of these structures. Conventional OAR constraints were kept constant. Impact of plan complexity and planning target volume (PTV) topography on sparing of both hippocampi and SVZ, conformity index (CI), the homogeneity index (HI) and quality of coverage (QoC) were analyzed. Limits of agreement were used to compare sparing of stem cell niches with either IMSRT-7 or IMSRT-14. The influence of treatment technique related to the topography ratio between PTV and OARs, realized in group A-D, was assessed by a mixed model. In 47 patients CI (p ≤ 0.003) and HI (p < 0.001) improved by IMSRT-7, IMSRT-14, QoC remained stable (p ≥ 0.50) indicating no compromise in radiotherapy. 90% of normal brain was exposed to a significantly higher dose using IMSRT. IMSRT-7 plans resulted in significantly lower biologically effective doses at all four neural stem cell structures, while contralateral neural stem cells are better spared compared to ipsilateral. A further increase of the number of beamlets (IMSRT-14) did not improve sparing significantly, so IMSRT-7 and IMSRT-14 can be used interchangeable. Patients with tumors contacting neither the subventricular zone nor the cortex benefit

  14. Cardiac embolization of an implanted fiducial marker for hepatic stereotactic body radiotherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennessey Hooman

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In liver stereotactic body radiotherapy, reduction of normal tissue irradiation requires daily image guidance. This is typically accomplished by imaging a surrogate to the tumor. The surrogate is often an implanted metal fiducial marker. There are few reports addressing the specific risks of hepatic fiducial marker implantation. These risks are assumed to be similar to percutaneous liver biopsies which are associated with a 1-4% complication rate - almost always pain or bleeding. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case of such a fiducial marker migrating to the heart. Case presentation An 81-year-old Caucasian man (5 years post-gastrectomy for a gastric adenocarcinoma was referred post-second line palliative chemotherapy for radiotherapy of an isolated liver metastasis. It was decided to proceed with treatment and platinum fiducials were chosen for radiation targeting. Under local anesthesia, three Nester embolization coils (Cook Medical Inc., Bloomington, IN, USA were implanted under computed tomography guidance. Before the placement of each coil, the location of the tip of the delivery needle was confirmed by computed tomography imaging. During the procedure, the third coil unexpectedly migrated through the hepatic vein to the inferior vena cava and lodged at the junction of the vena cava and the right atrium. The patient remained asymptomatic. He was immediately referred to angiography for extraction of the coil. Using fluoroscopic guidance, an EN Snare Retrieval System (Hatch Medical L.L.C., Snellville, GA, USA was introduced through a jugular catheter; it successfully grasped the coil and the coil was removed. The patient was kept overnight for observation and no immediate or delayed complications were encountered due to the migration or retrieval of the coil. He subsequently went on to be treated using the remaining fiducials. Conclusion Implanted fiducial markers are increasingly used for stereotactic

  15. Stereotactic radiation therapy: a second gold standard in the treatment of early-stage lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini B, Alejandro; Valdez C, Cristian; Sepulveda A, Veronica; Baeza L, Ricardo; Bustos, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death in the world. Although in Chile this is not the case, the northern regions of the country show higher incidence and mortality rates than the other Chilean regions. In recent years screening guides for lung cancer with low-dose scanner have begun to be established, and most of the medical societies involved in this subject have already settled the selection criteria. At the same time new techniques of treatment for these patients have developed, with highly sophisticated radiotherapy such as SBRT (Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy) and SBART (Stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy) that are revealing extremely encouraging results and augur significant changes in the coming years. In the present review we analyze the current work, their results, and the future of this treatment modality

  16. Psychosurgery: stereotactic subcaudate tractomy. An indispensable treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, P K; Bartlett, J R; Hale, A S; Poynton, A M; Malizia, A L; Hodgkiss, A D

    1994-11-01

    Stereotactic subcaudate tractotomy (SST) is the only type of psychosurgery performed at the Geoffrey Knight Unit, London, where nearly 1300 operations have been done since 1961. Statistically reliable data are not available to prove the effectiveness of SST. A detailed statement about contemporary psychosurgery is given. Relevant publications from the Unit and via Medline are discussed. The outcome figures are reviewed. The outcome is assessed at the Unit in global and clinical terms, associated with results of self-completed questionnaires. SST allows 40-60% of patients to live normal or near-normal lives, perhaps with continuation of medication. A reduction in suicide rate to 1% post-operatively, from 15% in cases of uncontrolled affective disorders is seen. As a treatment of last resort, no controlled trial against a comparable treatment is possible. It appears reasonable to offer SST to patients with suicidal and deluded depression or with frequently swinging moods, not responding to other treatments.

  17. Multi-isocenter stereotactic radiotherapy: implications for target dose distributions of systematic and random localization errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, M.A.; Zavgorodni, S.F.; Kendrick, L.A.; Weston, S.; Harper, C.S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: This investigation examined the effect of alignment and localization errors on dose distributions in stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with arced circular fields. In particular, it was desired to determine the effect of systematic and random localization errors on multi-isocenter treatments. Methods and Materials: A research version of the FastPlan system from Surgical Navigation Technologies was used to generate a series of SRT plans of varying complexity. These plans were used to examine the influence of random setup errors by recalculating dose distributions with successive setup errors convolved into the off-axis ratio data tables used in the dose calculation. The influence of systematic errors was investigated by displacing isocenters from their planned positions. Results: For single-isocenter plans, it is found that the influences of setup error are strongly dependent on the size of the target volume, with minimum doses decreasing most significantly with increasing random and systematic alignment error. For multi-isocenter plans, similar variations in target dose are encountered, with this result benefiting from the conventional method of prescribing to a lower isodose value for multi-isocenter treatments relative to single-isocenter treatments. Conclusions: It is recommended that the systematic errors associated with target localization in SRT be tracked via a thorough quality assurance program, and that random setup errors be minimized by use of a sufficiently robust relocation system. These errors should also be accounted for by incorporating corrections into the treatment planning algorithm or, alternatively, by inclusion of sufficient margins in target definition

  18. Dosimetric benefit of adaptive re-planning in pancreatic cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongbao [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Hoisak, Jeremy D.P.; Li, Nan; Jiang, Carrie [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Tian, Zhen [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Gautier, Quentin; Zarepisheh, Masoud [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Wu, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yaqiang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Jia, Xun [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); and others

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) shows promise in unresectable pancreatic cancer, though this treatment modality has high rates of normal tissue toxicity. This study explores the dosimetric utility of daily adaptive re-planning with pancreas SBRT. We used a previously developed supercomputing online re-planning environment (SCORE) to re-plan 10 patients with pancreas SBRT. Tumor and normal tissue contours were deformed from treatment planning computed tomographies (CTs) and transferred to daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans before re-optimizing each daily treatment plan. We compared the intended radiation dose, the actual radiation dose, and the optimized radiation dose for the pancreas tumor planning target volume (PTV) and the duodenum. Treatment re-optimization improved coverage of the PTV and reduced dose to the duodenum. Within the PTV, the actual hot spot (volume receiving 110% of the prescription dose) decreased from 4.5% to 0.5% after daily adaptive re-planning. Within the duodenum, the volume receiving the prescription dose decreased from 0.9% to 0.3% after re-planning. It is noteworthy that variation in the amount of air within a patient's stomach substantially changed dose to the PTV. Adaptive re-planning with pancreas SBRT has the ability to improve dose to the tumor and decrease dose to the nearby duodenum, thereby reducing the risk of toxicity.

  19. Tumor shrinkage assessed by volumetric MRI in the long-term follow-up after stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astner, Sabrina T.; Theodorou, Marilena; Dobrei-Ciuchendea, Mihaela; Kopp, Christine; Molls, Michael [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Auer, Florian [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Grosu, Anca-Ligia [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor volume reduction in the follow-up of meningiomas after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) or linac radiosurgery (RS) by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients and Methods: In 59 patients with skull base meningiomas, gross tumor volume (GTV) was outlined on contrast-en-hanced MRI before and median 50 months (range 11-92 months) after stereotactic radiotherapy. MRI was performed as an axial three-dimensional gradient-echo T1-weighted sequence at 1.6 mm slice thickness without gap (3D-MRI). Results were compared to the reports of diagnostic findings. Results: Mean tumor size of all 59 meningiomas was 13.9 ml (0.8-62.9 ml) before treatment. There was shrinkage of the treated meningiomas in all but one patient. Within a median volumetric follow-up of 50 months (11-95 months), an absolute mean volume reduction of 4 ml (0-18 ml) was seen. The mean relative size reduction compared to the volume before radiotherapy was 27% (0-73%). Shrinkage measured by 3D-MRI was greater at longer time intervals after radiotherapy. The mean size reduction was 17%, 23%, and 30% (at < 24 months, 24-48 months, and 48-72 months). Conclusion: By using 3D-MRI in almost all patients undergoing radiotherapy of a meningioma, tumor shrinkage is detected. The data presented here demonstrate that volumetric assessment from 3D-MRI provides additional information to routinely used radiologic response measurements. After FSRT or RS, a mean size reduction of 25-45% can be expected within 4 years. (orig.)

  20. Potential impact of 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT on stereotactic radiotherapy planning of meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyuyki, Fonyuy; Plotkin, Michail; Michel, Roger; Steffen, Ingo; Fahdt, Daniel; Brenner, Winfried; Graf, Reinhold; Denecke, Timm; Geworski, Lilli; Wurm, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Since meningiomas show a high expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2, PET with 68 Ga-DOTATOC was proposed as an additional imaging modality beside CT and MRI for planning radiotherapy. We investigated the input of 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT on the definition of the ''gross tumour volume'' (GTV) in meningiomas, in order to assess the potential value of this method. Prior to radiotherapy, 42 patients with meningiomas (26 f, 16 m, mean age 55) underwent MRI and 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT examinations. History: operated n = 24, radiotherapy n = 1, operation and radiotherapy n = 8, no treatment n = 9. PET/CT and MRI data were co-registered using a BrainLAB workstation. For comparison, the GTV was defined first under consideration of CT and MRI data, then using PET data. 3/42 patients were excluded from the analysis (two with negative PET results, one with an extensive tumour, not precisely delineable by MRI or PET/CT). The average GTV CT/MRI was 22(±19)cm 3 ; GTV PET was 23(±20)cm 3 . Additional GTV, obtained as a result of PET was 9(±10)cm 3 and was observed in patients with osseous infiltration. In some pre-treated patients there were intratumoural areas (as identified in CT/MRI) without SR-expression (7(±11)cm 3 ). Common GTV as obtained by both CT/MRI and PET was 15(±14)cm 3 . The mean bi-directional difference between the GTV CT/MRI and GTV PET accounted to 16(±15)cm 3 (93%, p 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET enables delineation of SR-positive meningiomas and delivers additional information to both CT and MRI regarding the planning of stereotactic radiotherapy. The acquisition on a PET/CT scanner helps to estimate the relation of PET findings to anatomical structures and is especially useful for detection of osseous infiltration. 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET also allows detection of additional lesions in patients with multiple meningiomas. (orig.)

  1. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer: five-year outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Hypofractionated, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is an emerging treatment approach for prostate cancer. We present the outcomes for low-risk prostate cancer patients with a median follow-up of 5 years after SBRT. Method and Materials Between Dec. 2003 and Dec. 2005, a pooled cohort of 41 consecutive patients from Stanford, CA and Naples, FL received SBRT with CyberKnife for clinically localized, low-risk prostate cancer. Prescribed dose was 35-36.25 Gy in five fractions. No patient received hormone therapy. Kaplan-Meier biochemical progression-free survival (defined using the Phoenix method and RTOG toxicity outcomes were assessed. Results At a median follow-up of 5 years, the biochemical progression-free survival was 93% (95% CI = 84.7% to 100%. Acute side effects resolved within 1-3 months of treatment completion. There were no grade 4 toxicities. No late grade 3 rectal toxicity occurred, and only one late grade 3 genitourinary toxicity occurred following repeated urologic instrumentation. Conclusion Five-year results of SBRT for localized prostate cancer demonstrate the efficacy and safety of shorter courses of high dose per fraction radiation delivered with SBRT technique. Ongoing clinical trials are underway to further explore this treatment approach.

  2. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastasis: Opportunities for Biology to Guide Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Rohann J M; Salama, Joseph K; Milano, Michael T; Palma, David A

    2016-01-01

    Oligometastasis refers to a state of limited metastatic disease burden, in which surgical or ablative treatment to all known visible metastases holds promise to extend survival or even effect cure. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is a form of radiation treatment capable of delivering a high biologically effective dose of radiation in a highly conformal manner, with a favorable toxicity profile. Enthusiasm for oligometastasis ablation, however, should be counterbalanced against the limited supporting evidence. It remains unknown to what extent (if any) ablation influences survival or quality of life. Rising clinical equipoise necessitates the completion of randomized controlled trials to assess this, several of which are underway. However, a lack of clear identification criteria or biomarkers to define the oligometastatic state hampers optimal patient selection.This narrative review explores the evolutionary origins of oligometastasis, the steps of the metastatic process at which oligometastases may arise, and the biomolecular mediators of this state. It discusses clinical outcomes with treatment of oligometastases, ongoing trials, and areas of basic and translational research that may lead to novel biomarkers. These efforts should provide a clearer, biomolecular definition of oligometastatic disease and aid in the accurate selection of patients for ablative therapies.

  3. Linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery with micro multi-leaf collimator : technological advancement in precision radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayananda, S.; Kinhikar, R.A.; Saju, Sherley; Deshpande, D.D.; Jalali, R.; Sarin, R.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Dinshaw, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) is an advancement on precision radiotherapy, in which stereo tactically guided localized high dose is delivered to the lesion (target) in a single fraction, while sparing the surrounding normal tissue. Radiosurgery has been used to treat variety of benign and malignant lesions as well as functional disorders in brain such as arteriovenous malformation (AVM), acoustic neuroma, solitary primary brain tumor, single metastasis, pituitary adenoma etc

  4. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuromas: A prospective monocenter study of about 158 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litre, Fabien; Rousseaux, Pascal; Jovenin, Nicolas; Bazin, Arnaud; Peruzzi, Philippe; Wdowczyk, Didier; Colin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcomes and efficacy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the treatment of acoustic neuromas. Material and methods: Between January 1996 and December 2009, 158 acoustic neuromas were treated by FSR in 155 patients. They received a dose of 50.4 Gy, with a safety margin of 1–2 mm with a median tumor volume at 2.45 mL (range: 0.17–12.5 mL) and a median follow-up duration at 60 months (range: 24–192). Results: FSR was well tolerated in all patients with mild sequelae consisting in radiation-induced trigeminal nerve impairments (3.2%), Grade 2 facial neuropathies (2.5%), new or aggravated tinnitus (2.1%) and VP shunting (2.5%). The treatment failed in four patients (2.5%) who had subsequent surgery respectively at 20, 38, 45 and 84 months post-FSR. The local tumor control rates were respectively 99.3%, 97.5% and 95.2% at 3, 5 and >7-year of follow-up. For initial Gardner–Robertson Grade 1 and 2 ANs, the preservation of useful hearing was possible in 54% of the cases; only Grade 1 ANs had stabilized during the course of the follow-up with 71% >7 years. However, hearing preservation was not correlated to the initial Koos Stage and to the radiation dose delivered to the cochlea. Tinnitus (70%), vertigo (59%), imbalance (46%) and ear mastoid pain (43%) had greatly improved post-FRS in most patients. Tumor control, hearing preservation and FRS toxicity were quite similar in patients with NF2, cystic acoustic neuroma, prior surgical resection and Koos Stage 4 AN. No secondary tumors were observed. Conclusion: FSR is a safe and effective therapeutic for acoustic neuromas and could be an alternative to microsurgery. Compared to radiosurgery, there are no contraindications for fractioned doses of stereotactic radiotherapy especially for Stage-4 tumors and patients at high risk of hearing loss

  5. Automated inverse optimization facilitates lower doses to normal tissue in pancreatic stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaylov, Ivaylo B; Mellon, Eric A; Yechieli, Raphael; Portelance, Lorraine

    2018-01-01

    Inverse planning is trial-and-error iterative process. This work introduces a fully automated inverse optimization approach, where the treatment plan is closely tailored to the unique patient anatomy. The auto-optimization is applied to pancreatic stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The automation is based on stepwise reduction of dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Five uniformly spaced points, from 1% to 70% of the organ at risk (OAR) volumes, are used. Doses to those DVH points are iteratively decreased through multiple optimization runs. With each optimization run the doses to the OARs are decreased, while the dose homogeneity over the target is increased. The iterative process is terminated when a pre-specified dose heterogeneity over the target is reached. Twelve pancreatic cases were retrospectively studied. Doses to the target, maximum doses to duodenum, bowel, stomach, and spinal cord were evaluated. In addition, mean doses to liver and kidneys were tallied. The auto-optimized plans were compared to the actual treatment plans, which are based on national protocols. The prescription dose to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) is the same for the treatment and the auto-optimized plans. The average difference for maximum doses to duodenum, bowel, stomach, and spinal cord are -4.6 Gy, -1.8 Gy, -1.6 Gy, and -2.4 Gy respectively. The negative sign indicates lower doses with the auto-optimization. The average differences in the mean doses to liver and kidneys are -0.6 Gy, and -1.1 Gy to -1.5 Gy respectively. Automated inverse optimization holds great potential for personalization and tailoring of radiotherapy to particular patient anatomies. It can be utilized for normal tissue sparing or for an isotoxic dose escalation.

  6. Comparison of stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of acoustic neurinomas according to 3-D tumor volume shrinkage and quality of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henzel, Martin; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Hamm, Klaus; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele; Sitter, Helmut; Gross, Markus W.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and also fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) offer high local control (LC) rates (> 90%). This study aimed to evaluate three-dimensional (3-D) tumor volume (TV) shrinkage and to assess quality of life (QoL) after SRS/SRT. Patients and methods: from 1999 to 2005, 35/74 patients were treated with SRS, and 39/74 with SRT. Median age was 60 years. Treatment was delivered by a linear accelerator. Median single dose was 13 Gy (SRS) or 54 Gy (SRT). Patients were followed up ≥ 12 months after SRS/SRT. LC and toxicity were evaluated by clinical examinations and magnetic resonance imaging. 3-D TV shrinkage was evaluated with the planning system. QoL was assessed using the questionnaire Short Form-36. Results: Median follow-up was 50/36 months (SRS/SRT). Actuarial 5-year freedom from progression/overall survival was 88.1%/100% (SRS), and 87.5%/87.2% (SRT). TV shrinkage was 15.1%/40.7% (SRS/SRT; p = 0.01). Single dose ( 0.05). Compared with the German normal population, patients had worse values for all domains except for mental health. Conclusion: TV shrinkage was significantly higher after SRT than after SRS. Main symptoms were not affected by SRS/SRT. Retrospectively, QoL was neither affected by SRS nor by SRT. (orig.)

  7. Pelvic re-irradiation using stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR): A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Louise Janet; Lilley, John; Hawkins, Maria A; Henry, Ann M; Dickinson, Peter; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2017-11-01

    To perform a systematic review regarding the use of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for the re-irradiation of recurrent malignant disease within the pelvis, to guide the clinical implementation of this technique. A systematic search strategy was adopted using the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases. 195 articles were identified, of which 17 were appropriate for inclusion. Studies were small and data largely retrospective. In total, 205 patients are reported to have received pelvic SABR re-irradiation. Dose and fractionation schedules and re-irradiated volumes are highly variable. Little information is provided regarding organ at risk constraints adopted in the re-irradiation setting. Treatment appears well-tolerated overall, with nine grade 3 and six grade 4 toxicities amongst thirteen re-irradiated patients. Local control at one year ranged from 51% to 100%. Symptomatic improvements were also noted. For previously irradiated patients with recurrent pelvic disease, SABR re-irradiation could be a feasible intervention for those who otherwise have limited options. Evidence to support this technique is limited but shows initial promise. Based on the available literature, suggestions for a more formal SABR re-irradiation pathway are proposed. Prospective studies and a multidisciplinary approach are required to optimise future treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy with linear accelerator for uveal melanoma - preliminary Vienna results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehetmayer, M.; Ruhswurm, I.; Georgopoulos, M.; Dieckmann, K.; Kren, G.; Poetter, R.; Kitz, K.

    1999-01-01

    Between June 1997 and February 1998, 21 patients suffering from uveal melanomas have been treated with a sterotactic 6 MeV LINAC (Saturne 43 trademark , General Electric, France) in conjunction with a stereotactic frame system (BrainLAB trademark , Germany). Immobilization of the eye was ensured with an optical fixation system which was proven reliable. During radiotherapy, movements of the irradiated eye were controlled on a monitor and documented by video recording. All patients co-operated very well with the optical fixation system. In 1164 measurements, the median value of horizontal deviation of the diseased eye during treatment was 0.3 mm (range: 0 to 1.3 mm). Median vertical deviation was 0.2 mm (range: 0 to 1.2 mm). For all patients, mean tumor prominence before treatment was 6.0±2.2 mm. In 20 patients, the total dose of 70 Gy (at 80%) was delivered in 5 fractions within 10 days. In one patient with a ciliary body tumor, the total dose of 70 Gy was divided into 7 fractions for better sparing of the anterior eye segment. Results: After a follow-up of at least 6 months, local tumor control was seen in all eyes. Mean tumor thickness reduction after 3, 6 and 9 months was 7%, 13% and 31%, respectively. Up to now, only mild subacute side-effects located in the anterior eye segment have been noticed. (orig.)

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Metastatic Lung Cancer as Oligo-Recurrence: An Analysis of 42 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Takahashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the outcome and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT in patients with oligo-recurrence cancer in the lung (ORCL. Methods and Materials. A retrospective review of 42 patients with ORCL who underwent SBRT in our two hospitals was conducted. We evaluated the outcome and adverse effects after SBRT for ORCL. Results. All patients finished their SBRT course without interruptions of toxicity reasons. The median follow-up period was 20 months (range, 1–90 months. The 2-year local control rate and overall survival were 87% (95% CI, 75–99% and 65% (95% CI, 48–82%. As for prognostic factor, the OS of patients with a short disease-free interval (DFI months, between the initial therapy and SBRT for ORCL, was significantly worse than the OS of long DFI months (. The most commonly observed late effect was radiation pneumonitis. One patient had grade 4 gastrointestinal toxicity (perforation of gastric tube. No other ≧ grade 3 acute and late adverse events occurred. There were no treatment-related deaths during this study. Conclusions. In patients with ORCL, radical treatment with SBRT is safe and provides a chance for long-term survival by offering favorable local control.

  10. Single Fraction Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastasis: Outcomes from 132 Consecutive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhidasan, S; Ball, D; Kron, T; Bressel, M; Shaw, M; Chu, J; Chander, S; Wheeler, G; Plumridge, N; Chesson, B; David, S; Siva, S

    2018-03-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is currently used to treat oligometastases, but the optimum dose/fractionation schedule is unknown. In this study, we evaluated outcomes after single fraction SABR in patients with oligometastatic disease. Single institutional retrospective review of patients treated with single fraction SABR for one to three oligometastases between 2010 and 2015. The primary outcome was freedom from widespread disease defined as distant recurrence not amenable to surgery or SABR; or recurrence with four or more metastases. In total, 186 treatments were delivered in 132 patients. The two most common target sites were lung (51%) and bone (40%). The most frequent single fraction prescription dose was 26 Gy (47%). The most common primary malignancy was genitourinary (n = 46 patients). Freedom from widespread disease was 75% at 1 year (95% confidence interval 67-83%) and 52% at 2 years (95% confidence interval 42-63%). Freedom from local progression at 1 year was 90% (95% confidence interval 85-95%) and at 2 years was 84% (95% confidence interval 77-91%). A compression fracture of the lumbar vertebra was the only grade 3+ treatment-related toxicity. Single fraction SABR is associated with a high rate of freedom from widespread disease, favourable local control and low toxicity comparable with historic multi-fraction SABR reports. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stereotactic radiotherapy of vestibular schwannoma. Hearing preservation, vestibular function, and local control following primary and salvage radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putz, Florian; Mueller, Jan; Wimmer, Caterina; Goerig, Nicole; Knippen, Stefan; Semrau, Sabine; Fietkau, Rainer; Lettmaier, Sebastian [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Iro, Heinrich; Grundtner, Philipp [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Eyuepoglu, Ilker; Roessler, Karl [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this publication is to present long-term data on functional outcomes and tumor control in a cohort of 107 patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (RT) for vestibular schwannoma. Included were 107 patients with vestibular schwannoma (primary or recurrent following resection) treated with stereotactic RT (either fractioned or single-dose radiosurgery) between October 2002 and December 2013. Local control and functional outcomes were determined. Analysis of hearing preservation was limited to a subgroup of patients with complete audiometric data collected before treatment and during follow-up. Vestibular function test (FVT) results could be analyzed in a subset of patients and were compared to patient-reported dizziness. After a mean follow-up of 46.3 months, actuarial local control for the whole cohort was 100% after 2, 97.6% after 5, and 94.1% after 10 years. In patients with primary RT, serviceable hearing was preserved in 72%. Predictors for preservation of serviceable hearing in multivariate analysis were time of follow-up (odds ratio, OR = 0.93 per month; p = 0.021) and pre-RT tumor size (Koos stage I-IIa vs. IIb-IV; OR = 0.15; p = 0.031). Worsening of FVT results was recorded in 17.6% (N = 3). Profound discrepancy of patient-reported dizziness and FVT results was observed after RT. In patients with primary RT, worsening of facial nerve function occurred in 1.7% (N = 1). Stereotactic RT of vestibular schwannoma provides good functional outcomes and high control rates. Dependence of hearing preservation on time of follow-up and initial tumor stage has to be considered. (orig.) [German] Praesentation von Langzeitdaten zu funktionellen Ergebnissen und Tumorkontrolle nach stereotaktischer Radiotherapie (RT) in einer Kohorte von 107 Patienten mit Akustikusneurinom. Zwischen Oktober 2002 und Dezember 2013 wurden 107 Patienten mit Akustikusneurinom (primaer oder rezidiviert nach vorangegangener Resektion) mittels stereotaktischer RT behandelt

  12. Planning benchmark study for SBRT of early stage NSCLC. Results of the DEGRO Working Group Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustakis, Christos; Blanck, Oliver; Ebrahimi Tazehmahalleh, Fatemeh; Chan, Mark ka heng; Ernst, Iris; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor; Krieger, Thomas; Duma, Marciana-Nona; Oechsner, Markus; Ganswindt, Ute; Heinz, Christian; Alheit, Horst; Blank, Hilbert; Nestle, Ursula; Wiehle, Rolf; Kornhuber, Christine; Ostheimer, Christian; Petersen, Cordula; Pollul, Gerhard; Baus, Wolfgang; Altenstein, Georg; Beckers, Eric; Jurianz, Katrin; Sterzing, Florian; Kretschmer, Matthias; Seegenschmiedt, Heinrich; Maass, Torsten; Droege, Stefan; Wolf, Ulrich; Schoeffler, Juergen; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning variability for early stage nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with respect to the published guidelines of the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). Planning computed tomography (CT) scan and the structure sets (planning target volume, PTV; organs at risk, OARs) of 3 patients with early stage NSCLC were sent to 22 radiotherapy departments with SBRT experience: each department was asked to prepare a treatment plan according to the DEGRO guidelines. The prescription dose was 3 fractions of 15 Gy to the 65% isodose. In all, 87 plans were generated: 36 used intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT), 21 used three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 6 used static field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (SF-IMRT), 9 used helical radiotherapy and 15 used robotic radiosurgery. PTV dose coverage and simultaneously kept OARs doses were within the clinical limits published in the DEGRO guidelines. However, mean PTV dose (mean 58.0 Gy, range 52.8-66.4 Gy) and dose conformity indices (mean 0.75, range 0.60-1.00) varied between institutions and techniques (p ≤ 0.02). OARs doses varied substantially between institutions, but appeared to be technique independent (p = 0.21). All studied treatment techniques are well suited for SBRT of early stage NSCLC according to the DEGRO guidelines. Homogenization of SBRT practice in Germany is possible through the guidelines; however, detailed treatment plan characteristics varied between techniques and institutions and further homogenization is warranted in future studies and recommendations. Optimized treatment planning should always follow the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle. (orig.) [de

  13. Development of a diamond dosimeter for measuring the absorbed dose in small beams used in stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsolat, F.

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a relatively recent technique used for the treatment of small benign and malignant tumors with small radiation beams. The clinical efficiency of this technique has been proved. However, the measurement of absolute and relative dose in small beams is not possible currently due to the lack of suited detectors for these measurements. In small beam dosimetry, the detector has to be as close as possible to tissue equivalence and exhibit a small detection volume due to the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. Characteristics of diamond (water equivalent material Z=6, high density) make it an ideal candidate to fulfil most of small beam dosimetry requirements. In this thesis, we developed a dosimeter prototype for small beams, based on CVD synthetic single crystal diamond. The diamond samples were characterized optically and their detection properties were investigated under X-rays and alpha-particles. First diamond dosimeter prototypes were tested with small beams produced by several stereotactic machines. Studies using Monte Carlo simulations were performed in order to optimize the parameters involved in the detector response in small beams. This leaded to a final diamond dosimeter prototype that respects all radiotherapy centers requirements, in both standard and small beams. (author) [fr

  14. Comparative analysis of thermoplastic masks versus vacuum cushions in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro-Martin, Arturo; Cacicedo, Jon; Leaman, Olwen; Sancho, Ismael; García, Elvira; Navarro, Valentin; Guedea, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    To compare thermoplastic masks (TMP) and vacuum cushion system (VCS) to assess differences in interfraction set up accuracy in patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) for oligometastatic lung cancer. Secondarily, to survey radiotherapy technologists to assess their satisfaction with the two systems. Retrospective study of patients treated with lung SBRT between 2008 to 2012 at our institution. Immobilization was performed for 73 treatment sessions (VCS = 40; TMP = 33). A total of 246 cone-beams were analysed. Patients considered ineligible for surgery with a life expectancy ≥6 months and performance status > 1 were included. Target lesion location was verified by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) prior to each session, with displacements assessed by CBCT simulation prior to each treatment session. Couch shifts were registered prospectively in vertical, longitudinal, and latero-lateral directions to obtain Kernel coordinates (3D representation). Technologists were surveyed to assess their satisfaction with indexing, positioning, and learning curve of the two systems. Setup displacements were obtained in all patients for each treatment plan and for each session. To assess differences between the immobilization systems, a t-test (Welch) was performed. Mean displacements for the TMP and VC systems, respectively, were as follows: session one, 0.64 cm vs 1.05 cm (p = 0.0002); session two, 0.49 cm vs 1.02 cm (p < 0.0001), and session three, 0.56 vs 0.97 cm (p = 0.0011). TMP resulted in significantly smaller shifts vs. VCS in all three treatment sessions. Technologists rated the learning curve, set up, and positioning more highly for TMP versus VCS. Due to the high doses and steep gradients in lung SBRT, accurate and reproducible inter-fraction set up is essential. We found that thermoplastic masks offers better reproducibility with significantly less interfractional set up displacement than vacuum cushions. Moreover, radiotherapy technologists rated

  15. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for recurrent head and neck cancer: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliga, Sujith; Kabarriti, Rafi; Ohri, Nitin; Haynes-Lewis, Hilda; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K

    2017-03-01

    The management of patients with recurrent head and neck cancers remains a challenging clinical dilemma. Concerns over toxicity with re-irradiation have limited its use in the clinical setting. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) has emerged as a highly conformal and precise type of radiotherapy and has the advantage of sparing normal tissue. Although SBRT is an attractive treatment modality, its use in the clinic is limited, given the technically challenging nature of the procedure. In this review, we attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of re-irradiation in patients with recurrent head and neck cancers, with particular attention to the advent of SBRT and its use with systemic therapies such as cetuximab. In the second portion of this review, we present our systematic review of published experiences with SBRT in recurrent head and neck cancers in an attempt to provide data on response rates (RR), overall survival and toxicity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 595-601, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Radiographic and metabolic response rates following image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin; Grills, Inga S.; Wong, Ching-Yee Oliver; Galerani, Ana Paula; Chao, Kenneth; Welsh, Robert; Chmielewski, Gary; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate radiographic and metabolic response after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early lung tumors. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine tumors were treated prospectively with SBRT (dose = 48-60 Gy, 4-5 Fx). Thirty-six cases were primary NSCLC (T1N0 = 67%; T2N0 = 25%); three cases were solitary metastases. Patients were followed using CT and PET at 6, 16, and 52 weeks post-SBRT, with CT follow-up thereafter. RECIST and EORTC criteria were used to evaluate CT and PET responses. Results: At median follow-up of 9 months (0.4-26), RECIST complete response (CR), partial response (PR), and stable disease (SD) rates were 3%, 43%, 54% at 6 weeks; 15%, 38%, 46% at 16 weeks; 27%, 64%, 9% at 52 weeks. Mean baseline tumor volume was reduced by 46%, 70%, 87%, and 96%, respectively at 6, 16, 52, and 72 weeks. Mean baseline maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) was 8.3 (1.1-20.3) and reduced to 3.4, 3.0, and 3.7 at 6, 16, and 52 weeks after SBRT. EORTC metabolic CR/PR, SD, and progressive disease rates were 67%, 22%, 11% at 6 weeks; 86%, 10%, 3% at 16 weeks; 95%, 5%, 0% at 52 weeks. Conclusions: SBRT yields excellent RECIST and EORTC based response. Metabolic response is rapid however radiographic response occurs even after 1-year post treatment.

  17. Quantitative assessment of inter-observer variability in target volume delineation on stereotactic radiotherapy treatment for pituitary adenoma and meningioma near optic tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Ogita, Mikio; Yamashita, Koichi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Shiomi, Hiroya; Tsubokura, Takuji; Kodani, Naohiro; Nishimura, Takuya; Aibe, Norihiro; Udono, Hiroki; Nishikata, Manabu; Baba, Yoshimi

    2011-01-01

    To assess inter-observer variability in delineating target volume and organs at risk in benign tumor adjacent to optic tract as a quality assurance exercise. We quantitatively analyzed 21 plans made by 11 clinicians in seven CyberKnife centers. The clinicians were provided with a raw data set (pituitary adenoma and meningioma) including clinical information, and were asked to delineate the lesions and create a treatment plan. Their contouring and plans (10 adenoma and 11 meningioma plans), were then compared. In addition, we estimated the influence of differences in contouring by superimposing the respective contours onto a default plan. The median planning target volume (PTV) and the ratio of the largest to the smallest contoured volume were 9.22 cm 3 (range, 7.17 - 14.3 cm 3 ) and 1.99 for pituitary adenoma, and 6.86 cm 3 (range 6.05 - 14.6 cm 3 ) and 2.41 for meningioma. PTV volume was 10.1 ± 1.74 cm 3 for group 1 with a margin of 1 -2 mm around the CTV (n = 3) and 9.28 ± 1.8 cm 3 (p = 0.51) for group 2 with no margin (n = 7) in pituitary adenoma. In meningioma, group 1 showed larger PTV volume (10.1 ± 3.26 cm 3 ) than group 2 (6.91 ± 0.7 cm 3 , p = 0.03). All submitted plan keep the irradiated dose to optic tract within the range of 50 Gy (equivalent total doses in 2 Gy fractionation). However, contours superimposed onto the dose distribution of the default plan indicated that an excessive dose 23.64 Gy (up to 268% of the default plan) in pituitary adenoma and 24.84 Gy (131% of the default plan) in meningioma to the optic nerve in the contours from different contouring. Quality assurance revealed inter-observer variability in contour delineation and their influences on planning for pituitary adenoma and meningioma near optic tract

  18. Treatment of Five or More Brain Metastases With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Grant K.; Suh, John H.; Reuther, Alwyn M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Barnett, Gene H.; Angelov, Lilyana; Weil, Robert J. [Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Neyman, Gennady [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chao, Samuel T., E-mail: chaos@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of patients with five or more brain metastases treated in a single session with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with brain metastases treated with SRS to five or more lesions in a single session were reviewed. Primary disease type, number of lesions, Karnofsky performance score (KPS) at SRS, and status of primary and systemic disease at SRS were included. Patients were treated using dosing as defined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 90-05, with adjustments for critical structures. We defined prior whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as WBRT completed >1 month before SRS and concurrent WBRT as WBRT completed within 1 month before or after SRS. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard regression were used to determine which patient and treatment factors predicted overall survival (OS). Results: The median OS after SRS was 7.5 months. The median KPS was 80 (range, 60-100). A KPS of {>=}80 significantly influenced OS (median OS, 4.8 months for KPS {<=}70 vs. 8.8 months for KPS {>=}80, p = 0.0097). The number of lesions treated did not significantly influence OS (median OS, 6.6 months for eight or fewer lesions vs. 9.9 months for more than eight, p = nonsignificant). Primary site histology did not significantly influence median OS. On multivariate Cox modeling, KPS and prior WBRT significantly predicted for OS. Whole-brain radiotherapy before SRS compared with concurrent WBRT significantly influenced survival, with a risk ratio of 0.423 (95% confidence interval 0.191-0.936, p = 0.0338). No significant differences were observed when no WBRT was compared with concurrent WBRT or when the no WBRT group was compared with prior WBRT. A KPS of {<=}70 predicted for poorer outcomes, with a risk ratio of 2.164 (95% confidence interval 1.157-4.049, p = 0.0157). Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery to five or more brain lesions is an effective treatment option for patients with

  19. Difficulties encountered and solutions found when implementing stereotactic radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assouline, A.; Halley, A.; Belghith, B.; Mazeron, J.J.; Feuvret, L.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the difficulties encountered when implementing stereotactic radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer (T1-T2, N0, M0) using a voluntary breath-hold technique. From 25/03/2010 to 22/02/2011, eight patients with a non-small cell lung cancer were selected for treatment. CT images were obtained with the patient maintaining breath-hold using a spirometer. Treatment was delivered when the patient maintains this level of breath-hold. Treatment was performed with a 4 MV and 10 MV photon beams from a linear accelerator Varian 2100CS, equipped with a 120 leaves collimator. 60 Gy or 48 Gy were delivered, in four sessions, to the 80% isodose. The planning target volume (PTV) was defined by adding a 5 mm margin to the internal target volume (ITV), the ITV corresponding to the gross tumour volume (GTV) plus a 3 mm margin. CTV is considered equal to GTV. The non-understanding of the gating technique, the great number of beams and the limited breath-hold times led to the failure of some treatments. It can be explained by some patients insufficient respiratory abilities and the low dose rate of one of the beams used for treatment, thus forcing some radiation fields to be delivered in two or three times. Implementing such a technique can be limited by the patients' physical abilities and the materials used. Some solutions were found: a training phase more intense with a coaching of the breath-hold technique more precise, or the use of an abdominal compression device. (authors)

  20. Dose variations caused by setup errors in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: A PRESAGE study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Kieyin; Gagliardi, Frank; Alqathami, Mamdooh; Ackerly, Trevor; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires tight margins around the tumor, thus producing a steep dose gradient between the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue. Any setup errors might become clinically significant. To date, no study has been performed to evaluate the dosimetric variations caused by setup errors with a 3-dimensional dosimeter, the PRESAGE. This research aimed to evaluate the potential effect that setup errors have on the dose distribution of intracranial SRT. Computed tomography (CT) simulation of a CIRS radiosurgery head phantom was performed with 1.25-mm slice thickness. An ideal treatment plan was generated using Brainlab iPlan. A PRESAGE was made for every treatment with and without errors. A prescan using the optical CT scanner was carried out. Before treatment, the phantom was imaged using Brainlab ExacTrac. Actual radiotherapy treatments with and without errors were carried out with the Novalis treatment machine. Postscan was performed with an optical CT scanner to analyze the dose irradiation. The dose variation between treatments with and without errors was determined using a 3-dimensional gamma analysis. Errors are clinically insignificant when the passing ratio of the gamma analysis is 95% and above. Errors were clinically significant when the setup errors exceeded a 0.7-mm translation and a 0.5° rotation. The results showed that a 3-mm translation shift in the superior-inferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions and 2° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 53.1%. Translational and rotational errors of 1.5 mm and 1°, respectively, generated a passing ratio of 62.2%. Translation shift of 0.7 mm in the directions of SI, RL, and AP and a 0.5° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 96.2%. Preventing the occurrences of setup errors in intracranial SRT treatment is extremely important as errors greater than 0.7 mm and 0.5° alter the dose distribution. The geometrical displacements affect dose delivery

  1. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for de novo spinal metastases: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Zain A; Sahgal, Arjun; De Salles, Antonio; Funaro, Melissa; Glover, Janis; Hayashi, Motohiro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Levivier, Marc; Ma, Lijun; Martínez-Alvarez, Roberto; Paddick, J Ian; Régis, Jean; Slotman, Ben J; Ryu, Samuel

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this systematic review was to provide an objective summary of the published literature pertaining to the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) specific to previously untreated spinal metastases. METHODS The authors performed a systematic review, using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, of the literature found in a search of Medline, PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library up to March 2015. The search strategy was limited to publications in the English language. RESULTS A total of 14 full-text articles were included in the analysis. All studies were retrospective except for 2 studies, which were prospective. A total of 1024 treated spinal lesions were analyzed. The median follow-up time ranged from 9 to 49 months. A range of dose-fractionation schemes was used, the most common of which were 16-24 Gy/1 fraction (fx), 24 Gy/2 fx, 24-27 Gy/3 fx, and 30-35 Gy/5 fx. In studies that reported crude results regarding in-field local tumor control, 346 (85%) of 407 lesions remained controlled. For studies that reported actuarial values, the weighted average revealed a 90% 1-year local control rate. Only 3 studies reported data on complete pain response, and the weighted average of these results yielded a complete pain response rate of 54%. The most common toxicity was new or progressing vertebral compression fracture, which was observed in 9.4% of cases; 2 cases (0.2%) of neurologic injury were reported. CONCLUSION There is a paucity of prospective data specific to SBRT in patients with spinal metastases not otherwise irradiated. This systematic review found that SBRT is associated with favorable rates of local control (approximately 90% at 1 year) and complete pain response (approximately 50%), and low rates of serious adverse events were found. Practice guidelines are summarized based on these data and International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society consensus.

  2. Long term results after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients with craniopharyngioma: maximal tumor control with minimal side effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrabi, Semi B; Adeberg, Sebastian; Welzel, Thomas; Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2014-01-01

    There are already numerous reports about high local control rates in patients with craniopharyngioma but there are only few studies with follow up times of more than 10 years. This study is an analysis of long term control, tumor response and side effects after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for patients with craniopharyngioma. 55 patients who were treated with FSRT for craniopharyngioma were analyzed. Median age was 37 years (range 6–70 years), among them eight children < 18 years. Radiotherapy (RT) was indicated for progressive disease after neurosurgical resection or postoperatively after repeated resection or partial resection. A median dose of 52.2 Gy (50 – 57.6 Gy) was applied with typical dose per fraction of 1.8 Gy five times per week. The regular follow up examinations comprised in addition to contrast enhanced MRI scans thorough physical examinations and clinical evaluation. During median follow up of 128 months (2 – 276 months) local control rate was 95.3% after 5 years, 92.1% after 10 years and 88.1% after 20 years. Overall survival after 10 years was 83.3% and after 20 years 67.8% whereby none of the deaths were directly attributed to craniopharyngioma. Overall treatment was tolerated well with almost no severe acute or chronic side effects. One patient developed complete anosmia, another one’s initially impaired vision deteriorated further. In 83.6% of the cases with radiological follow up a regression of irradiated tumor residues was monitored, in 7 cases complete response was achieved. 44 patients presented themselves initially with endocrinologic dysfunction none of them showed signs of further deterioration during follow up. No secondary malignancies were observed. Long term results for patients with craniopharyngioma after stereotactic radiotherapy are with respect to low treatment related side effects as well as to local control and overall survival excellent

  3. A Retrospective Review of CyberKnife Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Adrenal Tumors (Primary and Metastatic): Winthrop University Hospital Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Amishi; Rai, Hema; Haas, Jonathan; Witten, Matthew; Blacksburg, Seth; Schneider, Jeffrey G

    2015-01-01

    The adrenal gland is a common site of cancer metastasis. Surgery remains a mainstay of treatment for solitary adrenal metastasis. For patients who cannot undergo surgery, radiation is an alternative option. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an ablative treatment option allowing larger doses to be delivered over a shorter period of time. In this study, we report on our experience with the use of SBRT to treat adrenal metastases using CyberKnife technology. We retrospectively reviewed the Winthrop University radiation oncology data base to identify 14 patients for whom SBRT was administered to treat malignant adrenal disease. Of the factors examined, the biological equivalent dose (BED) of radiation delivered was found to be the most important predictor of local adrenal tumor control. We conclude that CyberKnife-based SBRT is a safe, non-invasive modality that has broadened the therapeutic options for the treatment of isolated adrenal metastases.

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as Primary Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer in the Elderly or Patients with Poor Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya eAmini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT is increasingly used to treat a variety of tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC in the recurrent setting. While there are published data for re-irradiation using SBRT for HNSCC, there are limited data supporting its use as upfront treatment for locally advanced disease.Study Design/Methods: Here we describe three patients who received SBRT as the primary treatment for their HNSCC along with a review of the current literature and discussion of future pathways.Results: The three cases discussed tolerated treatment well with manageable acute toxicities and had either a clinical or radiographic complete response to therapy.Conclusions: HNSCC presents a unique challenge in the elderly, where medical comorbidities make it difficult to tolerate conventional radiation, often given with a systemic sensitizer. For these individuals, providing a shortened course using SBRT may offer an effective alternative.

  5. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy boost for gynecologic tumors: An alternative to brachytherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molla, Meritxell; Escude, Lluis D.; Nouet, Philippe; Popowski, Youri D.Sc.; Hidalgo, Alberto; Rouzaud, Michel; Linero, Dolores; Miralbell, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: A brachytherapy (BT) boost to the vaginal vault is considered standard treatment for many endometrial or cervical cancers. We aimed to challenge this treatment standard by using stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a linac-based micromultileaf collimator technique. Methods and Materials: Since January 2002, 16 patients with either endometrial (9) or cervical (7) cancer have been treated with a final boost to the areas at higher risk for relapse. In 14 patients, the target volume included the vaginal vault, the upper vagina, the parametria, or (if not operated) the uterus (clinical target volume [CTV]). In 2 patients with local relapse, the CTV was the tumor in the vaginal stump. Margins of 6-10 mm were added to the CTV to define the planning target volume (PTV). Hypofractionated dynamic-arc or intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques were used. Postoperative treatment was delivered in 12 patients (2 x 7 Gy to the PTV with a 4-7-day interval between fractions). In the 4 nonoperated patients, a dose of 4 Gy/fraction in 5 fractions with 2 to 3 days' interval was delivered. Patients were immobilized in a customized vacuum body cast and optimally repositioned with an infrared-guided system developed for extracranial SRT. To further optimize daily repositioning and target immobilization, an inflated rectal balloon was used during each treatment fraction. In 10 patients, CT resimulation was performed before the last boost fraction to assess for repositioning reproducibility via CT-to-CT registration and to estimate PTV safety margins around the CTV. Finally, a comparative treatment planning study between BT and SRT was performed in 2 patients with an operated endometrial Stage I cancer. Results: No patient developed severe acute urinary or low-intestinal toxicity. No patient developed urinary late effects (>6 months). One patient with a vaginal relapse previously irradiated to the pelvic region presented with Grade 3 rectal bleeding 18 months after retreatment

  6. Stereotactic body radiotherapy of primary and metastatic renal lesions for patients with only one functioning kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svedman, Christer; Sandstroem, P.; Wersaell, Peter; Karlsson, Kristin; Rutkowska, Eva; Lax, Ingmar; Blomgren, H.

    2008-01-01

    Background. About 2% of patients with a carcinoma in one kidney develop either metastases or a new primary tumor in the contralateral kidney. Often, renal cancers progress rapidly at peripheral sites and a metastasis to the second kidney may not be the patient's main problem. However, when an initial renal cancer is more indolent yet spreads to the formerly unaffected kidney or a new primary tumor forms there, local treatment may be needed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been demonstrated as a valuable treatment option for tumors that cause local symptoms. Presented here is a retrospective analysis of patients in whom SBRT was used to control primary or metastatic renal disease. Patients and methods. Seven patients with a mean age of 64 (44-76) were treated for metastases from a malignant kidney to its contralateral counterpart. Dose/fractionation schedules varied between 10 Gyx3 and 10 Gyx4 depending on target location and size, given within one week. Follow-up times for patients who remained alive were 12, 52 and 66 months and for those who subsequently died were 10, 16, 49 and 70 months. Results. Local control, defined as radiologically stable disease or partial/complete response, was obtained in six of these seven patients and regained after retreatment in the one patient whose lesion progressed. Side effects were generally mild, and in five of the seven patients, kidney function remained unaffected after treatment. In two patients, the creatinine levels remained moderately elevated at approximately 160 μmol/L post treatment. At no time was dialysis required. Conclusion. These results indicate that SBRT is a valuable alternative to surgery and other options for patients with metastases from a cancer-bearing kidney to the remaining kidney and provides local tumor control with satisfactory kidney function

  7. Stereotactic radiotherapy of the prostate: fractionation and utilization in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiner, Josph P.; Schwartz, David; Shao, Meng; Osborn, Virginia; Schreiber, David [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Affairs New York Harbor Healthcare System, Brooklyn (United States); Choi, Kwang [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To analyze the utilization and fractionation of extreme hypofractionation via stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the treatment of prostate cancer. Data was analyzed on men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer between 2004–2012 and treated with definitive-intent radiation therapy, as captured in the National Cancer Database. This database is a hospital-based registry that collects an estimated 70% of all diagnosed malignancies in the United States. There were 299,186 patients identified, of which 4,962 (1.7%) were identified as receiving SBRT as primary treatment. Of those men, 2,082 had low risk disease (42.0%), 2,201 had intermediate risk disease (44.4%), and 679 had high risk disease (13.7%). The relative utilization of SBRT increased from 0.1% in 2004 to 4.0% in 2012. Initially SBRT was more commonly used in academic programs, though as time progressed there was a shift to favor an increased absolute number of men treated in the community setting. Delivery of five separate treatments was the most commonly utilized fractionation pattern, with 4,635 patients (91.3%) receiving this number of treatments. The most common dosing pattern was 725 cGy × 5 fractions (49.6%) followed by 700 cGy × 5 fractions (21.3%). Extreme hypofractionation via SBRT is slowly increasing acceptance. Currently 700-725 cGy × 5 fractions appears to be the most commonly employed scheme. As further long-term data regarding the safety and efficacy emerges, the relative utilization of this modality is expected to continue to increase.

  8. Early prediction of lung cancer recurrence after stereotactic radiotherapy using second order texture statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Palma, David A.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    Benign radiation-induced lung injury is a common finding following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer, and is often difficult to differentiate from a recurring tumour due to the ablative doses and highly conformal treatment with SABR. Current approaches to treatment response assessment have shown limited ability to predict recurrence within 6 months of treatment. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the accuracy of second order texture statistics for prediction of eventual recurrence based on computed tomography (CT) images acquired within 6 months of treatment, and compare with the performance of first order appearance and lesion size measures. Consolidative and ground-glass opacity (GGO) regions were manually delineated on post-SABR CT images. Automatic consolidation expansion was also investigated to act as a surrogate for GGO position. The top features for prediction of recurrence were all texture features within the GGO and included energy, entropy, correlation, inertia, and first order texture (standard deviation of density). These predicted recurrence with 2-fold cross validation (CV) accuracies of 70-77% at 2- 5 months post-SABR, with energy, entropy, and first order texture having leave-one-out CV accuracies greater than 80%. Our results also suggest that automatic expansion of the consolidation region could eliminate the need for manual delineation, and produced reproducible results when compared to manually delineated GGO. If validated on a larger data set, this could lead to a clinically useful computer-aided diagnosis system for prediction of recurrence within 6 months of SABR and allow for early salvage therapy for patients with recurrence.

  9. The Early Result of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High Risk Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei eLin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe rationale for hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer is based on the modern understanding of radiobiology and advances in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT techniques. Whole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk prostate cancer might escalate biologically effective dose without increasing toxicity. Here, we report our 4-year results of SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer.Methods and MaterialsFrom October 2009 to August 2012, 41 patients of newly diagnosed, high-risk or very high-risk (NCCN definition localized prostate cancer patients were treated with whole-pelvis irradiation and SBRT boost. The whole pelvis dose was 45Gy (25 fractions of 1.8Gy. The SBRT boost dose was 21 Gy (three fractions of 7 Gy. Ninety percent of these patients received hormone therapy. The toxicities of gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU tracts were scored by Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Effect (CTCAE v3.0. Biochemical failure was defined by Phoenix definition.ResultsMedian follow-up was 42 months. Mean PSA before treatment was 44.18 ng/ml. Mean PSA level at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months was 0.94, 0.44, 0.13, 0.12, and 0.05 ng/ml, respectively. The estimated 4-year biochemical failure-free survival was 91.9%. Three biochemical failures were observed. GI and GU tract toxicities were minimal. No grade 3 acute GU or GI toxicity was noted. During radiation therapy, 27% of the patient had grade 2 acute GU toxicity and 12% had grade 2 acute GI toxicity. At 3 months, most toxicity scores had returned to baseline. At the last follow up, there was no grade 3 late GU or GI toxicity.ConclusionsWhole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal toxicity and encouraging biochemical failure-free survival. Continued accrual and follow-up would be necessary to confirm the biochemical control rate and the toxicity profiles.

  10. Available evidence on re-irradiation with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy following high-dose previous thoracic radiotherapy for lung malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bari, Berardino; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Mazzola, Rosario; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Trovò, Marco; Livi, Lorenzo; Alongi, Filippo

    2015-06-01

    Patients affected with intra-thoracic recurrences of primary or secondary lung malignancies after a first course of definitive radiotherapy have limited therapeutic options, and they are often treated with a palliative intent. Re-irradiation with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) represents an appealing approach, due to the optimized dose distribution that allows for high-dose delivery with better sparing of organs at risk. This strategy has the goal of long-term control and even cure. Aim of this review is to report and discuss published data on re-irradiation with SABR in terms of efficacy and toxicity. Results indicate that thoracic re-irradiation may offer satisfactory disease control, however the data on outcome and toxicity are derived from low quality retrospective studies, and results should be cautiously interpreted. As SABR may be associated with serious toxicity, attention should be paid for an accurate patients' selection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stereotactic radiosurgery plus whole brain radiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone for patients with multiple brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondziolka, Douglas; Patel, Atul; Lunsford, L. Dade; Kassam, Amin; Flickinger, John C.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Multiple brain metastases are a common health problem, frequently diagnosed in patients with cancer. The prognosis, even after treatment with whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT), is poor with average expected survivals less than 6 months. Retrospective series of stereotactic radiosurgery have shown local control and survival benefits in case series of patients with solitary brain metastases. We hypothesized that radiosurgery plus WBRT would provide improved local brain tumor control over WBRT alone in patients with two to four brain metastases. Methods: Patients with two to four brain metastases (all ≤25 mm diameter and known primary tumor type) were randomized to initial brain tumor management with WBRT alone (30 Gy in 12 fractions) or WBRT plus radiosurgery. Extent of extracranial cancer, tumor diameters on MRI scan, and functional status were recorded before and after initial care. Results: The study was stopped at an interim evaluation at 60% accrual. Twenty-seven patients were randomized (14 to WBRT alone and 13 to WBRT plus radiosurgery). The groups were well matched to age, sex, tumor type, number of tumors, and extent of extracranial disease. The rate of local failure at 1 year was 100% after WBRT alone but only 8% in patients who had boost radiosurgery. The median time to local failure was 6 months after WBRT alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.5-8.5) in comparison to 36 months (95% CI, 15.6-57) after WBRT plus radiosurgery (p = 0.0005). The median time to any brain failure was improved in the radiosurgery group (p = 0.002). Tumor control did not depend on histology (p = 0.85), number of initial brain metastases (p = 0.25), or extent of extracranial disease (p = 0.26). Patients who received WBRT alone lived a median of 7.5 months, while those who received WBRT plus radiosurgery lived 11 months (p = 0.22). Survival did not depend on histology or number of tumors, but was related to extent of extracranial disease (p = 0.02). There was no

  12. Long-term outcome of moderate hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Draghini, Lorena; Casale, Michelina; Arcidiacono, Fabio; Anselmo, Paola; Trippa, Fabio; Giorgi, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate long-term results of moderate hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (hFSRT) for intracranial meningiomas. In all, 77 consecutive patients with 80 lesions were included. Median age was 65 years (range 23-82 years), male/female ratio was 21/56, and the median Karnofsky performance status was 90 (range 60-100). In 31 lesions (39 %), diagnosis was based upon clinical and radiological data; 37 lesions were histologically proven as World Health Organization (WHO) grade I and 12 grade II meningiomas. Median treatment volume was 23 cc. Prescribed doses were 45 Gy in 15 fractions of 3 Gy (15 x 3 Gy) or 42 Gy in 14 fractions of 3 Gy (14 x 3 Gy). After a median follow-up of 56 months, 49 (61 %) lesions received 14 x 3 Gy and 31 (39 %) 15 x 3 Gy. Local control (LC) rate remained unchanged at 84 % at 5 and 10 years. Overall survival and disease-specific survival (DSS) were 76 and 93 % at 5 years, 72 and 89 % at 10 years, respectively. With univariate analysis, previous surgery and WHO grade II tumor were negative prognostic factors for LC and DSS. With multivariate analysis only tumor grade was an independent prognostic factor for LC. No clinically significant acute and/or late toxicities were observed. Moderate hFSRT was effective and safe with an excellent tolerance profile. It can be an alternative treatment option for patients with recurrent or inoperable large meningiomas. The low number of fractions administered with hFSRT led to reduce treatment-related discomfort for patients. Grade II tumor and previous surgery were negative prognosis factors. (orig.) [de

  13. Measurement of the absorbed dose in the very small size photon beams used in stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derreumaux, S.; Huet, C.; Robbes, I.; Trompier, F.; Boisserie, G.; Brunet, G.; Buchheit, I.; Sarrazin, T.; Chea, M.

    2008-01-01

    After the radiotherapy accident in Toulouse, the French authority of nuclear safety and the French agency of health products safety have asked the IR.S.N. to establish, together with experts from the French society of medical physics and the French society of radiotherapy and oncology, a national protocol on dose calibration for the very small beams used in stereotactic radiotherapy. The research and reflexions of the working group 'GT minifaisceaux ' set up by the I.R.S.N. are presented in this final report. A review of the international literature has been performed. A national survey has been done to know the present practices in the dosimetry of small fields. A campaign of measurements of the data needed to characterize the small beams for the different stereotactic systems has started, using different types of detectors acquired by the I.R.S.N.. In this report are presented a deep synthesis on the problems related to the dosimetry of small fields, the results of the national survey, the first results of the campaign of measurements and the recommendations of the GT. (authors)

  14. Characteristics of Philips SL-20 linear accelerator used for stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, Harold; Ganesh, T.; Joshi, R.C.; Julka, P.K.; Rath, G.K.; Chander, Subhash; Pant, G.S.

    2002-01-01

    Commissioning of a stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) facility on a modified linear accelerator requires validation of mechanical parameters and establishment of parameters, such as tissue maximum ratio (TMR), relative output factors (OF), and off axis ratios (OAR). The mechanical and beam characteristics of Philips SL-20 linear accelerator modified for SRS/SRT were evaluated and presented. The SRS/SRT procedure carried on Philips SL-20 linear accelerator with Brown-Robert-Wells (BRW) and relocatable Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) head frames along with the Radionics planning system was evaluated. The tertiary collimator consists of the actual treatment cones and their sizes vary from 12.5 mm to 40 mm diameter. The alignment of the auxillary collimator axis with mechanical axes and stability of the isocenter of Philips SL-20 machine was evaluated using Iso-Align device and mechanical isocenter standard (MIS). All the mechanical errors of the linear accelerator were within 1 mm, except the stability of the isocenter while rotating the couch. Alignment of auxiliary collimator axis with the central axis, gantry and couch axes were achieved. The TMR, OF and OAR for 6 MV x-rays from Philips SL-20 linear accelerator for different cone sizes were deduced using a Multidata water phantom with 0.015 cc ion chamber. The difference between 50% width of profiles in two major axes (x and y) were within ± 0.4 mm. The cone dimensions were accurate up to 0.7 mm. The penumbra width for different cones varies from 3.1 mm to 3.5 mm. Dose linearity of the monitoring system was ≤ 1% above 5 MU. The mechanical and beam characteristics including dose linearity of the SL-20 machine are presented. The beam characteristics of this machine are comparable with the other modified linear accelerators for SRS/SRT. The shift of isocenter during rotation of couch can be nullified by fine adjusting laser target localizing frame to the laser position using micrometer screws

  15. The role of stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, Marco; Gioia, Lorenzo; Picozzi, Piero; Franzin, Alberto; Valle, Micol; Giovanelli, Massimo; Mortini, Pietro

    2008-07-01

    Single-session stereotactic radiotherapy (SR) may be a potential adjuvant treatment in acromegaly. We analyzed the safety and efficacy of SR in patients who had previously received maximal surgical debulking at our center. The study was a retrospective analysis of hormonal, radiological, and ophthalmologic data collected in a predefined protocol from 1994 through 2006. The study was performed at a university hospital. Eighty-three acromegalic patients, 52 women and 31 men, with a mean age of 42.6 +/- 1.2 yr, participated in the study. The median follow-up was 69 months (interquartile range 44-107 months). The patients were treated with SR for residual or recurrent GH-secreting adenoma. Normalization of age- and sex-adjusted IGF-I levels together with a basal GH level below 2.5 microg/liter without concomitant GH-suppressive drugs was the goal of therapy. Fifty patients (60.2%) reached the main outcome of the study. The rate of remission was 52.6% at 5 yr [95% confidence interval (CI) 40.6-64.6%]. Another 13 patients (15.7%), who were resistant to somatostatin analogs, were in remission after SR. Multivariate analysis showed that low basal GH and IGF-I levels were associated with a favorable outcome. No serious side effects occurred after SR. The 5-yr cumulative risk of new onset hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, or hypoadrenalism was 3.6% (95% CI 0-8.6%), 3.3% (95% CI 0-7.7%), and 4.9% (95% CI 0-10.4%), respectively. In a highly selected group of acromegalic patients, SR treatment had good efficacy and safety. This may lead to reconsider the role of SR in the therapeutic algorithm of acromegaly.

  16. Automatic real-time surveillance of eye position and gating for stereotactic radiotherapy of uveal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersch, Bernhard; Bogner, Joachim; Dieckmann, Karin; Poetter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar

    2004-01-01

    A new prototype (hardware and software) for monitoring eye movements using a noninvasive technique for gated linac-based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of uveal melanoma was developed. The prototype was tested within the scope of a study for 11 patients. Eye immobilization was achieved by having the patient fixate a light source integrated into the system. The system is used in conjunction with a Head and Neck mask system for immobilization, and uses infrared tracking technology for positioning (both BrainLAB AG Heimstetten/Germany). It was used during CT and MR image acquisition as well as during all of five treatment fractions (6 MeV, 5x12 Gy to 80% isodose) to guarantee identical patient setup and eye rotational state during treatment planning and treatment delivery. Maximum temporal and angular deviations tolerated during treatment delivery can be chosen by the physician, the radiation then being interrupted automatically and instantaneously if those criteria are being exceeded during irradiation. A graphical user interface displays life video images of the treated eye and information about the current and previous rotational deviation of the eye from its reference treatment position. The physician thus has online access to data directly linked to the success of the treatment and possible side effects. Mean angular deviations during CT/MR scans and treatment deliveries ranged from 1.61 deg. to 3.64 deg. (standard deviations 0.87 deg. to 2.09 deg.) which is in accordance with precision requirements for SRT. Typical situations when preset deviation criteria were exceeded are slow drifts (fatigue), sudden large eye movements (irritation), or if patients closed their eyes (fatigue). In these cases radiation was reliably interrupted by the gating system. In our clinical setup the novel system for computer-controlled eye movement gated treatments was well tolerated by all patients. The system yields quantitative real-time information about the eye's rotational state

  17. Adaptive fractionated stereotactic Gamma Knife radiotherapy of meningioma using integrated stereotactic cone-beam-CT and adaptive re-planning (a-gkFSRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stieler, F.; Wenz, F.; Abo-Madyan, Y.; Schweizer, B.; Polednik, M.; Herskind, C.; Giordano, F.A.; Mai, S. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) allows frameless stereotactic treatment using a combination of cone beam computer tomography (CBCT), a thermoplastic mask system, and an infrared-based high-definition motion management (HDMM) camera system for patient tracking during treatment. We report on the first patient with meningioma at the left petrous bone treated with adaptive fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (a-gkFSRT). The first patient treated with Gamma Knife Icon at our institute received MR imaging for preplanning before treatment. For each treatment fraction, a daily CBCT was performed to verify the actual scull/tumor position. The system automatically adapted the planned shot positions to the daily position and recalculated the dose distribution (online adaptive planning). During treatment, the HDMM system recorded the intrafractional patient motion. Furthermore, the required times were recorded to define a clinical treatment slot. Total treatment time was around 20 min. Patient positioning needed 0.8 min, CBCT positioning plus acquisition 1.65 min, CT data processing and adaptive planning 2.66 min, and treatment 15.6 min. The differences for the five daily CBCTs compared to the reference are for rotation: -0.59 ± 0.49 /0.18 ± 0.20 /0.05 ± 0.36 and for translation: 0.94 ± 0.52 mm/-0.08 ± 0.08 mm/-1.13 ± 0.89 mm. Over all fractions, an intrafractional movement of 0.13 ± 0.04 mm was observed. The Gamma Knife Icon allows combining the accuracy of the stereotactic Gamma Knife system with the flexibility of fractionated treatment with the mask system and CBCT. Furthermore, the Icon system introduces a new online patient tracking system to the clinical routine. The interfractional accuracy of patient positioning was controlled with a thermoplastic mask and CBCT. (orig.) [German] Das Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Schweden) ermoeglicht die stereotaktische Behandlung von Patienten mittels Cone-beam-Computertomographie (CBCT

  18. SU-E-J-187: Management of Optic Organ Motion in Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, M; Maurer, J [Cone Health Cancer Center, Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for optic nerve tumors can potentially use planning target volume (PTV) expansions as small as 1–5 mm. However, the motion of the intraorbital segment of the optic nerve has not been studied. Methods: A subject with a right optic nerve sheath meningioma underwent CT simulation in three fixed gaze positions: right, left, and fixed forward at a marker. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and the organs-at-risk (OAR) were contoured on all three scans. An IMRT plan using 10 static non-coplanar fields to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions was designed to treat the fixed-forward gazing GTV with a 1 mm PTV, then resulting coverage was evaluated for the GTV in the three positions. As an alternative, the composite structures were computed to generate the internal target volume (ITV), 1 mm expansion free-gazing PTV, and planning organat-risk volumes (PRVs) for free-gazing treatment. A comparable IMRT plan was created for the free-gazing PTV. Results: If the patient were treated using the fixed forward gaze plan looking straight, right, and left, the V100% for the GTV was 100.0%, 33.1%, and 0.1%, respectively. The volumes of the PTVs for fixed gaze and free-gazing plans were 0.79 and 2.21 cc, respectively, increasing the PTV by a factor of 2.6. The V100% for the fixed gaze and free-gazing plans were 0.85 cc and 2.8 cc, respectively increasing the treated volume by a factor of 3.3. Conclusion: Fixed gaze treatment appears to provide greater organ sparing than free-gazing. However unanticipated intrafraction right or left gaze can produce a geometric miss. Further study of optic nerve motion appears to be warranted in areas such as intrafraction optical confirmation of fixed gaze and optimized gaze directions to minimize lens and other normal organ dose in cranial radiotherapy.

  19. Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia after stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Satoru; Yamashita, Yasufumi; Nomoto, Yoshihito

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate characteristics of organizing pneumonia (OP) after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumor. Between September 2010 and June 2014, patients who were diagnosed as Stage I lung cancer and treated with SBRT at our institution were included in this study. A total of 78 patients (47 males with a median age of 80 years) were analyzed. The median follow-up period was 23 months. Five patients (6.4%) developed OP at 6–18 months after SBRT. The cumulative incidence of OP was 4.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–11.0) and 8.2% (95% CI, 2.9–17.0) at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Tumor location (superior and middle lobe vs inferior lobe) was shown to be a borderline significant factor for the occurrence of OP (P = 0.069). In the subgroup analysis of patients with a radiographic follow-up period at least 6 months, or who died within 6 months after SBRT, 7 of 72 patients (9.7%) developed Grade 2 or 3 radiation pneumonitis (G2/3 RP) at 2–4 months after SBRT. A statistically significant association between G2/3 RP in the subacute phase and OP was shown (P = 0.040). In two of the five patients who developed OP, the symptoms and radiographic change were improved rapidly by corticosteroid administration. One patient had relapsed OP after suspending the treatment and re-administration was required. Three patients with minor symptoms were managed without corticosteroid administration and OP resolved without any relapse. The radiation-induced OP should be considered as one of the late lung injuries after SBRT for lung tumors. (author)

  20. Outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy for unresectable primary or recurrent cholangiocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Da Hoon; Kim, Mi Sook; Cho, Chul Koo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Jang, Won Il; Seo, Young Seok; Park, Eun Kyung; Kim, Kum Bae; Han, Chul Ju; Kim, Sang Bum [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    To report the results of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for unresectable primary or recurrent cholangiocarcinoma. From January 2005 through August 2013, 58 patients with unresectable primary (n = 28) or recurrent (n = 30) cholangiocarcinoma treated by SBRT were retrospectively analyzed. The median prescribed dose was 45 Gy in 3 fractions (range, 15 to 60 Gy in 1-5 fractions). Patients were treated by SBRT only (n = 53) or EBRT + SBRT boost (n = 5). The median tumor volume was 40 mL (range, 5 to 1,287 mL). The median follow-up duration was 10 months (range, 1 to 97 months). The 1-year, 2-year overall survival rates, and median survival were 45%, 20%, and 10 months, respectively. The median survival for primary group and recurrent group were 5 and 13 months, respectively. Local control rate at 1-year and 2-year were 85% and 72%, respectively. Disease progression-free survival rates at 1-year and 2-year were 26% and 23%, respectively. In univariate analysis, ECOG performance score (0-1 vs. 2-3), treatment volume (<50 vs. > or =50 mL), and pre-SBRT CEA level (<5 vs. > or =5 ng/mL) were significant in overall survival rate. In multivariate analysis, ECOG score (p = 0.037) and tumor volume (p = 0.030) were statistically significant. In the recurrent tumor group, patients with >12 months interval from surgery to recurrence showed statistically significant higher overall survival rate than those with < or =12 months (p = 0.026). Six patients (10%) experienced > or =grade 3 complications. SBRT can be considered as an effective local modality for unresectable primary or recurrent cholangiocarcinoma.

  1. Multicenter results of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for non-resectable primary liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, Rafael A.; Rojas, Daniel; Sanabria, Juan R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. An excess of 100 000 individuals are diagnosed with primary liver tumors every year in USA but less than 20% of those patients are amenable to definitive surgical management due to advanced local disease or comorbidities. Local therapies to arrest tumor growth have limited response and have shown no improvement on patient survival. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as an alternative local ablative therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tumor response to SBRT in a combined multicenter database. Study design. Patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, n = 21) or intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC, n = 11) treated with SBRT from four Academic Medical Centers were entered into a common database. Statistical analyses were performed for freedom from local progression (FFLP) and patient survival. Results. The overall FFLP for advanced HCC was 63% at a median follow-up of 12.9 months. Median tumor volume decreased from 334.2 to 135 cm 3 (p < 0.004). The median time to local progression was 6.3 months. The 1- and 2-years overall survival rates were 87% and 55%, respectively. Patients with ICC had an overall FFLP of 55.5% at a median follow-up of 7.8 months. The median time to local progression was 4.2 months and the six-month and one-year overall survival rates were 75% and 45%, respectively. The incidence of grade 1-2 toxicities, mostly nausea and fatigue, was 39.5%. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were present in two and one patients, respectively. Conclusion. Higher rates of FFLP were achieved by SBRT in the treatment of primary liver malignancies with low toxicity

  2. An analysis of patient positioning during stereotactic lung radiotherapy performed without rigid external immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahele, Max; Verbakel, Wilko; Cuijpers, Johan; Slotman, Ben; Senan, Suresh

    2012-07-01

    Intra-fraction patient motion is incompletely understood and the optimum amount of support or immobilization during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is unclear. Rigid immobilization is often advocated, but motion still occurs. In contrast, we deliver the vast majority of SBRT using simple supporting devices, simultaneously emphasizing comfort, frequent position checks and progressive reduction in treatment times. We report spine stability during lung SBRT. Patients lie on a thin mattress with arms supported above their head and below-knee support. Stereoscopic spine X-rays before and after fraction delivery identified motion in three translational and three rotational directions. Images from 109 fractions in 30 patients resulted in 327 translational and 327 rotational pre- and post-fraction comparisons. Mean RapidArc® delivery time for variable fraction dose was 4.2 min (SD=1.4). 92% and 97% of translational and rotational differences were ≤1 mm and ≤1° in any direction and 98% of translational differences were ≤1.5mm. Mean vertical, longitudinal and lateral motion was 0mm (SD=0.4), 0mm (0.6) and 0mm (0.6). 84% and 94% of the 109 fractions were delivered with ≤1 and ≤1.5mm translation in all three directions and 93% with ≤1° of rotation. Two patients accounted for 10/17 fractions with >1mm translational motion. Based on pre and post-fraction X-ray imaging during fast lung SBRT, simple support devices can result in spine stability that is comparable to that reported with rigid external immobilization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. CT perfusion imaging in response assessment of pulmonary metastases undergoing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Brooke; Pun, Emma; Samuel, Michael; Tay, Huilee; Kron, Tomas; Bressel, Mathias; Ball, David; Siva, Shankar

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is an emerging treatment technique for pulmonary metastases in which conventional Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) may be inadequate. This study aims to assess the utility of CT perfusion imaging in response assessment of pulmonary metastases after SABR. In this ethics board-approved prospective study, 11 patients underwent a 26-Gy single fraction of SABR to pulmonary metastases. CT perfusion imaging occurred prior to and at 14 and 70 days post-SABR. Blood flow (mL/100 mL/min), blood volume (mL/100 mL), time to peak (seconds) and surface permeability (mL/100 mL/min), perfusion parameters of pulmonary metastases undergoing SABR, were independently assessed by two radiologists. Inter-observer variability was analysed. CT perfusion results were analysed for early response assessment comparing day 14 with baseline scans and for late response by comparing day 70 with baseline scans. The largest diameter of the pulmonary metastases undergoing SABR was recorded. Ten patients completed all three scans and one patient had baseline and early response assessment CT perfusion scans only. There was strong level of inter-observer agreement of CT perfusion interpretation with a median intraclass coefficient of 0.87 (range 0.20-0.98). Changes in all four perfusion parameters and tumour sizes were not statistically significant. CT perfusion imaging of pulmonary metastases is a highly reproducible imaging technique that may provide additional response assessment information above that of conventional RECIST, and it warrants further study in a larger cohort of patients undergoing SABR. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  4. Characteristics of a dedicated linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery-radiotherapy unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Downes, M. Beverly; Corn, Benjamin W.; Curran, Walter J.; Werner-Wasik, M.; Andrews, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) system on a dedicated Varian Clinac-600SR linear accelerator with Brown-Roberts-Wells and Gill-Thomas-Cosman relocatable frames along with the Radionics (RSA) planning system is evaluated. The Clinac-600SR has a single 6-MV beam with the same beam characteristics as that of the mother unit, the Clinac-600C. The primary collimator is a fixed cone projecting to a 10-cm diameter at isocenter. The secondary collimator is a heavily shielded cylindrical collimator attached to the face plate of the primary collimator. The tertiary collimation consists of the actual treatment cones. The cone sizes vary from 12.5 to 40.0 mm diameter. The mechanical stability of the entire system was verified. The variations in isocenter position with table, gantry, and collimator rotation were found to be <0.5 mm with a compounded accuracy of ≤ 1.0 mm. The radiation leakage under the cones was < 1% measured at a depth of 5 cm in a phantom. The beam profiles of all cones in the x and y directions were within ±0.5 mm and match with the physical size of the cone. The dosimetric data such as tissue maximum ratio, off-axis ratio, and cone factor were taken using film, diamond detector, and ion chambers. The mechanical and dosimetric characteristics including dose linearity of this unit are presented and found to be suitable for SRS/SRT. The difficulty in absolute dose measurement for small cone is discussed

  5. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in low- and intermediate-risk prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hun Jung; Phak, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Woo Chul [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) takes advantage of low α/β ratio of prostate cancer to deliver a large dose in few fractions. We examined clinical outcomes of SBRT using CyberKnife for the treatment of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. This study was based on a retrospective analysis of the 33 patients treated with SBRT using CyberKnife for localized prostate cancer (27.3% in low-risk and 72.7% in intermediate-risk). Total dose of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions of 7.25 Gy were administered. The acute and late toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response was monitored. Thirty-three patients with a median 51 months (range, 6 to 71 months) follow-up were analyzed. There was no biochemical failure. Median PSA nadir was 0.27 ng/mL at median 33 months and PSA bounce occurred in 30.3% (n = 10) of patients at median at median 10.5 months after SBRT. No grade 3 acute toxicity was noted. The 18.2% of the patients had acute grade 2 genitourinary (GU) toxicities and 21.2% had acute grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities. After follow-up of 2 months, most complications had returned to baseline. There was no grade 3 late GU and GI toxicity. Our experience with SBRT using CyberKnife in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer demonstrates favorable efficacy and toxicity. Further studies with more patients and longer follow-up duration are required.

  6. Radiosensitivity of Colon and Rectal Lung Oligometastasis Treated With Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinj, Rémy; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; François, Eric; Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Naghavi, Arash O; Leysalle, Axel; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Evesque, Ludovic; Padovani, Bernard; Ianessi, Antoine; Benezery, Karen; Doyen, Jérôme

    2017-09-01

    Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) may present with oligometastatic lung lesions for which stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) can be utilized. This study aims to report efficacy and prognostic factors associated with colorectal lung metastases treated with SABR. This is a retrospective study including patients who presented with lung oligometastasis from CRC treated with SABR from September 2007 to November 2014. We identified 53 oligometastatic patients with 87 lung lesions. The median prescription dose was 60 Gy in 3 fractions (median biological effective dose of 180 Gy). The median follow up was 33 months. The 1- and 2-year local control, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were 79.8% and 78.2%, 29.2% and 16.2%, and 83.8% and 69.3%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, rectal primary site (P = .001) and > 2 metastases (P = .02) were significantly associated with a lower local control rate. Rectal lesions were associated with higher radiation dose (169.3 Gy vs. 153.3 Gy; P = .01) and higher rate of KRAS mutations (73.3% vs. 40.4%; P = .02). KRAS mutation did not predict for local control, but predicted for a 1-year metastasis-free survival detriment (0% vs. 37.5%; P = .04), when compared with KRAS wild-type. On multivariate analysis, there is an overall survival detriment associated with gross tumor volume ≥ 3266 mm 3 (P = .03) and > 2 metastases (P = .04). In CRC, oligometastatic lung lesions treated with SABR had a worse outcome in patients presenting with a rectal primary, > 2 metastases, or treated with a larger gross tumor volume. More aggressive treatment may be considered in this subset of patients to improve outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung metastases as oligo-recurrence: a single institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Miura, Hiroyuki; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical outcomes following stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung metastases as oligo-recurrence. From May 2003 to June 2014, records for 66 patients with 76 oligo-recurrences in the lungs treated with SBRT were retrospectively reviewed. Oligo-recurrence primary sites and patient numbers were as follows: lungs, 31; colorectal, 13; head and neck, 10; esophagus, 3; uterus, 3; and others, 6. The median SBRT dose was 50 Gy (range, 45-60 Gy) administered in a median of 5 (range, 5-9) fractions. All patients received SBRT, with no acute toxicity. Surviving patients had a median follow-up time of 36.5 months. The 3-year rates of local control, overall survival and disease-free survival were 90.6%, 76.0% and 53.7%, respectively. Longer disease-free interval from initial treatment to SBRT, and non-colorectal cancer were both associated with favorable outcomes. Disease progression after SBRT occurred in 31 patients, most with distant metastases (n = 24) [among whom, 87.5% (n = 21) had new lung metastases]. Among these 21 patients, 12 were judged as having a second oligo-recurrence. Additional SBRT was performed for these 12 patients, and all 12 tumors were controlled without disease progression. Three patients (4.5%) developed Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis. No other late adverse events of Grade ≥2 were identified. Thus, SBRT for oligo-recurrence achieved acceptable tumor control, with additional SBRT also effective for selected patients with a second oligo-recurrence after primary SBRT. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  8. Texture analysis of automatic graph cuts segmentations for detection of lung cancer recurrence after stereotactic radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Palma, David A.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2015-03-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a treatment for early-stage lung cancer with local control rates comparable to surgery. After SABR, benign radiation induced lung injury (RILI) results in tumour-mimicking changes on computed tomography (CT) imaging. Distinguishing recurrence from RILI is a critical clinical decision determining the need for potentially life-saving salvage therapies whose high risks in this population dictate their use only for true recurrences. Current approaches do not reliably detect recurrence within a year post-SABR. We measured the detection accuracy of texture features within automatically determined regions of interest, with the only operator input being the single line segment measuring tumour diameter, normally taken during the clinical workflow. Our leave-one-out cross validation on images taken 2-5 months post-SABR showed robustness of the entropy measure, with classification error of 26% and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.77 using automatic segmentation; the results using manual segmentation were 24% and 0.75, respectively. AUCs for this feature increased to 0.82 and 0.93 at 8-14 months and 14-20 months post SABR, respectively, suggesting even better performance nearer to the date of clinical diagnosis of recurrence; thus this system could also be used to support and reinforce the physician's decision at that time. Based on our ongoing validation of this automatic approach on a larger sample, we aim to develop a computer-aided diagnosis system which will support the physician's decision to apply timely salvage therapies and prevent patients with RILI from undergoing invasive and risky procedures.

  9. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chapman, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rao, Aarti [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Shen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Quinlan-Davidson, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Filion, Edith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departement de Medecine, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Whyte, Richard I. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  10. CT perfusion imaging in response assessment of pulmonary metastases undergoing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, Brooke; Pun, Emma; Tay, Huilee; Kron, Tomas; Bressel, Mathias; Ball, David; Siva, Shankar; Samuel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is an emerging treatment technique for pulmonary metastases in which conventional Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) may be inadequate. This study aims to assess the utility of CT perfusion imaging in response assessment of pulmonary metastases after SABR. In this ethics board-approved prospective study, 11 patients underwent a 26-Gy single fraction of SABR to pulmonary metastases. CT perfusion imaging occurred prior to and at 14 and 70 days post-SABR. Blood flow (mL/100 mL/min), blood volume (mL/100 mL), time to peak (seconds) and surface permeability (mL/100 mL/min), perfusion parameters of pulmonary metastases undergoing SABR, were independently assessed by two radiologists. Inter-observer variability was analysed. CT perfusion results were analysed for early response assessment comparing day 14 with baseline scans and for late response by comparing day 70 with baseline scans. The largest diameter of the pulmonary metastases undergoing SABR was recorded. Ten patients completed all three scans and one patient had baseline and early response assessment CT perfusion scans only. There was strong level of inter-observer agreement of CT perfusion interpretation with a median intraclass coefficient of 0.87 (range 0.20–0.98). Changes in all four perfusion parameters and tumour sizes were not statistically significant. CT perfusion imaging of pulmonary metastases is a highly reproducible imaging technique that may provide additional response assessment information above that of conventional RECIST, and it warrants further study in a larger cohort of patients undergoing SABR.

  11. Definitive Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Extracranial Oligometastases: An International Survey of >1000 Radiation Oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Stephen L; Porceddu, Sandro; Nakamura, Naoki; Palma, David A; Lo, Simon S; Hoskin, Peter; Moghanaki, Drew; Chmura, Steven J; Salama, Joseph K

    2017-08-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is often used to treat patients with oligometastases (OM). Yet, patterns of SBRT practice for OM are unknown. Therefore, we surveyed radiation oncologists internationally, to understand how and when SBRT is used for OM. A 25-question survey was distributed to radiation oncologists. Respondents using SBRT for OM were asked how long they have been treating OM, number of patients treated, organs treated, primary reason for use, doses used, and future intentions. Respondents not using SBRT for OM were asked reasons why SBRT was not used and intentions for future adoption. Data were analyzed anonymously. We received 1007 surveys from 43 countries. Eighty-three percent began using SBRT after 2005 and greater than one third after 2010. Eighty-four percent cited perceived treatment response/durability as the primary reason for using SBRT in OM patients. Commonly treated organs were lung (90%), liver (75%), and spine (70%). SBRT dose/fractionation schemes varied widely. Most would offer a second course to new OM. Nearly all (99%) planned to continue and 66% planned to increase SBRT for OM. Of those not using SBRT, 59% plan to start soon. The most common reason for not using SBRT was lack of clinical efficacy (48%) or lack of necessary image guidance equipment (34%). Radiation oncologists are increasingly using SBRT for OM. The main reason for not using SBRT for OM is a perceived lack of evidence demonstrating clinical advantages. These data strengthen the need for robust prospective clinical trials (ongoing and in development) to demonstrate clinical efficacy given the widespread adoption of SBRT for OM.

  12. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18–25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume ≥12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED ≥100 Gy (total dose, 50–60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  13. Prescription dose and fractionation predict improved survival after stereotactic radiotherapy for brainstem metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeman Jonathan E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brainstem metastases represent an uncommon clinical presentation that is associated with a poor prognosis. Treatment options are limited given the unacceptable risks associated with surgical resection in this location. However, without local control, symptoms including progressive cranial nerve dysfunction are frequently observed. The objective of this study was to determine the outcomes associated with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiotherapy or radiosurgery (SRT/SRS of brainstem metastases. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 38 tumors in 36 patients treated with SRT/SRS between February 2003 and December 2011. Treatment was delivered with the Cyberknife™ or Trilogy™ radiosurgical systems. The median age of patients was 62 (range: 28–89. Primary pathologies included 14 lung, 7 breast, 4 colon and 11 others. Sixteen patients (44% had received whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT prior to SRT/SRS; ten had received prior SRT/SRS at a different site (28%. The median tumor volume was 0.94 cm3 (range: 0.01-4.2 with a median prescription dose of 17 Gy (range: 12–24 delivered in 1–5 fractions. Results Median follow-up for the cohort was 3.2 months (range: 0.4-20.6. Nineteen patients (52% had an MRI follow-up available for review. Of these, one patient experienced local failure corresponding to an actuarial 6-month local control of 93%. Fifteen of the patients with available follow-up imaging (79% experienced intracranial failure outside of the treatment volume. The median time to distant intracranial failure was 2.1 months. Six of the 15 patients with distant intracranial failure (40% had received previous WBRT. The actuarial overall survival rates at 6- and 12-months were 27% and 8%, respectively. Predictors of survival included Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA score, greater number of treatment fractions, and higher prescription dose. Three patients experienced acute treatment-related toxicity consisting of

  14. The dosimetric impact of implants on the spinal cord dose during stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazici, Gozde; Sari, Sezin Yuce; Yedekci, Fazli Yagiz; Yucekul, Altug; Birgi, Sumerya Duru; Demirkiran, Gokhan; Gultekin, Melis; Hurmuz, Pervin; Yazici, Muharrem; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Cengiz, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The effects of spinal implants on dose distribution have been studied for conformal treatment plans. However, the dosimetric impact of spinal implants in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatments has not been studied in spatial orientation. In this study we evaluated the effect of spinal implants placed in sawbone vertebra models implanted as in vivo instrumentations. Four different spinal implant reconstruction techniques were performed using the standard sawbone lumbar vertebrae model; 1. L2-L4 posterior instrumentation without anterior column reconstruction (PI); 2. L2-L4 anterior instrumentation, L3 corpectomy, and anterior column reconstruction with a titanium cage (AIAC); 3. L2-L4 posterior instrumentation, L3 corpectomy, and anterior column reconstruction with a titanium cage (PIAC); 4. L2-L4 anterior instrumentation, L3 corpectomy, and anterior column reconstruction with chest tubes filled with bone cement (AIABc). The target was defined as the spinous process and lamina of the lumbar (L) 3 vertebra. A thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD, LiF:Mg,Ti) was located on the measurement point anterior to the spinal cord. The prescription dose was 8 Gy and the treatment was administered in a single fraction using a CyberKnife® (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA). We performed two different treatment plans. In Plan A beam interaction with the rod was not limited. In plan B the rod was considered a structure of avoidance, and interaction between the rod and beam was prevented. TLD measurements were compared with the point dose calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). In plan A, the difference between TLD measurement and the dose calculated by the TPS was 1.7 %, 2.8 %, and 2.7 % for the sawbone with no implant, PI, and PIAC models, respectively. For the AIAC model the TLD dose was 13.8 % higher than the TPS dose; the difference was 18.6 % for the AIABc model. In plan B for the AIAC and AIABc models, TLD measurement was 2.5 % and 0.9 % higher than the

  15. Skull base meningiomas: Long-term results and patient self-reported outcome in 507 patients treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Adeberg, Sebastian; Dittmar, Jan-Oliver; Welzel, Thomas; Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcome of high-precision photon radiotherapy in 507 patients with skull base meningiomas. Methods and materials: At the time of radiation therapy, most patients presented with clinical symptoms including double vision, headache, nausea, trigeminal or facial nerve dysfunction or exophthalmus. In general tumors extended into several regions of the skull base. In 54%, prior neurosurgical intervention was performed, which was a partial resection or biopsy in 266 patients. Treatment was delivered using a 6 MV linear accelerator or the tomotherapy system. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) was applied in 376 patients (74%) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in 131 patients (26%). A median total dose of 57.6 Gy (range 25–68 Gy) was prescribed in median (range 1.6–5 Gy). To evaluate long-term toxicity as well as quality of life (QOL), we sent out a detailed questionnaire put together with special questions regarding the skull base location of the tumors. Special focus was long-term sequelae including visual deficits, cranial nerve deficits, headaches, fatigue or any other symptoms impairing overall QOL. The median follow-up time was 107 months (range 1–270 months). Results: Overall treatment was well tolerated. Local control for the whole cohort was 95% at 5 years and 88% at 10 years. Patients with benign histology had significant higher local control than high-grade meningiomas. For benign meningiomas, local control was 91% at 10 years. For high-risk meningiomas, local control was 81% at 5 years and 53% at 10 years. QOL was unchanged in 47.7% of the patients, and 37.5% showed improvement. Most patients reported an improvement of symptoms or steady state; in only few patients disorders worsened over time or side effects developed. Conclusion: Precision photon radiotherapy leads to long-term tumor control with minimal side effects, but also with preservation of QOL in patients with skull base meningiomas

  16. SHARP hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy is well tolerated in prostate cancer. Toxicity and quality of life assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinska, Monika; Kieszkowska-Grudny, Anna; Nawrocki, Sergiusz

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is one of the most significant issues in prostate cancer treatment decisions. This study aimed to investigate the toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) and QoL after treatment in localized prostate cancer patients. A prospective single-center clinical study was performed in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. Patients received 33.5 Gy in 5 fractions (SHARP regimen). Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to RTOG/EORTC score. Patients filled out EORTC QLQ-C30 and prostate cancer-specific QLQ-PR25 questionnaires. The analysis included 68 prostate cancer patients (55-83 years, median 73) with clinical stage T1c-T2cN0M0, median combined Gleason score of 6 (3-8), and median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 10 ng/mL (4-20 ng/mL). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy was given to 52 patients (76.5 %), and stopped in 31 patients (45.5 %) after 6 months; in 21 patients (31 %) after 2-3 years. Average and median follow-up was 24 months (18-45). Median nadir PSA level was 0.03 ng/mL for all patients and 0.6 ng/mL for patients without hormone treatment. No patients had PSA failure. There were no acute grade IV toxicities. One patient (1.5 %) developed grade III and 24 patients (35.3 %) grade II acute bladder toxicity. No one developed grade III and 7 patients (10.3 %) grade II acute rectal toxicity. No grade III or IV late gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities were reported. Grade II late urinary symptoms were observed in 8 patients (11.8 %) and gastrointestinal symptoms in 3 patients (4.4 %). Global health status/QoL was good and improved during the observational period. SBRT for prostate cancer patients is a well-tolerated treatment in terms of toxicity and QoL, has no negative impact on functioning and everyday life, with the important benefit of a short treatment period. However, long-term follow-up data are needed. (orig.) [de

  17. A multi-institutional study to assess adherence to lung stereotactic body radiotherapy planning goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woerner, Andrew; Roeske, John C.; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Campana, Maria; Surucu, Murat; Fan, John; Aydogan, Bulent; Koshy, Matthew; Laureckas, Robert; Vali, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A multi-institutional planning study was performed to evaluate the frequency that current guidelines established by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocols and other literature for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatments are followed. Methods: A total of 300 patients receiving lung SBRT treatments in four different institutions were retrospectively reviewed. The treatments were delivered using Linac based SBRT (160 patients) or image guided robotic radiosurgery (140). Most tumors were located peripherally (250/300). Median fractional doses and ranges were 18 Gy (8–20 Gy), 12 Gy (6–15 Gy), and 10 Gy (5–12 Gy) for three, four, and five fraction treatments, respectively. The following planning criteria derived from RTOG trials and the literature were used to evaluate the treatment plans: planning target volumes, PTV V 100 ≥ 95% and PTV V 95 ≥ 99%; conformality indices, CI 100% < 1.2 and CI 50% range of 2.9–5.9 dependent on PTV; total lung-ITV: V 20Gy < 10%, V 12.5Gy < 15%, and V 5Gy < 37%; contralateral lung V 5Gy < 26%; and maximum doses for spinal cord, esophagus, trachea/bronchus, and heart and great vessels. Populations were grouped by number of fractions, and dosimetric criteria satisfaction rates (CSRs) were reported. Results: Five fraction regimens were the most common lung SBRT fractionation (46%). The median PTV was 27.2 cm 3 (range: 3.8–419.5 cm 3 ). For all plans: mean PTV V 100 was 94.5% (±5.6%, planning CSR: 69.8%), mean PTV V 95 was 98.1% (±4.1%, CSR: 69.5%), mean CI 100% was 1.14 (±0.21, CSR: 79.1%, and 16.5% within minor deviation), and mean CI 50% was 5.63 (±2.8, CSR: 33.0%, and 28.0% within minor deviation). When comparing plans based on location, peripherally located tumors displayed higher PTV V 100 and PTV V 95 CSR (71.5% and 71.9%, respectively) than centrally located tumors (61.2% and 57.1%, respectively). Overall, the planning criteria were met for all the critical structure such as lung, heart

  18. SU-F-T-558: ArcCheck for Patient Specific QA in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramachandran, P [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); RMIT University, Bundoora (Australia); Tajaldeen, A; Esen, N; Geso, M [RMIT University, Bundoora (Australia); Taylor, D; Wanigaratne, D; Roozen, K; Kron, T [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) is one of the most preferred treatment techniques for early stage lung cancer. This technique has been extended to other treatment sites like Spine, Liver, Scapula, Sternum etc., This has resulted in increased physics QA time on machine. In this study, we’ve tested the feasibility of using ArcCheck as an alternative method to replace film dosimetry. Methods: Twelve patients with varied diagnosis of Lung, Liver, scapula, sternum and Spine undergoing SABR were selected for this study. Pre-treatment QA was performed for all the patients which include ionization chamber and film dosimetry. The required gamma criteria for each SABR plan to pass QA and proceed to treatment is 95% (3%,1mm). In addition to this routine process, the treatment plans were exported on to an ArcCheck phantom. The planned and measured dose from the ArcCheck device were compared using four different gamma criteria: 2%,2 mm, 3%,2 mm, 3%,1 mm and 3%, 3 mm. In addition to this, we’ve also introduced errors to gantry, collimator and couch angle to assess sensitivity of the ArcCheck with potential delivery errors. Results: The ArcCheck mean passing rates for all twelve cases were 76.1%±9.7% for gamma criteria 3%,1 mm, 89.5%±5.3% for 2%,2 mm, 92.6%±4.2% for 3%,2 mm, and 97.6%±2.4% for 3%,3 mm gamma criteria. When SABR spine cases are excluded, we observe ArcCheck passing rates higher than 95% for all the studied cases with 3%, 3mm, and ArcCheck results in acceptable agreement with the film gamma results. Conclusion: Our ArcCheck results at 3%, 3 mm were found to correlate well with our non-SABR spine routine patient specific QA results (3%,1 mm). We observed significant reduction in QA time on using ArcCheck for SABR QA. This study shows that ArcCheck could replace film dosimetry for all sites except SABR spine.

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of brain metastases; results from a single institution experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, D

    2013-09-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is frequently used for the treatment of brain metastases. This study provides a retrospective evaluation of patients with secondary lesions of the brain treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) at our institution.

  20. Adjuvant or radical fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with pituitary functional and nonfunctional macroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Damien C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SFRT for patients with pituitary macroadenoma (PMA. Methods and Materials Between March 2000 and March 2009, 27 patients (male to female ratio, 1.25 with PMA underwent SFRT (median dose, 50.4 Gy. Mean age of the patients was 56.5 years (range, 20.3 - 77.4. In all but one patient, SFRT was administered for salvage treatment after surgical resection (transphenoidal resection in 23, transphenoidal resection followed by craniotomy in 2 and multiple transphenoidal resections in another patient. In 10 (37% patients, the PMAs were functional (3 ACTH-secreting, 3 prolactinomas, 2 growth hormone-secreting and 2 multiple hormone-secretion. Three (11.1% and 9 (33.3% patients had PMA abutting and compressing the optic chiasm, respectively. Mean tumor volume was 2.9 ± 4.6 cm3. Eighteen (66.7% patients had hypopituitarism prior to SFRT. The mean follow-up period after SFRT was 72.4 ± 37.2 months. Results Tumor size decreased for 6 (22.2% patients and remained unchanged for 19 (70.4% other patients. Two (7.4% patients had tumor growth inside the prescribed treatment volume. The estimated 5-year tumor growth control was 95.5% after SFRT. Biochemical remission occurred in 3 (30% patients with functional PMA. Two patients with normal anterior pituitary function before SFRT developed new deficits 25 and 65 months after treatment. The 5-year survival without new anterior pituitary deficit was thus 95.8%. Five patients with visual field defect had improved visual function and 1 patient with no visual defect prior to SFRT, but an optic chiasm abutting tumor, had a decline in visual function. The estimated 5-year vision and pituitary function preservation rates were 93.2% and 95.8%, respectively. Conclusions SFRT is a safe and effective treatment for patients with PMA, although longer follow-up is needed to evaluate long-term outcomes. In this study, approximately 1

  1. Impact of Immobilization on Intrafraction Motion for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Winnie; Sahgal, Arjun; Foote, Matthew; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Jaffray, David A.; Letourneau, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) involves tight planning margins and steep dose gradients to the surrounding organs at risk (OAR). This study aimed to assess intrafraction motion using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for spine SBRT patients treated using three immobilization devices. Methods and Materials: Setup accuracy using CBCT was retrospectively analyzed for 102 treated spinal metastases in 84 patients. Thoracic and lumbar spine patients were immobilized with either an evacuated cushion (EC, n = 24) or a semirigid vacuum body fixation (BF, n = 60). For cases treated at cervical/upper thoracic (thoracic [T]1–T3) vertebrae, a thermoplastic S-frame (SF) mask (n = 18) was used. Patient setup was corrected by using bony anatomy image registration and couch translations only (no rotation corrections) with shifts confirmed on verification CBCTs. Repeat imaging was performed mid- and post-treatment. Patient translational and rotational positioning data were recorded to calculate means, standard deviations (SD), and corresponding margins ± 2 SD for residual setup errors and intrafraction motion. Results: A total of 355 localizations, 333 verifications, and 248 mid- and 280 post-treatment CBCTs were analyzed. Residual translations and rotations after couch corrections (verification scans) were similar for all immobilization systems, with SDs of 0.6 to 0.9 mm in any direction and 0.9° to 1.6°, respectively. Margins to encompass residual setup errors after couch corrections were within 2 mm. Including intrafraction motion, as measured on post-treatment CBCTs, SDs for total setup error in the left-right, cranial-caudal, and anterior-posterior directions were 1.3, 1.2, and 1.0 mm for EC; 0.9, 0.7, and 0.9 mm for BF; and 1.3, 0.9, and 1.1 mm for SF, respectively. The calculated margins required to encompass total setup error increased to 3 mm for EC and SF and remained within 2 mm for BF. Conclusion: Following image guidance, residual setup

  2. Commissioning and implementation of a stereotactic conformal radiotherapy technique using a general-purpose planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosleh-Shirazi, M Amin; Hansen, Vibeke N; Childs, Peter J; Warrington, Alan P; Saran, Frank H

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on commissioning and clinical implementation of a customized system for pediatric stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT). The system is based on the Pinnacle treatment-planning system and its interfaces with other equipment: (1) Beam models were optimized for our compact blocking system and a new LINAC. (2) Three CT-to-density conversion tables were evaluated, one using tabulated data for a commercial phantom, the second including additional points from the manufacturer's data for the inserts in an in-house phantom, and the third using measured densities for the in-house phantom materials combined with tabulated data for the commercial phantom. (3) Blocks were transferred to a computerized block cutter using in-house software that extracted the block shape from the export file and custom-fitted the additional necessary shapes. (4) In the absence of a DICOM RT Image link, a method based on screen data capture was used to export digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) to two portal imaging systems for treatment verification. Lens shielding by multileaf collimation in the anterior-posterior isocenter verification field was investigated. (1) Computed dose distributions using the beam models agreed with measurements well within published acceptability criteria. A difference of up to 1.0 mm was measured between the beam's eye views of aperture blocks and computed 50% isodose contours for a 2 x 2 x 2 mm dose calculation grid. (2) The third table, which included measured densities, improved the accuracy of the calculated isocenter dose by up to 0.5% in typical patient SCRT treatments and up to 1.0% in a phantom with 5-cm diameter inhomogeneity inserts. (3) The block export and customization process was shown to introduce no additional uncertainty. A 1-mm block production uncertainty was measured using film dosimetry on six blocks. (4) The DRR transfer method did not introduce uncertainty into the process. Verification field

  3. Phase II study on stereotactic body radiotherapy of colorectal metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Traberg Hansen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    ) in the treatment of inoperable patients with CRC-metastases. Sixty-four patients with a total number of 141 CRC-metastases in the liver (n = 44), lung (n = 12), lymph nodes (n = 3), suprarenal gland (n = 1) or two organs (n = 4) were treated with SBRT with a central dose of 15 Gy x 3 within 5-8 days. Median follow...... in high probability of local control and promising survival rate. One toxic death and few severe reactions were observed. For the majority of patients, the treatment related toxicity was moderate....

  4. Commissioning and implementation of a stereotactic conformal radiotherapy technique using a general‐purpose planning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosleh‐Shirazi, M. Amin; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Childs, Peter J.; Warrington, Alan P.; Saran, Frank H.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on commissioning and clinical implementation of a customized system for pediatric stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT). The system is based on the Pinnacle treatment‐planning system and its interfaces with other equipment: (1) Beam models were optimized for our compact blocking system and a new LINAC. (2) Three CT‐to‐density conversion tables were evaluated, one using tabulated data for a commercial phantom, the second including additional points from the manufacturer's data for the inserts in an in‐house phantom, and the third using measured densities for the in‐house phantom materials combined with tabulated data for the commercial phantom. (3) Blocks were transferred to a computerized block cutter using in‐house software that extracted the block shape from the export file and custom‐fitted the additional necessary shapes. (4) In the absence of a DICOM RT Image link, a method based on screen data capture was used to export digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) to two portal imaging systems for treatment verification. Lens shielding by multileaf collimation in the anterior‐posterior isocenter verification field was investigated. (1) Computed dose distributions using the beam models agreed with measurements well within published acceptability criteria. A difference of up to 1.0 mm was measured between the beam's eye views of aperture blocks and computed 50% isodose contours for a 2×2×2 mm dose calculation grid. (2) The third table, which included measured densities, improved the accuracy of the calculated isocenter dose by up to 0.5% in typical patient SCRT treatments and up to 1.0% in a phantom with 5‐cm diameter inhomogeneity inserts. (3) The block export and customization process was shown to introduce no additional uncertainty. A 1‐mm block production uncertainty was measured using film dosimetry on six blocks. (4) The DRR transfer method did not introduce uncertainty into the process

  5. Interfraction Liver Shape Variability and Impact on GTV Position During Liver Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Abdominal Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccles, Cynthia L.; Dawson, Laura A.; Moseley, Joanne L.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: For patients receiving liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), abdominal compression can reduce organ motion, and daily image guidance can reduce setup error. The reproducibility of liver shape under compression may impact treatment delivery accuracy. The purpose of this study was to measure the interfractional variability in liver shape under compression, after best-fit rigid liver-to-liver registration from kilovoltage (kV) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans to planning computed tomography (CT) scans and its impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) position. Methods and Materials: Evaluable patients were treated in a Research Ethics Board-approved SBRT six-fraction study with abdominal compression. Kilovoltage CBCT scans were acquired before treatment and reconstructed as respiratory sorted CBCT scans offline. Manual rigid liver-to-liver registrations were performed from exhale-phase CBCT scans to exhale planning CT scans. Each CBCT liver was contoured, exported, and compared with the planning CT scan for spatial differences, by use of in house-developed finite-element model-based deformable registration (MORFEUS). Results: We evaluated 83 CBCT scans from 16 patients with 30 GTVs. The mean volume of liver that deformed by greater than 3 mm was 21.7%. Excluding 1 outlier, the maximum volume that deformed by greater than 3 mm was 36.3% in a single patient. Over all patients, the absolute maximum deformations in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior directions were 10.5 mm (SD, 2.2), 12.9 mm (SD, 3.6), and 5.6 mm (SD, 2.7), respectively. The absolute mean predicted impact of liver volume displacements on GTV by use of center of mass displacements was 0.09 mm (SD, 0.13), 0.13 mm (SD, 0.18), and 0.08 mm (SD, 0.07) in the left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. Conclusions: Interfraction liver deformations in patients undergoing SBRT under abdominal compression after rigid liver

  6. Design and implementation of a system for treating paediatric patients with stereotactically-guided conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Elizabeth J.; Suter, Bridget L.; Warrington, Alan P.; Black, Peter; Saran, Frank; Brada, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Stereotactically-guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) allows the delivery of highly conformal dose distributions to localised brain tumours. This is of particular importance for children, whose often excellent long-term prognosis should be accompanied by low toxicity. The commercial immobilisation system in use at our hospital for adults was felt to be too heavy for children, and precluded the use of anaesthesia, which is sometimes required for paediatric patients. This paper therefore describes the design and implementation of a system for treating children with SCRT. This system needed to be well tolerated by patients, with good access for treating typical childhood malignancies. Materials and methods: A lightweight frame was developed for immobilisation, with a shell-based alternative for patients requiring general anaesthetic. Procedures were set up to introduce the patients to the frame system in order to maximise patient co-operation and comfort. Film measurements were made to assess the impact of the frame on transmission and surface dose. The reproducibility of the systems was assessed using electronic portal images. Results: Both frame and shell systems are in clinical use. The frame weighs 0.6 kg and is well tolerated. It has a transmission of 92-96%, and fields which pass through it deliver surface doses of 58-82% of the dose at d max , compared to 18% when no frame is present. However, the frame is constructed to maximise the availability of unobstructed beam directions. Reproducibility measurements for the frame showed a mean random error of 1.0±0.2 mm in two dimensions (2D) and 1.4±0.7 mm in 3D. The mean systematic error in 3D was 2.2 mm, and 90% of all overall 3D errors were less than 3.4 mm. For the shell system, the mean 2D random error was 1.5±0.2 mm. Conclusions: Two well-tolerated immobilisation devices have been developed for fractionated SCRT treatment of paediatric patients. A lightweight frame system gives a wide

  7. Maximum standardized uptake value from staging FDG-PET/CT does not predict treatment outcome for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Michael J; Stephans, Kevin L; Reddy, Chandana A; Djemil, Toufik; Srinivas, Shyam M; Videtic, Gregory M M

    2010-11-15

    To perform a retrospective review to determine whether maximum standardized uptake values (SUV(max)) from staging 2-deoxy-2- [(18)F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies are associated with outcomes for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Seventy-two medically inoperable patients were treated between October 17, 2003 and August 17, 2007 with SBRT for T1-2N0M0 NSCLC. SBRT was administered as 60 Gy in 3 fractions, 50 Gy in 5 fractions, or 50 Gy in 10 fractions using abdominal compression and image-guided SBRT. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to determine whether PET SUV(max) and other variables influenced outcomes: mediastinal failure (MF), distant metastases (DM), and overall survival (OS). Biopsy was feasible in 49 patients (68.1%). Forty-nine patients had T1N0 disease, and 23 had T2N0 disease. Median SUV(max) was 6.55 (range, 1.5-21). Median follow-up was 16.9 months (range, 0.1-37.9 months). There were 3 local failures, 8 MF, 19 DM, and 30 deaths. Two-year local control, MF, DM, and OS rates were 94.0%, 10.4%, 30.1%, and 61.3%, respectively. In univariate analysis, PET/CT SUV(max), defined either as a continuous or dichotomous variable, did not predict for MF, DM, or OS. On multivariable analysis, the only predictors for overall survival were T1 stage (hazard ratio = 0.331 [95% confidence interval, 0.156-0.701], p = 0.0039) and smoking pack-year history (hazard ratio = 1.015 [95% confidence interval, 1.004-1.026], p = 0.0084). Pretreatment PET SUV(max) did not predict for MF, DM, or OS in patients treated with SBRT for early-stage NSCLC. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Primary Lung Cancer and Other Targets: Results of Consultant Meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Wulf, Joern; Lax, Ingmar; Timmerman, Robert; Zimmermann, Frank; Stojkovski, Igor; Jeremic, Branislav

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and identify both advantages and disadvantages of its use in developing countries, a meeting composed of consultants of the International Atomic Energy Agency was held in Vienna in November 2006. Owing to continuous developments in the field, the meeting was extended by subsequent discussions and correspondence (2007-2010), which led to the summary presented here. The advantages and disadvantages of SBRT expected to be encountered in developing countries were identified. The definitions, typical treatment courses, and clinical results were presented. Thereafter, minimal methodology/technology requirements for SBRT were evaluated. Finally, characteristics of SBRT for developing countries were recommended. Patients for SBRT should be carefully selected, because single high-dose radiotherapy may cause serious complications in some serial organs at risk. Clinical experiences have been reported in some populations of lung cancer, lung oligometastases, liver cancer, pancreas cancer, and kidney cancer. Despite the disadvantages expected to be experienced in developing countries, SBRT using fewer fractions may be useful in selected patients with various extracranial cancers with favorable outcome and low toxicity.

  9. Dose-response of critical structures in the posterior eye segment to hypofractioned stereotactic photon radiotherapy of choroidal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunavoelgyi, Roman; Georg, Dietmar; Zehetmayer, Martin; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Pötter, Richard; Dörr, Wolfgang; Dieckmann, Karin

    2013-08-01

    To identify modifying factors and dose-/volume-response relationships for the retina and optic nerve related to highly conformal hypofractionated radiotherapy. Seventy-three patients undergoing hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy of choroidal melanoma were included in this retrospective study. The volumes of the optic nerve receiving doses of more than 7.5 or 12 Gy, respectively, were defined. Optic nerve circumference included in the 30%, 40%, 50%, or 80% isodose (ON%) and retina included in 30% or 40% were determined as quantal effects. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed for clinical variables as well as probit analysis to define EDx (doses where a positive response is expected in x% of the cases). Median follow-up was 90.0 (interquartile range 69.0-98.0) months. Fifty-two (71%) and 49 (67%) patients developed radiation retinopathy and optic neuropathy (any grade). Age, length of follow-up and diabetes were significant parameters regarding retinopathy. Optic neuropathy was significantly influenced by age, length of follow-up, and ON30. The probability of optic neuropathy (any grade and grade ≥ 2) significantly increases with the dose (p ranges from 0.0126 to 0.0211). Treatment planning should aim at minimizing encompassing isodoses particularly in the low dose region, without compromising PTV coverage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of target reproducibility on tumor dose in stereotactic radiotherapy of targets in the lung and liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulf, Joern; Haedinger, Ulrich; Oppitz, Ulrich; Thiele, Wibke; Flentje, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Previous analyses of target reproducibility in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy have revealed standard security margins for planning target volume (PTV) definition of 5 mm in axial and 5-10 mm in longitudinal direction. In this study the reproducibility of the clinical target volume (CTV) of lung and liver tumors within the PTV over the complete course of hypofractionated treatment is evaluated. The impact of target mobility on dose to the CTV is assessed by dose-volume histograms (DVH). Materials and methods: Twenty-two pulmonary and 21 hepatic targets were treated with three stereotactic fractions of 10 Gy to the PTV-enclosing 100%-isodose with normalization to 150% at the isocenter. A conformal dose distribution was related to the PTV, which was defined by margins of 5-10 mm added to the CTV. Prior to each fraction a computed tomography (CT)-simulation over the complete target volume was performed resulting in a total of 60 CT-simulations for lung and 58 CT-simulations for hepatic targets. The CTV from each CT-simulation was segmented and matched with the CT-study used for treatment planning. A DVH of the simulated CTV was calculated for each fraction. The target coverage (TC) of dose to the simulated CTV was defined as the proportion of the CTV receiving at least the reference dose (100%). Results: A decrease of TC to 3 . Conclusions: Target reproducibility was precise within the reference isodose in 91% of lung and 81% of liver tumors with a TC of the complete CTV ≥95% at each fraction of treatment. Pulmonary targets with increased breathing mobility and liver tumors >100 cm 3 are at risk for target deviation exceeding the standard security margins for PTV-definition at least for one fraction and require individual evaluation of sufficient margins

  11. Efficiency of Stereotactic Conformal Radiotherapy in Lung Metastases with Active Breathing Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Yu. Anikeeva, PhD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty four patients with lung metastases underwent radiosurgery treatment between October 2010 and December 2012. Stereotactic conformal high-dose radiation therapy with Active Breathing Control (ABC was conducted using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT technique. The median overall follow-up was 18 months (range 6-24 months, overall survival was 75%, and local control rate was 92%. The median time to progression was 4 months (range 1-18 months.There have been no cases of leucopenia, radiation esophagitis, mediastinitis or severe acute radiation pneumonitis. The late radiation effects Grade 2, according to the LENT SOMA scales, was observed in one patient (4%. The results of this study indicate that the usage of the stereotactic high-dose radiation therapy with ABC is safe and effective in the treatment of lung metastases.

  12. Development of dose audits for complex treatment techniques in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanic, A. M.; Molina, L.; Vallejos, M.; Montano, G.; Zaretzky, A.; Saravi, M.

    2014-08-01

    This work was performed in the frame of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) with IAEA whose objective was to extend the scope of activities carried out by national TLD-based networks from dosimetry audit for rectangular radiation fields to irregular and small fields relevant to modern radiotherapy. External audit is a crucial element in QA programmes for clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy, therefore a methodology and procedures were developed and were made available for dose measurement of complex radiotherapy parameters used for cancer treatment. There were three audit steps involved in this CRP: TLD based dosimetry for irregular MLC fields for conformal radiotherapy, dosimetry in the presence of heterogeneities and 2D MLC shaped fields relevant to stereotactic radiotherapy and applicable to dosimetry for IMRT. In addition, a new development of film-based 2D dosimetry for testing dose distributions in small field geometry was included. The plan for each audit step involved a pilot study and a trial audit run with a few local hospitals. The pilot study focused on conducting and evaluation of the audit procedures with all participants. The trial audit run was the running of the audit procedures by the participants to test them with a few local radiotherapy hospitals. This work intends to provide audits which are much nearer clinical practice than previous audits as they involve significant testing of Tps methods, as well as verifications to determinate whether hospitals can correctly calculate dose delivery in radiation treatments. (author)

  13. Dosimetric Study of Current Treatment Options for Radiotherapy in Retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldebawy, Eman [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Cancer Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Parker, William, E-mail: william.parker@mcgill.ca [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Abdel Rahman, Wamied [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Freeman, Carolyn R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the best treatment technique for patients with retinoblastoma requiring radiotherapy to the whole eye. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for 3 patients with retinoblastoma were developed using 10 radiotherapy techniques including electron beams, photon beam wedge pair (WP), photon beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), fixed gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), photon volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy (HT). Dose-volume analyses were carried out for each technique. Results: All techniques provided similar target coverage; conformity was highest for VMAT, nine-field (9F) IMRT, and HT (conformity index [CI] = 1.3) and lowest for the WP and two electron techniques (CI = 1.8). The electron techniques had the highest planning target volume dose gradient (131% of maximum dose received [D{sub max}]), and the CRT techniques had the lowest (103% D{sub max}) gradient. The volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20Gy}) for the ipsilateral bony orbit was lowest for the VMAT and HT techniques (56%) and highest for the CRT techniques (90%). Generally, the electron beam techniques were superior in terms of brain sparing and delivered approximately one-third of the integral dose of the photon techniques. Conclusions: Inverse planned image-guided radiotherapy delivered using HT or VMAT gives better conformity index, improved orbital bone and brain sparing, and a lower integral dose than other techniques.

  14. Development of dose audits for complex treatment techniques in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanic, A. M.; Molina, L.; Vallejos, M.; Montano, G.; Zaretzky, A.; Saravi, M., E-mail: stefanic@cae.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Regional de Referencia con Patrones Secundarios para Dosimetria - CNEA, Presbitero Juan Gonzalez y Aragon 15, B1802AYA Ezeiza (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    This work was performed in the frame of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) with IAEA whose objective was to extend the scope of activities carried out by national TLD-based networks from dosimetry audit for rectangular radiation fields to irregular and small fields relevant to modern radiotherapy. External audit is a crucial element in QA programmes for clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy, therefore a methodology and procedures were developed and were made available for dose measurement of complex radiotherapy parameters used for cancer treatment. There were three audit steps involved in this CRP: TLD based dosimetry for irregular MLC fields for conformal radiotherapy, dosimetry in the presence of heterogeneities and 2D MLC shaped fields relevant to stereotactic radiotherapy and applicable to dosimetry for IMRT. In addition, a new development of film-based 2D dosimetry for testing dose distributions in small field geometry was included. The plan for each audit step involved a pilot study and a trial audit run with a few local hospitals. The pilot study focused on conducting and evaluation of the audit procedures with all participants. The trial audit run was the running of the audit procedures by the participants to test them with a few local radiotherapy hospitals. This work intends to provide audits which are much nearer clinical practice than previous audits as they involve significant testing of Tps methods, as well as verifications to determinate whether hospitals can correctly calculate dose delivery in radiation treatments. (author)

  15. The use of stereotactic radiosurgical boost in the treatment of medulloblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Charles; Stea, Baldassarre; Lulu, Bruce; Hamilton, Allan; Cassady, J. Robert

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Starting in 1992, we began using a stereotactic radiosurgical (SRS) boost for the treatment of medulloblastomas. Four patients ranging in age from 7 to 42 years old have since been treated and are the subject of this retrospective study. Methods and Materials: All patients were initially treated with a maximally debulking surgery and external beam radiotherapy, which were then followed by a stereotactic radiosurgical boost using a modified 6 MeV linear accelerator. Radiosurgical boost doses ranged from 4.50 to 10.0 Gy. Target volumes ranged from 1.1 to 8.1 cc. The procedure was well tolerated with minimal acute toxicities. Results: All four patients are alive without evidence of recurrence (at 8 to 35 months). Acute nausea and vomiting was elicited during the radiosurgical procedure in the first patient treated. We have since begun premedicating patients with antiemetics or treating under general anesthesia. Late complications consisted of panhypopituitarism in one patient, which was thought to be attributable to the previous course of whole-brain radiotherapy. We have not observed any incidence of radionecrosis in this small cohort of patients. Conclusions: Our preliminary results with the use of radiosurgery for medulloblastomas are optimistic, and we would like to suggest the inclusion of a radiosurgery boost in future clinical trials for treatment of this disease

  16. IMRT with Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High Risk Malignant Salivary Gland Malignancies : A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana D Karam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with high risk salivary gland malignancies are at increased risk of local failure. We present our institutional experience with dose escalation using hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT in a subset of this rare disease. Over the course of 9 years, 10 patients presenting with skull base invasion, gross disease with one or more adverse features, or those treated with adjuvant radiation with three or more pathologic features were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy followed by hypofractionated SBRT boost. Patients presented with variable tumor histologies, and in all but one, the tumors were classified as poorly differentiated high grade. Four patients had gross disease, 3 had gross residual disease, 3 had skull base invasion, and 2 patients had rapidly recurrent disease (≤ 6 months that had been previously treated with surgical resection. The median Stereotactic Radiosurgery boost dose was 17.5 Gy (range 10-30 Gy given in a median of 5 fractions (range 3-6 fractions for a total median cumulative dose of 81.2 Gy (range 73.2-95.6 Gy. The majority of the patients received platinum based concurrent chemotherapy with their radiation. At a median follow-up of 32 months (range 12-120 for all patients and 43 months for surviving patients (range 12-120, actuarial 3-year locoregional control, distant control, progression free survival, and overall survival were 88%, 81%, 68%, and 79%, respectively. Only one patient failed locally and two failed distantly. Serious late toxicity included graft ulceration in 1 patient and osteoradionecrosis in another patient, both of which underwent surgical reconstruction. Six patients developed fibrosis. In a subset of patients with salivary gland malignancies with skull base invasion, gross disease, or those treated adjuvantly with three or more adverse pathologic features, hypofractionated SBRT boost to Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy yields good local control rates and

  17. SU-F-J-128: Dosimetric Impact of Esophagus Motion in Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J; Wang, X; Zhao, Z; Yang, J; Zhang, Y; Court, L; Li, J; Brown, P; Ghia, A [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Acute esophageal toxicity is a common side effect in spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The respiratory motion may alter esophageal position from the planning scan resulting in excessive esophageal dose. Here we assessed the dosimetric impact resulting from the esophageal motion using 4DCT. Methods: Nine patients treated to their thoracic spines in one fraction of 24 Gy were identified for this study. The original plan on a free breathing CT was copied to each phase image of a 4DCT scan, recalculated, scaled, and accumulated to the free breathing CT using deformable image registration. A segment of esophagus was contoured in the vicinity of treatment target. Esophagus dose volume histogram (DVH) was generated for both the original planned dose and the accumulated 4D dose for comparison. In parallel, we performed a chained deformable registration of 4DCT phase images to estimate the motion magnitude of the esophagus in a breathing cycle. We examined the correlation between the motion magnitude and the dosimetric deviation. Results: The esophageal motion mostly exhibited in the superior-inferior direction. The cross-sectional motion was small. Esophagus motion at T1 vertebra level (0.7 mm) is much smaller than that at T11 vertebra level (6.5 mm). The difference of Dmax between the original and 4D dose distributions ranged from 9.1 cGy (esophagus motion: 5.6 mm) to 231.1 cGy (esophagus motion: 3.1 mm). The difference of D(5cc) ranged from 5 cGy (esophagus motion: 3.1 mm) to 85 cGy (esophagus motion: 3.3 mm). There was no correlation between the dosimetric deviation and the motion magnitude. The V(11.9Gy)<5cc constraint was met for each patient when examining the DVH calculated from the 4D dose. Conclusion: Respiratory motion did not result in substantial dose increase to esophagus in spine SBRT. 4DCT simulation may not be necessary with regards to esophageal dose assessment.

  18. Small-field fractionated radiotherapy with or without stereotactic boost for vestibular schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagei, K.; Shirato, H.; Suzuki, K.; Isu, T.; Sawamura, Y.; Sakamoto, T.; Fukuda, S.; Nishioka, T.; Hashimoto, S.; Miyasaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of small-field fractionated radiotherapy with or without stereotactic boost (SB) for vestibular schwannomas.Methods and materials: Thirty-nine patients with vestibular schwannoma were treated with irradiation between March 1991 and February 1996. Extra-meatal tumor diameters were under 30 mm. Thirty-three patients received small-field fractionated radiotherapy followed by SB. Basic dose schedule was 44 Gy in 22 fractions over 5 1/2 weeks plus 4 Gy in one session. Six patients received small-field fractionated radiotherapy only (40-44 Gy in 20-22 fractions over 5-5 1/2 weeks or 36 Gy in 20 fractions over 5 weeks).< Results: Follow-up ranged from 6 to 69 months (median, 24 months). Tumors decreased in size in 13 cases (33%), were unchanged in 25 (64%), and increased in one (3%). The actuarial 2-year tumor control rate was 97%. Fifteen patients had useful hearing (Gardner-Robertson class 1-2) and 25 patients had testable hearing (class 1-4) before irradiation. The 2-year actuarial rates of useful hearing preservation (free of deterioration from class 1-2 to class 3-5) were 78%. The 2-year actuarial rates of any testable hearing preservation (free of deterioration from class 1-4 to class 5) were 96%. No permanent facial and trigeminal neuropathy developed after irradiation. The 2-year actuarial incidences of facial and trigeminal neuropathies were 8% and 16%, respectively.Conclusions: Small-field fractionated radiotherapy with or without SB provides excellent short-term local control and a relatively low incidence of complications for vestibular schwannoma, although further follow-up is necessary to evaluate the long-term results. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. SU-F-T-566: Absolute Film Dosimetry for Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Quality Assurance Using Gafchromic EBT3 Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, N; Lu, S; Qin, Y; Huang, Y; Zhao, B; Liu, C; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric uncertainty associated with Gafchromic (EBT3) films and establish an absolute dosimetry protocol for Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: EBT3 films were irradiated at each of seven different dose levels between 1 and 15 Gy with open fields, and standard deviations of dose maps were calculated at each color channel for evaluation. A scanner non-uniform response correction map was built by registering and comparing film doses to the reference diode array-based dose map delivered with the same doses. To determine the temporal dependence of EBT3 films, the average correction factors of different dose levels as a function of time were evaluated up to four days after irradiation. An integrated film dosimetry protocol was developed for dose calibration, calibration curve fitting, dose mapping, and profile/gamma analysis. Patient specific quality assurance (PSQA) was performed for 93 SRS/SBRT treatment plans. Results: The scanner response varied within 1% for the field sizes less than 5 × 5 cm{sup 2}, and up to 5% for the field sizes of 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}. The scanner correction method was able to remove visually evident, irregular detector responses found for larger field sizes. The dose response of the film changed rapidly (∼10%) in the first two hours and plateaued afterwards, ∼3% change between 2 and 24 hours. The mean uncertainties (mean of the standard deviations) were <0.5% over the dose range 1∼15Gy for all color channels for the OD response curves. The percentage of points passing the 3%/1mm gamma criteria based on absolute dose analysis, averaged over all tests, was 95.0 ± 4.2. Conclusion: We have developed an absolute film dose dosimetry protocol using EBT3 films. The overall uncertainty has been established to be approximately 1% for SRS and SBRT PSQA. The work was supported by a Research Scholar Grant, RSG-15-137-01-CCE from the American Cancer Society.

  20. Clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiotherapy of 54 Gy in nine fractions for patients with localized lung tumor using a custom-made immobilization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Abe, Yoshinao; Kondo, Hidehiro

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of 54 Gy in nine fractions for patients with localized lung tumor using a custom-made immobilization system. The subjects were 19 patients who had localized lung tumor (11 primaries, 8 metastases) between May 2003 and October 2005. Treatment was conducted on 19 lung tumors by fixed multiple noncoplanar conformal beams with a standard linear accelerator. The isocentric dose was 54 Gy in nine fractions. The median overall treatment time was 15 days (range 11-22 days). All patients were immobilized by a thermo-shell and a custom-made headrest during the treatment. The crude local tumor control rate was 95% during the follow-up of 9.4-39.5 (median 17.7) months. In-field recurrence was noted in only one patient at the last follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate at 2 years was 89.5%. Grade 1 radiation pneumonia and grade 1 radiation fibrosis were observed in 12 of the 19 patients. Treatment-related severe early and late complications were not observed in this series. The stereotactic body radiotherapy of 54 Gy in nine fractions achieved acceptable tumor control without any severe complications. The results suggest that SBRT can be one of the alternatives for patients with localized lung tumors. (author)

  1. Inter- and intrafractional movement of the tumour in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy of NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik R; Hansen, Olfred; Hjelm-Hansen, Mogens

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to determine the inter- and intra-fractional respiration induced tumour movements as well as setup accuracy in a stereotactic body frame for stereotactic treatments of NSCLC patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From August 2005 to March 2008, 26 patients with NSCLC....... These coordinate constitute the data of this study. RESULTS: The standard deviations of the respiration induced intra-fractional movements were: LR: 0.9 mm, AP: 1.6 mm and CC: 2.0 mm (1 SD). The inter-fractional movements were: LR: 1.1 mm, AP: 1.3 mm and CC: 1.7 mm (1 SD). Finally the set up accuracies in the body...... frame were LR: 1.5 mm, AP: 1.1 mm and CC: 1.7 mm (1 SD). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Consecutive CT scans can be used to evaluate the respiration induced tumour movement. For patients immobilized in a stereotactic body frame, large movements of the tumour are rarely seen within the lung...

  2. Is mask-based stereotactic head-and-neck fixation as precise as stereotactic head fixation for precision radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, Dietmar; Bogner, Joachim; Dieckmann, Karin; Poetter, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare setup accuracy and reproducibility of a stereotactic head and a head-and-neck fixation system, both based on thermoplastic material. Methods and Material: Ten patients were immobilized with a head and a head-and-neck fixation system (both BrainLAB, Germany). Both mask systems were modified with a custom-made mouthpiece and a strip of thermoplastic material attached to the lower part of the mask. During the first treatment session, after positioning patients using room lasers, two orthogonal portal images were taken as reference. Later on, at least five sets of orthogonal portal images were acquired for each patient. The isocentric setup accuracy was determined by comparing field edges and anatomic landmarks and the repositioning accuracy in the mask was obtained by comparing individual anatomic landmarks with respect to the metal balls, fixed on the masks. Systematic and random deviations and resulting three-dimensional (3D) vectors were calculated. Additionally, margins were derived from the systematic and random component of the isocentric setup accuracy. Finally, inter- and intraobserver variations were analyzed. Results: The systematic variation of the isocentric setup accuracy was very similar for the two mask systems, but the random variations were slightly larger for the head-and-neck system, resulting in a 0.4-mm larger 3D vector. The repositioning variations for the head mask were smaller compared with the head-and-neck mask, resulting in smaller 3D vectors for the random (∼0.4 mm) and systematic variations (∼0.6 mm). For both mask systems, a 2-mm margin can be used in lateral and anteroposterior direction, whereas in craniocaudal direction, this margin should be extended to 2.5 mm for the head mask and to 3 mm for the head-and-neck mask. The average absolute differences between two observers were within 0.5 mm, maximum deviations around 1 mm. Conclusion: Thermoplastic mask-based stereotactic head

  3. Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Uveal Melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazici, Gozde; Kiratli, Hayyam; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Sari, Sezin Yuce; Cengiz, Mustafa; Tarlan, Bercin; Mocan, Burce Ozgen; Zorlu, Faruk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results of stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRS/FSRT) for uveal melanoma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 181 patients with 182 uveal melanomas receiving SRS/FSRT between 2007 and 2013. Treatment was administered with CyberKnife. Results: According to Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study criteria, tumor size was small in 1%, medium in 49.5%, and large in 49.5% of the patients. Seventy-one tumors received <45 Gy, and 111 received ≥45 Gy. Median follow-up time was 24 months. Complete and partial response was observed in 8 and 104 eyes, respectively. The rate of 5-year overall survival was 98%, disease-free survival 57%, local recurrence-free survival 73%, distant metastasis-free survival 69%, and enucleation-free survival 73%. There was a significant correlation between tumor size and disease-free survival, SRS/FSRT dose and enucleation-free survival; and both were prognostic for local recurrence-free survival. Enucleation was performed in 41 eyes owing to progression in 26 and complications in 11. Conclusions: The radiation therapy dose is of great importance for local control and eye retention; the best treatment outcome was achieved using ≥45 Gy in 3 fractions.

  4. Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Uveal Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazici, Gozde [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Kiratli, Hayyam [Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Ozyigit, Gokhan; Sari, Sezin Yuce; Cengiz, Mustafa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Tarlan, Bercin [Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami, Florida (United States); Mocan, Burce Ozgen [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Zorlu, Faruk, E-mail: fzorlu@hacettepe.edu.tr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results of stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRS/FSRT) for uveal melanoma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 181 patients with 182 uveal melanomas receiving SRS/FSRT between 2007 and 2013. Treatment was administered with CyberKnife. Results: According to Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study criteria, tumor size was small in 1%, medium in 49.5%, and large in 49.5% of the patients. Seventy-one tumors received <45 Gy, and 111 received ≥45 Gy. Median follow-up time was 24 months. Complete and partial response was observed in 8 and 104 eyes, respectively. The rate of 5-year overall survival was 98%, disease-free survival 57%, local recurrence-free survival 73%, distant metastasis-free survival 69%, and enucleation-free survival 73%. There was a significant correlation between tumor size and disease-free survival, SRS/FSRT dose and enucleation-free survival; and both were prognostic for local recurrence-free survival. Enucleation was performed in 41 eyes owing to progression in 26 and complications in 11. Conclusions: The radiation therapy dose is of great importance for local control and eye retention; the best treatment outcome was achieved using ≥45 Gy in 3 fractions.

  5. Dose to the intracranial arteries in stereotactic and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, Carsten; Grosu, Anca L.; Stark, Sybille; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Busch, Raymonde; Kneschaurek, Peter; Molls, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine retrospectively the maximum dose to the large skull base/intracranial arteries in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), because of the potential risk of perfusion disturbances. Methods and Materials: Overall, 56 patients with tumors adjacent to at least one major artery were analyzed. Our strategy was to perform FSRT with these criteria: 1.8 Gy per fraction, planning target volume (PTV) enclosed by the 95% isodose, maximum dose 107%. Dose limits were applied to established organs at risk, but not the vessels. If FSRT planning failed to meet any of these criteria, IMRT was planned with the same objectives. Results: In 31 patients (median PTV, 23 cm 3 ), the FSRT plan fulfilled all criteria. No artery received a dose ≥105%. Twenty-five patients (median PTV, 39 cm 3 ) needed IMRT planning. In 11 of 25 patients (median PTV, 85 cm 3 ), no plan satisfying all our criteria could be calculated. Only in this group, moderately increased maximum vessel doses were observed (106-110%, n = 7, median PTV, 121 cm 3 ). The median PTV dose gradient was 29% (significantly different from the 14 patients with satisfactory IMRT plans). Three of the four patients in this group had paranasal sinus tumors. Conclusion: The doses to the major arteries should be calculated in IMRT planning for critical tumor locations if a dose gradient >13% within the PTV can not be avoided because the PTV is large or includes air cavities

  6. High symptom improvement and local tumor control using stereotactic radiotherapy when given early after diagnosis of meningioma. A multicentre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compter, I.; Houben, R.M.A.; Bosmans, G.; Baumert, B.G. [Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation-Oncology (MAASTRO); Zaugg, K.; Buescher, C. [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Clinic and Policlinic of Radiation-Oncology; Dings, J.T.A. [Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Anten, M.M.H.M.E. [Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurology

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: The goal of the present study was to analyze long-term results of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with a meningioma. Methods and materials: A total of 72 patients treated between 1996 and 2008 in MAASTRO clinic (n = 45) and University Hospital Zurich (n = 27) were included. SRT was given as primary treatment (n = 46), postoperatively (n = 19) or at recurrence (n = 7); 49 tumours (68%) were located in the skull base. Median total dose was 54 Gy. Results: Median follow-up was 4.13 years (range 0.66-11 years). The 3- and 5-year overall survival were 92 and 79% for grade 0 and I meningioma. Progression-free survival for grade 0 and I was 95% at 3 and 5 years, and 40% for grade II and III at 3 years. In 98.4% of patients, clinical symptoms were stable or improved. The majority of symptoms improved within 24 months after SRT. Local control is significantly better if patients are irradiated immediately after diagnosis compared to a watchful waiting policy (p = 0.017). Grade IV toxicity was low (4.2%, n = 3) Conclusion: SRT is an effective treatment with high local and clinical control. Early SRT resulted in better outcome than late treatment at progression. (orig.)

  7. Radiogenic Side Effects After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Photon Radiotherapy of Choroidal Melanoma in 212 Patients Treated Between 1997 and 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunavoelgyi, Roman [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dieckmann, Karin [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Gleiss, Andreas [Section of Clinical Biometrics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Sacu, Stefan; Kircher, Karl; Georgopoulos, Michael [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Georg, Dietmar [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Zehetmayer, Martin, E-mail: martin.zehetmayer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate side effects of hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy for patients with choroidal melanoma. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and twelve patients with choroidal melanoma unsuitable for ruthenium-106 brachytherapy or local resection were treated stereotactically at the Medical University of Vienna between 1997 and 2007 with a Linac with 6-MV photon beams in five fractions with 10, 12, or 14 Gy per fraction. Examinations for radiogenic side effects were performed at baseline and every 3 months in the first 2 years, then every 6 months until 5 years and then once a year thereafter until 10 years after radiotherapy. Adverse side effects were assessed using slit-lamp examination, funduscopy, gonioscopy, tonometry, and, if necessary, fundus photography and fluorescein angiography. Evaluations of incidence of side effects are based on an actuarial analysis. Results: One hundred and eighty-nine (89.2%) and 168 (79.2%) of the tumors were within 3 mm of the macula and the optic disc, respectively. The five most common radiotherapy side effects were retinopathy and optic neuropathy (114 cases and 107 cases, respectively), cataract development (87 cases), neovascular glaucoma (46 cases), and corneal epithelium defects (41 cases). In total, 33.6%, 38.5%, 51.2%, 75.5%, and 77.6% of the patients were free of any radiation retinopathy, optic neuropathy, cataract, neovascular glaucoma, or corneal epithelium defects 5 years after radiotherapy, respectively. Conclusion: In centrally located choroidal melanoma hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy shows a low to moderate rate of adverse long-term side effects comparable with those after proton beam radiotherapy. Future fractionation schemes should seek to further reduce adverse side effects rate while maintaining excellent local tumor control.

  8. Radiogenic Side Effects After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Photon Radiotherapy of Choroidal Melanoma in 212 Patients Treated Between 1997 and 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunavoelgyi, Roman; Dieckmann, Karin; Gleiss, Andreas; Sacu, Stefan; Kircher, Karl; Georgopoulos, Michael; Georg, Dietmar; Zehetmayer, Martin; Poetter, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate side effects of hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy for patients with choroidal melanoma. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and twelve patients with choroidal melanoma unsuitable for ruthenium-106 brachytherapy or local resection were treated stereotactically at the Medical University of Vienna between 1997 and 2007 with a Linac with 6-MV photon beams in five fractions with 10, 12, or 14 Gy per fraction. Examinations for radiogenic side effects were performed at baseline and every 3 months in the first 2 years, then every 6 months until 5 years and then once a year thereafter until 10 years after radiotherapy. Adverse side effects were assessed using slit-lamp examination, funduscopy, gonioscopy, tonometry, and, if necessary, fundus photography and fluorescein angiography. Evaluations of incidence of side effects are based on an actuarial analysis. Results: One hundred and eighty-nine (89.2%) and 168 (79.2%) of the tumors were within 3 mm of the macula and the optic disc, respectively. The five most common radiotherapy side effects were retinopathy and optic neuropathy (114 cases and 107 cases, respectively), cataract development (87 cases), neovascular glaucoma (46 cases), and corneal epithelium defects (41 cases). In total, 33.6%, 38.5%, 51.2%, 75.5%, and 77.6% of the patients were free of any radiation retinopathy, optic neuropathy, cataract, neovascular glaucoma, or corneal epithelium defects 5 years after radiotherapy, respectively. Conclusion: In centrally located choroidal melanoma hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy shows a low to moderate rate of adverse long-term side effects comparable with those after proton beam radiotherapy. Future fractionation schemes should seek to further reduce adverse side effects rate while maintaining excellent local tumor control.

  9. A multi-institutional study to assess adherence to lung stereotactic body radiotherapy planning goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woerner, Andrew; Roeske, John C.; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Campana, Maria; Surucu, Murat, E-mail: msurucu@lumc.edu [Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois 60153 (United States); Fan, John [Edward Cancer Center, Naperville, Illinois 60540 (United States); Aydogan, Bulent; Koshy, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States); Laureckas, Robert; Vali, Faisal [Advocate Christ Medical Center, Oak Lawn, Illinois 60453 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: A multi-institutional planning study was performed to evaluate the frequency that current guidelines established by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocols and other literature for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatments are followed. Methods: A total of 300 patients receiving lung SBRT treatments in four different institutions were retrospectively reviewed. The treatments were delivered using Linac based SBRT (160 patients) or image guided robotic radiosurgery (140). Most tumors were located peripherally (250/300). Median fractional doses and ranges were 18 Gy (8–20 Gy), 12 Gy (6–15 Gy), and 10 Gy (5–12 Gy) for three, four, and five fraction treatments, respectively. The following planning criteria derived from RTOG trials and the literature were used to evaluate the treatment plans: planning target volumes, PTV{sub V} {sub 100} ≥ 95% and PTV{sub V} {sub 95} ≥ 99%; conformality indices, CI{sub 100%} < 1.2 and CI{sub 50%} range of 2.9–5.9 dependent on PTV; total lung-ITV: V{sub 20Gy} < 10%, V{sub 12.5Gy} < 15%, and V{sub 5Gy} < 37%; contralateral lung V{sub 5Gy} < 26%; and maximum doses for spinal cord, esophagus, trachea/bronchus, and heart and great vessels. Populations were grouped by number of fractions, and dosimetric criteria satisfaction rates (CSRs) were reported. Results: Five fraction regimens were the most common lung SBRT fractionation (46%). The median PTV was 27.2 cm{sup 3} (range: 3.8–419.5 cm{sup 3}). For all plans: mean PTV{sub V} {sub 100} was 94.5% (±5.6%, planning CSR: 69.8%), mean PTV{sub V} {sub 95} was 98.1% (±4.1%, CSR: 69.5%), mean CI{sub 100%} was 1.14 (±0.21, CSR: 79.1%, and 16.5% within minor deviation), and mean CI{sub 50%} was 5.63 (±2.8, CSR: 33.0%, and 28.0% within minor deviation). When comparing plans based on location, peripherally located tumors displayed higher PTV{sub V} {sub 100} and PTV{sub V} {sub 95} CSR (71.5% and 71.9%, respectively) than centrally located tumors (61

  10. Planning benchmark study for SBRT of early stage NSCLC. Results of the DEGRO Working Group Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moustakis, Christos [University Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); German CyberKnife Center, Soest (Germany); Blanck, Oliver [UKSH Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kiel (Germany); Saphir Radiosurgery Center, Guestrow and Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Ebrahimi Tazehmahalleh, Fatemeh [University Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); City Hospital Dessau, Dessau (Germany); Chan, Mark ka heng [UKSH Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kiel (Germany); Ernst, Iris; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); German CyberKnife Center, Soest (Germany); Krieger, Thomas [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Duma, Marciana-Nona; Oechsner, Markus [Technical University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Ganswindt, Ute; Heinz, Christian [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Alheit, Horst; Blank, Hilbert [Radiationtherapy Distler, Bautzen (Germany); Nestle, Ursula; Wiehle, Rolf [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Kornhuber, Christine; Ostheimer, Christian [University Halle, Department of Radiation Oncology, Halle (Germany); Petersen, Cordula [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Pollul, Gerhard [University Mainz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mainz (Germany); Baus, Wolfgang; Altenstein, Georg [University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Beckers, Eric; Jurianz, Katrin [Gamma Knife Center Krefeld, Krefeld (Germany); Sterzing, Florian [University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Kretschmer, Matthias [Radiologische Allianz Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, Heinrich; Maass, Torsten [Radiationtherapy and Cyberknife Center Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Droege, Stefan [Lung Clinic Hemer, Hemer (Germany); Wolf, Ulrich [University Leipzig, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leipzig (Germany); Schoeffler, Juergen [Radiationtherapy Department Boeblingen, Boeblingen (Germany); Guckenberger, Matthias [University Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-10-15

    The aim was to evaluate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning variability for early stage nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with respect to the published guidelines of the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). Planning computed tomography (CT) scan and the structure sets (planning target volume, PTV; organs at risk, OARs) of 3 patients with early stage NSCLC were sent to 22 radiotherapy departments with SBRT experience: each department was asked to prepare a treatment plan according to the DEGRO guidelines. The prescription dose was 3 fractions of 15 Gy to the 65% isodose. In all, 87 plans were generated: 36 used intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT), 21 used three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 6 used static field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (SF-IMRT), 9 used helical radiotherapy and 15 used robotic radiosurgery. PTV dose coverage and simultaneously kept OARs doses were within the clinical limits published in the DEGRO guidelines. However, mean PTV dose (mean 58.0 Gy, range 52.8-66.4 Gy) and dose conformity indices (mean 0.75, range 0.60-1.00) varied between institutions and techniques (p ≤ 0.02). OARs doses varied substantially between institutions, but appeared to be technique independent (p = 0.21). All studied treatment techniques are well suited for SBRT of early stage NSCLC according to the DEGRO guidelines. Homogenization of SBRT practice in Germany is possible through the guidelines; however, detailed treatment plan characteristics varied between techniques and institutions and further homogenization is warranted in future studies and recommendations. Optimized treatment planning should always follow the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle. (orig.) [German] Ziel war die Untersuchung der Variabilitaet der Bestrahlungsplanung der stereotaktischen Strahlentherapie (SBRT) fuer das nicht-kleinzellige Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) im

  11. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic boost with concurrent and adjuvant temozolamide for glioblastoma in good performance status elderly patients – early results of a phase II trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eFloyd

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM is an aggressive primary brain neoplasm with dismal prognosis. Based on successful phase III trials, 60 Gy involved-field radiotherapy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks (Standard RT with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide is currently the standard of care. In this disease, age and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS are the most important prognostic factors. For elderly patients, clinical trials comparing standard RT with radiotherapy abbreviated to 40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks demonstrated similar outcomes, indicating shortened radiotherapy may be an appropriate option for elderly patients. However, these trials did not include temozolomide chemotherapy, and included patients with poor KPS, possibly obscuring benefits of more aggressive treatment for some elderly patients. We conducted a prospective Phase II trial to examine the efficacy of a hypofractionated radiation course followed by a stereotactic boost with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy in elderly patients with good performance status. In this study, patients 65 years and older with a KPS >70 and histologically confirmed GBM received 40 Gy in 15 fractions with 3D conformal technique followed by a 1-3 fraction stereotactic boost to the enhancing tumor. All patients also received concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide. Patients were evaluated 1 month post-treatment and every 2 months thereafter. Between 2007 and 2010, 20 patients (9 males and 11 females were enrolled in this study. The median age was 75.4 years (range 65-87 years. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range 7-32 months, 12 patients progressed and 5 are alive. The median progression free survival was 11 months and the median overall survival was 13 months. There was no additional toxicity. These results indicate that elderly patients with good KPS can achieve outcomes comparable to the current standard of care using an abbreviated radiotherapy course, radiosurgery boost and

  12. EPID-based in vivo dosimetry for stereotactic body radiotherapy of non-small cell lung tumors: Initial clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consorti, R; Fidanzio, A; Brainovich, V; Mangiacotti, F; De Spirito, M; Mirri, M A; Petrucci, A

    2017-10-01

    EPID-based in vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been implemented for stereotactic body radiotherapy treatments of non-small cell lung cancer to check both isocenter dose and the treatment reproducibility comparing EPID portal images. 15 patients with lung tumors of small dimensions and treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy were enrolled for this initial experience. IVD tests supplied ratios R between in vivo reconstructed and planned isocenter doses. Moreover a γ-like analysis between daily EPID portal images and a reference one, in terms of percentage of points with γ-value smaller than 1, P γlevels of 5% for R ratio, P γlevel, and an average P γ90%. Paradigmatic discrepancies were observed in three patients: a set-up error and a patient morphological change were identified thanks to CBCT image analysis whereas the third discrepancy was not fully justified. This procedure can provide improved patient safety as well as a first step to integrate IVD and CBCT dose recalculation. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Survey of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Japan by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Narita, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Onishi, Hiroshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To recognize the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in Japan, using a nationwide survey conducted by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group. Methods and Materials: The questionnaire was sent by mail to 117 institutions. Ninety-four institutions (80%) responded by the end of November 2005. Fifty-three institutions indicated that they have already started SBRT, and 38 institutions had been reimbursed by insurance. Results: A total of 1111 patients with histologically confirmed lung cancer were treated. Among these patients, 637 had T1N0M0 and 272 had T2N0M0 lung cancer. Metastatic lung cancer was found in 702 and histologically unconfirmed lung tumor in 291 patients. Primary liver cancer was found in 207 and metastatic liver cancer in 76 patients. The most frequent schedule used for primary lung cancer was 48Gy in 4 fractions at 22 institutions (52%), followed by 50Gy in 5 fractions at 11 institutions (26%) and 60Gy in 8 fractions at 4 institutions (10%). The tendency was the same for metastatic lung cancer. The average number of personnel involved in SBRT was 1.8 radiation oncologists, including 1.1 certified radiation oncologists, 2.8 technologists, 0.7 nurses, and 0.6 certified quality assurance personnel and 0.3 physicists. The most frequent amount of time for treatment planning was 61-120min, for quality assurance was 50-60min, and for treatment was 30min. There were 14 (0.6% of all cases) reported Grade 5 complications: 11 cases of radiation pneumonitis, 2 cases of hemoptysis, and 1 case of radiation esophagitis. Conclusion: The current status of SBRT in Japan was surveyed.

  14. Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer: setup reproducibility with novel arms-down immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Karen; Paterson, Claire; Hicks, Jonathan; Harrow, Stephen; McJury, Mark

    2016-12-01

    A clinical evaluation of the intrafraction and interfraction setup accuracy of a novel thermoplastic mould immobilization device and patient position in early-stage lung cancer being treated with stereotactic radiotherapy at the Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK. 35 patients were immobilized in a novel, arms-down position, with a four-point Klarity ™ (Klarity Medical Products, Ohio, US) clear thermoplastic mould fixed to a SinMed (CIVCO Medical solutions, lowa, US) head and neck board. A knee support was also used for patient comfort and support. Pre- and post-treatment kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) images were fused with the planning CT scan to determine intra- and interfraction motion. A total of 175 CBCT scans were analysed in the longitudinal, vertical and lateral directions. The mean intrafraction errors were 0.05 ± 0.77 mm (lateral), 0.44 ± 1.2 mm (superior-inferior) and -1.44 ± 1.35 mm (anteroposterior), respectively. Mean composite three-dimensional displacement vector was 2.14 ± 1.2 mm. Interfraction errors were -0.66 ± 2.35 mm (lateral), -0.13 ± 3.11 mm (superior-inferior) and 0.00 ± 2.94 mm (anteroposterior), with three-dimensional vector 4.08 ± 2.73 mm. Setup accuracy for lung image-guided stereotactic ablative radiotherapy using a unique immobilization device, where patients have arms by their sides, has been shown to be safe and favourably comparable to other published setup data where more complex and cumbersome devices were utilised. There was no arm toxicity reported and low arm doses. Advances in knowledge: We report on the accuracy of a novel patient immobilization device.

  15. WE-G-BRD-03: Development of a Real-Time Optical Tracking Goggle System (OTGS) for Intracranial Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittauer, K; Yan, G; Lu, B; Barraclough, B; Li, J; Liu, C [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Optical tracking systems (OTS) are an acceptable alternative to frame-based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). However, current surface-based OTS lack the ability to target exclusively rigid/bony anatomical features. We propose a novel marker-based optical tracking goggle system (OTGS) that provides real-time guidance based on the nose/facial bony anatomy. This ongoing study involves the development and characterization of the OTGS for clinical implementation in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods: The OTGS consists of eye goggles, a custom thermoplastic nosepiece, and 6 infrared markers pre-attached to the goggles. A phantom and four healthy volunteers were used to evaluate the calibration/registration accuracy, intrafraction accuracy, interfraction reproducibility, and end-to-end accuracy of the OTGS. The performance of the OTGS was compared with that of the frameless SonArray system and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for volunteer and phantom cases, respectively. The performance of the OTGS with commercial immobilization devices and under treatment conditions (i.e., couch rotation and translation range) was also evaluated. Results: The difference in the calibration/registration accuracy of 24 translations or rotation combinations between CBCT and in-house OTS software was within 0.5 mm/0.4°. The mean intrafraction and interfraction accuracy among the volunteers was 0.004+/−0.4mm with −0.09+/−0.5° (n=6,170) and −0.26+/−0.8mm with 0.15+/0.8° (n=11), respectively. The difference in end-to-end accuracy between the OTGS and CBCT was within 1.3 mm/1.1°. The predetermined marker pattern (1) minimized marker occlusions, (2) allowed for continuous tracking for couch angles +/− 90°, (3) and eliminated individual marker misplacement. The device was feasible with open and half masks for immobilization. Conclusion: Bony anatomical localization eliminated potential errors due to facial hair changes and/or soft tissue deformation. The

  16. LINAC based stereotactic radiotherapy of uveal melanoma: 4 years clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieckmann, Karin; Georg, Dietmar; Zehetmayer, Martin; Bogner, Joachim; Georgopoulos, Michael; Poetter, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To study local tumor control and radiogenic side effects after fractionated LINAC based stereotactic radiotherapy for selected uveal melanoma. Patients and methods: Between June 1997 and March 2001, 90 patients suffering from uveal melanoma were treated at a LINAC with 6 MV. The head was immobilized with a modified stereotactic frame system (BrainLAB). For stabilization of the eye position a light source was integrated into the mask system in front of the healthy or the diseased eye. A mini-video camera was used for on-line eye movement control. Tumors included in the study were either located unfavorably with respect to macula and optical disc ( 7 mm. Median tumor volume was 305±234 mm 3 (range 70-1430 mm 3 ), and mean tumor height was 5.4±2.3 mm (range 2.7-15.9 mm). Total doses of 70 (single dose 14 Gy at 80% isodose) or 60 Gy (single dose 12 Gy at 80% isodose) were applied in five fractions within 10 days. The first fractionation results in total dose (TD) (2 Gy) of 175 Gy for tumor and 238 Gy for normal tissue, corresponding values for the second fractionation schedule are 135 and 180 Gy, respectively. Results: After a median follow-up of 20 months (range 1-48 months) local control was achieved in 98% (n=88). The mean relative tumor reductions were 24, 27, and 37% after 12, 24 and 36 months. Three patients (3.3%) developed metastases. Secondary enucleation was performed in seven patients (7.7%). Long term side effects were retinopathy (25.5%), cataract (18.9%), optic neuropathy (20%), and secondary neovascular glaucoma (8.8%). Conclusion: Fractionated LINAC based stereotactic photon beam therapy in conjunction with a dedicated eye movement control system is a highly effective method to treat unfavorably located uveal melanoma. Total doses of 60 Gy (single dose 12 Gy) are considered to be sufficient to achieve good local tumor control

  17. Stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and inverse treatment planning for advanced pleural mesothelioma. Feasibility and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenter, M.W.; Thilmann, C.; Hof, H.; Debus, J. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Nill, S.; Hoess, A.; Partridge, M. [Dept. of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Haering, P. [Dept. of Central Dosimetry, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Manegold, C. [Dept. of Medical Oncology/Internal Medicine, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg gGmbH, Heidelberg (Germany); Wannenmacher, M. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-08-01

    Background and Purpose: Complex-shaped malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPMs) with challenging volumes are extremely difficult to treat by conventional radiotherapy due to tolerance doses of the surrounding normal tissue. In a feasibility study, we evaluated if inversely planned stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) could be applied in the treatment of MPM. Patients and Methods: Eight patients with unresectable lesions were treated after failure of chemotherapy. All patients were positioned using noninvasive patient fixation techniques which can be attached to the applied extracranial stereotactic system. Due to craniocaudal extension of the tumor, it was necessary to develop a special software attached to the inverse planning program KonRad, which can connect two inverse treatment plans and consider the applied dose of the first treatment plan in the area of the matchline of the second treatment plan. Results: Except for one patient, in whom radiotherapy was canceled due to abdominal metastasis, treatment could be completed in all patients and was well tolerated. Median survival after diagnosis was 20 months and after IMRT 6.5 months. Therefore, both the 1-year actuarial overall survival from the start of radiotherapy and the 2-year actuarial overall survival since diagnosis were 28%. IMRT did not result in clinically significant acute side effects. By using the described inverse planning software, over- or underdosage in the region of the field matchline could be prevented. Pure treatment time ranged between 10 and 21 min. Conclusion: This study showed that IMRT is feasible in advanced unresectable MPM. The presented possibilities of stereotactic IMRT in the treatment of MPM will justify the evaluation of IMRT in early-stage pleural mesothelioma combined with chemotherapy in a study protocol, in order to improve the outcome of these patients. Furthermore, dose escalation should be possible by using IMRT. (orig.)

  18. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for liver metastases. A retrospective analysis of 74 patients treated in the Klinikum rechts der Isar Munich; Die hypofraktionierte, stereotaktische Strahlentherapie von Lebermetastasen. Eine retrospektive Analyse von 74 Patienten des Klinikums rechts der Isar Muenchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heppt, Franz Johannes

    2013-06-12

    Purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of liver metastases and prognostic factors for local control and overall survival. From 2000 to 2009 74 patients with 91 metastases were treated at the Department for Radiation Therapy and Oncology (TU Muenchen). With an observed local control rate of 75% after 1 year, SBRT proved as an effective local treatment option. Unfortunately, systemic tumor progression still dominates long term survival in many patients.

  19. Prognostic indices in stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, David; Angelidis, Alexander; Budach, Volker; Ghadjar, Pirus; Kufeld, Markus; Badakhshi, Harun

    2015-11-26

    Our purpose was to analyze the long-term clinical outcome and to identify prognostic factors after Linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) on patients with brain metastases (BM) from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We performed a retrospective analysis of survival on 90 patients who underwent SRS or FSRT of intracranial NSCLC metastases between 04/2004 and 05/2014 that had not undergone prior surgery or whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for BM. Follow-up data was analyzed until May 2015. Potential prognostic factors were examined in univariable and multivariable analyses. The Golden Grading System (GGS), the disease-specific graded prognostic assessment (DS-GPA), the RADES II prognostic index as well as the NSCLC-specific index proposed by Rades et al. in 2013 (NSCLC-RADES) were calculated and their predictive values were tested in univariable analysis. The median follow-up time of the surviving patients was 14 months. The overall survival (OS) rate was 51 % after 6 months and 29.9 % after 12 months. Statistically significant factors of better OS after univariable analysis were lower International Union Against Cancer (UICC) stage at first diagnosis, histology of adenocarcinoma, prior surgery of the primary tumor and lower total BM volume. After multivariable analysis adenocarcinoma histology remained a significant factor; higher Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) and the presence of extracranial metastases (ECM) were also significant. The RADES II and the NSCLC-RADES indices were significant predictors of OS. However, the NSCLC-RADES failed to differentiate between intermediate- and low-risk patients. The DS-GPA and GGS were not statistically significant predictors of survival in univariable analysis. The ideal prognostic index has not been defined yet. We believe that more specific indices will be developed in the future. Our results indicate that the histologic subtype of NSCLC could add to the prognostic

  20. Hypo-fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of five fractions with linear accelerator for vestibular schwannomas: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thien; Duong, Courtney; Sheppard, John P; Lee, Seung Jin; Kishan, Amar U; Lee, Percy; Tenn, Stephen; Chin, Robert; Kaprealian, Tania B; Yang, Isaac

    2018-03-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are benign tumors stemming from the eighth cranial nerve. Treatment options for VS include conservative management, microsurgery, stereotactic radiosurgery, and fractionated radiotherapy. Though microsurgery has been the standard of care for larger lesions, hypo-fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (hypo-FSRT) is an emerging modality. However, its clinical efficacy and safety have yet to be established. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of manuscripts indexed in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Embase, and Cochrane databases reporting outcomes of VS cases treated with hypo-FSRT. Five studies representing a total of 228 patients were identified. Across studies, the pooled rates of tumor control, hearing, facial nerve, and trigeminal nerve preservation were 95%, 37%, 97%, and 98%. No instances of malignant induction were observed at median follow-up of 34.8 months. Complications included trigeminal neuropathy (n = 3), maxillary paresthesia (n = 1), neuralgia (n = 1), vestibular dysfunction (n = 1), radionecrosis (n = 1), and hydrocephalus (n = 1). Hypo-FSRT may be another useful approach to manage VS, but studies with extended follow-up times are required to establish long-term safety. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. The incidence of radiation necrosis following stereotactic radiotherapy for melanoma brain metastases: the potential impact of immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaidar-Person, Orit; Zagar, Timothy M; Deal, Allison; Moschos, Stergios J; Ewend, Matthew G; Sasaki-Adams, Deanna; Lee, Carrie B; Collichio, Frances A; Fried, David; Marks, Lawrence B; Chera, Bhishamjit S

    2017-07-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is the standard treatment for patients with limited number of brain metastases. In the past few years, newer immunotherapies (immune checkpoint inhibitors) have been proven to prolong survival in patients with metastatic melanoma. The safety of the combination of SRT and immunotherapy for brain metastases is unknown. We retrospectively identified patients with melanoma brain metastases treated with SRT between 2007 and 2015. Patients who did not have at least 3 months of follow-up with imaging after SRT were excluded from the analysis. Outcomes were compared between patients who were treated with or without immunotherapy. A total of 58 patients were included; of these, 29 were treated with SRT and immunotherapy. MAPK inhibitors (BRAF, MEK inhibitors) were used more often in the immunotherapy group (nine vs. two patients). There was a higher incidence of intracranial complications in patients treated with immunotherapy and SRT. Eight patients had radiation necrosis; all occurred in patients who were treated with immunotherapy. Nine patients had hemorrhage, of which seven occurred in patients who were treated with immunotherapy (P=0.08). However, patients treated with immunotherapy and SRT had a significant overall survival advantage compared with SRT without immunotherapy (15 vs. 6 months, P=0.0013). Patients treated with SRT and immunotherapy have a higher incidence/risk of intracranial complications, but a longer overall survival.

  2. Local progression and pseudo progression after single fraction or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for large brain metastases. A single centre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggenraad, R.; Verbeek-de Kanter, A.; Mast, M. [Radiotherapy Centre West, The Hague (Netherlands); Molenaar, R. [Diaconessenhuis, Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurology; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G. [Medical Centre Haagladen, The Hague (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Vecht, C. [Medical Centre Haagladen, The Hague (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurology; Struikmans, H. [Radiotherapy Centre West, The Hague (Netherlands); Leiden Univ. Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Kal, H.B.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The 1-year local control rates after single-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for brain metastases > 3 cm diameter are less than 70%, but with fractionated SRT (FSRT) higher local control rates have been reported. The purpose of this study was to compare our treatment results with SRT and FSRT for large brain metastases. Materials and methods: In two consecutive periods, 41 patients with 46 brain metastases received SRT with 1 fraction of 15 Gy, while 51 patients with 65 brain metastases received FSRT with 3 fractions of 8 Gy. We included patients with brain metastases with a planning target volume of > 13 cm{sup 3} or metastases in the brainstem. Results: The minimum follow-up of patients still alive was 22 months. Comparing 1 fraction of 15 Gy with 3 fractions of 8 Gy, the 1-year rates of freedom from any local progression (54% and 61%, p = 0.93) and pseudo progression (85% and 75%, p = 0.25) were not significantly different. Overall survival rates were also not different. Conclusion: The 1-year local progression and pseudo progression rates after 1 fraction of 15 Gy or 3 fractions of 8 Gy for large brain metastases and metastases in the brainstem are similar. For better local control rates, FSRT schemes with a higher biological equivalent dose may be necessary. (orig.)

  3. Stereotactic radiation therapy combined with immunotherapy: augmenting the role of radiation in local and systemic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabi, Andrew B; Tran, Phuoc T; Lim, Michael; Drake, Charles G; Deweese, Theodore L

    2015-05-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy are two contemporary radiation modalities that can treat tumors in any area of the body using highly focused radiation. Recently, immunotherapy has established itself as a viable and powerful anticancer treatment. In this review we detail the rationale supporting a combination of immunotherapy and stereotactic radiation. Additionally, we discuss the evidence for the immune stimulatory effects of focused radiation and the role that radiation may play in enhancing the systemic treatment effects of immunotherapy.

  4. Intrafraction Variation of Mean Tumor Position During Image-Guided Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Chirag; Grills, Inga S.; Kestin, Larry L.; McGrath, Samuel; Ye Hong; Martin, Shannon K.; Yan Di

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Prolonged delivery times during daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) introduce concerns regarding intrafraction variation (IFV) of the mean target position (MTP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of the IFV-MTP and to assess target margins required to compensate for IFV and postonline CBCT correction residuals. Patient, treatment, and tumor characteristics were analyzed with respect to their impact on IFV-MTP. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with 140 tumors underwent 659 fractions of lung SBRT. Dose prescribed was 48 or 60 Gy in 12 Gy fractions. Translational target position correction of the MTP was performed via onboard CBCT. IFV-MTP was measured as the difference in MTP between the postcorrection CBCT and the posttreatment CBCT excluding residual error. Results: IFV-MTP was 0.2 ± 1.8 mm, 0.1 ± 1.9 mm, and 0.01 ± 1.5 mm in the craniocaudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral dimensions and the IFV-MTP vector was 2.3 ± 2.1 mm. Treatment time and excursion were found to be significant predictors of IFV-MTP. An IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 and 5 mm was seen in 40.8% and 7.2% of fractions, respectively. IFV-MTP greater than 2 mm was seen in heavier patients with larger excursions and longer treatment times. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were seen between immobilization devices. The stereotactic frame immobilization device was found to be significantly less likely to have an IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 mm compared with the alpha cradle, BodyFIX, and hybrid immobilization devices. Conclusions: Treatment time and respiratory excursion are significantly associated with IFV-MTP. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were found between immobilization devices. Target margins for IFV-MTP plus post-correction residuals are dependent on immobilization device with 5-mm uniform margins being acceptable for the frame immobilization device.

  5. Clinical evaluation of an endorectal immobilization system for use in prostate hypofractionated Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolae, Alexandru; Davidson, Melanie; Easton, Harry; Helou, Joelle; Musunuru, Hima; Loblaw, Andrew; Ravi, Ananth

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a novel prostate endorectal immobilization system (EIS) for improving the delivery of hypofractionated Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) for prostate cancer. Twenty patients (n = 20) with low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer (T1-T2b, Gleason Score < 7, PSA ≤ 20 ng/mL), were treated with an EIS in place using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT), to a prescription dose of 26 Gy delivered in 2 fractions once per week; the intent of the institutional clinical trial was an attempt to replicate brachytherapy-like dosimetry using SABR. EBT3 radiochromic film embedded within the EIS was used as a quality assurance measure of the delivered dose; additionally, prostate intrafraction motion captured using pre- and post-treatment conebeam computed tomography (CBCT) scans was evaluated. Treatment plans were generated for patients with- and without the EIS to evaluate its effects on target and rectal dosimetry. None of the observed 3-dimensional prostate displacements were ≥ 3 mm over the elapsed treatment time. A Gamma passing rate of 95.64 ± 4.28 % was observed between planned and delivered dose profiles on EBT3 film analysis in the low-dose region. No statistically significant differences between treatment plans with- and without-EIS were observed for rectal, bladder, clinical target volume (CTV), and PTV contours (p = 0.477, 0.484, 0.487, and 0.487, respectively). A mean rectal V80% of 1.07 cc was achieved for plans using the EIS. The EIS enables the safe delivery of brachytherapy-like SABR plans to the prostate while having minimal impact on treatment planning and rectal dosimetry. Consistent and reproducible immobilization of the prostate is possible throughout the duration of these treatments using such a device

  6. Quality of life during 5 years after stereotactic radiotherapy in stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubels, Rutger J; Mokhles, Sahar; Andrinopoulou, Eleni R; Braat, Cornelia; Voort van Zyp, Noëlle C van der; Aluwini, Shafak; Aerts, Joachim G J V; Nuyttens, Joost J

    2015-01-01

    To determine the long-term impact of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) on the quality of life (QoL) of inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From January 2006 to February 2008, 39 patients with pathologically confirmed T1-2N0M0 NSCLC were treated with SRT. QoL, overall survival and local tumor control were assessed. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ)-C30 and the lung cancer-specific questionnaire QLQ-LC13 were used to investigate changes in QoL. Assessments were done before treatment, at 3 weeks, every 2–3 months during the first two years, and then every 6 months until 5 years after the treatment or death or progressive disease. The median follow up was 38 months. During the 5 years after treatment with SRT for stage I NSCLC, the level of QoL was maintained: There was a slow decline (slope: −0.015) of the global health status over the 5 years (p < 0.0001). The physical functioning and the role functioning improved slowly (slope: 0.006 and 0.004, resp.) over the years and this was also significant (p < 0.0001). The emotional functioning (EF) improved significantly at 1 year compared to the baseline. Two years after the treatment dyspnea slowly increased (slope: 0.005, p = 0.006). The actuarial overall survival was 62% at 2 years and 31% at 5-years. QoL was maintained 5 years after SRT for stage I NSCLC and EF improved significantly. Dyspnea slowly increased 2 years after the treatment

  7. Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellenberg, Devin; Goodman, Karyn A.; Lee, Florence; Chang, Stephanie; Kuo, Timothy; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Greco, Ralph; Yang, George P.; Koong, Albert C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer achieves only modest local control. This prospective trial evaluated the efficacy of a single fraction of 25 Gy stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivered between Cycle 1 and 2 of gemcitabine chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, pancreatic adenocarcinoma received gemcitabine with SBRT delivered 2 weeks after completion of the first cycle. Gemcitabine was resumed 2 weeks after SBRT and was continued until progression or dose-limiting toxicity. The gross tumor volume, with a 2-3-mm margin, was treated in a single 25-Gy fraction by Cyberknife. Patients were evaluated at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All 16 patients completed SBRT. A median of four cycles (range one to nine) of chemotherapy was delivered. Three patients (19%) developed local disease progression at 14, 16, and 21 months after SBRT. The median survival was 11.4 months, with 50% of patients alive at 1 year. Patients with normal carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9 levels either at diagnosis or after Cyberknife SBRT had longer survival (p <0.01). Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was mild, with 2 cases of Grade 2 (13%) and 1 of Grade 3 (6%) toxicity. Late gastrointestinal toxicity was more common, with five ulcers (Grade 2), one duodenal stenosis (Grade 3), and one duodenal perforation (Grade 4). A trend toward increased duodenal volumes radiated was observed in those experiencing late effects (p = 0.13). Conclusion: SBRT with gemcitabine resulted in comparable survival to conventional chemoradiotherapy and good local control. However, the rate of duodenal ulcer development was significant

  8. Vector-model-supported optimization in volumetric-modulated arc stereotactic radiotherapy planning for brain metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Eva Sau Fan; Wu, Vincent Wing Cheung; Harris, Benjamin; Foote, Matthew; Lehman, Margot; Chan, Lawrence Wing Chi

    2017-01-01

    Long planning time in volumetric-modulated arc stereotactic radiotherapy (VMA-SRT) cases can limit its clinical efficiency and use. A vector model could retrieve previously successful radiotherapy cases that share various common anatomic features with the current case. The prsent study aimed to develop a vector model that could reduce planning time by applying the optimization parameters from those retrieved reference cases. Thirty-six VMA-SRT cases of brain metastasis (gender, male [n = 23], female [n = 13]; age range, 32 to 81 years old) were collected and used as a reference database. Another 10 VMA-SRT cases were planned with both conventional optimization and vector-model-supported optimization, following the oncologists' clinical dose prescriptions. Planning time and plan quality measures were compared using the 2-sided paired Wilcoxon signed rank test with a significance level of 0.05, with positive false discovery rate (pFDR) of less than 0.05. With vector-model-supported optimization, there was a significant reduction in the median planning time, a 40% reduction from 3.7 to 2.2 hours (p = 0.002, pFDR = 0.032), and for the number of iterations, a 30% reduction from 8.5 to 6.0 (p = 0.006, pFDR = 0.047). The quality of plans from both approaches was comparable. From these preliminary results, vector-model-supported optimization can expedite the optimization of VMA-SRT for brain metastasis while maintaining plan quality.

  9. Evaluation of a post-analysis method for cumulative dose distribution in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imae, Toshikazu; Takenaka, Shigeharu; Saotome, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a post-analysis method for cumulative dose distribution in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). VMAT is capable of acquiring respiratory signals derived from projection images and machine parameters based on machine logs during VMAT delivery. Dose distributions were reconstructed from the respiratory signals and machine parameters in the condition where respiratory signals were without division, divided into 4 and 10 phases. The dose distribution of each respiratory phase was calculated on the planned four-dimensional CT (4DCT). Summation of the dose distributions was carried out using deformable image registration (DIR), and cumulative dose distributions were compared with those of the corresponding plans. Without division, dose differences between cumulative distribution and plan were not significant. In the condition Where respiratory signals were divided, dose differences were observed over dose in cranial region and under dose in caudal region of planning target volume (PTV). Differences between 4 and 10 phases were not significant. The present method Was feasible for evaluating cumulative dose distribution in VMAT-SBRT using 4DCT and DIR. (author)

  10. Outcome of four-dimensional stereotactic radiotherapy for centrally located lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuyttens, Joost J.; Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Praag, John; Aluwini, Shafak; Klaveren, Rob J. van; Verhoef, Cornelis; Pattynama, Peter M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess local control, overall survival, and toxicity of four-dimensional, risk-adapted stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivered while tracking respiratory motion in patients with primary and metastatic lung cancer located in the central chest. Methods: Fifty-eight central lesions of 56 patients (39 with primary, 17 with metastatic tumors) were treated. Fifteen tumors located near the esophagus were treated with 6 fractions of 8 Gy. Other tumors were treated according to the following dose escalation scheme: 5 fractions of 9 Gy (n = 6), then 5 fractions of 10 Gy (n = 15), and finally 5 fractions of 12 Gy (n = 22). Results: Dose constraints for critical structures were generally achieved; in 21 patients the coverage of the PTV was reduced below 95% to protect adjacent organs at risk. At a median follow-up of 23 months, the actuarial 2-years local tumor control was 85% for tumors treated with a BED >100 Gy compared to 60% for tumors treated with a BED ⩽100 Gy. No grade 4 or 5 toxicity was observed. Acute grade 1–2 esophagitis was observed in 11% of patients. Conclusion: SBRT of central lung lesions can be safely delivered, with promising early tumor control in patients many of whom have severe comorbid conditions.

  11. Severe Chest Wall Toxicity From Cryoablation in the Setting of Prior Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Binkley, Michael S; Aggarwal, Sonya; Qian, Yushen; Carter, Justin N; Shah, Rajesh; Loo, Billy W

    2016-02-02

    We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with metastatic synovial sarcoma of parotid origin, treated definitively with chemoradiation, who subsequently developed oligometastatic disease limited to the lungs. She underwent multiple left and right lung wedge resections and left lower lobectomy, followed by right lower lobe stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), 54 Gy in three fractions to a right lower lobe lesion abutting the chest wall. Two years later, she was treated with cryoablation for a separate right upper lobe nodule abutting the chest wall. Two months later, she presented with acute shortness of breath, pleuritic chest pain, decreased peripheral blood O2 saturation, and productive cough. A computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated severe chest wall necrosis in the area of recent cryoablation that, in retrospect, also received a significant radiation dose from her prior SABR. This case demonstrates that clinicians should exercise caution in using cryoablation when treating lung tumors abutting a previously irradiated chest wall. Note: Drs. Loo and Shah contributed equally as co-senior authors.

  12. Retrospective study on therapy options of brain metastases surgery versus stereotactic radiotherapy with the linear accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Fortunati, M K S

    2001-01-01

    Background: in the therapy of brain metastases there has been a great progress in the last years. It was shown, that more aggressive therapies can not only extend the survival of the patients, but also improve quality of life. The major question of this study was, whether surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy with the linear accelerator show better results in behalf of the survival. Beside this major question many parameters regarding the patient or his primary cancer were examined. Methods: from the 1st of January 1995 until the 30th of June 2000 233 patients with one or more brain metastases have been treated in the Wagner Jauregg Landesnervenkrankenhaus Oberoesterreich (WJ LNKH OeO). The LINAC has been established on the 1st of July 1997. The patients have been distributed in three groups: 1. LINAC-group: 81 patients have been treated from the 1st of July 1997 until the 30th of June 2000 with the LINAC. 2. Surgery-group: 81 patients have been operated from the 1st of July 1997 until the 30th June 2000. 3 Co...

  13. Hypofractionated boost to the dominant tumor region with intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy for prostate cancer: a sequential dose escalation pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralbell, Raymond; Mollà, Meritxell; Rouzaud, Michel; Hidalgo, Alberto; Toscas, José Ignacio; Lozano, Joan; Sanz, Sergi; Ares, Carmen; Jorcano, Sandra; Linero, Dolors; Escudé, Lluís

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, tolerability, and preliminary outcomes in patients with prostate cancer treated according to a hypofractionated dose escalation protocol to boost the dominant tumor-bearing region of the prostate. After conventional fractionated external radiotherapy to 64 to 64.4 Gy, 50 patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were treated with an intensity-modulated radiotherapy hypofractionated boost under stereotactic conditions to a reduced prostate volume to the dominant tumor region. A rectal balloon inflated with 60 cc of air was used for internal organ immobilization. Five, 8, and 8 patients were sequentially treated with two fractions of 5, 6, or 7 Gy, respectively (normalized total dose in 2 Gy/fraction [NTD(2 Gy)] 100 Gy, high-dose group). Androgen deprivation was given to 33 patients. Acute and late toxicities were assessed according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) scoring system. Two patients presented with Grade 3 acute urinary toxicity. The 5-year probabilities of >or=Grade 2 late urinary and late low gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity-free survival were 82.2% +/- 7.4% and 72.2% +/- 7.6%, respectively. The incidence and severity of acute or late toxicities were not correlated with low- vs. high-dose groups, pelvic irradiation, age, or treatment with or without androgen deprivation. The 5-year biochemical disease-free survival (b-DFS) and disease-specific survival were 98% +/- 1.9% and 100%, respectively. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy hypofractionated boost dose escalation under stereotactic conditions was feasible, and showed excellent outcomes with acceptable long-term toxicity. This approach may well be considered an alternative to high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Survival and prognostic factors in patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Thomas; Oettingen, Gorm von; Lassen-Ramshad, Yasmin A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background. Stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) of brain metastases is used with good effect around the world, but no consensus exists regarding which prognostic factors that are related to favourable or unfavourable prognosis after the treatment. A better definition of these factors...... will ensure a more precise application of the treatment. Material and methods. A consecutive cohort of the 198 patients treated for brain metastases with SRT without concurrent whole-brain radiation therapy at our department from 2001 to 2012 was retrospectively analysed. Results. Median survival was seven...... months and median time to clinical cerebral progression was eight months. The multivariate analysis revealed age ≥ 65 years, Performance Status ≥ 2, extracranial metastases and size of metastasis > 20 mm as independent prognostic factors related to shorter survival. No factors were independently related...

  15. SU-E-QI-21: Iodinated Contrast Agent Time Course In Human Brain Metastasis: A Study For Stereotactic Synchrotron Radiotherapy Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obeid, L; Esteve, F; Adam, J [Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, La Tronche, Isere (France); Tessier, A; Balosso, J [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, La Tronche, Isere (France)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy (SSRT) is an innovative treatment combining the selective accumulation of heavy elements in tumors with stereotactic irradiations using monochromatic medium energy x-rays from a synchrotron source. Phase I/II clinical trials on brain metastasis are underway using venous infusion of iodinated contrast agents. The radiation dose enhancement depends on the amount of iodine in the tumor and its time course. In the present study, the reproducibility of iodine concentrations between the CT planning scan day (Day 0) and the treatment day (Day 10) was assessed in order to predict dose errors. Methods: For each of days 0 and 10, three patients received a biphasic intravenous injection of iodinated contrast agent (40 ml, 4 ml/s, followed by 160 ml, 0.5 ml/s) in order to ensure stable intra-tumoral amounts of iodine during the treatment. Two volumetric CT scans (before and after iodine injection) and a multi-slice dynamic CT of the brain were performed using conventional radiotherapy CT (Day 0) or quantitative synchrotron radiation CT (Day 10). A 3D rigid registration was processed between images. The absolute and relative differences of absolute iodine concentrations and their corresponding dose errors were evaluated in the GTV and PTV used for treatment planning. Results: The differences in iodine concentrations remained within the standard deviation limits. The 3D absolute differences followed a normal distribution centered at zero mg/ml with a variance (∼1 mg/ml) which is related to the image noise. Conclusion: The results suggest that dose errors depend only on the image noise. This study shows that stable amounts of iodine are achievable in brain metastasis for SSRT treatment in a 10 days interval.

  16. Enhanced intrinsic radiosensitivity after treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery for an acoustic neuroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Gerard; Martin, Olga A.; Roos, Daniel E.; Lobachevsky, Pavel N.; Potter, Andrew E.; Zacest, Andrew C.; Bezak, Eva; Bonner, William M.; Martin, Roger F.; Leong, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced radiosensitivity is an uncommon phenomenon attributable to deficient DNA repair after radiotherapy which can be assessed with the γ-H2AX assay. Reports of radiosensitivity after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) are uncommon. We describe a case where the clinical, radiological and laboratory findings suggest enhanced radiosensitivity after SRS for an acoustic neuroma.

  17. On-board imaging validation of optically guided stereotactic radiosurgery positioning system for conventionally fractionated radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxim, Peter G; Loo, Billy W; Murphy, James D; Chu, Karen P M; Hsu, Annie; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2011-11-15

    To evaluate the positioning accuracy of an optical positioning system for stereotactic radiosurgery in a pilot experience of optically guided, conventionally fractionated, radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base tumors. Before each daily radiotherapy session, the positioning of 28 patients was set up using an optical positioning system. After this initial setup, the patients underwent standard on-board imaging that included daily orthogonal kilovoltage images and weekly cone beam computed tomography scans. Daily translational shifts were made after comparing the on-board images with the treatment planning computed tomography scans. These daily translational shifts represented the daily positional error in the optical tracking system and were recorded during the treatment course. For 13 patients treated with smaller fields, a three-degree of freedom (3DOF) head positioner was used for more accurate setup. The mean positional error for the optically guided system in patients with and without the 3DOF head positioner was 1.4 ± 1.1 mm and 3.9 ± 1.6 mm, respectively (p 3DOF head positioner (p = .057). No positional drift was observed in the patients without the 3DOF head positioner. Our initial clinical experience with optically guided head-and-neck fractionated radiotherapy was promising and demonstrated clinical feasibility. The optically guided setup was especially useful when used in conjunction with the 3DOF head positioner and when it was recalibrated to the shifts using the weekly portal images. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dosimetry comparison of irradiation with conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, conformal radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions and robotic stereotactic radiotherapy for benign brain tumours; Comparaison dosimetrique de la radiotherapie conformationnelle, la radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite, la radiotherapie conformationnelle en conditions stereotaxiques et la radiotherapie en conditions stereotaxiques robotisee des tumeurs cerebrales benignes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spasic, E.; Noel, A. [Departement de radiophysique, centre Alexis-Vautrin, avenue de Bourgogne, 54511 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy cedex (France); UMR 7039 CNRS, centre de recherche en automatique de Nancy (Cran), BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy cedex (France); Cran UMR 7039, faculte des sciences et techniques, universite Henri-Poincare Nancy 1, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy cedex (France); Cran UMR 7039, institut national polytechnique de Lorraine, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy cedex (France); Buchheit, I.; Bernier, V. [Departement de radiophysique, centre Alexis-Vautrin, avenue de Bourgogne, 54511 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy cedex (France)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose. - To compare several techniques in order to determine the best treatment for benign brain tumours. Methods and patients. - A retrospective study was performed for five patients who received 3D-conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy or CyberKnife{sup R}. These patients had a meningioma, a pituitary tumour, a cranio-pharyngioma or a neurinoma. In each case, these treatment plans were optimised and compared with the three other dosimetries. Radiobiological or positioning parameters were evaluated, as well as dosimetric parameters, in order to compare treatments with different characteristics. Results. - The dosimetric parameters showed that the choice of treatment seemed to be determined mostly by tumour size, shape and proximity with organs at risk (not tumour localisation). Whereas the results showed no significant deviations with regards to the radiobiological parameters. Therefore, with these parameters, it was difficult to give priority to a treatment. Conclusions. - With regards to benign brain tumours of medium or large size, intensity modulated radiotherapy seemed the recommended treatment. It enabled to obtain a good ratio between efficacy and toxicity for tumours that are really close to organs at risk. Concerning small benign brain tumours, the CyberKnife{sup R} was probably the best treatment. (authors)

  19. Maximizing Benefits from Maintenance Pemetrexed with Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Oligoprogressive Non-Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Lun Lu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance pemetrexed offers survival benefit with well-tolerated toxicities for advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We present 3 consecutively enrolled patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC, receiving stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR for oligoprogressive disease during maintenance pemetrexed. All of them had sustained local control of thoracic oligoprogression after the SABR, while maintenance pemetrexed were kept for additionally long progression-free interval. SABR targeting oligoprogression with continued pemetrexed is an effective and safe approach to extend exposure of maintenance pemetrexed, thus maximizing the benefit from it.

  20. Report on a randomized trial comparing two forms of immobilization of the head for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednarz, Greg; Machtay, Mitchell; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Downes, Beverly; Bogner, Joachim; Hyslop, Terry; Galvin, James; Evans, James; Curran, Walter Jr.; Andrews, David

    2009-01-01

    Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires accurate and reproducible immobilization of the patient's head. This randomized study compared the efficacy of two commonly used forms of immobilization used for SRT. Two routinely used methods of immobilization, which differ in their approach to reproduce the head position from day to day, are the Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) frame and the BrainLab thermoplastic mask. The GTC frame fixates on the patient's upper dentition and thus is in direct mechanical contact with the cranium. The BrainLab mask is a two-part masking system custom fitted to the front and back of the patient's head. After patients signed an IRB-approved informed consent form, eligible patients were randomized to either GTC frame or mask for their course of SRT. Patients were treated as per standard procedure; however, prior to each treatment a set of digital kilovolt images (ExacTrac, BrainLabAB, Germany) was taken. These images were fused with reference digitally reconstructed radiographs obtained from treatment planning CT to yield lateral, longitudinal, and vertical deviations of isocenter and head rotations about respective axes. The primary end point of the study was to compare the two systems with respect to mean and standard deviations using the distance to isocenter measure. A total of 84 patients were enrolled (69 patients evaluable with detailed positioning data). A mixed-effect linear regression and two-tiled t test were used to compare the distance measure for both the systems. There was a statistically significant (p<0.001) difference between mean distances for these systems, suggesting that the GTC frame was more accurate. The mean 3D displacement and standard deviations were 3.17+1.95 mm for mask and 2.00+1.04 mm for frame. Both immobilization techniques were highly effective, but the GTC frame was more accurate. To optimize the accuracy of SRT, daily kilovolt image guidance is recommended with either immobilization system.

  1. Clinical results of stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I small-cell lung cancer. A single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Asai, Kaori; Terashima, Koutarou; Matsumoto, Keiji; Hirata, Hideki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for Stage I small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). From April 2003 to September 2009, a total of eight patients with Stage I SCLC were treated with SBRT in our institution. In all patients, the lung tumors were proven as SCLC pathologically. The patients' ages were 58-84 years (median: 74). The T-stage of the primary tumor was T1a in two, T1b in two and T2a in four patients. Six of the patients were inoperable because of poor cardiac and/or pulmonary function, and two patients refused surgery. SBRT was given using 7-8 non-coplanar beams with 48 Gy in four fractions. Six of the eight patients received 3-4 cycles of chemotherapy using carboplatin (CBDCA) + etoposide (VP-16) or cisplatin (CDDP) + irinotecan (CPT-11). The follow-up period for all patients was 6-60 months (median: 32). Six patients were still alive without any recurrence. One patient died from this disease and one died from another disease. The overall and disease-specific survival rate at three years was 72% and 86%, respectively. There were no patients with local progression of the lesion targeted by SBRT. Only one patient had nodal recurrence in the mediastinum at 12 months after treatment. The progression-free survival rate was 71%. No Grade 2 or higher SBRT-related toxicities were observed. SBRT plus chemotherapy could be an alternative to surgery with chemotherapy for inoperable patients with Stage I small-cell lung cancer. However, further investigation is needed using a large series of patients. (author)

  2. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer patients with isolated lymph nodes involvement: a two-institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrosso, Gianluca; Trippa, Fabio; Maranzano, Ernesto; Carosi, Alessandra; Ponti, Elisabetta; Arcidiacono, Fabio; Draghini, Lorena; Di Murro, Luana; Lancia, Andrea; Santoni, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is emerging as a treatment option in oligometastatic cancer patients. This retrospective study aimed to analyze local control, biochemical progression-free survival (b-PFS), and toxicity in patients affected by isolated prostate cancer lymph node metastases. Finally, we evaluated androgen deprivation therapy-free survival (ADT-FS). Forty patients with 47 isolated lymph nodes of recurrent prostate cancer were treated with SBRT. Mostly, two different fractionation schemes were used: 5 × 7 Gy in 23 (48.9 %) lesions and 5 × 8 Gy in 13 (27.7 %) lesions. Response to treatment was assessed with periodical PSA evaluation. Toxicity was registered according to RTOG/EORTC criteria. With a mean follow-up of 30.18 months, local control was achieved in 98 % of the cases, with a median b-PFS of 24 months. We obtained a 2-year b-PFS of 44 % with 40 % of the patients ADT-free at last follow-up (mean value 26.18 months; range 3.96-59.46), whereas 12.5 % had a mean ADT-FS of 13.58 months (range 2.06-37.13). Late toxicity was observed in one (2.5 %) patient who manifested a grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity 11.76 months after the end of SBRT. Our study demonstrates that SBRT is safe, effective, and minimally invasive in the eradication of limited nodal metastases, yielding an important delay in prescribing ADT.

  3. Lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using a coplanar versus a non-coplanar beam technique: a comparison of clinical outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Bauer, Heather J.; Mayo, Charles S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine if lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using a coplanar beam technique was associated with similar outcomes as lung SBRT using a non-coplanar beam technique. Methods A retrospective review was performed of patients undergoing lung SBRT between January 2008 and April 2011. SBRT was initially delivered with multiple non-coplanar, non-overlapping beams; however, starting in December 2009, SBRT was delivered predominantly with all coplanar beams in order to reduce treatment time and complexity. Results This analysis included 149 patients; the median follow-up was 21 months. SBRT was delivered for primary (n = 90) or recurrent (n = 17) non-small cell lung cancer, or lung oligometastasis (n = 42). The most common dose (Gy)/fraction (fx) regimens were 48 Gy/4 fx (39%), 54 Gy/3 fx (37%), and 50 Gy/5 fx (17%). The beam arrangement was coplanar in 61 patients (41%) and non-coplanar in 88 patients (59%). In patients treated with 54 Gy/3 fx, the mean treatment times per fraction for the coplanar and non-coplanar cohorts were 10 and 14 minutes (p < 0.0001). Kaplan-Meier 2-year estimates of overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, and local control (LC) for the coplanar and non-coplanar cohorts were 65% vs. 56% (p = 0.30), 47% vs. 39% (p = 0.71), and 92% and 92% (p = 0.94), respectively. The 1-year estimates of grade 2-5 pulmonary toxicity for the coplanar and non-coplanar cohorts were 11% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.30). On multivariate analysis, beam arrangement was not significantly associated with OS, LC or pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions Patients treated with lung SBRT using a coplanar technique had similar outcomes as those treated with a non-coplanar technique. PMID:29296365

  4. Outcome of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for 90 Patients With Locally Persistent and Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shaoxiong; Chua, Daniel T.T.; Deng Meiling; Zhao Chong; Li Fengyan; Sham, Jonathan S.T.; Wang Hanyu; Bao Yong; Gao Yuanhong; Zeng Zhifan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence remains one of the major causes of failure in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) have recently evolved as a salvage option of NPC. This study was conducted to review the treatment outcome after FSRT for NPC. Methods and Materials: Between September 1999 and December 2005, 90 patients with persistent (Group 1: n = 34, relapse within 6 months of RT) or recurrent (Group 2: n = 56, relapse beyond 6 months) NPC received FSRT using multiple noncoplanar arcs of 8-MV photon to the target. Median FSRT dose was 18 Gy in three fractions (Group 1) or 48 Gy in six fractions (Group 2). Median follow-up was 20.3 months. Results: Complete response rate after FSRT was 66% for Group 1 and 63% for Group 2. One-, 2-, and 3-year disease-specific survival (DSS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates for all patients were 82.6%, 74.8%, 57.5%, and 72.9%, 60.4%, 54.5%, respectively. Three-year local failure-free survival, DSS, and PFS rates were 89.4%, 80.7%, and 72.3% for Group 1, and 75.1%, 45.9%, and 42.9% for Group 2, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that recurrent disease and large tumor volume were independent factors that predicted poorer DSS and PFS. Seventeen patients developed late complications, including 2 with fatal hemorrhage. Conclusions: Our results indicate that FSRT is effective for patients with persistent and recurrent NPC. Compared with reported results of radiosurgery, FSRT provides satisfactory tumor control and survival with a lower risk of complications and it may be a better treatment for local failures of NPC

  5. The use of dual vacuum stabilization device to reduce kidney motion for stereotactic radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Styles, Colin; Whitaker, May; Bressel, Mathias; Foroudi, Farshad; Schneider, Michal; Devereux, Thomas; Dang, Kim; Siva, Shankar

    2015-04-01

    Abdominal stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy is aided by motion management strategies to ensure accurate dose delivery as targets such as the kidney are easily influenced by breathing motion. Commercial devices such as compression plates and dual vacuum technology have been demonstrated to reduce the motion of lung and liver tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dual vacuum system in reducing kidney motion as well to investigate any relationship between abdominal wall motions with kidney motion. Ten healthy volunteers were set up with and without vacuum compression (Elekta BodyFIX(TM)) to simulate free and dampened breathing. Ultrasound imaging was used to visualize kidney motion at the same time an abdominal surface marker was monitored using infrared imaging (Varian, Real Time Position Management). The resulting kidney and abdominal motion tracks were imported into motion analysis (Physmo(TM)) and custom built software (Matlab) to calculate amplitude of motion independent of shifting baselines. Thirty-four kidney datasets were available for analysis, with six datasets unable to be retrieved. With vacuum compression six out of nine participants showed a mean reduction of kidney motion ranging between 1.6 and 8 mm (p vacuum compression. Two participants showed no significant change (Vacuum compression reduced kidney motion in the majority of participants; however larger breathing motion can also result from its use. No pattern emerged regarding which patients may benefit from vacuum immobilization as abdominal wall motion was not found to be an adequate surrogate for kidney motion. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Pattern of Progression after Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer Nodal Recurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ost, P; Jereczek-Fossa, B A; Van As, N; Zilli, T; Tree, A; Henderson, D; Orecchia, R; Casamassima, F; Surgo, A; Miralbell, R; De Meerleer, G

    2016-09-01

    To report the relapse pattern of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for oligorecurrent nodal prostate cancer (PCa). PCa patients with ≤3 lymph nodes (N1/M1a) at the time of recurrence were treated with SBRT. SBRT was defined as a radiotherapy dose of at least 5 Gy per fraction to a biological effective dose of at least 80 Gy to all metastatic sites. Distant progression-free survival was defined as the time interval between the first day of SBRT and appearance of new metastatic lesions, outside the high-dose region. Relapses after SBRT were recorded and compared with the initially treated site. Secondary end points were local control, time to palliative androgen deprivation therapy and toxicity scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. Overall, 89 metastases were treated in 72 patients. The median distant progression-free survival was 21 months (95% confidence interval 16-25 months) with 88% of patients having ≤3 metastases at the time of progression. The median time from first SBRT to the start of palliative androgen deprivation therapy was 44 months (95% confidence interval 17-70 months). Most relapses (68%) occurred in nodal regions. Relapses after pelvic nodal SBRT (n = 36) were located in the pelvis (n = 14), retroperitoneum (n = 1), pelvis and retroperitoneum (n = 8) or in non-nodal regions (n = 13). Relapses after SBRT for extrapelvic nodes (n = 5) were located in the pelvis (n = 1) or the pelvis and retroperitoneum (n = 4). Late grade 1 and 2 toxicity was observed in 17% (n = 12) and 4% of patients (n = 3). SBRT for oligometastatic PCa nodal recurrences is safe. Most subsequent relapses are again nodal and oligometastatic. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. MS-27THE IMPACT OF HYPOFRACTIONATED LINAC-BASED STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY UPON EARLY AUDITORY FUNCTIONS IN THE TREATMENT OF VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMAS

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fen; Roy, Amit; Badkul, Rajeev; John, Park; Kumar, Parvesh; Staecker, Hinrich

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the impact of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (fSRT) scheme upon early auditory functions in the treatment of vestibular schwannomas (VSs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: 21 VS patients treated with a Linac-based frameless fSRT to 25 Gy in 5 daily fractions were retrospectively reviewed. Serial audiometry tests including auditory thresholds and speech discrimination (SD) were conducted prior to fSRT and then at regular intervals post-fSRT to determine the impact of ou...

  8. Survival and Quality of Life After Stereotactic or 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widder, Joachim; Postmus, Douwe; Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters after either treatment. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of inoperable patients with T1-2N0M0 primary lung tumors were analyzed. Patients received 70 Gy in 35 fractions with 3D-CRT or 60 Gy in three to eight fractions with SABR. Global quality of life (GQOL), physical functioning (PF), and patient-rated dyspnea were assessed using the respective dimensions of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Questionnaire-C30 and LC13. HRQOL was analyzed using multivariate linear mixed-effects modeling, survival and local control (LC) using the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox proportional hazards analysis, and Fine and Gray multivariate competing risk analysis as appropriate. Results: Overall survival (OS) was better after SABR compared with 3D-CRT with a HR of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5–4.8; p < 0.01). 3D-CRT conferred a subhazard ratio for LC of 5.0 (95% CI: 1.7–14.7; p < 0.01) compared with SABR. GQOL and PF were stable after SABR (p = 0.21 and p = 0.62, respectively). Dyspnea increased after SABR by 3.2 out of 100 points (95% CI: 1.0–5.3; p < 0.01), which is clinically insignificant. At 1 year, PF decreased by an excess of 8.7 out of 100 points (95% CI: 2.8–14.7; p < 0.01) after 3D-CRT compared with SABR. Conclusion: In this nonrandomized comparison of two prospective cohorts of medically inoperable patients with Stage I lung cancer, OS and LC were better after SABR. GQOL, PF, and patient-rated dyspnea were stable after SABR, whereas PF decreased after 3D-CRT approaching clinical significance already at 1 year.

  9. Phase II study to assess the efficacy of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy followed by a stereotactic radiosurgery boost in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koong, Albert C.; Christofferson, Erin; Le, Quynh-Thu; Goodman, Karyn A.; Ho, Anthony; Kuo, Timothy; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Greco, Ralph; Norton, Jeffrey; Yang, George P.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of concurrent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) followed by body stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, all patients (19) had pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma and were uniformly staged. Our treatment protocol consisted of 45 Gy IMRT with concurrent 5-FU followed by a 25 Gy SRS boost to the primary tumor. Results: Sixteen patients completed the planned therapy. Two patients experienced Grade 3 toxicity (none had more than Grade 3 toxicity). Fifteen of these 16 patients were free from local progression until death. Median overall survival was 33 weeks. Conclusions: Concurrent IMRT and 5-FU followed by SRS in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer results in excellent local control, but does not improve overall survival and is associated with more toxicity than SRS, alone

  10. Radiation-induced liver disease after stereotactic body radiotherapy for small hepatocellular carcinoma: clinical and dose-volumetric parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jinhong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, So Yeon; Cho, Byungchul; Park, Jin-hong; Kim, Su Ssan; Song, Si Yeol; Lee, Sang-wook; Ahn, Seung Do

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the clinical and dose–volumetric parameters that predict the risk of radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) for patients with small, unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Between March 2007 and December 2009, 92 patients with HCC treated with SBRT were reviewed for RILD within 3 months of completing treatment. RILD was evaluated according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. A dose of 10–20 Gy (median, 15 Gy) per fraction was given over 3–4 consecutive days for a total dose of 30–60 Gy (median, 45 Gy). The following clinical and dose–volumetric parameters were examined: age, gender, Child-Pugh class, presence of hepatitis B virus, gross tumor volume, normal liver volume, radiation dose, fraction size, mean dose to the normal liver, and normal liver volumes receiving from < 5 Gy to < 60 Gy (in increments of 5 Gy). Seventeen (18.5%) of the 92 patients developed grade 2 or worse RILD after SBRT (49 patients in grade 1, 11 in grade 2, and 6 in ≥ grade 3). On univariate analysis, Child-Pugh class was identified as a significant clinical parameter, while normal liver volume and normal liver volumes receiving from < 15 Gy to < 60 Gy were the significant dose–volumetric parameters. Upon multivariate analysis, only Child-Pugh class was a significant parameter for predicting grade 2 or worse RILD. The Child-Pugh B cirrhosis was found to have a significantly greater susceptibility to the development of grade 2 or worse RILD after SBRT in patients with small, unresectable HCC. Additional efforts aimed at testing other models to predict the risk of RILD in a large series of HCC patients treated with SBRT are needed

  11. Cine Computed Tomography Without Respiratory Surrogate in Planning Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riegel, Adam C. B.A.; Chang, Joe Y.; Vedam, Sastry S.; Johnson, Valen; Chi, Pai-Chun Melinda; Pan, Tinsu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether cine computed tomography (CT) can serve as an alternative to four-dimensional (4D)-CT by providing tumor motion information and producing equivalent target volumes when used to contour in radiotherapy planning without a respiratory surrogate. Methods and Materials: Cine CT images from a commercial CT scanner were used to form maximum intensity projection and respiratory-averaged CT image sets. These image sets then were used together to define the targets for radiotherapy. Phantoms oscillating under irregular motion were used to assess the differences between contouring using cine CT and 4D-CT. We also retrospectively reviewed the image sets for 26 patients (27 lesions) at our institution who had undergone stereotactic radiotherapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer. The patients were included if the tumor motion was >1 cm. The lesions were first contoured using maximum intensity projection and respiratory-averaged CT image sets processed from cine CT and then with 4D-CT maximum intensity projection and 10-phase image sets. The mean ratios of the volume magnitude were compared with intraobserver variation, the mean centroid shifts were calculated, and the volume overlap was assessed with the normalized Dice similarity coefficient index. Results: The phantom studies demonstrated that cine CT captured a greater extent of irregular tumor motion than did 4D-CT, producing a larger tumor volume. The patient studies demonstrated that the gross tumor defined using cine CT imaging was similar to, or slightly larger than, that defined using 4D-CT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that cine CT is a promising alternative to 4D-CT for stereotactic radiotherapy planning

  12. Medical physics aspects of the synchrotron radiation therapies: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) and synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy (SSRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Adam, Jean-Francois; Alagoz, Enver; Bartzsch, Stefan; Crosbie, Jeff; DeWagter, Carlos; Dipuglia, Andrew; Donzelli, Mattia; Doran, Simon; Fournier, Pauline; Kalef-Ezra, John; Kock, Angela; Lerch, Michael; McErlean, Ciara; Oelfke, Uwe; Olko, Pawel; Petasecca, Marco; Povoli, Marco; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Siegbahn, Erik A; Sporea, Dan; Stugu, Bjarne

    2015-09-01

    Stereotactic Synchrotron Radiotherapy (SSRT) and Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) are both novel approaches to treat brain tumor and potentially other tumors using synchrotron radiation. Although the techniques differ by their principles, SSRT and MRT share certain common aspects with the possibility of combining their advantages in the future. For MRT, the technique uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams between 50 and 600 keV. Important features of highly brilliant Synchrotron sources are a very small beam divergence and an extremely high dose rate. The minimal beam divergence allows the insertion of so called Multi Slit Collimators (MSC) to produce spatially fractionated beams of typically ∼25-75 micron-wide microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns center-to-center(ctc)) spaces with a very sharp penumbra. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are extremely well tolerated by normal tissues and at the same time provide a higher therapeutic index for various tumor models in rodents. The hypothesis of a selective radio-vulnerability of the tumor vasculature versus normal blood vessels by MRT was recently more solidified. SSRT (Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiotherapy) is based on a local drug uptake of high-Z elements in tumors followed by stereotactic irradiation with 80 keV photons to enhance the dose deposition only within the tumor. With SSRT already in its clinical trial stage at the ESRF, most medical physics problems are already solved and the implemented solutions are briefly described, while the medical physics aspects in MRT will be discussed in more detail in this paper. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Translational and rotational intra- and inter-fractional errors in patient and target position during a short course of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, Gitte Fredberg; Logadottir, Ashildur

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung tumours enables setup correction based on tumour position. The aim of this study was to compare setup accuracy with daily soft tissue matching to bony anatomy matching and evaluate...... intra- and inter-fractional translational and rotational errors in patient and target positions....

  14. Residual F-18-FDG-PET Uptake 12 Weeks After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Predicts Local Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Widder, Joachim; Pruim, Jan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wiegman, Erwin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake at 12 weeks after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From November 2006 to February 2010, 132 medically

  15. [Novel irradiation techniques in the treatment of solid tumours. Radiotherapy for metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Arpád; Póti, Zsuzsa

    2014-02-23

    Novel developments in percutaneous radiotherapy, such as positron emission tomography/computed tomography, adaptive radiation planning, intensity modulation radiotherapy and intensity modulated arc therapy (RapidArc), as well as the newer generation of image control (cone-beam computed tomography) and image guided radiotherapy ensure increased dosages of planning target volume and clinical target volume of solid tumours without damaging surrounding tissues and providing maximal protection. By raising the dosages of planned target volume and clinical target volume, these novel technical developments have created new indications in the treatment of solid tumours. With the aid of the cone-beam computed tomography and image guided radiotherapy the organ metastasis (lung, liver, spinal cord) and the primary tumour can be treated safety and effectively. Hypofractionation, dose escalation and the use of stereotactic devices can probably decrease radiation damage. The authors review the most common forms of evidence-based fractionation schemes used in irradiation therapy.

  16. Fractionated vs. single-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Hearing preservation and patients' self-reported outcome based on an established questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel, Kerstin A.; Fischer, Hanna; Vogel, Marco M.E.; Combs, Stephanie E.; Oechsner, Markus; Bier, Henning; Meyer, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (RT) has been established as a valid treatment alternative in patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS). There is ongoing controversy regarding the optimal fractionation. Hearing preservation may be the primary goal for patients with VS, followed by maintenance of quality of life (QoL). From 2002 to 2015, 184 patients with VS were treated with radiosurgery (RS) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). A survey on current symptoms and QoL was conducted between February and June 2016. Median follow-up after RT was 7.5 years (range 0-14.4 years). Mean overall survival (OS) after RT was 31.1 years, with 94 and 87% survival at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Mean progression-free survival (PFS) was 13.3 years, with 5- and 10-year PFS of 92%. Hearing could be preserved in RS patients for a median of 36.3 months (range 2.3-13.7 years). Hearing worsened in 17 (30%) cases. Median hearing preservation for FSRT was 48.7 months (range 0.0-13.8 years); 29 (23%) showed hearing deterioration. The difference in hearing preservation was not significant between RS and FSRT (p = 0.3). A total of 123/162 patients participated in the patient survey (return rate 76%). The results correlate well with the information documented in the patient files for tinnitus and facial and trigeminal nerve toxicity. Significant differences appeared regarding hearing impairment, gait uncertainty, and imbalance. These data confirm that RS and FSRT are comparable in terms of local control for VS. RS should be reserved for smaller lesions, while FSRT can be offered independently of tumor size. Patient self-reported outcome during follow-up is of high value. The established questionnaire could be validated in the independent cohort. (orig.) [de

  17. Optimization of total arc degree for stereotactic radiotherapy by using integral biologically effective dose and irradiated volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Do Hoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Lee, Myung Za; Chun, Ha Chung

    2001-01-01

    To find the optimal values of total arc degree to protect the normal brain tissue from high dose radiation in stereotactic radiotherapy planning. With Xknife-3 planning system and 4 MV linear accelerator, the authors planned under various values of parameters. One isocenter, 12, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 mm of collimator diameters, 100 deg, 200 deg, 300 deg, 400 deg, 500 deg, 600 deg, of total arc degrees, and 30 deg or 45 deg of arc intervals were used. After the completion of planning, the plans were compared each other using V 50 (the volume of normal brain that is delivered high dose radiation) and integral biologically effective dose. At 30 deg of arc interval, the values of V 50 had the decreased pattern with the increase of total arc degree in any collimator diameter. At 45 deg arc interval, up to 400 deg of total arc degree, the values of V 50 decreased with the increase of total arc degree, but at 500 deg and 600 deg of total arc degrees, the values increased. At 30 deg of arc interval, integral biologically effective dose showed the decreased pattern with the increase of total arc degree in any collimator diameter. At 45 deg arc interval with less than 40 mm collimator diameter, the integral biologically effective dose decreased with the increase of total arc degree, but with 50 and 60 mm of collimator diameters, up to 400 deg of total arc degree, integral biologically effective dose decreased with the increase of total arc degree, but at 500 deg and 600 deg of total arc degrees, the values increased. In the stereotactic radiotherapy planning for brain lesions, planning with 400 deg of total arc degree is optimal. Especially, when the larger collimator more than 50 mm diameter should be used, the uses of 500 deg and 600 deg of total arc degrees make the increase of V 50 and integral biologically effective dose, Therefore stereotactic radiotherapy planning using 400 deg of total arc degree can increase the therapeutic ratio and produce the effective outcome

  18. Interfraction variation in lung tumor position with abdominal compression during stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Ueki, Nami; Iizuka, Yusuke; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yano, Shinsuke [Division of Clinical Radiology Service, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of abdominal compression on the interfraction variation in tumor position in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in a larger series of patients with large tumor motion amplitude.Methods: Thirty patients with lung tumor motion exceeding 8 mm who underwent SBRT were included in this study. After translational and rotational initial setup error was corrected based on bone anatomy, CBCT images were acquired for each fraction. The residual interfraction variation was defined as the difference between the centroid position of the visualized target in three dimensions derived from CBCT scans and those derived from averaged intensity projection images. The authors compared the magnitude of the interfraction variation in tumor position between patients treated with [n= 16 (76 fractions)] and without [n= 14 (76 fractions)] abdominal compression.Results: The mean ± standard deviation (SD) of the motion amplitude in the longitudinal direction before abdominal compression was 19.9 ± 7.3 (range, 10–40) mm and was significantly (p < 0.01) reduced to 12.4 ± 5.8 (range, 5–30) mm with compression. The greatest variance of the interfraction variation with abdominal compression was observed in the longitudinal direction, with a mean ± SD of 0.79 ± 3.05 mm, compared to −0.60 ± 2.10 mm without abdominal compression. The absolute values of the 95th percentile of the interfraction variation for one side in each direction were 3.97/6.21 mm (posterior/anterior), 4.16/3.76 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.90/2.32 mm (right/left) without abdominal compression, and 2.14/5.03 mm (posterior/anterior), 3.93/9.23 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.37/5.45 mm (right/left) with abdominal compression. An absolute interfraction variation greater than 5 mm was observed in six (9.2%) fractions without and 13 (17.1%) fractions with abdominal compression.Conclusions: Abdominal compression was effective for reducing the amplitude

  19. Early prediction of tumor recurrence based on CT texture changes after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Palma, David A.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Benign computed tomography (CT) changes due to radiation induced lung injury (RILI) are common following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and can be difficult to differentiate from tumor recurrence. The authors measured the ability of CT image texture analysis, compared to more traditional measures of response, to predict eventual cancer recurrence based on CT images acquired within 5 months of treatment. Methods: A total of 24 lesions from 22 patients treated with SABR were selected for this study: 13 with moderate to severe benign RILI, and 11 with recurrence. Three-dimensional (3D) consolidative and ground-glass opacity (GGO) changes were manually delineated on all follow-up CT scans. Two size measures of the consolidation regions (longest axial diameter and 3D volume) and nine appearance features of the GGO were calculated: 2 first-order features [mean density and standard deviation of density (first-order texture)], and 7 second-order texture features [energy, entropy, correlation, inverse difference moment (IDM), inertia, cluster shade, and cluster prominence]. For comparison, the corresponding response evaluation criteria in solid tumors measures were also taken for the consolidation regions. Prediction accuracy was determined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and two-fold cross validation (CV). Results: For this analysis, 46 diagnostic CT scans scheduled for approximately 3 and 6 months post-treatment were binned based on their recorded scan dates into 2–5 month and 5–8 month follow-up time ranges. At 2–5 months post-treatment, first-order texture, energy, and entropy provided AUCs of 0.79–0.81 using a linear classifier. On two-fold CV, first-order texture yielded 73% accuracy versus 76%–77% with the second-order features. The size measures of the consolidative region, longest axial diameter and 3D volume, gave two-fold CV accuracies of 60% and 57%, and AUCs of 0.72 and 0.65, respectively

  20. Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for Advanced Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronholm, Rickard

    This Ph.d. project describes the development of a workflow for Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for clinical radiotherapy plans. The workflow may be utilized to perform an independent dose verification of treatment plans. Modern radiotherapy treatment delivery is often conducted by dynamically...... modulating the intensity of the field during the irradiation. The workflow described has the potential to fully model the dynamic delivery, including gantry rotation during irradiation, of modern radiotherapy. Three corner stones of Monte Carlo Treatment Planning are identified: Building, commissioning...

  1. Retrospective study on therapy options of brain metastases: surgery versus stereotactic radiotherapy with the linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortunati, M.K.S.

    2001-04-01

    Background: in the therapy of brain metastases there has been a great progress in the last years. It was shown, that more aggressive therapies can not only extend the survival of the patients, but also improve quality of life. The major question of this study was, whether surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy with the linear accelerator show better results in behalf of the survival. Beside this major question many parameters regarding the patient or his primary cancer were examined. Methods: from the 1st of January 1995 until the 30th of June 2000 233 patients with one or more brain metastases have been treated in the Wagner Jauregg Landesnervenkrankenhaus Oberoesterreich (WJ LNKH OeO). The LINAC has been established on the 1st of July 1997. The patients have been distributed in three groups: 1. LINAC-group: 81 patients have been treated from the 1st of July 1997 until the 30th of June 2000 with the LINAC. 2. Surgery-group: 81 patients have been operated from the 1st of July 1997 until the 30th June 2000. 3 Control-group: 71 patients have been operated from the 1st of January 1995 until the 30th of June 1997, before the LINAC has been established on the 1st of July 1997. Results: There are shown the mean survival times. Therapy options (0,05): LINAC-group: 377 days. Surgery-group: 195 days. Control-group: 285 days. Primary cancer (0,05): unknown primary: 203 days. Cancer of the colon tract: 218 days. Breast cancer: 314 days. Melanoma: 162 days. Kidney: 466 days. Lung 261 days. Others: 439 days. Metastases in one/in both hemispheres (0,05): in one hemisphere 310 days, in both 184 days. All the other parameters (age, sex, Karnofsky-Index, period between diagnose of the primary and the brain metastases, primary cancer therapy, extra cerebral metastases, number of metastases, localization of metastases supra- or infratentoriell, dose/effect relationship in the LINAC-group, whole brain radiotherapy) showed interesting differences, but the results were not statistically

  2. Institutional experience in the treatment of colorectal liver metastases with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Méndez Romero, Alejandra; Keskin-Cambay, Fatma; van Os, Rob M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Heijmen, Ben J. M.; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Verhoef, Cornelis

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether the impact of dose escalation in our patient population represented an improvement in local control without increasing treatment related toxicity. A cohort of consecutive patients with colorectal liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) between

  3. Optimal beam margins in linac-based VMAT stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy: a Pareto front analysis for liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilla, Savino; Ianiro, Anna; Deodato, Francesco; Macchia, Gabriella; Digesù, Cinzia; Valentini, Vincenzo; Morganti, Alessio G

    2017-11-27

    We explored the Pareto fronts mathematical strategy to determine the optimal block margin and prescription isodose for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatments of liver metastases using the volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique. Three targets (planning target volumes [PTVs] = 20, 55, and 101 cc) were selected. A single fraction dose of 26 Gy was prescribed (prescription dose [PD]). VMAT plans were generated for 3 different beam energies. Pareto fronts based on (1) different multileaf collimator (MLC) block margin around PTV and (2) different prescription isodose lines (IDL) were produced. For each block margin, the greatest IDL fulfilling the criteria (95% of PTV reached 100%) was considered as providing the optimal clinical plan for PTV coverage. Liver D mean , V7Gy, and V12Gy were used against the PTV coverage to generate the fronts. Gradient indexes (GI and mGI), homogeneity index (HI), and healthy liver irradiation in terms of D mean , V7Gy, and V12Gy were calculated to compare different plans. In addition, each target was also optimized with a full-inverse planning engine to obtain a direct comparison with anatomy-based treatment planning system (TPS) results. About 900 plans were calculated to generate the fronts. GI and mGI show a U-shaped behavior as a function of beam margin with minimal values obtained with a +1 mm MLC margin. For these plans, the IDL ranges from 74% to 86%. GI and mGI show also a V-shaped behavior with respect to HI index, with minimum values at 1 mm for all metrics, independent of tumor dimensions and beam energy. Full-inversed optimized plans reported worse results with respect to Pareto plans. In conclusion, Pareto fronts provide a rigorous strategy to choose clinical optimal plans in SBRT treatments. We show that a 1-mm MLC block margin provides the best results with regard to healthy liver tissue irradiation and steepness of dose fallout. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists

  4. An analysis of respiratory induced kidney motion on four-dimensional computed tomography and its implications for stereotactic kidney radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva, Shankar; Pham, Daniel; Gill, Suki; Bressel, Mathias; Dang, Kim; Devereux, Thomas; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is an emerging treatment modality for primary renal cell carcinoma. To account for respiratory-induced target motion, an internal target volume (ITV) concept is often used in treatment planning of SABR. The purpose of this study is to assess patterns of kidney motion and investigate potential surrogates of kidney displacement with the view of ITV verification during treatment. Datasets from 71 consecutive patients with free breathing four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) planning scans were included in this study. The displacement of the left and right hemi-diaphragm, liver dome and abdominal wall were measured and tested for correlation with the displacement of the both kidneys and patient breathing frequency. Nine patients were excluded due to severe banding artifact. Of 62 evaluable patients, the median age was 68 years, with 41 male patients and 21 female patients. The mean (range) of the maximum, minimum and average breathing frequency throughout the 4DCTs were 20.1 (11–38), 15.1 (9–24) and 17.3 (9–27.5) breaths per minute, respectively. The mean (interquartile range) displacement of the left and right kidneys was 0.74 cm (0.45-0.98 cm) and 0.75 cm (0.49-0.97) respectively. The amplitude of liver-dome motion was correlated with right kidney displacement (r=0.52, p<0.001), but not with left kidney displacement (p=0.796). There was a statistically significant correlation between the magnitude of right kidney displacement and that of abdominal displacement (r=0.36, p=0.004), but not the left kidney (r=0.24, p=0.056). Hemi-diaphragm displacements were correlated with kidney displacements respectively, with a weaker correlation for the left kidney/left diaphragm (r=0.45, [95% CI 0.22 to 0.63], p=<0.001) than for the right kidney/right diaphragm (r=0.57, [95% CI 0.37 to 0.72], p=<0.001). For the majority of patients, maximal left and right kidney displacement is subcentimeter in magnitude. The magnitude of

  5. Volumetric-based image guidance is superior to marker-based alignments for stereotactic body radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Lu, Lan; Stephans, Kevin L; Sharma, Naveen; Vassil, Andrew; Shen, Zhilei Liu; Stockham, Abigail; Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D; Xia, Ping

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a dual marker-based and soft-tissue based image guidance for inter-fractional corrections in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of prostate cancer. We reviewed 18 patients treated with SBRT for prostate cancer. An endorectal balloon was inserted at simulation and each treatment. Planning margins were 3 mm/0 mm posteriorly. Prior to each treatment, a dual image guidance protocol was applied to align three makers using stereoscopic x ray images and then to the soft tissue using kilo-voltage cone beam CT (kV-CBCT). After treatment, prostate (CTV), rectal wall, and bladder were delineated on each kV-CBCT, and delivered dose was recalculated. Dosimetric endpoints were analyzed, including V 36.25 Gy for prostate, and D 0.03 cc for bladder and rectal wall. Following initial marker alignment, additional translational shifts were applied to 22 of 84 fractions after kV-CBCT. Among the 22 fractions, ten fractions exceeded 3 mm shifts in any direction, including one in the left-right direction, four in the superior-inferior direction, and five in the anterior-posterior direction. With and without the additional kV-CBCT shifts, the average V 36.25 Gy of the prostate for the 22 fractions was 97.6 ± 2.6% with the kV x ray image alone, and was 98.1 ± 2.4% after applying the additional kV-CBCT shifts. The improvement was borderline statistical significance using Wilcoxon signed-rank test (P = 0.007). D 0.03 cc was 45.8 ± 6.3 Gy vs. 45.1 ± 4.9 Gy for the rectal wall; and 49.5 ± 8.6 Gy vs. 49.3 ± 7.9 Gy for the bladder before and after applying kV-CBCT shifts. Marker-based alignment alone is not sufficient. Additional adjustments are needed for some patients based kV-CBCT. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Concepts of radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) relies heavily on medical imaging. Until recently, the most important planning tool was the treatment simulator. The kilovoltage radiographic capabilities in a treatment simulator enabled the boundaries of treatment fields to be visualized with respect to bony anatomic landmarks. Perhaps the most important advance in treatment planning in recent years is the ability to visualize the passage of the beams with respect to a more accurate geometrical representation of the tumor and other soft tissue structures. This 'virtual simulation' uses a computer-based representation of a patient to determine the extent of the disease and the location of radiation sensitive normal tissue. Computer tomographic (CT) imaging produces a high-resolution three-dimensional representation of anatomy that can be correlated with other image sets such as magnetic resonance images (MRI) of function. Positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging is beginning to be used to determine tumor proliferation and the presence of distant disease. It is likely that accurate RTP in conjunction with CT simulators will eliminate traditional treatment simulators in the future. Traditionally, patient dose calculation algorithms have been based on correcting measured dose in water phantoms to take into account beam modifiers, patient surface contours and internal tissue inhomogeneities. Recently, model-based algorithms have been computing the dose directly in the patient representation using the CT to obtain a voxel-by-voxel density map. The convolution/superposition method, which uses a Monte Carlo-derived transport kernel, is the current state-of-the-art algorithm for dose computation. Soon direct Monte Carlo simulation will be used in model-based dose computation. Model-based dose computations enable a simpler monitor unit calculation formulation. The other major breakthrough in RTP is computer-based optimization. The goals of the treatment are specified as

  7. Differences in Clinical Results After LINAC-Based Single-Dose Radiosurgery Versus Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Welzel, Thomas; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) vs. those treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: This study is based on an analysis of 200 patients with 202 VSs treated with FSRT (n = 172) or SRS (n = 30). Patients with tumor progression and/or progression of clinical symptoms were selected for treatment. In 165 out of 202 VSs (82%), RT was performed as the primary treatment for VS, and for 37 VSs (18%), RT was conducted for tumor progression after neurosurgical intervention. For patients receiving FSRT, a median total dose of 57.6 Gy was prescribed, with a median fractionation of 5 x 1.8 Gy per week. For patients who underwent SRS, a median single dose of 13 Gy was prescribed to the 80% isodose. Results: FSRT and SRS were well tolerated. Median follow-up time was 75 months. Local control was not statistically different for both groups. The probability of maintaining the pretreatment hearing level after SRS with doses of ≤13 Gy was comparable to that of FSRT. The radiation dose for the SRS group (≤13 Gy vs. >13 Gy) significantly influenced hearing preservation rates (p = 0.03). In the group of patients treated with SRS doses of ≤13 Gy, cranial nerve toxicity was comparable to that of the FSRT group. Conclusions: FSRT and SRS are both safe and effective alternatives for the treatment of VS. Local control rates are comparable in both groups. SRS with doses of ≤13 Gy is a safe alternative to FSRT. While FSRT can be applied safely for the treatment of VSs of all sizes, SRS should be reserved for smaller lesions.

  8. On-Board Imaging Validation of Optically Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery Positioning System for Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Paranasal Sinus and Skull Base Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Murphy, James D.; Chu, Karen P.M.; Hsu, Annie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu, E-mail: Qle@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the positioning accuracy of an optical positioning system for stereotactic radiosurgery in a pilot experience of optically guided, conventionally fractionated, radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Before each daily radiotherapy session, the positioning of 28 patients was set up using an optical positioning system. After this initial setup, the patients underwent standard on-board imaging that included daily orthogonal kilovoltage images and weekly cone beam computed tomography scans. Daily translational shifts were made after comparing the on-board images with the treatment planning computed tomography scans. These daily translational shifts represented the daily positional error in the optical tracking system and were recorded during the treatment course. For 13 patients treated with smaller fields, a three-degree of freedom (3DOF) head positioner was used for more accurate setup. Results: The mean positional error for the optically guided system in patients with and without the 3DOF head positioner was 1.4 {+-} 1.1 mm and 3.9 {+-} 1.6 mm, respectively (p <.0001). The mean positional error drifted 0.11 mm/wk upward during the treatment course for patients using the 3DOF head positioner (p = .057). No positional drift was observed in the patients without the 3DOF head positioner. Conclusion: Our initial clinical experience with optically guided head-and-neck fractionated radiotherapy was promising and demonstrated clinical feasibility. The optically guided setup was especially useful when used in conjunction with the 3DOF head positioner and when it was recalibrated to the shifts using the weekly portal images.

  9. Factors Influencing Neurocognitive Outcomes in Young Patients With Benign and Low-Grade Brain Tumors Treated With Stereotactic Conformal Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalali, Rakesh; Mallick, Indranil; Dutta, Debnarayan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To present the effect of radiotherapy doses to different volumes of normal structures on neurocognitive outcomes in young patients with benign and low-grade brain tumors treated prospectively with stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients (median age, 13 years) with residual/progressive brain tumors (10 craniopharyngioma, 8 cerebellar astrocytoma, 6 optic pathway glioma and 4 cerebral low-grade glioma) were treated with SCRT to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks. Prospective neuropsychological assessments were done at baseline before RT and at subsequent follow-up examinations. The change in intelligence quotient (IQ) scores was correlated with various factors, including dose-volume to normal structures. Results: Although the overall mean full-scale IQ (FSIQ) at baseline before RT remained unchanged at 2-year follow-up after SCRT, one third of patients did show a >10% decline in FSIQ as compared with baseline. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that patients aged 10% drop in FSIQ than older patients (53% vs. 10%, p = 0.03). Dosimetric comparison in patients showing a >10% decline vs. patients showing a 43.2 Gy to >13% of volume of the left temporal lobe were the ones to show a significant drop in FSIQ (p = 0.048). Radiotherapy doses to other normal structures, including supratentorial brain, right temporal lobe, and frontal lobes, did not reveal any significant correlation. Conclusion: Our prospectively collected dosimetric data show younger age and radiotherapy doses to left temporal lobe to be predictors of neurocognitive decline, and may well be used as possible dose constraints for high-precision radiotherapy planning.

  10. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with benign or atypical intracranial meningioma: Long-term experience and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milker-Zabel, Stefanie; Zabel, Angelika; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze our long-term experience and prognostic factors after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients with benign or atypical intracranial meningioma. Methods and materials: Between January 1985 and December 2001, 317 patients with a median age of 55.7 years were treated with FSRT for intracranial meningioma. The tumor distribution was World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 1 in 48.3%, WHO Grade 2 in 8.2%, and unknown in 43.5%. Of the 317 patients, 97 underwent RT as their primary treatment, 79 underwent postoperative RT (subtotal resection in 38 and biopsy only in 41), and 141 were treated for recurrent disease. The median target volume was 33.6 cm 3 (range, 1.0-412.6 cm 3 ). The median total dose was 57.6 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction five times weekly. Results: The median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 1.2-14.3 years). The overall local tumor control rate was 93.1% (295 of 317). Of the 317 patients, 72 had a partial response on CT/MRI and 223 (70.4%) remained stable. At a median of 4.5 years after FSRT, 22 patients (6.9%) had local tumor progression on MRI. Local tumor failure was significantly greater in patients with WHO Grade 2 meningioma (p 60 cm 3 had a recurrence rate of 15.5% vs. 4.3% for those with a tumor volume of ≤60 cm 3 (p < 0.001). In 42.9% of the patients, preexisting neurologic deficits improved. Worsening of preexisting neurologic symptoms occurred in 8.2%. Eight patients developed new clinical symptoms, such as reduced vision, trigeminal neuralgia, and intermittent tinnitus located at the side of the irradiated meningioma after FSRT. Conclusion: These data have demonstrated that FSRT is an effective and safe treatment modality for local control of meningioma with a low risk of significant late toxicity. We identified the tumor volume, indication for FSRT, and histologic features of the meningioma as statistically significant prognostic factors

  11. Neuropsychological outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for base of skull meningiomas: a prospective 1-year follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinvorth, Sarah; Welzel, Grit; Fuss, Martin; Debus, Juergen; Wildermuth, Susanne; Wannenmacher, Michael; Wenz, Frederik

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cognitive outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients with base of skull meningiomas. Methods and material: A total of 40 patients with base of skull meningiomas were neuro psychologically evaluated before, after the first fraction (1.8 Gy), at the end of FSRT (n=37), 6 weeks (n=24), 6 (n=18) and 12 months (n=14) after FSRT. A comprehensive test battery including assessment of general intelligence, attention and memory functions was used. Alternate forms were used and current mood state was controlled. Results: After the first fraction a transient decline in memory function and simultaneous improvements in attention functions were observed. No cognitive deteriorations were seen during further follow-up, but increases in attention and memory functions were observed. Mood state improved after the first fraction, at the end of radiotherapy and 6 weeks after radiotherapy. Conclusion: The present data support the conclusion that the probability for the development of permanent cognitive dysfunctions appears to be very low after FSRT. The transient memory impairments on day 1 are interpreted as most likely related to an increase of a preexisting peritumoral edema, whereas the significant acute improvements in attention functions are interpreted as practice effects. An analysis of localization specific effects of radiation failed to show clear hemisphere specific cognitive changes

  12. Reirradiation with stereotactic body radiotherapy: analysis of human spinal cord tolerance using the generalized linear-quadratic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhibin; Mayr, Nina A; Yuh, William T; Wang, Jian Z; Lo, Simon S

    2013-06-01

    Using the generalized linear-quadratic (gLQ) model, we reanalyzed published dosimetric data from patients with radiation myelopathy (RM) after reirradiation with spinal stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Based on a published study, the thecal sac dose of five RM patients and 14 no RM patients were reanalyzed using gLQ model. Maximum point doses (Pmax) in the thecal sac were obtained. The gLQ-based biological effective doses were calculated and normalized (nBEDgLQ) to a 2-Gy equivalent dose (nBEDgLQ = Gy2/2_gLQ). The initial conventional radiotherapy dose, converted to Gy2/2_gLQ, was added. Total (conventional radiotherapy + SBRT) mean Pmax nBEDgLQ was lower in no RM than RM patients: 59.2 Gy2/2_gLQ (range: 37.5-101.9) versus 94.8 Gy2/2_gLQ (range: 70.2-133.4) (p = 0.0016). The proportion of total Pmax nBEDgLQ accounted for by the SBRT Pmax nBEDgLQ was higher for RM patients. No RMs were seen below a total spinal cord nBEDgLQ of 70 Gy2/2_gLQ. The gLQ-derived spinal cord tolerance for total nBEDgLQ was 70 Gy2/2_gLQ.

  13. Comparison Between Infrared Optical and Stereoscopic X-Ray Technologies for Patient Setup in Image Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagaste, Barbara, E-mail: tagaste@cnao.it [Division of Radiation Oncology, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia (Italy); Riboldi, Marco [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia (Italy); TBM Lab, Department of Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano University, Milano (Italy); Spadea, Maria F. [TBM Lab, Department of Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano University, Milano (Italy); Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Universita degli Studi Magna Graecia, Catanzaro (Italy); Bellante, Simone [TBM Lab, Department of Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano University, Milano (Italy); Baroni, Guido [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia (Italy); TBM Lab, Department of Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano University, Milano (Italy); Cambria, Raffaella; Garibaldi, Cristina [Medical Physics, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Ciocca, Mario [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia (Italy); Medical Physics, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Catalano, Gianpiero [Division of Radiation Oncology, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Unit of Radiotherapy, Multimedica Holding Clinical Institute, Castellanza (Italy); Alterio, Daniela [Division of Radiation Oncology, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [Division of Radiation Oncology, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia (Italy); Department of Science and Biomedical Technologies, Universita di Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To compare infrared (IR) optical vs. stereoscopic X-ray technologies for patient setup in image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective data analysis of 233 fractions in 127 patients treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was performed. Patient setup at the linear accelerator was carried out by means of combined IR optical localization and stereoscopic X-ray image fusion in 6 degrees of freedom (6D). Data were analyzed to evaluate the geometric and dosimetric discrepancy between the two patient setup strategies. Results: Differences between IR optical localization and 6D X-ray image fusion parameters were on average within the expected localization accuracy, as limited by CT image resolution (3 mm). A disagreement between the two systems below 1 mm in all directions was measured in patients treated for cranial tumors. In extracranial sites, larger discrepancies and higher variability were observed as a function of the initial patient alignment. The compensation of IR-detected rotational errors resulted in a significantly improved agreement with 6D X-ray image fusion. On the basis of the bony anatomy registrations, the measured differences were found not to be sensitive to patient breathing. The related dosimetric analysis showed that IR-based patient setup caused limited variations in three cases, with 7% maximum dose reduction in the clinical target volume and no dose increase in organs at risk. Conclusions: In conclusion, patient setup driven by IR external surrogates localization in 6D featured comparable accuracy with respect to procedures based on stereoscopic X-ray imaging.

  14. A phase I study on stereotactic body radiotherapy of liver metastases based on functional treatment planning using positron emission tomography with 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-galactose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mette Marie; Bak-Fredslund, Kirstine; Petersen, Jørgen Baltzer

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The galactose analog 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-galactose (FDGal) is used for quantification of regional hepatic metabolic capacity by functional positron emission tomography computerized tomography (PET/CT). In the present study, FDGal PET/CT was used for functional treatment...

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Medically Inoperable Lung Cancer: Prospective, Single-Center Study of 108 Consecutive Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taremi, Mojgan, E-mail: mojgan.taremi@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hope, Andrew [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Dahele, Max [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stronach Regional Cancer Center, Newmarket, ON (Canada); Pearson, Shannon [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Fung, Sharon [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Purdie, Thomas [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Brade, Anthony [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cho, John; Sun, Alexander; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present the results of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for medically inoperable patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and contrast outcomes in patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. Methods and Materials: Between December 2004 and October 2008, 108 patients (114 tumors) underwent treatment according to the prospective research ethics board-approved SBRT protocols at our cancer center. Of the 108 patients, 88 (81.5%) had undergone pretreatment whole-body [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A pathologic diagnosis was unavailable for 33 (28.9%) of the 114 lesions. The SBRT schedules included 48 Gy in 4 fractions or 54-60 Gy in 3 fractions for peripheral lesions and 50-60 Gy in 8-10 fractions for central lesions. Toxicity and radiologic response were assessed at the 3-6-month follow-up visits using conventional criteria. Results: The mean tumor diameter was 2.4-cm (range, 0.9-5.7). The median follow-up was 19.1 months (range, 1-55.7). The estimated local control rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86-97%) and 89% (95% CI, 81-96%). The cause-specific survival rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% CI, 87-98%) and 77% (95% CI, 64-89%), respectively. No statistically significant difference was found in the local, regional, and distant control between patients with and without pathologically confirmed NSCLC. The most common acute toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 fatigue (53 of 108 patients). No toxicities of Grade 4 or greater were identified. Conclusions: Lung SBRT for early-stage NSCLC resulted in excellent local control and cause-specific survival with minimal toxicity. The disease-specific outcomes were comparable for patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. SBRT can be considered an option for selected patients with proven or presumed early-stage NSCLC.

  16. SU-F-T-644: Reproducibility of Target Position Using Moderate Voluntary Breath- Hold During Liver Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, G; Trakul, N; Chang, E; Shiu, A [University Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the reproducibility of target position using moderate voluntary breath-hold during liver stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). Methods: Two patients who underwent liver SABR on a Varian TrueBeam STx linac were used for this study. Fiducial markers were placed in and around the target in the liver as surrogates for the target position and motion. GTVs were contoured by assessing tumor extent on contrast enhanced CT. The PTV was created from the GTV by adding 2 mm margins to account for the residual motion during breath-holds. A portable biofeedback system was used to facilitate the breath-hold to a reproducible position. The Varian RPM system was used for gating the linac. Proceeding each treatment, orthogonal kV pairs were taken, and alignment to nearby bony anatomy was performed. Then the breath-hold CBCT was acquired to align the fiducial markers. On-line fluoroscopy was used to fine-tune the breath-hold gating thresholds to correlate with the positions of the fiducial markers. The inter-fraction reproducibility of the target was evaluated by the offsets of the daily breath-hold CBCTs from the paired kV matches as a direct measure of the target position relative to the bony anatomy. The intra-fraction reproducibility of the target position was assessed by the gated window of the RPM marker block for each fraction. Results: The absolute mean offsets between the CBCT and paired kV matches in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions were 0.06 cm, 0.10 cm, and 0.06 cm for patient 1, and 0.37 cm, 0.62 cm, and 0.09 cm for patient 2. The gated window of the RPM marker block for the breath-hold for each fraction was within 0.63 ± 0.16 cm and 0.59 ± 0.12 cm for patients 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: Moderate voluntary breath-hold showed good inter- and intra-fraction reproducibility of target position during liver SABR.

  17. Dosimetric and motion analysis of margin-intensive therapy by stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for resectable pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinzerling John H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The retroperitoneal margin is a common site of positive surgical margins in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer. Preoperative margin-intensive therapy (MIT involves delivery of a single high dose of ablative radiotherapy (30 Gy focused on this surgically inaccessible margin, utilizing stereotactic techniques in an effort to reduce local failure following surgery. In this study, we investigated the motion of regional organs at risk (OAR utilizing 4DCT, evaluated the dosimetric effects of abdominal compression (AC to reduce regional motion, and compared various planning techniques to optimize MIT. Methods 10 patients were evaluated with 4DCT scans. All 10 patients had scans using AC and seven of the 10 patients had scans both with and without AC. The peak respiratory abdominal organ and major vessel centroid excursion was measured. A "sub-GTV" region was defined by a radiation oncologist and surgical oncologist encompassing the retroperitoneal margin typically lateral and posterior to the superior mesenteric artery (SMA, and a 3-5 mm margin was added to constitute the PTV. Identical 3D non-coplanar SABR (3DSABR plans were designed for the average compression and non-compression scans. Compression scans were planned with 3DSABR, coplanar IMRT (IMRT, and Cyberknife (CK planning techniques. Dose volume analysis was undertaken for various endpoints, comparing OAR doses with and without AC and for different planning methods. Results The mean PTV size was 20.2 cm3. Regional vessel motion of the SMA, celiac trunk, and renal vessels was small ( 5 mm, so AC has been used in all patients enrolled thus far. AC did not significantly increase OAR dose including the stomach and traverse colon. There were several statistically significant differences in the doses to OARs as a function of the type of planning modality used. Conclusions AC does not significantly reduce the limited motion of structures in close proximity to the MIT target

  18. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Following In-Field Failure of Initial SBRT for Spinal Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Isabelle; Campbell, Mikki; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Letourneau, Daniel; Yu, Eugene; Cho, B C John; Lee, Young K; Fehlings, Michael G; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-10-01

    We report our experience in salvaging spinal metastases initially irradiated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), who subsequently progressed with imaging-confirmed local tumor progression, and were re-irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. From a prospective database, 56 metastatic spinal segments in 40 patients were identified as having been irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. In addition, 24 of 56 (42.9%) segments had initially been irradiated with conventional external beam radiation therapy before the first course of SBRT. Local control (LC) was defined as no progression on magnetic resonance imaging at the treated segment, and calculated according to the competing risk model. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated for each patient treated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. The median salvage second SBRT total dose and number of fractions was 30 Gy in 4 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 2-5 fractions), and for the first course of SBRT was 24 Gy in 2 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 1-5 fractions). The median follow-up time after salvage second SBRT was 6.8 months (range, 0.9-39 months), the median OS was 10.0 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 48%. A longer time interval between the first and second SBRT courses predicted for better OS (P=.02). The crude LC was 77% (43/56), the 1-year LC rate was 81%, and the median time to local failure was 3.0 months (range, 2.7-16.7 months). Of the 13 local failures, 85% (11/13) and 46% (6/13) showed progression within the epidural space and paraspinal soft tissues, respectively. Absence of baseline paraspinal disease predicted for better LC (Pinitial SBRT is a feasible and efficacious salvage treatment option. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The use of a silicon strip detector dose magnifying glass in stereotactic radiotherapy QA and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, J. H. D.; Knittel, T.; Downes, S.; Carolan, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Petasecca, M.; Perevertaylo, V. L.; Metcalfe, P.; Jackson, M.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery/therapy (SRS/SRT) is the use of radiation ablation in place of conventional surgical excision to remove or create fibrous tissue in small target volumes. The target of the SRT/SRS treatment is often located in close proximity to critical organs, hence the requirement of high geometric precision including a tight margin on the planning target volume and a sharp dose fall off. One of the major problems with quality assurance (QA) of SRT/SRS is the availability of suitable detectors with the required spatial resolution. The authors present a novel detector that they refer to as the dose magnifying glass (DMG), which has a high spatial resolution (0.2 mm) and is capable of meeting the stringent requirements of QA and dosimetry in SRS/SRT therapy. Methods: The DMG is an array of 128 phosphor implanted n + strips on a p-type Si wafer. The sensitive area defined by a single n + strip is 20x2000 μm 2 . The Si wafer is 375 μm thick. It is mounted on a 0.12 mm thick Kapton substrate. The authors studied the dose per pulse (dpp) and angular response of the detector in a custom-made SRS phantom. The DMG was used to determine the centers of rotation and positioning errors for the linear accelerator's gantry, couch, and collimator rotations. They also used the DMG to measure the profiles and the total scatter factor (S cp ) of the SRS cones. Comparisons were made with the EBT2 film and standard S cp values. The DMG was also used for dosimetric verification of a typical SRS treatment with various noncoplanar fields and arc treatments when applied to the phantom. Results: The dose per pulse dependency of the DMG was found to be cp agrees very well with the standard data with an average difference of 1.2±1.1%. Comparison of the relative intensity profiles of the DMG and EBT2 measurements for a simulated SRS treatment shows a maximum difference of 2.5%. Conclusions: The DMG was investigated for dose per pulse and angular dependency. Its

  20. Proton Stereotactic Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Benign Meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halasz, Lia M., E-mail: lhalasz@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bussiere, Marc R.; Dennis, Elizabeth R.; Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chapman, Paul H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Given the excellent prognosis for patients with benign meningiomas, treatment strategies to minimize late effects are important. One strategy is proton radiation therapy (RT), which allows less integral dose to normal tissue and greater homogeneity than photon RT. Here, we report the first series of proton stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) used for the treatment of meningiomas. Methods and Materials: We identified 50 patients with 51 histologically proven or image- defined, presumed-benign meningiomas treated at our institution between 1996 and 2007. Tumors of <4 cm in diameter and located {>=}2 mm from the optic apparatus were eligible for treatment. Indications included primary treatment (n = 32), residual tumor following surgery (n = 8), and recurrent tumor following surgery (n = 10). The median dose delivered was 13 Gray radiobiologic equivalent (Gy[RBE]) (range, 10.0-15.5 Gy[RBE]) prescribed to the 90% isodose line. Results: Median follow-up was 32 months (range, 6-133 months). Magnetic resonance imaging at the most recent follow-up or time of progression revealed 33 meningiomas with stable sizes, 13 meningiomas with decreased size, and 5 meningiomas with increased size. The 3-year actuarial tumor control rate was 94% (95% confidence interval, 77%-98%). Symptoms were improved in 47% (16/ 34) of patients, unchanged in 44% (15/34) of patients, and worse in 9% (3/34) of patients. The rate of potential permanent adverse effects after SRS was 5.9% (3/51 patients). Conclusions: Proton SRS is an effective therapy for small benign meningiomas, with a potentially lower rate of long-term treatment-related morbidity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess durability of tumor control and late effects.

  1. Hormone levels in radiotherapy treatment related fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswal, B.M.; Mallik, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    Radiotherapy is known to cause debilitating treatment related fatigue. Fatigue in general is a conglomeration of psychological, physical, hematological and unknown factors influencing the internal milieu of the cancer patient. Radiotherapy can add stress at the cellular and somatic level to aggravate further fatigue in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Stress related hormones might be mediating in the development of fatigue. This is an ongoing prospective study to evaluate if the hormonal profile related to stress is influenced by radiotherapy treatment related fatigue. The study was conducted from September 2002 onwards in the division of Radiotherapy and Oncology of our Medical School. Previously untreated patients with histopathology proof of malignancy requiring external beam radiotherapy were considered for this study. Selection criteria were applied to exclude other causes of fatigue. Initial fatigue score was obtained using Pipers Fatigue Score questionnaire containing 23 questions, subsequently final fatigue score was obtained at the end of radiotherapy. Blood samples were obtained to estimate the levels of ACTH, TSH, HGH, and cortisol on the final assessment. The hormone levels were compared with resultant post radiotherapy fatigue score. At the time of reporting 50 patients were evaluable for the study. The total significant fatigue score was observed among 12 (24%) patients. The individual debilitating fatigue score were behavioral severity 14 (28%), affective meaning 14(28%), Sensory 13 (26%) and cognitive mood 10 (20%) respectively. From the analysis of hormonal profile, growth hormone level > 1 ng/mL and TSH <0.03 appears to be associated with high fatigue score (though statistically not significant); whereas there was no correlation with ACTH and serum cortisol level. In our prospective study severe radiotherapy treatment related fatigue was found among our patient population. Low levels of TSH and high levels of GH appear to be associated

  2. Does radiation dose to the vestibule predict change in balance function and patient perceived dizziness following stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavas, Mark J; Carlson, Matthew L; Attia, Albert; Jacobson, Gary P; Rivas, Alejandro; Morales-Paliza, Manuel; Wanna, George B

    2014-01-01

    To date, the majority of the vestibular schwannoma (VS) literature has focused on tumor control rates, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Other factors that have been shown to significantly affect quality-of-life (QOL), such as dizziness, remain understudied. The primary objective of the current study is to investigate the association between radiation dose to the vestibule and post-treatment changes in vestibular function and patient reported dizziness handicap. This is a prospective observational pilot study at a tertiary academic referral center including all subjects that underwent linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRS) for sporadic VS and completed pre-treatment and post-treatment vestibular testing and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) questionnaires. Associations between objective vestibular test results, patient-reported DHI scores and radiation dose parameters were investigated. Ten patients met inclusion criteria. Tumor control was achieved in all individuals. There were no statistically significant associations or identifiable trends between radiation dose and change in vestibular function or DHI scores. Notably, the four ears receiving the highest vestibular dose had minimal changes in vestibular function tests and DHI scores. To the best of our knowledge, no previous reports have described the association between radiation dose to the vestibule and post-treatment changes in vestibular function and patient reported DHI. Based on these preliminary data, radiation dose to the vestibule does not reliably predict change in objective or subjective vestibular outcome measures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment of extramammary Paget's disease by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, N.P.; Jones, D.H.; Pye, R.J.; Hudson, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a rare cutaneous malignancy, which usually occurs in the elderly. Wide local excision is the recommended treatment, although this may not always be feasible. We report our experience of EMPD treated by radiotherapy in five patients. The radiotherapy was well tolerated in each case, and there were no signs of recurrence during follow-up (6 months-8 years). This study shows that radiotherapy is a useful alternative therapy for EMPD, and should be considered particularly in elderly patients who may not tolerate surgery. (author)

  4. Methodology to reduce 6D patient positional shifts into a 3D linear shift and its verification in frameless stereotactic radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Biplab; Ray, Jyotirmoy; Ganesh, Tharmarnadar; Manikandan, Arjunan; Munshi, Anusheel; Rathinamuthu, Sasikumar; Kaur, Harpreet; Anbazhagan, Satheeshkumar; Giri, Upendra K.; Roy, Soumya; Jassal, Kanan; Kalyan Mohanti, Bidhu

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this article is to derive and verify a mathematical formulation for the reduction of the six-dimensional (6D) positional inaccuracies of patients (lateral, longitudinal, vertical, pitch, roll and yaw) to three-dimensional (3D) linear shifts. The formulation was mathematically and experimentally tested and verified for 169 stereotactic radiotherapy patients. The mathematical verification involves the comparison of any (one) of the calculated rotational coordinates with the corresponding value from the 6D shifts obtained by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The experimental verification involves three sets of measurements using an ArcCHECK phantom, when (i) the phantom was not moved (neutral position: 0MES), (ii) the position of the phantom shifted by 6D shifts obtained from CBCT (6DMES) from neutral position and (iii) the phantom shifted from its neutral position by 3D shifts reduced from 6D shifts (3DMES). Dose volume histogram and statistical comparisons were made between ≤ft and ≤ft . The mathematical verification was performed by a comparison of the calculated and measured yaw (γ°) rotation values, which gave a straight line, Y  =  1X with a goodness of fit as R 2  =  0.9982. The verification, based on measurements, gave a planning target volume receiving 100% of the dose (V100%) as 99.1  ±  1.9%, 96.3  ±  1.8%, 74.3  ±  1.9% and 72.6  ±  2.8% for the calculated treatment planning system values TPSCAL, 0MES, 3DMES and 6DMES, respectively. The statistical significance (p-values: paired sample t-test) of V100% were found to be 0.03 for the paired sample ≤ft and 0.01 for ≤ft . In this paper, a mathematical method to reduce 6D shifts to 3D shifts is presented. The mathematical method is verified by using well-matched values between the measured and calculated γ°. Measurements done on the ArcCHECK phantom also proved that the proposed methodology is correct. The post-correction of the

  5. Adjuvant stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy to the resection cavity in recurrent glioblastoma - the GlioCave study (NOA 17 - ARO 2016/3 - DKTK ROG trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Christoph; Scherb, Hagen; Gempt, Jens; Kirschke, Jan; Zimmer, Claus; Schmidt-Graf, Friederike; Meyer, Bernhard; Combs, Stephanie E

    2018-01-03

    Glioblastoma relapses in the vast majority of cases within 1 year. Maximum safe resection of the recurrent glioblastoma can be offered in some cases. Re-irradiation has been established for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma, too. In both cases, adjuvant treatment, mostly using temozolomide, can improve PFS and OS after these interventions. However, combining gross tumor resection and adjuvant re-radiotherapy to the resection cavity has not been tested so far. In the multicenter two-armed randomized Phase II GlioCave Study, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy to the resection cavity, after gross tumor resection of recurrent glioblastoma, will be compared to observation. Depending on the size of the target volume, a total dose of 46 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction or a total dose if 36 Gy in 3 Gy per fraction will be applied. Progression free survival will be the primary endpoint of the study. Adjuvant treatment after gross tumor resection of recurrent glioblastoma is currently deemed to be limited to chemotherapy. However, re-irradiation has proven safety and tolerability in the treatment of macroscopic disease. Performing re-irradiation as an adjuvant measure after gross tumor resection has not been tested so far. The GlioCave Study will investigate the efficacy and the safety profile of this approach. The trial was prospectively registered at clinicaltrials.gov ( NCT02715297 , registration date February 29th, 2016). The protocol presented hereby refers to the version 1.2 of the protocol (January 11 th , 2017).

  6. Immersive visualization training of radiotherapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Roger; Ward, James W; Beavis, Andy W

    2005-01-01

    External radiation beam treatment of cancer tumours involves delivery of invisible radiation beams through the body where internal structures can not be seen. Beam targeting of patient anatomy has to very accurate to achieve the desired therapeutic result. Good understanding of radiotherapy treatment (RT) concepts is essential to training. This paper presents a virtual environment simulator developed by the authors for training and education of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment of cancer. This simulator employs immersive visualization to provide a high fidelity spatial awareness of the complex relationships between tumour, organs at risk, treatment beam and radiation dose. All these visualization are provided by a 3D virtual environment based on the patient in a RT treatment room. Immersive visualization using this simulator is being used to train radiation oncologist and radiation physicists about radiotherapy treatment.

  7. Comparative Analysis of Local Control Prediction Using Different Biophysical Models for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Tian Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The consistency for predicting local control (LC data using biophysical models for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT treatment of lung cancer is unclear. This study aims to compare the results calculated from different models using the treatment planning data. Materials and Methods. Treatment plans were designed for 17 patients diagnosed with primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC using 5 different fraction schemes. The Martel model, Ohri model, and the Tai model were used to predict the 2-year LC value. The Gucken model, Santiago model, and the Tai model were employed to estimate the 3-year LC data. Results. We found that the employed models resulted in completely different LC prediction except for the Gucken and the Santiago models which exhibited quite similar 3-year LC data. The predicted 2-year and 3-year LC values in different models were not only associated with the dose normalization but also associated with the employed fraction schemes. The greatest difference predicted by different models was up to 15.0%. Conclusions. Our results show that different biophysical models influence the LC prediction and the difference is not only correlated to the dose normalization but also correlated to the employed fraction schemes.

  8. Intrafractional setup errors in patients undergoing non-invasive fixation using an immobilization system during hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Meguru; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kuriyama, Kengo

    2013-01-01

    Intrafractional setup errors during hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) were investigated on the patient under voluntary breath-holding conditions with non-invasive immobilization on the CT-linac treatment table. A total of 30 patients with primary and metastatic lung tumors were treated with the hypofractionated SRT with a total dose of 48-60 Gy with four treatment fractions. The patient was placed supine and stabilized on the table with non-invasive patient fixation. Intrafractional setup errors in Right/Left (R.L.), Posterior/Anterior (P.A.), and Inferior/Superior (I.S.) dimensions were analyzed with pre- and post-irradiation CT images. The means and one standard deviation of the intrafractional errors were 0.9±0.7 mm (R.L.), 0.9±0.7 mm (P.A.) and 0.5±1.0 mm (I.S.). Setup errors in each session of the treatment demonstrated no statistically significant difference in the mean value between any two sessions. The frequency within 3 mm displacement was 98% in R.L., 98% in P.A. and 97% in I.S. directions. SRT under the non-invasive patient fixation immobilization system with a comparatively loose vacuum pillow demonstrated satisfactory reproducibility of minimal setup errors with voluntary breath-holding conditions that required a small internal margin. (author)

  9. EF5 PET of Tumor Hypoxia: A Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Figure 1 shows the tumor hypoxic fraction on EF5- PET imaging at baseline and after carbogen breathing. Figure 1: Effect of carbogen breathing...tumors (hypoxia) can compromise the effectiveness of radiation therapy, yet there is currently no clinically practical way to measure it. PET imaging...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0236 TITLE: EF5 PET of Tumor Hypoxia: A Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

  10. Predicting Chest Wall Pain From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Different Fractionation Schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woody, Neil M.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Djemil, Toufik; Kim, Yongbok; Xia Ping

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recent studies with two fractionation schemes predicted that the volume of chest wall receiving >30 Gy (V30) correlated with chest wall pain after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the lung. This study developed a predictive model of chest wall pain incorporating radiobiologic effects, using clinical data from four distinct SBRT fractionation schemes. Methods and Materials: 102 SBRT patients were treated with four different fractionations: 60 Gy in three fractions, 50 Gy in five fractions, 48 Gy in four fractions, and 50 Gy in 10 fractions. To account for radiobiologic effects, a modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) model calculated the dose to the chest wall with volume weighting. For comparison, V30 and maximum point dose were also reported. Using univariable logistic regression, the association of radiation dose and clinical variables with chest wall pain was assessed by uncertainty coefficient (U) and C statistic (C) of receiver operator curve. The significant associations from the univariable model were verified with a multivariable model. Results: 106 lesions in 102 patients with a mean age of 72 were included, with a mean of 25.5 (range, 12–55) months of follow-up. Twenty patients reported chest wall pain at a mean time of 8.1 (95% confidence interval, 6.3–9.8) months after treatment. The mEUD models, V30, and maximum point dose were significant predictors of chest wall pain (p < 0.0005). mEUD improved prediction of chest wall pain compared with V30 (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.11). The mEUD with moderate weighting (a = 5) better predicted chest wall pain than did mEUD without weighting (a = 1) (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.14). Body mass index (BMI) was significantly associated with chest wall pain (p = 0.008). On multivariable analysis, mEUD and BMI remained significant predictors of chest wall pain (p = 0.0003 and 0.03, respectively). Conclusion: mEUD with moderate weighting better predicted chest wall pain

  11. Performance of a novel repositioning head frame for gamma knife perfexion and image-guided linac-based intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschin, Mark; Nayebi, Nazanin; Carlsson, Per; Brown, Kevin; Tamerou, Messeret; Li, Winnie; Laperriere, Normand; Sahgal, Arjun; Cho, Young-Bin; Ménard, Cynthia; Jaffray, David

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the geometric positioning and immobilization performance of a vacuum bite-block repositioning head frame (RHF) system for Perfexion (PFX-SRT) and linac-based intracranial image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Patients with intracranial tumors received linac-based image-guided SRT using the RHF for setup and immobilization. Three hundred thirty-three fractions of radiation were delivered in 12 patients. The accuracy of the RHF was estimated for linac-based SRT with online cone-beam CT (CBCT) and for PFX-SRT with a repositioning check tool (RCT) and offline CBCT. The RCT's ability to act as a surrogate for anatomic position was estimated through comparison to CBCT image matching. Immobilization performance was evaluated daily with pre- and postdose delivery CBCT scans and RCT measurements. The correlation coefficient between RCT- and CBCT-reported displacements was 0.59, 0.75, 0.79 (Right, Superior, and Anterior, respectively). For image-guided linac-based SRT, the mean three-dimensional (3D) setup error was 0.8 mm with interpatient (Sigma) and interfraction (sigma) variations of 0.1 and 0.4 mm, respectively. For PFX-SRT, the initial, uncorrected mean 3D positioning displacement in stereotactic coordinates was 2.0 mm, with Sigma = 1.1 mm and sigma = 0.8 mm. Considering only RCT setups <1mm (PFX action level) the mean 3D positioning displacement reduced to 1.3 mm, with Sigma = 0.9 mm and sigma = 0.4 mm. The largest contributing systematic uncertainty was in the superior-inferior direction (mean displacement = -0.5 mm; Sigma = 0.9 mm). The largest mean rotation was 0.6 degrees in pitch. The mean 3D intrafraction motion was 0.4 +/- 0.3 mm. The RHF provides excellent immobilization for intracranial SRT and PFX-SRT. Some small systematic uncertainties in stereotactic positioning exist and must be considered when generating PFX-SRT treatment plans. The RCT provides reasonable surrogacy for internal anatomic displacement. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc

  12. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for high-risk central pulmonary metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lischalk, Jonathan W.; Malik, Ryan M.; Collins, Sean P.; Collins, Brian T.; Matus, Ismael A.; Anderson, Eric D.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy of central lung tumors carries a higher risk of treatment-related toxicity and local failure. In the era of aggressive oligometastic management the exploration of the proper dose-fractionation for metastatic central lung tumors is essential. Patients diagnosed with high-risk metastatic lesions of the central pulmonary tree comprised this single-institutional retrospective analysis. “High-risk” central pulmonary lesions were defined as those with abutment and/or invasion of the mainstem bronchus. All patients were treated using the CyberKnife SBRT system in 5 fractions to a total dose of 35 or 40 Gy. Twenty patients were treated from 2008 to 2011 at Georgetown University Hospital. At a median follow up of 19 months, 1-year Kaplan-Meier local control and overall survival was 70 and 75 %, respectively. Late grade 2 or higher atelectasis was the most common treatment-related toxicity and was significantly associated with maximum dose to the mainstem bronchus. Gross endobronchial involvement was associated with significantly lower overall survival. Five-fraction SBRT to a total dose of 35 or 40 Gy appears to be a safe and effective management strategy for high-risk central pulmonary metastatic lesions, though care should be taken to limit the maximum point dose to the mainstem bronchus

  13. Safety of radiotherapy treatments and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evin, C.

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy occupies a major place in cancer treatment, a place tending to expand under the impetus of several factors: constant progress of the techniques used, which provide new treatment options and now enable precision management of tumours with complex shapes; the development of conservative surgery with which it is combined; the ageing of the population, which should on its own lead to a 10% increase in treatments over the next few years. At the beginning of the third millennium French radiotherapy has experienced a major crisis with the occurrence in 2006 and 2007 of accidents which have had very serious consequences on the health of the patients involved. This crisis led the public authorities to introduce a 'national road map' to avoid the occurrence of further accidents in the future and to guarantee treatments of optimal quality to the patients. The mobilization of all concerned has been at the level of the challenge, and the implementation of measures to ensure treatment safety is now well under way in the radiotherapy establishments and centres. In his report preparing the way for the drafting of the Second Cancer Plan 2009-2013, Professor Grunfeld notes that 'a major paradigm change in the discipline' has been initiated as a consequence. Our system of care in radiotherapy nevertheless still has a worrying weakness; it concerns the fragility of the human resources of the radiotherapy teams, which it is essential to consolidate rapidly. (author)

  14. Tumor control probability and the utility of 4D vs 3D dose calculations for stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, Gilmer, E-mail: gilmer.valdes@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Robinson, Clifford [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Lee, Percy [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Morel, Delphine [Department of Biomedical Engineering, AIX Marseille 2 University, Marseille (France); Department of Medical Physics, Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble (France); Low, Daniel; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Lamb, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) dose calculations for lung cancer radiotherapy have been technically feasible for a number of years but have not become standard clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to determine if clinically significant differences in tumor control probability (TCP) exist between 3D and 4D dose calculations so as to inform the decision whether 4D dose calculations should be used routinely for treatment planning. Radiotherapy plans for Stage I-II lung cancer were created for 8 patients. Clinically acceptable treatment plans were created with dose calculated on the end-exhale 4D computed tomography (CT) phase using a Monte Carlo algorithm. Dose was then projected onto the remaining 9 phases of 4D-CT using the Monte Carlo algorithm and accumulated onto the end-exhale phase using commercially available deformable registration software. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the gross tumor volume (GTV), planning tumor volume (PTV), and PTV{sub setup} were compared according to target coverage and dose. The PTV{sub setup} was defined as a volume including the GTV and a margin for setup uncertainties but not for respiratory motion. TCPs resulting from these DVHs were estimated using a wide range of alphas, betas, and tumor cell densities. Differences of up to 5 Gy were observed between 3D and 4D calculations for a PTV with highly irregular shape. When the TCP was calculated using the resulting DVHs for fractionation schedules typically used in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), the TCP differed at most by 5% between 4D and 3D cases, and in most cases, it was by less than 1%. We conclude that 4D dose calculations are not necessary for most cases treated with SBRT, but they might be valuable for irregularly shaped target volumes. If 4D calculations are used, 4D DVHs should be evaluated on volumes that include margin for setup uncertainty but not respiratory motion.

  15. Pediatric radiotherapy planning and treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Olch, Arthur J

    2013-01-01

    "This is a very well-written and -organized book covering the planning and delivery aspects unique to pediatric radiotherapy. The author is a respected and well-known medical physicist with extensive pediatric radiotherapy experience. … a very useful book for any clinical physicist treating pediatric cases and seeking contextual and historical perspective. … a great reference for medical physicists who may not see many pediatric cases and can look to this text as a one-stop shop for not only a comprehensive overview, but detailed explanation for specific pediatric disease sites. Overall, it is a great addition to the reference library of any radiation therapy physicist."-Medical Physics, April 2014.

  16. Integral test phantom for dosimetric quality assurance of image guided and intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Sharpe, Michael B; Jaffray, David A

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a dosimetric phantom quality assurance (QA) of linear accelerators capable of cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guided and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). This phantom is to be used in an integral test to quantify in real-time both the performance of the image guidance and the dose delivery systems in terms of dose localization. The prototype IG-IMRT QA phantom consisted of a cylindrical imaging phantom (CatPhan) combined with an array of 11 radiation diodes mounted on a 10 cm diameter disk, oriented perpendicular to the phantom axis. Basic diode response characterization was performed for 6 and 18 MV photons. The diode response was compared to planning system calculations in the open and penumbrae regions of simple and complex beam arrangements. The clinical use of the QA phantom was illustrated in an integral test of an IG-IMRT treatment designed for a clinical spinal radiosurgery case. The sensitivity of the phantom to multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and setup errors in the clinical setting was assessed by introducing errors in the IMRT plan or by displacing the phantom. The diodes offered good response linearity and long-term reproducibility for both 6 and 18 MV. Axial dosimetry of coplanar beams (in a plane containing the beam axes) was made possible with the nearly isoplanatic response of the diodes over 360 degrees of gantry (usually within +/-1%). For single beam geometry, errors in phantom placement as small as 0.5 mm could be accurately detected (in gradient > or = 1% /mm). In clinical setting, MLC systematic errors of 1 mm on a single MLC bank introduced in the IMRT plan were easily detectable with the QA phantom. The QA phantom demonstrated also sufficient sensitivity for the detection of setup errors as small as 1 mm for the IMRT delivery. These results demonstrated that the prototype can accurately and efficiently verify the entire IG-IMRT process. This tool, in conjunction with image guidance

  17. Integral test phantom for dosimetric quality assurance of image guided and intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Sharpe, Michael B.; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a dosimetric phantom quality assurance (QA) of linear accelerators capable of cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guided and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). This phantom is to be used in an integral test to quantify in real-time both the performance of the image guidance and the dose delivery systems in terms of dose localization. The prototype IG-IMRT QA phantom consisted of a cylindrical imaging phantom (CatPhan) combined with an array of 11 radiation diodes mounted on a 10 cm diameter disk, oriented perpendicular to the phantom axis. Basic diode response characterization was performed for 6 and 18 MV photons. The diode response was compared to planning system calculations in the open and penumbrae regions of simple and complex beam arrangements. The clinical use of the QA phantom was illustrated in an integral test of an IG-IMRT treatment designed for a clinical spinal radiosurgery case. The sensitivity of the phantom to multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and setup errors in the clinical setting was assessed by introducing errors in the IMRT plan or by displacing the phantom. The diodes offered good response linearity and long-term reproducibility for both 6 and 18 MV. Axial dosimetry of coplanar beams (in a plane containing the beam axes) was made possible with the nearly isoplanatic response of the diodes over 360 deg. of gantry (usually within ±1%). For single beam geometry, errors in phantom placement as small as 0.5 mm could be accurately detected (in gradient ≥1%/mm). In clinical setting, MLC systematic errors of 1 mm on a single MLC bank introduced in the IMRT plan were easily detectable with the QA phantom. The QA phantom demonstrated also sufficient sensitivity for the detection of setup errors as small as 1 mm for the IMRT delivery. These results demonstrated that the prototype can accurately and efficiently verify the entire IG-IMRT process. This tool, in conjunction with image guidance capabilities

  18. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, Richard B.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Beard, Clair J.

    2012-01-01

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 × 1−2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior–posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior–posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  19. Participating in an International Stereotactic Radiotherapy Patient Registry: The Establishment of Data Collection Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Aylin; Arneric, Eva; Kernutt, Elizabeth; Baldacchino, Fiona; Haworth, Claire; Kedda, Mary-Anne; Tang, Colin; Bydder, Sean; Corica, Tammy

    2017-06-29

    Aim To describe data collection pathways and practical challenges experienced by an academic comprehensive cancer centre aiming to record clinical data for patients being treated with a novel radiotherapy treatment modality. Methods Various options to capture data from all patients treated with the CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital (SCGH) in Western Australia were explored. An international multicenter web-based secure database established and maintained by the Radiosurgery Society the RSSearch® Patient Registry was selected. Data were collected and entered over four contiguous phases, with either opt-in or opt-out consent and the completion of Patient Reported Outcome questionnaires for specific sub-groups. Results Between April 2014 and June 2016, 461 patients at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital were enrolled in the RSSearch® Patient Registry with the collection of over 17,500 data items. From 461 patients enrolled, 447 patients were treated with the CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System. The majority of patients were treated for either a malignant primary (43.2%) or metastatic disease (39.4%). The establishment of matrix organisational processes for data collection led to the development of improved workflow patterns and data collection pathways. Conclusions This article describes the processes developed by a single centre to establish an efficient system for data collection and participation in an international registry. The opt-out approach was more efficient in terms of patient recruitment compared to the informed-consent method used in earlier phases. The experience of this single centre may help inform other institutions considering data collection options for assessments of new or novel treatments.

  20. Stereotactic radiosurgery: a “targeted” therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ming; Han, Liang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    The developments of medicine always follow innovations in science and technology. In the past decade, such innovations have made cancer-related targeted therapies possible. In general, the term “targeted therapy” has been used in reference to cellular and molecular level oriented therapies. However, improvements in the delivery and planning of traditional radiation therapy have also provided cancer patients more options for “targeted” treatment, notably stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). In this review, the progress and controversies of SRS and SBRT are discussed to show the role of stereotactic radiation therapy in the ever evolving multidisciplinary care of cancer patients. PMID:22835385

  1. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  2. Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR): an alternative to surgery in stage I-II non-small-cell cancer of the lung?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirimanoff, René-Olivier

    2015-12-01

    For decades, surgery was considered to be the only standard therapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) has been used in a growing number of patients and institutions since the early 2000's. Initially this technique was intended mainly for patients who were deemed to be medically inoperable due to co-morbidities or who refused surgery, but more recently it has been applied to operable patients as well. Strict criteria for treatment planning, the use of high-technology equipment and the appropriate selection of dose based on tumor size and location are of paramount importance for a proper application of SABR. Under these conditions, SABR offers high control rates with a moderate risk of severe toxicity, quite comparable to those of modern surgery. This article reviews the basic principles of SABR, its practical aspects, the definition of biologically equivalent doses, the results in terms of tumor control, survival and toxicity and an attempt will be made to compare the results of SABR with those of surgery.

  3. Computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor on EPID cine images without implanted markers in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimura, H; Toyofuku, F; Higashida, Y; Onizuka, Y; Terashima, H; Egashira, Y; Shioyama, Y; Nomoto, S; Honda, H; Nakamura, K; Yoshidome, S; Anai, S

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor in cine images on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) without implanted markers during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Each tumor region was segmented in the first EPID cine image, i.e., reference portal image, based on a multiple-gray level thresholding technique and a region growing technique, and then the image including the tumor region was cropped as a 'tumor template' image. The tumor location was determined as the position in which the tumor template image took the maximum cross-correlation value within each consecutive portal image, which was acquired in cine mode on the EPID in treatment. EPID images with 512 x 384 pixels (pixel size: 0.56 mm) were acquired at a sampling rate of 0.5 frame s -1 by using energies of 4, 6 or 10 MV on linear accelerators. We applied our proposed method to EPID cine images (226 frames) of 12 clinical cases (ages: 51-83, mean: 72) with a non-small cell lung cancer. As a result, the average location error between tumor points obtained by our method and the manual method was 1.47 ± 0.60 mm. This preliminary study suggests that our method based on the tumor template matching technique might be feasible for tracking the location of a lung tumor without implanted markers in SBRT.

  4. Radiographic changes after lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) – Can we distinguish recurrence from fibrosis? A systematic review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Kitty; Dahele, Max; Senan, Suresh; Guckenberger, Matthias; Rodrigues, George B.; Ward, Aaron; Boldt, R. Gabriel; Palma, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Changes in lung density on computed tomography (CT) are common after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and can confound the early detection of recurrence. We performed a systematic review to describe post-SABR findings on computed tomography (CT) and positron-emission tomography (PET), identify imaging characteristics that predict recurrence and propose a follow-up imaging algorithm. Methods: A systematic review was conducted of studies providing detailed radiologic descriptions of anatomic and metabolic lung changes after SABR. Our search returned 824 studies; 26 met our inclusion criteria. Data are presented according to PRISMA guidelines. Results: Acute changes post-SABR predominantly appear as consolidation or ground glass opacities. Late changes often demonstrate a modified conventional pattern of fibrosis, evolving beyond 2 years after treatment. Several CT features, including an enlarging opacity, correlate with recurrence. Although PET SUVmax may rise immediately post-SABR, an SUVmax ⩾ 5 carries a high predictive value of recurrence. Conclusions: CT density changes are common post-SABR. The available evidence suggests that recurrent disease should be suspected if high-risk CT changes are seen with SUVmax ⩾ 5 on PET. Further studies are needed to validate the predictive values of such metrics, and for advanced analysis of CT changes to allow early detection of potentially curable local recurrence.

  5. Fractionated vs. single-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Hearing preservation and patients' self-reported outcome based on an established questionnaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessel, Kerstin A.; Fischer, Hanna; Vogel, Marco M.E.; Combs, Stephanie E. [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Neuherberg (Germany); Oechsner, Markus [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Bier, Henning [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Munich (Germany); Meyer, Bernhard [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (RT) has been established as a valid treatment alternative in patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS). There is ongoing controversy regarding the optimal fractionation. Hearing preservation may be the primary goal for patients with VS, followed by maintenance of quality of life (QoL). From 2002 to 2015, 184 patients with VS were treated with radiosurgery (RS) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). A survey on current symptoms and QoL was conducted between February and June 2016. Median follow-up after RT was 7.5 years (range 0-14.4 years). Mean overall survival (OS) after RT was 31.1 years, with 94 and 87% survival at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Mean progression-free survival (PFS) was 13.3 years, with 5- and 10-year PFS of 92%. Hearing could be preserved in RS patients for a median of 36.3 months (range 2.3-13.7 years). Hearing worsened in 17 (30%) cases. Median hearing preservation for FSRT was 48.7 months (range 0.0-13.8 years); 29 (23%) showed hearing deterioration. The difference in hearing preservation was not significant between RS and FSRT (p = 0.3). A total of 123/162 patients participated in the patient survey (return rate 76%). The results correlate well with the information documented in the patient files for tinnitus and facial and trigeminal nerve toxicity. Significant differences appeared regarding hearing impairment, gait uncertainty, and imbalance. These data confirm that RS and FSRT are comparable in terms of local control for VS. RS should be reserved for smaller lesions, while FSRT can be offered independently of tumor size. Patient self-reported outcome during follow-up is of high value. The established questionnaire could be validated in the independent cohort. (orig.) [German] Die stereotaktische Radiotherapie (RT) wurde als gueltige Behandlungsalternative bei Patienten mit Vestibularisschwannom (VS) etabliert. Diskussionen ueber die optimale Fraktionierung laufen jedoch. Der Erhalt von Hoervermoegen

  6. Factors affecting the local control of stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumors including primary lung cancer and metastatic lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Masaaki; Yamashita, Motohiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors affecting local control of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors including primary lung cancer and metastatic lung tumors. Between June 2006 and June 2009, 159 lung tumors in 144 patients (primary lung cancer, 128; metastatic lung tumor, 31) were treated with SBRT with 48-60 Gy (mean 50.1 Gy) in 4-5 fractions. Higher doses were given to larger tumors and metastatic tumors in principle. Assessed factors were age, gender, tumor origin (primary vs. metastatic), histological subtype, tumor size, tumor appearance (solid vs. ground glass opacity), maximum standardized uptake value of positron emission tomography using 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose, and SBRT doses. Follow-up time was 1-60 months (median 18 months). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year local failure-free rates of all lesions were 90, 80, and 77%, respectively. On univariate analysis, metastatic tumors (p<0.0001), solid tumors (p=0.0246), and higher SBRT doses (p=0.0334) were the statistically significant unfavorable factors for local control. On multivariate analysis, only tumor origin was statistically significant (p=0.0027). The 2-year local failure-free rates of primary lung cancer and metastatic lung tumors were 87 and 50%, respectively. A metastatic tumor was the only independently significant unfavorable factor for local control after SBRT. (author)

  7. Evaluation of motion measurement using cine MRI for image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy on a new phantom platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Wang, Ziheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate accuracy of motion tracking of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy. A phantom platform was developed in this work to fulfill the goal. The motion phantom consisted of a platform, a solid thread, a motor and a control system that can simulate motion in various modes. To validate its reproducibility, the phantom platform was setup three times and imaged with fluoroscopy using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for the same motion profile. After the validation test, the phantom platform was evaluated using cine MRI at 2.5 frames/second on a 1.5T GE scanner using five different artificial profiles and five patient profiles. The above profiles were again measured with EPID fluoroscopy and used as references. Discrepancies between measured profiles from cine MRI and EPID were quantified using root-mean-square (RMS) and standard deviation (SD). Pearson’s product moment correlational analysis was used to test correlation. The standard deviation for the reproducibility test was 0.28 mm. The discrepancies (RMS) between all profiles measured by cine MRI and EPID fluoroscopy ranged from 0.30 to 0.49 mm for artificial profiles and ranged from 0.75 to 0.91 mm for five patient profiles. The cine MRI sequence could precisely track phantom motion and the proposed motion phantom was feasible to evaluate cine MRI accuracy. PMID:29296304

  8. Assessment of targeting accuracy of a low-energy stereotactic radiosurgery treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taddei, Phillip J; Newhauser, Wayne D [Radiation Physics Department, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Chell, Erik; Hansen, Steven; Gertner, Michael, E-mail: ptaddei@mdanderson.or [Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., 8000 Jarvis Avenue, Newark, CA 94560 (United States)

    2010-12-07

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the United States, is a neovascular disease that may be controlled with radiation therapy. Early patient outcomes of external beam radiotherapy, however, have been mixed. Recently, a novel multimodality treatment was developed, comprising external beam radiotherapy and concomitant treatment with a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor. The radiotherapy arm is performed by stereotactic radiosurgery, delivering a 16 Gy dose in the macula (clinical target volume, CTV) using three external low-energy x-ray fields while adequately sparing normal tissues. The purpose of our study was to test the sensitivity of the delivery of the prescribed dose in the CTV using this technique and of the adequate sparing of normal tissues to all plausible variations in the position and gaze angle of the eye. Using Monte Carlo simulations of a 16 Gy treatment, we varied the gaze angle by {+-}5{sup 0} in the polar and azimuthal directions, the linear displacement of the eye {+-}1 mm in all orthogonal directions, and observed the union of the three fields on the posterior wall of spheres concentric with the eye that had diameters between 20 and 28 mm. In all cases, the dose in the CTV fluctuated <6%, the maximum dose in the sclera was <20 Gy, the dose in the optic disc, optic nerve, lens and cornea were <0.7 Gy and the three-field junction was adequately preserved. The results of this study provide strong evidence that for plausible variations in the position of the eye during treatment, either by the setup error or intrafraction motion, the prescribed dose will be delivered to the CTV and the dose in structures at risk will be kept far below tolerance doses.

  9. Assessment of targeting accuracy of a low-energy stereotactic radiosurgery treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taddei, Phillip J; Newhauser, Wayne D; Chell, Erik; Hansen, Steven; Gertner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the United States, is a neovascular disease that may be controlled with radiation therapy. Early patient outcomes of external beam radiotherapy, however, have been mixed. Recently, a novel multimodality treatment was developed, comprising external beam radiotherapy and concomitant treatment with a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor. The radiotherapy arm is performed by stereotactic radiosurgery, delivering a 16 Gy dose in the macula (clinical target volume, CTV) using three external low-energy x-ray fields while adequately sparing normal tissues. The purpose of our study was to test the sensitivity of the delivery of the prescribed dose in the CTV using this technique and of the adequate sparing of normal tissues to all plausible variations in the position and gaze angle of the eye. Using Monte Carlo simulations of a 16 Gy treatment, we varied the gaze angle by ±5 0 in the polar and azimuthal directions, the linear displacement of the eye ±1 mm in all orthogonal directions, and observed the union of the three fields on the posterior wall of spheres concentric with the eye that had diameters between 20 and 28 mm. In all cases, the dose in the CTV fluctuated <6%, the maximum dose in the sclera was <20 Gy, the dose in the optic disc, optic nerve, lens and cornea were <0.7 Gy and the three-field junction was adequately preserved. The results of this study provide strong evidence that for plausible variations in the position of the eye during treatment, either by the setup error or intrafraction motion, the prescribed dose will be delivered to the CTV and the dose in structures at risk will be kept far below tolerance doses.

  10. Prolonged treatment time deteriorates positioning accuracy for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Wang

    Full Text Available The accuracy of radiation delivery is increasingly important as radiotherapy technology continues to develop. The goal of this study was to evaluate intrafractional motion during intracranial radiosurgery and the relationship between motion change and treatment time.A total of 50 treatment records with 5988 images, all acquired during treatments with the CyberKnife Radiosurgery System, were retrospectively analyzed in this study. We measured translation and rotation motion including superior-inferior (SI, right-left (RL, anterior-posterior (AP, roll, tilt and yaw. All of the data was obtained during the first 45 minutes of treatment. The records were divided into 3 groups based on 15-min time intervals following the beginning of treatment: group A (0-15 min, group B (16-30 min and group C (31-45 min. The mean deviations, systematic errors, random errors and margin for planning target volume (PTV were calculated for each group.The mean deviations were less than 0.1 mm in all three translation directions in the first 15 minutes. Greater motion occurred with longer treatment times, especially in the SI direction. For the 3D vector, a time-dependent change was observed, from 0.34 mm to 0.77 mm (p=0.01. There was no significant correlation between the treatment time and deviations in the AP, LR and rotation axes. Longer treatment times were associated with increases in systematic error, but not in random error. The estimated PTV margin for groups A, B and C were 0.86 / 1.14 / 1.31 mm, 0.75 / 1.12 / 1.20 mm, and 0.43 / 0.54 / 0.81 mm in the SI, RL, and AP directions, respectively.During intracranial radiosurgery, a consistent increase in the positioning deviation over time was observed, especially in the SI direction. If treatment time is greater than 15 minutes, we recommend increasing the PTV margins to ensure treatment precision.

  11. Conservative treatment of radiotherapy sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, W.

    1997-01-01

    The improvement of tumor control rates and improved survival times of radiotherapy patients result in an increasing importance of radiation side effects in normal tissues. Possibilities for the modulation of normal tissue reactions by stimulation of tissue regeneration, or by interference with general pathogenetic pathways which are not specific for radiation damage, ar illustrated by a number of examples. Increasing knowledge about the pathogenesis of normal tissue radiation responses are expected to significantly improve the efficacy of prophylactic means and possibilities for conservative management of side effects of radiation therapy. Novel approaches may be developed if the so-called 'humoral radiation pathology' is taken into consideration in addition to the cellular effects of radiation. (orig.) [de

  12. Digital linear accelerator: The advantages for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andric, S.; Maksimovic, M.; Dekic, M.; Clark, T.

    1998-01-01

    Technical performances of Digital Linear Accelerator were presented to point out its advantages for clinical radiotherapy treatment. The accelerator installation is earned out at Military Medical Academy, Radiotherapy Department, by Medes and Elekta companies. The unit offers many technical advantages with possibility of introduction new conformal treatment techniques as stereotactic radiosurgery, total body and total skin irradiation. In the paper are underlined advantages in relation to running conventional accelerator units at Yugoslav radiotherapy departments, both from technical and medical point of view. (author)

  13. Radiotherapy treatment planning linear-quadratic radiobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J Donald

    2015-01-01

    Understand Quantitative Radiobiology from a Radiation Biophysics PerspectiveIn the field of radiobiology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) equation has become the standard for defining radiation-induced cell killing. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning: Linear-Quadratic Radiobiology describes tumor cell inactivation from a radiation physics perspective and offers appropriate LQ parameters for modeling tumor and normal tissue responses.Explore the Latest Cell Killing Numbers for Defining Iso-Effective Cancer TreatmentsThe book compil

  14. Radiotherapy for treatment of induratio penis plastica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruns, F.; Kardels, B.; Schaefer, U.; Schoenekaes, K.; Willich, N.

    1999-01-01

    Radiotherapy is shown to be an effective, low-cost and non-invasive modality for treatment of induratio penis plastica. Its efficiency could be proven especially for inflammatory stages of the disease, or as an alternative after failure of conventional treatment. A total dose of no more than 20-25 Gy was found to achieve clear improvements in two thirds of the patients treated, while avoiding at the same time cosmetically disadvantageous late effects. (orig./CB) [de

  15. An analysis to compare the effects of stereotactic surgery and conservative medical treatment on hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-dong GUO

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the therapeutic effects of stereotactic surgery and conservative medical treatment in patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage.Methods The clinical data of 100 patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage who underwent stereotactic surgery(stereotactic surgery group from June 2002 to October 2009 were retrospectively analyzed,and the result was compared with that of 80 contemporaneous patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage who received conservative medical treatment(medical treatment group.There was no significant difference of bleeding site,bleeding volume and state of consciousness on admission between two groups.Results The mortality rate of stereotactic surgery group was 21.0%,and of medical treatment group was 30.0%.The average hematoma absorption time in stereotactic surgery group was 4.8d,and that of medical treatment group was 15.1d.All of the surviving patients were followed-up for 6 months,the rate of cure and mild disability in stereotactic surgery group(37% was significantly higher than that of medical treatment group(26%,P 0.05.Conclusion Compared with conservative medical treatment,stereotactic surgery could decrease the mortality rate and improve the quality of life in patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage.

  16. Single-Fraction Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Edward W; Jung, David L; Balagamwala, Ehsan H; Angelov, Lilyana; Suh, John H; Djemil, Toufik; Magnelli, Anthony; Chao, Samuel T

    2017-06-01

    Chordoma is a radioresistant tumor that presents a therapeutic challenge with spine involvement, as high doses of radiation are needed for local control while limiting dose to the spinal cord. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy and safety of single-fraction spine stereotactic body radiation therapy for the treatment of spine chordoma. A retrospective review of our institutional database from 2006 to 2013 identified 8 patients (12 cases) with chordoma of the spine who were treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Surgical resection was performed in 7 of the 12 cases. The treatment volume was defined by the bony vertebral level of the tumor along with soft tissue extension appreciated on magnetic resonance imaging fusion. Medical records and imaging were assessed for pain relief and local control. Treatment toxicity was evaluated using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Median age was 59 years (range, 17-91). Median target volume was 48 cm 3 (1-304), and median prescription dose was 16 Gy (11-16). Median conformality index was 1.44 (1.14-3.21), and homogeneity index was 1.12 (1.05-1.19). With a median follow-up time of 9.7 months (.5-84), local control was achieved in 75% of the cases treated. One patient developed limited grade 2 spinal cord myelopathy that resolved with steroids. There were no other treatment toxicities from spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Single-fraction spine stereotactic body radiation therapy can be safely delivered to treat chordoma of the spine with the potential to improve pain symptoms. Although the early data are suggestive, long-term follow-up with more patients is necessary to determine the efficacy of spine stereotactic body radiation therapy in the treatment of chordoma of the spine.

  17. Stereotactic body radiotherapy with a focal boost to the MRI-visible tumor as monotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer: early results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluwini, Shafak; Rooij, Peter van; Hoogeman, Mischa; Kirkels, Wim; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine; Bangma, Chris

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that prostate cancer (PC) cells are more sensitive to high fraction dose in hypofractionation schemes. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy is established to be a good treatment option for PC using extremely hypofractionated schemes. This hypofractionation can also be achieved with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We report results on toxicity, PSA response, and quality of life (QOL) in patients treated with SBRT for favorable-risk PC. Over the last 4 years, 50 hormone-naïve patients with low- and intermediate-risk PC were treated with SBRT to a total dose of 38 Gy delivered in four daily fractions of 9.5 Gy. An integrated boost to 11 Gy per fraction was applied to the dominant lesion if visible on MRI. Toxicity and QoL was assessed prospectively using validated questionnaires. Median follow-up was 23 months. The 2-year actuarial biochemical control rate was 100%. Median PSA nadir was 0.6 ng/ml. Median International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) was 9/35 before treatment, with a median increase of 4 at 3 months and remaining stable at 13/35 thereafter. The EORTC/RTOG toxicity scales showed grade 2 and 3 gastrointestinal (GI) acute toxicity in 12% and 2%, respectively. The late grade 2 GI toxicity was 3% during 24 months FU. Genitourinary (GU) grade 2, 3 toxicity was seen in 15%, 8%, in the acute phase and 10%, 6% at 24 months, respectively. The urinary, bowel and sexual domains of the EORTC-PR25 scales recovered over time, showing no significant changes at 24 months post-treatment. SBRT to 38 Gy in 4 daily fractions for low- and intermediate-risk PC patients is feasible with low acute and late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Longer follow-up preferably within randomized studies, is required to compare these results with standard fractionation schemes

  18. Radiological and clinical pneumonitis after stereotactic lung radiotherapy: a matched analysis of three-dimensional conformal and volumetric-modulated arc therapy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, David A; Senan, Suresh; Haasbeek, Cornelis J A; Verbakel, Wilko F A R; Vincent, Andrew; Lagerwaard, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Lung fibrosis is common after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors, but the influence of treatment technique on rates of clinical and radiological pneumonitis is not well described. After implementing volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) for SBRT, we scored the early pulmonary changes seen with arc and conventional three-dimensional SBRT (3D-CRT). Twenty-five SBRT patients treated with RA were matched 1:2 with 50 SBRT patients treated with 3D-CRT. Dose fractionations were based on a risk-adapted strategy. Clinical pneumonitis was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Acute radiological changes 3 months posttreatment were scored by three blinded observers. Relationships among treatment type, baseline factors, and outcomes were assessed using Spearman's correlation, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests, and logistic regression. The RA and 3D-CRT groups were well matched. Forty-three patients (57%) had radiological pneumonitis 3 months after treatment. Twenty-eight patients (37%) had computed tomography (CT) findings of patchy or diffuse consolidation, and 15 patients (20%) had ground-glass opacities only. Clinical pneumonitis was uncommon, and no differences were seen between 3D-CRT vs. RA patients in rates of grade 2/3 clinical pneumonitis (6% vs. 4%, respectively; p = 0.99), moderate/severe radiological changes (24% vs. 36%, respectively, p = 0.28), or patterns of CT changes (p = 0.47). Radiological severity scores were associated with larger planning target volumes (p = 0.09) and extended fractionation (p = 0.03). Radiological changes after lung SBRT are common with both approaches, but no differences in early clinical or radiological findings were observed after RA. Longer follow-up will be required to exclude late changes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Surgery and radiotherapy in the treatment of cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Testori, A; Rutkowski, P; Marsden, J

    2009-01-01

    on individual circumstances. Radiotherapy is indicated as a treatment option in select patients with lentigo maligna melanoma and as an adjuvant in select patients with regional metastatic disease. Radiotherapy is also indicated for palliation, especially in bone and brain metastases....

  20. Dosimetric comparison between three dimensional conformal radiotherapy, tomo-therapy and treatment by Cyberknife: about one case of a ponto cerebellar meningioma; Comparaison dosimetrique entre radiotherapie conformationnelle tridimensionnelle, tomotherapie et traitement par cyberknife: a propos d'un cas de meningiome de l'angle pontocerebelleux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasseur, F.; Rezvoy, N.; Lacornerie, T.; Lartigau, E. [Centre Oscar-Lambret, Dept. Universitaire de Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France)

    2009-10-15

    In order to illustrate the evolution of techniques in radiotherapy we compare the dose distributions calculated for the exclusive treatment of a ponto-cerebellar angle meningioma by a linear accelerator (clinac 2100) by helical irradiation and by cyberknife in radiosurgery mode and in fractionated mode. In conclusion: according to our first results, the tomo-therapy or the fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy appear as the treatments conjugating the advantages of stereotactic radiotherapy ( conformation of the dose to the target volume) and the fractionated radiotherapy ( protection of sane tissues by the fractionation). This study highlights the saving of sane tissues that allows these techniques. this better tolerance is to be evaluated. If it was confirmed, an increasing of the dose prescribed on the target volume could be considered. (N.C.)

  1. Short communication: timeline of radiation-induced kidney function loss after stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy of renal cell carcinoma as evaluated by serial 99mTc-DMSA SPECT/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Price; Foroudi, Farshad; Pham, Daniel; Hofman, Michael S; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; Siva, Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) has been proposed as a definitive treatment for patients with inoperable primary renal cell carcinoma. However, there is little documentation detailing the radiobiological effects of hypofractionated radiation on healthy renal tissue. In this study we describe a methodology for assessment of regional change in renal function in response to single fraction SABR of 26 Gy. In a patient with a solitary kidney, detailed follow-up of kidney function post-treatment was determined through 3-dimensional SPECT/CT imaging and 51 Cr-EDTA measurements. Based on measurements of glomerular filtration rate, renal function declined rapidly by 34% at 3 months, plateaued at 43% loss at 12 months, with minimal further decrease to 49% of baseline by 18 months. The pattern of renal functional change in 99m Tc-DMSA uptake on SPECT/CT imaging correlates with dose delivered. This study demonstrates a dose effect relationship of SABR with loss of kidney function

  2. Characteristics of a novel treatment system for linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ning; Li, Haisen; Song, Kwang; Chin-Snyder, Karen; Qin, Yujiao; Kim, Jinkoo; Bellon, Maria; Gulam, Misbah; Gardner, Stephen; Doemer, Anthony; Devpura, Suneetha; Gordon, James; Chetty, Indrin; Siddiqui, Farzan; Ajlouni, Munther; Pompa, Robert; Hammoud, Zane; Simoff, Michael; Kalkanis, Steven; Movsas, Benjamin; Siddiqui, M Salim

    2015-07-08

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the dosimetric properties and accuracy of a novel treatment platform (Edge radiosurgery system) for localizing and treating patients with frameless, image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Initial measurements of various components of the system, such as a comprehensive assessment of the dosimetric properties of the flattening filter-free (FFF) beams for both high definition (HD120) MLC and conical cone-based treatment, positioning accuracy and beam attenuation of a six degree of freedom (6DoF) couch, treatment head leakage test, and integrated end-to-end accuracy tests, have been performed. The end-to-end test of the system was performed by CT imaging a phantom and registering hidden targets on the treatment couch to determine the localization accuracy of the optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), cone-beam CT (CBCT), and MV imaging systems, as well as the radiation isocenter targeting accuracy. The deviations between the percent depth-dose curves acquired on the new linac-based system (Edge), and the previously published machine with FFF beams (TrueBeam) beyond D(max) were within 1.0% for both energies. The maximum deviation of output factors between the Edge and TrueBeam was 1.6%. The optimized dosimetric leaf gap values, which were fitted using Eclipse dose calculations and measurements based on representative spine radiosurgery plans, were 0.700 mm and 1.000 mm, respectively. For the conical cones, 6X FFF has sharper penumbra ranging from 1.2-1.8 mm (80%-20%) and 1.9-3.8 mm (90%-10%) relative to 10X FFF, which has 1.2-2.2mm and 2.3-5.1mm, respectively. The relative attenuation measurements of the couch for PA, PA (rails-in), oblique, oblique (rails-out), oblique (rails-in) were: -2.0%, -2.5%, -15.6%, -2.5%, -5.0% for 6X FFF and -1.4%, -1.5%, -12.2%, -2.5%, -5.0% for 10X FFF, respectively, with a slight decrease in attenuation versus field size. The systematic

  3. Integer programming for improving radiotherapy treatment efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ming; Li, Yi; Kou, Bo; Zhou, Zhili

    2017-01-01

    Patients received by radiotherapy departments are diverse and may be diagnosed with different cancers. Therefore, they need different radiotherapy treatment plans and thus have different needs for medical resources. This research aims to explore the best method of scheduling the admission of patients receiving radiotherapy so as to reduce patient loss and maximize the usage efficiency of service resources. A mix integer programming (MIP) model integrated with special features of radiotherapy is constructed. The data used here is based on the historical data collected and we propose an exact method to solve the MIP model. Compared with the traditional First Come First Served (FCFS) method, the new method has boosted patient admission as well as the usage of linear accelerators (LINAC) and beds. The integer programming model can be used to describe the complex problem of scheduling radio-receiving patients, to identify the bottleneck resources that hinder patient admission, and to obtain the optimal LINAC-bed radio under the current data conditions. Different management strategies can be implemented by adjusting the settings of the MIP model. The computational results can serve as a reference for the policy-makers in decision making.

  4. Integer programming for improving radiotherapy treatment efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ming; Kou, Bo; Zhou, Zhili

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Patients received by radiotherapy departments are diverse and may be diagnosed with different cancers. Therefore, they need different radiotherapy treatment plans and thus have different needs for medical resources. This research aims to explore the best method of scheduling the admission of patients receiving radiotherapy so as to reduce patient loss and maximize the usage efficiency of service resources. Materials and methods A mix integer programming (MIP) model integrated with special features of radiotherapy is constructed. The data used here is based on the historical data collected and we propose an exact method to solve the MIP model. Results Compared with the traditional First Come First Served (FCFS) method, the new method has boosted patient admission as well as the usage of linear accelerators (LINAC) and beds. Conclusions The integer programming model can be used to describe the complex problem of scheduling radio-receiving patients, to identify the bottleneck resources that hinder patient admission, and to obtain the optimal LINAC-bed radio under the current data conditions. Different management strategies can be implemented by adjusting the settings of the MIP model. The computational results can serve as a reference for the policy-makers in decision making. PMID:28700726

  5. Dosimetry of small circular beams of high energy photons for stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy: the use of small ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazal, A.; Gaboriauid, G.; Zefkili, S.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Boutaudon, S.; Pontvert, D.

    1999-01-01

    The irradiation of small targets in the brain in a singe fraction (radiosurgery) or with a fractionated approach (stereotactic radiosurgery) with small beams of photons requires specific conditions to measure and to model the dosimetric data needed for treatment planning. In this work we present the method and materials adopted in our institution since 1988 to perform the dosimetry of high energy (6-23) circular photon beams with diameters ranging from 10 to 40 mm at the isocenter of linear accelerators, and its evolution as new dosimetric material became commercially available. in circular ionization chambers of small dimensions. We want to answer the following questions: Which are the minimal basic data needed to model small circular beams of high energy photons? Can we extrapolate or convert data from conventional data of larger beams? Which are the detectors well adapted for these kind of measurements and for which range of beam sizes?

  6. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  7. Effect of different breathing patterns in the same patient on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy dosimetry for primary renal cell carcinoma: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Siva, Shankar

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) targets requires motion management strategies to verify dose delivery. This case study highlights the effect of a change in patient breathing amplitude on the dosimetry to organs at risk and target structures. A 73-year-old male patient was planned for receiving 26 Gy of radiation in 1 fraction of SABR for a left primary RCC. The patient was simulated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and the tumor internal target volume (ITV) was delineated using the 4DCT maximum intensity projection. However, the initially planned treatment was abandoned at the radiation oncologist's discretion after pretreatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) motion verification identified a greater than 50% reduction in superior to inferior diaphragm motion as compared with the planning 4DCT. This patient was resimulated with respiratory coaching instructions. To assess the effect of the change in breathing on the dosimetry to the target, each plan was recalculated on the data set representing the change in breathing condition. A change from smaller to larger breathing showed a 46% loss in planning target volume (PTV) coverage, whereas a change from larger breathing to smaller breathing resulted in an 8% decrease in PTV coverage. ITV coverage was similarly reduced by 8% in both scenarios. This case study highlights the importance of tools to verify breathing motion prior to treatment delivery. 4D image guided radiation therapy verification strategies should focus on not only verifying ITV margin coverage but also the effect on the surrounding organs at risk

  8. Target volume geometric change and/or deviation from the cranium during fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases: potential pitfalls in image guidance based on bony anatomy alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2014-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the potential geometrical change and/or displacement of the target relative to the cranium during fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for treating newly developed brain metastases. For 16 patients with 21 lesions treated with image-guided frameless FSRT in 5 or 10 fractions using a 6-degree-of-freedom image guidance system-integrated platform, the unenhanced computed tomography or T2-weighted magnetic resonance images acquired until the completion of FSRT were fused to the planning image datasets for comparison. Significant change was defined as ≥3-mm change in the tumour diameter or displacement of the tumour centroid. FSRT was started 1 day after planning image acquisition. Tumour shrinkage, deviation and both were observed in 2, 1 and 1 of the 21 lesions, respectively, over a period of 7-13 days. Tumour shrinkage or deviation resulted in an increase or decrease in the marginal dose to the tumour, respectively, and a substantial increase in the irradiated volume for the surrounding tissue irrespective of the pattern of alteration. No obvious differences in the clinical and treatment characteristics were noted among the populations with or without significant changes in tumour volume or position. Target deformity and/or deviation can unexpectedly occur even during relatively short-course FSRT, inevitably leading to a gradual discrepancy between the planned and actually delivered doses to the tumour and surrounding tissue. To appropriately weigh the treatment outcome against the planned dose distribution, target deformity and/or deviation should also be considered in addition to the immobilisation accuracy, as image guidance with bony anatomy alignment does not necessarily guarantee accurate target localisation until completion of FSRT. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  9. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for locally advanced extrahepatic and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Kiri A; Veruttipong, Darlene; Agopian, Vatche G; Finn, Richard S; Hong, Johnny C; Kaldas, Fady M; Sadeghi, Saeed; Busuttil, Ronald W; Lee, Percy

    2016-01-01

    We report single-institution clinical efficacy and safety outcomes for patients with unresectable locally advanced cholangiocarcinoma who were treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and a subset of patients who received neoadjuvant SBRT and chemotherapy as part of an orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) protocol. From October 2008 to June 2015, 31 consecutive patients with unresectable extrahepatic (n = 25) or intrahepatic (n = 6) cholangiocarcinoma were treated with SBRT and retrospectively analyzed. Four patients underwent liver transplantation, and 1 underwent resection. SBRT was delivered in 5 fractions with a median dose of 40 Gy. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0. Overall survival (OS), time to progression, and local control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The median follow-up time was 11.5 months. The 1- and 2-year OS rates were 59% and 33%, respectively, with a median survival of 15.7 months. The 1- and 2-year freedom from progression was 67% and 34%, respectively. Median time to progression was 16.8 months. Nine patients had local failure. The actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rates were 78% and 47%, respectively. Among patients who also had OLT, the median OS was 31.3 months. Twenty-four patients (77%) experienced some form of acute grade 1-2 toxicity, most commonly fatigue or pain. Five patients (16%) experienced grade ≥3 toxicity. SBRT is a promising option for patients with unresectable or recurrent cholangiocarcinoma either as a component of neoadjuvant therapy prior to OLT or as part of definitive therapy for patients who are unresectable and not eligible for transplantation.

  10. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma (VS): Comparison between cystic-type and solid-type VS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirato, Hiroki; Sakamoto, Touru; Takeichi, Norihito; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Suzuki, Keishiro; Kagei, Kenji; Nishioka, Takashi; Fukuda, Satoshi; Sawamura, Yutaka; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness and complications of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for cystic-type vestibular schwannoma (VS) with those of solid-type VS. Methods and Materials: In 65 patients treated with fractionated SRT between 1991 and 1999, 20 were diagnosed with cystic VS, in which at least one-third of the tumor volume was a cystic component on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 45 were diagnosed with solid VS. Thirty-six Gy to 50 Gy in 20-25 fractions was administered to the isocenter and approximately 80% of the periphery of the tumor. All cystic and solid components were included in the gross tumor volume. The mean follow-up period was 37 months, ranging from 6 to 97 months. Results: The actuarial 3-year rate of no episode of enlargement greater than 2.0 mm was 55% for cystic-type and 75% for solid-type VS; the difference was statistically significant (p 0.023). The actuarial 3-year tumor-reduction (reduction in tumor size greater than 2.0 mm) rates were 93% and 31%, respectively (p = 0.0006). The overall actuarial tumor control rate (no tumor growth greater than 2.0 mm after 2 years or no requirement of salvage surgery) was 92% at 5 years in 44 patients with a follow-up period of 2 or more years. There was no difference in the class hearing preservation rate between cystic VS and solid VS. No permanent trigeminal or facial nerve palsy was observed in either group. Conclusion: Transient tumor enlargement occurs in cystic VS more frequently than in solid-type VS, but the subsequent tumor-reduction rate in cystic VS is better.

  11. Feasibility and potential utility of multicomponent exhaled breath analysis for predicting development of radiation pneumonitis after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moré, Jayaji M; Eclov, Neville C W; Chung, Melody P; Wynne, Jacob F; Shorter, Joanne H; Nelson, David D; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Burmeister, Robert; Banos, Peter; Maxim, Peter G; Loo, Billy W; Diehn, Maximilian

    2014-07-01

    In this prospective pilot study, we evaluated the feasibility and potential utility of measuring multiple exhaled gases as biomarkers of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients receiving stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung tumors. Breath analysis was performed for 26 patients receiving SABR for lung tumors. Concentrations of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), carbon monoxide (eCO), nitrous oxide (eN2O), and carbon dioxide (eCO2) were measured before and immediately after each fraction using real-time, infrared laser spectroscopy. RP development (CTCAE grade ≥2) was correlated with baseline gas concentrations, acute changes in gas concentrations after each SABR fraction, and dosimetric parameters. Exhaled breath analysis was successfully completed in 77% of patients. Five of 20 evaluable patients developed RP at a mean of 5.4 months after SABR. Acute changes in eNO and eCO concentrations, defined as percent changes between each pre-fraction and post-fraction measurement, were significantly smaller in RP versus non-RP cases (p = 0.022 and 0.015, respectively). In an exploratory analysis, a combined predictor of baseline eNO greater than 24 parts per billion and acute decrease in eCO less than 5.5% strongly correlated with RP incidence (p =0.0099). Neither eN2O nor eCO2 concentrations were significantly associated with RP development. Although generally higher in patients destined to develop RP, dosimetric parameters were not significantly associated with RP development. The majority of SABR patients in this pilot study were able to complete exhaled breath analysis. Baseline concentrations and acute changes in concentrations of exhaled breath components were associated with RP development after SABR. If our findings are validated, exhaled breath analysis may become a useful approach for noninvasive identification of patients at highest risk for developing RP after SABR.

  12. Efficient approach for determining four-dimensional computed tomography-based internal target volume in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Seung Gu; Kim, Eun Seog

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate efficient approaches for determining internal target volume (ITV) from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images used in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 4D CT images were analyzed for 15 patients who received SBRT for stage I NSCLC. Three different ITVs were determined as follows: combining clinical target volume (CTV) from all 10 respiratory phases (ITV 10Phases ); combining CTV from four respiratory phases, including two extreme phases (0% and 50%) plus two intermediate phases (20% and 70%) (ITV 4Phases ); and combining CTV from two extreme phases (ITV 2Phases ). The matching index (MI) of ITV 4Phases and ITV 2Phases was defined as the ratio of ITV 4Phases and ITV 2Phases , respectively, to the ITV 10Phases . The tumor motion index (TMI) was defined as the ratio of ITV 10Phases to CTV mean , which was the mean of 10 CTVs delineated on 10 respiratory phases. The ITVs were significantly different in the order of ITV 10Phases , ITV 4Phases , and ITV 2Phases (all p 4Phases was significantly higher than that of ITV 2Phases (p 4Phases was inversely related to TMI (r = -0.569, p = 0.034). In a subgroup with low TMI (n = 7), ITV 4Phases was not statistically different from ITV 10Phases (p = 0.192) and its MI was significantly higher than that of ITV 2Phases (p = 0.016). The ITV 4Phases may be an efficient approach alternative to optimal ITV 10Phases in SBRT for early-stage NSCLC with less tumor motion.

  13. A technique of using gated-CT images to determine internal target volume (ITV) for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jianyue; Ajlouni, Munther; Chen Qing; Yin, Fang-Fang; Movsas, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To develop and evaluate a technique and procedure of using gated-CT images in combination with PET image to determine the internal target volume (ITV), which could reduce the planning target volume (PTV) with adequate target coverage. Patients and methods: A skin marker-based gating system connected to a regular single slice CT scanner was used for this study. A motion phantom with adjustable motion amplitude was used to evaluate the CT gating system. Specifically, objects of various sizes/shapes, considered as virtual tumors, were placed on the phantom to evaluate the number of phases of gated images required to determine the ITV while taking into account tumor size, shape and motion. A procedure of using gated-CT and PET images to define ITV for patients was developed and was tested in patients enrolled in an IRB approved protocol. Results: The CT gating system was capable of removing motion artifacts for target motion as large as 3-cm when it was gated at optimal phases. A phantom study showed that two gated-CT scans at the end of expiration and the end of inspiration would be sufficient to determine the ITV for tumor motion less than 1-cm, and another mid-phase scan would be required for tumors with 2-cm motion, especially for small tumors. For patients, the ITV encompassing visible tumors in all sets of gated-CT and regular spiral CT images seemed to be consistent with the target volume determined from PET images. PTV expanded from the ITV with a setup uncertainty margin had less volume than PTVs from spiral CT images with a 10-mm generalized margin or an individualized margin determined at fluoroscopy. Conclusions: A technique of determining the ITV using gated-CT images was developed and was clinically implemented successfully for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

  14. Hippocampal Dosimetry Predicts Neurocognitive Function Impairment After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Benign or Low-Grade Adult Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondi, Vinai; Hermann, Bruce P.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the association between hippocampal dose and long-term neurocognitive function (NCF) impairment for benign or low-grade adult brain tumors treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). Methods and Materials: Adult patients with benign or low-grade adult brain tumors were treated with FSRT per institutional practice. No attempt was made to spare the hippocampus. NCF testing was conducted at baseline and 18 months follow-up, on a prospective clinical trial. Regression-based standardized z scores were calculated by using similar healthy control individuals evaluated at the same test–retest interval. NCF impairment was defined as a z score ≤−1.5. After delineation of the bilateral hippocampi according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group contouring atlas, dose–volume histograms were generated for the left and right hippocampi and for the composite pair. Biologically equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD 2 ) assuming an α/β ratio of 2 Gy were computed. Fisher’s exact test and binary logistic regression were used for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively. Dose–response data were fit to a nonlinear model. Results: Of 29 patients enrolled in this trial, 18 completed both baseline and 18-month NCF testing. An EQD 2 to 40% of the bilateral hippocampi >7.3 Gy was associated with impairment in Wechsler Memory Scale-III Word List (WMS-WL) delayed recall (odds ratio [OR] 19.3; p = 0.043). The association between WMS-WL delayed recall and EQD 2 to 100% of the bilateral hippocampi >0.0 Gy trended to significance (OR 14.8; p = 0.068). Conclusion: EQD 2 to 40% of the bilateral hippocampi greater than 7.3 Gy is associated with long-term impairment in list-learning delayed recall after FSRT for benign or low-grade adult brain tumors. Given that modern intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques can reduce the dose to the bilateral hippocampi below this dosimetric threshold, patients should be enrolled in

  15. Hippocampal Dosimetry Predicts Neurocognitive Function Impairment After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Benign or Low-Grade Adult Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondi, Vinai; Hermann, Bruce P.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the association between hippocampal dose and long-term neurocognitive function (NCF) impairment for benign or low-grade adult brain tumors treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). Methods and Materials: Adult patients with benign or low-grade adult brain tumors were treated with FSRT per institutional practice. No attempt was made to spare the hippocampus. NCF testing was conducted at baseline and 18 months follow-up, on a prospective clinical trial. Regression-based standardized z scores were calculated by using similar healthy control individuals evaluated at the same test–retest interval. NCF impairment was defined as a z score ≤−1.5. After delineation of the bilateral hippocampi according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group contouring atlas, dose–volume histograms were generated for the left and right hippocampi and for the composite pair. Biologically equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD 2 ) assuming an α/β ratio of 2 Gy were computed. Fisher’s exact test and binary logistic regression were used for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively. Dose–response data were fit to a nonlinear model. Results: Of 29 patients enrolled in this trial, 18 completed both baseline and 18-month NCF testing. An EQD 2 to 40% of the bilateral hippocampi >7.3 Gy was associated with impairment in Wechsler Memory Scale-III Word List (WMS-WL) delayed recall (odds ratio [OR] 19.3; p = 0.043). The association between WMS-WL delayed recall and EQD 2 to 100% of the bilateral hippocampi >0.0 Gy trended to significance (OR 14.8; p = 0.068). Conclusion: EQD 2 to 40% of the bilateral hippocampi greater than 7.3 Gy is associated with long-term impairment in list-learning delayed recall after FSRT for benign or low-grade adult brain tumors. Given that modern intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques can reduce the dose to the bilateral hippocampi below this dosimetric threshold, patients should be enrolled in

  16. Outcomes of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients With Potentially Operable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerwaard, Frank J., E-mail: fj.lagerwaard@vumc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verstegen, Naomi E.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Slotman, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Paul, Marinus A. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Smit, Egbert F. [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-05-01

    Background: Approximately two-thirds of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands currently undergo surgical resection. As an increasing number of fit patients have elected to undergo stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in recent years, we studied outcomes after SABR in patients with potentially operable stage I NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In an institutional prospective database collected since 2003, 25% of lung SABR cases (n = 177 patients) were found to be potentially operable when the following patients were excluded: those with (1) synchronous lung tumors or other malignancy, (2) prior high-dose radiotherapy/pneumonectomy, (3) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a severity score of 3-4 according to the Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease classification. (4) a performance score of {>=}3, and (5) other comorbidity precluding surgery. Study patients included 101 males and 76 females, with a median age of 76 years old, 60% of whom were staged as T1 and 40% of whom were T2. Median Charlson comorbidity score was 2 (range, 0-5). A SABR dose of 60 Gy was delivered using a risk-adapted scheme in 3, 5, or 8 fractions, depending on tumor size and location. Follow-up chest computed tomography scans were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Results: Median follow-up was 31.5 months; and median overall survival (OS) was 61.5 months, with 1- and 3-year survival rates of 94.7% and 84.7%, respectively. OS rates at 3 years in patients with (n = 59) and without (n = 118) histological diagnosis did not differ significantly (96% versus 81%, respectively, p = 0.39). Post-SABR 30-day mortality was 0%, while predicted 30-day mortality for a lobectomy, derived using the Thoracoscore predictive model (Falcoz PE et al. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2007;133:325-332), would have been 2.6%. Local control rates at 1 and 3 years were 98% and 93%, respectively. Regional and distant failure rates at 3 years were each

  17. Stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Levy, R.P.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lyman, J.T.; Chuang, F.Y.S.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.

    1989-12-01

    One of the more challenging problems of vascular neurosurgery is the management of surgically-inaccessible arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we have developed the method of stereotactic heavy-charged-particle (helium-ion) Bragg peak radiosurgery for treatment of inoperable intracranial AVMs in over 300 patients since 1980 [Fabrikant et al. 1989, Fabrikant et al. 1985, Levy et al. 1989]. This report describes patient selection, treatment method, clinical and neuroradiologic results and complications encountered. 4 refs

  18. Stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Levy, R.P.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lyman, J.T.; Chuang, F.Y.S.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.

    1989-12-01

    One of the more challenging problems of vascular neurosurgery is the management of surgically-inaccessible arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we have developed the method of stereotactic heavy-charged-particle (helium-ion) Bragg peak radiosurgery for treatment of inoperable intracranial AVMs in over 300 patients since 1980 (Fabrikant et al. 1989, Fabrikant et al. 1985, Levy et al. 1989). This report describes patient selection, treatment method, clinical and neuroradiologic results and complications encountered. 4 refs.

  19. Accuracy requirements in radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzdar, S. A.; Afzal, M.; Nazir, A.; Gadhi, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy attempts to deliver ionizing radiation to the tumour and can improve the survival chances and/or quality of life of patients. There are chances of errors and uncertainties in the entire process of radiotherapy that may affect the accuracy and precision of treatment management and decrease degree of conformation. All expected inaccuracies, like radiation dose determination, volume calculation, complete evaluation of the full extent of the tumour, biological behaviour of specific tumour types, organ motion during radiotherapy, imaging, biological/molecular uncertainties, sub-clinical diseases, microscopic spread of the disease, uncertainty in normal tissue responses and radiation morbidity need sound appreciation. Conformity can be increased by reduction of such inaccuracies. With the yearly increase in computing speed and advancement in other technologies the future will provide the opportunity to optimize a greater number of variables and reduce the errors in the treatment planning process. In multi-disciplined task of radiotherapy, efforts are needed to overcome the errors and uncertainty, not only by the physicists but also by radiologists, pathologists and oncologists to reduce molecular and biological uncertainties. The radiation therapy physics is advancing towards an optimal goal that is definitely to improve accuracy where necessary and to reduce uncertainty where possible. (author)

  20. A randomised phase II trial of Stereotactic Ablative Fractionated radiotherapy versus Radiosurgery for Oligometastatic Neoplasia to the lung (TROG 13.01 SAFRON II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva, Shankar; Kron, Tomas; Bressel, Mathias; Haas, Marion; Mai, Tao; Vinod, Shalini; Sasso, Giuseppe; Wong, Wenchang; Le, Hien; Eade, Thomas; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Chesson, Brent; Pham, Daniel; Høyer, Morten; Montgomery, Rebecca; Ball, David

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is emerging as a non-invasive method for precision irradiation of lung tumours. However, the ideal dose/fractionation schedule is not yet known. The primary purpose of this study is to assess safety and efficacy profile of single and multi-fraction SABR in the context of pulmonary oligometastases. The TROG 13.01/ALTG 13.001 clinical trial is a multicentre unblinded randomised phase II study. Eligible patients have up to three metastases to the lung from any non-haematological malignancy, each < 5 cm in size, non-central targets, and have all primary and extrathoracic disease controlled with local therapies. Patients are randomised 1:1 to a single fraction of 28Gy versus 48Gy in four fractions of SABR. The primary objective is to assess the safety of each treatment arm, with secondary objectives including assessment of quality of life, local efficacy, resource use and costs, overall and disease free survival and time to distant failure. Outcomes will be stratified by number of metastases and origin of the primary disease (colorectal versus non-colorectal primary). Planned substudies include an assessment of the impact of online e-Learning platforms for lung SABR and assessment of the effect of SABR fractionation on the immune responses. A total of 84 patients are required to complete the study. Fractionation schedules have not yet been investigated in a randomised fashion in the setting of oligometastatic disease. Assuming the likelihood of similar clinical efficacy in both arms, the present study design allows for exploration of the hypothesis that cost implications of managing potentially increased toxicities from single fraction SABR will be outweighed by costs associated with delivering multiple-fraction SABR

  1. Parenchymal and Functional Lung Changes after Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer—Experiences from a Single Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Hörner-Rieber

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThis study aimed to evaluate parenchymal and functional lung changes following stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients and to correlate radiological and functional findings with patient and treatment characteristics as well as survival.Materials and methodsSeventy patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with SBRT from 2004 to 2015 with more than 1 year of CT follow-up scans were analyzed. Incidence, morphology, severity of acute and late lung abnormalities as well as pulmonary function changes were evaluated and correlated with outcome.ResultsMedian follow-up time was 32.2 months with 2-year overall survival (OS of 83% and local progression-free survival of 88%, respectively. Regarding parenchymal changes, most patients only developed mild to moderate CT abnormalities. Mean ipsilateral lung dose (MLD in biological effective dose and planning target volume size were significantly associated with maximum severity score of parenchymal changes (p = 0.014, p < 0.001. Furthermore, both maximum severity score and MLD were significantly connected with OS in univariate analysis (p = 0.043, p = 0.025. For functional lung changes, we detected significantly reduced total lung capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and forced vital capacity (FVC parameters after SBRT (p ≤ 0.001. Multivariate analyses revealed SBRT with an MLD ≥ 9.72 Gy and FVC reduction ≥0.54 L as independent prognostic factors for inferior OS (p = 0.029, p = 0.004.ConclusionSBRT was generally tolerated well with only mild toxicity. For evaluating the possible prognostic impact of MLD and FVC reduction on survival detected in this analysis, larger prospective studies are truly needed.

  2. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Recurrent or Oligometastatic Uterine Cervix Cancer: A Cooperative Study of the Korean Radiation Oncology Group (KROG 14-11).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae Jin; Chang, Ah Ram; Seo, Youngseok; Cho, Chul Koo; Jang, Won-Il; Kim, Mi Sook; Choi, Chulwon

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate local control and patient survival for recurrent or oligometastatic uterine cervical cancer treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using CyberKnife, and to demonstrate the safety of SBRT. Between 2002 and 2013, 100 recurrent or oligometastatic lesions in 85 patients were treated with SBRT at three Institutions. SBRT sites were within the previous RT field in 59 and partially overlapped in nine. SBRT sites included three local recurrences, 89 lymph node metastases, and eight distant metastases. Patients were treated with a median dose of 39 Gy in three fractions, which was equivalent to a biologically effective dose (BED) of 90 Gy. The median follow-up period was 20.4 months. Local failure occurred in 17 out of 100 SBRT-treated sites. The 2-year and 5-year local progression-free survival rates were 82.5% and 78.8%, respectively. Eleven local failures occurred within the previous RT field. The 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 57.5% and 32.9%, respectively. BED >90 Gy (p=0.072) and >69 Gy (p=0.059) and longer disease-free interval (p=0.065) predicted marginally superior local control. Re-irradiation appeared to be related to inferior local control (p<0.001), but the SBRT BED in this group was much lower than the dose in the other group (median BED, 79 Gy vs. 90 Gy). Chronic toxicities of grade 3 or more occurred in five cases. SBRT for recurrent or oligometastatic cervical cancer resulted in excellent local control, especially with a long disease-free interval and high BED treatment, with acceptable toxicities. Therefore, SBRT can be considered a therapeutic option for these patients. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.