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Sample records for stereotactic imrt boost

  1. IMRT with Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High Risk Malignant Salivary Gland Malignancies : A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana D Karam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with high risk salivary gland malignancies are at increased risk of local failure. We present our institutional experience with dose escalation using hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT in a subset of this rare disease. Over the course of 9 years, 10 patients presenting with skull base invasion, gross disease with one or more adverse features, or those treated with adjuvant radiation with three or more pathologic features were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy followed by hypofractionated SBRT boost. Patients presented with variable tumor histologies, and in all but one, the tumors were classified as poorly differentiated high grade. Four patients had gross disease, 3 had gross residual disease, 3 had skull base invasion, and 2 patients had rapidly recurrent disease (≤ 6 months that had been previously treated with surgical resection. The median Stereotactic Radiosurgery boost dose was 17.5 Gy (range 10-30 Gy given in a median of 5 fractions (range 3-6 fractions for a total median cumulative dose of 81.2 Gy (range 73.2-95.6 Gy. The majority of the patients received platinum based concurrent chemotherapy with their radiation. At a median follow-up of 32 months (range 12-120 for all patients and 43 months for surviving patients (range 12-120, actuarial 3-year locoregional control, distant control, progression free survival, and overall survival were 88%, 81%, 68%, and 79%, respectively. Only one patient failed locally and two failed distantly. Serious late toxicity included graft ulceration in 1 patient and osteoradionecrosis in another patient, both of which underwent surgical reconstruction. Six patients developed fibrosis. In a subset of patients with salivary gland malignancies with skull base invasion, gross disease, or those treated adjuvantly with three or more adverse pathologic features, hypofractionated SBRT boost to Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy yields good local control rates and

  2. A dose planning study on applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost in combination with 3D MRI based brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assenholt, Marianne S.; Petersen, Joergen B.; Nielsen, Soeren K.; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Tanderup, Kari

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. Locally advanced cervical cancer is usually treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy (BT). However, if response or tumour topography is unfavourable it may be difficult to reach a sufficient BT dose. The purpose of this study was to explore whether an applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost could be combined with brachytherapy to improve dose volume parameters. Material and methods. Dose plans of 6 patients with HR CTV volumes of 31-100cc at the time of BT were analysed. MRI was performed with a combined intracavitary (IC)-interstitial (IS) ring applicator in situ. A radiotherapy schedule consisting of 45Gy (1.8Gyx25) IMRT followed by boost of 28Gy (7Gyx4fx) was modelled. Four different boost techniques were evaluated: IC-BT, IC/IS-BT, IC-BT+IMRT and IMRT. Dose plans were optimised for maximal tumour dose (D90) and coverage (V85Gy) while respecting DVH constraints in organs at risk: D2cc <75Gy in rectum and sigmoid and <90Gy in bladder (EQD2). In combined BT+IMRT dose plans, the IMRT plan was optimised on top of the BT dose distribution. Volumes irradiated to more than 60 Gy EQD2 (V60Gy) were evaluated. Results. Median dose coverage in IC plans was 74% [66-93%]. By using IC/IS or IC-BT+IMRT boost, the median coverage was improved to 95% [78-99%], and to 96% [69-99%] respectively. For IMRT alone, a median coverage of 98% [90-100%] was achieved, but V60Gy volumes were significantly increased by a median factor of 2.0 [1.4-2.3] as compared to IC/IS. It depended on the individual tumour topography whether IC/IS-BT or IC-BT+IMRT boost was the most favourable technique. Conclusion. It is technically possible to create dose plans that combine image guided BT and IMRT. In this study the dose coverage could be significantly increased by adding IS-BT or IMRT boost to the intracavitary dose. Using IMRT alone for boost cannot be advocated since this results in a significant increase of the volume irradiated to 60Gy

  3. Stereotactic IMRT using a MMLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoban, P.; Short, R.; Biggs, D.; Rose, A.; Smee, R.; Schneider, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The leaf width of the multileaf collimator (MLC) used for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT ) largely determines the resolution of the intensity maps that define the entire profile of each beam. In turn it is this resolution, and consequently the achievable degree of beam modulation, that determines the ability to conform the 3D dose distribution to complex target volumes. As such, the leaf width is of more importance than in fixed-field MLC treatments where only the beam edges are affected.A Radionics micro-multileaf collimator (MMLC) with 4 mm leaf width, attached to a Siemens Primus linear accelerator, is in use for stereotactic IMRT at PbWH. Treatment planning is performed with the XPlan system including an integrated IMRT module. Cases treated have so far been with conventional fractionation, including both malignant and benign cranial lesions. Meningiomas in particular often require a complex dose distribution because of their en-plaque nature and/or proximity to the brainstem. Stereotactic localisation and fixation is with the Gill-Thomas-Cosman head-ring or Head and Neck localiser. Cases are typically planned both for fixed-field treatment and IMRT, with IMRT being used if significant benefit is seen. IMRT treatment with the Siemens MLC is also an option. A quality assurance system has been set up, including a flowchart/checklist and phantom dosimetry using TLDs. As expected, treatment plans show IMRT with the MMLC to consistently be the best option dosimetrically. In particular, for a given target coverage there is always better sparing of nearby organs at risk (OARs) with MMLC rather than MLC-based IMRT. Adjustments such as the inclusion of a margin around the target volume or an increase in the penalty for target underdosage improve coverage for MLC plans but generally at the expense of increased OAR involvement. MMLC IMRT treatments commonly require 30-50 fields and can be delivered in approximately 10-15 minutes using an autosequence

  4. Whole brain radiotherapy with adjuvant or concomitant boost in brain metastasis: dosimetric comparison between helical and volumetric IMRT technique.

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    Borghetti, Paolo; Pedretti, Sara; Spiazzi, Luigi; Avitabile, Rossella; Urpis, Mauro; Foscarini, Federica; Tesini, Giulia; Trevisan, Francesca; Ghirardelli, Paolo; Pandini, Sara Angela; Triggiani, Luca; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Buglione, Michela

    2016-04-19

    To compare and evaluate the possible advantages related to the use of VMAT and helical IMRT and two different modalities of boost delivering, adjuvant stereotactic boost (SRS) or simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), in the treatment of brain metastasis (BM) in RPA classes I-II patients. Ten patients were treated with helical IMRT, 5 of them with SRS after whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and 5 with SIB. MRI co-registration with planning CT was mandatory and prescribed doses were 30 Gy in 10 fractions (fr) for WBRT and 15Gy/1fr or 45Gy/10fr in SRS or SIB, respectively. For each patient, 4 "treatment plans" (VMAT SRS and SIB, helical IMRT SRS and SIB) were calculated and accepted if PTV boost was included in 95 % isodose and dose constraints of the main organs at risk were respected without major deviations. Homogeneity Index (HI), Conformal Index (CI) and Conformal Number (CN) were considered to compare the different plans. Moreover, time of treatment delivery was calculated and considered in the analysis. Volume of brain metastasis ranged between 1.43 and 51.01 cc (mean 12.89 ± 6.37 ml) and 3 patients had double lesions. V95% resulted over 95 % in the average for each kind of technique, but the "target coverage" was inadequate for VMAT planning with two sites. The HI resulted close to the ideal value of zero in all cases; VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS showed mean CI of 2.15, 2.10, 2.44 and 1.66, respectively (optimal range: 1.5-2.0). Helical IMRT-SRS was related to the best and reliable finding of CN (0.66). The mean of treatment time was 210 s, 467 s, 440 s, 1598 s, respectively, for VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS. This dosimetric comparison show that helical IMRT obtain better target coverage and respect of CI and CN; VMAT could be acceptable in solitary metastasis. SIB modality can be considered as a good choice for clinical and logistic compliance; literature's preliminary data are confirming also a

  5. Whole brain radiotherapy with adjuvant or concomitant boost in brain metastasis: dosimetric comparison between helical and volumetric IMRT technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghetti, Paolo; Pedretti, Sara; Spiazzi, Luigi; Avitabile, Rossella; Urpis, Mauro; Foscarini, Federica; Tesini, Giulia; Trevisan, Francesca; Ghirardelli, Paolo; Pandini, Sara Angela; Triggiani, Luca; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Buglione, Michela

    2016-01-01

    To compare and evaluate the possible advantages related to the use of VMAT and helical IMRT and two different modalities of boost delivering, adjuvant stereotactic boost (SRS) or simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), in the treatment of brain metastasis (BM) in RPA classes I-II patients. Ten patients were treated with helical IMRT, 5 of them with SRS after whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and 5 with SIB. MRI co-registration with planning CT was mandatory and prescribed doses were 30 Gy in 10 fractions (fr) for WBRT and 15Gy/1fr or 45Gy/10fr in SRS or SIB, respectively. For each patient, 4 “treatment plans” (VMAT SRS and SIB, helical IMRT SRS and SIB) were calculated and accepted if PTV boost was included in 95 % isodose and dose constraints of the main organs at risk were respected without major deviations. Homogeneity Index (HI), Conformal Index (CI) and Conformal Number (CN) were considered to compare the different plans. Moreover, time of treatment delivery was calculated and considered in the analysis. Volume of brain metastasis ranged between 1.43 and 51.01 cc (mean 12.89 ± 6.37 ml) and 3 patients had double lesions. V95% resulted over 95 % in the average for each kind of technique, but the “target coverage” was inadequate for VMAT planning with two sites. The HI resulted close to the ideal value of zero in all cases; VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS showed mean CI of 2.15, 2.10, 2.44 and 1.66, respectively (optimal range: 1.5–2.0). Helical IMRT-SRS was related to the best and reliable finding of CN (0.66). The mean of treatment time was 210 s, 467 s, 440 s, 1598 s, respectively, for VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS. This dosimetric comparison show that helical IMRT obtain better target coverage and respect of CI and CN; VMAT could be acceptable in solitary metastasis. SIB modality can be considered as a good choice for clinical and logistic compliance; literature’s preliminary data are confirming

  6. Dosimetric comparison of standard three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost schedule (sequential IMRT plan) with simultaneous integrated boost-IMRT (SIB IMRT) treatment plan in patients with localized carcinoma prostate.

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    Bansal, A; Kapoor, R; Singh, S K; Kumar, N; Oinam, A S; Sharma, S C

    2012-07-01

    DOSIMETERIC AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL COMPARISON OF TWO RADIATION SCHEDULES IN LOCALIZED CARCINOMA PROSTATE: Standard Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3DCRT) followed by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) boost (sequential-IMRT) with Simultaneous Integrated Boost IMRT (SIB-IMRT). Thirty patients were enrolled. In all, the target consisted of PTV P + SV (Prostate and seminal vesicles) and PTV LN (lymph nodes) where PTV refers to planning target volume and the critical structures included: bladder, rectum and small bowel. All patients were treated with sequential-IMRT plan, but for dosimetric comparison, SIB-IMRT plan was also created. The prescription dose to PTV P + SV was 74 Gy in both strategies but with different dose per fraction, however, the dose to PTV LN was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions over 5 weeks for sequential-IMRT and 54 Gy delivered in 27 fractions over 5.5 weeks for SIB-IMRT. The treatment plans were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms. Also, Tumor Control Probability (TCP) and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) obtained with the two plans were compared. The volume of rectum receiving 70 Gy or more (V > 70 Gy) was reduced to 18.23% with SIB-IMRT from 22.81% with sequential-IMRT. SIB-IMRT reduced the mean doses to both bladder and rectum by 13% and 17%, respectively, as compared to sequential-IMRT. NTCP of 0.86 ± 0.75% and 0.01 ± 0.02% for the bladder, 5.87 ± 2.58% and 4.31 ± 2.61% for the rectum and 8.83 ± 7.08% and 8.25 ± 7.98% for the bowel was seen with sequential-IMRT and SIB-IMRT plans respectively. For equal PTV coverage, SIB-IMRT markedly reduced doses to critical structures, therefore should be considered as the strategy for dose escalation. SIB-IMRT achieves lesser NTCP than sequential-IMRT.

  7. Phase II study to assess the efficacy of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy followed by a stereotactic radiosurgery boost in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koong, Albert C.; Christofferson, Erin; Le, Quynh-Thu; Goodman, Karyn A.; Ho, Anthony; Kuo, Timothy; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Greco, Ralph; Norton, Jeffrey; Yang, George P.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of concurrent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) followed by body stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, all patients (19) had pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma and were uniformly staged. Our treatment protocol consisted of 45 Gy IMRT with concurrent 5-FU followed by a 25 Gy SRS boost to the primary tumor. Results: Sixteen patients completed the planned therapy. Two patients experienced Grade 3 toxicity (none had more than Grade 3 toxicity). Fifteen of these 16 patients were free from local progression until death. Median overall survival was 33 weeks. Conclusions: Concurrent IMRT and 5-FU followed by SRS in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer results in excellent local control, but does not improve overall survival and is associated with more toxicity than SRS, alone

  8. Optimization of the primary collimator settings for fractionated IMRT stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobler, Matt; Leavitt, Dennis D.; Watson, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Advances in field-shaping techniques for stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy have allowed dynamic adjustment of field shape with gantry rotation (dynamic conformal arc) in an effort to minimize dose to critical structures. Recent work evaluated the potential for increased sparing of dose to normal tissues when the primary collimator setting is optimized to only the size necessary to cover the largest shape of the dynamic micro multi leaf field. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is now a treatment option for patients receiving stereotactic radiotherapy treatments. This multisegmentation of the dose delivered through multiple fixed treatment fields provides for delivery of uniform dose to the tumor volume while allowing sparing of critical structures, particularly for patients whose tumor volumes are less suited for rotational treatment. For these segmented fields, the total number of monitor units (MUs) delivered may be much greater than the number of MUs required if dose delivery occurred through an unmodulated treatment field. As a result, undesired dose delivered, as leakage through the leaves to tissues outside the area of interest, will be proportionally increased. This work will evaluate the role of optimization of the primary collimator setting for these IMRT treatment fields, and compare these results to treatment fields where the primary collimator settings have not been optimized

  9. Hypofractionated stereotactic boost in intermediate risk prostate carcinoma: Preliminary results of a multicenter phase II trial (CKNO-PRO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pasquier

    Full Text Available Dose escalation may improve curability in intermediate-risk prostate carcinoma. A multicenter national program was developed to assess toxicity and tumor response with hypofractionated stereotactic boost after conventional radiotherapy in intermediate-risk prostate cancer.Between August 2010 and April 2013, 76 patients with intermediated-risk prostate carcinoma were included in the study. A first course delivered 46 Gy by IMRT (68.4% of patients or 3D conformal radiotherapy (31.6% of patients. The second course delivered a boost of 18 Gy (3x6Gy within 10 days. Gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU toxicities were evaluated as defined by NCI-CTCAE (v4.0. Secondary outcome measures were local control, overall and metastasis-free survival, PSA kinetics, and patient functional status (urinary and sexual according to the IIEF5 and IPSS questionnaires.The overall treatment time was 45 days (median, range 40-55. Median follow-up was 26.4 months (range, 13.6-29.9 months. Seventy-seven per cent (n = 58 of patients presented a Gleason score of 7. At 24 months, biological-free survival was 98.7% (95% CI, 92.8-99.9% and median PSA 0.46 ng/mL (range, 0.06-6.20 ng/mL. Grade ≥2 acute GI and GU toxicities were 13.2% and 23.7%, respectively. Grade ≥2 late GI and GU toxicities were observed in 6.6% and 2.6% of patients, respectively. No grade 4 toxicity was observed.Hypofractionated stereotactic boost is effective and safely delivered for intermediate-risk prostate carcinoma after conventional radiation. Mild-term relapse-free survival and tolerance results are promising, and further follow-up is warranted to confirm the results at long term.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01596816.

  10. Stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and inverse treatment planning for advanced pleural mesothelioma. Feasibility and initial results

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    Muenter, M.W.; Thilmann, C.; Hof, H.; Debus, J. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Nill, S.; Hoess, A.; Partridge, M. [Dept. of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Haering, P. [Dept. of Central Dosimetry, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Manegold, C. [Dept. of Medical Oncology/Internal Medicine, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg gGmbH, Heidelberg (Germany); Wannenmacher, M. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-08-01

    Background and Purpose: Complex-shaped malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPMs) with challenging volumes are extremely difficult to treat by conventional radiotherapy due to tolerance doses of the surrounding normal tissue. In a feasibility study, we evaluated if inversely planned stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) could be applied in the treatment of MPM. Patients and Methods: Eight patients with unresectable lesions were treated after failure of chemotherapy. All patients were positioned using noninvasive patient fixation techniques which can be attached to the applied extracranial stereotactic system. Due to craniocaudal extension of the tumor, it was necessary to develop a special software attached to the inverse planning program KonRad, which can connect two inverse treatment plans and consider the applied dose of the first treatment plan in the area of the matchline of the second treatment plan. Results: Except for one patient, in whom radiotherapy was canceled due to abdominal metastasis, treatment could be completed in all patients and was well tolerated. Median survival after diagnosis was 20 months and after IMRT 6.5 months. Therefore, both the 1-year actuarial overall survival from the start of radiotherapy and the 2-year actuarial overall survival since diagnosis were 28%. IMRT did not result in clinically significant acute side effects. By using the described inverse planning software, over- or underdosage in the region of the field matchline could be prevented. Pure treatment time ranged between 10 and 21 min. Conclusion: This study showed that IMRT is feasible in advanced unresectable MPM. The presented possibilities of stereotactic IMRT in the treatment of MPM will justify the evaluation of IMRT in early-stage pleural mesothelioma combined with chemotherapy in a study protocol, in order to improve the outcome of these patients. Furthermore, dose escalation should be possible by using IMRT. (orig.)

  11. The use of stereotactic radiosurgical boost in the treatment of medulloblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Charles; Stea, Baldassarre; Lulu, Bruce; Hamilton, Allan; Cassady, J. Robert

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Starting in 1992, we began using a stereotactic radiosurgical (SRS) boost for the treatment of medulloblastomas. Four patients ranging in age from 7 to 42 years old have since been treated and are the subject of this retrospective study. Methods and Materials: All patients were initially treated with a maximally debulking surgery and external beam radiotherapy, which were then followed by a stereotactic radiosurgical boost using a modified 6 MeV linear accelerator. Radiosurgical boost doses ranged from 4.50 to 10.0 Gy. Target volumes ranged from 1.1 to 8.1 cc. The procedure was well tolerated with minimal acute toxicities. Results: All four patients are alive without evidence of recurrence (at 8 to 35 months). Acute nausea and vomiting was elicited during the radiosurgical procedure in the first patient treated. We have since begun premedicating patients with antiemetics or treating under general anesthesia. Late complications consisted of panhypopituitarism in one patient, which was thought to be attributable to the previous course of whole-brain radiotherapy. We have not observed any incidence of radionecrosis in this small cohort of patients. Conclusions: Our preliminary results with the use of radiosurgery for medulloblastomas are optimistic, and we would like to suggest the inclusion of a radiosurgery boost in future clinical trials for treatment of this disease

  12. Simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) in nasopharyngeal cancer

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    Studer, Gabriela [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Peponi, Evangelia; Glanzmann, Christoph; Kunz, Guntram; Renner, Christoph; Tomuschat, Katja

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and safety of using simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) to treat nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) in a Caucasian cohort. Outcome was analyzed with respect to dose-volume histogram (DVH) values. Patients and Methods: Between 03/2002 and 01/2008, 39 NPC patients underwent SIB-IMRT (37 Caucasians; 31 males; mean age 53 years [16-78 years]). 41% presented with WHO (World Health Organization) type 1 unfavorable histology, 85% with stage III/IV disease. 19 patients had total gross tumor volume (GTV) 16-70 cm{sup 3} (mean 36 cm{sup 3}), while 16 had GTV > 70 cm{sup 3} (73-217 cm{sup 3}; mean 115 cm{sup 3}). All patients with stage II-IV disease received concomitant cisplatin. The prescribed SIB dose delivered to the planning target volume (PTV) was 70 Gy (2.00 Gy/fraction) in 17, 69.6 Gy (2.11 Gy/fraction) in 19, and 66 Gy (2.20 Gy/fraction) in three patients. Results: 3-year local relapse-free, nodal relapse-free, distant metastases-free, disease-free rates and overall survival were 86%, 89%, 85%, 72%, and 85% (median follow-up 30 months [8-71 months]). Histology was a significant prognostic factor concerning overall survival, with worst prognosis in WHO type 1 compared to type 2/3 (75% vs. 93%; p = 0.03). There was a trend in favor of WHO type 2/3 regarding local control (74% vs. 94%; p = 0.052). The PTV DVHs showed a slight left shift compared to reported series. Three patients developed grade 3 late effects (xerostomia [n=2], dysphagia [n=1], hearing loss [n=1]). Conclusion: In comparison with predominantly Asian NPC IMRT series in the literature, chemo-IMRT in the own Caucasian cohort, characterized by less radioresponsive WHO type 1, was equally effective. Treatment tolerance was excellent. (orig.)

  13. Effect of patient setup errors on simultaneously integrated boost head and neck IMRT treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Keall, Paul J.; Wu Qiuwen; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine dose delivery errors that could result from random and systematic setup errors for head-and-neck patients treated using the simultaneous integrated boost (SIB)-intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients who participated in an intramural Phase I/II parotid-sparing IMRT dose-escalation protocol using the SIB treatment technique had their dose distributions reevaluated to assess the impact of random and systematic setup errors. The dosimetric effect of random setup error was simulated by convolving the two-dimensional fluence distribution of each beam with the random setup error probability density distribution. Random setup errors of σ = 1, 3, and 5 mm were simulated. Systematic setup errors were simulated by randomly shifting the patient isocenter along each of the three Cartesian axes, with each shift selected from a normal distribution. Systematic setup error distributions with Σ = 1.5 and 3.0 mm along each axis were simulated. Combined systematic and random setup errors were simulated for σ = Σ = 1.5 and 3.0 mm along each axis. For each dose calculation, the gross tumor volume (GTV) received by 98% of the volume (D 98 ), clinical target volume (CTV) D 90 , nodes D 90 , cord D 2 , and parotid D 50 and parotid mean dose were evaluated with respect to the plan used for treatment for the structure dose and for an effective planning target volume (PTV) with a 3-mm margin. Results: Simultaneous integrated boost-IMRT head-and-neck treatment plans were found to be less sensitive to random setup errors than to systematic setup errors. For random-only errors, errors exceeded 3% only when the random setup error σ exceeded 3 mm. Simulated systematic setup errors with Σ = 1.5 mm resulted in approximately 10% of plan having more than a 3% dose error, whereas a Σ = 3.0 mm resulted in half of the plans having more than a 3% dose error and 28% with a 5% dose error

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: A Promising Treatment Option for the Boost of Oropharyngeal Cancers Not Suitable for Brachytherapy: A Single-Institutional Experience

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    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim, E-mail: a.al-mamgani@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Tans, Lisa; Teguh, David N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rooij, Peter van [Department of Biostatistics, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Zwijnenburg, Ellen M.; Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the outcome and toxicity of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a treatment option for boosting primary oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) in patients who not suitable for the standard brachytherapy boost (BTB). Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2010, 51 patients with Stage I to IV biopsy-proven OPC who were not suitable for BTB received boosts by means of SBRT (3 times 5.5 Gy, prescribed to the 80% isodose line), after 46 Gy of IMRT to the primary tumor and neck (when indicated). Endpoints of the study were local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and acute and late toxicity. Results: After a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 6-65 months), the 2-year actuarial rates of LC, DFS, and OS were 86%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, and the 3-year rates were 70%, 66%, and 54%, respectively. The treatment was well tolerated, as there were no treatment breaks and no Grade 4 or 5 toxicity reported, either acute or chronic. The overall 2-year cumulative incidence of Grade {>=}2 late toxicity was 28%. Of the patients with 2 years with no evidence of disease (n = 20), only 1 patient was still feeding tube dependent and 2 patients had Grade 3 xerostomia. Conclusions: According to our knowledge, this study is the first report of patients with primary OPC who received boosts by means of SBRT. Patients with OPC who are not suitable for the standard BTB can safely and effectively receive boosts by SBRT. With this radiation technique, an excellent outcome was achieved. Furthermore, the SBRT boost did not have a negative impact regarding acute and late side effects.

  15. Integration method of 3D MR spectroscopy into treatment planning system for glioblastoma IMRT dose painting with integrated simultaneous boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ken, Soléakhéna; Cassol, Emmanuelle; Delannes, Martine; Celsis, Pierre; Cohen-Jonathan, Elizabeth Moyal; Laprie, Anne; Vieillevigne, Laure; Franceries, Xavier; Simon, Luc; Supper, Caroline; Lotterie, Jean-Albert; Filleron, Thomas; Lubrano, Vincent; Berry, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    To integrate 3D MR spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) in the treatment planning system (TPS) for glioblastoma dose painting to guide simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). For sixteen glioblastoma patients, we have simulated three types of dosimetry plans, one conventional plan of 60-Gy in 3D conformational radiotherapy (3D-CRT), one 60-Gy plan in IMRT and one 72-Gy plan in SIB-IMRT. All sixteen MRSI metabolic maps were integrated into TPS, using normalization with color-space conversion and threshold-based segmentation. The fusion between the metabolic maps and the planning CT scans were assessed. Dosimetry comparisons were performed between the different plans of 60-Gy 3D-CRT, 60-Gy IMRT and 72-Gy SIB-IMRT, the last plan was targeted on MRSI abnormalities and contrast enhancement (CE). Fusion assessment was performed for 160 transformations. It resulted in maximum differences <1.00 mm for translation parameters and ≤1.15° for rotation. Dosimetry plans of 72-Gy SIB-IMRT and 60-Gy IMRT showed a significantly decreased maximum dose to the brainstem (44.00 and 44.30 vs. 57.01 Gy) and decreased high dose-volumes to normal brain (19 and 20 vs. 23% and 7 and 7 vs. 12%) compared to 60-Gy 3D-CRT (p < 0.05). Delivering standard doses to conventional target and higher doses to new target volumes characterized by MRSI and CE is now possible and does not increase dose to organs at risk. MRSI and CE abnormalities are now integrated for glioblastoma SIB-IMRT, concomitant with temozolomide, in an ongoing multi-institutional phase-III clinical trial. Our method of MR spectroscopy maps integration to TPS is robust and reliable; integration to neuronavigation systems with this method could also improve glioblastoma resection or guide biopsies

  16. Prostate IMRT fractionation strategies. Two-phase treatment versus simultaneous integrated boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stavrev, P.; Hristov, D.

    2003-01-01

    Background. The purpose of the study was to investigate the radiobiological effect of the number of fractions, position uncertainties and clonogen spread (microscopic disease) on two different inverse treatment planning alternatives: (a) 2-phase strategy; (b) simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Material and methods. The tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were calculated for the 2-phase strategy, which has well defined fractionation scheme and compared to the TCP and NTCP for the SIB strategy calculated as a function of the number of fractions. For a 7-beam IMRT prostate treatment, we have performed inverse treatment planning for the two different strategies following the above method. Results. When the position uncertainties and clonogen spread were accounted for in the TCP calculation a drop as large as 10% was found. A drop of 5-7% in the TCP was obtained for the SIB strategy, if delivered in the same number of fractions as the 2-phased one. Conclusions. The potential of inverse planning to design tight conformal dose distributions is fully revealed in the SIB optimization process. The optimized SIB superior dose distributions require modification of the delivered dose per fraction and therefore careful selection of the fractionation regime. Hence physically optimized SIB treatments may not always lead to better tumour control and tissue sparing. (author)

  17. Dosimetric evaluation of simultaneous integrated boost during stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer

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    Yang, Wensha, E-mail: wensha.yang@cshs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Reznik, Robert; Fraass, Benedick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Nissen, Nicholas [Department of Surgery, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hendifar, Andrew [Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wachsman, Ashley [Department of Cross-Sectional Imaging Interventional Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sandler, Howard; Tuli, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a promising way to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. A simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the region of vessel abutment or encasement during SBRT has the potential to downstage otherwise likely positive surgical margins. Despite the potential benefit of using SIB-SBRT, the ability to boost is limited by the local geometry of the organs at risk (OARs), such as stomach, duodenum, and bowel (SDB), relative to tumor. In this study, we have retrospectively replanned 20 patients with 25 Gy prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) and 33~80 Gy to the boost target volume (BTV) using an SIB technique for all patients. The number of plans and patients able to satisfy a set of clinically established constraints is analyzed. The ability to boost vessels (within the gross target volume [GTV]) is shown to correlate with the overlap volume (OLV), defined to be the overlap between the GTV + a 1(OLV1)- or 2(OLV2)-cm margin with the union of SDB. Integral dose, boost dose contrast (BDC), biologically effective BDC, tumor control probability for BTV, and normal tissue complication probabilities are used to analyze the dosimetric results. More than 65% of the cases can deliver a boost to 40 Gy while satisfying all OAR constraints. An OLV2 of 100 cm{sup 3} is identified as the cutoff volume: for cases with OLV2 larger than 100 cm{sup 3}, it is very unlikely the case could achieve 25 Gy to the PTV while successfully meeting all the OAR constraints.

  18. EORTC 22972-26991/MRC BR10 trial: Fractionated stereotactic boost following conventional radiotherapy of high grade gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumert, Brigitta G.; Brada, Michael; Bernier, Jacques; Kortmann, Rolf D.; Dehing-Oberije, Cary; Collette, Laurence; Davis, J. Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The EORTC trial No. 22972 investigated the role of an additional fractionated stereotactic boost (fSRT) to conventional radiotherapy for patients with high grade gliomas. A quality-assurance (QA) programme was run in conjunction with the study and was the first within the EORTC addressing the quality of a supposedly highly accurate treatment technique such as stereotactic radiotherapy. A second aim was to investigate a possible relation between the clinical results of the stereotactic boost arm and the results of the QA. Materials and methods: The trial was closed in 2001 due to low accrual. In total, 25 patients were randomized: 14 into the experimental arm and 11 into the control arm. Six centres randomized patients, 8 centres had completed the dummy run (DR) for the stereotactic boost part. All participating centres (9) were asked to complete a quality-assurance questionnaire. The DR consisted of treatment planning according to the guidelines of the protocol on 3 different tumour volumes drawn on CT images of a humanized phantom. The SRT technique to be used was evaluated by the questionnaire. Clinical data from patients recruited to the boost arm from 6 participating centres were analysed. Results: There was a full compliance to the protocol requirements for 5 centres. Major and minor deviations in conformality were observed for 2 and 3 centres, respectively. Of the 8 centres which completed the DR, one centre did not comply with the requirements of stereotactic radiotherapy concerning accuracy, dosimetry and planning. Median follow-up and median overall survival were 39.2 and 21.4 months, respectively. Acute and late toxicities of the stereotactic boost were low. One radiation necrosis was seen for a patient who has not received the SRT boost. Three reported serious adverse events were all seizures and probably therapy-related. Conclusions: Overall compliance was good but not ideal from the point of view of this highly precise radiation

  19. Definitive Upfront Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Combined with Image-Guided, Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IG-IMRT or IG-IMRT Alone for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Chi

    Full Text Available Image-guided (IG intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT enables maximal tumor margin reduction for the sparing of organs at risk (OARs when used to treat locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC with definitive chemo-radiation. It also allows for the incorporation of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR into the treatment regimen. Here, we describe our initial experience in combining definitive upfront SABR to the primary lesion with chemo-radiation delivered with conventionally fractionated IG-IMRT to the remaining regional disease; along with clinical outcome following chemo-radiation with conventionally fractionated IG-IMRT alone in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC.The clinical outcome of 29 patients with locally advanced NSCLC who underwent conventionally fractionated IG-IMRT, or definitive upfront SABR followed by IG-IMRT combined with chemotherapy (induction, concurrent, or both was retrospectively reviewed.After a median follow up of 23.7 months, the median overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS were 19.8 and 11.3 months, respectively. The 2 year local, regional, and distant control was 60%, 62%, and 38%, respectively. No local failure was observed in 3 patients following SABR + IG-IMRT while 6/26 patients failed locally following IG-IMRT alone. SABR + IG-IMRT was well tolerated. No ≥ grade 3 radiation-related toxicity was observed.Definitive upfront SABR followed by IG-IMRT in selected patients with locally advanced NSCLC warrants further investigation in future clinical trials, while chemo-radiation with IG-IMRT alone was well tolerated.

  20. A Prospective Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Incorporating a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Prostate Cancer: Long-term Outcomes Compared With Standard Image Guided IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, Michael H. [Midwestern University, Glendale, Arizona (United States); Schild, Steven E., E-mail: sschild@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Wong, William W.; Vora, Sujay A.; Keole, Sameer R.; Vargas, Carlos E.; Daniels, Thomas B.; Ezzell, Gary A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Nguyen, Ba D.; Roarke, Michael C. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: This report describes the long-term outcomes of a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), integrating a {sup 111}In capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan-directed simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-one patients with T1N0M0 to T4N0M0 prostate cancer were enrolled, and their ProstaScint and pelvic computed tomography scans were coregistered for treatment planning. The entire prostate received 75.6 Gy in 42 fractions with IMRT, whereas regions of increased uptake on ProstaScint scans received 82 Gy as an SIB. Patients with intermediate- and high-risk disease also received 6 months and 12 months of adjuvant hormonal therapy, respectively. Results: The study enrolled 31 low-, 30 intermediate-, and 10 high-risk patients. The median follow-up was 120 months (range, 24-150 months). The 10-year biochemical control rates were 85% for the entire cohort and 84%, 84%, and 90% for patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk disease, respectively. The 10-year survival rate of the entire cohort was 69%. Pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level >10 ng/mL and boost volume of >10% of the prostate volume were significantly associated with poorer biochemical control and survival. The outcomes were compared with those of a cohort of 302 patients treated similarly but without the SIB and followed up for a median of 91 months (range, 6-138 months). The 5- and 10-year biochemical control rates were 86% and 61%, respectively, in patients without the SIB compared with 94% and 85%, respectively, in patients in this trial who received the SIB (P=.02). The cohort that received an SIB did not have increased toxicity. Conclusions: The described IMRT strategy, integrating multiple imaging modalities to administer 75.6 Gy to the entire prostate with a boost dose of 82 Gy, was feasible. The addition of the SIB was associated with greater biochemical control but not toxicity. Modern

  1. Ototoxicity evaluation in medulloblastoma patients treated with involved field boost using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT): a retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Wilson Albieri; Nadalin, Wladimir; Odone Filho, Vicente; Petrilli, Antonio Sergio; Weltman, Eduardo; Chen, Michael Jenwei; Silva, Nasjla Saba da; Cappellano, Andrea Maria; Pereira, Liliane Desgualdo; Gonçalves, Maria Ines Rabelo; Ferrigno, Robson; Hanriot, Rodrigo Morais

    2014-01-01

    Ototoxicity is a known side effect of combined radiation therapy and cisplatin chemotherapy for the treatment of medulloblastoma. The delivery of an involved field boost by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may reduce the dose to the inner ear when compared with conventional radiotherapy. The dose of cisplatin may also affect the risk of ototoxicity. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the impact of involved field boost using IMRT and cisplatin dose on the rate of ototoxicity. Data from 41 medulloblastoma patients treated with IMRT were collected. Overall and disease-free survival rates were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method Hearing function was graded according to toxicity criteria of Pediatric Oncology Group (POG). Doses to inner ear and total cisplatin dose were correlated with hearing function by univariate and multivariate data analysis. After a mean follow-up of 44 months (range: 14 to 72 months), 37 patients remained alive, with two recurrences, both in spine with CSF involvement, resulting in a disease free-survival and overall survival of 85.2% and 90.2%, respectively. Seven patients (17%) experienced POG Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. Cisplatin dose was a significant factor for hearing loss in univariate analysis (p < 0.03). In multivariate analysis, median dose to inner ear was significantly associated with hearing loss (p < 0.01). POG grade 3 and 4 toxicity were uncommon with median doses to the inner ear bellow 42 Gy (p < 0.05) and total cisplatin dose of less than 375 mg/m 2 (p < 0.01). IMRT leads to a low rate of severe ototoxicity. Median radiation dose to auditory apparatus should be kept below 42 Gy. Cisplatin doses should not exceed 375 mg/m 2

  2. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy as a boost treatment for tumors in the head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Takashi; Isobe, Kouichi; Ueno, Naoyuki; Ito, Hisao; Fukuda, Ataru; Sudo, Satoshi; Shirotori, Hiroaki; Kitahara, Isao; Fukushima, Takanori

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to report initial results of CyberKnife stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) boost for tumors in the head and neck area. Between March 2008 and August 2009, 10 patients were treated with SRT boost using CyberKnife system due mainly to unfavorable condition such as tumors in close proximity to serial organs or former radiotherapy fields. Treatment sites were the external auditory canal in two, the nasopharynx in one, the oropharynx in three, the nasal cavity in one, the maxillary sinus in two, and the oligometastatic cervical lymph node in one. All patients underwent preceding conventional radiotherapy of 40 to 60 Gy. Dose and fractionation scheme of the Cyberknife SRT boost was individualized, and prescribed dose ranged from 9 Gy to 16 Gy in 3 to 4 fractions. Among four patients for whom dose to the optic pathway was concerned, the maximum dose was only about 3 Gy for three patients whereas 9.6 Gy in the remaining one patient. The maximum dose for the mandible in one of three patients with oropharyngeal cancer was 19.7 Gy, whereas majority of the bone can be spared by using non-isocentric conformal beams. For a patient with nasopharyngeal cancer, the highest dose in the brain stem was 15 Gy. However, majority of the brain stem received less than 40% of the maximum dose. Although a small volume high dose area within the normal structure could be observed in several patients, results of the present study showed potential benefits of the CyberKnife SRT boost. (author)

  3. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of Hypofractionated IMRT Field-in-Field Boost for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monjazeb, Arta M., E-mail: arta.monjazeb@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [U.C. Davis School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ayala, Deandra; Jensen, Courtney [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Case, L. Douglas [Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Bourland, J. Daniel; Ellis, Thomas L. [Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Chan, Michael D. [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Tatter, Stephen B. [Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lesser, Glen J. [Hematology Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Shaw, Edward G. [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: To describe the results of a Phase I dose escalation trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) using a hypofractionated concurrent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost. Methods: Twenty-one patients were enrolled between April 1999 and August 2003. Radiotherapy consisted of daily fractions of 1.8 Gy with a concurrent boost of 0.7 Gy (total 2.5 Gy daily) to a total dose of 70, 75, or 80 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was not permitted. Seven patients were enrolled at each dose and dose limiting toxicities were defined as irreversible Grade 3 or any Grade 4-5 acute neurotoxicity attributable to radiotherapy. Results: All patients experienced Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities. Acutely, 8 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 and 4 toxicities. Of these, only two reversible cases of otitis media were attributable to radiotherapy. No dose-limiting toxicities were encountered. Only 2 patients experienced Grade 3 delayed toxicity and there was no delayed Grade 4 toxicity. Eleven patients requiring repeat resection or biopsy were found to have viable tumor and radiation changes with no cases of radionecrosis alone. Median overall and progression-free survival for this cohort were 13.6 and 6.5 months, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 57% and 19%. At recurrence, 15 patients received chemotherapy, 9 underwent resection, and 5 received radiotherapy. Conclusions: Using a hypofractionated concurrent IMRT boost, we were able to safely treat patients to 80 Gy without any dose-limiting toxicity. Given that local failure still remains the predominant pattern for GBM patients, a trial of dose escalation with IMRT and temozolomide is warranted.

  4. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of Hypofractionated IMRT Field-in-Field Boost for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monjazeb, Arta M.; Ayala, Deandra; Jensen, Courtney; Case, L. Douglas; Bourland, J. Daniel; Ellis, Thomas L.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Chan, Michael D.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Lesser, Glen J.; Shaw, Edward G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the results of a Phase I dose escalation trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) using a hypofractionated concurrent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost. Methods: Twenty-one patients were enrolled between April 1999 and August 2003. Radiotherapy consisted of daily fractions of 1.8 Gy with a concurrent boost of 0.7 Gy (total 2.5 Gy daily) to a total dose of 70, 75, or 80 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was not permitted. Seven patients were enrolled at each dose and dose limiting toxicities were defined as irreversible Grade 3 or any Grade 4–5 acute neurotoxicity attributable to radiotherapy. Results: All patients experienced Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities. Acutely, 8 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 and 4 toxicities. Of these, only two reversible cases of otitis media were attributable to radiotherapy. No dose-limiting toxicities were encountered. Only 2 patients experienced Grade 3 delayed toxicity and there was no delayed Grade 4 toxicity. Eleven patients requiring repeat resection or biopsy were found to have viable tumor and radiation changes with no cases of radionecrosis alone. Median overall and progression-free survival for this cohort were 13.6 and 6.5 months, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 57% and 19%. At recurrence, 15 patients received chemotherapy, 9 underwent resection, and 5 received radiotherapy. Conclusions: Using a hypofractionated concurrent IMRT boost, we were able to safely treat patients to 80 Gy without any dose-limiting toxicity. Given that local failure still remains the predominant pattern for GBM patients, a trial of dose escalation with IMRT and temozolomide is warranted.

  5. Comparison of whole-field simultaneous integrated boost VMAT and IMRT in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xiance; Yi, Jinling; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yan, Huawei; Han, Ce; Xie, Congying, E-mail: billy07@wzhospital.cn

    2013-01-01

    To study the feasibility of using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to deliver whole-field simultaneous integrated boost (WF-SIB) to treat patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). WF-SIB intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, one-arc WF-SIB VMAT plans, and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT plans were generated with identical objective functions for 8 patients with NPC of various stages. Isodose distributions and dose-volume histograms were evaluated. Dosimetric and biological quality indices of clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs) were calculated to study the optimization capability of these 3 modalities in the treatment of patients with NPC. The optimization time, delivery time, required monitor units (MUs), and delivery accuracy were also compared to investigate the feasibility of these 3 modalities. There was no significant difference (p = 0.92) in target coverage (TC) between WF-SIB IMRT (99.00 ± 0.79) and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT (97.98 ± 1.29). However, both had higher TC than one-arc VMAT plans (89.92 ± 6.32, p < 0.01). IMRT demonstrated the best protection of the spinal cord, whereas two-arc VMAT showed the minimum D{sub max} to OARs. No other significant differences were observed among these 3 modalities on CTV coverage and OAR sparing. The delivery and MU efficiency of one-arc and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT were greatly improved compared with WF-SIB IMRT. The optimization time of one-arc and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT plans were 5 and 10 times greater than that of WF-SIB IMRT, respectively. The delivery accuracy of WF-SIB VMAT was not affected by the increased freedom. For patients with NPC, one-arc WF-SIB VMAT might not be able to achieve sufficient TC, whereas two-arc WF-SIB VMAT was able to achieve reasonable TC. No significant advantage on OAR protection was demonstrated by VMAT compared with IMRT. WF-SIB VMAT has significantly shorter delivery times, but WF-SIB IMRT may still be the first treatment choice for patients with NPC.

  6. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy boost for gynecologic tumors: An alternative to brachytherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molla, Meritxell; Escude, Lluis D.; Nouet, Philippe; Popowski, Youri D.Sc.; Hidalgo, Alberto; Rouzaud, Michel; Linero, Dolores; Miralbell, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: A brachytherapy (BT) boost to the vaginal vault is considered standard treatment for many endometrial or cervical cancers. We aimed to challenge this treatment standard by using stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a linac-based micromultileaf collimator technique. Methods and Materials: Since January 2002, 16 patients with either endometrial (9) or cervical (7) cancer have been treated with a final boost to the areas at higher risk for relapse. In 14 patients, the target volume included the vaginal vault, the upper vagina, the parametria, or (if not operated) the uterus (clinical target volume [CTV]). In 2 patients with local relapse, the CTV was the tumor in the vaginal stump. Margins of 6-10 mm were added to the CTV to define the planning target volume (PTV). Hypofractionated dynamic-arc or intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques were used. Postoperative treatment was delivered in 12 patients (2 x 7 Gy to the PTV with a 4-7-day interval between fractions). In the 4 nonoperated patients, a dose of 4 Gy/fraction in 5 fractions with 2 to 3 days' interval was delivered. Patients were immobilized in a customized vacuum body cast and optimally repositioned with an infrared-guided system developed for extracranial SRT. To further optimize daily repositioning and target immobilization, an inflated rectal balloon was used during each treatment fraction. In 10 patients, CT resimulation was performed before the last boost fraction to assess for repositioning reproducibility via CT-to-CT registration and to estimate PTV safety margins around the CTV. Finally, a comparative treatment planning study between BT and SRT was performed in 2 patients with an operated endometrial Stage I cancer. Results: No patient developed severe acute urinary or low-intestinal toxicity. No patient developed urinary late effects (>6 months). One patient with a vaginal relapse previously irradiated to the pelvic region presented with Grade 3 rectal bleeding 18 months after retreatment

  7. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: a promising treatment option for the boost of oropharyngeal cancers not suitable for brachytherapy: a single-institutional experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Mamgani, A.; Tans, L.; Teguh, D.N.; Rooij, P. van; Zwijnenburg, E.M.; Levendag, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively assess the outcome and toxicity of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a treatment option for boosting primary oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) in patients who not suitable for the standard brachytherapy boost (BTB). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 2005 and 2010,

  8. Serial tomotherapy vs. MLC-IMRT (Multileaf Collimator Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy) for simultaneous boost treatment large intracerebral lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Dirk; Lohr, Frank; Mai, Sabine; Polednik, Martin; Wenz, Frederik; Dobler, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Recent data suggest that a radiosurgery boost treatment for up to three brain metastases in addition to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is beneficial. Sequential treatment of multiple metastatic lesions is time-consuming and optimal normal tissue sparing is not trivial for larger metastases when separate plans are created and are only superimposed afterwards. Sequential Tomotherapy with noncoplanar arcs and Multi-field IMRT may streamline the process and enable easy simultaneous treatment. We compared plans for 2-3 intracerebral targets calculated with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) based on treatment with MLC or sequential Tomotherapy using the Peacock-System. Treatment time was not to exceed 90 min on a linac with standart dose rate. MIMiC plans without treatment-time restrictions were created as a benchmark. Materials and methods: Calculations are based on a Siemens KD2 linac with a dose rate of 200 MU/min. Step-and-Shoot IMRT is performed with a standard MLC (2 x 29 leaves, 1 cm), serial Tomotherapy with the Multivane-Collimator MIMiC (NOMOS Inc. USA). Treatment plans are created with Corvus 5.0. To create plans with good conformity we chose a noncoplanar beam- and arc geometry for each approach (IMRT 4-, MIMiC 5-couch angles). The benchmark MIMiC plans with maximally steep dose gradients had 9 couch angles. For plan comparison reasons, 10Gy were prescribed to 90% of the PTV. Steepness of dose gradients, homogeneity and conformity were assessed by the following parameters: Volume encompassed by certain isodoses outside the target as well as homogeneity and conformity as indicated by Homogeneity- and Conformity-Index. Results: Plans without treatment-time restrictions had slightest dose to organ at risk (OAR), normal tissue and least Conformity-index. MIMiC- and MLC-IMRT based plans can be treated within the intended period of 90 min, all plans met the required dose. MLC based plans resulted in higher dose to organs at risk (OAR) and dose

  9. Small-field fractionated radiotherapy with or without stereotactic boost for vestibular schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagei, K.; Shirato, H.; Suzuki, K.; Isu, T.; Sawamura, Y.; Sakamoto, T.; Fukuda, S.; Nishioka, T.; Hashimoto, S.; Miyasaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of small-field fractionated radiotherapy with or without stereotactic boost (SB) for vestibular schwannomas.Methods and materials: Thirty-nine patients with vestibular schwannoma were treated with irradiation between March 1991 and February 1996. Extra-meatal tumor diameters were under 30 mm. Thirty-three patients received small-field fractionated radiotherapy followed by SB. Basic dose schedule was 44 Gy in 22 fractions over 5 1/2 weeks plus 4 Gy in one session. Six patients received small-field fractionated radiotherapy only (40-44 Gy in 20-22 fractions over 5-5 1/2 weeks or 36 Gy in 20 fractions over 5 weeks).< Results: Follow-up ranged from 6 to 69 months (median, 24 months). Tumors decreased in size in 13 cases (33%), were unchanged in 25 (64%), and increased in one (3%). The actuarial 2-year tumor control rate was 97%. Fifteen patients had useful hearing (Gardner-Robertson class 1-2) and 25 patients had testable hearing (class 1-4) before irradiation. The 2-year actuarial rates of useful hearing preservation (free of deterioration from class 1-2 to class 3-5) were 78%. The 2-year actuarial rates of any testable hearing preservation (free of deterioration from class 1-4 to class 5) were 96%. No permanent facial and trigeminal neuropathy developed after irradiation. The 2-year actuarial incidences of facial and trigeminal neuropathies were 8% and 16%, respectively.Conclusions: Small-field fractionated radiotherapy with or without SB provides excellent short-term local control and a relatively low incidence of complications for vestibular schwannoma, although further follow-up is necessary to evaluate the long-term results. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. Radiobiological impact of dose calculation algorithms on biologically optimized IMRT lung stereotactic body radiation therapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, X.; Penagaricano, J.; Zheng, D.; Morrill, S.; Zhang, X.; Corry, P.; Griffin, R. J.; Han, E. Y.; Hardee, M.; Ratanatharathom, V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the radiobiological impact of Acuros XB (AXB) vs. Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA) dose calculation algorithms in combined dose-volume and biological optimized IMRT plans of SBRT treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Twenty eight patients with NSCLC previously treated SBRT were re-planned using Varian Eclipse (V11) with combined dose-volume and biological optimization IMRT sliding window technique. The total dose prescribed to the PTV was 60 Gy with 12 Gy per fraction. The plans were initially optimized using AAA algorithm, and then were recomputed using AXB using the same MUs and MLC files to compare with the dose distribution of the original plans and assess the radiobiological as well as dosimetric impact of the two different dose algorithms. The Poisson Linear-Quadatric (PLQ) and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) models were used for estimating the tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), respectively. The influence of the model parameter uncertainties on the TCP differences and the NTCP differences between AAA and AXB plans were studied by applying different sets of published model parameters. Patients were grouped into peripheral and centrally-located tumors to evaluate the impact of tumor location. PTV dose was lower in the re-calculated AXB plans, as compared to AAA plans. The median differences of PTV(D 95% ) were 1.7 Gy (range: 0.3, 6.5 Gy) and 1.0 Gy (range: 0.6, 4.4 Gy) for peripheral tumors and centrally-located tumors, respectively. The median differences of PTV(mean) were 0.4 Gy (range: 0.0, 1.9 Gy) and 0.9 Gy (range: 0.0, 4.3 Gy) for peripheral tumors and centrally-located tumors, respectively. TCP was also found lower in AXB-recalculated plans compared with the AAA plans. The median (range) of the TCP differences for 30 month local control were 1.6 % (0.3 %, 5.8 %) for peripheral tumors and 1.3 % (0.5 %, 3.4 %) for centrally located tumors. The lower

  11. Interpretation of Gamma Index for Quality Assurance of Simultaneously Integrated Boost (SIB) IMRT Plans for Head and Neck Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiq, Maria; Atiq, Atia; Iqbal, Khalid; Shamsi, Quratul ain; Andleeb, Farah; Buzdar, Saeed Ahmad

    2017-12-01

    Objective: The Gamma Index is prerequisite to estimate point-by-point difference between measured and calculated dose distribution in terms of both Distance to Agreement (DTA) and Dose Difference (DD). This study aims to inquire what percentage of pixels passing a certain criteria assure a good quality plan and suggest gamma index as efficient mechanism for dose verification of Simultaneous Integrated Boost Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy plans. Method: In this study, dose was calculated for 14 head and neck patients and IMRT Quality Assurance was performed with portal dosimetry using the Eclipse treatment planning system. Eclipse software has a Gamma analysis function to compare measured and calculated dose distribution. Plans of this study were deemed acceptable when passing rate was 95% using tolerance for Distance to agreement (DTA) as 3mm and Dose Difference (DD) as 5%. Result and Conclusion: Thirteen cases pass tolerance criteria of 95% set by our institution. Confidence Limit for DD is 9.3% and for gamma criteria our local CL came out to be 2.0% (i.e., 98.0% passing). Lack of correlation was found between DD and γ passing rate with R2 of 0.0509. Our findings underline the importance of gamma analysis method to predict the quality of dose calculation. Passing rate of 95% is achieved in 93% of cases which is adequate level of accuracy for analyzed plans thus assuring the robustness of SIB IMRT treatment technique. This study can be extended to investigate gamma criteria of 5%/3mm for different tumor localities and to explore confidence limit on target volumes of small extent and simple geometry.

  12. Partial stereotactic ablative boost radiotherapy in bulky non-small cell lung cancer: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Y

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Yun Bai,1 Xian-shu Gao,1 Shang-bin Qin,1 Jia-yan Chen,1 Meng-meng Su,1 Qing Liu,2 Xiu-bo Qin,2 Ming-wei Ma,1 Bo Zhao,1 Xiao-bin Gu,1 Mu Xie,1 Ming Cui,1 Xin Qi,1 Xiao-ying Li1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China; 2Department of Medical Imaging, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China Purpose: Bulky non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is difficult to achieve effective local control by conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CRT. The present work aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of partial stereotactic ablative boost radiotherapy (P-SABR in bulky NSCLC. Patients and methods: From December 2012 through August 2017, 30 patients with bulky NSCLC treated with P-SABR technique were analyzed. The P-SABR plan consisted of one partial SABR plan (5–9 Gy/f, 3–6 fractions to gross tumor boost (GTVb, followed by one CRT plan to the planning target volume (PTV. GTVb was the max volume receiving SABR to guarantee the dose of organs-at-risks (OARs falloff to about 3 Gy/f. The total dose of PTV margin was planned to above 60 Gy. The simply CRT plans were created using the same planning parameters as the original plan, with the goal to achieve comparable OARs doses and PTV margin dose to the P-SABR plan. Dosimetric variables were acquired in both P-SABR and compared CRT plans. Toxicity, local control, and survival were also evaluated. Results: Median follow-up in survivors was 10.3 months (range=2.3–39.4 months. Eleven patients (36.7% had partial response (PR and ten patients (33.3% had stable disease (SD. Two-year overall survival was 55.6%. Two-year local control rate was 85.7%. No severe acute side effects .CTCAE Grade III were observed. Compared to the simply CRT plan, P-SABR plans achieved similar doses to the OARs and Dmin, but increased dose at the isocenter, Dmean, Dmax, and biological equivalent dose (BED significantly (P<0.05. BED in the tumor center could reach 107.3 Gy (93.2–132

  13. Prone Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiotherapy Without a Boost to the Tumor Bed: Comparable Toxicity of IMRT Versus a 3D Conformal Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardee, Matthew E.; Raza, Shahzad; Becker, Stewart J.; Jozsef, Gabor; Lymberis, Stella C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Hochman, Tsivia; Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); DeWyngaert, Keith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: We report a comparison of the dosimetry and toxicity of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) among patients treated in the prone position with the same fractionation and target of the hypofractionation arm of the Canadian/Whelan trial. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved protocol identified a consecutive series of early-stage breast cancer patients treated according to the Canadian hypofractionation regimen but in the prone position. Patients underwent IMRT treatment planning and treatment if the insurance carrier approved reimbursement for IMRT; in case of refusal, a 3D-CRT plan was used. A comparison of the dosimetric and toxicity outcomes during the acute, subacute, and long-term follow-up of the two treatment groups is reported. Results: We included 97 consecutive patients with 100 treatment plans in this study (3 patients with bilateral breast cancer); 40 patients were treated with 3D-CRT and 57 with IMRT. IMRT significantly reduced the maximum dose (Dmax median, 109.96% for 3D-CRT vs. 107.28% for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) and improved median dose homogeneity (median, 1.15 for 3D-CRT vs. 1.05 for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) when compared with 3D-CRT. Acute toxicity consisted primarily of Grade 1 to 2 dermatitis and occurred in 92% of patients. Grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 13% of patients in the 3D-CRT group and 2% in the IMRT group. IMRT moderately decreased rates of acute pruritus (p = 0.03, chi-square test) and Grade 2 to 3 subacute hyperpigmentation (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). With a minimum of 6 months' follow-up, the treatment was similarly well tolerated in either group, including among women with large breast volumes. Conclusion: Hypofractionated breast radiotherapy is well tolerated when treating patients in the prone position, even among those with large breast volumes. Breast IMRT significantly improves dosimetry but yields only a modest

  14. Integrated boost IMRT with FET-PET-adapted local dose escalation in glioblastomas. Results of a prospective phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piroth, M.D.; Pinkawa, M.; Holy, R.; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH

    2012-01-01

    Dose escalations above 60 Gy based on MRI have not led to prognostic benefits in glioblastoma patients yet. With positron emission tomography (PET) using [ 18 F]fluorethyl-L-tyrosine (FET), tumor coverage can be optimized with the option of regional dose escalation in the area of viable tumor tissue. In a prospective phase II study (January 2008 to December 2009), 22 patients (median age 55 years) received radiochemotherapy after surgery. The radiotherapy was performed as an MRI and FET-PET-based integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The prescribed dose was 72 and 60 Gy (single dose 2.4 and 2.0 Gy, respectively) for the FET-PET- and MR-based PTV-FET (72 Gy) and PTV-MR (60 Gy) . FET-PET and MRI were performed routinely for follow-up. Quality of life and cognitive aspects were recorded by the EORTC-QLQ-C30/QLQ Brain20 and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), while the therapy-related toxicity was recorded using the CTC3.0 and RTOG scores. Median overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 14.8 and 7.8 months, respectively. All local relapses were detected at least partly within the 95% dose volume of PTV-MR (60 Gy) . No relevant radiotherapy-related side effects were observed (excepted alopecia). In 2 patients, a pseudoprogression was observed in the MRI. Tumor progression could be excluded by FET-PET and was confirmed in further MRI and FET-PET imaging. No significant changes were observed in MMSE scores and in the EORTC QLQ-C30/QLQ-Brain20 questionnaires. Our dose escalation concept with a total dose of 72 Gy, based on FET-PET, did not lead to a survival benefit. Acute and late toxicity were not increased, compared with historical controls and published dose-escalation studies. (orig.)

  15. Integrated boost IMRT with FET-PET-adapted local dose escalation in glioblastomas. Results of a prospective phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piroth, M.D.; Pinkawa, M.; Holy, R. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain] (and others)

    2012-04-15

    Dose escalations above 60 Gy based on MRI have not led to prognostic benefits in glioblastoma patients yet. With positron emission tomography (PET) using [{sup 18}F]fluorethyl-L-tyrosine (FET), tumor coverage can be optimized with the option of regional dose escalation in the area of viable tumor tissue. In a prospective phase II study (January 2008 to December 2009), 22 patients (median age 55 years) received radiochemotherapy after surgery. The radiotherapy was performed as an MRI and FET-PET-based integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The prescribed dose was 72 and 60 Gy (single dose 2.4 and 2.0 Gy, respectively) for the FET-PET- and MR-based PTV-FET{sub (72 Gy)} and PTV-MR{sub (60 Gy)}. FET-PET and MRI were performed routinely for follow-up. Quality of life and cognitive aspects were recorded by the EORTC-QLQ-C30/QLQ Brain20 and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), while the therapy-related toxicity was recorded using the CTC3.0 and RTOG scores. Median overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 14.8 and 7.8 months, respectively. All local relapses were detected at least partly within the 95% dose volume of PTV-MR{sub (60 Gy)}. No relevant radiotherapy-related side effects were observed (excepted alopecia). In 2 patients, a pseudoprogression was observed in the MRI. Tumor progression could be excluded by FET-PET and was confirmed in further MRI and FET-PET imaging. No significant changes were observed in MMSE scores and in the EORTC QLQ-C30/QLQ-Brain20 questionnaires. Our dose escalation concept with a total dose of 72 Gy, based on FET-PET, did not lead to a survival benefit. Acute and late toxicity were not increased, compared with historical controls and published dose-escalation studies. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of Acute and Late Toxicity of Two Regimens of 3- and 5-Week Concomitant Boost Prone IMRT to Standard 6-Week Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raza, Shahzad; Lymberis, Stella C.; Ciervide, Raquel [Department of Radiation Oncology and Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Axelrod, Deborah [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Magnolfi, Chiara; Rosenstein, Barry; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology and Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-05-08

    Purpose: Limited information is available comparing toxicity of accelerated radiotherapy (RT) to that of standard fractionation RT for early stage breast cancer. We report early and late toxicities of two prone regimens of accelerated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a concomitant boost (CB) to the tumor bed delivered over 3 or 5 weeks as compared to standard 6 week RT with a sequential electron boost. Methods: From 2/2003 to 12/2007, 169 consecutive patients with Stage I–II breast cancer were offered the choice to undergo prone RT with either: a 6-week standard RT regimen of 46 Gy/23 fractions (fx) to the whole breast (WB), followed by a14 Gy sequential boost (SB) to the tumor bed (6wSB), a 5-week regimen of 50 Gy to WB with an IMRT CB of 6.25 Gy in 25 fx (5wCB); or a 3-week protocol of 40.5 Gy to WB with an IMRT CB of 7.5 Gy in 15 fx (3wCB). These regimens were estimated as biologically equivalent, based on alpha/beta = 4 for tumor control. Toxicities were reported using RTOG and LENT/SOMA scoring. Results: 51/169 patients chose standard 6wSB, 28 selected 5wCB, and 90 enrolled in 3wCB protocol. Maximum acute toxicity was Grade 3 dermatitis in 4% of the patients in the 6wSB compared 1% in 3wCB. In general, acute complications (breast pain, fatigue, and dermatitis) were significantly less in the 3wCB than in the other schedules (P < 0.05). With a median follow-up of 61 months, the only Grade 3 late toxicity was telangiectasia in two patients: one in 3wCB and one in 5wCB group. Notably, fibrosis was comparable among the three groups (P = NS). Conclusion: These preliminary data suggest that accelerated regimens of breast RT over 3 or 5 weeks in the prone position, with an IMRT tumor bed CB, result in comparable late toxicity to standard fractionation with a sequential tumor boost delivered over 6 weeks. As predicted by radiobiological modeling the shorter regimen was associated with less acute effects.

  17. The Early Result of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High Risk Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei eLin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe rationale for hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer is based on the modern understanding of radiobiology and advances in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT techniques. Whole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk prostate cancer might escalate biologically effective dose without increasing toxicity. Here, we report our 4-year results of SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer.Methods and MaterialsFrom October 2009 to August 2012, 41 patients of newly diagnosed, high-risk or very high-risk (NCCN definition localized prostate cancer patients were treated with whole-pelvis irradiation and SBRT boost. The whole pelvis dose was 45Gy (25 fractions of 1.8Gy. The SBRT boost dose was 21 Gy (three fractions of 7 Gy. Ninety percent of these patients received hormone therapy. The toxicities of gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU tracts were scored by Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Effect (CTCAE v3.0. Biochemical failure was defined by Phoenix definition.ResultsMedian follow-up was 42 months. Mean PSA before treatment was 44.18 ng/ml. Mean PSA level at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months was 0.94, 0.44, 0.13, 0.12, and 0.05 ng/ml, respectively. The estimated 4-year biochemical failure-free survival was 91.9%. Three biochemical failures were observed. GI and GU tract toxicities were minimal. No grade 3 acute GU or GI toxicity was noted. During radiation therapy, 27% of the patient had grade 2 acute GU toxicity and 12% had grade 2 acute GI toxicity. At 3 months, most toxicity scores had returned to baseline. At the last follow up, there was no grade 3 late GU or GI toxicity.ConclusionsWhole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal toxicity and encouraging biochemical failure-free survival. Continued accrual and follow-up would be necessary to confirm the biochemical control rate and the toxicity profiles.

  18. Prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost: which is the best planning method?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tree, Alison; Jones, Caroline; Sohaib, Aslam; Khoo, Vincent; As, Nicholas van

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of a simultaneous integrated boost to the intra-prostatic tumour nodule may improve local control. The ability to deliver such treatments with hypofractionated SBRT was attempted using RapidArc (Varian Medical systems, Palo Alto, CA) and Multiplan (Accuray inc, Sunnyvale, CA). 15 patients with dominant prostate nodules had RapidArc and Multiplan plans created using a 5 mm isotropic margin, except 3 mm posteriorly, aiming to deliver 47.5 Gy in 5 fractions to the boost whilst treating the whole prostate to 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. An additional RapidArc plan was created using an 8 mm isotropic margin, except 5 mm posteriorly, to account for lack of intrafraction tracking. Both RapidArc and Multiplan can produce clinically acceptable boost plans to a dose of 47.5 Gy in 5 fractions. The mean rectal doses were lower for RapidArc plans (D50 13.2 Gy vs 15.5 Gy) but the number of missed constraints was the same for both planning methods (11/75). When the margin was increased to 8 mm/5 mm for the RapidArc plans to account for intrafraction motion, 37/75 constraints were missed. RapidArc and Multiplan can produce clinically acceptable simultaneous integrated boost plans, but the mean rectal D50 and D20 with RapidArc are lower. If the margins are increased to account for intrafraction motion, the RapidArc plans exceed at least one dose constraint in 13/15 cases. Delivering a simultaneous boost with hypofractionation appears feasible, but requires small margins needing intrafraction motion tracking

  19. A randomized phase II/III study of adverse events between sequential (SEQ) versus simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma; preliminary result on acute adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songthong, Anussara P; Kannarunimit, Danita; Chakkabat, Chakkapong; Lertbutsayanukul, Chawalit

    2015-08-08

    To investigate acute and late toxicities comparing sequential (SEQ-IMRT) versus simultaneous integrated boost intensity modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Newly diagnosed stage I-IVB NPC patients were randomized to receive SEQ-IMRT or SIB-IMRT, with or without chemotherapy. SEQ-IMRT consisted of two sequential radiation treatment plans: 2 Gy x 25 fractions to low-risk planning target volume (PTV-LR) followed by 2 Gy x 10 fractions to high-risk planning target volume (PTV-HR). In contrast, SIB-IMRT consisted of only one treatment plan: 2.12 Gy and 1.7 Gy x 33 fractions to PTV-HR and PTV-LR, respectively. Toxicities were evaluated according to CTCAE version 4.0. Between October 2010 and November 2013, 122 eligible patients were randomized between SEQ-IMRT (54 patients) and SIB-IMRT (68 patients). With median follow-up time of 16.8 months, there was no significant difference in toxicities between the two IMRT techniques. During chemoradiation, the most common grade 3-5 acute toxicities were mucositis (15.4% vs 13.6%, SEQ vs SIB, p = 0.788) followed by dysphagia (9.6% vs 9.1%, p = 1.000) and xerostomia (9.6% vs 7.6%, p = 0.748). During the adjuvant chemotherapy period, 25.6% and 32.7% experienced grade 3 weight loss in SEQ-IMRT and SIB-IMRT (p = 0.459). One-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 95.8% and 95.5% in SEQ-IMRT and 98% and 90.2% in SIB-IMRT, respectively (p = 0.472 for OS and 0.069 for PFS). This randomized, phase II/III trial comparing SIB-IMRT versus SEQ-IMRT in NPC showed no statistically significant difference between both IMRT techniques in terms of acute adverse events. Short-term tumor control and survival outcome were promising.

  20. A randomized phase II/III study of adverse events between sequential (SEQ) versus simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma; preliminary result on acute adverse events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Songthong, Anussara P.; Kannarunimit, Danita; Chakkabat, Chakkapong; Lertbutsayanukul, Chawalit

    2015-01-01

    To investigate acute and late toxicities comparing sequential (SEQ-IMRT) versus simultaneous integrated boost intensity modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Newly diagnosed stage I-IVB NPC patients were randomized to receive SEQ-IMRT or SIB-IMRT, with or without chemotherapy. SEQ-IMRT consisted of two sequential radiation treatment plans: 2Gy x 25 fractions to low-risk planning target volume (PTV-LR) followed by 2Gy x 10 fractions to high-risk planning target volume (PTV-HR). In contrast, SIB-IMRT consisted of only one treatment plan: 2.12Gy and 1.7Gy x 33 fractions to PTV-HR and PTV-LR, respectively. Toxicities were evaluated according to CTCAE version 4.0. Between October 2010 and November 2013, 122 eligible patients were randomized between SEQ-IMRT (54 patients) and SIB-IMRT (68 patients). With median follow-up time of 16.8 months, there was no significant difference in toxicities between the two IMRT techniques. During chemoradiation, the most common grade 3–5 acute toxicities were mucositis (15.4 % vs 13.6 %, SEQ vs SIB, p = 0.788) followed by dysphagia (9.6 % vs 9.1 %, p = 1.000) and xerostomia (9.6 % vs 7.6 %, p = 0.748). During the adjuvant chemotherapy period, 25.6 % and 32.7 % experienced grade 3 weight loss in SEQ-IMRT and SIB-IMRT (p = 0.459). One-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 95.8 % and 95.5 % in SEQ-IMRT and 98 % and 90.2 % in SIB-IMRT, respectively (p = 0.472 for OS and 0.069 for PFS). This randomized, phase II/III trial comparing SIB-IMRT versus SEQ-IMRT in NPC showed no statistically significant difference between both IMRT techniques in terms of acute adverse events. Short-term tumor control and survival outcome were promising

  1. SU-E-T-542: Comparison of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) of Brain Lesions Using Gamma Knife, VMAT, IMRT, and Conformal Arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S; Charpentier, P; Chan, P; Neicu, T; Miyamoto, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare dose distributions in stereotactic radiation surgery of brain lesions using gamma Knife, VMAT, conformal arcs, and IMRT in order to provide an optimal treatment. Methods: Dose distributions from single shot of 4C model of Gamma Knife at the helmet collimation sizes of 4, 8, 14, and 18 mm in diameter were compared with full arcs with the square shapes of 4×4 (or 5×5), 8×8 (or 10×10), and spherical shapes of 16 or 20 mm in diameter using EDR3 films in the same gamma knife QA phantom. Plans for ten SRS cases with single and multiple lesions were created in gamma knife plans and Pinnacle plans. The external beam plans had enlarged field size by 2-mm and used single conformal full circle arc for solitary lesion and none coplanar arcs/beams for multiple lesions. Coverage, conformity index, dose to critical organs, and integral dose to the brain and nearby critical structures were compared on all plans. Structures and dose matrices were registered in a Velocity deformable image registration system. Results: Single full circle arc from Elekta beam-modulate MLC (4-mm leaf thickness) and agility MLC (5-mm leaf thickness) have larger penumbra and less flatness than that of Gamma Knife single shot. None-coplanar arcs or beams were required to achieve similar dose distribution. In general, Gamma Knife plans provided significant less integral dose than that of linac-based plans. Benefits of IMRT and VMAT versus gamma Knife and conformal arcs were not significant. Conclusion: Our dose measurement and treatment planning evaluation clearly demonstrated dose distribution differences amount current popular SRS modalities for small solitary and multiple brain lesions. The trend of using MLC shape beams or arcs to replace conventional cones should be revisited in order to keep lower integral dose if the late correlates with some radiation-induced side effects. Pilot grant from Elekta LLC

  2. An open source solution for an in-house built dynamic platform for the validation of stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy for VMAT and IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Luis; Ziebell, Amy; Morton, Jason; Bhat, Madhava

    2016-12-01

    An in-house solution for the verification of dose delivered to a moving phantom as required for the clinical implementation of lung stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy was developed. The superior-inferior movement required to simulate tumour motion during a normal breathing cycle was achieved via the novel use of an Arduino Uno™, a low-cost open-source microcontroller board connected to a high torque servo motor. Slow CT imaging was used to acquire the image set and a 4D cone beam CT (4D-CBCT) verified the efficacy of contoured margins before treatment on the moving phantom. Treatment fields were delivered to a section of a CIRS™ anthropomorphic phantom. Dose verification to the dynamic phantom with Gafchromic EBT3 film using 3 %-1 mm gamma analysis acceptance criteria registered an absolute dose pass rate for IMRT and VMAT of 98 and 96.6 %, respectively. It was verified that 100 % of the PTV received the prescribed dose of 12 Gy per fraction using the dynamic phantom, and no major discrepancy between planned and measured results due to interplay between multileaf collimator sequences and target motion was observed. This study confirmed that the use of an in-house solution using open source hardware and software with existing quality assurance equipment was appropriate in validating a new treatment technique.

  3. A Phase 2 Trial of Stereotactic Radiosurgery Boost After Surgical Resection for Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, Cameron [Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yang, T. Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Hilden, Patrick; Zhang, Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Chan, Kelvin; Yamada, Yoshiya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Chan, Timothy A. [Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lymberis, Stella C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Narayana, Ashwatha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Greenwich Hospital, Greenwich, Connecticut (United States); Tabar, Viviane; Gutin, Philip H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ballangrud, Åse [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Beal, Kathryn, E-mail: BealK@MSKCC.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control after surgical resection and postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients (50 lesions) were enrolled and available for analysis. Eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed malignancy with 1 or 2 intraparenchymal brain metastases, age ≥18 years, and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥70. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to test for significant associations between clinical factors and overall survival (OS). Competing risks regression models, as well as cumulative incidence functions, were fit using the method of Fine and Gray to assess the association between clinical factors and both local failure (LF; recurrence within surgical cavity or SRS target), and regional failure (RF; intracranial metastasis outside of treated volume). Results: The median follow-up was 12.0 months (range, 1.0-94.1 months). After surgical resection, 39 patients with 40 lesions were treated a median of 31 days (range, 7-56 days) later with SRS to the surgical bed to a median dose of 1800 cGy (range, 1500-2200 cGy). Of the 50 lesions, 15 (30%) demonstrated LF after surgery. The cumulative LF and RF rates were 22% and 44% at 12 months. Patients who went on to receive SRS had a significantly lower incidence of LF (P=.008). Other factors associated with improved local control include non-small cell lung cancer histology (P=.048), tumor diameter <3 cm (P=.010), and deep parenchymal tumors (P=.036). Large tumors (≥3 cm) with superficial dural/pial involvement showed the highest risk for LF (53.3% at 12 months). Large superficial lesions treated with SRS had a 54.5% LF. Infratentorial lesions were associated with a higher risk of developing RF compared to supratentorial lesions (P<.001). Conclusions: Postoperative SRS is associated with high rates of local control, especially for deep brain metastases <3 cm. Tumors ≥3 cm with superficial dural

  4. Combined treatment of adenoid cystic carcinoma with cetuximab and IMRT plus C12 heavy ion boost: ACCEPT [ACC, Erbitux® and particle therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinke Axel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local control in adjuvant/definitive RT of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC is largely dose-dependent leading to the establishment of particle therapy in this indication. However, even modern techniques leave space for improvement of local control by intensification of local treatment. Radiation sensitization by exploitation of high EGFR-expression in ACC with the EGFR receptor antibody cetuximab seems promising. Methods/design The ACCEPT trial is a prospective, mono-centric, phase I/II trial evaluating toxicity (primary endpoint: acute and late effects and efficacy (secondary endpoint: local control, distant control, disease-free survival, overall survival of the combined treatment with IMRT/carbon ion boost and weekly cetuximab in 49 patients with histologically proven (≥R1-resected, inoperable or Pn+ ACC. Patients receive 18 GyE carbon ions (6 fractions and 54 Gy IMRT (2.0 Gy/fraction in combination with weekly cetuximab throughout radiotherapy. Discussion The primary objective of ACCEPT is to evaluate toxicity and feasibility of cetuximab and particle therapy in adenoid cystic carcinoma. Trial Registration Clinical Trial Identifier: NCT 01192087 EudraCT number: 2010 - 022425 - 15

  5. Combined treatment of adenoid cystic carcinoma with cetuximab and IMRT plus C12 heavy ion boost: ACCEPT [ACC, Erbitux® and particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Alexandra D; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Hinke, Axel; Debus, Jürgen; Münter, Marc W

    2011-01-01

    Local control in adjuvant/definitive RT of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is largely dose-dependent leading to the establishment of particle therapy in this indication. However, even modern techniques leave space for improvement of local control by intensification of local treatment. Radiation sensitization by exploitation of high EGFR-expression in ACC with the EGFR receptor antibody cetuximab seems promising. The ACCEPT trial is a prospective, mono-centric, phase I/II trial evaluating toxicity (primary endpoint: acute and late effects) and efficacy (secondary endpoint: local control, distant control, disease-free survival, overall survival) of the combined treatment with IMRT/carbon ion boost and weekly cetuximab in 49 patients with histologically proven (≥R1-resected, inoperable or Pn+) ACC. Patients receive 18 GyE carbon ions (6 fractions) and 54 Gy IMRT (2.0 Gy/fraction) in combination with weekly cetuximab throughout radiotherapy. The primary objective of ACCEPT is to evaluate toxicity and feasibility of cetuximab and particle therapy in adenoid cystic carcinoma. Clinical Trial Identifier: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01192087 EudraCT number: 2010 - 022425 - 15

  6. SU-E-T-428: Dosimetric Impact of Multileaf Collimator Leaf Width On Single and multiple Isocenter Stereotactic IMRT Treatment Plans for multiple Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giem, J; Algan, O; Ahmad, S; Ali, I; Young, J; Hossain, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impacts that multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf width has on the dose conformity and normal brain tissue doses of single and multiple isocenter stereotactic IMRT (SRT) plans for multiple intracranial tumors. Methods: Fourteen patients with 2–3 targets were studied retrospectively. Patients treated with multiple isocenter treatment plans using 9 to 12 non-coplanar beams per lesion underwent repeat planning using single isocenter and 10 to 12 non-coplanar beams with 2.5mm, 3mm and 5mm MLC leaf widths. Brainlab iPlan treatment planning system for delivery with the 2.5mm MLC served as reference. Identical contour sets and dose-volume constraints were applied. The prescribed dose to each target was 25 Gy to be delivered over 5 fractions with a minimum of 99% dose to cover ≥ 95% of the target volume. Results: The lesions and normal brains ranged in size from 0.11 to 51.67cc (median, 2.75cc) and 1090 to 1641cc (median, 1401cc), respectively. The Paddick conformity index for single and multiple isocenter (2.5mm vs. 3mm and 5mm MLCs) was (0.79±0.08 vs. 0.79±0.07 and 0.77±0.08) and (0.79±0.09 vs. 0.77±0.09 and 0.76±0.08), respectively. The average normal brain volumes receiving 15 Gy for single and multiple isocenter (2.5mm vs. 3mm and 5mm MLCs) were (3.65% vs. 3.95% and 4.09%) and (2.89% vs. 2.91% and 2.92%), respectively. Conclusion: The average dose conformity observed for the different leaf width for single and multiple isocenter plans were similar, throughout. However, the average normal brain volumes receiving 2.5 to 15 Gy were consistently lower for the 2.5mm MLC leaf width, especially for single isocenter plans. The clinical consequences of these integral normal brain tissue doses are still unknown, but employing the use of the 2.5mm MLC option is desirable at sparing normal brain tissue for both single and multiple isocenter cases

  7. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy with TPF followed by radioimmunotherapy with Cetuximab and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in combination with a carbon ion boost for locally advanced tumours of the oro-, hypopharynx and larynx - TPF-C-HIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavtratzas Athanasios

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term locoregional control in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN remains challenging. While recent years have seen various approaches to improve outcome by intensification of treatment schedules through introduction of novel induction and combination chemotherapy regimen and altered fractionation regimen, patient tolerance to higher treatment intensities is limited by accompanying side-effects. Combined radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab as well as modern radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and carbon ion therapy (C12 are able to limit toxicity while maintaining treatment effects. In order to achieve maximum efficacy with yet acceptable toxicity, this sequential phase II trial combines induction chemotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-FU (TPF followed by radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab as IMRT plus carbon ion boost. We expect this approach to result in increased cure rates with yet manageable accompanying toxicity. Methods/design The TPF-C-HIT trial is a prospective, mono-centric, open-label, non-randomized phase II trial evaluating efficacy and toxicity of the combined treatment with IMRT/carbon ion boost and weekly cetuximab in 50 patients with histologically proven locally advanced SCCHN following TPF induction chemotherapy. Patients receive 24 GyE carbon ions (8 fractions and 50 Gy IMRT (2.0 Gy/fraction in combination with weekly cetuximab throughout radiotherapy. Primary endpoint is locoregional control at 12 months, secondary endpoints are disease-free survival, progression-free survival, overall survival, acute and late radiation effects as well as any adverse events of the treatment as well as quality of life (QoL analyses. Discussion The primary objective of TPF-C-HIT is to evaluate efficacy and toxicity of cetuximab in combination with combined IMRT/carbon ion therapy following TPF induction in locally advanced SCCHN. Trial Registration

  8. IMRT With Simultaneous Integrated Boost and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montejo, Michael E.; Shrieve, Dennis C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Bentz, Brandon G.; Hunt, Jason P.; Buchman, Luke O. [Division of Otolaryngology-Head Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Agarwal, Neeraj [Department of Internal Medicine, Oncology Division, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Hitchcock, Ying J., E-mail: ying.hitchcock@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of accelerated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy in advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between April 2003 and May 2008, 43 consecutive patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma received accelerated chemoradiation with concurrent cisplatin or cetuximab. The doses for intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost were 67.5, 60.0, and 54 Gy in 30 daily fractions of 2.25, 2.0, and 1.8 Gy to the planning target volumes for gross disease, high-risk nodes, and low-risk nodes, respectively. Results: Of the patients, 90.7% completed chemoradiotherapy as prescribed. The median treatment duration was 43 days (range, 38-55 days). The complete response rate was 74.4%. With median follow-up of 36.7 months (range, 16.8-78.1 months) in living patients, the estimated 1-, 2-, and 5-year locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 82%, 82%, and 82%; 73%, 65%, and 61%; and 73%, 73%, and 70%, respectively. One treatment-related death occurred from renal failure. Grade 3 mucositis and dermatitis occurred in 13 patients (30.2%) and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Grade 2 xerostomia occurred in 12 patients (27.9%). In patients with adequate follow-up, 82% were feeding tube free by 6 months after therapy; 13% remained feeding tube dependent at 1 year. Grade 3 soft-tissue fibrosis, esophageal stricture, osteoradionecrosis, and trismus occurred in 3 patients (6.9%), 5 patients (11.6%), 1 patient (2.3%), and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Conclusions: Our results show that intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost with concurrent chemotherapy improved local and regional control. Acute and late toxicities were tolerable and acceptable. A prospective trial of this fractionation regimen is necessary for further assessment of its efficacy and toxicity compared with other approaches.

  9. IMRT With Simultaneous Integrated Boost and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montejo, Michael E.; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Bentz, Brandon G.; Hunt, Jason P.; Buchman, Luke O.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Hitchcock, Ying J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of accelerated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy in advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between April 2003 and May 2008, 43 consecutive patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma received accelerated chemoradiation with concurrent cisplatin or cetuximab. The doses for intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost were 67.5, 60.0, and 54 Gy in 30 daily fractions of 2.25, 2.0, and 1.8 Gy to the planning target volumes for gross disease, high-risk nodes, and low-risk nodes, respectively. Results: Of the patients, 90.7% completed chemoradiotherapy as prescribed. The median treatment duration was 43 days (range, 38–55 days). The complete response rate was 74.4%. With median follow-up of 36.7 months (range, 16.8–78.1 months) in living patients, the estimated 1-, 2-, and 5-year locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 82%, 82%, and 82%; 73%, 65%, and 61%; and 73%, 73%, and 70%, respectively. One treatment-related death occurred from renal failure. Grade 3 mucositis and dermatitis occurred in 13 patients (30.2%) and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Grade 2 xerostomia occurred in 12 patients (27.9%). In patients with adequate follow-up, 82% were feeding tube free by 6 months after therapy; 13% remained feeding tube dependent at 1 year. Grade 3 soft-tissue fibrosis, esophageal stricture, osteoradionecrosis, and trismus occurred in 3 patients (6.9%), 5 patients (11.6%), 1 patient (2.3%), and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Conclusions: Our results show that intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost with concurrent chemotherapy improved local and regional control. Acute and late toxicities were tolerable and acceptable. A prospective trial of this fractionation regimen is necessary for further assessment of its efficacy and toxicity compared with other approaches.

  10. SU-E-T-338: Dosimetric Study of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) in Early Stage Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I; Quinn, K; Seebach, A; Wang, H [OSF Saint Anthony Medical Center, Rockford, IL (United States); Yah, R [University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study evaluates the dosimetric differences using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients previously treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy IMRT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in early stage lung cancer. Methods: We evaluated 9 consecutive medically inoperable lung cancer patients at the start of the SBRT program who were treated with IMRT from November 2010 to October 2011. These patients were treated using 6 MV energy. The 9 cases were then re-planned with VMAT performed with arc therapy using 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) energy with the same organs at risk (OARS) constraints. Data collected for the treatment plans included target coverage, beam on time, dose to OARS and gamma pass rate. Results: Five patients were T1N0 and four patients were T2N0 with all tumors less than 5 cm. The average GTV was 13.02 cm3 (0.83–40.87) and average PTV was 44.65 cm3 (14.06–118.08). The IMRT plans had a mean of 7.2 angles (6–9) and 5.4 minutes (3.6–11.1) per plan. The VMAT plans had a mean of 2.8 arcs (2–3) and 4.0 minutes (2.2–6.0) per plan. VMAT had slightly more target coverage than IMRT with average increase in D95 of 2.68% (1.24–5.73) and D99 of 3.65% (0.88–8.77). VMAT produced lower doses to all OARs. The largest reductions were in maximum doses to the spinal cord with an average reduction of 24.1%, esophagus with an average reduction of 22.1%, and lung with an average reduction in the V20 of 16.3% The mean gamma pass rate was 99.8% (99.2–100) at 3 mm and 3% for VMAT with comparable values for IMRT. Conclusion: These findings suggest that using VMAT for SBRT in early stage lung cancer is superior to IMRT in terms of dose coverage, OAR dose and a lower treatment delivery time with a similar gamma pass rate.

  11. Comparison of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) plus a stereotactic boost (WBRT + SRS) for one to three brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, Dirk [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Department of Radiation Oncology]|[University Medical Center, Hamburg (Germany). Department of Radiation Oncology; Kueter, Jan-Dirk; Dunst, Juergen [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Department of Radiation Oncology; Hornung, Dagmar [University Medical Center, Hamburg (Germany). Department of Radiation Oncology; Veninga, Theo; Hanssens, Patrick [Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands). Department of Radiation Oncology; Schild, Steven E. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States). Department of Radiation Oncology

    2008-12-15

    The best available treatment of patients with one to three brain metastases is still unclear. This study compared the results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) plus SRS (WBRT + SRS). Survival (OS), intracerebral control (IC), and local control of treated metastases (LC) were retrospectively analyzed in 144 patients receiving SRS alone (n = 93) or WBRT + SRS (n = 51). Eight additional potential prognostic factors were evaluated: age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score (ECOG-PS), tumor type, number of brain metastases, extracerebral metastases, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, and interval from tumor diagnosis to irradiation. Subgroup analyses were performed for RPA class I and II patients. 1-year-OS was 53% after SRS and 56% after WBRT + SRS (p = 0.24). 1-year-IC rates were 51% and 66% (p = 0.015), respectively. 1-year-LC rates were 66% and 87% (p = 0.003), respectively. On multivariate analyses, OS was associated with age (p = 0.004), ECOG-PS (p = 0.005), extracerebral metastases (p < 0.001), RPA class (p < 0.001), and interval from tumor diagnosis to irradiation (p < 0.001). IC was associated with interval from tumor diagnosis to irradiation (p = 0.004) and almost with treatment (p = 0.09), and LC with treatment (p = 0.026) and almost with interval (p = 0.08). The results of the subgroup analyses were similar to those of the entire cohort. The increase in IC was stronger in RPA class I patients. WBRT + SRS resulted in better IC and LC but not better OS than SRS alone. Because also IC and LC are important end-points, additional WBRT appears justified in patients with one to three brain metastases, in particular in RPA class I patients. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) plus a stereotactic boost (WBRT + SRS) for one to three brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; University Medical Center, Hamburg; Kueter, Jan-Dirk; Dunst, Juergen; Hornung, Dagmar; Veninga, Theo; Hanssens, Patrick; Schild, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    The best available treatment of patients with one to three brain metastases is still unclear. This study compared the results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) plus SRS (WBRT + SRS). Survival (OS), intracerebral control (IC), and local control of treated metastases (LC) were retrospectively analyzed in 144 patients receiving SRS alone (n = 93) or WBRT + SRS (n = 51). Eight additional potential prognostic factors were evaluated: age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score (ECOG-PS), tumor type, number of brain metastases, extracerebral metastases, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, and interval from tumor diagnosis to irradiation. Subgroup analyses were performed for RPA class I and II patients. 1-year-OS was 53% after SRS and 56% after WBRT + SRS (p = 0.24). 1-year-IC rates were 51% and 66% (p = 0.015), respectively. 1-year-LC rates were 66% and 87% (p = 0.003), respectively. On multivariate analyses, OS was associated with age (p = 0.004), ECOG-PS (p = 0.005), extracerebral metastases (p < 0.001), RPA class (p < 0.001), and interval from tumor diagnosis to irradiation (p < 0.001). IC was associated with interval from tumor diagnosis to irradiation (p = 0.004) and almost with treatment (p = 0.09), and LC with treatment (p = 0.026) and almost with interval (p = 0.08). The results of the subgroup analyses were similar to those of the entire cohort. The increase in IC was stronger in RPA class I patients. WBRT + SRS resulted in better IC and LC but not better OS than SRS alone. Because also IC and LC are important end-points, additional WBRT appears justified in patients with one to three brain metastases, in particular in RPA class I patients. (orig.)

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost After Concurrent Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase 1 Dose Escalation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T., E-mail: jhepel@lifespan.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Leonard, Kara Lynne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Safran, Howard [Division of Medical Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Division of Medical Oncology, Miriam Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Ng, Thomas [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Taber, Angela [Division of Medical Oncology, Miriam Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Khurshid, Humera; Birnbaum, Ariel [Division of Medical Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Wazer, David E.; DiPetrillo, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost to primary and nodal disease after chemoradiation has potential to improve outcomes for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A dose escalation study was initiated to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received chemoradiation to a dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions and had primary and nodal volumes appropriate for SBRT boost (<120 cc and <60 cc, respectively). SBRT was delivered in 2 fractions after chemoradiation. Dose was escalated from 16 to 28 Gy in 2 Gy/fraction increments, resulting in 4 dose cohorts. MTD was defined when ≥2 of 6 patients per cohort experienced any treatment-related grade 3 to 5 toxicity within 4 weeks of treatment or the maximum dose was reached. Late toxicity, disease control, and survival were also evaluated. Results: Twelve patients (3 per dose level) underwent treatment. All treatment plans met predetermined dose-volume constraints. The mean age was 64 years. Most patients had stage III disease (92%) and were medically inoperable (92%). The maximum dose level was reached with no grade 3 to 5 acute toxicities. At a median follow-up time of 16 months, 1-year local-regional control (LRC) was 78%. LRC was 50% at <24 Gy and 100% at ≥24 Gy (P=.02). Overall survival at 1 year was 67%. Late toxicity (grade 3-5) was seen in only 1 patient who experienced fatal bronchopulmonary hemorrhage (grade 5). There were no predetermined dose constraints for the proximal bronchial-vascular tree (PBV) in this study. This patient's 4-cc PBV dose was substantially higher than that received by other patients in all 4 cohorts and was associated with the toxicity observed: 20.3 Gy (P<.05) and 73.5 Gy (P=.07) for SBRT boost and total treatment, respectively. Conclusions: SBRT boost to both primary and nodal disease after chemoradiation is feasible and well tolerated. Local control rates are encouraging, especially at doses ≥24

  14. The Comparison of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT andIntensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT for prostate cancer byNCCN risk groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Ricco

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this study is to compare freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF between SBRT and IMRT for patients with organ confined prostate cancer treated between 2007 through 2012 utilizing the 2015 National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN risk stratification guidelines. A secondary objective is to compare our updated toxicity at last follow up compared to pretreatment with respect to bowel, bladder, sexual functioning, and need for invasive procedures between the two groups.METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 270 consecutive men treated with either SBRT (n=150 or IMRT (120 at a community hospital with two distinct radiation departments and referral patterns. Charts were reviewed for pretreatment and treatment factors including race, age, clinical T stage, initial PSA, Gleason score, use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT, treatment with SBRT vs. IMRT as well as stratification by 2015 NCCN guidelines. Kaplan Meier (KM methodology was used to estimate freedom from biochemical failure, with statistical comparisons accomplished using log rank tests. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to establish independent factors prognostic of biochemical failure. Descriptive statistics were used to describe toxicity graded by a modified RTOG late radiation morbidity scoring system. RESULTS: Significant prognostic factors in univariate analysis for FFBF included NCCN risk groups (p=0.0032, grade (p=0.019, and PSA (p=0.008. There was no significant difference in FFBF between SBRT vs. IMRT (p=0.46 with 6 year actuarial FFBF of 91.9% for SBRT and 88.9% for IMRT. Multivariable analysis revealed only the NCCN risk stratification to be significant predictor for FFBF (p=0.04. 4 year actuarial FFBF by NCCN risk stratification was 100% very low risk, 100% low risk, 96.5% intermediate risk, 94.5% high risk, and 72.7% very high risk. There were no grade 3 gastrointestinal (GI or genitourinary (GU toxicities for either

  15. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in France: the boost of the national funding for the new expensive innovative technologies (STIC 2001 and 2002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchal, C.; Lapeyre, M.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Gerard, J.P.; Hasle, E.; Carrere, M.O.

    2003-01-01

    The STIC 2001 and STIC 2002 projects intend to allow the implementation and the assessment of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in France. IMRT is an innovative technique in which the high-dose radiation volume conforms to an accurately defined target volume with less morbidity to the surrounding normal tissues. The main medical objectives of the projects are (1) to improve the therapeutic index while decreasing acute toxicity and late sequelae (mainly xerostomia and acute mucite for head and neck tumors), which allows an increase in the radiation dose to the tumor and then a better tumor control; (2) to propose a salvage treatment to patients who locally recurred in previously irradiated sites; (3) to determine the optimal treatment guidelines for a safe use of the technique in clinical routine. Our projects also aim at comparing IMRT and 3D conformal treatments on the one hand (STIC 2001), and IMRT and conventional treatments on the other hand (STIC 2002), with regard to costs. As a matter of fact, the use of IMRT is presently limited in France because its implementation requires high investment and personnel costs. The seventeen French Regional Cancer Centres involved in the two projects intend to study the additional cost of the use IMRT in comparison with the use of standard techniques, which appears to be a step for a wide use of this technique in France. Each of the studies is two-year prospective, and includes patients with head and neck tumors treated with a curative intend (post operative or exclusive treatments for STIC 2002 and STIC 2002), and patients with a prostate cancer (STIC 2001). (author)

  16. Stereotactic body radiotherapy with a focal boost to the MRI-visible tumor as monotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer: early results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluwini, Shafak; Rooij, Peter van; Hoogeman, Mischa; Kirkels, Wim; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine; Bangma, Chris

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that prostate cancer (PC) cells are more sensitive to high fraction dose in hypofractionation schemes. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy is established to be a good treatment option for PC using extremely hypofractionated schemes. This hypofractionation can also be achieved with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We report results on toxicity, PSA response, and quality of life (QOL) in patients treated with SBRT for favorable-risk PC. Over the last 4 years, 50 hormone-naïve patients with low- and intermediate-risk PC were treated with SBRT to a total dose of 38 Gy delivered in four daily fractions of 9.5 Gy. An integrated boost to 11 Gy per fraction was applied to the dominant lesion if visible on MRI. Toxicity and QoL was assessed prospectively using validated questionnaires. Median follow-up was 23 months. The 2-year actuarial biochemical control rate was 100%. Median PSA nadir was 0.6 ng/ml. Median International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) was 9/35 before treatment, with a median increase of 4 at 3 months and remaining stable at 13/35 thereafter. The EORTC/RTOG toxicity scales showed grade 2 and 3 gastrointestinal (GI) acute toxicity in 12% and 2%, respectively. The late grade 2 GI toxicity was 3% during 24 months FU. Genitourinary (GU) grade 2, 3 toxicity was seen in 15%, 8%, in the acute phase and 10%, 6% at 24 months, respectively. The urinary, bowel and sexual domains of the EORTC-PR25 scales recovered over time, showing no significant changes at 24 months post-treatment. SBRT to 38 Gy in 4 daily fractions for low- and intermediate-risk PC patients is feasible with low acute and late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Longer follow-up preferably within randomized studies, is required to compare these results with standard fractionation schemes

  17. Planning issues for IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoban, P.; Schneider, M.; Smee, R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Despite the 'inverse planning' stage of an intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment there remains a large number of variables that can, and must, be set manually. These variables can significantly affect the quality of the dose distribution arrived at by the optimisation. Clinical IMRT planning with the Radionics XPlan system for micro-multileaf collimator (MMLC) delivery has allowed for important lessons to be learned regarding the best beam and organ configurations prior to optimisation of beamlet weights. Important user-definable variables are beam directions, organ parameters (dose goals/penalties), and the margin (if any) around the planning target volume (PTV) used to aid coverage. Conventional stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) treatments typically involve non-coplanar beams since there is often an advantage in terms of cranial organ at risk (OAR) sparing. IMRT can also benefit from such a configuration. The balance between target coverage and OAR sparing is largely controlled by user-defined goal doses and penalties. Once optimisation has been performed, intensity maps can be discretised into a selected number of levels. Less levels means less field segments and thus a shorter treatment time. Although IMRT beams attempt to spare structures which are in the 'beam's eye view' (BEV) of the target volume, sparing is greater if beams which minimise the involvement of OARs in their view are used. It has been found that the use of a margin is an effective way to ensure adequate PTV coverage. Alternatively the PTV penalties can be made larger. The best result is often obtained by the use of a 3-4 mm margin, whose penalty for underdosage is somewhat less than that for the PTV. Discretising the intensity maps to 4 or 5 levels is typically a good balance between shortening treatment time and not overly degrading the dose distribution. Beam configuration is still an important step in IMRT planning, even though optimisation of intensity maps is

  18. Hypofractionated Image-Guided IMRT in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Infiltrated Vessels Concomitant With Capecitabine: A Phase I Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passoni, Paolo, E-mail: passoni.paolo@hsr.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Reni, Michele [Department of Medical Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Cattaneo, Giovanni M. [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Slim, Najla [Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Cereda, Stefano [Department of Medical Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Balzano, Gianpaolo; Castoldi, Renato [Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Longobardi, Barbara [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Bettinardi, Valentino; Gianolli, Luigi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Gusmini, Simone [Department of Radiology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Staudacher, Carlo [Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Calandrino, Riccardo [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Di Muzio, Nadia [Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose (MTD) of an integrated boost to the tumor subvolume infiltrating vessels, delivered simultaneously with radical dose to the whole tumor and concomitant capecitabine in patients with pretreated advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage III or IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma without progressive disease after induction chemotherapy were eligible. Patients underwent simulated contrast-enhanced four-dimensional computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography. Gross tumor volume 1 (GTV1), the tumor, and GTV2, the tumor subvolume 1 cm around the infiltrated vessels, were contoured. GTVs were fused to generate Internal Target Volume (ITV)1 and ITV2. Biological tumor volume (BTV) was fused with ITV1 to create the BTV+Internal Target Volume (ITV) 1. A margin of 5/5/7 mm (7 mm in cranium-caudal) was added to BTV+ITV1 and to ITV2 to create Planning Target Volume (PTV) 1 and PTV2, respectively. Radiation therapy was delivered with tomotherapy. PTV1 received a fixed dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions, and PTV2 received a dose escalation from 48 to 58 Gy as simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in consecutive groups of at least 3 patients. Concomitant chemotherapy was capecitabine, 1250 mg/m{sup 2} daily. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any treatment-related G3 nonhematological or G4 hematological toxicity occurring during the treatment or within 90 days from its completion. Results: From June 2005 to February 2010, 25 patients were enrolled. The dose escalation on the SIB was stopped at 58 Gy without reaching the MTD. One patient in the 2{sup nd} dose level (50 Gy) had a DLT: G3 acute gastric ulcer. Three patients had G3 late adverse effects associated with gastric and/or duodenal mucosal damage. All patients received the planned dose of radiation. Conclusions: A dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions to the whole tumor with an SIB of 58 Gy to small

  19. SU-E-T-309: Dosimetric Comparison of Simultaneous Integrated Boost Treatment Plan Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies (IMRTs), Dual Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (DA-VMAT) and Single Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (SA-VMAT) for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivakumar, R; Janardhan, N; Bhavani, P; Surendran, J; Saranganathan, B; Ibrahim, S; Jhonson, B; Madhuri, B; Anuradha, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the plan quality and performance of Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) Treatment plan between Seven field (7F) and Nine field(9F) Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies and Single Arc (SA) and Dual Arc (DA) Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy( VMAT). Methods: Retrospective planning study of 16 patients treated in Elekta Synergy Platform (mlci2) by 9F-IMRT were replanned with 7F-IMRT, Single Arc VMAT and Dual Arc VMAT using CMS, Monaco Treatment Planning System (TPS) with Monte Carlo simulation. Target delineation done as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Protocols (RTOG 0225&0615). Dose Prescribed as 70Gy to Planning Target Volumes (PTV70) and 61Gy to PTV61 in 33 fraction as a SIB technique. Conformity Index(CI), Homogeneity Index(HI) were used as analysis parameter for Target Volumes as well as Mean dose and Max dose for Organ at Risk(OAR,s).Treatment Delivery Time(min), Monitor unit per fraction (MU/fraction), Patient specific quality assurance were also analysed. Results: A Poor dose coverage and Conformity index (CI) was observed in PTV70 by 7F-IMRT among other techniques. SA-VMAT achieved poor dose coverage in PTV61. No statistical significance difference observed in OAR,s except Spinal cord (P= 0.03) and Right optic nerve (P=0.03). DA-VMAT achieved superior target coverage, higher CI (P =0.02) and Better HI (P=0.03) for PTV70 other techniques (7F-IMRT/9F-IMRT/SA-VMAT). A better dose spare for Parotid glands and spinal cord were seen in DA-VMAT. The average treatment delivery time were 5.82mins, 6.72mins, 3.24mins, 4.3mins for 7F-IMRT, 9F-IMRT, SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT respectively. Significance difference Observed in MU/fr (P <0.001) and Patient quality assurance pass rate were >95% (Gamma analysis (Γ3mm, 3%). Conclusion: DA-VAMT showed better target dose coverage and achieved better or equal performance in sparing OARs among other techniques. SA-VMAT offered least Treatment Time than other techniques but achieved poor target coverage. DA-VMAT offered

  20. SU-E-T-309: Dosimetric Comparison of Simultaneous Integrated Boost Treatment Plan Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies (IMRTs), Dual Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (DA-VMAT) and Single Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (SA-VMAT) for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivakumar, R; Janardhan, N; Bhavani, P; Surendran, J; Saranganathan, B; Ibrahim, S; Jhonson, B; Madhuri, B [Omega Hospitals, Hyderabad, Telangana (India); Anuradha, C [Vit University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the plan quality and performance of Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) Treatment plan between Seven field (7F) and Nine field(9F) Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies and Single Arc (SA) and Dual Arc (DA) Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy( VMAT). Methods: Retrospective planning study of 16 patients treated in Elekta Synergy Platform (mlci2) by 9F-IMRT were replanned with 7F-IMRT, Single Arc VMAT and Dual Arc VMAT using CMS, Monaco Treatment Planning System (TPS) with Monte Carlo simulation. Target delineation done as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Protocols (RTOG 0225&0615). Dose Prescribed as 70Gy to Planning Target Volumes (PTV70) and 61Gy to PTV61 in 33 fraction as a SIB technique. Conformity Index(CI), Homogeneity Index(HI) were used as analysis parameter for Target Volumes as well as Mean dose and Max dose for Organ at Risk(OAR,s).Treatment Delivery Time(min), Monitor unit per fraction (MU/fraction), Patient specific quality assurance were also analysed. Results: A Poor dose coverage and Conformity index (CI) was observed in PTV70 by 7F-IMRT among other techniques. SA-VMAT achieved poor dose coverage in PTV61. No statistical significance difference observed in OAR,s except Spinal cord (P= 0.03) and Right optic nerve (P=0.03). DA-VMAT achieved superior target coverage, higher CI (P =0.02) and Better HI (P=0.03) for PTV70 other techniques (7F-IMRT/9F-IMRT/SA-VMAT). A better dose spare for Parotid glands and spinal cord were seen in DA-VMAT. The average treatment delivery time were 5.82mins, 6.72mins, 3.24mins, 4.3mins for 7F-IMRT, 9F-IMRT, SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT respectively. Significance difference Observed in MU/fr (P <0.001) and Patient quality assurance pass rate were >95% (Gamma analysis (Γ3mm, 3%). Conclusion: DA-VAMT showed better target dose coverage and achieved better or equal performance in sparing OARs among other techniques. SA-VMAT offered least Treatment Time than other techniques but achieved poor target coverage. DA-VMAT offered

  1. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics after stereotactic body radiotherapy as monotherapy or boost after whole pelvic radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun Jung Kim

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: In this report of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients, an initial period of rapid PSA decline was followed by a slow decline, which resulted in a lower PSA nadir. The PSA kinetics of SBRT monotherapy appears to be comparable to those achieved with SBRT boost with WPRT.

  2. A comparative study of quality of life in patients with localized prostate cancer treated at a single institution: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy or external beam + high dose rate brachytherapy boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helou, Joelle; Morton, Gerard; Zhang, Liying; Deabreu, Andrea; D’Alimonte, Laura; Elias, Evelyn; Musunuru, Hima Bindu; Mamedov, Alexandre; Ravi, Ananth; Chung, Hans; Cheung, Patrick; Loblaw, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the quality of life (QOL) in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) alone or high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy + hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and materials: Patient self-reported QOL was prospectively measured among patients from two sequential phase 2 clinical trials: 1-SABR 35 Gy/5 fractions/5 weeks, 2–15 Gy HDR 1 fraction, followed by EBRT 37.5 Gy/15 fractions/3 weeks. The expanded prostate cancer index composite was assessed at baseline and q6 monthly up to 5 years. Urinary, bowel and sexual domains were analyzed. A minimally clinical important change (MCIC) was defined as 0.5*standard deviation of the baseline for each domain. Fisher exact test and general linear mixed model were used (p < 0.05). Results: 84 and 123 patients were treated on the SABR and HDR boost studies, with a median follow up of 51 and 61 months respectively. There was a significant difference in MCIC between treatments in the urinary function and bother (p < 0.0001), the bowel function (p = 0.0216) and the sexual function (p = 0.0419) and bother (p = 0.0290) domains in favor of the SABR group. Of patients who reported no problem with their sexual function at baseline, 7% and 23% respectively considered it to be a moderate to big problem on follow up (p = 0.0077). Conclusion: Patients treated with HDR-boost reported deterioration of QOL particularly in sexual domains in comparison with SABR

  3. IMRT in hypopharyngeal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, G.; Luetolf, U.M.; Davis, J.B.; Glanzmann, C. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-06-15

    Background and purpose: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) data on hypopharyngeal cancer (HC) are scant. In this study, the authors report on early results in an own HC patient cohort treated with IMRT. A more favorable outcome as compared to historical data on conventional radiation techniques was expected. Patients and methods: 29 consecutive HC patients were treated with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) IMRT between 01/2002 and 07/2005 (mean follow-up 16 months, range 4-44 months). Doses of 60-71 Gy with 2.0-2.2 Gy/fraction were applied. 26/29 patients were definitively irradiated, 86% received simultaneous cisplatin-based chemotherapy. 60% presented with locally advanced disease (T3/4 Nx, Tx N2c/3). Mean primary tumor volume measured 36.2 cm{sup 3} (4-170 cm{sup 3}), mean nodal volume 16.6 cm{sup 3} (0-97 cm{sup 3}). Results: 2-year actuarial local, nodal, distant control, and overall disease-free survival were 90%, 93%, 93%, and 90%, respectively. In 2/4 patients with persistent disease (nodal in one, primary in three), salvage surgery was performed. The mean dose to the spinal cord (extension of > 5-15 mm) was 26 Gy (12-38 Gy); the mean maximum (point) dose was 44.4 Gy (26-58.9 Gy). One grade (G) 3 dysphagia and two G4 reactions (laryngeal fibrosis, dysphagia), both following the schedule with 2.2 Gy per fraction, have been observed so far. Larynx preservation was achieved in 25/26 of the definitively irradiated patients (one underwent a salvage laryngectomy); 23 had no or minimal dysphagia (G0-1). Conclusion: excellent early disease control and high patient satisfaction with swallowing function in HC following SIB IMRT were observed; these results need to be confirmed based on a longer follow-up period. In order to avoid G4 reactions, SIB doses of < 2.2 Gy/fraction are recommended for large tumors involving laryngeal structures. (orig.)

  4. SU-F-J-101: Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Planning for Primary Prostate Cancer with Selective Intraprostatic Boost Determined by 18F-Choline PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, L [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Wang, H; Kuang, Y [University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Hirata, E; Kwee, S [Queen’s Medical Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of {sup 18}F-choline positron emission tomography (PET) scans guidance for SBRT dose painting in patients with prostate cancer and its impact on tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Methods: Twenty seven patients with localized prostate cancer who had {sup 18}F-choline PET/CT scan prior to treatment were included. A pair of nested intraprostatic dominant lesion (IDL) contours (IDL{sub suv60%} and IDL{sub suv70%}) were generated for each patient based on 60% and 70% of maximum prostate uptake on the {sup 18}F-choline PET images. GTV{sub reg} was delineated on prostate according to the gland boundary seen on CT images. The PTVs (PTV{sub suv60%} and PTV{sub suv70%}) were defined as respective IDLs with a 3-mm margin posteriorly and 5 mm in all other dimensions. Two 5-fraction SBRT plans using VMAT technique along with 10 MV FFF beams, plan{sub 36Gy} and plan{sub 50–55Gy}, were generated for each patient. All plans included a dose of 36.25 Gy prescribed to PTV{sub reg}. The Plan{sub 50–55Gy} also included a simultaneous boost dose of 50 Gy and 55 Gy prescribed to the PTV{sub suv60%} and PTV{sub suv70%}, respectively. The utility of {sup 18}F-Choline PET-guided SBRT dose escalation was evaluated by its ability to achieve the prescription dose objectives while adhering to organ-at-risk (OAR) dose constraints. The TCP and NTCP calculated by radiological models were also compared between two plans for each patient. Results: In all 54 SBRT plans generated, the planning objectives and dose constraints were met without exception. Plan{sub 50–55Gy} had a significantly higher dose in PTV{sub suv60%} and PTV{sub suv70%} than those in Plan{sub 36Gy} (p < 0.05), respectively, while still maintaining a safe OAR sparing profile. In addition, plan{sub 50–55Gy} had significantly higher TCP than plan{sub 36Gy}. Conclusion: Using VMAT with FFF beams to incorporate a simultaneous {sup 18}F

  5. Inverse planning IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2008-01-01

    The lecture addressed the following topics: Optimizing radiotherapy dose distribution; IMRT contributes to optimization of energy deposition; Inverse vs direct planning; Main steps of IMRT; Background of inverse planning; General principle of inverse planning; The 3 main components of IMRT inverse planning; The simplest cost function (deviation from prescribed dose); The driving variable : the beamlet intensity; Minimizing a 'cost function' (or 'objective function') - the walker (or skier) analogy; Application to IMRT optimization (the gradient method); The gradient method - discussion; The simulated annealing method; The optimization criteria - discussion; Hard and soft constraints; Dose volume constraints; Typical user interface for definition of optimization criteria; Biological constraints (Equivalent Uniform Dose); The result of the optimization process; Semi-automatic solutions for IMRT; Generalisation of the optimization problem; Driving and driven variables used in RT optimization; Towards multi-criteria optimization; and Conclusions for the optimization phase. (P.A.)

  6. Single-Arc IMRT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortfeld, Thomas; Webb, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The idea of delivering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multileaf collimator in a continuous dynamic mode during a single rotation of the gantry has recently gained momentum both in research and industry. In this note we investigate the potential of this Single-Arc IMRT technique at a conceptual level. We consider the original theoretical example case from Brahme et al that got the field of IMRT started. Using analytical methods, we derive deliverable intensity 'landscapes' for Single-Arc as well as standard IMRT and Tomotherapy. We find that Tomotherapy provides the greatest flexibility in shaping intensity landscapes and that it allows one to deliver IMRT in a way that comes close to the ideal case in the transverse plane. Single-Arc and standard IMRT make compromises in different areas. Only in relatively simple cases that do not require substantial intensity modulation will Single-Arc be dosimetrically comparable to Tomotherapy. Compared with standard IMRT, Single-Arc could be dosimetrically superior in certain cases if one is willing to accept the spreading of low dose values over large volumes of normal tissue. In terms of treatment planning, Single-Arc poses a more challenging optimization problem than Tomotherapy or standard IMRT. We conclude that Single-Arc holds potential as an efficient IMRT technique especially for relatively simple cases. In very complex cases, Single-Arc may unduly compromise the quality of the dose distribution, if one tries to keep the treatment time below 2 min or so. As with all IMRT techniques, it is important to explore the tradeoff between plan quality and the efficiency of its delivery carefully for each individual case. (note)

  7. Comparison of three concomitant boost techniques for early-stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, Janet K.; Halle, Jan S.; Chang, Sha X.; Sartor, Carolyn I.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Whole breast radiotherapy (RT) followed by a tumor bed boost typically spans 5-6 weeks of treatment. Interest is growing in RT regimens, such as concomitant boost, that decrease overall treatment time, lessening the time/cost burden to patients and facilities. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography (CT) scans from 20 cases were selected for this retrospective, dosimetric study to compare three different techniques of concomitant boost delivery: (1) standard tangents plus an electron boost (2) intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) tangents using custom compensators plus an electron boost, and (3) IMRT tangents plus a conformal photon boost. The equivalent uniform dose model was used to compare the plans. Results: The average breast equivalent uniform dose value for the three techniques (standard, IMRT plus electrons, and IMRT plus photons) was 48.6, 47.9, and 48.3, respectively. The plans using IMRT more closely approximated the prescribed dose of 46 Gy to the whole breast. The breast volume receiving >110% of the dose was less with the IMRT tangents than with standard RT (p 0.037), but no significant difference in the maximal dose or other evaluated parameters was noted. Conclusion: Although the IMRT techniques delivered the prescribed dose with better dose uniformity, the small improvement seen did not support a goal of improved resource use

  8. A comparison of HDR brachytherapy and IMRT techniques for dose escalation in prostate cancer: A radiobiological modeling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatyga, M.; Williamson, J. F.; Dogan, N.; Todor, D.; Siebers, J. V.; George, R.; Barani, I.; Hagan, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, 401 College Street, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    A course of one to three large fractions of high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy is an attractive alternative to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for delivering boost doses to the prostate in combination with additional external beam irradiation for intermediate risk disease. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively compare single-fraction HDR boosts to biologically equivalent fractionated IMRT boosts, assuming idealized image guided delivery (igIMRT) and conventional delivery (cIMRT). For nine prostate patients, both seven-field IMRT and HDR boosts were planned. The linear-quadratic model was used to compute biologically equivalent dose prescriptions. The cIMRT plan was evaluated as a static plan and with simulated random and setup errors. The authors conclude that HDR delivery produces a therapeutic ratio which is significantly better than the conventional IMRT and comparable to or better than the igIMRT delivery. For the HDR, the rectal gBEUD analysis is strongly influenced by high dose DVH tails. A saturation BED, beyond which no further injury can occur, must be assumed. Modeling of organ motion uncertainties yields mean outcomes similar to static plan outcomes.

  9. Surviving Hypopharynx-Larynx Carcinoma in the Era of IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studer, Gabriela; Peponi, Evangelia; Kloeck, Stephan; Dossenbach, Thomas; Huber, Gerhard; Glanzmann, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Outcome in locoregionally advanced laryngeal carcinoma and hypopharyngeal carcinoma after conventional radiation techniques is known for modest disease control and considerable late toxicity. Considering the lack of standardization in prescription dose for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), we aimed to compare the results after our methods of simultaneously integrated boost IMRT with published results. Methods and Materials: Between March 2002 and December 2008, 65 hypopharyngeal, 31 supraglottic, and 27 locoregionally advanced glottic tumor patients underwent definitive IMRT (with simultaneous chemotherapy in 86%). Of these, 64% presented with locoregionally advanced disease. Mean follow-up was 26 months (range, 3-83 months), with a median of 21 months. Treatment (2.0-2.2Gy per fraction, 66-72.6Gy) followed a prospectively defined protocol. If the boost volume included more than half of the larynx or a substantial part of the pharynx, dose was limited to 2.0Gy per fraction. Results: The 2-year local, nodal, and locoregional control (LRC) rates for the entire cohort were 82%, 90%, and 77%, respectively; the disease-free and overall survival rates were 75% and 83%, respectively. The ultimate 2-year LRC rate, including salvage surgery, was 86%. Laryngectomy was required in 2 LRC patients needing tracheostoma already before; 2 further LRC patients needed tracheostomy before IMRT and remained tracheostoma dependent, and 3 patients remained feeding tube dependent after IMRT. Salvage laryngectomy was successful in 8 of 11. Of all 123 patients, 91 patients (74%) are locoregionally controlled and live with a functional laryngopharynx. Conclusions: Simultaneously integrated boost IMRT with limited acceptance of dose inhomogeneity resulted in very satisfactory disease control despite a slight left shift of planning target volume curves on the dose-volume histogram. Considering the treatment tolerance, a careful increase in dose in our patients seems possible

  10. Simultaneous optimization of sequential IMRT plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popple, Richard A.; Prellop, Perri B.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Santos, Jennifer F. de los; Duan, Jun; Fiveash, John B.; Brezovich, Ivan A.

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy often comprises two phases, in which irradiation of a volume at risk for microscopic disease is followed by a sequential dose escalation to a smaller volume either at a higher risk for microscopic disease or containing only gross disease. This technique is difficult to implement with intensity modulated radiotherapy, as the tolerance doses of critical structures must be respected over the sum of the two plans. Techniques that include an integrated boost have been proposed to address this problem. However, clinical experience with such techniques is limited, and many clinicians are uncomfortable prescribing nonconventional fractionation schemes. To solve this problem, we developed an optimization technique that simultaneously generates sequential initial and boost IMRT plans. We have developed an optimization tool that uses a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and a high level programming language for technical computing. The tool uses the TPS to calculate the dose deposition coefficients (DDCs) for optimization. The DDCs were imported into external software and the treatment ports duplicated to create the boost plan. The initial, boost, and tolerance doses were specified and used to construct cost functions. The initial and boost plans were optimized simultaneously using a gradient search technique. Following optimization, the fluence maps were exported to the TPS for dose calculation. Seven patients treated using sequential techniques were selected from our clinical database. The initial and boost plans used to treat these patients were developed independently of each other by dividing the tolerance doses proportionally between the initial and boost plans and then iteratively optimizing the plans until a summation that met the treatment goals was obtained. We used the simultaneous optimization technique to generate plans that met the original planning goals. The coverage of the initial and boost target volumes in the simultaneously optimized

  11. Is it beneficial to selectively boost high-risk tumor subvolumes? A comparison of selectively boosting high-risk tumor subvolumes versus homogeneous dose escalation of the entire tumor based on equivalent EUD plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yusung; To me, Wolfgang A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To quantify and compare expected local tumor control and expected normal tissue toxicities between selective boosting IMRT and homogeneous dose escalation IMRT for the case of prostate cancer. Methods. Four different selective boosting scenarios and three different high-risk tumor subvolume geometries were designed to compare selective boosting and homogeneous dose escalation IMRT plans delivering the same equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to the entire PTV. For each scenario, differences in tumor control probability between both boosting strategies were calculated for the high-risk tumor subvolume and remaining low-risk PTV, and were visualized using voxel based iso-TCP maps. Differences in expected rectal and bladder complications were quantified using radiobiological indices (generalized EUD (gEUD) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP)) as well as %-volumes. Results. For all investigated scenarios and high-risk tumor subvolume geometries, selective boosting IMRT improves expected TCP compared to homogeneous dose escalation IMRT, especially when lack of control of the high-risk tumor subvolume could be the cause for tumor recurrence. Employing, selective boosting IMRT significant increases in expected TCP can be achieved for the high-risk tumor subvolumes. The three conventional selective boosting IMRT strategies, employing physical dose objectives, did not show significant improvement in rectal and bladder sparing as compared to their counterpart homogeneous dose escalation plans. However, risk-adaptive optimization, utilizing radiobiological objective functions, resulted in reduction in NTCP for the rectum when compared to its corresponding homogeneous dose escalation plan. Conclusions. Selective boosting is a more effective method than homogeneous dose escalation for achieving optimal treatment outcomes. Furthermore, risk-adaptive optimization increases the therapeutic ratio as compared to conventional selective boosting IMRT

  12. IMRT plan verification in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlk, P.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the procedure for verification of IMRT (Intensity modulated radiation therapy) plan, which is used in the Oncological Institute of St. Elisabeth in Bratislava. It contains basic description of IMRT technology and developing a deployment plan for IMRT planning system CORVUS 6.0, the device Mimic (Multilammelar intensity modulated collimator) and the overall process of verifying the schedule created. The aim of verification is particularly good control of the functions of MIMIC and evaluate the overall reliability of IMRT planning. (author)

  13. Boosted jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juknevich, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the substructure of jets high transverse momentum at hadron colliders. A template method is introduced to distinguish heavy jets by comparing their energy distributions to the distributions of a set of templates which describe the kinematical information from signal or background. As an application, a search for a boosted Higgs boson decaying into bottom quarks in association with a leptonically decaying W boson is presented as well. (author)

  14. Limited benefit of inversely optimised intensity modulation in breast conserving radiotherapy with simultaneously integrated boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, Hans Paul van der; Dolsma, Wil V.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Korevaar, Erik W.; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Maduro, John H.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To examine whether in breast-conserving radiotherapy (RT) with simultaneously integrated boost (SIB), application of inversely planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT-SIB) instead of three-dimensional RT (3D-CRT-SIB) has benefits that justify the additional costs, and to evaluate whether a potential benefit of IMRT-SIB depends on specific patient characteristics. Material and methods: 3D-CRT-SIB and various IMRT-SIB treatment plans were constructed and optimised for 30 patients with early stage left-sided breast cancer. Coverage of planning target volumes (PTVs) and dose delivered to organs at risk (OARs) were determined for each plan. Overlap between heart and breast PTV (OHB), size of breast and boost PTVs and boost location were examined in their ability to identify patients that might benefit from IMRT-SIB. Results: All plans had adequate PTV coverage. IMRT-SIB generally reduced dose levels delivered to heart, lungs, and normal breast tissue relative to 3D-CRT-SIB. However, IMRT-SIB benefit differed per patient. For many patients, comparable results were obtained with 3D-CRT-SIB, while patients with OHB > 1.4 cm and a relatively large boost PTV volume (>125 cm 3 ) gained most from the use of IMRT-SIB. Conclusions: In breast-conserving RT, results obtained with 3D-CRT-SIB and IMRT-SIB are generally comparable. Patient characteristics could be used to identify patients that are most likely to benefit from IMRT-SIB.

  15. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Timothy W.; Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-01-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management

  16. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy with Simultaneously Integrated Boost at University Hospital Centre Zagreb (KBC Zagreb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barisic, L.; Bibic, J.; Grego, T.; Hrsak, H.; Kovacevic, N.

    2013-01-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy technique (IMRT) is state of art in modern radiotherapy for bilateral Head and Neck (H and N) malignancies. IMRT of real patients is implemented at KBC Zagreb since June 2012. Our method is inspired partly by Hull IMRT technique. It differs from standard IMRT beam layout (7 beams, gantry angles in 51° steps) and it avoids direct irradiation of OARs. We also use simultaneous integrated boost (SIB IMRT) fractionation. The aim of this paper is to present in some details the whole process of our SIB IMRT including plan quality assurance. Results for several patients together with comparison with ConPas and standard IMRT are presented. In our department, in last several years, routine method for H and N cancer RT was ConPas. During this period we (together with ConPas plans) produced standard IMRT plans with seven equidistant fields for actual patients. Our comparative analysis showed clear superiority of IMRT over ConPas for H and N radiotherapy. Since spring 2012 we have produced also non-standard IMRT plans that are based on Hull (U.K.) experience, with beam gantry angles at 0, 50, 80, 150, 210, 280 and 310 degrees. Also, in this method, direct irradiation of OARs (particularly spinal cord) is avoided by shielding as initial constraint. This approach proved to be better than standard IMRT in all analyzed cases. Having all this in mind, we decided to implement 'our' IMRT technique on real patients. Second essential point of our method is SIB fractionation. It has dosimetric, logistic and radiobiological advantages over standard fractionation. IMRT plan QA is routinely performed using Seven29 and Gamma index method. We take 3 mm/3 % Gamma index and 85 % of passed points as passing rate.(author)

  17. Planner concepts in IMRT planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Suvendu Kr.; Rath, A.K.; Patnaik, S.; Mishra, S.K.

    2008-01-01

    IMRT is the most sophisticated, innovative, three- dimensional conformal radiation treatment that delivers highly focused radiation with minimal impact to surrounding normal tissue. As it is a computer control technique, the planar should have adequate knowledge to execute the plan in proper way other wise it is very difficult to get the optimal plan. In this article we want to high light, planner should have the basic concepts before starting the IMRT planning

  18. Stereotactic radiotherapy for pediatric intracranial germ cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zissiadis, Yvonne; Dutton, Sharon; Kieran, Mark; Goumnerova, Liliana; Scott, R. Michael; Kooy, Hanne M.; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Intracranial germ cell tumors are rare, radiosensitive tumors seen most commonly in the second and third decades of life. Radiotherapy alone has been the primary treatment modality for germinomas, and is used with chemotherapy for nongerminomatous tumors. Stereotactic radiotherapy techniques minimize the volume of surrounding normal tissue irradiated and, hence, the late radiation morbidity. This study reports our experience with stereotactic radiotherapy in this group of tumors. Methods and Materials: Between December 1992 and December 1998, 18 patients with intracranial germ cell tumors were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. A total of 23 histologically proven tumors were treated. Thirteen patients had a histologic diagnosis of germinoma, and 5 patients had germinoma with nongerminomatous elements. Of those patients with a histologic diagnosis of germinoma, 5 had multiple midline tumors. The median age of the patients was 12.9 years (range, 5.6-17.5 years). Results: A boost using stereotactic radiotherapy was delivered to 19 tumors following whole-brain radiation in 8 cases and craniospinal radiation in 11 cases. Three tumors were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy to the tumor volume alone following chemotherapy, and 1 tumor received a boost using stereotactic radiosurgery following craniospinal radiation. A median dose of 2520 cGy (range, 1500-3600) cGy was given to the whole brain, and a median dose of 2160 (range, 2100-2600) cGy was given to the spinal field. The median boost dose to the tumor was 2600 (range, 2160-3600) cGy, given by stereotactic radiotherapy delivered to the 95% isodose line. At a median follow-up time of 40 (range, 12-73) months, no local or marginal recurrences were reported in patients with germinoma. Two patients with nongerminomatous tumors have relapsed. One had elevation of tumor markers only at 37 months following treatment, and the other had persistent disease following chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Eight

  19. Breast biopsy -- stereotactic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... org/-/media/ACR/Files/Practice-Parameters/stereo-breast.pdf . Updated 2016. Accessed March 14, 2017. Parker C, Umphrey H, Bland K. The role of stereotactic breast biopsy in the management of breast disease. In: Cameron ...

  20. Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in a Large Bilateral Thalamic and Basal Ganglia Arteriovenous Malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs in the basal ganglia and thalamus have a more aggressive natural history with a higher morbidity and mortality than AVMs in other locations. Optimal treatment—complete obliteration without new neurological deficits—is often challenging. We present a patient with a large bilateral basal ganglia and thalamic AVM successfully treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (HFSRS with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Methods. The patient was treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery to 30 Gy at margin in 5 fractions of 9 static fields with a minimultileaf collimator and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Results. At 10 months following treatment, digital subtraction angiography showed complete obliteration of the AVM. Conclusions. Large bilateral thalamic and basal ganglia AVMs can be successfully treated with complete obliteration by HFSRS with IMRT with relatively limited toxicity. Appropriate caution is recommended.

  1. Importance of the initial volume of parotid glands in xerostomia for patients with head and neck cancers treated with IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yasumasa; Nakamatsu, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Toru; Kanamori, Shuichi; Koike, Ryuta; Okumura, Masahiko; Suzuki, Minoru

    2005-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate predictors of xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancers treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Thirty-three patients with pharyngeal cancer were evaluated for xerostomia after having been treated with IMRT. All patients were treated with whole-neck irradiation of 46-50 Gy by IMRT, followed by boost IMRT to the high-risk clinical target volume to a total dose of 56-70 Gy in 28-35 fractions (median, 68 Gy). For boost IMRT, a second computed tomography (CT-2) scan was done in the third to fourth week of IMRT. Xerostomia was scored 3-4 months after the start of IMRT. The mean doses to the contralateral and ipsilateral parotid glands were 24.0±6.2 and 30.3±6.6 Gy, respectively. Among the 33 patients, xerostomia of grades 0, 1, 2 and 3 was noted in one, 18, 12 and two patients, respectively. Although the mean dose to the parotid glands was not correlated with the grade of xerostomia, the initial volume of the parotid glands was correlated with the grade of xerostomia (P=0.04). Of 17 patients with small parotid glands (≤38.8 ml) on initial CT (CT-1), 11 (65%) showed grade 2 or grade 3 xerostomia, whereas only three (19%) of 16 patients with larger parotid glands showed grade 2 xerostomia (P<0.05). The mean volume of the parotid glands on CT-1 was 43.1±15.2 ml, but decreased significantly to 32.0±11.4 ml (74%) on CT-2 (P<0.0001). Initial volumes of the parotid glands are significantly correlated with the grade of xerostomia in patients treated with IMRT. The volume of the parotid glands decreased significantly during the course of IMRT. (author)

  2. Preliminary experience with frameless stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buatti, John M.; Bova, Frank J.; Friedman, William A.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Marcus, Robert B.; Zuofeng, Li; Mendenhall, William M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To report our initial clinical experience using a novel high-precision frameless stereotactic radiotherapy system in 50 patients who have received 1271 treatments. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients ranging in age from 2 to 72 yr were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Thirty-two were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy alone, and 18 had stereotactic radiotherapy interdigitated as a boost in addition to standard irradiation. Pathologies treated included meningioma (13), low grade astrocytoma (10), germinoma (9), craniopharyngioma (4), schwannoma (2), and pituitary adenoma (2). Two additional patients had miscellaneous benign neoplasms and 8 patients had the technique used as a dose escalation strategy for malignant lesions including chordoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor, sarcoma, and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. Treatment reproducibility was initially gauged by comparing the bite plate position using infrared light emitting diodes (irleds) with the stereotactic radiosurgery reference system. This test of accuracy consisted of 10 bite plate repositionings for each patient and 100 readings of each of the 6 irleds on the bite plate at each new position. Each of the 1271 patient treatments was monitored for continuous digital position, and a reading was made before treating each arc of radiation. We chose 0.3 mm translation and 0.3 degrees rotation as the maximum tolerated misalignment before treating each arc. Results: With a mean follow-up of 9 mo, no patient had a marginal or distal failure. One patient with a malignant glioma had central disease progression. Acute side effects were minimal. In 3 of 9 low grade astrocytomas, a marked increase in imaging enhancement and edema occurred in the first year after treatment that resolved with steroids. The initial test of accuracy revealed bite plate reproducibility as follows. Translational errors (mm): Anterior-posterior, 0.06 ± 0.06; lateral, 0.03 ± 0.05; axial, 0.07 ± 0

  3. To boost or not boost in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Suwinski, R.; Withers, H.R.; Fowler, J.; Fijuth, J.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper it to analyse and discuss standard definition of the 'boost' procedure in relation to clinical results and new forms of the boost designed on physical and radiobiological bases. Seventeen sets of clinical data including over 5000 cases cancer with different tumour stages and locations and treated with various forms of 'boost' method have been subtracted from literature. Effectiveness of boost is analyzed regarding its place in combined treatment, timing and subvolume involved. Radiobiological parameter of D10 and normalization method for biologically equivalent doses and dose intensity are used to simulated cold and not subvolumes (hills and dales) and its influence of effectiveness on the boost delivery. Sequential and concomitant boost using external irradiation, although commonly used, offers LTC benefit lower than expected. Brachytherapy, intraoperative irradiation and concurrent chemotherapy boost methods appear more effective. Conformal radiotherapy, with or without dose-intensity modulation, allows heterogeneous increase in dose intensity within the target volume and can be used to integrate the 'boost dose' into baseline treatment (Simultaneous Integrated Boost and SIB). Analysis of interrelationships between boost-dose; boost volume and its timing shows that a TCP benefit from boosting can be expected when a relatively large part of the target volume is involved. Increase in boost dose above 1.2-1.3 of baseline dose using 'standard' methods does not substantially further increase the achieved TCP benefit unless hypoxic cells are a problem. Any small uncertainties in treatment planning can ruin all potential beneficial effect of the boost. For example, a 50% dose deficit in a very small (e.g. 1%) volume of target can decrease TCP to zero. Therefore boost benefits should be carefully weighed against any risk of cold spots in the target volume. Pros and cons in discussion of the role of boost in radiotherapy lead to the important

  4. Impact of intensity-modulated radiation therapy as a boost treatment on the lung-dose distributions for non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Youngmin; Kim, Jeung Kee; Lee, Hyung Sik; Hur, Won Joo; Chai, Gyu Young; Kang, Ki Mun

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as a method of boost radiotherapy after the initial irradiation by the conventional anterior/posterior opposed beams for centrally located non-small-cell lung cancer through the evaluation of dose distributions according to the various boost methods. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with T3 or T4 lung cancer and mediastinal node enlargement who previously received radiotherapy were studied. All patients underwent virtual simulation retrospectively with the previous treatment planning computed tomograms. Initial radiotherapy plans were designed to deliver 40 Gy to the primary tumor and involved nodal regions with the conventional anterior/posterior opposed beams. Two radiation dose levels, 24 and 30 Gy, were used for the boost radiotherapy plans, and four different boost methods (a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy [3DCRT], five-, seven-, and nine-beam IMRT) were applied to each dose level. The goals of the boost plans were to deliver the prescribed radiation dose to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) and minimize the volumes of the normal lungs and spinal cord irradiated above their tolerance doses. Dose distributions in the PTVs and lungs, according to the four types of boost plans, were compared in the boost and sum plans, respectively. Results: The percentage of lung volumes irradiated >20 Gy (V20) was reduced significantly in the IMRT boost plans compared with the 3DCRT boost plans at the 24- and 30-Gy dose levels (p 0.007 and 0.0315 respectively). Mean lung doses according to the boost methods were not different in the 24- and 30-Gy boost plans. The conformity indexes (CI) of the IMRT boost plans were lower than those of the 3DCRT plans in the 24- and 30-Gy plans (p = 0.001 in both). For the sum plans, there was no difference of the dose distributions in the PTVs and lungs according to the boost methods. Conclusions: In the boost plans the V20s and CIs were

  5. Software for simulating IMRT protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Thelma C.F.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. de, E-mail: tcff@ufmg.b, E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear

    2009-07-01

    The Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy - IMRT is an advanced technique to cancer treatment widely used on oncology around the world. The present paper describes the SOFT-RT software which is a tool for simulating IMRT protocol. Also, it will be present a cerebral tumor case of studied in which three irradiation windows with distinct orientation were applied. The SOFT-RT collect and export data to MCNP code. This code simulates the photon transport on the voxel model. Later, a out-module from SOFT-RT import the results and express the dose-response superimposing dose and voxel model in a tree-dimensional graphic representation. The present paper address the IMRT software and its function as well a cerebral tumor case of studied is showed. The graphic interface of the SOFT-RT illustrates the example case. (author)

  6. Software for simulating IMRT protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Thelma C.F.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. de

    2009-01-01

    The Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy - IMRT is an advanced technique to cancer treatment widely used on oncology around the world. The present paper describes the SOFT-RT software which is a tool for simulating IMRT protocol. Also, it will be present a cerebral tumor case of studied in which three irradiation windows with distinct orientation were applied. The SOFT-RT collect and export data to MCNP code. This code simulates the photon transport on the voxel model. Later, a out-module from SOFT-RT import the results and express the dose-response superimposing dose and voxel model in a tree-dimensional graphic representation. The present paper address the IMRT software and its function as well a cerebral tumor case of studied is showed. The graphic interface of the SOFT-RT illustrates the example case. (author)

  7. Optimization of Stereotactic Radiotherapy Treatment Delivery Technique for Base-Of-Skull Meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Brenda G.; Candish, Charles; Vollans, Emily; Gete, Ermias; Lee, Richard; Martin, Monty; Ma, Roy; McKenzie, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This study compares static conformal field (CF), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and dynamic arcs (DA) for the stereotactic radiotherapy of base-of-skull meningiomas. Twenty-one cases of base-of-skull meningioma (median planning target volume [PTV] = 21.3 cm 3 ) previously treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were replanned with each technique. The plans were compared for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI), and doses to normal structures at 6 dose values from 50.4 Gy to 5.6 Gy. The mean CI was 1.75 (CF), 1.75 (DA), and 1.66 (IMRT) (p 3 , the CI (IMRT) was always superior to CI (DA) and CI (CF). At PTV sizes below 25 cm 3 , there was no significant difference in CI between each technique. There was no significant difference in HI between plans. The total volume of normal tissue receiving 50.4, 44.8, and 5.6 Gy was significantly lower when comparing IMRT to CF and DA plans (p 3 , due to improved conformity and normal tissue sparing, in particular for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe

  8. Peripheral doses from pediatric IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Eric E.; Maserang, Beth; Wood, Roy; Mansur, David

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral dose (PD) data exist for conventional fields (≥10 cm) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery to standard adult-sized phantoms. Pediatric peripheral dose reports are limited to conventional therapy and are model based. Our goal was to ascertain whether data acquired from full phantom studies and/or pediatric models, with IMRT treatment times, could predict Organ at Risk (OAR) dose for pediatric IMRT. As monitor units (MUs) are greater for IMRT, it is expected IMRT PD will be higher; potentially compounded by decreased patient size (absorption). Baseline slab phantom peripheral dose measurements were conducted for very small field sizes (from 2 to 10 cm). Data were collected at distances ranging from 5 to 72 cm away from the field edges. Collimation was either with the collimating jaws or the multileaf collimator (MLC) oriented either perpendicular or along the peripheral dose measurement plane. For the clinical tests, five patients with intracranial or base of skull lesions were chosen. IMRT and conventional three-dimensional (3D) plans for the same patient/target/dose (180 cGy), were optimized without limitation to the number of fields or wedge use. Six MV, 120-leaf MLC Varian axial beams were used. A phantom mimicking a 3-year-old was configured per Center for Disease Control data. Micro (0.125 cc) and cylindrical (0.6 cc) ionization chambers were appropriated for the thyroid, breast, ovaries, and testes. The PD was recorded by electrometers set to the 10 -10 scale. Each system set was uniquely calibrated. For the slab phantom studies, close peripheral points were found to have a higher dose for low energy and larger field size and when MLC was not deployed. For points more distant from the field edge, the PD was higher for high-energy beams. MLC orientation was found to be inconsequential for the small fields tested. The thyroid dose was lower for IMRT delivery than that predicted for conventional (ratio of IMRT/cnventional ranged from

  9. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost vs. conventional radiotherapy with sequential boost for breast cancer - A preliminary result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Hua; Hou, Ming-Feng; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Huang, Ming-Yii; Tsuei, Le-Ping; Chen, Fang-Ming; Ou-Yang, Fu; Huang, Chih-Jen

    2015-10-01

    This study was aimed to assess the acute dermatological adverse effect from two distinct RT techniques for breast cancer patients. We compared intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB) and conventional radiotherapy followed by sequential boost (CRT-SB). The study population was composed of 126 consecutive female breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery. Sixty-six patients received IMRT-SIB to 2 dose levels simultaneously. They received 50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction to the whole breast and 60.2 Gy at 2.15 Gy per fraction to the tumor bed by integral boost. Sixty patients in the CRT-SB group received 50 Gy in 25 fractions to the whole breast followed by a boost irradiation to tumor bed in 5-7 fractions to a total dose of 60-64 Gy. Acute skin toxicities were documented in agreement with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3 (CTCAE v.3.0). Ninety-eight patients had grade 1 radiation dermatitis while 14 patients had grade 2. Among those with grade 2, there were 3 patients in IMRT-SIB group (4.5%) while 11 in CRT-SB group (18.3%). (P = 0.048) There was no patient with higher than grade 2 toxicity. Three year local control was 99.2%, 3-year disease free survival was 97.5% and 3-year overall survival was 99.2%. A significant reduction in the severity of acute radiation dermatitis from IMRT-SIB comparing with CRT-SB is demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of intrafraction patient movement for CNS and head and neck IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Siyong; Akpati, Hilary C.; Kielbasa, Jerrold E.; Li, Jonathan G.; Liu, Chihray; Amdur, Robert J.; Palta, Jatinder R.

    2004-01-01

    Intrafraction patient motion is much more likely in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) than in conventional radiotherapy primarily due to longer beam delivery times in IMRT treatment. In this study, we evaluated the uncertainty of intrafraction patient displacement in CNS and head and neck IMRT patients. Immobilization is performed in three steps: (1) the patient is immobilized with thermoplastic facemask, (2) the patient displacement is monitored using a commercial stereotactic infrared IR camera (ExacTrac, BrainLab) during treatment, and (3) repositioning is carried out as needed. The displacement data were recorded during beam-on time for the entire treatment duration for 5 patients using the camera system. We used the concept of cumulative time versus patient position uncertainty, referred to as an uncertainty time histogram (UTH), to analyze the data. UTH is a plot of the accumulated time during which a patient stays within the corresponding movement uncertainty. The University of Florida immobilization procedure showed an effective immobilization capability for CNS and head and neck IMRT patients by keeping the patient displacement less than 1.5 mm for 95% of treatment time (1.43 mm for 1, and 1.02 mm for 1, and less than 1.0 mm for 3 patients). The maximum displacement was 2.0 mm

  11. IMRT dose fractionation for head and neck cancer: Variation in current approaches will make standardisation difficult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Kean F. (Academic Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)); Fowler, Jack F. (Dept. of Human Oncology and Medical Physics, Univ. of Wisconsin, Wisconsin (United States)); Sykes, Andrew J.; Yap, Beng K.; Lee, Lip W.; Slevin, Nick J. (Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom))

    2009-04-15

    Introduction. Altered fractionation has demonstrated clinical benefits compared to the conventional 2 Gy/day standard of 70 Gy. When using synchronous chemotherapy, there is uncertainty about optimum fractionation. IMRT with its potential for Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) adds further to this uncertainty. This survey will examine international practice of IMRT fractionation and suggest possible reasons for diversity in approach. Material and methods. Fourteen international cancer centres were surveyed for IMRT dose/fractionation practised in each centre. Results. Twelve different types of dose fractionation were reported. Conventional 70-72 Gy (daily 2 Gy/fraction) was used in 3/14 centres with concurrent chemotherapy while 11/14 centres used altered fractionation. Two centres used >1 schedule. Reported schedules and number of centres included 6 fractions/week DAHANCA regime (3), modest hypofractionation (=2.2 Gy/fraction) (3), dose-escalated hypofractionation (=2.3 Gy/fraction) (4), hyperfractionation (1), continuous acceleration (1) and concomitant boost (1). Reasons for dose fractionation variability include (i) dose escalation; (ii) total irradiated volume; (iii) number of target volumes; (iv) synchronous systemic treatment; (v) shorter overall treatment time; (vi) resources availability; (vii) longer time on treatment couch; (viii) variable GTV margins; (ix) confidence in treatment setup; (x) late tissue toxicity and (xi) use of lower neck anterior fields. Conclusions. This variability in IMRT fractionation makes any meaningful comparison of treatment results difficult. Some standardization is needed particularly for design of multi-centre randomized clinical trials.

  12. SU-G-TeP4-02: A Method for Evaluating the Direct Impact of Failed IMRT QAs On Patient Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geneser, S; Butkus, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We developed a method to calculate patient doses corresponding to IMRT QA measurements in order to determine and assess the actual dose delivered for plans with failed (or borderline) IMRT QA. This work demonstrates the feasibility of automatically computing delivered patient dose from portal dosimetry measurements in the Varian TPS system, which would provide a valuable and clinically viable IMRT QA tool for physicists and physicians. Methods: IMRT QA fluences were measured using portal dosimetry, processed using in-house matlab software, and imported back into Eclipse to calculate dose on the planning CT. To validate the proposed workflow, the Eclipse calculated portal dose for a 5-field sliding window prostate boost plan was processed as described above. The resulting dose was compared to the planned dose and found to be within 0.5 Gy. Two IMRT QA results for the prostate boost plan (one that failed and one that passed) were processed and the resulting patient doses were evaluated. Results: The max dose difference between IMRT QA #1 and the original planned and approved dose is 4.5 Gy, while the difference between the planned and IMRT QA #2 dose is 4.0 Gy. The inferior portion of the PTV is slightly underdosed in both plans, and the superior portion is slightly overdosed. The patient dose resulting from IMRT QA #1 and #2 differs by only 0.5 Gy. With this new information, it may be argued that the evaluated plan alteration to obtain passing gamma analysis produced clinically irrelevant differences. Conclusion: Evaluation of the delivered QA dose on the planning CT provides valuable information about the clinical relevance of failed or borderline IMRT QAs. This particular workflow demonstrates the feasibility of pushing the measured IMRT QA portal dosimetry results directly back onto the patient planning CT within the Varian system.

  13. SU-G-TeP4-02: A Method for Evaluating the Direct Impact of Failed IMRT QAs On Patient Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geneser, S; Butkus, M [Yale University School of Medicine/YNHH Radiology, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We developed a method to calculate patient doses corresponding to IMRT QA measurements in order to determine and assess the actual dose delivered for plans with failed (or borderline) IMRT QA. This work demonstrates the feasibility of automatically computing delivered patient dose from portal dosimetry measurements in the Varian TPS system, which would provide a valuable and clinically viable IMRT QA tool for physicists and physicians. Methods: IMRT QA fluences were measured using portal dosimetry, processed using in-house matlab software, and imported back into Eclipse to calculate dose on the planning CT. To validate the proposed workflow, the Eclipse calculated portal dose for a 5-field sliding window prostate boost plan was processed as described above. The resulting dose was compared to the planned dose and found to be within 0.5 Gy. Two IMRT QA results for the prostate boost plan (one that failed and one that passed) were processed and the resulting patient doses were evaluated. Results: The max dose difference between IMRT QA #1 and the original planned and approved dose is 4.5 Gy, while the difference between the planned and IMRT QA #2 dose is 4.0 Gy. The inferior portion of the PTV is slightly underdosed in both plans, and the superior portion is slightly overdosed. The patient dose resulting from IMRT QA #1 and #2 differs by only 0.5 Gy. With this new information, it may be argued that the evaluated plan alteration to obtain passing gamma analysis produced clinically irrelevant differences. Conclusion: Evaluation of the delivered QA dose on the planning CT provides valuable information about the clinical relevance of failed or borderline IMRT QAs. This particular workflow demonstrates the feasibility of pushing the measured IMRT QA portal dosimetry results directly back onto the patient planning CT within the Varian system.

  14. Diet-boosting foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity - diet-boosting foods; Overweight - diet-boosting foods ... Low-fat and nonfat milk, yogurt, and cottage cheese are healthy sources of calcium, vitamin D , and potassium. Unlike sweetened drinks with extra calories, milk ...

  15. Stereotactic neurosurgery for tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, Johannes D.; Schuurman, Richard; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Esselink, Rianne A. J.; Bosch, D. Andries

    2002-01-01

    The role of the motor thalamus as surgical target in stereotactic neurosurgery for different kinds of tremor is discussed. For tremor in Parkinson's disease. the subthalamic nucleus becomes more and more often the surgical target, because this target also gives relief of other and more

  16. Hypofractionated image guided radiation therapy followed by prostate seed implant boost for men with newly diagnosed intermediate and high risk adenocarcinoma of the prostate: Preliminary results of a phase 2 prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Gresswell, MD

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Early results on the toxicity and efficacy of the combination of hypofractionated IG-IMRT and low-dose-rate brachytherapy boost are favorable. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm safety and effectiveness.

  17. Multiple brain metastases irradiation with Eleka Axesse stereotactic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, P. V.; Polovnikov, E. S.; Orlov, K. Yu.; Krutko, A. V.; Kirilova, I. A.; Moskalev, A. V.; Filatova, E. V.; Zheravin, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Brain metastases are one of the factors complicating the treatment of a malignant tumor. Radiation therapy, especially radiosurgery, plays an important role in the modern treatment practice. During 2011-2016, 32 patients (from 29 to 67 years old) with multiple brain metastases underwent the treatment with SRS or SRT in our center. The number of secondary lesions varied from 2 to 11. Eight patients underwent microsurgery resection. Seven patients had recurrence after whole brain radiotherapy. Thirty patient underwent single fraction SRS and two patients with large metastases (bigger than 3 cm) underwent fractionated SRT. The treatment was done with dedicated linear accelerator stereotactic system Elekta Axesse (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). Different stereotactic fixation devices were used, namely, Leksell G frame, non-invasive HeadFIX frame, and reinforced thermoplastic mask (IMRT perforation). All treatments included a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique and of Inage Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) technique. All lesions were treated from a single isocenter, which allowed reducing the treatment time and overall dose to the patient's body. All patients suffered the treatment satisfactorily. No adverse reactions or complications were met in any case during or right after the treatment. Different stereotactic fixation devices and modern treatment techniques allowed creating an optimal, safe and comfortable way for patient treatment. The treatment time was from 15 to 50 minutes. Patient position verification after or during the treatment demonstrated good accuracy for all fixation types and low level of intrafraction motion.

  18. Boosting foundations and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Schapire, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Boosting is an approach to machine learning based on the idea of creating a highly accurate predictor by combining many weak and inaccurate "rules of thumb." A remarkably rich theory has evolved around boosting, with connections to a range of topics, including statistics, game theory, convex optimization, and information geometry. Boosting algorithms have also enjoyed practical success in such fields as biology, vision, and speech processing. At various times in its history, boosting has been perceived as mysterious, controversial, even paradoxical.

  19. Restricted Field IMRT Dramatically Enhances IMRT Planning for Mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Aaron M.; Schofield, Deborah; Hacker, Fred; Court, Laurence E.; Czerminska, Maria M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the target coverage and normal tissue sparing of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for mesothelioma after extrapleural pneumonectomy. Methods and Materials: Thirteen plans from patients previously treated with IMRT for mesothelioma were replanned using a restricted field technique. This technique was novel in two ways. It limited the entrance beams to 200 o around the target and three to four beams per case had their field apertures restricted down to the level of the heart or liver to further limit the contralateral lung dose. New constraints were added that included a mean lung dose of <9.5 Gy and volume receiving ≥5 Gy of <55%. Results: In all cases, the planning target volume coverage was excellent, with an average of 97% coverage of the planning target volume by the target dose. No change was seen in the target coverage with the new technique. The heart, kidneys, and esophagus were all kept under tolerance in all cases. The average mean lung dose, volume receiving ≥20 Gy, and volume receiving ≥5 Gy with the new technique was 6.6 Gy, 3.0%, and 50.8%, respectively, compared with 13.8 Gy, 15%, and 90% with the previous technique (p < 0.0001 for all three comparisons). The maximal value for any case in the cohort was 8.0 Gy, 7.3%, and 57.5% for the mean lung dose, volume receiving ≥20 Gy, and volume receiving ≥5 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: Restricted field IMRT provides an improved method to deliver IMRT to a complex target after extrapleural pneumonectomy. An upcoming Phase I trial will provide validation of these results

  20. CT-guided stereotactic neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Takaaki; Sato, Shoju; Matsumoto, Akira; Sano, Akira; Takahashi, Kazunori; Murakami, Yuji; Ohta, Kosuke

    1985-01-01

    Brown-Roberts-Wells stereotactic instruments were used for CT guided stereotactic surgery in 54 cases (65 operations). Stereotactic biopsy was done in 9 cases and successive regional chemotherapy was done in 3 cases. Stereotactic drainage was done in 2 cases of bacterial abcess, 3 cases of cystic neoplasm and 33 cases (43 operations) of intracerebral hematoma. CT guided stereotactic procedure was valuable for the correct cannulation to the center of the cavity. We tried to utilize CT image for the selection of targets for stereotactic functional neurosurgical procedures in 6 cases. In the cases of thalamotomy, the information derived from CT made the operation safer than that by contrast ventriculography alone. In all cases of electrode implantation for deep brain stimulation, accurate and precise electrode placement was achieved from CT images alone. This rapid and easy surgical technique was useful also for poor risk patients. (author)

  1. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost of 70-75 Gy in 5 weeks for advanced head and neck cancer. A phase I dose escalation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvek, J.; Skacelikova, E.; Otahal, B.; Halamka, M.; Feltl, D. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Oncology; Kubes, J. [University Hospital Bulovka, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kominek, P. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2012-08-15

    Background and purpose: The present study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of a new, 5-week regimen of 70-75 Gy hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost (HARTCIB) for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. Methods and materials: A total of 39 patients with very advanced, stage IV nonmetastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (median gross tumor volume 72 ml) were included in this phase I dose escalation study. A total of 50 fractions intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were administered twice daily over 5 weeks. Prescribed total dose/dose per fraction for planning target volume (PTV{sub tumor}) were 70 Gy in 1.4 Gy fractions, 72.5 Gy in 1.45 Gy fractions, and 75 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions for 10, 13, and 16 patients, respectively. Uninvolved lymphatic nodes (PTV{sub uninvolved}) were irradiated with 55 Gy in 1.1 Gy fractions using the concomitant integrated boost. Results: Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale; the incidence of grade 3 mucositis was 51% in the oral cavity/pharynx and 0% in skin and the recovery time was {<=} 9 weeks for all patients. Late toxicity was evaluated in patients in complete remission according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. No grade 3/4 late toxicity was observed. The 1-year locoregional progression-free survival was 50% and overall survival was 55%. Conclusion: HARTCIB (75 Gy in 5 weeks) is feasible for patients deemed unsuitable for chemoradiation. Acute toxicity was lower than predicted from radiobiological models; duration of dysphagia and confluent mucositis were particularly short. Better conformity of radiotherapy allows the use of more intensive altered fractionation schedules compared with older studies. These results suggest that further dose escalation might be possible when highly conformal techniques (e.g., stereotactic radiotherapy) are used.

  2. A review of stereotactic body radiotherapy – is volumetric modulated arc therapy the answer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapkaroski, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.sapkaroski@gmail.com; Osborne, Catherine; Knight, Kellie A [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Vic. (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a high precision radiotherapy technique used for the treatment of small to moderate extra-cranial tumours. Early studies utilising SBRT have shown favourable outcomes. However, major disadvantages of static field SBRT include long treatment times and toxicity complications. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may potentially mitigate these disadvantages. This review aims to assess the feasibility of emerging VMAT and IMRT-based SBRT treatment techniques and qualify which offers the best outcome for patients, whilst identifying any emerging and advantageous SBRT planning trends. A review and synthesis of data from current literature up to September 2013 was conducted on EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, Science Direct, Proquest central, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews. Only full text papers comparing VMAT and or IMRT and or Static SBRT were included. Ten papers were identified that evaluated the results of VMAT/IMRT SBRT. Five related to medically inoperable stage 1 and 2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three to spinal metastasis, one related to abdominal lymph node malignancies, with the final one looking at pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall treatment times with VMAT were reduced by 66–70% for lung, 46–58% for spine, 42% and 21% for lymph node and pancreatic metastasis respectively, planning constraints were met with several studies showing improved organs at risk sparing with IMRT/VMAT to static SBRT. Both IMRT and VMAT were able to meet all planning constraints in the studies reviewed, with VMAT offering the greatest treatment efficiency. Early clinical outcomes with VMAT and IMRT SBRT have demonstrated excellent local control and favourable survival outcomes.

  3. A review of stereotactic body radiotherapy – is volumetric modulated arc therapy the answer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapkaroski, Daniel; Osborne, Catherine; Knight, Kellie A

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a high precision radiotherapy technique used for the treatment of small to moderate extra-cranial tumours. Early studies utilising SBRT have shown favourable outcomes. However, major disadvantages of static field SBRT include long treatment times and toxicity complications. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may potentially mitigate these disadvantages. This review aims to assess the feasibility of emerging VMAT and IMRT-based SBRT treatment techniques and qualify which offers the best outcome for patients, whilst identifying any emerging and advantageous SBRT planning trends. A review and synthesis of data from current literature up to September 2013 was conducted on EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, Science Direct, Proquest central, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews. Only full text papers comparing VMAT and or IMRT and or Static SBRT were included. Ten papers were identified that evaluated the results of VMAT/IMRT SBRT. Five related to medically inoperable stage 1 and 2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three to spinal metastasis, one related to abdominal lymph node malignancies, with the final one looking at pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall treatment times with VMAT were reduced by 66–70% for lung, 46–58% for spine, 42% and 21% for lymph node and pancreatic metastasis respectively, planning constraints were met with several studies showing improved organs at risk sparing with IMRT/VMAT to static SBRT. Both IMRT and VMAT were able to meet all planning constraints in the studies reviewed, with VMAT offering the greatest treatment efficiency. Early clinical outcomes with VMAT and IMRT SBRT have demonstrated excellent local control and favourable survival outcomes

  4. Sequentially delivered boost plans are superior to simultaneously delivered plans in head and neck cancer when the boost volume is located further away from the parotid glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamers-Kuijper, Emmy; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Mourik, Anke van; Rasch, Coen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To find parameters that predict which head and neck patients benefit from a sequentially delivered boost treatment plan compared to a simultaneously delivered plan, with the aim to spare the salivary glands. Methods and materials: We evaluated 50 recently treated head and neck cancer patients. Apart from the clinical plan with a sequentially (SEQ) given boost using an Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Technique (IMRT), a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique plan was constructed with the same beam set-up. The mean dose to the parotid glands was calculated and compared. The elective nodal areas were bilateral in all cases, with a boost on either one side or both sides of the neck. Results: When the parotid gland volume and the Planning Target Volume (PTV) for the boost overlap there is on average a lower dose to the parotid gland with a SIB technique (-1.2 Gy), which is, however, not significant (p = 0.08). For all parotid glands with no boost PTV overlap, there is a benefit from a SEQ technique compared to a SIB technique for the gland evaluated (on average a 2.5 Gy lower dose to the parotid gland, p < 0.001). When the distance between gland and PTV is 0-1 cm, this difference is on average 0.8 Gy, for 1-2 cm distance 2.9 Gy and for glands with a distance greater than 2 cm, 3.3 Gy. When the lymph nodes on the evaluated side are also included in the boost PTV, however, this relationship between the distance and the gain of a SEQ seems less clear. Conclusions: A sequentially delivered boost technique results in a better treatment plan for most cases, compared to a simultaneous integrated boost IMRT technique, if the boost PTV is more than 1 cm away from at least one parotid gland.

  5. Multifractionated image-guided and stereotactic intensity-modulated radiotherapy of paraspinal tumors: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yoshiya; Lovelock, D. Michael; Yenice, Kamil M.; Bilsky, Mark H.; Hunt, Margaret A.; Zatcky, Joan; Leibel, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The use of image-guided and stereotactic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques have made the delivery of high-dose radiation to lesions within close proximity to the spinal cord feasible. This report presents clinical and physical data regarding the use of IMRT coupled with noninvasive body frames (stereotactic and image-guided) for multifractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (Memorial) stereotactic body frame (MSBF) and Memorial body cradle (MBC) have been developed as noninvasive immobilizing devices for paraspinal IMRT using stereotactic (MSBF) and image-guided (MBC) techniques. Patients were either previously irradiated or prescribed doses beyond spinal cord tolerance (54 Gy in standard fractionation) and had unresectable gross disease involving the spinal canal. The planning target volume (PTV) was the gross tumor volume with a 1 cm margin. The PTV was not allowed to include the spinal cord contour. All treatment planning was performed using software developed within the institution. Isocenter verification was performed with an in-room computed tomography scan (MSBF) or electronic portal imaging devices, or both. Patients were followed up with serial magnetic resonance imaging every 3-4 months, and no patients were lost to follow-up. Kaplan-Meier statistics were used for analysis of clinical data. Results: Both the MSBF and MBC were able to provide setup accuracy within 2 mm. With a median follow-up of 11 months, 35 patients (14 primary and 21 secondary malignancies) underwent treatment. The median dose previously received was 3000 cGy in 10 fractions. The median dose prescribed for these patients was 2000 cGy/5 fractions (2000-3000 cGy), which provided a median PTV V100 of 88%. In previously unirradiated patients, the median prescribed dose was 7000 cGy (5940-7000 cGy) with a median PTV V100 of 90%. The median Dmax to the cord was 34% and 68% for previously irradiated and never

  6. Chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of prostate cancer patients treated with IMRT and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartel, Carola; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Durante, Marco; Sommer, Sylwester; Nasonova, Elena; Fournier, Claudia; Lee, Ryonfa; Debus, Juergen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Ritter, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the cytogenetic damage in blood lymphocytes of patients treated for prostate cancer with different radiation qualities and target volumes. Materials and methods: Twenty patients receiving carbon-ion boost irradiation followed by IMRT or IMRT alone for the treatment of prostate cancer entered the study. Cytogenetic damage induced in peripheral blood lymphocytes of these patients was investigated at different times during the radiotherapy course using Giemsa staining and mFISH. A blood sample from each patient was taken before initiation of radiation therapy and irradiated in vitro to test for individual radiosensitivity. In addition, in vitro dose-effect curves for the induction of chromosomal exchanges by X-rays and carbon ions of different energies were measured. Results: The yield of chromosome aberrations increased during the therapy course, and the frequency was lower in patients irradiated with carbon ions as compared to patients treated with IMRT with similar target volumes. A higher frequency of aberrations was measured by increasing the target volume. In vitro, high-LET carbon ions were more effective than X-rays in inducing aberrations and yielded a higher fraction of complex exchanges. The yield of complex aberrations observed in vivo was very low. Conclusion: The investigation showed no higher aberration yield induced by treatment with a carbon-ion boost. In contrast, the reduced integral dose to the normal tissue is reflected in a lower chromosomal aberration yield when a carbon-ion boost is used instead of IMRT alone. No cytogenetic 'signature' of exposure to densely ionizing carbon ions could be detected in vivo.

  7. A new plan quality index for nasopharyngeal cancer SIB IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X; Yi, J; Zhou, Y; Yan, H; Han, C; Xie, C

    2014-02-01

    A new plan quality index integrating dosimetric and radiobiological indices was proposed to facilitate the evaluation and comparison of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients. Ten NPC patients treated by SIB-IMRT were enrolled in the study. Custom software was developed to read dose-volume histogram (DVH) curves from the treatment planning system (TPS). A plan filtering matrix was introduced to filter plans that fail to satisfy treatment protocol. Target plan quality indices and organ at risk (OAR) plan quality indices were calculated for qualified plans. A unique composite plan quality index (CPQI) was proposed based on the relative weight of these indices to evaluate and compare competing plans. Plan ranking results were compared with detailed statistical analysis, radiation oncology quality system (ROQS) scoring results and physician's evaluation results to verify the accuracy of this new plan quality index. The average CPQI values for plans with OAR priority of low, normal, high, and PTV only were 0.22 ± 0.08, 0.49 ± 0.077, 0.71 ± 0.062, and -0.21 ± 0.16, respectively. There were significant differences among these plan quality indices (One-way ANOVA test, p plans were selected. Plan filtering matrix was able to speed up the plan evaluation process. The new matrix plan quality index CPQI showed good consistence with physician ranking results. It is a promising index for NPC SIB-IMRT plan evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. TH-EF-204-04: Experience of IMRT and Other Conformal Techniques in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krylova, T.

    2016-01-01

    Joanna E. Cygler, Jan Seuntjens, J. Daniel Bourland, M. Saiful Huq, Josep Puxeu Vaque, Daniel Zucca Aparicio, Tatiana Krylova, Yuri Kirpichev, Eric Ford, Caridad Borras Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SRT) utilizes small static and dynamic (IMRT) fields, to successfully treat malignant and benign diseases using techniques such as Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). SRT is characterized by sharp dose gradients for individual fields and their resultant dose distributions. For appropriate targets, small field radiotherapy offers improved treatment quality by allowing better sparing of organs at risk while delivering the prescribed target dose. Specialized small field treatment delivery systems, such as robotic-controlled linear accelerators, gamma radiosurgery units, and dynamic arc linear accelerators may utilize rigid fixation, image guidance, and tumor tracking, to insure precise dose delivery to static or moving targets. However, in addition to great advantages, small field delivery techniques present special technical challenges for dose calibration due to unique geometries and small field sizes not covered by existing reference dosimetry protocols such as AAPM TG-51 or IAEA TRS 398. In recent years extensive research has been performed to understand small field dosimetry and measurement instrumentation. AAPM, IAEA and ICRU task groups are expected to provide soon recommendations on the dosimetry of small radiation fields. In this symposium we will: 1] discuss the physics, instrumentation, methodologies and challenges for small field radiation dose measurements; 2] review IAEA and ICRU recommendations on prescribing, recording and reporting of small field radiation therapy; 3] discuss selected clinical applications and technical aspects for specialized image-guided, small field, linear accelerator based treatment techniques such as IMRT and SBRT. Learning Objectives: To learn the physics of small fields in contrast to

  9. TH-EF-204-04: Experience of IMRT and Other Conformal Techniques in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krylova, T. [Russian Research Cancer Center (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    Joanna E. Cygler, Jan Seuntjens, J. Daniel Bourland, M. Saiful Huq, Josep Puxeu Vaque, Daniel Zucca Aparicio, Tatiana Krylova, Yuri Kirpichev, Eric Ford, Caridad Borras Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SRT) utilizes small static and dynamic (IMRT) fields, to successfully treat malignant and benign diseases using techniques such as Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). SRT is characterized by sharp dose gradients for individual fields and their resultant dose distributions. For appropriate targets, small field radiotherapy offers improved treatment quality by allowing better sparing of organs at risk while delivering the prescribed target dose. Specialized small field treatment delivery systems, such as robotic-controlled linear accelerators, gamma radiosurgery units, and dynamic arc linear accelerators may utilize rigid fixation, image guidance, and tumor tracking, to insure precise dose delivery to static or moving targets. However, in addition to great advantages, small field delivery techniques present special technical challenges for dose calibration due to unique geometries and small field sizes not covered by existing reference dosimetry protocols such as AAPM TG-51 or IAEA TRS 398. In recent years extensive research has been performed to understand small field dosimetry and measurement instrumentation. AAPM, IAEA and ICRU task groups are expected to provide soon recommendations on the dosimetry of small radiation fields. In this symposium we will: 1] discuss the physics, instrumentation, methodologies and challenges for small field radiation dose measurements; 2] review IAEA and ICRU recommendations on prescribing, recording and reporting of small field radiation therapy; 3] discuss selected clinical applications and technical aspects for specialized image-guided, small field, linear accelerator based treatment techniques such as IMRT and SBRT. Learning Objectives: To learn the physics of small fields in contrast to

  10. Tomotherapy: IMRT and tomographic verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: External beam radiation therapy delivery began around the turn of the century with the use of one or a few kilovoltage beams directed to the presumed site of the tumor. Often the treatment lasted until erythema dose was reached. Delivering the beams rotationally allowed the dose to be focused on the tumor and the skin to be spared. With the advent of megavoltage radiation therapy in the 1950's, using Co-60 teletherapy and betatrons, the treatment could once again be delivered from only a few beam directions and the dose to the skin would be kept below tolerance. Fields were shaped by lead blocks and later by custom-made blocks fabricated from low-melting temperature heavy metal. Linear accelerators did not fundamentally change the way in which radiation was delivered. It is likely that this delivery paradigm would not have changed had it not been for the advent of computers. Brahme and Cormack showed in the late 1980's that highly conformal treatments could be delivered with non-uniform intensity beams. At that time the only way in which the intensity modulated beams could be delivered was using custom-milled compensators. Fabricating and using compensators for multiple fields is time-consuming and labor-intensive. Serial tomotherapy was the first successful delivery method for IMRT and went back to the earlier practice of rotation therapy. The NOMOS Peacock system uses a binary (on-off) multileaf collimator (MLC) system to modulate a fan beam of radiation. It uses an optimization system to determine when leaves should be opened and closed. The system delivers two beam slices at once and the couch is indexed to the next slices by precisely translating the couch. This approach was first used in 1994 and to-date has treated several thousand patients. Prior to the advent of IMRT, accelerator vendors introduced the multileaf collimator (MLC) to provide field shaping without the need to fabricate custom blocking. Most new linear accelerator purchases today

  11. The use of IMRT in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenzel, Thorsten; Kruell, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is frequently used, but there are no data about current frequency regarding specific tumor sites and equipment used for quality assurance (QA). An online survey about IMRT was executed from April to October 2014 by the collaborative IMRT working group (AK IMRT) of the German Association of Medical Physicists (DGMP). A total of 23 German institutions took part in the survey. Most reports came from users working with Elekta, Varian, and Siemens treatment machines, but also from TomoTherapy and BrainLab. Most frequent IMRT technology was volumetric modulated arc therapy (58.37 %: VMAT/''rapid arc''), followed by step-and-shoot IMRT (14.66 %), dynamic MLC (dMLC: 14.53 %), TomoTherapy (9.25 %), and 3.2 % other techniques. Different commercial hard- and software solutions are available for QA, whereas many institutes still develop their own phantoms. Data of 26,779 patients were included in the survey; 44 % were treated using IMRT techniques. IMRT was most frequently used for anal cancer, (whole) craniospinal irradiation, head and neck cancer, prostate cancer, other tumors in the pelvic region, gynecological tumors (except for breast cancer), and brain tumors. An estimated 10 % of all patients treated in 2014 with radiation in Germany were included in the survey. It is representative for the members of the AK IMRT. IMRT may be on the way to replace other treatment techniques. However, many scientific questions are still open. In particular, it is unclear when the IMRT technique should not be used. (orig.) [de

  12. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in brain tumors and cervical region. Experience of the Dean Funes Medical Center, first experience in stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery inside the country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Vita, H.; Brunetto, M.; Derechinsky, V; Derechinsky, G.; Derechinsky, M.; Gonzalez, S.; Marinello, A.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study to analyze the results of 53 patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy in 'Centro Medico Dean Funes' was performed. The patients had brain and head and neck tumors. Patients and methods: From November 1997 to March 2003, 53 patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy in 'Centro Medico Dean Funes'. The daily dose administered varied from 1.8 to 2 Gy and the total dose from 30 to 70 Gy. The minimal follow up was 2 months, and the medium follow up 32 months. Local control and survival were analyzed in all patients, as well as tolerance and the complications of the treatment. Results: Since these series represented a very heterogeneous group of patients, the final results were very difficult to compare with other alternative treatments. However, an excellent tolerance to therapy was observed. Some subsets of patients had good results to treatment: patients with metastasis to the orbit, patients with lesions to the sellar and parasellar regions and some who relapsed following conventional radiotherapy, mainly lymphomas. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiotherapy is a valid therapeutic method to treat tumors of the brain and head and neck, as long as the tumor has a moderate size (6 cm. or less) and the shape is cylindrical or ellipsoid. Stereotactic radiation improves the therapeutic ratio as compared with the conventional radiotherapy. It has advantages over the 3D technique, and could compete with IMRT (Intensity modulated radiation therapy). (author) [es

  13. Fluence complexity for IMRT field and simplification of IMRT verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanushova, Tereza; Vondarchek, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) requires dosimetric verification of each patient’s plan, which is time consuming. This work deals with the idea of minimizing the number of fields for control, or even replacing plan verification by machine quality assurance (QA). We propose methods for estimation of fluence complexity in an IMRT field based on dose gradients and investigate the relation between results of gamma analysis and this quantity. If there is a relation, it might be possible to only verify the most complex field of a plan. We determine the average fluence complexity in clinical fields and design a test fluence corresponding to this amount of complexity which might be used in daily QA and potentially replace patient-related verification. Its applicability is assessed in clinical practice. The relation between fluence complexity and results of gamma analysis has been confirmed for plans but not for single fields. There is an agreement between the suggested test fluence and clinical fields in the average gamma parameter. A critical value of average gamma has been specified for the test fluence as a criterion for distinguishing between poorly and well deliverable plans. It will not be possible to only verify the most complex field of a plan but verification of individual plans could be replaced by a morning check of the suggested test fluence, together with a well-established set of QA tests. (Author)

  14. Learning Boost C++ libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Arindam

    2015-01-01

    If you are a C++ programmer who has never used Boost libraries before, this book will get you up-to-speed with using them. Whether you are developing new C++ software or maintaining existing code written using Boost libraries, this hands-on introduction will help you decide on the right library and techniques to solve your practical programming problems.

  15. Boost.Unicode

    OpenAIRE

    Wien, Erik; Gigstad, Lars Erik

    2005-01-01

    The project has resulted in a Unicode string library for C++ that abstracts away the complexity of working with Unicode text. The idea behind the project originated from the Boost community's developer mailings lists, and is developed with inclusion into the Boost library collection in mind.

  16. The simultaneous boost technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebesque, J.V.; Keus, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    Simultaneous boost technique in radiotherapy consists of delivering the boost treatment (additional doses to reduced volumes) simultaneously with the basic (large-field) treatment for all treatment sessions. Both the dose per fraction delivered by basic-treatment fields and by boost-treatment fields have to be reduced to end up with the same total dose in boost volume as in the original schedule, where basic treatment preceded boost treatment. These dose reductions and corresponding weighting factors have been calculated using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model and the concept of Normalized Total Dose (NTD). Relative NTD distributions were computed to evaluate the dose distributions resulting for the simultaneous boost technique with respect to acute and late normal tissue damage and tumor control. For the example of treatment of prostate cancer the weighting factors were calculated on basis of NTD for late normal tissue damage. For treatment of oropharyngeal cancer NTD for acute and normal tissue damage was used to determine the weighting factors. In this last example a theoretical sparing of late normal tissue damage can be demonstrated. Another advantage of simultaneous boost technique is that megavoltage images of the large basic-treatment fields facilitates the determination of the position of the patient with respect to the small boost-treatment fields. (author). 42 refs., 8 figs

  17. Toxicity and outcome of pelvic IMRT for node-positive prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.C.; Luetjens, J.; Eckert, F.; Bamberg, M.; Alber, M.; Schilling, D.; Belka, C.; Gaswindt, U.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study reports on the treatment techniques, toxicity, and outcome of pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lymph node-positive prostate cancer (LNPPC, T1-4, c/pN1 cM0). Patients and methods: Pelvic IMRT to 45-50.4 Gy was applied in 39 cases either after previous surgery of involved lymph nodes (n = 18) or with a radiation boost to suspicious nodes (n = 21) with doses of 60-70 Gy, usually combined with androgen deprivation (n = 37). The prostate and seminal vesicles received 70-74 Gy. In cases of previous prostatectomy, prostatic fossa and remnants of seminal vesicles were given 66-70 Gy. Treatment-related acute and late toxicity was graded according to the RTOG criteria. Results: Acute radiation-related toxicity higher than grade 2 occurred in 2 patients (with the need for urinary catheter/subileus related to adhesions after surgery). Late toxicity was mild (grade 1-2) after a median follow-up of 70 months. Over 50% of the patients reported no late morbidity (grade 0). PSA control and cancer-specific survival reached 67% and 97% at over 5 years. Conclusion: Pelvic IMRT after the removal of affected nodes or with a radiation boost to clinically positive nodes led to an acceptable late toxicity (no grade 3/4 events), thus justifying further evaluation of this approach in a larger cohort. (orig.)

  18. LDA boost classification: boosting by topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, La; Qiao, Guo; Qimin, Cao; Qitao, Li

    2012-12-01

    AdaBoost is an efficacious classification algorithm especially in text categorization (TC) tasks. The methodology of setting up a classifier committee and voting on the documents for classification can achieve high categorization precision. However, traditional Vector Space Model can easily lead to the curse of dimensionality and feature sparsity problems; so it affects classification performance seriously. This article proposed a novel classification algorithm called LDABoost based on boosting ideology which uses Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) to modeling the feature space. Instead of using words or phrase, LDABoost use latent topics as the features. In this way, the feature dimension is significantly reduced. Improved Naïve Bayes (NB) is designed as the weaker classifier which keeps the efficiency advantage of classic NB algorithm and has higher precision. Moreover, a two-stage iterative weighted method called Cute Integration in this article is proposed for improving the accuracy by integrating weak classifiers into strong classifier in a more rational way. Mutual Information is used as metrics of weights allocation. The voting information and the categorization decision made by basis classifiers are fully utilized for generating the strong classifier. Experimental results reveals LDABoost making categorization in a low-dimensional space, it has higher accuracy than traditional AdaBoost algorithms and many other classic classification algorithms. Moreover, its runtime consumption is lower than different versions of AdaBoost, TC algorithms based on support vector machine and Neural Networks.

  19. Dosimetric verification of IMRT plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulski, W.; Cheimicski, K.; Rostkowska, J.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a complex procedure requiring proper dosimetric verification. IMRT dose distributions are characterized by steep dose gradients which enable to spare organs at risk and allow for an escalation of the dose to the tumor. They require large number of radiation beams (sometimes over 10). The fluence measurements for individual beams are not sufficient for evaluation of the total dose distribution and to assure patient safety. The methods used at the Centre of Oncology in Warsaw are presented. In order to measure dose distributions in various cross-sections the film dosimeters were used (radiographic Kodak EDR2 films and radiochromic Gafchromic EBT films). The film characteristics were carefully examined. Several types of tissue equivalent phantoms were developed. A methodology of comparing measured dose distributions against the distributions calculated by treatment planning systems (TPS) was developed and tested. The tolerance level for this comparison was set at 3% difference in dose and 3 mm in distance to agreement. The so called gamma formalism was used. The results of these comparisons for a group of over 600 patients are presented. Agreement was found in 87 % of cases. This film dosimetry methodology was used as a benchmark to test and validate the performance of commercially available 2D and 3D matrices of detectors (ionization chambers or diodes). The results of these validations are also presented. (authors)

  20. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in the treatment of children and Adolescents - a single institution's experience and a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Peter

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While IMRT is widely used in treating complex oncological cases in adults, it is not commonly used in pediatric radiation oncology for a variety of reasons. This report evaluates our 9 year experience using stereotactic-guided, inverse planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in children and adolescents in the context of the current literature. Methods Between 1999 and 2008 thirty-one children and adolescents with a mean age of 14.2 years (1.5 - 20.5 were treated with IMRT in our department. This heterogeneous group of patients consisted of 20 different tumor entities, with Ewing's sarcoma being the largest (5 patients, followed by juvenile nasopharyngeal fibroma, esthesioneuroblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma (3 patients each. In addition a review of the available literature reporting on technology, quality, toxicity, outcome and concerns of IMRT was performed. Results With IMRT individualized dose distributions and excellent sparing of organs at risk were obtained in the most challenging cases. This was achieved at the cost of an increased volume of normal tissue receiving low radiation doses. Local control was achieved in 21 patients. 5 patients died due to progressive distant metastases. No severe acute or chronic toxicity was observed. Conclusion IMRT in the treatment of children and adolescents is feasible and was applied safely within the last 9 years at our institution. Several reports in literature show the excellent possibilities of IMRT in selective sparing of organs at risk and achieving local control. In selected cases the quality of IMRT plans increases the therapeutic ratio and outweighs the risk of potentially increased rates of secondary malignancies by the augmented low dose exposure.

  1. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC: A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Rübe, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels.

  2. Stereotactic radiotherapy in pediatric indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernier-Chastagner, V.; Supiot, S.; Carrie, C.; Helfre, S.

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a very high precision procedure, which has been limited to radiosurgery for a long time. Technological improvements allowed the development of radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions, leading to a lot of innovations. Previously indicated for cerebral pathologies, this procedure is now developed for extra-cerebral locations. In paediatrics, stereotactic radiotherapy is still limited, delivered precociously, due to the possibility of long-term late effects that needs to be addressed. This review reports the different useful conditions, technical evolutions, and the current validated paediatric indications, with differences from adults, and future directions. (authors)

  3. The role and strategy of IMRT in radiotherapy of pelvic tumors: Dose escalation and critical organ sparing in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.-M.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Lee, M.-L.; Huang, P.-I.; Hsieh, C.-M.; Chen, P.-H.; Lin, Y.-H.; Wang, L.-W.; Yen, S.-H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) strategy in dose escalation of prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Plan dosimetric data of 10 prostate cancer patients were compared with two-dimensional (2D) or IMRT techniques for pelvis (two-dimensional whole pelvic radiation therapy [2D-WPRT] or IM-WPRT) to receive 50 Gy or 54 Gy and additional prostate boost by three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or IMRT (3D-PBRT or IM-PBRT) techniques up to 72 Gy or 78 Gy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs), normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) of critical organ, and conformity of target volume in various combinations were calculated. Results: In DVH analysis, the plans with IM-WPRT (54 Gy) and additional boost up to 78 Gy had lower rectal and bladder volume percentage at 50 Gy and 60 Gy, compared with those with 2D-WPRT (50 Gy) and additional boost up to 72 Gy or 78 Gy. Those with IM-WPRT (54 Gy) also had better small bowel sparing at 30 Gy and 50 Gy, compared with those with 2D-WPRT (50 Gy). In NTCP, those with IM-WPRT and total dose of 78 Gy achieved lower complication rates in rectum and small bowel, compared with those of 2D-WPRT with total dose of 72 Gy. In conformity, those with IM-WPRT had better conformity compared with those with 2D-WPRT with significance (p < 0.005). No significant difference in DVHs, NTCP, or conformity was found between IM-PBRT and 3D-PBRT after IM-WPRT. Conclusions: Initial pelvic IMRT is the most important strategy in dose escalation and critical organ sparing. IM-WPRT is recommended for patients requiring WPRT. There is not much benefit for critical organ sparing by IMRT after 2D-WPRT

  4. BENEFITS OF INTENSITY-MODULATED RADIOTHERAPY (IMRT IN PATIENTS WITH HEAD AND NECK MALIGNANCIES- A SINGLE INSTITUTION EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry Seasor Abraham

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Radiotherapy and surgery are the principal curative modalities in treatment of head and neck cancer. Conventional twodimensional and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy result in significant side effects and altered quality of life. IntensityModulated Radiotherapy (IMRT can spare the normal tissues, while delivering a curative dose to the tumour-bearing tissues. This study reveals the role of IMRT in head and neck cancer in view of normal tissue sparing with good tumour control. MATERIALS AND METHODS Radical radiotherapy was given using linear accelerator up to a dose of 66 to 70 gray in 30 to 33 fractions (intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost over 6 to 7 weeks to 56 eligible patients. Concurrent cisplatin was given to patients with locally-advanced disease up to a dose of 40 mg/m2 weekly once along with radiation. The patients were monitored weekly once during the treatment for acute skin and mucosal toxicities using the RTOG scoring criteria. After the treatment, locoregional response was assessed and recorded at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months intervals. RESULTS Severe skin toxicity (grade III or more was seen in approximately 7% patients. Severe mucosal toxicity (grade III or more was seen in approximately 80% of patients. IMRT technique showed better skin sparing compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy. Severe mucosal toxicity was slightly higher in this study due to the simultaneous integrated boost technique used for dose intensification to the mucosa, which results in better primary tumour control. At the end of 6 months, 75% patients achieved locoregional control and residual/recurrent disease was seen in 25% of patients. IMRT offered good locoregional control with less skin toxicity and acceptable mucosal toxicity. The results were similar to the previous study reports using IMRT. CONCLUSION IMRT is a better treatment option in locally-advanced head and neck malignancies providing good

  5. Normal tissue complication probability: Does simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy score over other techniques in treatment of prostate adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jothy Basu K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The main objective of this study was to analyze the radiobiological effect of different treatment strategies on high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma. Materials and Methods: Ten cases of high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma were selected for this dosimetric study. Four different treatment strategies used for treating prostate cancer were compared. Conventional four-field box technique covering prostate and nodal volumes followed by three-field conformal boost (3D + 3DCRT, four-field box technique followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT boost (3D + IMRT, IMRT followed by IMRT boost (IMRT + IMRT, and simultaneous integrated boost IMRT (SIBIMRT were compared in terms of tumor control probability (TCP and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP. The dose prescription except for SIBIMRT was 45 Gy in 25 fractions for the prostate and nodal volumes in the initial phase and 27 Gy in 15 fractions for the prostate in the boost phase. For SIBIMRT, equivalent doses were calculated using biologically equivalent dose assuming the α/β ratio of 1.5 Gy with a dose prescription of 60.75 Gy for the gross tumor volume (GTV and 45 Gy for the clinical target volume in 25 fractions. IMRT plans were made with 15-MV equispaced seven coplanar fields. NTCP was calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB model. Results: An NTCP of 10.7 ± 0.99%, 8.36 ± 0.66%, 6.72 ± 0.85%, and 1.45 ± 0.11% for the bladder and 14.9 ± 0.99%, 14.04 ± 0.66%, 11.38 ± 0.85%, 5.12 ± 0.11% for the rectum was seen with 3D + 3DCRT, 3D + IMRT, IMRT + IMRT, and SIBIMRT respectively. Conclusions: SIBIMRT had the least NTCP over all other strategies with a reduced treatment time (3 weeks less. It should be the technique of choice for dose escalation in prostate carcinoma.

  6. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Intracranial Tumors : Early Experience with Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Chang Ok; Chung, Sang Sup; Chu, Sung Sil; Kim, Young Soo; Yoon, Do Heum; Kim, Sun Ho; Loh, John Juhn; Kim, Gwi Eon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-06-15

    Between August 1988 and December 1991, 24 patients with intracranial tumors were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery(RS) using a 10 MV linear accelerator at Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine. There were 5 meningiomas, 3 craniopharyngiomas, 9 glial tumors, 2 solitary metastases, 2 acoustic neurinomas, 2 pineal tumors, and 1 non-Hodgkin Iymphoma. Ten patients were treated as primary treatment after diagnosis with stereotactic biopsy or neuroimaging study. Nine patients underwent RS for post-op. residual tumors and three patients as a salvage treatment for recurrence after external irradiation. Two patients received RS as a boost followed by fractionated conventional radiotherapy. Among sixteen patients who were followed more than 6 months with neuroimage, seven patients (2 meningiomas, 4 benign glial tumors, one non-Hodgkin lymphoma) showed complete response on neuroimage after RS and nine patients showed decreased tumor size. There was no acute treatment related side reaction. Late complications include three patients with symptomatic peritumoral braid edema and one craniopharyngioma with optic chiasmal injury. Through this early experience, we conclude that stereotactically directed single high doses of irradiation to the small intracranial tumors is effective for tumor control. However, in order to define the role of radiosurgery in the management of intracranial tumors, we should get the long-term results available to demonstrate the benefits versus potential complications of this therapeutic modality.

  7. Beam position optimisation for IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, L.; Hoban, P.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The introduction of IMRT has not generally resulted in the use of optimised beam positions because to find the global solution of the problem a time consuming stochastic optimisation method must be used. Although a deterministic method may not achieve the global minimum it should achieve a superior dose distribution compared to no optimisation. This study aimed to develop and test such a method. The beam optimisation method developed relies on an iterative process to achieve the desired number of beams from a large initial number of beams. The number of beams is reduced in a 'weeding-out' process based on the total fluence which each beam delivers. The process is gradual, with only three beams removed each time (following a small number of iterations), ensuring that the reduction in beams does not dramatically affect the fluence maps of those remaining. A comparison was made between the dose distributions achieved when the beams positions were optimised in this fashion and when the beams positions were evenly distributed. The method has been shown to work quite effectively and efficiently. The Figure shows a comparison in dose distribution with optimised and non optimised beam positions for 5 beams. It can be clearly seen that there is an improvement in the dose distribution delivered to the tumour and a reduction in the dose to the critical structure with beam position optimisation. A method for beam position optimisation for use in IMRT optimisations has been developed. This method although not necessarily achieving the global minimum in beam position still achieves quite a dramatic improvement compared with no beam position optimisation and is very efficiently achieved. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  8. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC. A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Ruebe, Christian [Saarland University Medical School, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p < 0.001; IF: 74.3 vs. 70.1 Gy, p < 0.03). With IMRT-IF, a PD of at least 66 Gy was achieved for 95 % of all plans. For IF as compared with ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p < 0.00001; 3D-CRT: 20.2 vs. 9.9 %, p < 0.00001). The esophageal NTCP showed a particularly good sparing with IMRT vs. 3D-CRT (ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels. (orig.) [German] Das Potenzial der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (IMRT) soll im Rahmen der FDG-PET basierten Bestrahlungsplanung des lokal fortgeschrittenen nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinoms (LA-NSCLC) fuer 2 Zielvolumenansaetze (Involved-Field-Bestrahlung, IF) sowie elektive Nodalbestrahlung (ENI) geprueft und mit der 3-D-konformalen Strahlentherapie (3-D

  9. Urethrogram-directed Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer in Patients with Contraindications to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima ePaydar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-directed stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has been established as a safe and effective treatment for prostate cancer. For patients with contraindications to MRI, CT-urethrogram is an alternative imaging approach to identify the location of the prostatic apex to guide treatment. This study sought to evaluate the safety of urethrogram-directed SBRT for prostate cancer.Methods: Between February 2009 and January 2014, 31 men with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated definitively with urethrogram-directed SBRT with or without supplemental intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT at Georgetown University Hospital. SBRT was delivered either as a primary treatment of 35-36.25 Gray (Gy in 5 fractions or as a boost of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions followed by supplemental conventionally fractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (45-50.4 Gy. Toxicities were recorded and scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAE v.4.0.Results: The median patient age was 70 years with a median prostate volume of 38 cc. The median follow-up was 3.7 years. The patients were elderly (Median age = 70, and comorbidities were common (Carlson Comorbidity Index > 2 in 36%. 71% of patients utilized alpha agonists prior to treatment, and 9.7% had prior procedures for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. The 3-year actuarial incidence rates of > Grade 3 GU toxicity and > Grade 2 GI toxicity were 3.2% and 9.7%, respectively. There were no Grade 4 or 5 toxicities.Conclusions: MRI is the preferred imaging modality to guide prostate SBRT treatment. However, urethrogram-directed SBRT is a safe alternative for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer who are unable to undergo MRI.

  10. Boosted tops at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Villaplana, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    A sample of candidate events for highly boosted top quarks is selected following the standard ATLAS selection for semi-leptonic ttbar events plus a requirement that the invariant mass of the reconstructed ttbar pair is greater than 700 GeV. Event displays are presented for the most promising candidates, as well as quantitative results for observables designed to isolate a boosted top quark signal.

  11. Deep Incremental Boosting

    OpenAIRE

    Mosca, Alan; Magoulas, George D

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces Deep Incremental Boosting, a new technique derived from AdaBoost, specifically adapted to work with Deep Learning methods, that reduces the required training time and improves generalisation. We draw inspiration from Transfer of Learning approaches to reduce the start-up time to training each incremental Ensemble member. We show a set of experiments that outlines some preliminary results on some common Deep Learning datasets and discuss the potential improvements Deep In...

  12. Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) / Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT): Benefit to Irish patients and Irish Healthcare Economy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cagney, DN

    2017-01-01

    Cancer incidence across Europe is projected to rise rapidly over the next decade. This rising cancer incidence is mirrored by increasing use of and indications for stereotactic radiation. This paper seeks to summarize the exponential increase in indications for stereotactic radiotherapy as well as the evolving economic advantages of stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy

  13. Apparatus for stereotactic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koslow, M.A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for stereotactic surgery consisting of a probe and a computerized tomographic scanning system is described. The scanning system comprises a display and means for reconstructing cross-sectional images on the display using data from partial circumferential scans of source and detectors. It operates on the data with an algorithm that provides the difference between the local values of the linear attenuation coefficient and average of these values within a circle centered at each reconstruction point. The scanning system includes a means of maintaining the frames of reference of the probe and scanning system rigid with respect to one another. The position of the probe, which may be a cryogenic probe, with respect to the actual anatomical structure of the body, particularly a human head, may thus be viewed by the surgeon. (author)

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Use of Cone-Down Boost for Pediatric Head-and-Neck Rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Mark W.; Esiashvili, Natia; George, Bradley A.; Katzenstein, Howard M.; Olson, Thomas A.; Rapkin, Louis B.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To report our initial experience using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a cone-down boost for pediatric head-and-neck rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: A review of institutional treatment records identified children treated with IMRT for head-and-neck RMS between January 2000 and February 2007. All patients had undergone chemotherapy according to cooperative group RMS protocols. The initial planning target volume (PTV) covered the prechemotherapy tumor extent with variable margins, generally 1-2 cm. The boost PTV covered the postchemotherapy tumor volume, usually with a margin of 0.5-1 cm. Results: A total of 20 patients were treated with IMRT for head-and-neck RMS. Of these 20 patients, 4 had Group II, 15 Group III, and 1 Group IV disease. The site was parameningeal in 12, nonparameningeal in 6, and orbit primary in 2. Of the 20 patients, 14 were treated with a cone-down boost after a median dose of 36 Gy (range, 30-45.6). The mean initial PTV was 213.5 cm 3 , and the mean boost PTV was 76.9 cm 3 . Patients received a median total dose of 50.4 Gy. The median follow-up time was 29 months. The 3-year Kaplan-Meier local control rate was 100%, although 1 patient developed an in-field recurrence 50 months after IMRT. The 3-year event-free survival rate, overall survival rate, and risk of central nervous system failure was 74%, 76%, and 7%, respectively. Conclusions: Our preliminary follow-up of pediatric head-and-neck RMS patients treated with IMRT revealed excellent local control. The initial targeting of the prechemotherapy tumor volume with 1-2-cm margin to 30.6 or 36 Gy followed by a cone-down boost to the postchemotherapy tumor volume with a 0.5-1-cm margin allowed for significant sparing of normal tissues and provided good local control

  15. Individualized planning target volumes for intrafraction motion during hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Patrick; Sixel, Katharina; Morton, Gerard; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Tirona, Romeo; Pang, Geordi; Choo, Richard; Szumacher, Ewa; DeBoer, Gerrit; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to access toxicities of delivering a hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost with individualized intrafraction planning target volume (PTV) margins and daily online correction for prostate position. Methods and materials: Phase I involved delivering 42 Gy in 21 fractions using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, followed by a Phase II IMRT boost of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Digital fluoroscopy was used to measure respiratory-induced motion of implanted fiducial markers within the prostate. Electronic portal images were taken of fiducial marker positions before and after each fraction of radiotherapy during the first 9 days of treatment to calculate intrafraction motion. A uniform 10-mm PTV margin was used for the first phase of treatment. PTV margins for Phase II were patient-specific and were calculated from the respiratory and intrafraction motion data obtained from Phase I. The IMRT boost was delivered with daily online correction of fiducial marker position. Acute toxicity was measured using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0. Results: In 33 patients who had completed treatment, the average PTV margin used during the hypofractionated IMRT boost was 3 mm in the lateral direction, 3 mm in the superior-inferior direction, and 4 mm in the anteroposterior direction. No patients developed acute Grade 3 rectal toxicity. Three patients developed acute Grade 3 urinary frequency and urgency. Conclusions: PTV margins can be reduced significantly with daily online correction of prostate position. Delivering a hypofractionated boost with this high-precision IMRT technique resulted in acceptable acute toxicity

  16. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC. A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Ruebe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p < 0.001; IF: 74.3 vs. 70.1 Gy, p < 0.03). With IMRT-IF, a PD of at least 66 Gy was achieved for 95 % of all plans. For IF as compared with ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p < 0.00001; 3D-CRT: 20.2 vs. 9.9 %, p < 0.00001). The esophageal NTCP showed a particularly good sparing with IMRT vs. 3D-CRT (ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels. (orig.) [de

  17. Overview of IMRT - definitions and basic concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, T.R.

    2008-01-01

    A detailed advanced outline of the title topic is presented. Summary is formulated as follows: (i) Conventional MLC, developed for block replacement, require corrections and careful QA when when used for IMRT; (ii) There are both advantages and disadvantages of static or dynamic MLC delivery; (iii) Tomotherapy uses binary MLC systems specifically designed for IMRT; (iv) There are two types of optimization, grid of beamlets and direct aperture methods; (v) Optimization is controlled by objective functions. (P.A.)

  18. A national dosimetric audit of IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budgell, Geoff; Berresford, Joe; Trainer, Michael; Bradshaw, Ellie; Sharpe, Peter; Williams, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: A dosimetric audit of IMRT has been carried out within the UK between June 2009 and March 2010 in order to provide an independent check of safe implementation and to identify problems in the modelling and delivery of IMRT. Methods and materials: A mail based audit involving film and alanine dosimeters was utilized. Measurements were made for each individual field in an IMRT plan isocentrically in a flat water-equivalent phantom at a depth of 5 cm. The films and alanine dosimeters were processed and analysed centrally; additional ion chamber measurements were made by each participating centre. Results: 57 of 62 centres participated, with a total of 78 plans submitted. For the film measurements, all 176 fields from the less complex IMRT plans (including prostate and breast plans) achieved over 95% pixels passing a gamma criterion of 3%/3 mm within the 20% isodose. For the more complex IMRT plans (mainly head and neck) 8/245 fields (3.3%) achieved less than 95% pixels passing a 4%/4 mm gamma criterion. Of the alanine measurements, 4/78 (5.1%) of the measurements differed by >5% from the dose predicted by the treatment planning system. Three of these were large deviations of -77.1%, -29.1% and 14.1% respectively. Excluding the three measurements outside 10%, the mean difference was 0.05% with a standard deviation of 1.5%. The out of tolerance results have been subjected to further investigations. Conclusions: A dosimetric audit has been successfully carried out of IMRT implementation by over 90% of UK radiotherapy departments. The audit shows that modelling and delivery of IMRT is accurate, suggesting that the implementation of IMRT has been carried out safely.

  19. A dosimetric selectivity intercomparison of HDR brachytherapy, IMRT and helical tomotherapy in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermesse, Johanne; Biver, Sylvie; Jansen, Nicolas; Coucke, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Lenaerts, Eric [Dept. of Medical Physics, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); De Patoul, Nathalie; Vynckier, Stefaan [Dept. of Medical Physics, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Scalliet, Pierre [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Nickers, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille (France)

    2009-11-15

    Background and purpose: dose escalation in order to improve the biochemical control in prostate cancer requires the application of irradiation techniques with high conformality. The dosimetric selectivity of three radiation modalities is compared: high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT), intensity-modulated radiation radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT). Patients and methods: ten patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated by a 10-Gy HDR-BT boost after external-beam radiotherapy were investigated. For each patient, HDR-BT, IMRT and HT theoretical treatment plans were realized using common contour sets. A 10-Gy dose was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV). The PTVs and critical organs' dose-volume histograms obtained were compared using Student's t-test. Results: HDR-BT delivers spontaneously higher mean doses to the PTV with smaller cold spots compared to IMRT and HT. 33% of the rectal volume received a mean HDR-BT dose of 3.86 {+-} 0.3 Gy in comparison with a mean IMRT dose of 6.57 {+-} 0.68 Gy and a mean HT dose of 5.58 {+-} 0.71 Gy (p < 0.0001). HDR-BT also enables to better spare the bladder. The hot spots inside the urethra are greater with HDR-BT. The volume of healthy tissue receiving 10% of the prescribed dose is reduced at least by a factor of 8 with HDR-BT (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: HDR-BT offers better conformality in comparison with HT and IMRT and reduces the volume of healthy tissue receiving a low dose. (orig.)

  20. Optimization of dose distributions for adjuvant locoregional radiotherapy of gastric cancer by IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohr, F.; Dobler, B.; Mai, S.; Hermann, B.; Tiefenbacher, U.; Wieland, P.; Steil, V.; Wenz, F.

    2003-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Locoregional relapse is a problem frequently encountered with advanced gastric cancer. Data from the randomized Intergroup trial 116 suggest effectiveness of adjuvant radiochemotherapy, albeit with significant toxicity. The potential of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to reduce toxicity by significantly reducing maximum and median doses to organs at risk while still applying sufficient dose to the target volume in the upper abdomen was studied. Patient and Methods: For a typical configuration of target volumes and organs, a step-and-shoot IMRT plan (eight beam orientations), developed as a class solution for treatment of tumors in the upper abdomen (Figures 1 to 3), a conventional plan, a combination of the conventional plan with a kidney-sparing boost plan, and a conventional plan with noncoplanar ap and pa fields for improved kidney sparing were compared with respect to coverage of target volume and dose to organs at risk with a dose of 45 Gy delivered as the median dose to the target volume. Results: When using the conventional three-dimensionally planned box techniques, the right kidney could be kept below tolerance, but median dose to the left kidney amounted to between 14.8 and 26.9 Gy, depending on the plan. IMRT reduced the median dose to the left kidney to 10.5 Gy, while still keeping the dose to the right kidney 90% of prescription dose were delivered to > 90% of target volume with IMRT (Table 1). Conclusion: IMRT has the potential to deliver efficient doses to target volumes in the upper abdomen, while delivering dose to organs at risk in a more advantageous fashion than a conventional technique. For clinical implementation, the possibility of extensive organ motion in the upper abdomen has to be taken into account for treatment planning and patient positioning. The multitude of potential risks related to its application has to be the subject of thorough follow-up and further studies. (orig.)

  1. Study of the absorbed dose in small fields with absence of lateral electronic balance in stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy with modulated intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas V, M. X.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we develop and experimental and theoretical study, using semi analytical techniques of the physical dosimetry for small and nonstandard fields for stereotactic radiosurgery (Srs) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), with high energy photon beams from a BrainLAB system with cones at Instituto del Cancer SOLCA (Ecuador) and a Tomo Therapy Hi-Art system at Centro Oncologico de Chihuahua (Mexico). (Author)

  2. Stereotactic treatment. Definitions and literature overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontenla, D.P.

    2008-01-01

    The topics discussed include, among others, the following: Radiosurgery definitions; Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT); Available uncertainties in SRS; Gamma knife; Linac-based SRS; Components of a radiosurgery system; Stereotactic hardware (brain lab); m3 linac attachment; Radiosurgery - clinical procedure; Cancer management; Rationale for SRT; Role of radiosurgery in the management of intracranial tumors; Indications for stereotactic SRS/SRT; Physical components required for SRS/SRT; Stereotactic patient set-up; Stereotactic CT scan for SRS; Physical components required for SRT: Relocatable head frame (GTC); Patient immobilization; Treatment planning system; Basic requirements for SRS dosimetry (Linac based); Stereotactic set-up QA (Linac); Stereotactic frames and QA; Beam dose measurements; Dose evaluation tools; Phantoms. (P.A.)

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Kamran A. [Mayo Medical School, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Rose, Peter S. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Brinkmann, Debra H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Laack, Nadia N., E-mail: laack.nadia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J.; Rose, Peter S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Brown, Paul D.; Brinkmann, Debra H.; Laack, Nadia N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 ± 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10–40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1–5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18–30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1–5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  5. A national survey of the availability of intensity-modulated radiation therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlDuhaiby, Eman Z; Breen, Stephen; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Sharpe, Michael; Mayhew, Linda; Tyldesley, Scott; Wilke, Derek R; Hodgson, David C

    2012-01-01

    The timely and appropriate adoption of new radiation therapy (RT) technologies is a challenge both in terms of providing of optimal patient care and managing health care resources. Relatively little is known regarding the rate at which new RT technologies are adopted in different jurisdictions, and the barriers to implementation of these technologies. Surveys were sent to all radiation oncology department heads in Canada regarding the availability of RT equipment from 2006 to 2010. Data were collected concerning the availability and use of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and the obstacles to implementation of these technologies. IMRT was available in 37% of responding centers in 2006, increasing to 87% in 2010. In 2010, 72% of centers reported that IMRT was available for all patients who might benefit, and 37% indicated that they used IMRT for 'virtually all' head and neck patients. SRS availability increased from 26% in 2006 to 42.5% in 2010. Eighty-two percent of centers reported that patients had access to SRS either directly or by referral. The main barriers for IMRT implementation included the need to train or hire treatment planning staff, whereas barriers to SRS implementation mostly included the need to purchase and/or upgrade existing planning software and equipment. The survey showed a growing adoption of IMRT and SRS in Canada, although the latter was available in less than half of responding centers. Barriers to implementation differed for IMRT compared to SRS. Enhancing human resources is an important consideration in the implementation of new RT technologies, due to the multidisciplinary nature of the planning and treatment process

  6. Impact of gantry rotation time on plan quality and dosimetric verification. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasler, Marlies; Wirtz, Holger; Lutterbach, Johannes [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Strahlentherapie Singen-Friedrichshafen, Singen (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    To compare plan quality criteria and dosimetric accuracy of step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ss-IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) using two different gantry rotation times. This retrospective planning study based on 20 patients was comprised of 10 prostate cancer (PC) and 10 head and neck (HN) cancer cases. Each plan contained two target volumes: a primary planning target volume (PTV) and a boost volume. For each patient, one ss-IMRT plan and two VMAT plans at 90 s (VMAT90) and 120 s (VMAT120) per arc were generated with the Pinnacle {sup copyright} planning system. Two arcs were provided for the PTV plans and a single arc for boost volumes. Dosimetric verification of the plans was performed using a 2D ionization chamber array placed in a full scatter phantom. VMAT reduced delivery time and monitor units for both treatment sites compared to IMRT. VMAT120 vs. VMAT90 increased delivery time and monitor units in PC plans without improving plan quality. For HN cases, VMAT120 provided comparable organs at risk sparing and better target coverage and conformity than VMAT90. In the VMAT plan verification, an average of 97.1% of the detector points passed the 3 mm, 3% {gamma} criterion, while in IMRT verification it was 98.8%. VMAT90, VMAT120, and IMRT achieved comparable treatment plans. Slower gantry movement in VMAT120 plans only improves dosimetric quality for highly complex targets.

  7. Impact of gantry rotation time on plan quality and dosimetric verification. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasler, Marlies; Wirtz, Holger; Lutterbach, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    To compare plan quality criteria and dosimetric accuracy of step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ss-IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) using two different gantry rotation times. This retrospective planning study based on 20 patients was comprised of 10 prostate cancer (PC) and 10 head and neck (HN) cancer cases. Each plan contained two target volumes: a primary planning target volume (PTV) and a boost volume. For each patient, one ss-IMRT plan and two VMAT plans at 90 s (VMAT90) and 120 s (VMAT120) per arc were generated with the Pinnacle copyright planning system. Two arcs were provided for the PTV plans and a single arc for boost volumes. Dosimetric verification of the plans was performed using a 2D ionization chamber array placed in a full scatter phantom. VMAT reduced delivery time and monitor units for both treatment sites compared to IMRT. VMAT120 vs. VMAT90 increased delivery time and monitor units in PC plans without improving plan quality. For HN cases, VMAT120 provided comparable organs at risk sparing and better target coverage and conformity than VMAT90. In the VMAT plan verification, an average of 97.1% of the detector points passed the 3 mm, 3% γ criterion, while in IMRT verification it was 98.8%. VMAT90, VMAT120, and IMRT achieved comparable treatment plans. Slower gantry movement in VMAT120 plans only improves dosimetric quality for highly complex targets.

  8. IMRT delivery verification using a spiral phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Susan L.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Orton, Nigel P.; McNutt, Todd R.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we report on the testing and verification of a system for IMRT delivery quality assurance that uses a cylindrical solid water phantom with a spiral trajectory for radiographic film placement. This spiral film technique provides more complete dosimetric verification of the entire IMRT treatment than perpendicular film methods, since it samples a three-dimensional dose subspace rather than using measurements at only one or two depths. As an example, the complete analysis of the predicted and measured spiral films is described for an intracranial IMRT treatment case. The results of this analysis are compared to those of a single field perpendicular film technique that is typically used for IMRT QA. The comparison demonstrates that both methods result in a dosimetric error within a clinical tolerance of 5%, however the spiral phantom QA technique provides a more complete dosimetric verification while being less time consuming. To independently verify the dosimetry obtained with the spiral film, the same IMRT treatment was delivered to a similar phantom in which LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters were arranged along the spiral trajectory. The maximum difference between the predicted and measured TLD data for the 1.8 Gy fraction was 0.06 Gy for a TLD located in a high dose gradient region. This further validates the ability of the spiral phantom QA process to accurately verify delivery of an IMRT plan

  9. Phantom-to-clinic development of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy for early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Chuxiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Simmons Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Chun, Stephen G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sumer, Baran D. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Nedzi, Lucien A.; Abdulrahman, Ramzi E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Simmons Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Yordy, John S. [Valley Radiation Therapy Center, Anchorage, AK (United States); Lee, Pam; Hrycushko, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Simmons Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Solberg, Timothy D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ahn, Chul [Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Timmerman, Robert D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Simmons Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Schwartz, David L., E-mail: david.schwartz214@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Simmons Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to commission and clinically test a robotic stereotactic delivery system (CyberKnife, Sunnyvale, CA) to treat early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer. We enrolled 15 patients with cTis-T2N0M0 carcinoma of the glottic larynx onto an institutional review board (IRB)-approved clinical trial. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans prescribed 45 Gy/10 fractions to the involved hemilarynx. SBRT dosimetry was compared with (1) standard carotid-sparing laryngeal intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and (2) selective hemilaryngeal IMRT. Our results demonstrate that SBRT plans improved sparing of the contralateral arytenoid (mean 20.0 Gy reduction, p <0.001), ipsilateral carotid D{sub max} (mean 20.6 Gy reduction, p <0.001), contralateral carotid D{sub max} (mean 28.1 Gy reduction, p <0.001), and thyroid D{sub mean} (mean 15.0 Gy reduction, p <0.001) relative to carotid-sparing IMRT. SBRT also modestly improved dose sparing to the contralateral arytenoid (mean 4.8 Gy reduction, p = 0.13) and spinal cord D{sub max} (mean 4.9 Gy reduction, p = 0.015) relative to selective hemilaryngeal IMRT plans. This “phantom-to-clinic” feasibility study confirmed that hypofractionated SBRT treatment for early-stage laryngeal cancer can potentially spare dose to adjacent normal tissues relative to current IMRT standards. Clinical efficacy and toxicity correlates continue to be collected through an ongoing prospective trial.

  10. Clinical results of conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy using a focal simultaneous boost for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in elderly or medically unfit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutkenhaus, Lotte J; van Os, Rob M; Bel, Arjan; Hulshof, Maarten C C M

    2016-03-18

    For elderly or medically unfit patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer, cystectomy or chemotherapy are contraindicated. This leaves radical radiotherapy as the only treatment option. It was the aim of this study to retrospectively analyze the treatment outcome and associated toxicity of conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using a focal simultaneous tumor boost for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in patients not suitable for cystectomy. One hundred eighteen patients with T2-4 N0-1 M0 bladder cancer were analyzed retrospectively. Median age was 80 years. Treatment consisted of either a conformal box technique or IMRT and included a simultaneous boost to the tumor. To enable an accurate boost delivery, fiducial markers were placed around the tumor. Patients were treated with 40 Gy in 20 fractions to the elective treatment volumes, and a daily tumor boost up to 55-60 Gy. Clinical complete response was seen in 87 % of patients. Three-year overall survival was 44 %, with a locoregional control rate of 73 % at 3 years. Toxicity was low, with late urinary and intestinal toxicity rates grade ≥ 2 of 14 and 5 %, respectively. The use of IMRT reduced late intestinal toxicity, whereas fiducial markers reduced acute urinary toxicity. Radical radiotherapy using a focal boost is feasible and effective for elderly or unfit patients, with a 3-year locoregional control of 73 %. Toxicity rates were low, and were reduced by the use of IMRT and fiducial markers.

  11. Dose and volume effects of gastrointestinal toxicity during neoadjuvant IMRT for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, A. L.; Vogelius, I. R.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    . Materials and Methods: We explored dose metrics correlating with acute diarrhea and chemotherapy compliance for a single-institution cohort of rectal cancer patients (n=115) treated with IMRT. Acute diarrhea during treatment was scored prospectively by trained RT nurses (CTCAE v3.0). The highest toxicity.......03) and patients with diabetes (OR=7.29, 1.21-43.8, p=0.03). Age, brachytherapy boost, prior abdominal surgery, smoking history, or domestic status had no influence on any of the two endpoints, nor had concurrent chemotherapy on the risk of acute diarrhea. Conclusions: We found that dose to the intestinal cavity...

  12. Comparison between intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 3D tangential beams technique used in patients with early-stage breast cancer who received breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sas-Korczynska, B.; Kokoszka, A.; Korzeniowski, S.; Sladowska, A.; Rozwadowska-Bogusz, B.; Lesiak, J.; Dyczek, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The most often found complications in patients with breast cancer who received radiotherapy are cardiac and pulmonary function disorders and development of second malignancies. Aim: To compare the intensity modulated radiotherapy with the 3D tangential beams technique in respect of dose distribution in target volume and critical organs they generate in patients with early-stage breast cancer who received breast-conserving therapy. Materials and methods: A dosimetric analysis was performed to assess the three radiotherapy techniques used in each of 10 consecutive patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Radiotherapy was planned with the use of all the three techniques: 3D tangential beams with electron boost, IMRT with electron boost, and intensity modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost. Results: The use of the IMRT techniques enables more homogenous dose distribution in target volume. The range of mean and median dose to the heart and lung was lower with the IMRT techniques in comparison to the 3D tangential beams technique. The range of mean dose to the heart amounted to 0.3 - 3.5 Gy for the IMRT techniques and 0.4 - 4.3 for the tangential beams technique. The median dose to the lung on the irradiated side amounted to 4.9 - 5 Gy for the IMRT techniques and 5.6 Gy for the 3D tangential beams technique. Conclusion: The application of the IMRT techniques in radiotherapy patients with early-stage breast cancer allows to obtain more homogenous dose distribution in target volume, while permitting to reduce the dose to critical organs. (authors)

  13. Dose-escalated simultaneous integrated-boost treatment of prostate cancer patients via helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, M.; Astner, S.T.; Duma, M.N.; Putzhammer, J.; Winkler, C.; Molls, M.; Geinitz, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Jacob, V. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Nieder, C. [Nordland Hospital, Bodoe (Norway). Dept. of Oncology and Palliative Care; Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2012-05-15

    The goal of this work was to assess the feasibility of moderately hypofractionated simultaneous integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) with helical tomotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer regarding acute side effects and dose-volume histogram data (DVH data). Acute side effects and DVH data were evaluated of the first 40 intermediate risk prostate cancer patients treated with a definitive daily image-guided SIB-IMRT protocol via helical tomotherapy in our department. The planning target volume including the prostate and the base of the seminal vesicles with safety margins was treated with 70 Gy in 35 fractions. The boost volume containing the prostate and 3 mm safety margins (5 mm craniocaudal) was treated as SIB to a total dose of 76 Gy (2.17 Gy per fraction). Planning constraints for the anterior rectal wall were set in order not to exceed the dose of 76 Gy prescribed to the boost volume. Acute toxicity was evaluated prospectively using a modified CTCAE (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) score. SIB-IMRT allowed good rectal sparing, although the full boost dose was permitted to the anterior rectal wall. Median rectum dose was 38 Gy in all patients and the median volumes receiving at least 65 Gy (V65), 70 Gy (V70), and 75 Gy (V75) were 13.5%, 9%, and 3%, respectively. No grade 4 toxicity was observed. Acute grade 3 toxicity was observed in 20% of patients involving nocturia only. Grade 2 acute intestinal and urological side effects occurred in 25% and 57.5%, respectively. No correlation was found between acute toxicity and the DVH data. This institutional SIB-IMRT protocol using daily image guidance as a precondition for smaller safety margins allows dose escalation to the prostate without increasing acute toxicity. (orig.)

  14. Normal liver tissue sparing by intensity-modulated proton stereotactic body radiotherapy for solitary liver tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Joergen B. B.; Hansen, Anders T.; Lassen, Yasmin; Grau, Cai; Hoeyer, Morten; Muren, Ludvig P.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is often the preferred treatment for the advanced liver tumours which owing to tumour distribution, size and multi-focality are out of range of surgical resection or radiofrequency ablation. However, only a minority of patients with liver tumours may be candidates for conventional SBRT because of the limited radiation tolerance of normal liver, intestine and other normal tissues. Due to the favourable depth-dose characteristics of protons, intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) may be a superior alternative to photon-based SBRT. The purpose of this treatment planning study was therefore to investigate the potential sparing of normal liver by IMPT compared to photon-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for solitary liver tumours. Material and methods. Ten patients with solitary liver metastasis treated at our institution with multi-field SBRT were retrospectively re-planned with IMRT and proton pencil beam scanning techniques. For the proton plans, two to three coplanar fields were used in contrast to five to six coplanar and non-coplanar photon fields. The same planning objectives were used for both techniques. A risk adapted dose prescription to the PTV surface of 12.5-16.75 Gy x 3 was used. Results. The spared liver volume for IMPT was higher compared to IMRT in all 10 patients. At the highest prescription dose level, the median liver volume receiving less than 15 Gy was 1411 cm 3 for IMPT and 955 cm 3 for IMRT (p D 15 Gy > 700 cm 3 constraint. For the D mean = 15 Gy constraint, nine of 10 cases could be treated at the highest dose level using IMPT whereas with IMRT, only two cases met this constraint at the highest dose level and six at the lowest dose level. Conclusion. A considerable sparing of normal liver tissue can be obtained using proton-based SBRT for solitary liver tumours

  15. The history of stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasak, John M; Gorecki, John P

    2009-08-01

    Stereotactic neurosurgery originated from the pioneering work of Horsley and Clarke, who developed a stereotactic apparatus to study the monkey brain in 1908. Spiegel and Wycis applied this technology to the human brain in 1947, which ultimately lead to the development of multiple stereotactic neurosurgical devices during the 1950s. It was Lars Leksell of Sweden, however, who envisioned stereotactic radiosurgery. Leksell developed the gamma knife to treat intracranial lesions in a noninvasive fashion. His work stimulated worldwide interest and created the field of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  16. Stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Simon S. [Univ. Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Case Comprehensive Cancer Center; Teh, Bin S. [The Methodist Hospital Cancer Center and Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States). Weill Cornell Medical College; Lu, Jiade J. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schefter, Tracey E. (eds.) [Colorado Univ., Aurora, CO (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-11-01

    Comprehensive an up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. Examines in detail retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials for various organ sites from around the world. Written by world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia and Europe. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an innovative treatment for various primary and metastatic cancers, and the past five years have witnessed a quantum leap in its use. This book provides a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. It will serve as a detailed resource for this rapidly developing treatment modality. The organ sites covered include lung, liver, spine, pancreas, prostate, adrenal, head and neck, and female reproductive tract. Retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials on SBRT for various organ sites from around the world are examined, and toxicities and normal tissue constraints are discussed. This book features unique insights from world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia, and Europe. It will be necessary reading for radiation oncologists, radiation oncology residents and fellows, medical physicists, medical physics residents, medical oncologists, surgical oncologists, and cancer scientists.

  17. Stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzevic, Dario; Legcevic, Jelena; Splavski, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vestibular schwannomas (acoustic neuromas) are common benign tumours that arise from the Schwann cells of the vestibular nerve. Management options include observation with neuroradiological follow-up, microsurgical resection and stereotactic radiotherapy. OBJECTIVES: To assess...... the effect of stereotactic radiotherapy compared to observation, microsurgical resection, any other treatment modality, or a combination of two or more of the above approaches for vestibular schwannoma. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL......; Web of Science; CAB Abstracts; ISRCTN and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 24 July 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) exploring the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy compared with observation alone, microsurgical...

  18. Stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, G.; Daisne, J.F.; Thillays, F.

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is now well implanted in the radiotherapy treatment tools of brain metastasis. The dose can be delivered in one or multiple sessions. Results seem equivalent. CT scan and MRI imaging are required to delineate and calculate dosimetry. Doses are variable according to the size of the metastases, localization, pathology or equipment. Stabilization or reduction of tumour size is the rules after stereotactic treatment. Impact in terms of overall survival is more difficult to apprehend because of the general context of the disease. Many questions remain unresolved, such as the usefulness of whole brain irradiation, adaptation of the treatment schedule to tumour pathophysiology, role of stereotactic treatment after surgery of metastases, etc. (authors)

  19. Patients burden in stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralik, G.; Fribertova, M.; Trosanova, D.; Kolarcikova, E.

    2009-01-01

    Radiosurgery is one time application of High radiation to a stereotactically defined volume. Treatment delivery involves multiple stereotactically targeted, arced fields. The goal of Radiosurgery is to deliver a high dose to target, while only a minimum dose is delivered to adjacent normal tissue that are just a few millimeters away . Stereotactic Radiosurgery on linac has been employed at St. Elisabeth Cancer Institute in Bratislava since 1993. Until July 31,2008, 1 030 subjects have been treated including patients with brain tumors, metastases, recurrent tumours, and A V malformations, using Leibinger stereotaxy collimators or Mimic MLC system on a Linac accelerator. The presentation shows dose delivery to risk organs in different indications. (authors)

  20. Dosimetry tools and techniques for IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Daniel A.; Moran, Jean M.; Dempsey, James F.; Dong Lei; Oldham, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) poses a number of challenges for properly measuring commissioning data and quality assurance (QA) radiation dose distributions. This report provides a comprehensive overview of how dosimeters, phantoms, and dose distribution analysis techniques should be used to support the commissioning and quality assurance requirements of an IMRT program. The proper applications of each dosimeter are described along with the limitations of each system. Point detectors, arrays, film, and electronic portal imagers are discussed with respect to their proper use, along with potential applications of 3D dosimetry. Regardless of the IMRT technique utilized, some situations require the use of multiple detectors for the acquisition of accurate commissioning data. The overall goal of this task group report is to provide a document that aids the physicist in the proper selection and use of the dosimetry tools available for IMRT QA and to provide a resource for physicists that describes dosimetry measurement techniques for purposes of IMRT commissioning and measurement-based characterization or verification of IMRT treatment plans. This report is not intended to provide a comprehensive review of commissioning and QA procedures for IMRT. Instead, this report focuses on the aspects of metrology, particularly the practical aspects of measurements that are unique to IMRT. The metrology of IMRT concerns the application of measurement instruments and their suitability, calibration, and quality control of measurements. Each of the dosimetry measurement tools has limitations that need to be considered when incorporating them into a commissioning process or a comprehensive QA program. For example, routine quality assurance procedures require the use of robust field dosimetry systems. These often exhibit limitations with respect to spatial resolution or energy response and need to themselves be commissioned against more established dosimeters. A chain of

  1. Stereotactic radiosurgery: incision less surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Victor M.; Palma, Raul B.

    1997-01-01

    Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) involves the application of focused high dose, high energy radiation to precisely (stereotactically) localized targets in the head without opening the skull for the purpose of destroying pathologic tissues like tumors, and also for producing discrete lesions for the relief of certain functional disorders. This procedure was pioneered by Lars Leksel in the 1950s and has progressively been refined with the development of more powerful computer technology and more precise and safer radiation delivery systems. The used of the Linear Accelerator (LINAC)- based radiosurgery system would be the most cost-effective and appropriate system for this treatment

  2. Conformal radiotherapy with intensity modulation and integrated boost in the head and neck cancers: experience of the Curie Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledano, I.; Serre, A.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Ortholan, C.; Racadot, S.; Calais, G.; Alfonsi, M.; Giraud, P.; Graff, P.; Serre, A.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Ortholan, C.; Racadot, S.; Calais, G.; Alfonsi, M.; Giraud, P.

    2009-01-01

    The modulated intensity radiotherapy (I.M.R.T.) is used in the treatment of cancers in superior aero digestive tracts to reduce the irradiation of parotids and to reduce the delayed xerostomia. This retrospective study presents the results got on the fourteen first patients according an original technique of I.M.R.T. with integrated boost. It appears that this technique is feasible and allows to reduce the xerostomia rate without modifying the local control rate. To limit the average dose to the parotids under 30 Gy seems reduce the incidence of severe xerostomia. (N.C.)

  3. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  4. Intrafraction Motion in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Maddalena M.G.; Peulen, Heike M.U.; Belderbos, Josè S.A.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients delivers high doses that require high-precision treatment. Typically, image guidance is used to minimize day-to-day target displacement, but intrafraction position variability is often not corrected. Currently, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is replacing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in many departments because of its shorter delivery time. This study aimed to evaluate whether intrafraction variation in VMAT patients is reduced in comparison with patients treated with IMRT. Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients (197 IMRT and 112 VMAT) treated with a frameless SBRT technique to a prescribed dose of 3 × 18 Gy were evaluated. Image guidance for both techniques was identical: pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) (CBCT{sub precorr}) for setup correction followed immediately before treatment by postcorrection CBCT (CBCT{sub postcorr}) for verification. Then, after either a noncoplanar IMRT technique or a VMAT technique, a posttreatment (CBCT{sub postRT}) scan was acquired. The CBCT{sub postRT} and CBCT{sub postcorr} scans were then used to evaluate intrafraction motion. Treatment delivery times, systematic (Σ) and random (σ) intrafraction variations, and associated planning target volume (PTV) margins were calculated. Results: The median treatment delivery time was significantly reduced by 20 minutes (range, 32-12 minutes) using VMAT compared with noncoplanar IMRT. Intrafraction tumor motion was significantly larger for IMRT in all directions up to 0.5 mm systematic (Σ) and 0.7 mm random (σ). The required PTV margins for IMRT and VMAT differed by less than 0.3 mm. Conclusion: VMAT-based SBRT for NSCLC was associated with significantly shorter delivery times and correspondingly smaller intrafraction motion compared with noncoplanar IMRT. However, the impact on the required PTV margin was small.

  5. Can you boost your metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000893.htm Can you boost your metabolism? To use the sharing ... boosting metabolism than tactics that work. Some myths can backfire. If you think you are burning more ...

  6. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in bilateral retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atalar, Banu; Ozyar, Enis; Gunduz, Kaan; Gungor, Gorkem

    2010-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for retinoblastoma has traditionally been done with conventional radiotherapy techniques which resulted high doses to the surrounding normal tissues. A 20 month-old girl with group D bilateral retinoblastoma underwent intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to both eyes after failing chemoreduction and focal therapies including cryotherapy and transpupillary thermotherapy. In this report, we discuss the use of IMRT as a method for reducing doses to adjacent normal tissues while delivering therapeutic doses to the tumour tissues compared with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). At one year follow-up, the patient remained free of any obvious radiation complications. Image guided IMRT provides better dose distribution than 3DCRT in retinoblastoma eyes, delivering the therapeutic dose to the tumours and minimizing adjacent tissue damage

  7. Extracranial Stereotactic Radioablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papie, Lech; Timmerman, Robert; Desrosiers, Colleen; Randall, Marcus [Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2003-12-01

    Extracranial stereotactic radioablation (ESR) involves treating well-demarcated targeted tissues (e.g. tumor with minimal margin for set-up uncertainties) with very large doses of radiation in single or a few fractions with the intent of causing profound late tissue damage within the targeted volume. In such circumstances, considerable effort must be taken to reduce non-target tissue exposure to the high dose levels in order to prevent late complications to involved organs. Consequently, the following conditions for effective delivery of the ESR techniques have to be satisfied: 1) delivery of a high dose per fraction, i.e. 10-24 Gy; 2) delivery of only a few fractions per course of treatment (e.g. 1-4); 3) shaping of the prescription isodose surface conformally to the target surface; 4) delivery of a non-uniform dose distribution within the target with the highest dose in centrally located regions of hypoxia; 5) rapid fall-off of dose from the target volume to healthy tissue in all directions. In this paper it is shown that high doses per fraction in few fractions can be delivered to a variety of locations with both efficacy and acceptable toxicity (conditions 1 and 2). Conformal shaping of the high isodose surfaces is best accomplished by employing many beams (5-10) each with carefully milled apertures precisely coincident with the target projection (condition 3). Beam intensity modulation creating parabolic beam entrance fluence profiles both concentrates the highest dose in central regions of tumor hypoxia and increases fall-off gradients outside of the target (conditions 4 and 5). It is also shown that isotropic, highly non-coplanar beam arrangements avoiding oppositional fields allow more optimal fall-off gradients to normal tissue as opposed to coplanar treatments (condition 5)

  8. Stereotactic radiosurgery for hemangioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Yamada, Yasushi; Kida, Yoshihisa; Iwakoshi, Takayasu; Yoshimoto, Masayuki [Komaki City Hospital, Aichi (Japan). Gamma Knife Center

    2001-12-01

    We evaluated the treatment results of Gamma Knife radiosurgery for intracranial hemanigioblastoma of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome or sporadic disease. Stereotactic radiosurgery was performed in 20 patients with 35 hemangioblastomas over a 9-year interval. The mean age of the patients was 48.5 years (range, 18-79 years). The volume of the tumors varied from 0.03 to 19 ml (mean, 3.0 ml), and the mean tumor margin dose was 17.8 Gy (range, 14-24 Gy). Clinical and neuroimaging follow-up was obtained 6 to 58 months (mean 26.2 months) after radiosurgery. Thirty-one (89%) of 35 tumors were controlled locally. Two tumors (6%) disappeared and 11 (31%) decreased in size during follow-up period. Eighteen (52%) remained unchanged in size. Three out of four enlarged tumors were resected surgically after radiosurgery. Another tumor was resected surgically to improve the patient's symptoms of nausea and vomiting caused by persistent perifocal edema in spite of reduced tumor volume. Only one patient, who had a tumor in the 4th ventricle arising from the brainstem, died 12 months after radiosurgery. Although the treated tumor remained stable in size, he developed aspiration pneumonia due to brainstem dysfunction caused by perifocal edema. All tumors less than 1 cm in diameter did not progress during follow-up period. For small hemangioblastomas, radiosurgery is a safe and effective option to control disease. If a large tumor is treated by radiosurgery, careful observation of the patient's neurological condition is necessary. (author)

  9. Quality assurance device for four-dimensional IMRT or SBRT and respiratory gating using patient-specific intrafraction motion kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, Benjamin E; Ehler, Eric; Bragg, Henry; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2007-09-17

    Emerging technologies such as four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) and implanted beacons are expected to allow clinicians to accurately model intrafraction motion and to quantitatively estimate internal target volumes (ITVs) for radiation therapy involving moving targets. In the case of intensity-modulated (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivery, clinicians must consider the interplay between the temporal nature of the modulation and the target motion within the ITV. A need exists for a 4D IMRT/SBRT quality assurance (QA) device that can incorporate and analyze customized intrafraction motion as it relates to dose delivery and respiratory gating. We built a 4D IMRT/SBRT prototype device and entered (X, Y, Z)(T) coordinates representing a motion kernel into a software application that 1. transformed the kernel into beam-specific two-dimensional (2D) motion "projections," 2. previewed the motion in real time, and 3. drove a recision X-Y motorized device that had, atop it, a mounted planar IMRT QA measurement device. The detectors that intersected the target in the beam's-eye-view of any single phase of the breathing cycle (a small subset of all the detectors) were defined as "target detectors" to be analyzed for dose uniformity between multiple fractions. Data regarding the use of this device to quantify dose variation fraction-to-fraction resulting from target motion (for several delivery modalities and with and without gating) have been recently published. A combined software and hardware solution for patient-customized 4D IMRT/SBRT QA is an effective tool for assessing IMRT delivery under conditions of intrafraction motion. The 4D IMRT QA device accurately reproduced the projected motion kernels for all beam's-eye-view motion kernels. This device has been proved to, effectively quantify the degradation in dose uniformity resulting from a moving target within a static planning target volume, and, integrate with a commercial

  10. Quality assurance device for four‐dimensional IMRT or SBRT and respiratory gating using patient‐specific intrafraction motion kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehler, Eric; Bragg, Henry; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2007-01-01

    Emerging technologies such as four‐dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) and implanted beacons are expected to allow clinicians to accurately model intrafraction motion and to quantitatively estimate internal target volumes (ITVs) for radiation therapy involving moving targets. In the case of intensity‐modulated (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivery, clinicians must consider the interplay between the temporal nature of the modulation and the target motion within the ITV. A need exists for a 4D IMRT/SBRT quality assurance (QA) device that can incorporate and analyze customized intrafraction motion as it relates to dose delivery and respiratory gating. We built a 4D IMRT/SBRT prototype device and entered (X, Y, Z)(T) coordinates representing a motion kernel into a software application that transformed the kernel into beam‐specific two‐dimensional (2D) motion “projections,”previewed the motion in real time, anddrove a precision X–Y motorized device that had, atop it, a mounted planar IMRT QA measurement device. The detectors that intersected the target in the beam's‐eye‐view of any single phase of the breathing cycle (a small subset of all the detectors) were defined as “target detectors” to be analyzed for dose uniformity between multiple fractions. Data regarding the use of this device to quantify dose variation fraction‐to‐fraction resulting from target motion (for several delivery modalities and with and without gating) have been recently published. A combined software and hardware solution for patient‐customized 4D IMRT/ SBRT QA is an effective tool for assessing IMRT delivery under conditions of intrafraction motion. The 4D IMRT QA device accurately reproduced the projected motion kernels for all beam's‐eye‐view motion kernels. This device has been proved to • effectively quantify the degradation in dose uniformity resulting from a moving target within a static planning target volume, and • integrate

  11. Dosimetric comparison of the related parameters between simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy and sequential boost conformal radiotherapy for postoperative malignant glioma of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Qian; Lu Jie; Li Jianbin; Sun Tao; Bai Tong; Liu Tonghai; Yin Yong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dosimetric of different parameter of simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) with sequential boost conformal radiotherapy (SB-CRT) for postoperative malignant glioma of the brain. Methods: Ten patients with malignant glioma of brain were selected to study. Each patient was simulated all by CT and MRI, and the imagings of CT and MRI were all sent to Pinnacle 3 planning system. The fusion technology with MR-CT imaging was used on Pinnacle 3 planning system. The target volume was delineated and defined based on MRI. The postoperative residual lesion and resection cavity were defined as gross tumor volume (GTV) and expanded GTV some scope was defined as clinical target volume (CTV). The margins of GTV expanded 10 mm and 25 mm were defined as CTV1 and CTV2 respectively. CTV1 and CTV2 all enlarged 5 mm were defined as PTV1 and PTV2 respectively. The plans of simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy and sequential boost conformal radiotherapy were respectively designed for each patient using Pinnacle 3 planning system and the dosimetric of different parameter was compared. The prescribe dose of SIB-IMRT was PTV1: 62.5 Gy/25 f, PTV2: 50.0 Gy/25 f; and SB-CRT was PTV1: 66.0 Gy/33 f, PTV2: 50.0 Gy/25 f. The dosimetries of different parameters of SIB-IMRT and SB-CRT were compared by using Paired-Samples T Test. Results: The maximum and mean dose of PTV1, PTV2, and brainstem were of significant difference (P 0.05). Conclusion: The SIB-IMRT plan is better than the SB-CRT plan. The CI and HI of SIB-IMRT are superior to SB-CRT. At the same time, it can preserve the important organs such as brainstem and reduce the mean dose of whole brain. On the other hand it can shorten the total period of therapy time. (authors)

  12. Study of the IMRT interplay effect using a 4DCT Monte Carlo dose calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Michael D; Abdellatif, Ady; Chen, Jeff; Wong, Eugene

    2012-04-21

    Respiratory motion may lead to dose errors when treating thoracic and abdominal tumours with radiotherapy. The interplay between complex multileaf collimator patterns and patient respiratory motion could result in unintuitive dose changes. We have developed a treatment reconstruction simulation computer code that accounts for interplay effects by combining multileaf collimator controller log files, respiratory trace log files, 4DCT images and a Monte Carlo dose calculator. Two three-dimensional (3D) IMRT step-and-shoot plans, a concave target and integrated boost were delivered to a 1D rigid motion phantom. Three sets of experiments were performed with 100%, 50% and 25% duty cycle gating. The log files were collected, and five simulation types were performed on each data set: continuous isocentre shift, discrete isocentre shift, 4DCT, 4DCT delivery average and 4DCT plan average. Analysis was performed using 3D gamma analysis with passing criteria of 2%, 2 mm. The simulation framework was able to demonstrate that a single fraction of the integrated boost plan was more sensitive to interplay effects than the concave target. Gating was shown to reduce the interplay effects. We have developed a 4DCT Monte Carlo simulation method that accounts for IMRT interplay effects with respiratory motion by utilizing delivery log files.

  13. SU-F-T-212: A Comparison of Treatment Strategies for Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberton, T; Slater, J; Wroe, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective and noninvasive treatment for intracranial lesions that uses highly focused radiation beams in a single treatment fraction. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric differences between the treatment brain metastasis with a proton beam vs. intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: Ten separate brain metastasis targets where chosen and treatment plans were created for each, using three different strategies: custom proton beam shaping devices, standardized proton beam shaping devices, and IMRT. Each plan was required to satisfy set parameters for providing adequate coverage and minimizing risk to adjacent tissues. The effectiveness of each plan was calculated by comparing the homogeneity index, conformity index, and V12 for each target using a paired one tailed T-test (α=0.05). Specific comparison of the conformity indices was also made using a subcategory containing targets with volume>1cc. Results: There was no significant difference between the homogeneity indices of the three plans (p>0.05), showing that each plan has the capability of adequately covering the targets. There was a statistically significant difference (p 1cc) there was no statistical difference between the proton plans and the IMRT treatment for the conformity index. Conclusion: A custom proton plan is the recommended treatment explored in this study as it is the most reliable way of effectively treating the target while sparing the maximum amount of normal tissue.

  14. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) in locally advanced thyroid cancer: Acute toxicity results of a phase I study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbano, Teresa Guerrero; Clark, Catharine H.; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Adams, Elizabeth J.; Miles, Elizabeth A.; Mc Nair, Helen; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Warrington, Jim; Dearnaley, David P.; Harmer, Clive; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: This phase 1 study was designed to determine the toxicity of accelerated fractionation IMRT in locally advanced thyroid cancer. Methods: Patients with high risk locally advanced thyroid cancer who required post-operative EBRT were recruited. A single-phase inverse-planned-simultaneous-boost was delivered by IMRT: 58.8 Gy/28F (daily) to the primary tumour and involved nodes and 50 Gy/28F to the elective nodes. Acute (NCICTCv.2.0) and late toxicity (RTOG and modified LENTSOM) was collected. Results: Thirteen patients were treated (7 medullary thyroid, 2 Hurthle cell and 4 well differentiated thyroid cancer). G3 and G2 radiation dermatitis rates were 38.5% and 31%; G3 and G2 mucositis rates 8% and 53% and G3 and G2 pain 23% and 54%. Thirty-one percentage required enteral feeding. G3 and G2 xerostomia rates were 0% and 31%. Recovery was seen, with 62% patients having dysphagia G ≤ 1 2 months after IMRT. Thirty percent of patients developed L'Hermitte's syndrome. No grade 4 toxicity was observed. No dose limiting toxicity was found. Conclusions: Accelerated fractionation IMRT in this group of patients is feasible and safe. The acute toxicity appeared acceptable and early indicators of late toxicity moderate and similar to what would be expected with conventional RT. Longer follow up is required to quantify late side effects

  15. Stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy: Dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlienger, M.; Lartigau, E.; Nataf, F.; Mornex, F.; Latorzeff, I.; Lisbona, A.; Mahe, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was the study of the successive steps permitting the prescription of dose in stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy, which includes radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The successive steps studied are: the choice of stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy among the therapeutic options, based on curative or palliative treatment intent, then the selection of lesions according to size/volume, pathological type and their number permitting the choice between radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, which have the same methodological basis. Clinical experience has determined the level of dose to treat the lesions and limit the irradiation of healthy adjacent tissues and organs at risk structures. The last step is the optimization of the different parameters to obtain a safe compromise between the lesion dose and healthy adjacent structures. Study of dose-volume histograms, coverage indices and 3D imaging permit the optimization of irradiation. For lesions close to or included in a critical area, the prescribed dose is planned using the inverse planing method. Implementation of the successively described steps is mandatory to insure the prescription of an optimized dose. The whole procedure is based on the delineation of the lesion and adjacent healthy tissues. There are sometimes difficulties to assess the delineation and the volume of the target, however improvement of local control rates and reduction of secondary effects are the proof that the totality of the successive procedures are progressively improved. In practice, stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy is a continually improved treatment method, which constantly benefits from improvements in the choice of indications, imaging, techniques of irradiation, planing/optimization methodology and irradiation technique and from data collected from prolonged follow-up. (authors)

  16. Deep nets vs expert designed features in medical physics: An IMRT QA case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interian, Yannet; Rideout, Vincent; Kearney, Vasant P; Gennatas, Efstathios; Morin, Olivier; Cheung, Joey; Solberg, Timothy; Valdes, Gilmer

    2018-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of Deep Neural Networks against a technique designed by domain experts in the prediction of gamma passing rates for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance (IMRT QA). A total of 498 IMRT plans across all treatment sites were planned in Eclipse version 11 and delivered using a dynamic sliding window technique on Clinac iX or TrueBeam Linacs. Measurements were performed using a commercial 2D diode array, and passing rates for 3%/3 mm local dose/distance-to-agreement (DTA) were recorded. Separately, fluence maps calculated for each plan were used as inputs to a convolution neural network (CNN). The CNNs were trained to predict IMRT QA gamma passing rates using TensorFlow and Keras. A set of model architectures, inspired by the convolutional blocks of the VGG-16 ImageNet model, were constructed and implemented. Synthetic data, created by rotating and translating the fluence maps during training, was created to boost the performance of the CNNs. Dropout, batch normalization, and data augmentation were utilized to help train the model. The performance of the CNNs was compared to a generalized Poisson regression model, previously developed for this application, which used 78 expert designed features. Deep Neural Networks without domain knowledge achieved comparable performance to a baseline system designed by domain experts in the prediction of 3%/3 mm Local gamma passing rates. An ensemble of neural nets resulted in a mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.70 ± 0.05 and the domain expert model resulted in a 0.74 ± 0.06. Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) with transfer learning can predict IMRT QA passing rates by automatically designing features from the fluence maps without human expert supervision. Predictions from CNNs are comparable to a system carefully designed by physicist experts. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Dosimetric comparison of intensity-modulated, conformal, and four-field pelvic radiotherapy boost plans for gynecologic cancer: a retrospective planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Philip; Yeo, Inhwan; Perkins, Gregory; Fyles, Anthony; Milosevic, Michael

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as an alternative to conformal radiotherapy (CRT) or 4-field box boost (4FB) in women with gynecologic malignancies who are unsuitable for brachytherapy for technical or medical reasons. Dosimetric and toxicity information was analyzed for 12 patients with cervical (8), endometrial (2) or vaginal (2) cancer previously treated with external beam pelvic radiotherapy and a CRT boost. Optimized IMRT boost treatment plans were then developed for each of the 12 patients and compared to CRT and 4FB plans. The plans were compared in terms of dose conformality and critical normal tissue avoidance. The median planning target volume (PTV) was 151 cm 3 (range 58–512 cm 3 ). The median overlap of the contoured rectum with the PTV was 15 (1–56) %, and 11 (4–35) % for the bladder. Two of the 12 patients, both with large PTVs and large overlap of the contoured rectum and PTV, developed grade 3 rectal bleeding. The dose conformity was significantly improved with IMRT over CRT and 4FB (p ≤ 0.001 for both). IMRT also yielded an overall improvement in the rectal and bladder dose-volume distributions relative to CRT and 4FB. The volume of rectum that received the highest doses (>66% of the prescription) was reduced by 22% (p < 0.001) with IMRT relative to 4FB, and the bladder volume was reduced by 19% (p < 0.001). This was at the expense of an increase in the volume of these organs receiving doses in the lowest range (<33%). These results indicate that IMRT can improve target coverage and reduce dose to critical structures in gynecologic patients receiving an external beam radiotherapy boost. This dosimetric advantage will be integrated with other patient and treatment-specific factors, particularly internal tumor movement during fractionated radiotherapy, in the context of a future image-guided radiation therapy study

  18. Comparison of long-term survival and toxicity of simultaneous integrated boost vs conventional fractionation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao HM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hengmin Tao,1,2 Yumei Wei,1 Wei Huang,1 Xiujuan Gai,1,2 Baosheng Li11Department of 6th Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, 2School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Jinan University-Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, People’s Republic of ChinaAim: In recent years, the intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB and intensity-modulated radiotherapy with conventional fractionation (IMRT-CF have been involved in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. However, the potential clinical effects and toxicities are still controversial.Methods: Here, 107 patients with biopsy-proven locally advanced NPC between March 2004 and January 2011 were enrolled in the retrospective study. Among them, 54 patients received IMRT-SIB, and 53 patients received IMRT-CF. Subsequently, overall survival (OS, 5-year progression-free survival (PFS, 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS, and relevant toxicities were analyzed.Results: In the present study, all patients completed the treatment, and the overall median follow-up time was 80 months (range: 8–126 months. The 5-year OS analysis revealed no significant difference between the IMRT-SIB and IMRT-CF groups (80.9% vs 80.5%, P=0.568. In addition, there were also no significant between-group differences in 5-year PFS (73.3% vs 74.4%, P=0.773 and 5-year LRFS (88.1% vs 90.8%, P=0.903. Notably, the dose to critical organs (spinal cord, brainstem, and parotid gland in patients treated by IMRT-CF was significantly lower than that in patients treated by IMRT-SIB (all P<0.05.Conclusion: Both IMRT-SIB and IMRT-CF techniques are effective in treating locally advanced NPC, with similar OS, PFS, and LRFS. However, IMRT-CF has more advantages than IMRT-SIB in protecting spinal cord, brainstem, and parotid gland from acute and late toxicities, such as xerostomia. Further prospective study is warranted to confirm our findings.Keywords: intensity

  19. Pathologic contrast enhancement of cerebral lesions: A comparative study using stereotactic CT, stereotactic MR imaging, and stereotactic biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earnest, F. IV; Kelly, P.J.; Scheithauer, B.; Kall, B.; Cascino, T.L.; Ehman, R.L.; Forbes, G.

    1986-01-01

    The author compared the pattern and degree of Gd-DTPA dimeglumine contrast enhancement demonstrated on stereotactic MR images with that seen on stereotactic CT images obtained after conventional iodinated contrast agent enhancement and with histopathologic findings on sequential stereotactic brain biopsies. Stereotactic biopsies of the areas that enhanced on CT or MR imaging revealed tumor tissue with neovascularity. Tumor tissue with no or mild neovascularity did not enhance with contrast agent administration. Isolated tumor cells were frequently found beyond the margins of some primary brain neoplasms defined by contrast agent-enhanced MR imaging and CT. The histopathologic findings associated with pathologic contrast agent enhancement are presented

  20. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with compensators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salz, H.; Wiezorek, T.; Scheithauer, M.; Kleen, W.; Schwedas, M.; Wendt, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    The irradiation with intensity-modulated fields is possible with static as well as dynamic methods. In our university hospital, the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with compensators was prepared and used for the first time for patient irradiation in July 2001. The compensators consist of a mixture of tin granulate and wax, which is filled in a milled negative mould. The treatment planning is performed with Helax-TMS (MDS Nordion). An additional software is used for editing the modulation matrix ('Modifix'). Before irradiation of the first patient, extensive measurements have been carried out in terms of quality assurance of treatment planning and production of compensators. The results of the verification measurements have shown that IMRT with compensators possesses high spatial and dosimetric exactness. The calculated dose distributions are applied correctly. The accuracy of the calculated monitor units is normally better than 3%; in small volumes, further dosimetric inaccuracies between calculated and measured dose distributions are mostly less than 3%. Therefore, the compensators contribute to the achievement of high-level IMRT even when apparatuses without MLC are used. This paper describes the use of the IMRT with compensators, presents the limits of this technology, and discusses the first practical experiences. (orig.) [de

  1. Dosimetry of parotid glands in IMRT plan of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian Jiancheng; Yu Xinsheng; Jiang Guoliang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of different intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan on the dosimetry of parotid in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: Under the same constraints and objections, the IMRT plan of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with sparing unilateral parotid and the IMRT plan added plan tumor volume (PTV) margin for parotid gland was investigated. Results: Between conventional IMRT plan and the IMRT plan spared unilateral parotid, their target coverage, homogeneity index and conformal index of PTV 70 is similar. On PTV 60 , D min in the plan of sparing one parotid gland was more than that in normal IMRT plan (P 95 in the plan of sparing one parotid gland have improved (P 50%VOL and D mean of parotid gland were similar between the two plans. Between conventional IMRT plan and the IMRT plan added 2 or 3 mm margin for parotid gland, their target coverage, homogeneity index and conformal index of PTV 70 is similar. D min , D mean and D 95 of PTV 60 have decreased tendency from normal IMRT plan to 2 mm margin plan to 3 mm margin plan. D max of brainstem and spine cord have increased tendency from normal IMRT plan to 2 mm margin plan to 3 mm margin plan. Conclusions: The IMRT plan of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with sparing unilateral parotid may be adopted not to protect both two parotids, while PTV margin for parotid added as parotid move. (authors)

  2. A stereotactic adapter compatible with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacak, R.K.; Law, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    One application of computed-tomographic (CT) scanners is the localization of intracranial targets for stereotactic surgery. Unfortunately, conventional stereotactic devices affixed to the patient cause artifacts which obscure anatomic features in CT images. The authors describe the initial phase of a project to eliminate this problem by using an adapter that is free of metallic objects. Localization of the target point relative to the coordinate system of a Leksell stereotactic frame is achieved from CT image measurements

  3. Inverse IMRT workflow process at Austin health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rykers, K.; Fernando, W.; Grace, M.; Liu, G.; Rolfo, A.; Viotto, A.; Mantle, C.; Lawlor, M.; Au-Yeung, D.; Quong, G.; Feigen, M.; Lim-Joon, D.; Wada, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The work presented here will review the strategies adopted at Austin Health to bring IMRT into clinical use. IMRT is delivered using step and shoot mode on an Elekta Precise machine with 40 pairs of 1cm wide MLC leaves. Planning is done using CMS Focus/XiO. A collaborative approach for RO's, Physicists and RTs from concept to implementation was adopted. An overview will be given of the workflow for the clinic, the equipment used, tolerance levels and the lessons learned. 1. Strategic Planning for IMRT 2. Training a. MSKCC (New York) b.ESTRO (Amsterdam) c.Elekta (US and UK) 3. Linac testing and data acquisition a. Equipment and software review and selection b. Linac reliability/geometric and mechanical checks c. Draft Patient QA procedure d. EPI Image matching checks and procedures 4. Planning system checks a. export of dose matrix (options) b. dose calculation choices 5. IMRT Research Initiatives a. IMRT Planning Studies, Stabilisation, On-line Imaging 6. Equipment Procurement and testing a. Physics and Linac Equipment, Hardware, Software/Licences, Stabilisation 7. Establishing a DICOM Environment a. Prescription sending, Image transfer for EPI checks b. QA Files 8. Physics QA (Pre-Treatment) a.Clinical plan review; DVH checks b. geometry; dosimetry checks; DICOM checks c. 2D Distance to agreement; mm difference reports; Gamma function index 9. Documentation a.Protocol Development i. ICRU 50/62 reporting and prescribing b. QA for Physics c. QA for RT's d. Generation of a report for RO/patient history. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  4. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy after concomitant chemoradiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer: A TITE-CRM phase 1 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyen, Jérôme; Poudenx, Michel; Gal, Jocelyn; Otto, Josiane; Guerder, Caroline; Naghavi, Arash O; Gérard, Anais; Leysalle, Axel; Cohen, Charlotte; Padovani, Bernard; Ianessi, Antoine; Schiappa, Renaud; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves

    2018-05-01

    Platinum based chemoradiotherapy is the standard of care for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). With evidence that NSCLC can have a dose dependent response with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), we hypothesize that a SABR boost on residual tumor treated with chemoradiotherapy could increase treatment efficacy. The purpose of this study was to determine feasibility of such an approach. A prospective phase I trial was performed including 26 patients. Time-to-event continual reassessment method (TITE-CRM) was used for dose escalation which ranged from 3 × 7 to 3 × 12 Gy for the stereotactic boost, after 46 Gy (2 Gy per day) of chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was of 37.1 months (1.7-60.7), and 3, 4, 3, 3, 9 and 4 patients were included at the dose levels 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, respectively. During chemoradiotherapy, 9 patients experienced grade 3 toxicity. After stereotactic radiotherapy, 1 patient experienced an esophageal fistula (with local relapse) at the 3 × 11 Gy level, and 1 patient died from hemoptysis at the 3 × 12 Gy level. The 2-year rate of local control, locoregional free survival, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival was 70.3%, 55.5%, 44.5% and 50.8%, respectively. In the treatment of NSCLC with chemoradiotherapy followed by a stereotactic boost, the safe recommended dose in our protocol was a boost dose of 3 × 11 Gy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Improving bladder cancer treatment with radiotherapy using separate intensity modulated radiotherapy plans for boost and elective fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rooijen, D.; Van de Kamer, J.; Hulshof, M.; Koning, C.; Bel, A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate to what extent IMRT can decrease the dose to the organs at risk in bladder cancer treatment compared with conformal treatment while making separate treatment plans for the elective field and the boost. Special attention is paid to sparing small intestines. Twenty patients who were treated with the field-in-field technique (FiF) were re-planned with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using five and seven beams, respectively. Separate treatment plans were made for the elective field (including the pelvic lymph nodes) and the boost, which enables position correction for bone and tumour separately. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy to the elective field and 55 or 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). For bladder and rectum, V{sub 45}Gy and V{sub 55}Gy were compared, and for small intestines, V{sub 25}Gy and V{sub 40}Gy. The dose distribution with IMRT conformed better to the shape of the target. There was no significant difference between the techniques in dose to the healthy bladder. The median V{sub 40}Gy of the small intestines decreased from 114 to 66 cc (P = 0.001) with five beam IMRT, and to 55 cc (P = 0.001) with seven beam IMRT compared with FiF. V{sub 45}Gy for rectum decreased from 34.2% to 17.5% (P = 0.004) for both five and seven beam plans, while V{sub 55}Gy for rectum remained the same. With IMRT, a statistically significant dose decrease to the small intestines can be achieved while covering both tumour and elective PTV adequately.

  6. Improving bladder cancer treatment with radiotherapy using separate intensity modulated radiotherapy plans for boost and elective fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rooijen, D.; Van de Kamer, J.; Hulshof, M.; Koning, C.; Bel, A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate to what extent IMRT can decrease the dose to the organs at risk in bladder cancer treatment compared with conformal treatment while making separate treatment plans for the elective field and the boost. Special attention is paid to sparing small intestines. Twenty patients who were treated with the field-in-field technique (FiF) were re-planned with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using five and seven beams, respectively. Separate treatment plans were made for the elective field (including the pelvic lymph nodes) and the boost, which enables position correction for bone and tumour separately. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy to the elective field and 55 or 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). For bladder and rectum, V 45 Gy and V 55 Gy were compared, and for small intestines, V 25 Gy and V 40 Gy. The dose distribution with IMRT conformed better to the shape of the target. There was no significant difference between the techniques in dose to the healthy bladder. The median V 40 Gy of the small intestines decreased from 114 to 66 cc (P = 0.001) with five beam IMRT, and to 55 cc (P = 0.001) with seven beam IMRT compared with FiF. V 45 Gy for rectum decreased from 34.2% to 17.5% (P = 0.004) for both five and seven beam plans, while V 55 Gy for rectum remained the same. With IMRT, a statistically significant dose decrease to the small intestines can be achieved while covering both tumour and elective PTV adequately.

  7. Is it sufficient to repeat LINEAR accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery in choroidal melanoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furdova, A; Horkovicova, K; Justusova, P; Sramka, M

    One day session LINAC based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) at LINAC accelerator is a method of "conservative" attitude to treat the intraocular malignant uveal melanoma. We used model Clinac 600 C/D Varian (system Aria, planning system Corvus version 6.2 verification IMRT OmniPro) with 6 MeV X by rigid immobilization of the eye to the Leibinger frame. The stereotactic treatment planning after fusion of CT and MRI was optimized according to the critical structures (lens, optic nerve, also lens and optic nerve at the contralateral side, chiasm). The first plan was compared and the best plan was applied for therapy at C LINAC accelerator. The planned therapeutic dose was 35.0 Gy by 99 % of DVH (dose volume histogram). In our clinical study in the group of 125 patients with posterior uveal melanoma treated with SRS, in 2 patients (1.6 %) was repeated SRS indicated. Patient age of the whole group ranged from 25 to 81 years with a median of 54 TD was 35.0 Gy. In 2 patients after 5 year interval after stereotactic radiosurgery for uveal melanoma stage T1, the tumor volume increased to 50 % of the primary tumor volume and repeated SRS was necessary. To find out the changes in melanoma characteristics after SRS in long term interval after irradiation is necessary to follow up the patient by an ophthalmologist regularly. One step LINAC based stereotactic radiosurgery with a single dose 35.0 Gy is one of treatment options to treat T1 to T3 stage posterior uveal melanoma and to preserve the eye globe. In some cases it is possible to repeat the SRS after more than 5 year interval (Fig. 8, Ref. 23).

  8. Enable dosimetric of the Stereotactic Body Frame from Elekta in treatment planning systems for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Perez, Y.; Caballero Pinelo, R.; Alfonso Laguardia, R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the commissioning of a stereotactic body frame (SBF ® , Elekta) professional treatment planning systems (TPS) model Elekta's PrecisePlan ® and ERGO++®, for highly foxused delivery of megavoltage photon beams intended for treating tumors located in the thorax and abdominal region. For this purpose we applicated a dedicate stereotactic body frame (SBF ® , Elekta) intended for high precision radiotherapy in extra-cranial located tumors was studied. Issues associated with their implementation in the TPSs were evaluated comparing the dose calculations in two studies of CT under different conditions. an anthropomorphic thorax phantom, model CIRS Thorax IMRT ® , was used in designing several test cases. Ion chamber measurement was permormed in selected points in the phantom, for comparison purposes with dose calculated by the treatment planning systems. The commissioning of the stereotactic body frame (SBF ® , Elekta) and the stereotactic localization was verified, including the dose calculation verification in presence the SBF. The attenuation factors measured for the SBF were obtained and corrected in the TPS PrecisePlan ® , the biggest discrepancies obtained were ∼5% for the oblique sectors (inferior corners), because the minimum permissible value for the software is 0.95 while the real value measured was 0.898. It was studied the SBF, their components and their interference in depth with the photon beams and their implementation in the TPS. The introduction of the correction factors demonstrated to be effective to reduce the eventual errors of dose calculation in the TPS . (Author)

  9. Radiochemoimmunotherapy with intensity-modulated concomitant boost: interim analysis of the REACH trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Alexandra D; Krauss, Jürgen; Potthoff, Karin; Simon, Christian; Nikoghosyan, Anna V; Lossner, Karen; Debus, Jürgen; Münter, Marc W

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy and toxicity clinical in the intensified treatment of locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) with the combination of chemotherapy, the EGFR antibody cetuximab, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in a concomitant boost concept. REACH is a prospective, bi-centric phase II trial of carboplatin/5-FU and cetuximab weekly combined with IMRT. Primary endpoint is locoregional control, secondary endpoints include acute radiation effects and adverse events. Evaluation of disease response is carried out according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST); toxicity is assessed using NCI CTC v 3.0. Treatment was tolerated moderately well, acneiforme erythema occurred in 74.1% (grade II/III), mucositis grade III in 28.6%, and radiation dermatitis grade III in 14.3%. Higher-grade side-effects resolved quickly until the first follow-up post treatment. Objective response rates were promising with 28.6% CR at first follow-up and 92.9% thereafter. The combination of standard carboplatin/5-FU and cetuximab is feasible and results in promising objective response rates. The use of an IMRT concomitant boost is practicable in a routine clinical setting resulting in only moderate overall toxicity of the regimen.

  10. Stereotactic lesioning for mental illness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.-C.; Lee, T.-K.

    2008-01-01

    The authors report stereotactically created lesioning by radiofrequency or Cyberknife radiosurgery for patients with mental illness. Since 1993, thirty-eight patients have undergone stereotactic psychosurgery for medically intractable mental illnesses. Two patients had aggressive behavior. Twenty-five patients suffered from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and ten patients had depression. Another patient suffered from atypical psychosis. Bilateral amygdalotomy and subcaudate tractotomy were done for aggressive behavior. Limbic leucotomy or anterior cingulotomy was done for CCD and subcaudate tractotomy with or without cingulotomy was done for depression. In twenty-three patients, the lesions were made by a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator. In fifteen cases, the lesions were made with Cyberknife Radiosurgery (CKRS). The Overt Aggression Scale (OAS) declined from 8 to 2 with clinical improvement during follow up period. With long-term follow up (meaning 57 months) in 25 OCDs, the mean Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Score (YBOCS) declined from 34 to 13 (n = 25). The Hamilton Depression scale (HAMD) for ten patients with depression declined from 38.5 to 10.5 (n = 10). There was no operative mortality and no significant morbidity except one case with transient urinary incontinence. Authors suggest that stereotactic psychosurgery by RF and CKRS could be a safe and effective means of treating some medically intractable mental illnesses. (author)

  11. Letter to the Editor on 'Single-Arc IMRT?'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Karl

    2009-04-21

    In the note 'Single Arc IMRT?' (Bortfeld and Webb 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 N9-20), Bortfeld and Webb present a theoretical investigation of static gantry IMRT (S-IMRT), single-arc IMRT and tomotherapy. Based on their assumptions they conclude that single-arc IMRT is inherently limited in treating complex cases without compromising delivery efficiency. Here we present an expansion of their work based on the capabilities of the Varian RapidArc single-arc IMRT system. Using the same theoretical framework we derive clinically deliverable single-arc IMRT plans based on these specific capabilities. In particular, we consider the range of leaf motion, the ability to rapidly and continuously vary the dose rate and the choice of collimator angle used for delivery. In contrast to the results of Bortfeld and Webb, our results show that single-arc IMRT plans can be generated that closely match the theoretical optimum. The disparity in the results of each investigation emphasizes that the capabilities of the delivery system, along with the ability of the optimization algorithm to exploit those capabilities, are of particular importance in single-arc IMRT. We conclude that, given the capabilities available with the RapidArc system, single-arc IMRT can produce complex treatment plans that are delivered efficiently (in approximately 2 min).

  12. The impact of respiratory motion and treatment technique on stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q. Jackie; Thongphiew, Danthai; Wang Zhiheng; Chankong, Vira; Yin Fangfang

    2008-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), which delivers a much higher fractional dose than conventional treatment in only a few fractions, is an effective treatment for liver metastases. For patients who are treated under free-breathing conditions, however, respiration-induced tumor motion in the liver is a concern. Limited clinical information is available related to the impact of tumor motion and treatment technique on the dosimetric consequences. This study evaluated the dosimetric deviations between planned and delivered SBRT dose in the presence of tumor motion for three delivery techniques: three-dimensional conformal static beams (3DCRT), dynamic conformal arc (DARC), and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Five cases treated with SBRT for liver metastases were included in the study, with tumor motions ranging from 0.5 to 1.75 cm. For each case, three different treatment plans were developed using 3DCRT, DARC, and IMRT. The gantry/multileaf collimator (MLC) motion in the DARC plans and the MLC motion in the IMRT plans were synchronized to the patient's respiratory motion. Retrospectively sorted four-dimensional computed tomography image sets were used to determine patient-organ motion and to calculate the dose delivered during each respiratory phase. Deformable registration, using thin-plate-spline models, was performed to encode the tumor motion and deformation and to register the dose-per-phase to the reference phase images. The different dose distributions resulting from the different delivery techniques and motion ranges were compared to assess the effect of organ motion on dose delivery. Voxel dose variations occurred mostly in the high gradient regions, typically between the target volume and normal tissues, with a maximum variation up to 20%. The greatest CTV variation of all the plans was seen in the IMRT technique with the largest motion range (D99: -8.9%, D95: -8.3%, and D90: -6.3%). The greatest variation for all 3DCRT plans was less

  13. Distribution-Specific Agnostic Boosting

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Vitaly

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of boosting the accuracy of weak learning algorithms in the agnostic learning framework of Haussler (1992) and Kearns et al. (1992). Known algorithms for this problem (Ben-David et al., 2001; Gavinsky, 2002; Kalai et al., 2008) follow the same strategy as boosting algorithms in the PAC model: the weak learner is executed on the same target function but over different distributions on the domain. We demonstrate boosting algorithms for the agnostic learning framework tha...

  14. Impact of the Radiation Boost on Outcomes After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Colin; Anderson, Penny R.; Li Tianyu; Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Swaby, Ramona; Denlinger, Crystal; Dushkin, Holly; Nicolaou, Nicos; Freedman, Gary M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the impact of radiation tumor bed boost parameters in early-stage breast cancer on local control and cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 3,186 women underwent postlumpectomy whole-breast radiation with a tumor bed boost for Tis to T2 breast cancer from 1970 to 2008. Boost parameters analyzed included size, energy, dose, and technique. Endpoints were local control, cosmesis, and fibrosis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate actuarial incidence, and a Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine independent predictors of outcomes on multivariate analysis (MVA). The median follow-up was 78 months (range, 1-305 months). Results: The crude cosmetic results were excellent in 54%, good in 41%, and fair/poor in 5% of patients. The 10-year estimate of an excellent cosmesis was 66%. On MVA, independent predictors for excellent cosmesis were use of electron boost, lower electron energy, adjuvant systemic therapy, and whole-breast IMRT. Fibrosis was reported in 8.4% of patients. The actuarial incidence of fibrosis was 11% at 5 years and 17% at 10 years. On MVA, independent predictors of fibrosis were larger cup size and higher boost energy. The 10-year actuarial local failure was 6.3%. There was no significant difference in local control by boost method, cut-out size, dose, or energy. Conclusions: Likelihood of excellent cosmesis or fibrosis are associated with boost technique, electron energy, and cup size. However, because of high local control and rare incidence of fair/poor cosmesis with a boost, the anatomy of the patient and tumor cavity should ultimately determine the necessary boost parameters.

  15. Boosted beta regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Schmid

    Full Text Available Regression analysis with a bounded outcome is a common problem in applied statistics. Typical examples include regression models for percentage outcomes and the analysis of ratings that are measured on a bounded scale. In this paper, we consider beta regression, which is a generalization of logit models to situations where the response is continuous on the interval (0,1. Consequently, beta regression is a convenient tool for analyzing percentage responses. The classical approach to fit a beta regression model is to use maximum likelihood estimation with subsequent AIC-based variable selection. As an alternative to this established - yet unstable - approach, we propose a new estimation technique called boosted beta regression. With boosted beta regression estimation and variable selection can be carried out simultaneously in a highly efficient way. Additionally, both the mean and the variance of a percentage response can be modeled using flexible nonlinear covariate effects. As a consequence, the new method accounts for common problems such as overdispersion and non-binomial variance structures.

  16. Gradient Boosting Machines, A Tutorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey eNatekin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods. A theoretical information is complemented with many descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. A set of practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed.

  17. Robust loss functions for boosting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Takafumi; Takenouchi, Takashi; Eguchi, Shinto; Murata, Noboru

    2007-08-01

    Boosting is known as a gradient descent algorithm over loss functions. It is often pointed out that the typical boosting algorithm, Adaboost, is highly affected by outliers. In this letter, loss functions for robust boosting are studied. Based on the concept of robust statistics, we propose a transformation of loss functions that makes boosting algorithms robust against extreme outliers. Next, the truncation of loss functions is applied to contamination models that describe the occurrence of mislabels near decision boundaries. Numerical experiments illustrate that the proposed loss functions derived from the contamination models are useful for handling highly noisy data in comparison with other loss functions.

  18. A dosimetric comparison of 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy with an SIB for large and small breast volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, Andrea [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford Hospital, Gosford, New South Wales (Australia); Atyeo, John, E-mail: john.atyeo@sydney.edu.au [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Cox, Jennifer [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Rinks, Marianne [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Radiation Oncology, Cancer Services, Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District, Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia)

    2014-07-01

    Radiation therapy to the breast is a complex task, with many different techniques that can be employed to ensure adequate dose target coverage while minimizing doses to the organs at risk. This study compares the dose planning outcomes of 3 radiation treatment modalities, 3 dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and static tomotherapy, for left-sided whole-breast radiation treatment with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Overall, 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer were separated into 2 cohorts, small and large, based on breast volume. Dose plans were produced for each patient using 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy. All patients were prescribed a dose of 45 Gy in 20 fractions to the breast with an SIB of 56 Gy in 20 fractions to the tumor bed and normalized so that D{sub 98%} > 95% of the prescription dose. Dosimetric comparisons were made between the 3 modalities and the interaction of patient size. All 3 modalities offered adequate planning target volume (PTV) coverage with D{sub 98%} > 95% and D{sub 2%} < 107%. Static tomotherapy offered significantly improved (p = 0.006) dose homogeneity to the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.079 ± 0.011) and breast minus the SIB volume (Breast{sub SIB}) (p < 0.001, 0.15 ± 0.03) compared with the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.085 ± 0.008, 0.088 ± 0.12) and Breast{sub SIB} (0.22 ± 0.05, 0.23 ± 0.03) for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively. Static tomotherapy also offered statistically significant reductions (p < 0.001) in doses to the ipsilateral lung mean dose of 6.79 ± 2.11 Gy compared with 7.75 ± 2.54 Gy and 8.29 ± 2.76 Gy for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively, and significantly (p < 0.001) reduced heart doses (mean = 2.83 ± 1.26 Gy) compared to both IMRT and 3D-CRT (mean = 3.70 ± 1.44 Gy and 3.91 ± 1.58 Gy). Static tomotherapy is the dosimetrically superior modality for the whole breast with an SIB compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT. IMRT is superior to 3D

  19. Linac based radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, T.R.

    2008-01-01

    The following topics were discussed: Definition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT); Stereo market; Indications for SRS/SRT; History of linac-based SRS/SRT; Variety of systems; QA for SRS; Localization; and Imaging. (P.A.)

  20. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy as definitive treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeder, Falk; Nicolay, Nils H; Nguyen, Tam; Saleh-Ebrahimi, Ladan; Askoxylakis, Vasilis; Bostel, Tilman; Zwicker, Felix; Debus, Juergen; Timke, Carmen; Huber, Peter E

    2014-01-01

    To report our experience with increased dose intensity-modulated radiation and concurrent systemic chemotherapy as definitive treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer. We analyzed 27 consecutive patients with histologically proven esophageal cancer, who were treated with increased-dose IMRT as part of their definitive therapy. The majority of patients had T3/4 and/or N1 disease (93%). Squamous cell carcinoma was the dominating histology (81%). IMRT was delivered in step-and-shoot technique in all patients using an integrated boost concept. The boost volume was covered with total doses of 56-60 Gy (single dose 2-2.14 Gy), while regional nodal regions received 50.4 Gy (single dose 1.8 Gy) in 28 fractions. Concurrent systemic therapy was scheduled in all patients and administered in 26 (96%). 17 patients received additional adjuvant systemic therapy. Loco-regional control, progression-free and overall survival as well as acute and late toxicities were retrospectively analyzed. In addition, quality of life was prospectively assessed according to the EORTC QLQs (QLQ-OG25, QLQ-H&N35 and QLQ-C30). Radiotherapy was completed as planned in all but one patient (96%), and 21 patients received more than 80% of the planned concurrent systemic therapy. We observed ten locoregional failures, transferring into actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-locoregional control rates of 77%, 65% and 48%. Seven patients developed distant metastases, mainly to the lung (71%). The actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-disease free survival rates were 58%, 48% and 36%, and overall survival rates were 82%, 61% and 56%. The concept was well tolerated, both in the clinical objective examination and also according to the subjective answers to the QLQ questionnaire. 14 patients (52%) suffered from at least one acute CTC grade 3/4 toxicity, mostly hematological side effects or dysphagia. Severe late toxicities were reported in 6 patients (22%), mostly esophageal strictures and ulcerations. Severe side effects to

  1. Phase I Trial of Preoperative Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy with Incorporated Boost and Oral Capecitabine in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, Gary M.; Meropol, Neal J.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Hoffman, John; Callahan, Elaine; Price, Robert; Cheng, Jonathan; Cohen, Steve; Lewis, Nancy; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Rogatko, Andre; Konski, Andre

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of preoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and an incorporated boost with concurrent capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The eligibility criteria included adenocarcinoma of the rectum, T3-T4 and/or N1-N2 disease, performance status 0 or 1, and age ≥18 years. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost were used to treat the whole pelvis to 45 Gy and the gross tumor volume plus 2 cm to 55 Gy in 25 treatments within 5 weeks. The study was designed to escalate the dose to the gross tumor volume in 5-Gy increments in 3-patient cohorts. Capecitabine was given orally 825 mg/m 2 twice daily for 7 days each week during RT. The primary endpoint was the maximal tolerated radiation dose, and the secondary endpoints were the pathologic response and quality of life. Results: Eight patients completed RT at the initial dose level of 55 Gy. The study was discontinued because of toxicity-six Grade 3 toxicities occurred in 3 (38%) of 8 patients. All patients went on to definitive surgical resection, and no patient had a pathologically complete response. Conclusion: This regimen, using hypofractionated RT with an incorporated boost, had unacceptable toxicity despite using standard doses of capecitabine and IMRT. Additional research is needed to determine whether IMRT is able to reduce the side effects during and after pelvic RT with conventional dose fractionation

  2. An absorbed dose calorimeter for IMRT dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duane, S.; Aldehaybes, M.; Bailey, M.; Lee, N.D.; Thomas, C.G.; Palmans, H.

    2012-01-01

    A new calorimeter for dosimetry in small and complex fields has been built. The device is intended for the direct determination of absorbed dose to water in moderately small fields and in composite fields such as IMRT treatments, and as a transfer instrument calibrated against existing absorbed dose standards in conventional reference conditions. The geometry, materials and mode of operation have been chosen to minimize detector perturbations when used in a water phantom, to give a reasonably isotropic response and to minimize the effects of heat transfer when the calorimeter is used in non-reference conditions in a water phantom. The size of the core is meant to meet the needs of measurement in IMRT treatments and is comparable to the size of the air cavity in a type NE2611 ionization chamber. The calorimeter may also be used for small field dosimetry. Initial measurements in reference conditions and in an IMRT head and neck plan, collapsed to gantry angle zero, have been made to estimate the thermal characteristics of the device, and to assess its performance in use. The standard deviation (estimated repeatability) of the reference absorbed dose measurements was 0.02 Gy (0.6%). (authors)

  3. Boosted Higgs shapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaffer, Matthias; Spannowsky, Michael; Wymant, Chris

    2014-05-01

    The inclusive Higgs production rate through gluon fusion has been measured to be in agreement with the Standard Model (SM). We show that even if the inclusive Higgs production rate is very SM-like, a precise determination of the boosted Higgs transverse momentum shape offers the opportunity to see effects of natural new physics. These measurements are generically motivated by effective field theory arguments and specifically in extensions of the SM with a natural weak scale, like composite Higgs models and natural supersymmetry. We show in detail how a measurement at high transverse momentum of H→2l+p T via H→ττ and H→WW * could be performed and demonstrate that it offers a compelling alternative to the t anti tH channel. We discuss the sensitivity to new physics in the most challenging scenario of an exactly SM-like inclusive Higgs cross-section.

  4. Robust boosting via convex optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rätsch, Gunnar

    2001-12-01

    In this work we consider statistical learning problems. A learning machine aims to extract information from a set of training examples such that it is able to predict the associated label on unseen examples. We consider the case where the resulting classification or regression rule is a combination of simple rules - also called base hypotheses. The so-called boosting algorithms iteratively find a weighted linear combination of base hypotheses that predict well on unseen data. We address the following issues: o The statistical learning theory framework for analyzing boosting methods. We study learning theoretic guarantees on the prediction performance on unseen examples. Recently, large margin classification techniques emerged as a practical result of the theory of generalization, in particular Boosting and Support Vector Machines. A large margin implies a good generalization performance. Hence, we analyze how large the margins in boosting are and find an improved algorithm that is able to generate the maximum margin solution. o How can boosting methods be related to mathematical optimization techniques? To analyze the properties of the resulting classification or regression rule, it is of high importance to understand whether and under which conditions boosting converges. We show that boosting can be used to solve large scale constrained optimization problems, whose solutions are well characterizable. To show this, we relate boosting methods to methods known from mathematical optimization, and derive convergence guarantees for a quite general family of boosting algorithms. o How to make Boosting noise robust? One of the problems of current boosting techniques is that they are sensitive to noise in the training sample. In order to make boosting robust, we transfer the soft margin idea from support vector learning to boosting. We develop theoretically motivated regularized algorithms that exhibit a high noise robustness. o How to adapt boosting to regression problems

  5. TH-A-BRC-03: AAPM TG218: Measurement Methods and Tolerance Levels for Patient-Specific IMRT Verification QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miften, M. [University of Colorado School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    of possible dosimetry protocols. The report will be reviewed by the AAPM Working Group on Recommendations for Radiotherapy External Beam Quality Assurance and then by the AAPM Science Council before publication in Medical Physics Survey of possible calibration protocols for calibration of Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery (GSR) devices Overview of modern Quality Assurance techniques for GSR AAPM TG-218 Tolerance Levels and Methodologies for IMRT Verification QA - Moyed Miften Patient-specific IMRT QA measurement is a process designed to identify discrepancies between calculated and delivered doses. Error tolerance limits are not well-defined or consistently applied across centers. The AAPM TG-218 report has been prepared to improve the understanding and consistency of this process by providing recommendations for methodologies and tolerance limits in patient-specific IMRT QA. Learning Objectives: Review measurement methods and methodologies for absolute dose verification Provide recommendations on delivery methods, data interpretation, the use of analysis routines and choice of tolerance limits for IMRT QA Sonja Dieterich has a research agreement with Sun Nuclear Inc. Steven Goetsch is a part-time consultant for Elekta.

  6. TH-A-BRC-03: AAPM TG218: Measurement Methods and Tolerance Levels for Patient-Specific IMRT Verification QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miften, M.

    2016-01-01

    of possible dosimetry protocols. The report will be reviewed by the AAPM Working Group on Recommendations for Radiotherapy External Beam Quality Assurance and then by the AAPM Science Council before publication in Medical Physics Survey of possible calibration protocols for calibration of Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery (GSR) devices Overview of modern Quality Assurance techniques for GSR AAPM TG-218 Tolerance Levels and Methodologies for IMRT Verification QA - Moyed Miften Patient-specific IMRT QA measurement is a process designed to identify discrepancies between calculated and delivered doses. Error tolerance limits are not well-defined or consistently applied across centers. The AAPM TG-218 report has been prepared to improve the understanding and consistency of this process by providing recommendations for methodologies and tolerance limits in patient-specific IMRT QA. Learning Objectives: Review measurement methods and methodologies for absolute dose verification Provide recommendations on delivery methods, data interpretation, the use of analysis routines and choice of tolerance limits for IMRT QA Sonja Dieterich has a research agreement with Sun Nuclear Inc. Steven Goetsch is a part-time consultant for Elekta.

  7. CyberKnife Boost for Patients with Cervical Cancer Unable to Undergo Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Jonathan Andrew; Witten, Matthew R.; Clancey, Owen; Episcopia, Karen; Accordino, Diane; Chalas, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Standard radiation therapy for patients undergoing primary chemosensitized radiation for carcinomas of the cervix usually consists of external beam radiation followed by an intracavitary brachytherapy boost. On occasion, the brachytherapy boost cannot be performed due to unfavorable anatomy or because of coexisting medical conditions. We examined the safety and efficacy of using CyberKnife stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a boost to the cervix after external beam radiation in those patients unable to have brachytherapy to give a more effective dose to the cervix than with conventional external beam radiation alone. Six consecutive patients with anatomic or medical conditions precluding a tandem and ovoid boost were treated with combined external beam radiation and CyberKnife boost to the cervix. Five patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis with serial intensity-modulated radiation therapy boost to the uterus and cervix to a dose of 61.2 Gy. These five patients received an SBRT boost to the cervix to a dose of 20 Gy in five fractions of 4 Gy each. One patient was treated to the pelvis to a dose of 45 Gy with an external beam boost to the uterus and cervix to a dose of 50.4 Gy. This patient received an SBRT boost to the cervix to a dose of 19.5 Gy in three fractions of 6.5 Gy. Five percent volumes of the bladder and rectum were kept to ≤75 Gy in all patients (i.e., V75 Gy ≤ 5%). All of the patients remain locally controlled with no evidence of disease following treatment. Grade 1 diarrhea occurred in 4/6 patients during the conventional external beam radiation. There has been no grade 3 or 4 rectal or bladder toxicity. There were no toxicities observed following SBRT boost. At a median follow-up of 14 months, CyberKnife radiosurgical boost is well tolerated and efficacious in providing a boost to patients with cervix cancer who are unable to undergo brachytherapy boost. Further follow-up is required to see if these results remain durable.

  8. TH-A-BRC-02: AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, S. [San Diego Medical Physics (United States)

    2016-06-15

    of possible dosimetry protocols. The report will be reviewed by the AAPM Working Group on Recommendations for Radiotherapy External Beam Quality Assurance and then by the AAPM Science Council before publication in Medical Physics Survey of possible calibration protocols for calibration of Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery (GSR) devices Overview of modern Quality Assurance techniques for GSR AAPM TG-218 Tolerance Levels and Methodologies for IMRT Verification QA - Moyed Miften Patient-specific IMRT QA measurement is a process designed to identify discrepancies between calculated and delivered doses. Error tolerance limits are not well-defined or consistently applied across centers. The AAPM TG-218 report has been prepared to improve the understanding and consistency of this process by providing recommendations for methodologies and tolerance limits in patient-specific IMRT QA. Learning Objectives: Review measurement methods and methodologies for absolute dose verification Provide recommendations on delivery methods, data interpretation, the use of analysis routines and choice of tolerance limits for IMRT QA Sonja Dieterich has a research agreement with Sun Nuclear Inc. Steven Goetsch is a part-time consultant for Elekta.

  9. TH-A-BRC-02: AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, S.

    2016-01-01

    of possible dosimetry protocols. The report will be reviewed by the AAPM Working Group on Recommendations for Radiotherapy External Beam Quality Assurance and then by the AAPM Science Council before publication in Medical Physics Survey of possible calibration protocols for calibration of Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery (GSR) devices Overview of modern Quality Assurance techniques for GSR AAPM TG-218 Tolerance Levels and Methodologies for IMRT Verification QA - Moyed Miften Patient-specific IMRT QA measurement is a process designed to identify discrepancies between calculated and delivered doses. Error tolerance limits are not well-defined or consistently applied across centers. The AAPM TG-218 report has been prepared to improve the understanding and consistency of this process by providing recommendations for methodologies and tolerance limits in patient-specific IMRT QA. Learning Objectives: Review measurement methods and methodologies for absolute dose verification Provide recommendations on delivery methods, data interpretation, the use of analysis routines and choice of tolerance limits for IMRT QA Sonja Dieterich has a research agreement with Sun Nuclear Inc. Steven Goetsch is a part-time consultant for Elekta.

  10. Simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Bong Kyung; Kang, Min Kyul; Kim, Jae Chul [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Young; Choi, Gyu Seog; Kim, Jong Gwang; Kang, Byung Woog; Kim, Hye Jin; Park, Soo Yeun [Kyungpook National University Chilgok Hospital, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) for preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), by comparing with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Patients who were treated with PCRT for LARC from 2015 January to 2016 December were retrospectively enrolled. Total doses of 45 Gy to 50.4 Gy with 3D-CRT or SIB-IMRT were administered concomitantly with 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin or capecitabine. Surgery was performed 8 weeks after PCRT. Between PCRT and surgery, one cycle of additional chemotherapy was administered. Pathologic tumor responses were compared between SIB-IMRT and 3D-CRT groups. Acute gastrointestinal, genitourinary, hematologic, and skin toxicities were compared between the two groups based on the RTOG toxicity criteria. SIB-IMRT was used in 53 patients, and 3D-CRT in 41 patients. After PCRT, no significant differences were noted in tumor responses, pathologic complete response (9% vs. 7%; p = 1.000), pathologic tumor regression Grade 3 or higher (85% vs. 71%; p = 0.096), and R0 resection (87% vs. 85%; p = 0.843). Grade 2 genitourinary toxicities were significantly lesser in the SIB-IMRT group (8% vs. 24%; p = 0.023), but gastrointestinal toxicities were not different across the two groups. SIB-IMRT showed lower GU toxicity and similar tumor responses when compared with 3D-CRT in PCRT for LARC.

  11. Dysphagia in head and neck cancer patients following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peponi, Evangelia; Glanzmann, Christoph; Willi, Bettina; Huber, Gerhard; Studer, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the objective and subjective long term swallowing function, and to relate dysphagia to the radiation dose delivered to the critical anatomical structures in head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, +/- chemotherapy), using a midline protection contour (below hyoid, ~level of vertebra 2/3). 82 patients with stage III/IV squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, oropharynx, or hypopharynx, who underwent successful definitive (n = 63, mean dose 68.9Gy) or postoperative (n = 19, mean dose 64.2Gy) simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) -IMRT either alone or in combination with chemotherapy (85%) with curative intent between January 2002 and November 2005, were evaluated retrospectively. 13/63 definitively irradiated patients (21%) presented with a total gross tumor volume (tGTV) >70cc (82-173cc; mean 106cc). In all patients, a laryngo-pharyngeal midline sparing contour outside of the PTV was drawn. Dysphagia was graded according subjective patient-reported and objective observer-assessed instruments. All patients were re-assessed 12 months later. Dose distribution to the swallowing structures was calculated. At the re-assessment, 32-month mean post treatment follow-up (range 16-60), grade 3/4 objective toxicity was assessed in 10%. At the 32-month evaluation as well as at the last follow up assessment mean 50 months (16-85) post-treatment, persisting swallowing dysfunction grade 3 was subjectively and objectively observed in 1 patient (1%). The 5-year local control rate of the cohort was 75%; no medial marginal failures were observed. Our results show that sparing the swallowing structures by IMRT seems effective and relatively safe in terms of avoidance of persistent grade 3/4 late dysphagia and local disease control

  12. An analysis of tolerance levels in IMRT quality assurance procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basran, Parminder S.; Woo, Milton K.

    2008-01-01

    Increased use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has resulted in increased efforts in patient quality assurance (QA). Software and detector systems intended to streamline the IMRT quality assurance process often report metrics, such as percent discrepancies between measured and computed doses, which can be compared to benchmark or threshold values. The purpose of this work is to examine the relationships between two different types of IMRT QA processes in order to define, or refine, appropriate tolerances values. For 115 IMRT plans delivered in a 3 month period, we examine the discrepancies between (a) the treatment planning system (TPS) and results from a commercial independent monitor unit (MU) calculation program; (b) TPS and results from a commercial diode-array measurement system; and (c) the independent MU calculation and the diode-array measurements. Statistical tests were performed to assess significance in the IMRT QA results for different disease site and machine models. There is no evidence that the average total dose discrepancy in the monitor unit calculation depends on the disease site. Second, the discrepancies in the two IMRT QA methods are independent: there is no evidence that a better --or worse--monitor unit validation result is related to a better--or worse--diode-array measurement result. Third, there is marginal benefit in repeating the independent MU calculation with a more suitable dose point, if the initial IMRT QA failed a certain tolerance. Based on these findings, the authors conclude at some acceptable tolerances based on disease site and IMRT QA method. Specifically, monitor unit validations are expected to have a total dose discrepancy of 3% overall, and 5% per beam, independent of disease site. Diode array measurements are expected to have a total absolute dose discrepancy of 3% overall, and 3% per beam, independent of disease site. The percent of pixels exceeding a 3% and 3 mm threshold in a gamma analysis should be

  13. Geometric factors influencing dosimetric sparing of the parotid glands using IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, Margie A.; Jackson, Andrew; Narayana, Ashwatha; Lee, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the relationship between the parotid volume, parotid-planning target volume (PTV) overlap, and dosimetric sparing of the parotid with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Parotid data were collected retrospectively for 51 patients treated with simultaneous boost IMRT. Unresectable patients received 54 or 59.4 Gy to subclinical disease, 70 Gy to gross disease. Patients treated postoperatively received 54, 60, and 66 Gy to low-risk, high-risk, and tumor bed regions. Volume and mean dose of each gland and gland segments outside of and overlapping the PTV were collected. Proximity of each gland to each PTV was recorded. Results: Dosimetric sparing (mean dose ≤26.5 Gy) was achieved in 66 of 71 glands with ≤21% parotid-PTV overlap and 8 of 23 glands with >21% overlap (p = 21%. Median mean dose was 25.9 Gy to glands overlapping PTV 54 or PTV 59 alone and 30.0 Gy to those abutting PTV 7 (p 7 was associated with higher parotid dose, satisfactory sparing was achieved in 24 of 43 ipsilateral glands. Conclusions: Dosimetric sparing of the parotid is feasible when the parotid-PTV overlap is less than approximately 20%. With more overlap, sparing may result in low doses within the overlap region, possibly leading to inadequate PTV coverage. Gland proximity to the high-dose PTV is associated with higher mean dose but does not always preclude dosimetric sparing

  14. Clinical results of conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy using a focal simultaneous boost for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in elderly or medically unfit patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutkenhaus, Lotte J.; Os, Rob M. van; Bel, Arjan; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    For elderly or medically unfit patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer, cystectomy or chemotherapy are contraindicated. This leaves radical radiotherapy as the only treatment option. It was the aim of this study to retrospectively analyze the treatment outcome and associated toxicity of conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using a focal simultaneous tumor boost for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in patients not suitable for cystectomy. One hundred eighteen patients with T2-4 N0-1 M0 bladder cancer were analyzed retrospectively. Median age was 80 years. Treatment consisted of either a conformal box technique or IMRT and included a simultaneous boost to the tumor. To enable an accurate boost delivery, fiducial markers were placed around the tumor. Patients were treated with 40 Gy in 20 fractions to the elective treatment volumes, and a daily tumor boost up to 55–60 Gy. Clinical complete response was seen in 87 % of patients. Three-year overall survival was 44 %, with a locoregional control rate of 73 % at 3 years. Toxicity was low, with late urinary and intestinal toxicity rates grade ≥ 2 of 14 and 5 %, respectively. The use of IMRT reduced late intestinal toxicity, whereas fiducial markers reduced acute urinary toxicity. Radical radiotherapy using a focal boost is feasible and effective for elderly or unfit patients, with a 3-year locoregional control of 73 %. Toxicity rates were low, and were reduced by the use of IMRT and fiducial markers. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-016-0618-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  15. Computed tomography-controlled stereotactic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Keizo; Shichijo, Fumio; Gyoten, Tetsuya; Tomida, Keisuke; Miyake, Hajime

    1986-01-01

    A single use of coordinate system of computed tomography (CT) scanner is utilized for CT-controlled stereotactic surgery. Depth, direction and readjustment of target trajectory were defined by known values of cursor number in CT images and numbers of the sliding table indicator. We loaded calculation formulas into hand held computer to obtain immediate answers. Stereotactic apparatus consisted two main parts: the patient's head fixation and probe holder. Surgery was performed in cases of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage for evacuation of the hematomas successfully. Target accuracy was satisfactory. With further advance of this surgery, automatic stereotactic control with a special robot machine seeing possible. (author)

  16. Stereotactic imaging in functional neurosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirabayashi, Hidehiro

    2012-07-01

    Background: The birth of stereotactic functional neurosurgery in 1947 was to a great extent dependent on the development of ventriculography. The last decades have witnessed a renaissance of functional stereotactic neurosurgery in the treatment of patients with movement disorders. Initially, these procedures were largely based on the same imaging technique that had been used since the birth of this technique, and that is still used in some centers. The introduction of new imaging modalities such as Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provided new potentials, but also new challenges for accurate identification and visualisation of the targets in the basal ganglia and the thalamus with an urge to thoroughly evaluate and optimize the stereotactic targeting technique, as well as evaluate accurately in stereotactic space the location and extent of stereotactic Radiofrequency (RF) lesions and the position of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. Aims: To study the differences between CT and MRI regarding indirect atlas coordinates in thalamic and pallidal procedures and to evaluate and validate visualisation of the pallidum and the subthalamic nucleus in view of direct targeting irrespective of atlas-derived coordinates. Furthermore, to evaluate the contribution of RF parameters on the size of stereotactic lesions, as well as the impact of size and location on clinical outcome. Method: The coordinates in relation to the landmarks of the 3{sup rd} ventricle of the targets in the pallidum and ventrolateral thalamus were compared between CT and MRI in 34 patients. In another 48 patients direct visualization of the pallidum was evaluated and compared to indirect atlas based targeting. The possibility and versatility of visualizing the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) on short acquisition MRI were evaluated in a multicentre study, and the use of alternative landmarks in identification of the STN was demonstrated in another study. In 46 patients CT and

  17. Stereotactic imaging in functional neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    Background: The birth of stereotactic functional neurosurgery in 1947 was to a great extent dependent on the development of ventriculography. The last decades have witnessed a renaissance of functional stereotactic neurosurgery in the treatment of patients with movement disorders. Initially, these procedures were largely based on the same imaging technique that had been used since the birth of this technique, and that is still used in some centers. The introduction of new imaging modalities such as Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provided new potentials, but also new challenges for accurate identification and visualisation of the targets in the basal ganglia and the thalamus with an urge to thoroughly evaluate and optimize the stereotactic targeting technique, as well as evaluate accurately in stereotactic space the location and extent of stereotactic Radiofrequency (RF) lesions and the position of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. Aims: To study the differences between CT and MRI regarding indirect atlas coordinates in thalamic and pallidal procedures and to evaluate and validate visualisation of the pallidum and the subthalamic nucleus in view of direct targeting irrespective of atlas-derived coordinates. Furthermore, to evaluate the contribution of RF parameters on the size of stereotactic lesions, as well as the impact of size and location on clinical outcome. Method: The coordinates in relation to the landmarks of the 3 rd ventricle of the targets in the pallidum and ventrolateral thalamus were compared between CT and MRI in 34 patients. In another 48 patients direct visualization of the pallidum was evaluated and compared to indirect atlas based targeting. The possibility and versatility of visualizing the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) on short acquisition MRI were evaluated in a multicentre study, and the use of alternative landmarks in identification of the STN was demonstrated in another study. In 46 patients CT and MRI

  18. Cognitive outcome after stereotactic amygdalohippocampectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtěch, Zdeněk; Krámská, Lenka; Malíková, Hana; Seltenreichová, Kateřina; Procházka, Tomáš; Kalina, Miroslav; Liščák, Roman

    2012-06-01

    We sought to determine the neuropsychological outcome after stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy performed for intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. The article describes the cases of 31 patients who were evaluated using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised prior to, and one year after, surgery. Patients showed increases in their mean Full Scale, Verbal and Performance IQ scores of 4, 3 and 4 IQ points respectively (pmemory performance - with a mean increase of 1, 3 and 0 MQ points in Global, Verbal and Visual memory respectively (pmemory improved in 3 (10.3%) patients, verbal memory in 1 (3.4%) and 1 patient (3.3%) showed deterioration in visual memory. Our results provide evidence for unchanged memory in patients with MTLE after the procedure. No verbal memory deterioration was detected in any of our patients, while improvements were found in intellectual performance. The results suggest that stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalahippocampectomy could be superior to open surgery in terms of its neurocognitive outcomes. A larger randomised trial of these approaches is justified. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Combining Boosted Global

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szidónia Lefkovits

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The domain of object detection presents a wide range of interest due to its numerous application possibilities especially real time applications. All of them require high detection rate correlated with short processing time. One of the most efficient systems, working with visual information, were presented in the publication of Viola et al. [1], [2].This detection system uses classifiers based on Haar-like separating features combined with the AdaBoost learning algorithm. The most important bottleneck of the system is the big number of false detections at high hit rate. In this paper we propose to overcome this disadvantage by using specialized parts classifiers. This aim comes from the observation that the target object does not resemble the false detections at all.The reason of this fact is the coding manner of Haar-like features which attend to handle image patches and neglect the edges and contours. In order to obtain a more robust classifier, a global aspect method is combined with a part-based method, having the goal to improve the performance of the detector without significant increase of the detection time.

  20. Lhermitte's Sign Developing after IMRT for Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong C. Lim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lhermitte's sign (LS is a benign form of myelopathy with neck flexion producing an unpleasant electric-shock sensation radiating down the extremities. Although rare, it can occur after head and neck radiotherapy. Results. We report a case of Lhermitte's developing after curative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for a patient with locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. IMRT delivers a conformal dose of radiation in head and neck cancer resulting in a gradient of radiation dose throughout the spinal cord. Using IMRT, more dose is delivered to the anterior spinal cord than the posterior cord. Conclusions. Lhermitte's sign can develop after IMRT for head and neck cancer. We propose an anterior spinal cord structure, the spinothalamic tract to be the target of IMRT-caused LS.

  1. Reduced Toxicity With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT): An Update on the Whole Abdominopelvic Radiation Therapy (WAP-RT) Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Neil B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Stein, Nicholas F. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); LaQuaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Magnan, Heather M. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare malignancy typically involving the peritoneum in young men. Whole abdominopelvic radiation therapy (WAP-RT) using conventional 2-dimensional (2D) radiation therapy (RT) is used to address local recurrence but has been limited by toxicity. Our objectives were to assess the benefit of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on toxicity and to update the largest series on radiation for DSRCT. Methods and Materials: The records of 31 patients with DSRCT treated with WAP-RT (22 with 2D-RT and 9 with IMRT) between 1992 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. All received multi-agent chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking followed by 30 Gy of WAP-RT. A further focal boost of 12 to 24 Gy was used in 12 cases. Boost RT and autologous stem cell transplantation were nearly exclusive to patients treated with 2D-RT. Toxicities were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Dosimetric analysis compared IMRT and simulated 2D-RT dose distributions. Results: Of 31 patients, 30 completed WAP-RT, with a median follow-up after RT of 19 months. Acute toxicity was reduced with IMRT versus 2D-RT: P=.04 for gastrointestinal toxicity of grade 2 or higher (33% vs 77%); P=.02 for grade 4 hematologic toxicity (33% vs 86%); P=.01 for rates of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; and P=.04 for rates of platelet transfusion. Post treatment red blood cell and platelet transfusion rates were also reduced (P=.01). IMRT improved target homogeneity ([D05-D95]/D05 of 21% vs 46%) and resulted in a 21% mean bone dose reduction. Small bowel obstruction was the most common late toxicity (23% overall). Updated 3-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 50% and 24%, respectively. Overall survival was associated with distant metastasis at diagnosis on multivariate analysis. Most failures remained intraperitoneal (88%). Conclusions: IMRT for consolidative WAP-RT in DSRCT improves

  2. Stereotactic body radiotherapy a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Gaya, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collecting the key information in this burgeoning field into a single volume, this handbook for clinical oncology trainees and consultants covers all of the basic aspects of stereotactic radiotherapy systems and treatment and includes plenty of case studies.

  3. Hybrid IMRT plans-concurrently treating conventional and IMRT beams for improved breast irradiation and reduced planning time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayo, Charles S.; Urie, Marcia M.; Fitzgerald, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a hybrid intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique as a class solution for treatment of the intact breast. Methods and materials: The following five plan techniques were compared for 10 breast patients using dose-volume histogram analysis: conventional wedged-field tangents (Tangents), forward-planned field-within-a-field tangents (FIF), IMRT-only tangents (IMRT tangents), conventional open plus IMRT tangents (4-field hybrid), and conventional open plus IMRT tangents with 2 anterior oblique IMRT beams (6-field hybrid). Results: The 4-field hybrid and FIF achieved dose distributions better than Tangents and IMRT tangents. The volume of tissue outside the planning target volume receiving ≥110% of prescribed dose was largest for IMRT tangents (average 158 cc) and least for 6-field hybrid (average 1 cc); the FIF and 4-field hybrid were comparable (average 15 cc). Heart volume ≥30 Gy averaged 13 cc for all techniques, except Tangents, for which it was 32 cc. Average total lung volume ≥20 Gy was 7% for all. Contralateral breast doses were < 3% for all. Planning time for hybrid techniques was significantly less than for conventional FIF technique. Conclusions: The 4-field hybrid technique is a viable class solution. The 6-field hybrid technique creates the most conformal dose distribution at the expense of more normal tissue receiving low dose

  4. Stereotactic Neurosurgical Treatment Options for Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eTrippel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Craniopharyngioma are the most common non glial tumors in childhood. The results of different studies indicate that radical excision surgery is not an appropriate treatment strategy for childhood craniopharyngioma with hypothalamic involvement. Stereotactic neurosurgery provides save, minimal invasive and cost efficient options in the treatment of childhood craniopharyngioma. In this review a summary of the contribution of the stereotactic neurosurgery in the interdisciplinary treatment regime of childhood craniopharyngioma will be given and discussed in detail.

  5. Study of the absorbed dose in small fields with absence of lateral electronic balance in stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy with modulated intensity; Estudio de la dosis absorbida en campos pequenos con ausencia de equilibrio electronico lateral en radiocirugia estereotaxica y radioterapia con intensidad modulada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas V, M. X.

    2013-07-01

    In this thesis we develop and experimental and theoretical study, using semi analytical techniques of the physical dosimetry for small and nonstandard fields for stereotactic radiosurgery (Srs) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), with high energy photon beams from a BrainLAB system with cones at Instituto del Cancer SOLCA (Ecuador) and a Tomo Therapy Hi-Art system at Centro Oncologico de Chihuahua (Mexico). (Author)

  6. IMRT for Image-Guided Single Vocal Cord Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Sarah O.S.; Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Keskin-Cambay, Fatma; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We have been developing an image-guided single vocal cord irradiation technique to treat patients with stage T1a glottic carcinoma. In the present study, we compared the dose coverage to the affected vocal cord and the dose delivered to the organs at risk using conventional, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) coplanar, and IMRT non-coplanar techniques. Methods and Materials: For 10 patients, conventional treatment plans using two laterally opposed wedged 6-MV photon beams were calculated in XiO (Elekta-CMS treatment planning system). An in-house IMRT/beam angle optimization algorithm was used to obtain the coplanar and non-coplanar optimized beam angles. Using these angles, the IMRT plans were generated in Monaco (IMRT treatment planning system, Elekta-CMS) with the implemented Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. The organs at risk included the contralateral vocal cord, arytenoids, swallowing muscles, carotid arteries, and spinal cord. The prescription dose was 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Results: For the conventional plans and coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, the population-averaged mean dose ± standard deviation to the planning target volume was 67 ± 1 Gy. The contralateral vocal cord dose was reduced from 66 ± 1 Gy in the conventional plans to 39 ± 8 Gy and 36 ± 6 Gy in the coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, respectively. IMRT consistently reduced the doses to the other organs at risk. Conclusions: Single vocal cord irradiation with IMRT resulted in good target coverage and provided significant sparing of the critical structures. This has the potential to improve the quality-of-life outcomes after RT and maintain the same local control rates.

  7. IMRT for Image-Guided Single Vocal Cord Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, Sarah O.S., E-mail: s.osman@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Keskin-Cambay, Fatma; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have been developing an image-guided single vocal cord irradiation technique to treat patients with stage T1a glottic carcinoma. In the present study, we compared the dose coverage to the affected vocal cord and the dose delivered to the organs at risk using conventional, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) coplanar, and IMRT non-coplanar techniques. Methods and Materials: For 10 patients, conventional treatment plans using two laterally opposed wedged 6-MV photon beams were calculated in XiO (Elekta-CMS treatment planning system). An in-house IMRT/beam angle optimization algorithm was used to obtain the coplanar and non-coplanar optimized beam angles. Using these angles, the IMRT plans were generated in Monaco (IMRT treatment planning system, Elekta-CMS) with the implemented Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. The organs at risk included the contralateral vocal cord, arytenoids, swallowing muscles, carotid arteries, and spinal cord. The prescription dose was 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Results: For the conventional plans and coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, the population-averaged mean dose {+-} standard deviation to the planning target volume was 67 {+-} 1 Gy. The contralateral vocal cord dose was reduced from 66 {+-} 1 Gy in the conventional plans to 39 {+-} 8 Gy and 36 {+-} 6 Gy in the coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, respectively. IMRT consistently reduced the doses to the other organs at risk. Conclusions: Single vocal cord irradiation with IMRT resulted in good target coverage and provided significant sparing of the critical structures. This has the potential to improve the quality-of-life outcomes after RT and maintain the same local control rates.

  8. Dosimetric adaptive IMRT driven by fiducial points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crijns, Wouter; Van Herck, Hans; Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Haustermans, Karin; Slagmolen, Pieter; Maes, Frederik; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy have become standard treatments but are more sensitive to anatomical variations than 3D conformal techniques. To correct for inter- and intrafraction anatomical variations, fast and easy to implement methods are needed. Here, the authors propose a full dosimetric IMRT correction that finds a compromise in-between basic repositioning (the current clinical practice) and full replanning. It simplifies replanning by avoiding a recontouring step and a full dose calculation. It surpasses repositioning by updating the preoptimized fluence and monitor units (MU) using a limited number of fiducial points and a pretreatment (CB)CT. To adapt the fluence the fiducial points were projected in the beam's eye view (BEV). To adapt the MUs, point dose calculation towards the same fiducial points were performed. The proposed method is intrinsically fast and robust, and simple to understand for operators, because of the use of only four fiducial points and the beam data based point dose calculations. Methods: To perform our dosimetric adaptation, two fluence corrections in the BEV are combined with two MU correction steps along the beam's path. (1) A transformation of the fluence map such that it is realigned with the current target geometry. (2) A correction for an unintended scaling of the penumbra margin when the treatment beams scale to the current target size. (3) A correction for the target depth relative to the body contour and (4) a correction for the target distance to the source. The impact of the correction strategy and its individual components was evaluated by simulations on a virtual prostate phantom. This heterogeneous reference phantom was systematically subjected to population based prostate transformations to simulate interfraction variations. Additionally, a patient example illustrated the clinical practice. The correction strategy was evaluated using both dosimetric

  9. Dosimetric adaptive IMRT driven by fiducial points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crijns, Wouter, E-mail: wouter.crijns@uzleuven.be [Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van Herck, Hans [Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) – PSI, Center for the Processing of Speech and Images, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Haustermans, Karin [Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Slagmolen, Pieter [Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) – PSI, Center for the Processing of Speech and Images, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); iMinds-KU Leuven Medical IT Department, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Maes, Frederik [Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) – PSI, Center for the Processing of Speech and Images, KU Leuven and iMinds, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van den Heuvel, Frank [Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Department of Oncology, MRC-CR-UK Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy have become standard treatments but are more sensitive to anatomical variations than 3D conformal techniques. To correct for inter- and intrafraction anatomical variations, fast and easy to implement methods are needed. Here, the authors propose a full dosimetric IMRT correction that finds a compromise in-between basic repositioning (the current clinical practice) and full replanning. It simplifies replanning by avoiding a recontouring step and a full dose calculation. It surpasses repositioning by updating the preoptimized fluence and monitor units (MU) using a limited number of fiducial points and a pretreatment (CB)CT. To adapt the fluence the fiducial points were projected in the beam's eye view (BEV). To adapt the MUs, point dose calculation towards the same fiducial points were performed. The proposed method is intrinsically fast and robust, and simple to understand for operators, because of the use of only four fiducial points and the beam data based point dose calculations. Methods: To perform our dosimetric adaptation, two fluence corrections in the BEV are combined with two MU correction steps along the beam's path. (1) A transformation of the fluence map such that it is realigned with the current target geometry. (2) A correction for an unintended scaling of the penumbra margin when the treatment beams scale to the current target size. (3) A correction for the target depth relative to the body contour and (4) a correction for the target distance to the source. The impact of the correction strategy and its individual components was evaluated by simulations on a virtual prostate phantom. This heterogeneous reference phantom was systematically subjected to population based prostate transformations to simulate interfraction variations. Additionally, a patient example illustrated the clinical practice. The correction strategy was evaluated using both dosimetric

  10. Simultaneous Integrated Boost Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Compared With Conventional Radiotherapy in Patients Treated With Concurrent Carboplatin and 5-Fluorouracil for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clavel, Sebastien, E-mail: sebastien.clavel@umontreal.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen, David H.A.; Fortin, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Despres, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Khaouam, Nader [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Donath, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Soulieres, Denis [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Guertin, Louis [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, the toxicity and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in patients treated with concomitant carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and December 2007, 249 patients were treated with definitive chemoradiation. One hundred patients had 70 Gy in 33 fractions using IMRT, and 149 received CRT at 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median follow-up was 42 months. Three-year actuarial rates for locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 95.1% vs. 84.4% (p = 0.005), 85.3% vs. 69.3% (p = 0.001), and 92.1% vs. 75.2% (p < 0.001) for IMRT and CRT, respectively. The benefit of the radiotherapy regimen on outcomes was also observed with a Cox multivariate analysis. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with less acute dermatitis and less xerostomia at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Conclusions: This study suggests that simultaneous integrated boost using IMRT is associated with favorable locoregional control and survival rates with less xerostomia and acute dermatitis than CRT when both are given concurrently with chemotherapy.

  11. Simultaneous Integrated Boost Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Compared With Conventional Radiotherapy in Patients Treated With Concurrent Carboplatin and 5-Fluorouracil for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavel, Sébastien; Nguyen, David H.A.; Fortin, Bernard; Després, Philippe; Khaouam, Nader; Donath, David; Soulières, Denis; Guertin, Louis; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, the toxicity and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in patients treated with concomitant carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and December 2007, 249 patients were treated with definitive chemoradiation. One hundred patients had 70 Gy in 33 fractions using IMRT, and 149 received CRT at 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median follow-up was 42 months. Three-year actuarial rates for locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 95.1% vs. 84.4% (p = 0.005), 85.3% vs. 69.3% (p = 0.001), and 92.1% vs. 75.2% (p < 0.001) for IMRT and CRT, respectively. The benefit of the radiotherapy regimen on outcomes was also observed with a Cox multivariate analysis. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with less acute dermatitis and less xerostomia at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Conclusions: This study suggests that simultaneous integrated boost using IMRT is associated with favorable locoregional control and survival rates with less xerostomia and acute dermatitis than CRT when both are given concurrently with chemotherapy.

  12. Conformal intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivered by robotic linac - testing IMRT to the limit?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper it is proposed that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) could be delivered optimally by a short-length linac mounted on a robotic arm. The robot would allow the linac to 'plant' narrow pencils of photon radiation with any orientation (excluding zones within which the linac and couch might collide) relative to the planning target volume (PTV). The treatment is specified by the trajectory of the robot and by the number of monitor units (MUs) delivered at each robotic orientation. An inverse-planning method to determine the optimum robotic trajectory is presented. It is shown that for complex PTVs, specifically those with concavities in their outline, the conformality of the treatment is improved by the use of a complex trajectory in comparison with a less complex constrained trajectory and this improvement is quantified. It is concluded that robotic linac delivery would lead to a great flexibility in those IMRT treatments requiring very complicated dose distributions with complex 3D shapes. However, even using very fast computers, the goal of determining whether robotic linac delivery is the ultimate IMRT cannot be conclusively reached at present. (author)

  13. A Dosimetric Comparison of Dose Escalation with Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many studies have demonstrated that a higher radiotherapy dose is associated with improved outcomes in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We performed a dosimetric planning study to assess the dosimetric feasibility of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB in locally advanced NSCLC. Methods. We enrolled twenty patients. Five different dose plans were generated for each patient. All plans were prescribed a dose of 60 Gy to the planning tumor volume (PTV. In the three SIB groups, the prescribed dose was 69 Gy, 75 Gy, and 81 Gy in 30 fractions to the internal gross tumor volume (iGTV. Results. The SIB-IMRT plans were associated with a significant increase in the iGTV dose (P < 0.05, without increased normal tissue exposure or prolonged overall treatment time. Significant differences were not observed in the dose to the normal lung in terms of the V5 and V20 among the four IMRT plans. The maximum dose (Dmax in the esophagus moderately increased along with the prescribed dose (P < 0.05. Conclusions. Our results indicated that escalating the dose by SIB-IMRT is dosimetrically feasible; however, systematic evaluations via clinical trials are still warranted. We have designed a further clinical study (which is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02841228.

  14. Limited parameter set IMRT for carcinoma breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinath, M.; Sharma, Sanjiv; Vivek, T.R.; Suparna; Deka, Preeti; Manikandan; Giriraj

    2008-01-01

    Post operative radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery is an effective and widely accepted treatment modality in early stage breast cancer. The treatment is usually performed using two wedged tangential photon beams. The disadvantage of this technique is significant dose inhomogeneity as large as 15-20% in the superior and inferior regions of the breast due to lesser transmission thickness and in the medial and lateral aspect of the breast due to lower attenuation of lung tissue in the field. The aim of the study is to modify the conventional wedged tangential pair to achieve a more homogeneous dose distribution and a reduction in acute toxicity and improved cosmetic result. A comparative study is done between the conventional wedged technique and limited parameter set IMRT

  15. Prostate Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy to Dominant Intraprostatic Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Louise J.; Lilley, John; Thompson, Christopher M.; Cosgrove, Vivian; Mason, Josh; Sykes, Jonathan; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate boosting dominant intraprostatic lesions (DILs) in the context of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) and to examine the impact on tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate datasets were selected. DILs were defined using T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Four plans were produced for each dataset: (1) no boost to DILs; (2) boost to DILs, no seminal vesicles in prescription; (3) boost to DILs, proximal seminal vesicles (proxSV) prescribed intermediate dose; and (4) boost to DILs, proxSV prescribed higher dose. The prostate planning target volume (PTV) prescription was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions. DILs were initially prescribed 115% of the PTV Prostate prescription, and PTV DIL prescriptions were increased in 5% increments until organ-at-risk constraints were reached. TCP and NTCP calculations used the LQ-Poisson Marsden, and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman models respectively. Results: When treating the prostate alone, the median PTV DIL prescription was 125% (range: 110%-140%) of the PTV Prostate prescription. Median PTV DIL D50% was 55.1 Gy (range: 49.6-62.6 Gy). The same PTV DIL prescriptions and similar PTV DIL median doses were possible when including the proxSV within the prescription. TCP depended on prostate α/β ratio and was highest with an α/β ratio = 1.5 Gy, where the additional TCP benefit of DIL boosting was least. Rectal NTCP increased with DIL boosting and was considered unacceptably high in 5 cases, which, when replanned with an emphasis on reducing maximum dose to 0.5 cm 3 of rectum (Dmax 0.5cc ), as well as meeting existing constraints, resulted in considerable rectal NTCP reductions. Conclusions: Boosting DILs in the context of SABR is technically feasible but should be approached with caution. If this therapy is adopted, strict rectal constraints are required including Dmax 0.5cc . If

  16. Film dosimetry for IMRT: sensitivity corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchowerska, N.; Hoban, P.; Davison, A.; Metcalfe, P.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The trend towards conformal, dynamic and intensity modulated radiotherapy treatments has furthered the need for true integrating dosimetry. In traditional radiotherapy, film dosimetry is commonly used. The accuracy and reproducibility of film optical density as an indicator of dose, has been associated with several variables. These include the effects of film specific sensitivity, direction of exposure, chemical processing and film scanner sensitivity. In this study, a procedure is developed to account for these variables, with a particular view to film being used as a dosimeter for conformal treatments. An effective sensitometric curve was established by exposing part of a single sheet of film to known doses. All films were processed together and scanned using a DuoscanT1200 transmission scanner, resulting in 12 bit image files. The images were analysed using Osiris software and the results fitted to the modified Williamson equation: P P s (l - 10 αD ) This yields values of α [film sensitivity], and P s [saturation pixel value], allowing individual dosimetry films to be normalised to this sensitometric calibration curve. For validation, a piece of Kodak X Omat-V film was sealed in a head phantom and exposed to a total of 51 IMRT fields, delivered from 6 gantry angles. The rest of the sheet of film was resealed and exposed to four known doses, providing sensitometric data, specific to this exposure. All films were then processed, scanned and analysed as described above. Observed variations in serial films exposed to 50cGy is in the order of 9% [mean 25.0,standard deviation = 3.2]. The automatic gain of the scanner system typically contributed 4% variation and needs to be carefully monitored. Results indicate that by using the sensitometric data from each exposure, the collective errors can be minimised. The IMRT exposure results confirm that the above process is viable for use in dosimetry for conformal radiation therapy. Copyright (2000) Australasian

  17. Inverse vs. forward breast IMRT planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihai, Alina; Rakovitch, Eileen; Sixel, Katharina; Woo, Tony; Cardoso, Marlene; Bell, Chris; Ruschin, Mark; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) improves dose distribution homogeneity within the whole breast. Previous publications report the use of inverse or forward dose optimization algorithms. Because the inverse technique is not widely available in commercial treatment planning systems, it is important to compare the 2 algorithms. The goal of this work is to compare them on a prospective cohort of 30 patients. Dose distributions were evaluated on differential dose-volume histograms using the volumes receiving more than 105% (V 105 ) and 110% (V 110 ) of the prescribed dose, and on the maximum dose (D max ) or hot spot and the sagittal dose gradient (SDG) being the gradient between the dose on inframammary crease and the dose prescribed. The data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed rank test. The inverse planning significantly improves the V 105 (mean value 9.7% vs. 14.5%, p = 0.002), and the V 110 (mean value 1.4% vs. 3.2%, p = 0.006). However, the SDG is not statistically significantly different for either algorithm. Looking at the potential impact on skin acute reaction, although there is a significant reduction of V 110 using an inverse algorithm, it is unlikely this 1.6% volume reduction will present a significant clinical advantage over a forward algorithm. Both algorithms are equivalent in removing the hot spots on the inframammary fold, where acute skin reactions occur more frequently using a conventional wedge technique. Based on these results, we recommend that both forward and inverse algorithms should be considered for breast IMRT planning

  18. Coverage-based constraints for IMRT optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mescher, H.; Ulrich, S.; Bangert, M.

    2017-09-01

    Radiation therapy treatment planning requires an incorporation of uncertainties in order to guarantee an adequate irradiation of the tumor volumes. In current clinical practice, uncertainties are accounted for implicitly with an expansion of the target volume according to generic margin recipes. Alternatively, it is possible to account for uncertainties by explicit minimization of objectives that describe worst-case treatment scenarios, the expectation value of the treatment or the coverage probability of the target volumes during treatment planning. In this note we show that approaches relying on objectives to induce a specific coverage of the clinical target volumes are inevitably sensitive to variation of the relative weighting of the objectives. To address this issue, we introduce coverage-based constraints for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Our implementation follows the concept of coverage-optimized planning that considers explicit error scenarios to calculate and optimize patient-specific probabilities q(\\hat{d}, \\hat{v}) of covering a specific target volume fraction \\hat{v} with a certain dose \\hat{d} . Using a constraint-based reformulation of coverage-based objectives we eliminate the trade-off between coverage and competing objectives during treatment planning. In-depth convergence tests including 324 treatment plan optimizations demonstrate the reliability of coverage-based constraints for varying levels of probability, dose and volume. General clinical applicability of coverage-based constraints is demonstrated for two cases. A sensitivity analysis regarding penalty variations within this planing study based on IMRT treatment planning using (1) coverage-based constraints, (2) coverage-based objectives, (3) probabilistic optimization, (4) robust optimization and (5) conventional margins illustrates the potential benefit of coverage-based constraints that do not require tedious adjustment of target volume objectives.

  19. Boosted top: experimental tools overview

    CERN Document Server

    Usai, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    An overview of tools and methods for the reconstruction of high-boost top quark decays at the LHC is given in this report. The focus is on hadronic decays, in particular an overview of the current status of top quark taggers in physics analyses is presented. The most widely used jet substructure techniques, normally used in combination with top quark taggers, are reviewed. Special techniques to treat pileup in large cone jets are described, along with a comparison of the performance of several boosted top quark reconstruction techniques.

  20. BoostEMM : Transparent boosting using exceptional model mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zon, S.B.; Zeev Ben Mordehay, O.; Vrijdag, T.S.; van Ipenburg, W.; Veldsink, J.; Duivesteijn, W.; Pechenizkiy, M.; Bordino, I.; Caldarelli, G.; Fumarola, F.; Gullo, F.; Squartini, T.

    2017-01-01

    Boosting is an iterative ensemble-learning paradigm. Every iteration, a weak predictor learns a classification task, taking into account performance achieved in previous iterations. This is done by assigning weights to individual records of the dataset, which are increased if the record is

  1. SemiBoost: boosting for semi-supervised learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallapragada, Pavan Kumar; Jin, Rong; Jain, Anil K; Liu, Yi

    2009-11-01

    Semi-supervised learning has attracted a significant amount of attention in pattern recognition and machine learning. Most previous studies have focused on designing special algorithms to effectively exploit the unlabeled data in conjunction with labeled data. Our goal is to improve the classification accuracy of any given supervised learning algorithm by using the available unlabeled examples. We call this as the Semi-supervised improvement problem, to distinguish the proposed approach from the existing approaches. We design a metasemi-supervised learning algorithm that wraps around the underlying supervised algorithm and improves its performance using unlabeled data. This problem is particularly important when we need to train a supervised learning algorithm with a limited number of labeled examples and a multitude of unlabeled examples. We present a boosting framework for semi-supervised learning, termed as SemiBoost. The key advantages of the proposed semi-supervised learning approach are: 1) performance improvement of any supervised learning algorithm with a multitude of unlabeled data, 2) efficient computation by the iterative boosting algorithm, and 3) exploiting both manifold and cluster assumption in training classification models. An empirical study on 16 different data sets and text categorization demonstrates that the proposed framework improves the performance of several commonly used supervised learning algorithms, given a large number of unlabeled examples. We also show that the performance of the proposed algorithm, SemiBoost, is comparable to the state-of-the-art semi-supervised learning algorithms.

  2. Three-Year Outcomes of Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Simultaneous Integrated Boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Mark W.; Godette, Karen D.; Whitaker, Daisy J.; Davis, Lawrence W.; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report our clinical experience using breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Retrospective review identified 354 Stage 0 to III breast cancer patients treated with SIB-IMRT after conservative surgery between 2003 and 2006. The most common fractionation (89%) simultaneously delivered 1.8 Gy to the ipsilateral breast tissue and 2.14 Gy to the resection cavity, yielding a breast dose of 45 Gy (25 fractions) and cavity dose 59.92 Gy (28 fractions), biologically equivalent for tumor control to 45 Gy to the breast with sequential 16-Gy boost (33 fractions). Results: A total of 356 breasts in 354 patients were treated: 282 with invasive breast cancer, and 74 with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). For left breast radiation, median cardiac V 15 was 2.9% and left ventricular V 15 1.7%. Median follow-up was 33 months (range, 4-73 months). Acute toxicity was Grade 1 in 57% of cases, Grade 2 in 43%, and Grade 3 in <1%. For invasive breast cancer, the 3-year overall survival was 97.6% and risk of any locoregional recurrence was 2.8%. For ductal carcinoma in situ, 3-year overall survival was 98% and risk of locoregional recurrence 1.4%. In 142 cases at a minimum of 3 years follow-up, global breast cosmesis was judged by physicians as good or excellent in 96.5% and fair in 3.5%. Conclusions: Breast SIB-IMRT reduced treatment duration by five fractions with a favorable acute toxicity profile and low cardiac dose for left breast treatment. At 3 years, locoregional control was excellent, and initial assessment suggested good or excellent cosmesis in a high percentage of evaluable patients.

  3. IMRT and radiation protection in the prostate cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Helena C.; Silva, Andre R.M.; Oliveira, Claudia F.M.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to specify the technological advances that IMRT presents relative to other traditional radiotherapy, particularly to conformal radiotherapy three dimensional (3D-TCR) and benefits compared to the side effects caused by from treatment of radiotherapy

  4. IMRT fluence map editing to control hot and cold spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor Cook, J.; Tobler, Matt; Leavitt, Dennis D.; Watson, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    Manually editing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fluence maps effectively controls hot and cold spots that the IMRT optimization cannot control. Many times, re-optimizing does not reduce the hot spots or increase the cold spots. In fact, re-optimizing only places the hot and cold spots in different locations. Fluence-map editing provides manual control of dose delivery and provides the best treatment plan possible. Several IMRT treatments were planned using the Varian Eclipse planning system. We compare the effects on dose distributions between fluence-map editing and re-optimization, discuss techniques for fluence-map editing, and analyze differences between fluence editing on one beam vs. multiple beams. When editing a beam's fluence map, it is essential to choose a beam that least affects dose to the tumor and critical structures. Editing fluence maps gives an advantage in treatment planning and provides controlled delivery of IMRT dose

  5. Prostate Dose Escalation by Innovative Inverse Planning-Driven IMRT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing, Lei

    2005-01-01

    .... Because of the tacit ignorance of intra-structural tradeoff, the IMRT plans generated by these systems for prostate treatment are, at best, sub-optimal and our endeavor of providing the best possible...

  6. Boost.Asio C++ network programming

    CERN Document Server

    Torjo, John

    2013-01-01

    What you want is an easy level of abstraction, which is just what this book provides in conjunction with Boost.Asio. Switching to Boost.Asio is just a few extra #include directives away, with the help of this practical and engaging guide.This book is great for developers that need to do network programming, who don't want to delve into the complicated issues of a raw networking API. You should be familiar with core Boost concepts, such as smart pointers and shared_from_this, resource classes (noncopyable), functors and boost::bind, boost mutexes, and the boost date/time library. Readers should

  7. Comparative Cost-Effectiveness of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Versus Intensity-Modulated and Proton Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthan, Anju; Pruttivarasin, Narin; Davies, Diane; Taylor, Douglas C. A.; Pawar, Vivek; Bijlani, Akash; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Chen, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the cost-effectiveness of several external beam radiation treatment modalities for the treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods: A lifetime Markov model incorporated the probabilities of experiencing treatment-related long-term toxicity or death. Toxicity probabilities were derived from published sources using meta-analytical techniques. Utilities and costs in the model were obtained from publicly available secondary sources. The model calculated quality-adjusted life expectancy and expected lifetime cost per patient, and derived ratios of incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained between treatments. Analyses were conducted from both payer and societal perspectives. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Results: Compared to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and proton beam therapy (PT), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was less costly and resulted in more QALYs. Sensitivity analyses showed that the conclusions in the base-case scenario were robust with respect to variations in toxicity and cost parameters consistent with available evidence. At a threshold of $50,000/QALY, SBRT was cost-effective in 75% and 94% of probabilistic simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, from a payer perspective. From a societal perspective, SBRT was cost-effective in 75% and 96% of simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, at a threshold of $50,000/QALY. In threshold analyses, SBRT was less expensive with better outcomes compared to IMRT at toxicity rates 23% greater than the SBRT base-case rates. Conclusion: Based on the assumption that each treatment modality results in equivalent long-term efficacy, SBRT is a cost-effective strategy resulting in improved quality-adjusted survival compared to IMRT and PT for the treatment of localized prostate cancer.

  8. Comparative cost-effectiveness of stereotactic body radiation therapy versus intensity-modulated and proton radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju eParthan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the cost-effectiveness of several external beam radiation treatment modalities for the treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer.Methods. A lifetime Markov model incorporated the probabilities of experiencing treatment-related long-term toxicity or death. Toxicity probabilities were derived from published sources using meta-analytical techniques. Utilities and costs in the model were obtained from publically available secondary sources. The model calculated quality-adjusted life expectancy and expected lifetime cost per patient, and derived ratios of incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY gained between treatments. Analyses were conducted from both a payer and societal perspectives. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed.Results. Compared to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and proton beam therapy (PT, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT was less costly and resulted in more QALYs. Sensitivity analyses showed that the conclusions in the base-case scenario were robust with respect to variations in toxicity and cost parameters consistent with available evidence. At a threshold of $50,000/QALY, SBRT was cost effective in 75%, and 94% of probabilistic simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, from a payer perspective. From a societal perspective, SBRT was cost-effective in 75%, and 96% of simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, at a threshold of $50,000/QALY. In threshold analyses, SBRT was less expensive with better outcomes compared to IMRT at toxicity rates 23% greater than the SBRT base-case rates. Conclusions. Based on the assumption that each treatment modality results in equivalent long-term efficacy, SBRT is a cost-effective strategy resulting in improved quality-adjusted survival compared to IMRT and PT for the treatment of localized prostate cancer.

  9. Automated IMRT planning with regional optimization using planning scripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhaferllari, Ilma; Wong, Eugene; Bzdusek, Karl; Lock, Michael; Chen, Jeff

    2013-01-07

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has become a standard technique in radiation therapy for treating different types of cancers. Various class solutions have been developed for simple cases (e.g., localized prostate, whole breast) to generate IMRT plans efficiently. However, for more complex cases (e.g., head and neck, pelvic nodes), it can be time-consuming for a planner to generate optimized IMRT plans. To generate optimal plans in these more complex cases which generally have multiple target volumes and organs at risk, it is often required to have additional IMRT optimization structures such as dose limiting ring structures, adjust beam geometry, select inverse planning objectives and associated weights, and additional IMRT objectives to reduce cold and hot spots in the dose distribution. These parameters are generally manually adjusted with a repeated trial and error approach during the optimization process. To improve IMRT planning efficiency in these more complex cases, an iterative method that incorporates some of these adjustment processes automatically in a planning script is designed, implemented, and validated. In particular, regional optimization has been implemented in an iterative way to reduce various hot or cold spots during the optimization process that begins with defining and automatic segmentation of hot and cold spots, introducing new objectives and their relative weights into inverse planning, and turn this into an iterative process with termination criteria. The method has been applied to three clinical sites: prostate with pelvic nodes, head and neck, and anal canal cancers, and has shown to reduce IMRT planning time significantly for clinical applications with improved plan quality. The IMRT planning scripts have been used for more than 500 clinical cases.

  10. IMRT limits nephrotoxicity after chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trip, Anouk Kirsten; Nijkamp, Jasper; Tinteren, Harm van; Cats, Annemieke; Boot, Henk; Jansen, Edwin Petrus Marianus; Verheij, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This observational study compares the effect of different radiotherapy techniques on late nephrotoxicity after postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer. Patients and methods: Dosimetric parameters were compared between AP–PA, 3D-conformal and IMRT techniques. Renal function was measured by 99m Tc-MAG-3 renography, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the development of hypertension. Mixed effects models were used to compare renal function over time. Results: Eighty-seven patients treated between 2002 and 2010 were included, AP–PA (n = 31), 3D-conformal (n = 25) and IMRT (n = 31), all 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy: 5FU/leucovorin (n = 4), capecitabine (n = 37), and capecitabine/cisplatin (n = 46). Median follow-up time was 4.7 years (range 0.2–8). With IMRT, the mean dose to the left kidney was significantly lower. Left kidney function decreased progressively in the total study population, however with IMRT this occurred at a lower rate. A dose–effect relationship was present between mean dose to the left kidney and the left kidney function. GFR decreased only moderately in time, which was not different between techniques. Six patients developed hypertension, of whom none in the IMRT group. Conclusions: This study confirms progressive late nephrotoxicity in patients treated with postoperative chemoradiotherapy by different techniques for gastric cancer. Nephrotoxicity was less severe with IMRT and should be considered the preferred technique

  11. Phantoms for IMRT dose distribution measurement and treatment verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Daniel A.; Gerber, Russell L.; Mutic, Sasa; Purdy, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Background: The verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient treatment dose distributions is currently based on custom-built or modified dose measurement phantoms. The only commercially available IMRT treatment planning and delivery system (Peacock, NOMOS Corp.) is supplied with a film phantom that allows accurate spatial localization of the dose distribution using radiographic film. However, measurements using other dosimeters are necessary for the thorough verification of IMRT. Methods: We have developed a phantom to enable dose measurements using a cylindrical ionization chamber and the localization of prescription isodose curves using a matrix of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) chips. The external phantom cross-section is identical to that of the commercial phantom, to allow direct comparisons of measurements. A supplementary phantom has been fabricated to verify the IMRT dose distributions for pelvis treatments. Results: To date, this phantom has been used for the verification of IMRT dose distributions for head and neck and prostate cancer treatments. Designs are also presented for a phantom insert to be used with polymerizing gels (e.g., BANG-2) to obtain volumetric dose distribution measurements. Conclusion: The phantoms have proven useful in the quantitative evaluation of IMRT treatments

  12. IMRT limits nephrotoxicity after chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trip, Anouk Kirsten; Nijkamp, Jasper; van Tinteren, Harm; Cats, Annemieke; Boot, Henk; Jansen, Edwin Petrus Marianus; Verheij, Marcel

    2014-08-01

    This observational study compares the effect of different radiotherapy techniques on late nephrotoxicity after postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer. Dosimetric parameters were compared between AP-PA, 3D-conformal and IMRT techniques. Renal function was measured by (99m)Tc-MAG-3 renography, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the development of hypertension. Mixed effects models were used to compare renal function over time. Eighty-seven patients treated between 2002 and 2010 were included, AP-PA (n=31), 3D-conformal (n=25) and IMRT (n=31), all 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy: 5FU/leucovorin (n=4), capecitabine (n=37), and capecitabine/cisplatin (n=46). Median follow-up time was 4.7 years (range 0.2-8). With IMRT, the mean dose to the left kidney was significantly lower. Left kidney function decreased progressively in the total study population, however with IMRT this occurred at a lower rate. A dose-effect relationship was present between mean dose to the left kidney and the left kidney function. GFR decreased only moderately in time, which was not different between techniques. Six patients developed hypertension, of whom none in the IMRT group. This study confirms progressive late nephrotoxicity in patients treated with postoperative chemoradiotherapy by different techniques for gastric cancer. Nephrotoxicity was less severe with IMRT and should be considered the preferred technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Stereotactic radiotherapy in oligometastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Thomas A C; Corkum, Mark T; Louie, Alexander V

    2017-09-01

    Oligometastatic cancer describes a disease state somewhere between localized and metastatic cancer. Proposed definitions of oligometastatic disease have typically used a cut-off of five or fewer sites of disease. Treatment of oligometastatic disease should have the goal of long-term local control, and in selected cases, disease remission. While several retrospective cohorts argue for surgical excision of limited metastases (metastasectomy) as the preferred treatment option for several clinical indications, limited randomized data exists for treating oligometastases. Alternatively, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a radiotherapy technique that combines high radiation doses per fraction with precision targeting with the goal of achieving long-term local control of treated sites. Published cohort studies of SABR have demonstrated excellent local control rates of 70-90% in oligometastatic disease, with long-term survival in some series approaching 20-40%. A recent randomized phase 2 clinical trial by Gomez et al. demonstrated significantly improved progression free survival with aggressive consolidative therapy (surgery, radiotherapy ± chemotherapy or SABR) in oli-gometastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). As additional randomized controlled trials are ongoing to determine the efficacy of SABR in oligometastatic disease, SABR is increasingly being used within routine clinical practice. This review article aims to sum-marize the history and current paradigm of the oligometastatic state, review recently pub-lished literature of SABR in oligometastatic cancer and discuss ongoing trials and future directions in this context.

  14. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for craniopharyngiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Frank, Claudia; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Rhein, Bernhard; Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate outcome and toxicity after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) in patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with craniopharyngiomas were treated with FSRT between May 1989 and February 2001. Median age was 33.5 years (range: 5-57 years). Nine patients received FSRT after surgery as primary treatment, and 17 patients were irradiated for recurrent tumor or progressive growth after initial surgery. Median target dose was 52.2 Gy (range: 50.0-57.6 Gy) with conventional fractionation. Follow-up included MRI and neurologic, ophthalmologic, and endocrinologic examinations. Results: The median follow-up was 43 months (range: 7-143 months). The actuarial local control rate and actuarial overall survival rates were 100% and 100%, respectively, at 5 years and 100% and 83%, respectively, at 10 years. Four patients showed complete response, 14 patients showed partial response, and 8 patients remained stable. In 5 patients, vision improved after radiation therapy. Acute toxicity was mild. One patient required cyst drainage 3 months after radiotherapy. Late toxicity after radiotherapy included impairment of hormone function in 3 out of 18 patients at risk. We did not observe any vision impairment, radionecrosis, or secondary malignancies. Conclusions: FSRT is effective and safe in the treatment of cystic craniopharyngiomas. Toxicity is extremely low using this conformal technique

  15. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamoto, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Tomio; Matsutani, Masao; Takakura, Kintomo; Terahara, Atsuro (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-03-01

    Since stereotactic radiosurgery using a gamma knife was developed in 1968 by Leksell, it has been used with increasing frequency in Japan. During the period from June 19, 1990 through December 20, 1991, 218 patients have been treated with stereotactic radiosurgery using a gamma knife. Of them, 116 had vascular lesions (116), including arteriovenous malformation (114), dural arteriovenous malformation (one), and cerebral aneurysm (one); and the other 102 had tumorous lesions, including acoustic neurinoma (48), meningioma (26), pituitary tumor (11), metastatic tumor (7), germ cell tumor (3), glioma (2), hemangioblastoma (2), chordoma (one), craniopharyngioma (one), and trigeminal neurinoma (one). In this article, candidates of stereotactic radiosurgery using a gamma knife are discussed, with particular attention to clinical results of the aforementioned 218 patients. (N.K.) 54 refs.

  16. IMRT and radiation protection in the prostate cancer therapy; IMRT e a protecao radiologica no tratamento do cancer de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Helena C.; Silva, Andre R.M.; Oliveira, Claudia F.M., E-mail: andrerichard88@bol.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to specify the technological advances that IMRT presents relative to other traditional radiotherapy, particularly to conformal radiotherapy three dimensional (3D-TCR) and benefits compared to the side effects caused by from treatment of radiotherapy.

  17. SU-E-J-70: Feasibility Study of Dynamic Arc and IMRT Treatment Plans Utilizing Vero Treatment Unit and IPlan Planning Computer for SRS/FSRT Brain Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, S; Lee, S; Dagan, R; Malyapa, R; Mendenhall, N; Mendenhall, W; Ho, M; Hough, D; Yam, M; Li, Z

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of utilizing Dynamic Arc (DA) and IMRT with 5mm MLC leaf of VERO treatment unit for SRS/FSRT brain cancer patients with non-invasive stereotactic treatments. The DA and IMRT plans using the VERO unit (BrainLab Inc, USA) are compared with cone-based planning and proton plans to evaluate their dosimetric advantages. Methods: The Vero treatment has unique features like no rotational or translational movements of the table during treatments, Dynamic Arc/IMRT, tracking of IR markers, limitation of Ring rotation. Accuracies of the image fusions using CBCT, orthogonal x-rays, and CT are evaluated less than ∼ 0.7mm with a custom-made target phantom with 18 hidden targets. 1mm margin is given to GTV to determine PTV for planning constraints considering all the uncertainties of planning computer and mechanical uncertainties of the treatment unit. Also, double-scattering proton plans with 6F to 9F beams and typical clinical parameters, multiple isocenter plans with 6 to 21 isocenters, and DA/IMRT plans are evaluated to investigate the dosimetric advantages of the DA/IMRT for complex shape of targets. Results: 3 Groups of the patients are divided: (1) Group A (complex target shape), CI's are same for IMRT, and DGI of the proton plan are better by 9.5% than that of the IMRT, (2) Group B, CI of the DA plans (1.91+/−0.4) are better than cone-based plan, while DGI of the DA plan is 4.60+/−1.1 is better than cone-based plan (5.32+/−1.4), (3) Group C (small spherical targets), CI of the DA and cone-based plans are almost the same. Conclusion: For small spherical targets, cone-based plans are superior to other 2 plans: DS proton and DA plans. For complex or irregular plans, dynamic and IMRT plans are comparable to cone-based and proton plans for complex targets

  18. Physics acceptance and QA procedures for IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LoSasso, T.; Ling, C.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may improve tumor control without compromising normal tissues by facilitating higher, more conformal tumor doses relative to 3D CRT. Intensity modulation (IM) is now possible with inverse planning and radiation delivery using dynamic multileaf collimation. Compared to 3D CRT, certain components in the IMRT process are more obscure to the user. Thus, special quality assurance procedures are required. Hardware and software are still relatively new to many users, and the potential for error is unknown. The relationship between monitor unit (MU) setting and radiation dose for IM beams is much more complex than for non-IM fields. The leaf sequence computer files, which control the MLC position as a function of MU, are large and do not lend themselves to simple manual verification. The 'verification' port film for each IM treatment field, usually obtained with the MLC set at the extreme leaf positions for that field to outline the entire irradiated area, does not verify the intensity modulation pattern. Finally, in IMRT using DMLC (the so-called sliding window technique), a small error in the window (or gap) width will lead to a significant dose error. In earlier papers, we provided an evaluation of the mechanical and dosimetric aspects in the use of a MLC in the dynamic mode. Mechanical tolerances are significantly tighter for DMLC than for static MLC treatments. Transmission through the leaves and through rounded leaf ends and head scatter were shown to be significant to the accuracy of radiation dose delivery using DMLC. With these considerations, we concluded that the present DMLC hardware and software are effective for routine clinical implementation, provided that a carefully designed routine QA procedure is followed to assure the normality of operation. In our earlier studies, an evaluation of the long-term stability of DMLC operation had not yet been performed. This paper describes the current status of our

  19. Hypofractionated stereotactic irradiation. Basic and clinical researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Miyakawa, Akifumi; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Otsuka, Shinya; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Ayakawa, Shiho

    2011-01-01

    Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) has a number of biological advantages over single-session radiosurgery. An apparent trend is seen in the clinic towards shift from the latter to the former; however, there is no adequate model to convert single doses to hypofractionated doses. The linear-quadratic model overestimates the effect of single-fraction radiation. This should be kept in mind in evaluating the doses of stereotactic irradiation. ''Biological effective dose'' should not be used in radiosurgery and hypofractionated SRT. Clinically, we have used 3- to 10-fraction SRT for acoustic neuroma and benign skull base tumors using cyberknife and tomotherapy. Preliminary results are encouraging. (author)

  20. New CT-aided stereotactic neurosurgery technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, H.M.; Truong, T.K.; Reed, I.S.; Slater, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In this communication, a new technique for CT-aided stereotactic neurosurgery is presented. The combination of specially designed hardware and software provides a fast, simple, and versatile tool for the accurate insertion of a probe into the human brain. This system is portable and can be implemented on any CT computer system. The complete procedure to perform the CT-aided stereotactic neurosurgery technique is presented. Experimental results are given which demonstrate the power of the method. Finally, the key algorithms for realizing this technique are described in the Appendix

  1. Noninvasive patient fixation for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohr, Frank; Debus, Juergen; Frank, Claudia; Herfarth, Klaus; Pastyr, Otto; Rhein, Bernhard; Bahner, Malte L.; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Wannenmacher, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the setup accuracy that can be achieved with a novel noninvasive patient fixation technique based on a body cast attached to a recently developed stereotactic body frame during fractionated extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one CT studies (≥ 20 slices, thickness: 3 mm) from 5 patients who were immobilized in a body cast attached to a stereotactic body frame for treatment of para medullary tumors in the thoracic or lumbar spine were evaluated with respect to setup accuracy. The immobilization device consisted of a custom-made wrap-around body cast that extended from the neck to the thighs and a separate head mask, both made from Scotchcast. Each CT study was performed immediately before or after every second or third actual treatment fraction without repositioning the patient between CT and treatment. The stereotactic localization system was mounted and the isocenter as initially located stereo tactically was marked with fiducials for each CT study. Deviation of the treated isocenter as compared to the planned position was measured in all three dimensions. Results: The immobilization device can be easily handled, attached to and removed from the stereotactic frame and thus enables treatment of multiple patients with the same stereotactic frame each day. Mean patient movements of 1.6 mm ± 1.2 mm (laterolateral [LL]), 1.4 mm ± 1.0 mm (anterior-posterior [AP]), 2.3 mm ± 1.3 mm (transversal vectorial error [VE]) and < slice thickness = 3 mm (cranio caudal [CC]) were recorded for the targets in the thoracic spine and 1.4 mm ± 1.0 mm (LL), 1.2 mm ± 0.7 mm (AP), 1.8 mm ± 1.2 mm (VE), and < 3 mm (CC) for the lumbar spine. The worst case deviation was 3.9 mm for the first patient with the target in the thoracic spine (in the LL direction). Combining those numbers (mean transversal VE for both locations and maximum CC error of 3 mm), the mean three-dimensional vectorial patient movement and thus the mean overall

  2. Interactive computer graphics for stereotactic neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.H.; Davis, J.R.; Gahbauer, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    A microcomputer (IBM PC/AT) system has been developed to incorporate multiple image sources for stereotactic neurosurgery. Hard copy data is calibrated and captured with a video camera and frame grabber. Line contours are generated automatically on the basis of gray scale density or digitized manually. Interactive computer graphics provide a format with acceptable speed and accuracy for stereotactic neurosurgery. The ability to dimensionally integrate existing image data from multiple sources for target selection makes preoperative scans and scanner compatible head holders unnecessary. The system description and examples of use for brain tumor biopsy and brachytherapy ware presented

  3. The number of beams in IMRT-theoretical investigations and implications for single-arc IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortfeld, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The first purpose of this paper is to shed some new light on the old question of selecting the number of beams in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The second purpose is to illuminate the related issue of discrete static beam angles versus rotational techniques, which has recently re-surfaced due to the advancement of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). A specific objective is to find analytical expressions that allow one to address the points raised above. To make the problem mathematically tractable, it is assumed that the depth dose is flat and that the lateral dose profile can be approximated by polynomials, specifically Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind, of finite degree. The application of methods known from image reconstruction then allows one to answer the first question above as follows: the required number of beams is determined by the maximum degree of the polynomials used in the approximation of the beam profiles, which is a measure of the dose variability. There is nothing to be gained by using more beams. In realistic cases, in which the variability of the lateral dose profile is restricted in several ways, the required number of beams is of the order of 10-20. The consequence of delivering the beams with a 'leaf sweep' technique during continuous rotation of the gantry, as in VMAT, is also derived in an analytical form. The main effect is that the beams fan out, but the effect near the axis of rotation is small. This result can serve as a theoretical justification of VMAT. Overall the analytical derivations in this paper, albeit based on strong simplifications, provide new insights into, and a deeper understanding of, the beam angle problem in IMRT. The decomposition of the beam profiles into well-behaved and easily deliverable smooth functions, such as Chebyshev polynomials, could be of general interest in IMRT treatment planning.

  4. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for carcinoma of the maxillary sinus: A comparison of IMRT planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Raef S.; Ove, Roger; Duan, Jun; Popple, Richard; Cobb, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of maxillary sinus carcinoma with forward planning can be technically difficult when the neck also requires radiotherapy. This difficulty arises because of the need to spare the contralateral face while treating the bilateral neck. There is considerable potential for error in clinical setup and treatment delivery. We evaluated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as an improvement on forward planning, and compared several inverse planning IMRT platforms. A composite dose-volume histogram (DVH) was generated from a complex forward planned case. We compared the results with those generated by sliding window fixed field dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) IMRT, using sets of coplanar beams. All setups included an anterior posterior (AP) beam, and 3-, 5-, 7-, and 9-field configurations were evaluated. The dose prescription and objective function priorities were invariant. We also evaluated 2 commercial tomotherapy IMRT delivery platforms. DVH results from all of the IMRT approaches compared favorably with the forward plan. Results for the various inverse planning approaches varied considerably across platforms, despite an attempt to prescribe the therapy similarly. The improvement seen with the addition of beams in the fixed beam sliding window case was modest. IMRT is an effective means of delivering radiotherapy reliably in the complex setting of maxillary sinus carcinoma with neck irradiation. Differences in objective function definition and optimization algorithms can lead to unexpected differences in the final dose distribution, and our evaluation suggests that these factors are more significant than the beam arrangement or number of beams

  5. IMRT for adjuvant radiation in gastric cancer: A preferred plan?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringash, Jolie; Perkins, Greg; Brierley, James; Lockwood, Gina; Islam, Mohammad; Catton, Pamela; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John; Wong, Rebecca; Dawson, Laura

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the potential advantage of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) over conformal planning for postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with gastric carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients who had undergone treatment planning with conformal beam arrangements for 4500 cGy adjuvant radiotherapy between 2000 and 2001 underwent repeat planning using IMRT techniques. Conformal five-field plans were compared with seven- to nine-field coplanar sliding-window IMRT plans. For each patient, the cumulative dose-volume histograms and organ-dose summaries (without distributions or digitally reconstructed radiographs) were provided to two independent, 'blinded' GI radiation oncologists. The oncologists indicated which plan provided better planning target volume coverage and critical organ sparing, any safety concerns with either plan, and which plan they would choose to treat the patient. Results: In 18 (90%) of 20 cases, both oncologists chose the same plan. Cases with disagreement were given to a third 'blinded' reviewer. A 'preferred plan' could be determined in 19 (95%) of 20 cases. IMRT was preferred in 17 (89%) of 19 cases. In 4 (20%) of 20 IMRT plans at least one radiation oncologist had safety concerns because of the spinal cord dose (3 cases) or small bowel dose (2 cases). Of 42 ratings, IMRT was thought to provide better planning target volume coverage in 36 (86%) and better sparing of the spinal cord in 31 (74%) of 42, kidneys in 29 (69%), liver in 30 (71%), and heart in 29 (69%) of 42 ratings. The median underdose volume (1.7 vs. 4.1 cm 3 ), maximal dose to the spinal cord (36.85 vs. 45.65 Gy), and dose to 50% of the liver (17.29 vs. 27.97), heart (12.89 vs. 15.50 Gy), and left kidney (15.50 vs. 16.06 Gy) were lower with IMRT than with the conformal plans. Conclusion: Compared with the conformal plans, oncologists frequently preferred IMRT plans when using dose-volume histogram data. The advantages of IMRT plans include both

  6. Pre-clinical evaluation of an inverse planning module for segmental MLC based IMRT delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, Dietmar; Kroupa, Bernhard

    2002-01-01

    Phantom tests are performed for pre-clinical evaluation of a commercial inverse planning system (HELAX TMS, V 6.0) for segmented multileaf collimator (MLC) intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery. The optimization module has available two optimization algorithms: the target primary feasibility and the weighted feasibility algorithm, only the latter allows the user to specify weights for structures. In the first series, single beam tests are performed to evaluate the outcome of inverse planning in terms of plausibility for the following situations: oblique incidence, presence of inhomogeneities, multiple targets at different depths and multiple targets with different desired doses. Additionally, for these tests a manual plan is made for comparison. In the absence of organs at risk, both the optimization algorithms are found to assign the highest priority to low dose constraints for targets. In the second series, tests resembling clinical relevant configurations (simultaneous boost and concave target with critical organ) are performed with multiple beam arrangements in order to determine the impact of the system's configuration on inverse planning. It is found that the definition of certain segment number and segment size limitations does not largely compromise treatment plans when using multiple beams. On the other hand, these limitations are important for delivery efficiency and dosimetry. For the number of iterations and voxels per volume of interest, standard values in the system's configuration are considered to be sufficient. Additionally, it is demonstrated that precautions must be taken to precisely define treatment goals when using computerized treatment optimization. Similar phantom tests could be used for a direct dosimetric verification of all steps from inverse treatment planning to IMRT delivery. (note)

  7. AP-PA field orientation followed by IMRT reduces lung exposure in comparison to conventional 3D conformal and sole IMRT in centrally located lung tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyfer Viacheslav

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Little attention has been paid to the fact that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT techniques do not easily enable treatment with opposed beams. Three treatment plans (3 D conformal, IMRT, and combined (anterior-posterior-posterio-anterior (AP-PA + IMRT of 7 patients with centrally-located lung cancer were compared for exposure of lung, spinal cord and esophagus. Combined IMRT and AP-PA techniques offer better lung tissue sparing compared to plans predicated solely on IMRT for centrally-located lung tumors.

  8. On correlations in IMRT planning aims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arkajyoti; Das, Indra J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to study correlations amongst IMRT DVH evaluation points and how their relaxation impacts the overall plan. 100 head‐and‐neck cancer cases, using the Eclipse treatment planning system with the same protocol, are statistically analyzed for PTV, brainstem, and spinal cord. To measure variations amongst the plans, we use (i) interquartile range (IQR) of volume as a function of dose, (ii) interquartile range of dose as a function of volume, and (iii) dose falloff. To determine correlations for institutional and ICRU goals, conditional probabilities and medians are computed. We observe that most plans exceed the median PTV dose (average D50 = 104% prescribed dose). Furthermore, satisfying D50 reduced the probability of also satisfying D98, constituting a negative correlation of these goals. On the other hand, satisfying D50 increased the probability of satisfying D2, suggesting a positive correlation. A positive correlation is also observed between the PTV V105 and V110. Similarly, a positive correlation between the brainstem V45 and V50 is measured by an increase in the conditional median of V45, when V50 is violated. Despite the imposed institutional and international recommendations, significant variations amongst DVH points can occur. Even though DVH aims are evaluated independently, sizable correlations amongst them are possible, indicating that some goals cannot be satisfied concurrently, calling for unbiased plan criteria. PACS number(s): 87.55.dk, 87.53.Bn, 87.55.Qr, 87.55.de. PMID:27929480

  9. Detection of Illegitimate Emails using Boosting Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    2011-01-01

    and spam email detection. For our desired task, we have applied a boosting technique. With the use of boosting we can achieve high accuracy of traditional classification algorithms. When using boosting one has to choose a suitable weak learner as well as the number of boosting iterations. In this paper, we......In this paper, we report on experiments to detect illegitimate emails using boosting algorithm. We call an email illegitimate if it is not useful for the receiver or for the society. We have divided the problem into two major areas of illegitimate email detection: suspicious email detection...

  10. Towards biologically conformal radiation therapy (BCRT): Selective IMRT dose escalation under the guidance of spatial biology distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yong; Xing Lei

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that the spatial biology distribution (e.g., clonogen density, radiosensitivity, tumor proliferation rate, functional importance) in most tumors and sensitive structures is heterogeneous. Recent progress in biological imaging is making the mapping of this distribution increasingly possible. The purpose of this work is to establish a theoretical framework to quantitatively incorporate the spatial biology data into intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) inverse planning. In order to implement this, we first derive a general formula for determining the desired dose to each tumor voxel for a known biology distribution of the tumor based on a linear-quadratic model. The desired target dose distribution is then used as the prescription for inverse planning. An objective function with the voxel-dependent prescription is constructed with incorporation of the nonuniform dose prescription. The functional unit density distribution in a sensitive structure is also considered phenomenologically when constructing the objective function. Two cases with different hypothetical biology distributions are used to illustrate the new inverse planning formalism. For comparison, treatments with a few uniform dose prescriptions and a simultaneous integrated boost are also planned. The biological indices, tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), are calculated for both types of plans and the superiority of the proposed technique over the conventional dose escalation scheme is demonstrated. Our calculations revealed that it is technically feasible to produce deliberately nonuniform dose distributions with consideration of biological information. Compared with the conventional dose escalation schemes, the new technique is capable of generating biologically conformal IMRT plans that significantly improve the TCP while reducing or keeping the NTCPs at their current levels. Biologically conformal radiation therapy (BCRT

  11. An IMRT dose distribution study using commercial verification software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grace, M.; Liu, G.; Fernando, W.; Rykers, K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The introduction of IMRT requires users to confirm that the isodose distributions and relative doses calculated by their planning system match the doses delivered by their linear accelerators. To this end the commercially available software, VeriSoft TM (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was trialled to determine if the tools and functions it offered would be of benefit to this process. The CMS Xio (Computer Medical System) treatment planning system was used to generate IMRT plans that were delivered with an upgraded Elekta SL15 linac. Kodak EDR2 film sandwiched in RW3 solid water (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was used to measure the IMRT fields delivered with 6 MV photons. The isodose and profiles measured with the film generally agreed to within ± 3% or ± 3 mm with the planned doses, in some regions (outside the IMRT field) the match fell to within ± 5%. The isodose distributions of the planning system and the film could be compared on screen and allows for electronic records of the comparison to be kept if so desired. The features and versatility of this software has been of benefit to our IMRT QA program. Furthermore, the VeriSoft TM software allows for quick and accurate, automated planar film analysis.Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  12. Neuropsychological outcomes following stereotactic laser amygdalohippocampectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, Melanie R F; Lucas, John A; Feyissa, Anteneh M; Grewal, Sanjeet; Wharen, Robert E; Tatum, William O

    2017-10-01

    The objective was to analyze neuropsychological testing data from 15 patients before and after stereotactic laser ablation surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy and to describe the seizure outcomes after stereotactic laser ablation surgery. A retrospective review of 15 patients who underwent stereotactic laser ablation and who also underwent neuropsychological testing before and after surgery was performed. Verbal and visual memory was assessed in all 15 patients using California Verbal Learning Test and Wechsler Memory Scale IV. Naming was assessed in 9 of 15 patients using the Boston Naming Test. Statistical analysis was performed to determine clinically significant changes using previously validated reliable change indices and proprietary Advanced Clinical Solutions software. Seizure outcome data were evaluated using Engel classification. Postsurgery neuropsychological evaluation demonstrated that all 15 patients experienced at least 1 clinically significant decline in either verbal or visual memory. Ten patients in this series, including five with dominant-hemisphere surgery, demonstrated decline in delayed memory for narrative information (Logical Memory II). By contrast, the Boston Naming Test demonstrated more favorable results after surgery. Two of nine patients demonstrated a clinically significant increase in naming ability, and only one of nine patients demonstrated a clinically significant decline in naming ability. With at least 6months of follow-up after surgery, 33% reported seizure freedom. Stereotactic laser ablation can result in clinically significant and meaningful decline in verbal and visual memory when comparing patients to their own presurgical baseline. Naming ability, conversely, is much less likely to be impacted by stereotactic laser ablation and may improve after the procedure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Preliminary analysis of the sequential simultaneous integrated boost technique for intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Nishiyama, Kinji; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ohira, Shingo; Tsujii, Katsutomo; Isono, Masaru; Masaoka, Akira; Teshima, Teruki

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three strategies for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for 20 head-and-neck cancer patients. For simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), doses were 66 and 54 Gy in 30 fractions for PTVboost and PTVelective, respectively. Two-phase IMRT delivered 50 Gy in 25 fractions to PTVelective in the First Plan, and 20 Gy in 10 fractions to PTVboost in the Second Plan. Sequential SIB (SEQ-SIB) delivered 55 Gy and 50 Gy in 25 fractions, respectively, to PTVboost and PTVelective using SIB in the First Plan and 11 Gy in 5 fractions to PTVboost in the Second Plan. Conformity indexes (CIs) (mean ± SD) for PTVboost and PTVelective were 1.09 ± 0.05 and 1.34 ± 0.12 for SIB, 1.39 ± 0.14 and 1.80 ± 0.28 for two-phase IMRT, and 1.14 ± 0.07 and 1.60 ± 0.18 for SEQ-SIB, respectively. CI was significantly highest for two-phase IMRT. Maximum doses (Dmax) to the spinal cord were 42.1 ± 1.5 Gy for SIB, 43.9 ± 1.0 Gy for two-phase IMRT and 40.3 ± 1.8 Gy for SEQ-SIB. Brainstem Dmax were 50.1 ± 2.2 Gy for SIB, 50.5 ± 4.6 Gy for two-phase IMRT and 47.4 ± 3.6 Gy for SEQ-SIB. Spinal cord Dmax for the three techniques was significantly different, and brainstem Dmax was significantly lower for SEQ-SIB. The compromised conformity of two-phase IMRT can result in higher doses to organs at risk (OARs). Lower OAR doses in SEQ-SIB made SEQ-SIB an alternative to SIB, which applies unconventional doses per fraction. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  14. Skin dose differences between intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy and between boost and integrated treatment regimens for treating head and neck and other cancer sites in patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penoncello, Gregory P.; Ding, George X.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate dose to skin between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment techniques for target sites in the head and neck, pelvis, and brain and (2) to determine if the treatment dose and fractionation regimen affect the skin dose between traditional sequential boost and integrated boost regimens for patients with head and neck cancer. A total of 19 patients and 48 plans were evaluated. The Eclipse (v11) treatment planning system was used to plan therapy in 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 5 patients with prostate cancer, and 5 patients with brain cancer with VMAT and static-field IMRT. The mean skin dose and the maximum dose to a contiguous volume of 2 cm"3 for head and neck plans and brain plans and a contiguous volume of 5 cm"3 for pelvis plans were compared for each treatment technique. Of the 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 3 underwent an integrated boost regimen. One integrated boost plan was replanned with IMRT and VMAT using a traditional boost regimen. For target sites located in the head and neck, VMAT reduced the mean dose and contiguous hot spot most noticeably in the shoulder region by 5.6% and 5.4%, respectively. When using an integrated boost regimen, the contiguous hot spot skin dose in the shoulder was larger on average than a traditional boost pattern by 26.5% and the mean skin dose was larger by 1.7%. VMAT techniques largely decrease the contiguous hot spot in the skin in the pelvis by an average of 36% compared with IMRT. For the same target coverage, VMAT can reduce the skin dose in all the regions of the body, but more noticeably in the shoulders in patients with head and neck and pelvis cancer. We also found that using integrated boost regimens in patients with head and neck cancer leads to higher shoulder skin doses compared with traditional boost regimens.

  15. Skin dose differences between intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy and between boost and integrated treatment regimens for treating head and neck and other cancer sites in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penoncello, Gregory P; Ding, George X

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate dose to skin between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment techniques for target sites in the head and neck, pelvis, and brain and (2) to determine if the treatment dose and fractionation regimen affect the skin dose between traditional sequential boost and integrated boost regimens for patients with head and neck cancer. A total of 19 patients and 48 plans were evaluated. The Eclipse (v11) treatment planning system was used to plan therapy in 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 5 patients with prostate cancer, and 5 patients with brain cancer with VMAT and static-field IMRT. The mean skin dose and the maximum dose to a contiguous volume of 2cm(3) for head and neck plans and brain plans and a contiguous volume of 5cm(3) for pelvis plans were compared for each treatment technique. Of the 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 3 underwent an integrated boost regimen. One integrated boost plan was replanned with IMRT and VMAT using a traditional boost regimen. For target sites located in the head and neck, VMAT reduced the mean dose and contiguous hot spot most noticeably in the shoulder region by 5.6% and 5.4%, respectively. When using an integrated boost regimen, the contiguous hot spot skin dose in the shoulder was larger on average than a traditional boost pattern by 26.5% and the mean skin dose was larger by 1.7%. VMAT techniques largely decrease the contiguous hot spot in the skin in the pelvis by an average of 36% compared with IMRT. For the same target coverage, VMAT can reduce the skin dose in all the regions of the body, but more noticeably in the shoulders in patients with head and neck and pelvis cancer. We also found that using integrated boost regimens in patients with head and neck cancer leads to higher shoulder skin doses compared with traditional boost regimens. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by

  16. Intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery using dynamic micro-multileaf collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, Stanley H.; Cardinale, Robert M.; Wu Qiuwen; Zwicker, Robert D.; Broaddus, William C.; Mohan, Radhe

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The implementation of dynamic leaf motion on a micro-multileaf collimator system provides the capability for intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery (IMSRS), and the consequent potential for improved dose distributions for irregularly shaped tumor volumes adjacent to critical organs. This study explores the use of IMSRS to provide improved tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing for small cranial tumors relative to plans based on multiple fixed uniform-intensity beams or traditional circular collimator arc-based stereotactic techniques. Methods and Materials: Four patient cases involving small brain lesions are presented and analyzed. The cases were chosen to include a representative selection of target shapes, number of targets, and adjacent critical areas. Patient plans generated for these comparisons include standard arcs with multiple circular collimators, and fixed noncoplanar static fields with uniform-intensity beams and IMSRS. Parameters used for evaluation of the plans include the percentage of irradiated volume to tumor volume (PITV), normal tissue dose-volume histograms, and dose-homogeneity ratios. All IMSRS plans were computed using previously established IMRT techniques adapted for use with the BrainLAB M3 micro-multileaf collimator. The algorithms comprising the IMRT system for optimization of intensity distributions and conversion into leaf trajectories of the BrainLab M3 were developed at our institution. The ADAC Pinnacle 3 radiation treatment-planning system was used for dose calculations and for input of contours for target volumes and normal critical structures. Results: For all cases, the IMSRS plans showed a high degree of conformity of the dose distribution with the target shape. The IMSRS plans provided either (1) a smaller volume of normal tissue irradiated to significant dose levels, generally taken as doses greater than 50% of the prescription, or (2) a lower dose to an important adjacent critical organ. The reduction in

  17. Technical Note: Evaluation of the systematic accuracy of a frameless, multiple image modality guided, linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, N., E-mail: nwen1@hfhs.org; Snyder, K. C.; Qin, Y.; Li, H.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chetty, I. J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Brand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Scheib, S. G.; Schmelzer, P. [Varian Medical System, Täfernstrasse 7, Dättwil AG 5405 (Switzerland)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the total systematic accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. Methods: The localization accuracy and intermodality difference was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom, in which the targets were localized using optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), electromagnetic beacon-based tracking (Calypso®), cone-beam CT, “snap-shot” planar x-ray imaging, and a robotic couch. Six IMRT plans with jaw tracking and a flattening filter free beam were used to study the dosimetric accuracy for intracranial and spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment. Results: End-to-end localization accuracy of the system evaluated with the end-to-end phantom was 0.5 ± 0.2 mm with a maximum deviation of 0.9 mm over 90 measurements (including jaw, MLC, and cone measurements for both auto and manual fusion) for single isocenter, single target treatment, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm for multitarget treatment with shared isocenter. Residual setup errors were within 0.1 mm for OSMS, and 0.3 mm for Calypso. Dosimetric evaluation based on absolute film dosimetry showed greater than 90% pass rate for all cases using a gamma criteria of 3%/1 mm. Conclusions: The authors’ experience demonstrates that the localization accuracy of the frameless image-guided system is comparable to robotic or invasive frame based radiosurgery systems.

  18. Technical Note: Evaluation of the systematic accuracy of a frameless, multiple image modality guided, linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, N.; Snyder, K. C.; Qin, Y.; Li, H.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chetty, I. J.; Scheib, S. G.; Schmelzer, P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the total systematic accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. Methods: The localization accuracy and intermodality difference was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom, in which the targets were localized using optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), electromagnetic beacon-based tracking (Calypso®), cone-beam CT, “snap-shot” planar x-ray imaging, and a robotic couch. Six IMRT plans with jaw tracking and a flattening filter free beam were used to study the dosimetric accuracy for intracranial and spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment. Results: End-to-end localization accuracy of the system evaluated with the end-to-end phantom was 0.5 ± 0.2 mm with a maximum deviation of 0.9 mm over 90 measurements (including jaw, MLC, and cone measurements for both auto and manual fusion) for single isocenter, single target treatment, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm for multitarget treatment with shared isocenter. Residual setup errors were within 0.1 mm for OSMS, and 0.3 mm for Calypso. Dosimetric evaluation based on absolute film dosimetry showed greater than 90% pass rate for all cases using a gamma criteria of 3%/1 mm. Conclusions: The authors’ experience demonstrates that the localization accuracy of the frameless image-guided system is comparable to robotic or invasive frame based radiosurgery systems.

  19. Radiochromic film for individual patient QA in extracranial stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kron, T.; Clements, N.; Aarons, Y.; Dunn, L.; Chesson, B.; Miller, J.; Roozen, K.; Ball, D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Modern radiotherapy is characterised by increasingly complex radiation delivery such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) or extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (ESR). It has become common practice to verify the delivery for each patient in IMRT, however, no such methods have been defined to date for ESR. It was the aim of the present work to develop a method to verify the dose distribution for ESR in a moving phantom using radiochromic film. Methods: Radiochromic film (ISP EBT2) was used in a cylindrical film cassette fitted into a QUASAR phantom (Modus Medical). The cassette can be moved forwards and backwards with motion patterns that can mimic the breathing of individual patients. The radiotherapy treatment plans of four patients were re-planned for the phantom. Between 8 and 10 radiation fields of 6 MV photons from a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator were used to deliver target doses between 18 and 26 Gy per fraction. In order to allow for measurements with EBT2 film all monitor units were divided by 3 or 4 resulting in maximum doses not exceeding 10 Gy. The film was evaluated using a transmission scan on an Epson Perfection V700 scanner with 50 dpi spatial resolution (3 colors, 48bit). A calibration curve was used to convert either the red or green component of the scan to dose. Results: Qualitative film analysis found no discernible discrepancies from planned isodose distributions in the stationary images. The dose distribution in the moving phantom was used successfully to confirm the appropriateness of the ITV construction in the planning process. Conclusions: We have developed a QA procedure that accounts for breathing patterns of individual patients in ESR for lung cancer. Radiochromic film was found to be easy to adapt to this process.

  20. Influence of daily setup measurements and corrections on the estimated delivered dose during IMRT treatment of prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haaren, Paul M.A. van; Bel, Arjan; Hofman, Pieter; Vulpen, Marco van; Kotte, Alexis N.T.J.; Heide, Uulke A. van der

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of marker-based position verification, using daily imaging and an off-line correction protocol, by calculating the delivered dose to prostate, rectum and bladder. Methods: Prostate cancer patients (n = 217) were treated with IMRT, receiving 35 daily fractions. Plans with five beams were optimized taking target coverage (CTV, boost) and organs-at-risk (rectum and bladder) into account. PTV margins were 8 mm. Prostate position was verified daily using implanted fiducial gold markers by imaging the first segment of all the five beams on an EPID. Setup deviations were corrected off-line using an adapted shrinking-action-level protocol. The estimated delivered dose, including daily organ movements, was calculated using a version of PLATO's dose engine, enabling batch processing of large numbers of patients. The dose was calculated ± inclusion of setup corrections, and was evaluated relative to the original static plan. The marker-based measurements were considered representative for all organs. Results: Daily organ movements would result in an underdosage of 2-3 Gy to CTV and boost volume relative to the original plan, which was prevented by daily setup corrections. The dose to rectum and bladder was on average unchanged, but a large spread was introduced by organ movements, which was reduced by including setup corrections. Conclusions: Without position verification and setup corrections, margins of 8mm would be insufficient to account for position uncertainties during IMRT of prostate cancer. With the daily off-line correction protocol, the remaining variations are accommodated adequately

  1. The effect of concomitant chemotherapy on parotid gland function following head and neck IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Aisha B; Gulliford, Sarah L; Bhide, Shreerang A; Zaidi, Shane H; Newbold, Kate L; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M

    2013-03-01

    To determine whether concomitant chemotherapy increases the incidence of high grade xerostomia following parotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer. The incidence of high grade (≥G2) acute (CTCAEv3.0) and late (LENTSOMA and RTOG) xerostomia was compared between patients treated with either IMRT or concomitant chemo-IMRT (c-IMRT) in 2 prospective studies. Parotid gland mean tolerance doses (D₅₀) were reported using non-linear logistic regression analysis. Thirty-six patients received IMRT alone and 60 patients received c-IMRT. Patients received 65 Gy in 30 daily fractions to the primary site and involved nodal groups and 54 Gy in 30 fractions to elective nodal groups, mean doses to the parotid glands were comparable. Concomitant cisplatin 100mg/m(2) was administered on days 1 and 29 of IMRT. The incidence of ≥G2 subjective xerostomia was similar in both groups; acute-64.7% (IMRT) versus 60.3% (c-IMRT), p=0.83; late-43% (IMRT) versus 34% (c-IMRT), p=0.51. Recovery of parotid salivary flow at 1 year was higher with IMRT (64% vs 50%), but not statistically significant (p=0.15). D₅₀ for absence of parotid saliva flow at 1 year was 23.2 Gy (95% CI: 17.7-28.7) for IMRT and 21.1 Gy (11.8-30.3) for c-IMRT. Concomitant c-IMRT does not increase the incidence of acute or late xerostomia relative to IMRT alone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of concomitant chemotherapy on parotid gland function following head and neck IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, Aisha B.; Gulliford, Sarah L.; Bhide, Shreerang A.; Zaidi, Shane H.; Newbold, Kate L.; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether concomitant chemotherapy increases the incidence of high grade xerostomia following parotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer. Materials and methods: The incidence of high grade (⩾G2) acute (CTCAEv3.0) and late (LENTSOMA and RTOG) xerostomia was compared between patients treated with either IMRT or concomitant chemo-IMRT (c-IMRT) in 2 prospective studies. Parotid gland mean tolerance doses (D 50 ) were reported using non-linear logistic regression analysis. Results: Thirty-six patients received IMRT alone and 60 patients received c-IMRT. Patients received 65 Gy in 30 daily fractions to the primary site and involved nodal groups and 54 Gy in 30 fractions to elective nodal groups, mean doses to the parotid glands were comparable. Concomitant cisplatin 100 mg/m 2 was administered on days 1 and 29 of IMRT. The incidence of ⩾G2 subjective xerostomia was similar in both groups; acute-64.7% (IMRT) versus 60.3% (c-IMRT), p = 0.83; late-43% (IMRT) versus 34% (c-IMRT), p = 0.51. Recovery of parotid salivary flow at 1 year was higher with IMRT (64% vs 50%), but not statistically significant (p = 0.15). D 50 for absence of parotid saliva flow at 1 year was 23.2 Gy (95% CI: 17.7–28.7) for IMRT and 21.1 Gy (11.8–30.3) for c-IMRT. Conclusion: Concomitant c-IMRT does not increase the incidence of acute or late xerostomia relative to IMRT alone

  3. Evaluation and performance of arccheck and film using gamma criteria in pre-treatment quality assurance of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Ramachandran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the use of ArcCHECK (AC as an alternative method to replace film dosimetry for pre-treatment quality assurance (QA of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR treatment plans. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients with a varied diagnosis of lung, spine, sacrum, sternum, ribs, scapula, and femur undergoing SABR were selected for this study. Pre-treatment QA was performed for all the patients using ionization chamber and film dosimetry. Measurements were also carried out on an AC phantom. The planned and measured doses from the AC device and EBT3 films were compared using four different gamma criteria: 2%/2 mm, 3%/2 mm, 3%/1 mm, and 3%/3 mm. Results: The mean gamma passing rates at 3%/3 mm for all non-spine SABR cases were 98.79 ± 0.96 and 99.27 ± 1.03 with AC and films, respectively. The mean passing rates at 3%/2 mm for AC and films were 98.76 ± 0.42 and 99.43 ± 0.27 respectively for spine VMAT SABR, and 87.15 ± 2.45 and 99.79 ± 0.14 respectively for spine IMRT SABR. In the case of spine tumors, the gamma criterion was tightened due to the proximity of spinal cord to the planning target volume. Our results show that AC provides good results for all VMAT SABR plans. Conclusion: The AC results at 3%/3 mm were in good agreement with film dosimetry for most cases. We observed a significant reduction in QA time on using AC for SABR QA. This study showed that AC results are comparable to film dosimetry for all studied sites except for spine IMRT SABR.

  4. SU-G-BRC-12: Isotoxic Dose Escalation for Advanced Lung Cancer: Comparison of Different Boosting Strategiesfor Patients with Recurrent Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shusharina, N; Khan, F; Sharp, G; Choi, N [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the dose level and timing of the boost in locally advanced lung cancer patients with confirmed tumor recurrence by comparing different boosting strategies by an impact of dose escalation in improvement of the therapeutic ratio. Methods: We selected eighteen patients with advanced NSCLC and confirmed recurrence. For each patient, a base IMRT plan to 60 Gy prescribed to PTV was created. Then we compared three dose escalation strategies: a uniform escalation to the original PTV, an escalation to a PET-defined target planned sequentially and concurrently. The PET-defined targets were delineated by biologically-weighed regions on a pre-treatment 18F-FDG PET. The maximal achievable dose, without violating the OAR constraints, was identified for each boosting method. The EUD for the target, spinal cord, combined lung, and esophagus was compared for each plan. Results: The average prescribed dose was 70.4±13.9 Gy for the uniform boost, 88.5±15.9 Gy for the sequential boost and 89.1±16.5 Gy for concurrent boost. The size of the boost planning volume was 12.8% (range: 1.4 – 27.9%) of the PTV. The most prescription-limiting dose constraints was the V70 of the esophagus. The EUD within the target increased by 10.6 Gy for the uniform boost, by 31.4 Gy for the sequential boost and by 38.2 for the concurrent boost. The EUD for OARs increased by the following amounts: spinal cord, 3.1 Gy for uniform boost, 2.8 Gy for sequential boost, 5.8 Gy for concurrent boost; combined lung, 1.6 Gy for uniform, 1.1 Gy for sequential, 2.8 Gy for concurrent; esophagus, 4.2 Gy for uniform, 1.3 Gy for sequential, 5.6 Gy for concurrent. Conclusion: Dose escalation to a biologically-weighed gross tumor volume defined on a pre-treatment 18F-FDG PET may provide improved therapeutic ratio without breaching predefined OAR constraints. Sequential boost provides better sparing of OARs as compared with concurrent boost.

  5. SU-G-BRC-12: Isotoxic Dose Escalation for Advanced Lung Cancer: Comparison of Different Boosting Strategiesfor Patients with Recurrent Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shusharina, N; Khan, F; Sharp, G; Choi, N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the dose level and timing of the boost in locally advanced lung cancer patients with confirmed tumor recurrence by comparing different boosting strategies by an impact of dose escalation in improvement of the therapeutic ratio. Methods: We selected eighteen patients with advanced NSCLC and confirmed recurrence. For each patient, a base IMRT plan to 60 Gy prescribed to PTV was created. Then we compared three dose escalation strategies: a uniform escalation to the original PTV, an escalation to a PET-defined target planned sequentially and concurrently. The PET-defined targets were delineated by biologically-weighed regions on a pre-treatment 18F-FDG PET. The maximal achievable dose, without violating the OAR constraints, was identified for each boosting method. The EUD for the target, spinal cord, combined lung, and esophagus was compared for each plan. Results: The average prescribed dose was 70.4±13.9 Gy for the uniform boost, 88.5±15.9 Gy for the sequential boost and 89.1±16.5 Gy for concurrent boost. The size of the boost planning volume was 12.8% (range: 1.4 – 27.9%) of the PTV. The most prescription-limiting dose constraints was the V70 of the esophagus. The EUD within the target increased by 10.6 Gy for the uniform boost, by 31.4 Gy for the sequential boost and by 38.2 for the concurrent boost. The EUD for OARs increased by the following amounts: spinal cord, 3.1 Gy for uniform boost, 2.8 Gy for sequential boost, 5.8 Gy for concurrent boost; combined lung, 1.6 Gy for uniform, 1.1 Gy for sequential, 2.8 Gy for concurrent; esophagus, 4.2 Gy for uniform, 1.3 Gy for sequential, 5.6 Gy for concurrent. Conclusion: Dose escalation to a biologically-weighed gross tumor volume defined on a pre-treatment 18F-FDG PET may provide improved therapeutic ratio without breaching predefined OAR constraints. Sequential boost provides better sparing of OARs as compared with concurrent boost.

  6. Peripheral doses of cranial pediatric IMRT performed with attenuator blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger; Schitz, Ivette; Schelin, Hugo Reuters; Silva, Ricardo Goulart da; Viamonte, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents values of peripheral doses measured at six vital points of simulator objects which represent the ages of 2, 5 and 10 years old, submitted to a cranial IMRT procedure that applied compensator blocks interposed to 6 MV beams. The found values indicate that there is independence of dose with position of measurements and age of the patient, as the peripheral dose at the points nearest and the 2 year old simulator object where larger. The doses in thyroid reached the range of 1.4 to 2.9% of the dose prescribed in the isocenter, indicating that the peripheral doses for IMRT that employ compensator blocks can be greater than for the IMRT produced with sliding window technique

  7. Dosimetry for synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy: from a macroscopic approach to microscopic energy deposits consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edouard, M.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic strategies are currently being evaluated to find a curative treatment for high grade glioma. Among them, radiation therapy is partially effective but limited by the insufficient differential effect that can be reached between the dose delivered to the tumor compared to the one received by the healthy tissues. Synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy aims at increasing this differential effect with a localized dose boost obtained by low energy x-rays stereotactic irradiations (≤ 100 keV) in presence of heavy elements restricted to the target area. This PhD work takes place in the general context of the future clinical trials foreseen at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The first objective was to optimize the dose delivery to the target, at a macroscopic scale. We have demonstrated in particular that an even number of weighted beams was required to homogenize the tumor dose distribution. Microdosimetry studies were then performed to evaluate the dose delivered at the cellular level, taking into account the fine high-Z element distribution. These theoretical results have been compared to in vitro studies. Cell survival studies were performed using either a 3D glioma model (spheroids) or cells irradiated in suspension in an iodinated medium. (author) [fr

  8. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) combined with concurrent but not adjuvant chemotherapy in primary nasopharyngeal cancer – a retrospective single center analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh-Ebrahimi, Ladan; Zwicker, Felix; Muenter, Marc W; Bischof, Marc; Lindel, Katja; Debus, Juergen; Huber, Peter E; Roeder, Falk

    2013-01-01

    We report our experience in 49 consecutive patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma who were treated by Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) combined with simultaneous but not adjuvant chemotherapy (CHT). The medical records of 49 patients with histologically proven primary nasopharygeal carcinoma treated with IMRT and concurrent platin-based CHT (predominantly cisplatin weekly) were retrospectively reviewed. The majority of patients showed advanced clinical stages (stage III/IV:72%) with undifferentiated histology (82%). IMRT was performed in step-and-shoot technique using an integrated boost concept in 84%. In this concept, the boost volume covered the primary tumor and involved nodes with doses of 66–70.4 Gy (single dose 2.2 Gy). Uninvolved regional nodal areas were covered with doses of 54–59.4 Gy (median single dose 1.8 Gy). At least one parotid gland was spared. None of the patients received adjuvant CHT. The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 48 months. Radiation therapy was completed without interruption in all patients and 76% of the patients received at least 80% of the scheduled CHT. Four local recurrences have been observed, transferring into 1-, 3-, and 5-year Local Control (LC) rates of 98%, 90% and 90%. One patient developed an isolated regional nodal recurrence, resulting in 1-, 3-, and 5-year Regional Control (RC) rates of 98%. All locoregional failures were located inside the radiation fields. Distant metastases were found in six patients, transferring into 1-, 3, and 5-year Distant Control (DC) rates of 92%, 86% and 86%. Progression free survival (PFS) rates after 1, 3 and 5 years were 86%, 70% and 69% and 1-, 3- and 5-year Overall Survival (OS) rates were 96%, 82% and 79%. Acute toxicity ≥ grade III mainly consisted of dysphagia (32%), leukopenia (24%), stomatitis (16%), infection (8%) and nausea (8%). Severe late toxicity (grade III) was documented in 18% of the patients, mainly as xerostomia (10%). Concurrent chemoradiation

  9. Peripheral doses of cranial pediatric IMRT performed with attenuator blocks; Doses perifericas de IMRT cranial pediatrica realizada com blocos atenuadores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger; Schitz, Ivette; Schelin, Hugo Reuters, E-mail: soboll@utfpr.edu.b, E-mail: iveteschitz@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: schelin@utfpr.edu.b [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Silva, Ricardo Goulart da, E-mail: ricardo.goulart@ymail.co [Hospital Angelina Caron, Campina Grande do Sul, PR (Brazil); Viamonte, Alfredo, E-mail: aviamonte@inca.gov.b [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper presents values of peripheral doses measured at six vital points of simulator objects which represent the ages of 2, 5 and 10 years old, submitted to a cranial IMRT procedure that applied compensator blocks interposed to 6 MV beams. The found values indicate that there is independence of dose with position of measurements and age of the patient, as the peripheral dose at the points nearest and the 2 year old simulator object where larger. The doses in thyroid reached the range of 1.4 to 2.9% of the dose prescribed in the isocenter, indicating that the peripheral doses for IMRT that employ compensator blocks can be greater than for the IMRT produced with sliding window technique

  10. Functional image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy planning for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsegmed, Uranchimeg [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakashima, Takeo [Division of Radiation Therapy, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakamura, Yuko; Higaki, Toru [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Imano, Nobuki; Doi, Yoshiko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Ozawa, Shuichi; Murakami, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Awai, Kazuo [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the current planning study is to evaluate the ability of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI)–guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning by using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques in sparing the functional liver tissues during SBRT for hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, 20 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were enrolled. Functional liver tissues were defined according to quantitative liver-spleen contrast ratios ≥ 1.5 on a hepatobiliary phase scan. Functional images were fused with the planning computed tomography (CT) images; the following 2 SBRT plans were designed using a “step-and-shoot” static IMRT technique for each patient: (1) an anatomical SBRT plan optimization based on the total liver; and (2) a functional SBRT plan based on the functional liver. The total prescribed dose was 48 gray (Gy) in 4 fractions. Dosimetric parameters, including dose to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV D{sub 95%}), percentages of total and functional liver volumes, which received doses from 5 to 30 Gy (V5 to V30 and fV5 to fV30), and mean doses to total and functional liver (MLD and fMLD, respectively) of the 2 plans were compared. Compared with anatomical plans, functional image-guided SBRT plans reduced MLD (mean: plan A, 5.5 Gy; and plan F, 5.1 Gy; p < 0.0001) and fMLD (mean: plan A, 5.4 Gy; and plan F, 4.9 Gy; p < 0.0001), as well as V5 to V30 and fV5 to fV30. No differences were noted in PTV coverage and nonhepatic organs at risk (OARs) doses. In conclusion, EOB-MRI–guided SBRT planning using the IMRT technique may preserve functional liver tissues in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

  11. Stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obedian, E.; Lotbiniere, A.C.J. de; Haffty, B.G.; Piepmeier, J.M.; Fischer, D.B.; Knisely, J.P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the influence of several prognostic factors on overall survival and progression free survival in patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases. Materials and Methods: Records of 61 coecutive patients with pathologically confirmed extra-cranial malignancies undergoing SRS at Yale University School of Medicine between 12/18/91 and 7/2/96 were reviewed. All patients underwent head frame localization and CT and/or MRI based treatment planning. Outcome was analyzed with respect to age, number of lesions, size of lesions, location of lesions, site and stage of primary tumor, status of primary tumor at time of SRS, history of whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT), surgery, and/or chemotherapy prior to or after SRS, delay in SRS from diagnosis of brain metastases, dose of radiation delivered, and brain metastasis free interval. Both overall survival and progression free survival were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Tests for statistical significance were performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Median follow-up was 29 months. 3% ((8(61))) of patients displayed evidence of progressive disease at the site of SRS, and 87% ((53(61))) of patients have died. Overall and progression free survival rates for the entire cohort of patients were 43.8% and 89.5% at 1 year and 11.1% and 71.4% at 2 years, respectively. Patients undergoing SRS for a solitary brain metastasis had a significant improvement in overall survival with 1 year survival rates of 52.6% vs. 32.7% for patients undergoing SRS for more than 1 brain metastasis (p=0.002). Patients who presented with progressive systemic disease at the time of SRS had an inferior overall survival with a 1 year survival rate of 15.4% compared to patients with presumed/known stable disease who had a 1 year survival rate of 51.5%/54.2% (p<0.001). Patients treated for cerebral metastases had a higher progression free survival compared to patients undergoing SRS

  12. Can All Centers Plan Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) Effectively? An External Audit of Dosimetric Comparisons Between Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and IMRT for Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hans T.; Lee, Brian; Park, Eileen; Lu, Jiade J.; Xia Ping

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric endpoints between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at our center with limited IMRT experience, and to perform an external audit of the IMRT plans. Methods and Materials: Ten patients, who received adjuvant chemoradiation for gastric cancer, formed the study cohort. For standardization, the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk were recontoured with the assistance of a study protocol radiologic atlas. The cohort was replanned with CMS Xio to generate coplanar 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. All 10 datasets, including volumes but without the plans (i.e., blinded), were transmitted to an experienced center where IMRT plans were designed using Nomos Corvus (IMRT-C) and ADAC Pinnacle (IMRT-P). All IMRT plans were normalized to D95% receiving 45 Gy. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy yielded higher PTV V45 (volume that receives ≥45 Gy) (p < 0.001) than 3D-CRT. No difference in V20 was seen in the right (p = 0.9) and left (p 0.3) kidneys, but the liver mean dose (p < 0.001) was superior with IMRT. For the external audit, IMRT-C (p = 0.002) and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved significantly lower left kidney V20 than IMRT, and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved lower right kidney V20 than IMRT. The IMRT-C (p = 0.003) but not IMRT-P (p = 0.6) had lower liver mean doses than IMRT. Conclusions: At our institution with early IMRT experience, IMRT improved PTV dose coverage and liver doses but not kidney doses. An external audit of IMRT plans showed that an experienced center can yield superior IMRT plans

  13. Robotic-based carbon ion therapy and patient positioning in 6 degrees of freedom: setup accuracy of two standard immobilization devices used in carbon ion therapy and IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Alexandra D; Winter, Marcus; Kuhn, Sabine P; Debus, Jürgen; Nairz, Olaf; Münter, Marc W

    2012-03-29

    To investigate repositioning accuracy in particle radiotherapy in 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, 3 DOF) for two immobilization devices (Scotchcast masks vs thermoplastic head masks) currently in use at our institution for fractionated radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients. Position verifications in patients treated with carbon ion therapy and IMRT for head and neck malignancies were evaluated. Most patients received combined treatment regimen (IMRT plus carbon ion boost), immobilization was achieved with either Scotchcast or thermoplastic head masks. Position corrections in robotic-based carbon ion therapy allowing 6 DOF were compared to IMRT allowing corrections in 3 DOF for two standard immobilization devices. In total, 838 set-up controls of 38 patients were analyzed. Robotic-based position correction including correction of rotations was well tolerated and without discomfort. Standard deviations of translational components were between 0.5 and 0.8 mm for Scotchcast and 0.7 and 1.3 mm for thermoplastic masks in 6 DOF and 1.2-1.4 mm and 1.0-1.1 mm in 3 DOF respectively. Mean overall displacement vectors were between 2.1 mm (Scotchcast) and 2.9 mm (thermoplastic masks) in 6 DOF and 3.9-3.0 mm in 3 DOF respectively. Displacement vectors were lower when correction in 6 DOF was allowed as opposed to 3 DOF only, which was maintained at the traditional action level of >3 mm for position correction in the pre-on-board imaging era. Setup accuracy for both systems was within the expected range. Smaller shifts were required when 6 DOF were available for correction as opposed to 3 DOF. Where highest possible positioning accuracy is required, frequent image guidance is mandatory to achieve best possible plan delivery and maintenance of sharp gradients and optimal normal tissue sparing inherent in carbon ion therapy.

  14. Improved normal tissue sparing in head and neck radiotherapy using biological cost function based-IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N; Lawford, C; Khoo, V; Rolfo, M; Joon, D L; Wada, M

    2011-12-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has reduced the impact of acute and late toxicities associated with head and neck radiotherapy. Treatment planning system (TPS) advances in biological cost function based optimization (BBO) and improved segmentation techniques have increased organ at risk (OAR) sparing compared to conventional dose-based optimization (DBO). A planning study was undertaken to compare OAR avoidance in DBO and BBO treatment planning. Simultaneous integrated boost treatment plans were produced for 10 head and neck patients using both planning systems. Plans were compared for tar get coverage and OAR avoidance. Comparisons were made using the BBO TPS Monte Carlo dose engine to eliminate differences due to inherent algorithms. Target coverage (V95%) was maintained for both solutions. BBO produced lower OAR doses, with statistically significant improvement to left (12.3%, p = 0.005) and right parotid mean dose (16.9%, p = 0.004), larynx V50_Gy (71.0%, p = 0.005), spinal cord (21.9%, p < 0.001) and brain stem dose maximums (31.5%, p = 0.002). This study observed improved OAR avoidance with BBO planning. Further investigations will be undertaken to review any clinical benefit of this improved planned dosimetry.

  15. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy using simultaneous-integrated boost for definitive treatment of locally advanced mucosal head and neck cancer: outcomes from a single-institution series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, Meredith; Guo, Linxin; Hanna, Catherine; Back, Michael; Guminski, Alex; Lee, Adrian; Eade, Thomas; Veivers, David; Wignall, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The study aims to report outcomes for patients treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with simultaneous-integrated boost and weekly cisplatin for American Joint Committee on Cancer stage III/IV mucosal head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Records for 67 patients treated definitively with IMRT for HNSCC were reviewed. By including only those treated with weekly cisplatin, 45 patients were eligible for analysis. Treatment outcomes, effect of patient, tumour and treatment characteristics on disease recurrence were analysed. All patients completed IMRT to 7000cGy in 35 fractions, with concurrent weekly cisplatin 40mg/m 2 (median 6 cycles). Median follow-up was 28 months for living patients. Two-year loco-regional recurrence-free, metastasis-free and overall survival were 85.4, 81.0 and 87.4%, respectively. Local recurrence occurred in three patients, and distant recurrence in eight patients. Our results show efficacy of IMRT and weekly cisplatin in the treatment of stage III/IV HNSCC at our institution with respect to loco-regional control.

  16. The impact of direct aperture optimization on plan quality and efficiency in complex head and neck IMRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabatino Marcello

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional step&shoot intensity modulated radio therapy (IMRT approaches potentially lead to treatment plans with high numbers of segments and monitor units (MU and, therefore, could be time consuming at the linear accelerator. Direct optimization methods are able to reduce the complexity without degrading the quality of the plan. The aim of this study is the evaluation of different IMRT approaches at standardized conditions for head and neck tumors. Method For 27 patients with carcinomas in the head and neck region a planning study with a 2-step-IMRT system (KonRad, a direct optimization system (Panther DAO and a mixture of both approaches (MasterPlan DSS was created. In order to avoid different prescription doses for boost volumes a simple standardization was realized. The dose was downscaled to 50 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV which included the primary tumor as well as the bilateral lymphatic drainage (cervical and supraclavicular. Dose restrictions for the organs at risk (OAR were downscaled to this prescription from high dose concepts up to 72 Gy. Those limits were defined as planning objectives while reaching definable PTV coverage with a standardized field setup. The parameters were evaluated from the corresponding dose volume histogram (DVH. Special attention was paid to the efficiency of the method, measured by means of calculated MU and required segments. Statistical tests of significance were applied to quantify the differences between the evaluated systems. Results PTV coverage for all systems in terms of V90% and V95% fell short of the requested 100% and 95%, respectively, but were still acceptable (range: 98.7% to 99.1% and 94.2% to 94.7%. Overall for OAR sparing and the burden of healthy tissue with low doses no technique was superior for all evaluated parameters. Differences were found for the number of segments where the direct optimization systems generated less segments. Lowest average numbers of

  17. The impact of direct aperture optimization on plan quality and efficiency in complex head and neck IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatino, Marcello; Kretschmer, Matthias; Zink, Klemens; Würschmidt, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Conventional step&shoot intensity modulated radio therapy (IMRT) approaches potentially lead to treatment plans with high numbers of segments and monitor units (MU) and, therefore, could be time consuming at the linear accelerator. Direct optimization methods are able to reduce the complexity without degrading the quality of the plan. The aim of this study is the evaluation of different IMRT approaches at standardized conditions for head and neck tumors. For 27 patients with carcinomas in the head and neck region a planning study with a 2-step-IMRT system (KonRad), a direct optimization system (Panther DAO) and a mixture of both approaches (MasterPlan DSS) was created. In order to avoid different prescription doses for boost volumes a simple standardization was realized. The dose was downscaled to 50 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) which included the primary tumor as well as the bilateral lymphatic drainage (cervical and supraclavicular). Dose restrictions for the organs at risk (OAR) were downscaled to this prescription from high dose concepts up to 72 Gy. Those limits were defined as planning objectives while reaching definable PTV coverage with a standardized field setup. The parameters were evaluated from the corresponding dose volume histogram (DVH). Special attention was paid to the efficiency of the method, measured by means of calculated MU and required segments. Statistical tests of significance were applied to quantify the differences between the evaluated systems. PTV coverage for all systems in terms of V 90% and V 95% fell short of the requested 100% and 95%, respectively, but were still acceptable (range: 98.7% to 99.1% and 94.2% to 94.7%). Overall for OAR sparing and the burden of healthy tissue with low doses no technique was superior for all evaluated parameters. Differences were found for the number of segments where the direct optimization systems generated less segments. Lowest average numbers of MU were 308 by Panther DAO calculated for

  18. Stereotactic breast biopsy with a biopsy gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, S.H.; Lovin, J.; Luethke, J.; Jobe, W.E.; Hopper, K.D.; Yakes, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    With the recent introduction of stereotactic mammographic localizing devices, the authors have been performing histologic core needle breast biopsies in which the Bard biopsy gun is used in conjunction with sterotactic guidance. The authors have performed 60 breast gun biopsies with 16-gauge and 18-gauge biopsy-cut needles. These biopsies were followed immediately by traditional surgical excision. Pathologic results correlated well in 52 of the 60 patients, including 10 of 13 cancers. Three of the eight negative correlations occurred when diagnosis was made on gun biopsy but not on surgical biopsy. The stereotactic- guided gun biopsies appear to approach the surgical gold standard, decrease patient discomfort and potential disfigurement, lower the cost of breast biopsy, and lower the threshold necessary to perform breast biopsy

  19. Stereotactic Bragg peak proton radiosurgery method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjellberg, R.N.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the technical aspects of a stereotactic Bragg peak proton radiosurgical method for the head is presented. The preparatory radiographic studies are outlined and the stereotactic instrument and positioning of the patient are described. The instrument is so calibrated that after corrections for soft tissue and bone thickness, the Bragg peak superimposes upon the intracranial target. The head is rotated at specific intervals to allow predetermined portals of access for the beam path, all of which converge on the intracranial target. Normally, portals are arranged to oppose and overlap from both sides of the head. Using a number of beams (in sequence) on both sides of the head, the target dose is far greater than the path dose. The procedure normally takes 3/2-2 hours, following which the patient can walk away. (Auth./C.F.)

  20. Stereotactic radiosurgery: basic concepts and current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, Maheep Singh

    2016-01-01

    Term Stereotactic Radiosurgery was coined by Prof Lars Leksell in 1951 as concept. Leksell's experimented together with the radiobiologist Borje Larsson in Uppsala, on trying to develop 'stereotactic radiosurgery', aimed at lesioning in the central brain in functional operations such as thalamotomy and capsulotomy. Clinical experiments using a proton beam were initiated at the Gustav Werner Institute in Uppsala, and a few patients had been treated. Experiences from these led Leksell to design a multi-source 'beam knife', which became ready for use in 1967 as the first 'Gamma Knife' and installed at the private hospital Sophiahammet in Stockholm as a clinical research unit. Moving from functional neurosurgery today Gamma knife is used for a wide range on brain tumors, vascular malformations and functional disorders. Introduction of newer technology in navigation and radiation delivery has made it possible to do whole body Radiosurgery. Various technologies, basic principles, radiobiological aspects and applications will be discussed. (author)

  1. New stereotactic X-ray knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barish, R.J.; Barish, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    For many years, the irradiation of small volumes of tissue in the brain to necrotizing doses has been investigated as a non-invasive alternative to neurosurgery. We propose a new system in which a precisely machined helmet serves as a multi-port focussed X-ray collimator when it is itself irradiated by a conventional medical linear accelerator run in the electron mode. When the collimator is attached to a stereotactic frame, the geometric accuracy of delivering small radiation fields to the brain is limited primarily by the accuracy of the stereotactic localization, and is relatively independent of the positional stability of the accelerator. Field sizes as small as two millimeters are readily achievable. The problem of low dose rate associated with these small fields is overcome by the use of high electron beam currents

  2. Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jennifer L; Li, Gordon; Shaffer, Jenny L; Azoulay, Melissa I; Gibbs, Iris C; Nagpal, Seema; Soltys, Scott G

    2018-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Standard therapy depends on patient age and performance status but principally involves surgical resection followed by a 6-wk course of radiation therapy given concurrently with temozolomide chemotherapy. Despite such treatment, prognosis remains poor, with a median survival of 16 mo. Challenges in achieving local control, maintaining quality of life, and limiting toxicity plague treatment strategies for this disease. Radiotherapy dose intensification through hypofractionation and stereotactic radiosurgery is a promising strategy that has been explored to meet these challenges. We review the use of hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with newly diagnosed and recurrent glioblastoma. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  3. Stereotactic radiosurgery planning with ictal SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerly, T.; RMIT University, Bundoora, VIC; Geso, M.; O'Keefe, G.; Smith, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is motivated by a clinical requirement to utilise ictal SPECT images for target localisation in stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning using the xknife system which only supports CT and MRI images. To achieve this, the SPECT images were converted from raw (pixel data only) format into a part 10 compliant DICOM CT fileset. The minimum requirements for the recasting of a raw format image as DICOM CT or MRI data set are described in detail. The method can be applied to the importation of raw format images into any radiotherapy treatment planning system that supports CT or MRI import. It is demonstrated that the combination of the low spatial resolution SPECT images, depicting functional information, with high spatial resolution MRI images, which show the structural information, is suitable for stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  4. Stereotactic radiosurgery with an upper partial denture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayama, Shusaku; Kunieda, Etsuo; Takeda, Atsushi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Oku, Yohei

    2009-01-01

    A 54-year-old male with partial denture underwent stereotactic radiosurgery with an infrared camera-guided system for a metastatic brain tumor arising from lung cancer. Although this method utilizes a biteplate mounted on the upper jaw to detect head movement, the patient only had four teeth in his upper jaw. In order to stabilize the biteplate, the maxillary denture was fixed to the biteplate with an autopolymerizing resin. In addition, the rest-occlusal position of the lower jaw was impressed on the inferior surface of the biteplate with an autopolymerizing resin. To assess reproducibility and stability, the distance between the left and right incus and left and right markers was measured during pre-planning, as well as before and after stereotactic irradiation. Wearing the biteplate ensures the accuracy of radiotherapy planning for the implementation of radiosurgery in patients who have many maxillary teeth missing. However, a large degree of error was observed when the biteplate was removed. (author)

  5. Exclusive image guided IMRT vs. radical prostatectomy followed by postoperative IMRT for localized prostate cancer: a matched-pair analysis based on risk-groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azelie, Caroline; Créhange, Gilles; Gauthier, Mélanie; Mirjolet, Céline; Cormier, Luc; Martin, Etienne; Peignaux-Casasnovas, Karine; Truc, Gilles; Chamois, Jérôme; Maingon, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether patients treated for a localized prostate cancer (PCa) require a radical prostatectomy followed by postoperative radiotherapy or exclusive radiotherapy, in the modern era of image guided IMRT. 178 patients with PCa were referred for daily exclusive image guided IMRT (IG-IMRT) using an on-line 3D ultra-sound based system and 69 patients were referred for postoperative IMRT without image guidance after radical prostatectomy (RP + IMRT). Patients were matched in a 1:1 ratio according to their baseline risk group before any treatment. Late toxicity was scored using the CTV v3.0 scale. Biochemical failure was defined as a postoperative PSA ≤ 0.1 ng/mL followed by 1 consecutive rising PSA for the postoperative group of patients and by the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/mL) for the group of patients treated with exclusive radiotherapy. A total of 98 patients were matched (49:49). From the start of any treatment, the median follow-up was 56.6 months (CI 95% = [49.6-61.2], range [18.2-115.1]). No patient had late gastrointestinal grade ≥ 2 toxicity in the IG-IMRT group vs. 4% in the RP + IMRT group. Forty two percent of the patients in both groups had late grade ≥ 2 genitourinary toxicity. The 5-year FFF rates in the IG-IMRT group and in the RP + IMRT groups were 93.1% [80.0-97.8] and 76.5% [58.3-87.5], respectively (p = 0.031). Patients with a localized PCa treated with IG-IMRT had better oncological outcome than patients treated with RP + IMRT. Further improvements in postoperative IMRT using image guidance and dose escalation are urgently needed

  6. Stereotactic Radiotherapy by 6MV Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oho, Yoon Kyeong; Kim, Mi Hee; Gil, Hak Jun [Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    1988-12-15

    Eight patients with intracranial tumors or arteriovenous malformation (AVM)s which were less than 3 cm in diameter were treated by a technique of stereotactic radiotherapy during the 4 months period from July 1988 through October 1988 at the Division of Radiation Therapy, Kang-Nam St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University Medical College. The patients were diagnosed as AVMs in 3 cases, acoustic neurinoma, craniopharyngioma (recurrent), hemangioblastoma, pineocytoma, and pituitary microadenoma in each case. There are several important factors in this procedure, such as localization system, portal, field size, radiation dose, and perioperative supportive care. It is suggested that stereotactic radiotherapy may be performed safely with a radiation dose of 12-30 Gy. So this noninvasive procedure can be used to treat unresectable intracranial tumors or AVMs. Of these, clinical symptoms had been regressed in AVMs in 2 cases at 3 months and 2 months after Stereotactic radiotherapy, one of whom was confirmed slightly regressed on the follow-up angiogram. And also craniopharyngioma and pineocytoma was minimally regressed on 3 month follow-up CT.

  7. Stereotactic Radiotherapy by 6MV Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oho, Yoon Kyeong; Kim, Mi Hee; Gil, Hak Jun

    1988-01-01

    Eight patients with intracranial tumors or arteriovenous malformation (AVM)s which were less than 3 cm in diameter were treated by a technique of stereotactic radiotherapy during the 4 months period from July 1988 through October 1988 at the Division of Radiation Therapy, Kang-Nam St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University Medical College. The patients were diagnosed as AVMs in 3 cases, acoustic neurinoma, craniopharyngioma (recurrent), hemangioblastoma, pineocytoma, and pituitary microadenoma in each case. There are several important factors in this procedure, such as localization system, portal, field size, radiation dose, and perioperative supportive care. It is suggested that stereotactic radiotherapy may be performed safely with a radiation dose of 12-30 Gy. So this noninvasive procedure can be used to treat unresectable intracranial tumors or AVMs. Of these, clinical symptoms had been regressed in AVMs in 2 cases at 3 months and 2 months after Stereotactic radiotherapy, one of whom was confirmed slightly regressed on the follow-up angiogram. And also craniopharyngioma and pineocytoma was minimally regressed on 3 month follow-up CT

  8. Stereotactic radiation therapy for large vestibular schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandl, Ellen S.; Meijer, Otto W.M.; Slotman, Ben J.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Peerdeman, Saskia M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the morbidity and tumor-control rate in the treatment of large vestibular schwannomas (VS) after stereotactic radiation therapy in our institution. Material and methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients (17 men, 8 women) with large VS (diameter 3.0 cm or larger), treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) between 1992 and 2007, were retrospectively studied after a mean follow-up period of three years with respect to tumor-control rate and complications. Results: Actuarial 5-year maintenance of pre-treatment hearing level probability of 30% was achieved. Five of 17 patients suffered permanent new facial nerve dysfunction. The actuarial 5-year facial nerve preservation probability was 80%. Permanent new trigeminal nerve neuropathy occurred in two of 15 patients, resulting in an actuarial 5-year trigeminal nerve preservation probability of 85%. Tumor progression occurred in four of 25 (16%) patients. The overall 5-year tumor control probability was 82%. Conclusion: Increased morbidity rates were found in patients with large VS treated with SRT or SRS compared to the published series on regular sized VS and other smaller retrospective studies on large VS.

  9. Stereotactic irradiation for metastatic brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Ryutaro

    2017-01-01

    First, this paper reviewed the latest findings of stereotactic irradiation (STI) for metastatic brain tumors. Then, it described the results of randomized controlled trials for single or a few (2-4) metastasis in the following comparison tests: (1) comparison between whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone group and (WBRT + STI) group, (2) comparison between STI alone group and (STI + WBRT) group, (3) comparison between STI alone group and (tumorectomy + WBRT) group, (4) comparison between (STI + WBRT) group and (tumorectomy + WBRT) group, and (5) between (tumorectomy + WBRT) group and (tumorectomy + STI) group. Among these, STI alone without WBRT has obtained a certain consensus. Against multiple metastatic brain tumors of 5 or more, when considering cognitive impairment and QOL loss by adding WBRT, it is general consensus that STI alone may be sufficient. At the authors' institution, cyber knife (CK) was introduced in 2008 and nearly 300 stereotactic radiotherapy for metastatic brain tumors have been performed annually. By adopting a robot arm and development of a lesion tracking system, the positional correction against the deviation of the bone margin of the skull is guaranteed in real time to ensure accuracy during irradiation, and hypofractionated stereotactic irradiation becomes easier. (A.O.)

  10. Current status of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Kazuo; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro

    2007-01-01

    External-beam radiation therapy has been one of the treatment options for prostate cancer. The dose response has been observed for a dose range of 64.8-81 Gy. The problem of external-beam radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer is that as the dose increases, adverse effects also increase. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) has enabled us to treat patients with up to 72-76 Gy to the prostate, with a relatively acceptable risk of late rectal bleeding. Recently, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been shown to deliver a higher dose to the target with acceptable low rates of rectal and bladder complications. The most important things to keep in mind when using an IMRT technique are that there is a significant trade-off between coverage of the target, avoidance of adjacent critical structures, and the inhomogeneity of the dose within the target. Lastly, even with IMRT, it should be kept in mind that a ''perfect'' plan that creates completely homogeneous coverage of the target volume and zero or small dose to the adjacent organs at risk is not always obtained. Participating in many treatment planning sessions and arranging the beams and beam weights create the best approach to the best IMRT plan. (author)

  11. Consequences of leaf calibration errors on IMRT delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastre-Padro, M; Welleweerd, J; Malinen, E; Eilertsen, K; Olsen, D R; Heide, U A van der

    2007-01-01

    IMRT treatments using multi-leaf collimators may involve a large number of segments in order to spare the organs at risk. When a large proportion of these segments are small, leaf positioning errors may become relevant and have therapeutic consequences. The performance of four head and neck IMRT treatments under eight different cases of leaf positioning errors has been studied. Systematic leaf pair offset errors in the range of ±2.0 mm were introduced, thus modifying the segment sizes of the original IMRT plans. Thirty-six films were irradiated with the original and modified segments. The dose difference and the gamma index (with 2%/2 mm criteria) were used for evaluating the discrepancies between the irradiated films. The median dose differences were linearly related to the simulated leaf pair errors. In the worst case, a 2.0 mm error generated a median dose difference of 1.5%. Following the gamma analysis, two out of the 32 modified plans were not acceptable. In conclusion, small systematic leaf bank positioning errors have a measurable impact on the delivered dose and may have consequences for the therapeutic outcome of IMRT

  12. A class solution for RapidArc prostate planning with simultaneous integrated boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, David; Alahakone, D.; Meyer, J.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Standardised treatment planning procedures make the planning process for rotational IMRT more efficient and consistent. This may be achieved by applying the same planning strategy, or class solution, for each patient. In doing so it may be possible to achieve acceptable plans for each patient within a relatively short timeframe, whilst time consuming individual optimisation of the planning parameters can be avoided. Methods Tn this work, a robust and streamlined planning strategy is established with an emphasis on treating prostate patients with a simultaneous integrated boost RapidArc plan. This planning strategy outlines the field set up, recommended starting objectives, required user interactions to be made throughout optimisation and post optimisation adjustments. A comparative planning study-with static gantry IMRT -is then presented for ten prostate patients as justification for the planning strategy itself. Results A variety of parameters are evaluated relating to both the planning itself and the plans that result. Results of this comparative study are in line with previously published data and the planning process is streamlined to a point where the RapidArc optimisation and calculation time is 16.7 1.5 min collectively. Discussion and Conclusion Application of this planning strategy reduces the dependence of the produced plan on the experience of the planner and has the potential to streamline the planning process within radiotherapy departments. Modified applications of the strategy have also proved to be useful for the planning of other treatment sites.

  13. Reirradiation of head and neck cancer focusing on hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Kodani, Naohiro; Ogita, Mikio; Sato, Kengo; Himei, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    Reirradiation is a feasible option for patients who do not otherwise have treatment options available. Depending on the location and extent of the tumor, reirradiation may be accomplished with external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, radiosurgery, or intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Although there has been limited experience with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (hSRT), it may have the potential for curative or palliative treatment due to its advanced precision technology, particularly for limited small lesion. On the other hand, severe late adverse reactions are anticipated with reirradiation than with initial radiation therapy. The risk of severe late complications has been reported to be 20- 40% and is related to prior radiotherapy dose, primary site, retreatment radiotherapy dose, treatment volume, and technique. Early researchers have observed lethal bleeding in such patients up to a rate of 14%. Recently, similar rate of 10-15% was observed for fatal bleeding with use of modern hSRT like in case of carotid blowout syndrome. To determine the feasibility and efficacy of reirradiation using modern technology, we reviewed the pertinent literature. The potentially lethal side effects should be kept in mind when reirradiation by hSRT is considered for treatment, and efforts should be made to minimize the risk in any future investigations

  14. Reirradiation of head and neck cancer focusing on hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogita Mikio

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reirradiation is a feasible option for patients who do not otherwise have treatment options available. Depending on the location and extent of the tumor, reirradiation may be accomplished with external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, radiosurgery, or intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT. Although there has been limited experience with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (hSRT, it may have the potential for curative or palliative treatment due to its advanced precision technology, particularly for limited small lesion. On the other hand, severe late adverse reactions are anticipated with reirradiation than with initial radiation therapy. The risk of severe late complications has been reported to be 20- 40% and is related to prior radiotherapy dose, primary site, retreatment radiotherapy dose, treatment volume, and technique. Early researchers have observed lethal bleeding in such patients up to a rate of 14%. Recently, similar rate of 10-15% was observed for fatal bleeding with use of modern hSRT like in case of carotid blowout syndrome. To determine the feasibility and efficacy of reirradiation using modern technology, we reviewed the pertinent literature. The potentially lethal side effects should be kept in mind when reirradiation by hSRT is considered for treatment, and efforts should be made to minimize the risk in any future investigations.

  15. Matching tomographic IMRT fields with static photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, A.; Leybovich, L.; Dogan, N.; Emami, B.

    2001-01-01

    The matching of abutting radiation fields presents a challenging problem in radiation therapy. Due to sharp penumbra of linear accelerator beams, small (1-2 mm) errors in field positioning can lead to large (>30%) hot or cold spots in the abutment region. With head and neck immobilization devices (thermoplastic mask/aquaplast) an average setup error of 3 mm has been reported. Therefore hot or cold spots approaching 50% of the prescription dose may occur along the matchline. Although abutting radiation fields have been investigated for static fields, there is no reported study regarding matching of tomographic IMRT and static fields. Compared to static fields, the matching of tomographic IMRT fields with static fields is more complicated. Since IMRT and static fields are planned on separate treatment planning computers, the dose in the abutment region is not specified. In addition, commonly used techniques for matching fields, such as feathering of junctions, are not practical. We have developed a method that substantially reduces dose inhomogeneity in the abutment region. In this method, a 'buffer zone' around the matchline was created and was included as part of the target for both IMRT and static field plans. In both fields, a small dose gradient (≤3%/mm) in the buffer zone was created. In the IMRT plan, the buffer zone was divided into three sections with dose varying from 83% to 25% of prescription dose. The static field dose profile was modified using either a specially designed physical (hard) or a dynamic (soft) wedge. When these modified fields were matched, the combined dose in the abutment region varied by ≤10% in the presence of setup errors spanning 4 mm (±2 mm) when the hard wedge was used and 10 mm (±5 mm) with the soft wedge

  16. Monte Carlo simulations to replace film dosimetry in IMRT verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetzfried, Thomas; Trautwein, Marius; Koelbi, Oliver; Bogner, Ludwig; Rickhey, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Patient-specific verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans can be done by dosimetric measurements or by independent dose or monitor unit calculations. The aim of this study was the clinical evaluation of IMRT verification based on a fast Monte Carlo (MC) program with regard to possible benefits compared to commonly used film dosimetry. 25 head-and-neck IMRT plans were recalculated by a pencil beam based treatment planning system (TPS) using an appropriate quality assurance (QA) phantom. All plans were verified both by film and diode dosimetry and compared to MC simulations. The irradiated films, the results of diode measurements and the computed dose distributions were evaluated, and the data were compared on the basis of gamma maps and dose-difference histograms. Average deviations in the high-dose region between diode measurements and point dose calculations performed with the TPS and MC program were 0.7 ± 2.7% and 1.2 ± 3.1%, respectively. For film measurements, the mean gamma values with 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance-to-agreement were 0.74 ± 0.28 (TPS as reference) with dose deviations up to 10%. Corresponding values were significantly reduced to 0.34 ± 0.09 for MC dose calculation. The total time needed for both verification procedures is comparable, however, by far less labor intensive in the case of MC simulations. The presented study showed that independent dose calculation verification of IMRT plans with a fast MC program has the potential to eclipse film dosimetry more and more in the near future. Thus, the linac-specific QA part will necessarily become more important. In combination with MC simulations and due to the simple set-up, point-dose measurements for dosimetric plausibility checks are recommended at least in the IMRT introduction phase. (orig.)

  17. Image guided IMRT dosimetry using anatomy specific MOSFET configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Md Nurul; Norrlinger, Bern; Heaton, Robert; Islam, Mohammad

    2008-06-23

    We have investigated the feasibility of using a set of multiple MOSFETs in conjunction with the mobile MOSFET wireless dosimetry system, to perform a comprehensive and efficient quality assurance (QA) of IMRT plans. Anatomy specific MOSFET configurations incorporating 5 MOSFETs have been developed for a specially designed IMRT dosimetry phantom. Kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV CBCT) imaging was used to increase the positional precision and accuracy of the detectors and phantom, and so minimize dosimetric uncertainties in high dose gradient regions. The effectiveness of the MOSFET based dose measurements was evaluated by comparing the corresponding doses measured by an ion chamber. For 20 head and neck IMRT plans the agreement between the MOSFET and ionization chamber dose measurements was found to be within -0.26 +/- 0.88% and 0.06 +/- 1.94% (1 sigma) for measurement points in the high dose and low dose respectively. A precision of 1 mm in detector positioning was achieved by using the X-Ray Volume Imaging (XVI) kV CBCT system available with the Elekta Synergy Linear Accelerator. Using the anatomy specific MOSFET configurations, simultaneous measurements were made at five strategically located points covering high dose and low dose regions. The agreement between measurements and calculated doses by the treatment planning system for head and neck and prostate IMRT plans was found to be within 0.47 +/- 2.45%. The results indicate that a cylindrical phantom incorporating multiple MOSFET detectors arranged in an anatomy specific configuration, in conjunction with image guidance, can be utilized to perform a comprehensive and efficient quality assurance of IMRT plans.

  18. Evaluation tools of quality control for patients submitted to IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavor, Milton

    2011-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is currently been implemented in a rapidly growing number of centers in Brazil. As consequence many institutions are now facing the problem of performing a comprehensive quality control program before and during the implementation of IMRT in the clinical routine practice. The aim of this work is to evaluate and propose a methodology for quality assurance in IMRT treatments. An ionization chamber and a two-dimensional array detector were performed to assess the absolute value of the total dose of all fields in one specific point. The relative total dose distribution of all fields was measured with a radiochromic film and a two-dimensional array at one depth in a phantom. A comparison between measured and calculated dose distributions was performed using the gamma-index method, assessing the percentage of points that meet the criteria of +-3% dose difference and +-3 mm distance to agreement. As a result of 113 tested IMRT beams using ionization chamber and 81 using two-dimensional array, the proposal was to take an action level of about +- 5% compared to the treatment planning systems and measurements, for the verification of the dose in a single point at the low gradient dose region. Analysis of the two-dimensional array measurements showed that the gamma value was <1 for 97.7% of the data and for the film the gamma value was <1 for 96.6% of the data. This can be concluded that for an accurate delivery of dose in 'sliding-window' IMRT with micro multileaf collimator, the absolute value of the total dose and the relative total dose distribution should be checked by absolute and relative dosimetry respectively. (author)

  19. Preliminary experience with frameless stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buatti, John M.; Bova, Francis J.; Friedman, William A.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mickle, J. Parker; Ellis, Thomas L.; Mendenhall, William M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To report initial clinical experience with a novel high-precision stereotactic radiotherapy system. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients ranging in age from 2 to 82 years received a total of 1426 treatments with the University of Florida frameless stereotactic radiotherapy system. Of the total, 39 (65%) were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) alone, and 21 (35%) received SRT as a component of radiotherapy. Pathologic diagnoses included meningiomas (15 patients), low-grade astrocytomas (11 patients), germinomas (9 patients), and craniopharyngiomas (5 patients). The technique was used as means of dose escalation in 11 patients (18%) with aggressive tumors. Treatment reproducibility was measured by comparing bite plate positioning registered by infrared light-emitting diodes (IRLEDs) with the stereotactic radiosurgery reference system, and with measurements from each treatment arc for the 1426 daily treatments (5808 positions). We chose 0.3 mm vector translation error and 0.3 deg. rotation about each axis as the maximum tolerated misalignment before treating each arc. Results: With a mean follow-up of 11 months, 3 patients had recurrence of malignant disease. Acute side effects were minimal. Of 11 patients with low grade astrocytomas, 4 (36%) had cerebral edema and increased enhancement on MR scans in the first year, and 2 required steroids. All had resolution and marked tumor involution on follow-up imaging. Bite plate reproducibility was as follows. Translational errors: anterior-posterior, 0.01 ± 0.10; lateral, 0.02 ± 0.07; axial, 0.01 ± 0.10. Rotational errors (degrees): anterior-posterior, 0.00 ± 0.03; lateral, 0.00 ± 0.06; axial, 0.01 ± 0.04. No patient treatment was delivered beyond the maximum tolerated misalignment. Daily treatment was delivered in approximately 15 min per patient. Conclusion: Our initial experience with stereotactic radiotherapy using the infrared camera guidance system was good. Patient selection and treatment

  20. Powerful boost for Indian lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-06-01

    The Neyveli Lignite Corporation (NLC) of India has begun the first phase of an expansion program that will open a second mine and boost lignite production in Tamil Nadu to nearly five times its present level within the next 15 years. Mining conditions at Neyveli are particularly difficult. The harsh abrasive overburden strata present severe and strenuous conditions; sticky and marshy surface clays, the presence of groundwater aquifers, the cyclonic and monsoonal climate and high stripping ratios are other problems. The overburden is drilled and blasted; in areas of sticky topsoil, non-stick liners for the buckets etc. are used. Adequate safeguards and infrastructure are being developed to deal with differing strata conditions. The conveyor transport system features slow, wider belt conveyors, changeover from fixed type roller to freely hanging garland type, interlinking of benches and specially designed drive heads. The groundwater aquifers are continuously depressurized by grid pumping from a series of pumps; boreholes have been sunk to 120 m.

  1. Advanced Airfoils Boost Helicopter Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Carson Helicopters Inc. licensed the Langley RC4 series of airfoils in 1993 to develop a replacement main rotor blade for their Sikorsky S-61 helicopters. The company's fleet of S-61 helicopters has been rebuilt to include Langley's patented airfoil design, and the helicopters are now able to carry heavier loads and fly faster and farther, and the main rotor blades have twice the previous service life. In aerial firefighting, the performance-boosting airfoils have helped the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service control the spread of wildfires. In 2003, Carson Helicopters signed a contract with Ducommun AeroStructures Inc., to manufacture the composite blades for Carson Helicopters to sell

  2. ATLAS boosted object tagging 2

    CERN Document Server

    Caudron, Julien; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A detailed study into the optimal techniques for identifying boosted hadronically decaying W or Z bosons is presented. Various algorithms for reconstructing, grooming and tagging bosonic jets are compared for W bosons with a wide range of transverse momenta using 8 TeV data and 8 TeV and 13 TeV MC simulations. In addition, given that a hadronic jet has been identified as resulting from the hadronic decay of a W or Z, a technique is developed to discriminate between W and Z bosons. The modeling of the tagging variables used in this technique is studied using 8 TeV pp collision data and systematic uncertainties for the tagger efficiency and fake rates are evaluated.

  3. Face Alignment Using Boosting and Evolutionary Search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Hua; Liu, Duanduan; Poel, Mannes; Nijholt, Antinus; Zha, H.; Taniguchi, R.-I.; Maybank, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a face alignment approach using granular features, boosting, and an evolutionary search algorithm. Active Appearance Models (AAM) integrate a shape-texture-combined morphable face model into an efficient fitting strategy, then Boosting Appearance Models (BAM) consider the

  4. Dosimetric and motion analysis of margin-intensive therapy by stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for resectable pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinzerling John H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The retroperitoneal margin is a common site of positive surgical margins in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer. Preoperative margin-intensive therapy (MIT involves delivery of a single high dose of ablative radiotherapy (30 Gy focused on this surgically inaccessible margin, utilizing stereotactic techniques in an effort to reduce local failure following surgery. In this study, we investigated the motion of regional organs at risk (OAR utilizing 4DCT, evaluated the dosimetric effects of abdominal compression (AC to reduce regional motion, and compared various planning techniques to optimize MIT. Methods 10 patients were evaluated with 4DCT scans. All 10 patients had scans using AC and seven of the 10 patients had scans both with and without AC. The peak respiratory abdominal organ and major vessel centroid excursion was measured. A "sub-GTV" region was defined by a radiation oncologist and surgical oncologist encompassing the retroperitoneal margin typically lateral and posterior to the superior mesenteric artery (SMA, and a 3-5 mm margin was added to constitute the PTV. Identical 3D non-coplanar SABR (3DSABR plans were designed for the average compression and non-compression scans. Compression scans were planned with 3DSABR, coplanar IMRT (IMRT, and Cyberknife (CK planning techniques. Dose volume analysis was undertaken for various endpoints, comparing OAR doses with and without AC and for different planning methods. Results The mean PTV size was 20.2 cm3. Regional vessel motion of the SMA, celiac trunk, and renal vessels was small ( 5 mm, so AC has been used in all patients enrolled thus far. AC did not significantly increase OAR dose including the stomach and traverse colon. There were several statistically significant differences in the doses to OARs as a function of the type of planning modality used. Conclusions AC does not significantly reduce the limited motion of structures in close proximity to the MIT target

  5. Value of stereotactic radiosurgery in patients with multiple brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jie; Lin Zhiguo; Li Qingguo; Shen Hong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the prognostic factors and evaluate the effect of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with multiple brain metastases. Methods: Comparison was made in 53 such patients treated by stereotactic radiosurgery plus radiotherapy and 53 treated by radiotherapy alone. Patients were matched-paired according to the following criteria: age, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) before treatment, extent of systemic cancer and number of brain metastasis. Forty patients had stereotactic radiosurgery, 13 patients stereotactic fractionated radiosurgery. In the stereotactic radiosurgery group, the patients were given a mean marginal dose of 20 Gy. Methods of stereotactic fractionated radiosurgery was 4-12 Gy per fraction , twice a week to a total dose of 15-30 Gy. Whole brain radiotherapy was given immediately after stereotactic radiosurgery. For patients treated by radiotherapy alone, the entire brain was treated by 30-40 Gy in 3-4 weeks. Results: The median survival was 11.6 months in stereotactic radiosurgery plus radiotherapy and 6.7 months in radiotherapy alone. The one year survival rate and one year local control rate were 44.3%, 17.1% and 50.9%, 13. 2%. Those with KPS increased after treatment gave 1-year survivals of 69.8% and 30.2%, respectively. The validity rates in CT or MRI three months after treatment were 82.0% and 55.0%. The difference in the two groups was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.01). 23.3% of death in the stereotactic radiosurgery plus radiotherapy group was due to brain metastasis vs 51.0% in the radiotherapy alone group (P < 0.05). Complication of the two groups was similar. Conclusion: Stereotactic radiosurgery plus radiotherapy is superior to radiotherapy alone for multiple brain metastases in improving the local control and ultimate outcome

  6. TH-EF-BRB-03: Significant Cord and Esophagus Dose Reduction by 4π Non-Coplanar Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, V; Tran, A; Nguyen, D; Woods, K; Cao, M; Kaprealian, T; Chin, R; Low, D; Sheng, K [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate significant organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing achievable with 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy on spine SBRT and SRS patients. Methods: Twenty-five stereotactic spine cases previously treated with VMAT (n = 23) or IMRT (n = 2) were included in this study. A computer-aided-design model of a Linac with a 3D-scanned human surface was utilized to determine the feasible beam space throughout the 4π steradian and beam specific source-to-target-distances (STD) required for collision avoidance. 4π radiotherapy plans integrating beam orientation and fluence map optimization were then created using a column-generation algorithm. Twenty optimal beams were selected for each case. To evaluate the tradeoff between dosimetric benefit and treatment complexity, 4π plans including only isocentrically deliverable beams were also created. Beam angles of all standard and isocentric 4π plans were imported into Eclipse to recalculate the dose using the same calculation engine as the clinical plans for unbiased comparison. OAR and PTV dose statistics for the clinical, standard-4π, and isocentric-4π plans were compared. Results: Comparing standard-4π to clinical plans, particularly significant average percent reduction in the [mean, maximum] dose of the cord and esophagus of [41%, 21.7%], and [38.7%, 36.4%] was observed, along with global decrease in all other OAR dose statistics. The average cord volume receiving more than 50% prescription dose was substantially decreased by 76%. In addition, improved PTV coverage was demonstrated with a maximum dose reduction of 0.93% and 1.66% increase in homogeneity index (D95/D5). All isocentric-4π plans achieved dosimetric performance equivalent to that of the standard-4π plans with higher delivery complexity. Conclusion: 4π radiotherapy significantly improves stereotactic spine treatment dosimetry. With the substantial OAR dose sparing, PTV dose escalation is considerably safer. Isocentric-4π is sufficient to achieve the

  7. Institutional Patient-specific IMRT QA Does Not Predict Unacceptable Plan Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kry, Stephen F., E-mail: sfkry@mdanderson.org [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Molineu, Andrea [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kerns, James R.; Faught, Austin M.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Pulliam, Kiley B.; Tonigan, Jackie [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Alvarez, Paola [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Stingo, Francesco [The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Followill, David S. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether in-house patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) results predict Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC)-Houston phantom results. Methods and Materials: IROC Houston's IMRT head and neck phantoms have been irradiated by numerous institutions as part of clinical trial credentialing. We retrospectively compared these phantom results with those of in-house IMRT QA (following the institution's clinical process) for 855 irradiations performed between 2003 and 2013. The sensitivity and specificity of IMRT QA to detect unacceptable or acceptable plans were determined relative to the IROC Houston phantom results. Additional analyses evaluated specific IMRT QA dosimeters and analysis methods. Results: IMRT QA universally showed poor sensitivity relative to the head and neck phantom, that is, poor ability to predict a failing IROC Houston phantom result. Depending on how the IMRT QA results were interpreted, overall sensitivity ranged from 2% to 18%. For different IMRT QA methods, sensitivity ranged from 3% to 54%. Although the observed sensitivity was particularly poor at clinical thresholds (eg 3% dose difference or 90% of pixels passing gamma), receiver operator characteristic analysis indicated that no threshold showed good sensitivity and specificity for the devices evaluated. Conclusions: IMRT QA is not a reasonable replacement for a credentialing phantom. Moreover, the particularly poor agreement between IMRT QA and the IROC Houston phantoms highlights surprising inconsistency in the QA process.

  8. Institutional Patient-specific IMRT QA Does Not Predict Unacceptable Plan Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kry, Stephen F.; Molineu, Andrea; Kerns, James R.; Faught, Austin M.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Pulliam, Kiley B.; Tonigan, Jackie; Alvarez, Paola; Stingo, Francesco; Followill, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether in-house patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) results predict Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC)-Houston phantom results. Methods and Materials: IROC Houston's IMRT head and neck phantoms have been irradiated by numerous institutions as part of clinical trial credentialing. We retrospectively compared these phantom results with those of in-house IMRT QA (following the institution's clinical process) for 855 irradiations performed between 2003 and 2013. The sensitivity and specificity of IMRT QA to detect unacceptable or acceptable plans were determined relative to the IROC Houston phantom results. Additional analyses evaluated specific IMRT QA dosimeters and analysis methods. Results: IMRT QA universally showed poor sensitivity relative to the head and neck phantom, that is, poor ability to predict a failing IROC Houston phantom result. Depending on how the IMRT QA results were interpreted, overall sensitivity ranged from 2% to 18%. For different IMRT QA methods, sensitivity ranged from 3% to 54%. Although the observed sensitivity was particularly poor at clinical thresholds (eg 3% dose difference or 90% of pixels passing gamma), receiver operator characteristic analysis indicated that no threshold showed good sensitivity and specificity for the devices evaluated. Conclusions: IMRT QA is not a reasonable replacement for a credentialing phantom. Moreover, the particularly poor agreement between IMRT QA and the IROC Houston phantoms highlights surprising inconsistency in the QA process

  9. IMRT QA using machine learning: A multi-institutional validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Gilmer; Chan, Maria F; Lim, Seng Boh; Scheuermann, Ryan; Deasy, Joseph O; Solberg, Timothy D

    2017-09-01

    To validate a machine learning approach to Virtual intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) for accurately predicting gamma passing rates using different measurement approaches at different institutions. A Virtual IMRT QA framework was previously developed using a machine learning algorithm based on 498 IMRT plans, in which QA measurements were performed using diode-array detectors and a 3%local/3 mm with 10% threshold at Institution 1. An independent set of 139 IMRT measurements from a different institution, Institution 2, with QA data based on portal dosimetry using the same gamma index, was used to test the mathematical framework. Only pixels with ≥10% of the maximum calibrated units (CU) or dose were included in the comparison. Plans were characterized by 90 different complexity metrics. A weighted poison regression with Lasso regularization was trained to predict passing rates using the complexity metrics as input. The methodology predicted passing rates within 3% accuracy for all composite plans measured using diode-array detectors at Institution 1, and within 3.5% for 120 of 139 plans using portal dosimetry measurements performed on a per-beam basis at Institution 2. The remaining measurements (19) had large areas of low CU, where portal dosimetry has a larger disagreement with the calculated dose and as such, the failure was expected. These beams need further modeling in the treatment planning system to correct the under-response in low-dose regions. Important features selected by Lasso to predict gamma passing rates were as follows: complete irradiated area outline (CIAO), jaw position, fraction of MLC leafs with gaps smaller than 20 or 5 mm, fraction of area receiving less than 50% of the total CU, fraction of the area receiving dose from penumbra, weighted average irregularity factor, and duty cycle. We have demonstrated that Virtual IMRT QA can predict passing rates using different measurement techniques and across multiple

  10. Process control analysis of IMRT QA: implications for clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlicki, Todd; Rice, Roger K; Yoo, Sua; Court, Laurence E; McMillan, Sharon K; Russell, J Donald; Pacyniak, John M; Woo, Milton K; Basran, Parminder S; Boyer, Arthur L; Bonilla, Claribel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold: first is to investigate the process of IMRT QA using control charts and second is to compare control chart limits to limits calculated using the standard deviation (σ). Head and neck and prostate IMRT QA cases from seven institutions in both academic and community settings are considered. The percent difference between the point dose measurement in phantom and the corresponding result from the treatment planning system (TPS) is used for analysis. The average of the percent difference calculations defines the accuracy of the process and is called the process target. This represents the degree to which the process meets the clinical goal of 0% difference between the measurements and TPS. IMRT QA process ability defines the ability of the process to meet clinical specifications (e.g. 5% difference between the measurement and TPS). The process ability is defined in two ways: (1) the half-width of the control chart limits, and (2) the half-width of ±3σ limits. Process performance is characterized as being in one of four possible states that describes the stability of the process and its ability to meet clinical specifications. For the head and neck cases, the average process target across institutions was 0.3% (range: -1.5% to 2.9%). The average process ability using control chart limits was 7.2% (range: 5.3% to 9.8%) compared to 6.7% (range: 5.3% to 8.2%) using standard deviation limits. For the prostate cases, the average process target across the institutions was 0.2% (range: -1.8% to 1.4%). The average process ability using control chart limits was 4.4% (range: 1.3% to 9.4%) compared to 5.3% (range: 2.3% to 9.8%) using standard deviation limits. Using the standard deviation to characterize IMRT QA process performance resulted in processes being preferentially placed in one of the four states. This is in contrast to using control charts for process characterization where the IMRT QA processes were spread over three of the

  11. Automatic learning-based beam angle selection for thoracic IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amit, Guy; Marshall, Andrea; Purdie, Thomas G.; Jaffray, David A.; Levinshtein, Alex; Hope, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Patricia; Pekar, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The treatment of thoracic cancer using external beam radiation requires an optimal selection of the radiation beam directions to ensure effective coverage of the target volume and to avoid unnecessary treatment of normal healthy tissues. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning is a lengthy process, which requires the planner to iterate between choosing beam angles, specifying dose–volume objectives and executing IMRT optimization. In thorax treatment planning, where there are no class solutions for beam placement, beam angle selection is performed manually, based on the planner’s clinical experience. The purpose of this work is to propose and study a computationally efficient framework that utilizes machine learning to automatically select treatment beam angles. Such a framework may be helpful for reducing the overall planning workload. Methods: The authors introduce an automated beam selection method, based on learning the relationships between beam angles and anatomical features. Using a large set of clinically approved IMRT plans, a random forest regression algorithm is trained to map a multitude of anatomical features into an individual beam score. An optimization scheme is then built to select and adjust the beam angles, considering the learned interbeam dependencies. The validity and quality of the automatically selected beams evaluated using the manually selected beams from the corresponding clinical plans as the ground truth. Results: The analysis included 149 clinically approved thoracic IMRT plans. For a randomly selected test subset of 27 plans, IMRT plans were generated using automatically selected beams and compared to the clinical plans. The comparison of the predicted and the clinical beam angles demonstrated a good average correspondence between the two (angular distance 16.8° ± 10°, correlation 0.75 ± 0.2). The dose distributions of the semiautomatic and clinical plans were equivalent in terms of primary target volume

  12. Incorporating prior knowledge into beam orientation optimization in IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugachev, Andrei M.S.; Lei Xing

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Selection of beam configuration in currently available intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning systems is still based on trial-and-error search. Computer beam orientation optimization has the potential to improve the situation, but its practical implementation is hindered by the excessive computing time associated with the calculation. The purpose of this work is to provide an effective means to speed up the beam orientation optimization by incorporating a priori geometric and dosimetric knowledge of the system and to demonstrate the utility of the new algorithm for beam placement in IMRT. Methods and Materials: Beam orientation optimization was performed in two steps. First, the quality of each possible beam orientation was evaluated using beam's-eye-view dosimetrics (BEVD) developed in our previous study. A simulated annealing algorithm was then employed to search for the optimal set of beam orientations, taking into account the BEVD scores of different incident beam directions. During the calculation, sampling of gantry angles was weighted according to the BEVD score computed before the optimization. A beam direction with a higher BEVD score had a higher probability of being included in the trial configuration, and vice versa. The inclusion of the BEVD weighting in the stochastic beam angle sampling process made it possible to avoid spending valuable computing time unnecessarily at 'bad' beam angles. An iterative inverse treatment planning algorithm was used for beam intensity profile optimization during the optimization process. The BEVD-guided beam orientation optimization was applied to an IMRT treatment of paraspinal tumor. The advantage of the new optimization algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the calculation with the conventional scheme without the BEVD weighting in the beam sampling. Results: The BEVD tool provided useful guidance for the selection of the potentially good directions for the beams to incident and was used

  13. A silicon strip detector dose magnifying glass for IMRT dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, J. H. D.; Carolan, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Petasecca, M.; Khanna, S.; Perevertaylo, V. L.; Metcalfe, P.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows the delivery of escalated radiation dose to tumor while sparing adjacent critical organs. In doing so, IMRT plans tend to incorporate steep dose gradients at interfaces between the target and the organs at risk. Current quality assurance (QA) verification tools such as 2D diode arrays, are limited by their spatial resolution and conventional films are nonreal time. In this article, the authors describe a novel silicon strip detector (CMRP DMG) of high spatial resolution (200 μm) suitable for measuring the high dose gradients in an IMRT delivery. Methods: A full characterization of the detector was performed, including dose per pulse effect, percent depth dose comparison with Farmer ion chamber measurements, stem effect, dose linearity, uniformity, energy response, angular response, and penumbra measurements. They also present the application of the CMRP DMG in the dosimetric verification of a clinical IMRT plan. Results: The detector response changed by 23% for a 390-fold change in the dose per pulse. A correction function is derived to correct for this effect. The strip detector depth dose curve agrees with the Farmer ion chamber within 0.8%. The stem effect was negligible (0.2%). The dose linearity was excellent for the dose range of 3-300 cGy. A uniformity correction method is described to correct for variations in the individual detector pixel responses. The detector showed an over-response relative to tissue dose at lower photon energies with the maximum dose response at 75 kVp nominal photon energy. Penumbra studies using a Varian Clinac 21EX at 1.5 and 10.0 cm depths were measured to be 2.77 and 3.94 mm for the secondary collimators, 3.52 and 5.60 mm for the multileaf collimator rounded leaf ends, respectively. Point doses measured with the strip detector were compared to doses measured with EBT film and doses predicted by the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The differences were 1.1%

  14. Quality correction factors of composite IMRT beam deliveries: Theoretical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the scope of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry using ionization chambers, quality correction factors of plan-class-specific reference (PCSR) fields are theoretically investigated. The symmetry of the problem is studied to provide recommendable criteria for composite beam deliveries where correction factors are minimal and also to establish a theoretical limit for PCSR delivery k Q factors. Methods: The concept of virtual symmetric collapsed (VSC) beam, being associated to a given modulated composite delivery, is defined in the scope of this investigation. Under symmetrical measurement conditions, any composite delivery has the property of having a k Q factor identical to its associated VSC beam. Using this concept of VSC, a fundamental property of IMRT k Q factors is demonstrated in the form of a theorem. The sensitivity to the conditions required by the theorem is thoroughly examined. Results: The theorem states that if a composite modulated beam delivery produces a uniform dose distribution in a volume V cyl which is symmetric with the cylindrical delivery and all beams fulfills two conditions in V cyl : (1) the dose modulation function is unchanged along the beam axis, and (2) the dose gradient in the beam direction is constant for a given lateral position; then its associated VSC beam produces no lateral dose gradient in V cyl , no matter what beam modulation or gantry angles are being used. The examination of the conditions required by the theorem lead to the following results. The effect of the depth-dose gradient not being perfectly constant with depth on the VSC beam lateral dose gradient is found negligible. The effect of the dose modulation function being degraded with depth on the VSC beam lateral dose gradient is found to be only related to scatter and beam hardening, as the theorem holds also for diverging beams. Conclusions: The use of the symmetry of the problem in the present paper leads to a valuable theorem showing

  15. Effect on therapeutic ratio of planning a boosted radiotherapy dose to the dominant intraprostatic tumour lesion within the prostate based on multifunctional MR parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, G S; deSouza, N M; Dearnaley, D; Morgan, V A; Morgan, S C; Partridge, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the feasibility of an 8-Gy focal radiation boost to a dominant intraprostatic lesion (DIL), identified using multiparametric MRI (mpMRI), and to assess the potential outcome compared with a uniform 74-Gy prostate dose. Methods: The DIL location was predicted in 23 patients using a histopathologically verified model combining diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, T2 maps and three-dimensional MR spectroscopic imaging. The DIL defined prior to neoadjuvant hormone downregulation was firstly registered to MRI-acquired post-hormone therapy and subsequently to CT radiotherapy scans. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment was planned for an 8-Gy focal boost with 74-Gy dose to the remaining prostate. Areas under the dose–volume histograms (DVHs) for prostate, bladder and rectum, the tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) were compared with those of the uniform 74-Gy IMRT plan. Results: Deliverable IMRT plans were feasible for all patients with identifiable DILs (20/23). Areas under the DVHs were increased for the prostate (75.1 ± 0.6 vs 72.7 ± 0.3 Gy; p < 0.001) and decreased for the rectum (38.2 ± 2.5 vs 43.5 ± 2.5 Gy; p < 0.001) and the bladder (29.1 ± 9.0 vs 36.9 ± 9.3 Gy; p < 0.001) for the boosted plan. The prostate TCP was increased (80.1 ± 1.3 vs 75.3 ± 0.9 Gy; p < 0.001) and rectal NTCP lowered (3.84 ± 3.65 vs 9.70 ± 5.68 Gy; p = 0.04) in the boosted plan. The bladder NTCP was negligible for both plans. Conclusion: Delivery of a focal boost to an mpMRI-defined DIL is feasible, and significant increases in TCP and therapeutic ratio were found. Advances in knowledge: The delivery of a focal boost to an mpMRI-defined DIL demonstrates statistically significant increases in TCP and therapeutic ratio. PMID:24601648

  16. Stereotactic aspiration for hypertensive pontine hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahama, Hidetoshi; Morii, Ken; Sato, Mitsuya; Sekiguchi, Kentaro; Sato, Susumu

    1989-01-01

    Recently, CT-guided stereotactic aspiration has been attempted as a useful method for hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. Since the CT scanner was introduced in our clinic, we have experienced 55 cases with hypertensive pontine hemorrhage. We carried out stereotactic aspiration in nine cases consisting of four men and five women, ranging in age from 34 to 66 years. Operation was performed between 4 and 22 days after the hemorrhage (mean: 7.7 days). On the other hand, 46 cases were conservatively treated. They consisted of 31 men and 15 women, aged from 31 to 79 years, with a mean age of 55.5 years. The purpose of this study is to review the outcome at three months after the onset, and then to evaluate the clinical value of this method for hypertensive pontine hemorrhage. We have analyzed the outcome from the viewpoint of consciousness level, CT classification, and maximum transverse hematoma diameter on CT scan. In the present study, there was a statistically significant correlation between consciousness level and outcome in the conservative group. The outcome in the operated-on group tended to be superior to that in the conservatively treated group. Particularly, in cases of Japan Coma Scale 10 to 100, functionally favorable effects were considered to be obtained by stereotactic aspiration. According to CT classification, operation was considered to have exerted functionally favorable effects on unilateral basis tegmentum type and bilateral tegmentum type. The conservatively treated group showed a statistically significant correlation between maximum transverse hematoma diameter and outcome. A favorable prognosis was considered to be induced by operation in cases of 22 to 28 mm in maximum transverse hematoma diameter. (author)

  17. Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... desktop! more... Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem Article Chapters Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem print full article print this chapter email this ...

  18. Solid craniopharyngiomas treated by stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backlund, E.-O.

    1979-01-01

    The radiological changes of solid craniopharyngiomas treated by stereotactic radiosurgery have been followed. Nine cases are considered, the patients having received gamma radiation treatment with a dose distribution permitting no part of the tumour to receive doses less than 2-3 Gy. Target doses were 20 to 50 Gy. Tumour shrinkage was registered and no complications which could be attributed with certainty to the irradiation were encountered. The results did not allow an optimal single dose to be determined with accuracy but vaguely indicated that lower doses than those used are sufficient for desired effect on the tumour without jeopardizing its surroundings. (Auth./C.F.)

  19. Simultaneous integrated boost-intensity modulated radiation therapy for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Joong-Won; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Kim, Bo Hyun; Woo, Sang Myung; Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Sang Soo; Lee, Woo Jin; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Chang-Min [National Cancer Center, Center for Liver Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of simultaneous integrated boost-intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) in patients with inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 53 patients with inoperable HCC underwent SIB-IMRT using two dose-fractionation schemes, depending on the proximity of gastrointestinal structures. The 41 patients in the low dose-fractionation (LD) group, with internal target volume (ITV) < 1 cm from gastrointestinal structures, received total doses of 55 and 44 Gy in 22 fractions to planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and 2 (PTV2), respectively. The 12 patients in the high dose-fractionation (HD) group, with ITV ≥ 1 cm from gastrointestinal structures, received total doses of 66 and 55 Gy in 22 fractions to the PTV1 and PTV2, respectively. Overall, treatment was well tolerated, with no grade > 3 toxicity. The LD group had larger sized tumors (median: 6 vs. 3.4 cm) and greater frequencies of vascular invasion (80.6 vs. 16.7 %) than patients in the HD group (p < 0.05 each). The median overall survival (OS) was 25.1 months and the actuarial 2-year local progression-free survival (LPFS), relapse-free survival (RFS), and OS rates were 67.3, 14.7, and 54.7 %, respectively. The HD group tended to show better tumor response (100 vs. 62.2 %, p = 0.039) and 2-year LPFS (85.7 vs. 59 %, p = 0.119), RFS (38.1 vs. 7.3 %, p = 0.063), and OS (83.3 vs. 44.3 %, p = 0.037) rates than the LD group. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor response was significantly associated with OS. SIB-IMRT is feasible and safe for patients with inoperable HCC. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Arbeit war es, die klinische Wirksamkeit und die Sicherheit der intensitaetsmodulierten Radiotherapie mit simultanem integriertem Boost (SIB-IMRT) fuer Patienten mit einem inoperablen hepatozellulaeren Karzinom (HCC) zu evaluieren. Bei 53 Patienten mit inoperablem HCC wurden zwei unterschiedliche Dosierungskonzepte je nach Lagebeziehung des

  20. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) following forward planned field-in field IMRT: Results from the Cambridge Breast IMRT trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukesh, Mukesh B.; Qian, Wendi; Wilkinson, Jennifer S.; Dorling, Leila; Barnett, Gillian C.; Moody, Anne M.; Wilson, Charles; Twyman, Nicola; Burnet, Neil G.; Wishart, Gordon C.; Coles, Charlotte E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in breast cancer reduces clinician-assessed breast tissue toxicity including fibrosis, telangectasia and sub-optimal cosmesis. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are also important as they provide the patient’s perspective. This longitudinal study reports on (a) the effect of forward planned field-in-field IMRT (∼simple IMRT) on PROMs compared to standard RT at 5 years after RT, (b) factors affecting PROMs at 5 years after RT and (c) the trend of PROMs over 5 years of follow up. Methods: PROMs were assessed at baseline (pre-RT), 6, 24 and 60 months after completion of RT using global health (EORTC QLQ C30) and 4 breast symptom questions (BR23). Also, 4 breast RT-specific questions were included at 6, 24 and 60 months: change in skin appearance, firmness to touch, reduction in breast size and overall change in breast appearance since RT. The benefits of simple IMRT over standard RT at 5 years after RT were assessed using standard t-test for global health and logistic regression analysis for breast symptom questions and breast RT-specific questions. Clinical factors affecting PROMs at 5 years were investigated using a multivariate analysis. A repeated mixed model was applied to explore the trend over time for each of PROMs. Results: (89%) 727/815, 84%, 81% and 61% patients completed questionnaires at baseline, 6, 24 and 60 months respectively. Patients reported worse toxicity for all four BR23 breast symptoms at 6 months, which then improved over time (p < 0.0001). They also reported improvement in skin appearance and breast hardness over time (p < 0.0001), with no significant change for breast shrinkage (p = 0.47) and overall breast appearance (p = 0.13). At 5 years, PROMs assessments did not demonstrate a benefit for simple IMRT over standard radiotherapy. Large breast volume, young age, baseline surgical cosmesis and post-operative infection were the most important variables to affect PROMs

  1. Emphasizing Conformal Avoidance Versus Target Definition for IMRT Planning in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harari, Paul M.; Song Shiyu; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a method for streamlining the process of elective nodal volume definition for head-and-neck (H and N) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients who had undergone curative-intent RT for H and N cancer underwent comprehensive treatment planning using three distinct, plan design techniques: conventional three-field design, target-defined IMRT (TD-IMRT), and conformal avoidance IMRT (CA-IMRT). For each patient, the conventional three-field design was created first, thereby providing the 'outermost boundaries' for subsequent IMRT design. In brief, TD-IMRT involved physician contouring of the gross tumor volume, high- and low-risk clinical target volume, and normal tissue avoidance structures on consecutive 1.25-mm computed tomography images. CA-IMRT involved physician contouring of the gross tumor volume and normal tissue avoidance structures only. The overall physician time for each approach was monitored, and the resultant plans were rigorously compared. Results: The average physician working time for the design of the respective H and N treatment contours was 0.3 hour for the conventional three-field design plan, 2.7 hours for TD-IMRT, and 0.9 hour for CA-IMRT. Dosimetric analysis confirmed that the largest volume of tissue treated to an intermediate (50 Gy) and high (70 Gy) dose occurred with the conventional three-field design followed by CA-IMRT and then TD-IMRT. However, for the two IMRT approaches, comparable results were found in terms of salivary gland and spinal cord protection. Conclusion: CA-IMRT for H and N treatment offers an alternative to TD-IMRT. The overall time for physician contouring was substantially reduced (approximately threefold), yielding a more standardized elective nodal volume. Because of the complexity of H and N IMRT target design, CA-IMRT might ultimately prove a safer and more reliable method to export to general radiation oncology practitioners, particularly

  2. A mathematical framework for virtual IMRT QA using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, G; Scheuermann, R; Hung, C Y; Olszanski, A; Bellerive, M; Solberg, T D

    2016-07-01

    It is common practice to perform patient-specific pretreatment verifications to the clinical delivery of IMRT. This process can be time-consuming and not altogether instructive due to the myriad sources that may produce a failing result. The purpose of this study was to develop an algorithm capable of predicting IMRT QA passing rates a priori. From all treatment, 498 IMRT plans sites were planned in eclipse version 11 and delivered using a dynamic sliding window technique on Clinac iX or TrueBeam Linacs. 3%/3 mm local dose/distance-to-agreement (DTA) was recorded using a commercial 2D diode array. Each plan was characterized by 78 metrics that describe different aspects of their complexity that could lead to disagreements between the calculated and measured dose. A Poisson regression with Lasso regularization was trained to learn the relation between the plan characteristics and each passing rate. Passing rates 3%/3 mm local dose/DTA can be predicted with an error smaller than 3% for all plans analyzed. The most important metrics to describe the passing rates were determined to be the MU factor (MU per Gy), small aperture score, irregularity factor, and fraction of the plan delivered at the corners of a 40 × 40 cm field. The higher the value of these metrics, the worse the passing rates. The Virtual QA process predicts IMRT passing rates with a high likelihood, allows the detection of failures due to setup errors, and it is sensitive enough to detect small differences between matched Linacs.

  3. Simulation of respiratory motion during IMRT dose delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohn, Silje; Wasboe, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Background. When intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is realised with dynamic multi-leaf collimators (MLC) and given under respiratory motion, dosimetric errors may occur. These errors are a consequence of the dose blurring and the interplay between the organ motion and the leaf motion. In the present study, a model for evaluating these dosimetric effects for patient-specific cases has been developed and tested. Material and methods. In the purpose written software, three dimensional (3D) dose distributions can be calculated both with and without a generated breathing cycle. To validate the presented model and illustrate its application, periodic breathing cycles were generated, where the starting phase was set randomly for each field during the calculations. Respiration in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI) and left-right (LR) direction was tested and verified. To illustrate the application of the presented model, two 5-fields IMRT plans with different complexity were calculated with a 2 cm peak-to-peak motion in the AP direction for one fraction and for 25 fractions. Results. The results showed that the calculation method is of good accuracy, in particular for IMRT plans consisting of several fields, where 97% of the pixels within the body fulfilled a tolerance set to 4% dose difference and 4 mm distance to agreement (DTA). For the two IMRT plans with different complexity, pronounced respiratory induced dose errors, which increased with increasing complexity, were found for both one fraction and 25 fractions, but due to the random stating phase the interplay effect was considerably reduced for the plans consisting of 25 fractions. This illustrates how the dosimetric effects will vary depending on the dose plan and on the number of fractions investigated. Conclusion. For patient specific cases, the model can with good accuracy calculate 3D dose distributions both with and without respiratory motion, and evaluate the dosimetric effects

  4. Retrospective analysis of 'gamma distribution' based IMRT QA criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, C.; Chappell, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: IMRT has been implemented into clinical practice at Royal Hobart Hospital (RHH) since mid 2006 for treating patients with Head and Neck (H and N) or prostate tumours. A local quality assurance (QA) acceptance criteria based on 'gamma distribution' for approving IMRT plan was developed and implemented in early 2007. A retrospective analysis of such criteria over 194 clinical cases will be presented. The RHH IMRT criteria was established with assumption that gamma distribution obtained through inter-comparison of 2 D dose maps between planned and delivered was governed by a positive-hail' normal distribution. A commercial system-MapCheck was used for 2 D dose map comparison with a built-in gamma analysis tool. Gamma distribution histogram was generated and recorded for all cases. By retrospectively analysing those distributions using curve fitting technique, a statistical gamma distribution can be obtained and evaluated. This analytical result can be used for future IMRT planing and treatment delivery. The analyses indicate that gamma distribution obtained through MapCheckTM is well under the normal distribution, particularly for prostate cases. The applied pass/fail criteria is not overly sensitive to identify 'false fails' but can be further tighten-up for smaller field while for larger field found in both H and N and prostate cases, the criteria was correctly applied. Non-uniform distribution of detectors in MapCheck and experience level of planners are two major factors to variation in gamma distribution among clinical cases. This criteria derived from clinical statistics is superior and more accurate than single-valued criteria for lMRT QA acceptance procedure. (author)

  5. Modeling of asymmetrical boost converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Isabel Arango Zuluaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetrical interleaved dual boost (AIDB is a fifth-order DC/DC converter designed to interface photovoltaic (PV panels. The AIDB produces small current harmonics to the PV panels, reducing the power losses caused by the converter operation. Moreover, the AIDB provides a large voltage conversion ratio, which is required to step-up the PV voltage to the large dc-link voltage used in grid-connected inverters. To reject irradiance and load disturbances, the AIDB must be operated in a closed-loop and a dynamic model is required. Given that the AIDB converter operates in Discontinuous Conduction Mode (DCM, classical modeling approaches based on Continuous Conduction Mode (CCM are not valid. Moreover, classical DCM modeling techniques are not suitable for the AIDB converter. Therefore, this paper develops a novel mathematical model for the AIDB converter, which is suitable for control-pur-poses. The proposed model is based on the calculation of a diode current that is typically disregarded. Moreover, because the traditional correction to the second duty cycle reported in literature is not effective, a new equation is designed. The model accuracy is contrasted with circuital simulations in time and frequency domains, obtaining satisfactory results. Finally, the usefulness of the model in control applications is illustrated with an application example.

  6. Clinical accuracy of ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerly, T.; Lancaster, C. M.; Geso, M.; Roxby, K. J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this paper, the authors assess the accuracy of the Brainlab ExacTrac system for frameless intracranial stereotactic treatments in clinical practice. Methods: They recorded couch angle and image fusion results (comprising lateral, longitudinal, and vertical shifts, and rotation corrections about these axes) for 109 stereotactic radiosurgery and 166 stereotactic radiotherapy patient treatments. Frameless stereotactic treatments involve iterative 6D image fusion corrections applied until the results conform to customizable pass criteria, theirs being 0.7 mm and 0.5 deg. for each axis. The planning CT slice thickness was 1.25 mm. It has been reported in the literature that the CT slices' thickness impacts the accuracy of localization to bony anatomy. The principle of invariance with respect to patient orientation was used to determine spatial accuracy. Results: The data for radiosurgery comprised 927 image pairs, of which 532 passed (pass ratio of 57.4%). The data for radiotherapy comprised 15983 image pairs, of which 10 050 passed (pass ratio of 62.9%). For stereotactic radiotherapy, the combined uncertainty of ExacTrac calibration, image fusion, and intrafraction motion was (95% confidence interval) 0.290-0.302 and 0.306-0.319 mm in the longitudinal and lateral axes, respectively. The combined uncertainty of image fusion and intrafraction motion in the anterior-posterior coordinates was 0.174-0.182 mm. For stereotactic radiosurgery, the equivalent ranges are 0.323-0.393, 0.337-0.409, and 0.231-0.281 mm. The overall spatial accuracy was 1.24 mm for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and 1.35 mm for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Conclusions: The ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system spatial accuracy is adequate for clinical practice, and with the same pass criteria, SRT is more accurate than SRS. They now use frameless stereotaxy exclusively at their center.

  7. Endocavitary in vivo Dosimetry for IMRT Treatments of Gynecologic Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cilla, Savino; Macchia, Gabriella; Digesù, Cinzia; Deodato, Francesco; Sabatino, Domenico; Morganti, Alessio G.; Piermattei, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy and reproducibility of endometrial carcinoma treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was assessed by means of in vivo dosimetry. Six patients who had previously undergone radical hysterectomy for endometrial carcinoma were treated with IMRT using a vaginal applicator with radio-opaque fiducial markers. An ion-chamber inserted into the applicator supplied an endocavitary in vivo dosimetry for quality assurance purposes. The ratio R = D/D TPS between the in vivo measured dose D and the predicted dose by the treatment planning system D TPS was determined for every fraction of the treatment. Results showed that 90% and 100% of the ratios resulted equal to 1 within 5% and 10%, respectively. The mean value of the ratios distribution for the 6 patients was R = 0.995 and the SD = 0.034. The ratio R* between the measured and predicted total doses for each patient was near to 1, within 2%. The dosimetric results suggest that the use of a vaginal applicator in an image-guided approach could make the interfractions target position stable and reproducible, allowing a safe use of the IMRT technique in the treatment of postoperative vaginal vault. In vivo dosimetry may supply useful information about the discrimination of random vs. systematic errors. The workload is minimum and this in vivo dosimetry can be applied also in the clinical routine.

  8. A Method for Correcting IMRT Optimizer Heterogeneity Dose Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacarias, Albert S.; Brown, Mellonie F.; Mills, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy treatment planning for volumes close to the patient's surface, in lung tissue and in the head and neck region, can be challenging for the planning system optimizer because of the complexity of the treatment and protected volumes, as well as striking heterogeneity corrections. Because it is often the goal of the planner to produce an isodose plan with uniform dose throughout the planning target volume (PTV), there is a need for improved planning optimization procedures for PTVs located in these anatomical regions. To illustrate such an improved procedure, we present a treatment planning case of a patient with a lung lesion located in the posterior right lung. The intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan generated using standard optimization procedures produced substantial dose nonuniformity across the tumor caused by the effect of lung tissue surrounding the tumor. We demonstrate a novel iterative method of dose correction performed on the initial IMRT plan to produce a more uniform dose distribution within the PTV. This optimization method corrected for the dose missing on the periphery of the PTV and reduced the maximum dose on the PTV to 106% from 120% on the representative IMRT plan.

  9. Acute toxicity of postoperative IMRT and chemotherapy for endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tierney, R.M.; Powell, M.A.; Mutch, D.G.; Gibb, R.K.; Rader, J.S.; Grigsby, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with and without chemotherapy in patients with endometrial cancer. A total of 19 patients with stages IB-IVB endometrial cancer who underwent surgery and postoperative IMRT were reviewed. The treatment planning goal was to cover the tissue at risk and minimize the dose to the bladder, bowel, and bone marrow. Median dose was 50.4 Gy (range 49.6-51.2 Gy). Altogether, 14 patients underwent chemotherapy; most were given carboplatin and paclitaxel. Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 (CTCAE). The prescribed radiation treatment was completed in all patients. The prescribed cycles of chemotherapy were completed in all 14 patients, except one who received five of six cycles limited by prolonged thrombocytopenia. Chemotherapy was delayed in two patients (14%). Three patients required growth factor support during chemotherapy, and one patient required a blood transfusion. Acute grades 3-4 hematological toxicity occurred in 9 of the 14 patients (64%) who underwent chemotherapy. None experienced acute grade 3 or 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity. Adjuvant IMRT and chemotherapy following surgery in patients with endometrial cancer is well tolerated and did not lead to treatment modification in most patients. (author)

  10. Metallic stent and stereotactic conformal radiotherapy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yu; Wang Ning; Tian Qihe; Guo Zhanwen; Zhang Haibo; Song Liyan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of metallic stent combined with stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Methods: Fifty-four patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma were analyzed, including 31 treated with stent plus stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (combined group) and 23 with metallic stent alone (control group). Results: The mean survival time of combined group was 11.1 ± 4.6 months, compared with 5.1 ± 2.8 months of the control group, giving a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.01). Conclusion: The combination of metallic stent and stereotactic conformal radiotherapy is more effective than metallic stent alone for unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma. (authors)

  11. Implementation of Upright Digital Breast Tomosynthesis-guided Stereotactic Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omofoye, Toma S; Martaindale, Sarah; Teichgraeber, Davis C; Parikh, Jay R

    2017-11-01

    With growing adoption of digital breast tomosynthesis, an increasing number of imaging abnormalities are being identified only by tomosynthesis. Upright digital breast tomosynthesis-guided stereotactic biopsy is a proven method for sampling these abnormalities as well as abnormalities traditionally evaluated using conventional stereotactic biopsy. In this article, we describe the technique of upright digital breast tomosynthesis-guided stereotactic biopsy and outline a systematic operational approach to implementation of this technique in clinical radiology practices. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Statistical process control analysis for patient-specific IMRT and VMAT QA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghangthum, Taweap; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Srisatit, Somyot; Pawlicki, Todd

    2013-05-01

    This work applied statistical process control to establish the control limits of the % gamma pass of patient-specific intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA), and to evaluate the efficiency of the QA process by using the process capability index (Cpml). A total of 278 IMRT QA plans in nasopharyngeal carcinoma were measured with MapCHECK, while 159 VMAT QA plans were undertaken with ArcCHECK. Six megavolts with nine fields were used for the IMRT plan and 2.5 arcs were used to generate the VMAT plans. The gamma (3%/3 mm) criteria were used to evaluate the QA plans. The % gamma passes were plotted on a control chart. The first 50 data points were employed to calculate the control limits. The Cpml was calculated to evaluate the capability of the IMRT/VMAT QA process. The results showed higher systematic errors in IMRT QA than VMAT QA due to the more complicated setup used in IMRT QA. The variation of random errors was also larger in IMRT QA than VMAT QA because the VMAT plan has more continuity of dose distribution. The average % gamma pass was 93.7% ± 3.7% for IMRT and 96.7% ± 2.2% for VMAT. The Cpml value of IMRT QA was 1.60 and VMAT QA was 1.99, which implied that the VMAT QA process was more accurate than the IMRT QA process. Our lower control limit for % gamma pass of IMRT is 85.0%, while the limit for VMAT is 90%. Both the IMRT and VMAT QA processes are good quality because Cpml values are higher than 1.0.

  13. Survival after stereotactic biopsy of malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, R.J.; Lunsford, L.D.; Taylor, F.H.

    1988-01-01

    For many patients with malignant gliomas in inaccessible or functionally important locations, stereotactic biopsy followed by radiation therapy (RT) may be a more appropriate initial treatment than craniotomy and tumor resection. We studied the long term survival in 91 consecutive patients with malignant gliomas diagnosed by stereotactic biopsy: 64 had glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 27 had anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). Sixty-four per cent of the GBMs and 33% of the AAs involved deep or midline cerebral structures. The treatment prescribed after biopsy, the tumor location, the histological findings, and the patient's age at presentation (for AAs) were statistically important factors determining patient survival. If adequate RT (tumor dose of 5000 to 6000 cGy) was not prescribed, the median survival was less than or equal to 11 weeks regardless of tumor histology or location. The median survival for patients with deep or midline tumors who completed RT was similar in AA (19.4 weeks) and GBM (27 weeks) cases. Histology was an important predictor of survival only for patients with adequately treated lobar tumors. The median survival in lobar GBM patients who completed RT was 46.9 weeks, and that in lobar AA patients who completed RT was 129 weeks. Cytoreductive surgery had no statistically significant effect on survival. Among the clinical factors examined, age of less than 40 years at presentation was associated with prolonged survival only in AA patients. Constellations of clinical features, tumor location, histological diagnosis, and treatment prescribed were related to survival time

  14. Multimedia educational services in stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazioglou, M.; Theodorou, K.; Kappas, C.

    1999-01-01

    The computer-based learning methods in medicine have been well established as stand-alone learning systems. Recently, these systems were enriched with the use of telematics technology to provide distance learning capabilities. Stereotactic radiotherapy is more of the most representative advanced radiotherapy techniques. Due to the multidisciplinary character of the technique and the rapid evolution of technology implemented, the demands in training have increased. The potential of interactive multimedia and Internet technologies for the achievement of distance learning capabilities in this domain are investigated. The realization of a computer-based educational program in stereotactic radiotherapy in a multimedia format is a new application in the computer-aided distance learning field. The system is built according to a client and server architecture, based on the Internet infrastructure, and composed of server nodes. The impact of the system may be described in terms of: time and transportation costs saving, flexibility in training (scheduling, rate and subject selection), online communication and interaction with experts, cost effective access to material (delivery or access by a large number of users and revision of the material by avoiding and database development. (authors)

  15. Grade 3/4 Dermatitis in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Cetuximab and IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studer, Gabriela; Brown, Michelle; Salgueiro, Eveline Barata; Schmueckle, Hildegard; Romancuk, Natalie; Winkler, Gisela; Lee, Soon Jae; Straeuli, Ariane; Kissling, Beatrix; Dummer, Reinhard; Glanzmann, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the rate of serious (>Grade 2, CTCAE 3.0) dermatitis in our head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients undergoing simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy with concomitant cetuximab (SIB-IMRT-cetuximab). We hypothesized a positive association between the radiation dose to the skin and the degree of dermatitis in patients receiving cetuximab. Methods and Materials: Between April 2006 and December 2009, 99 HNC patients underwent SIB-IMRT-cetuximab. In 69/99 (70%), systemic treatment consisted of concomitant cetuximab only, whereas 30 (30%) were switched from concomitant cisplatin to concomitant cetuximab. Treatment-related dermatitis was prospectively monitored. Ninety-nine patients treated with four to seven concomitant cycles of cisplatin only served as an internal control group. The radiation dose delivered to the skin was measured and related to dermal reactions. Results: Grade 3/4 dermatitis developed in 34% of the cetuximab cohort, which was substantially higher than in the control cohort (3%, p < 0.01). No cases of skin necrosis or other fatal events related to cetuximab have occurred so far. A significantly larger mean skin area was found exposed to high radiation doses in patients with severe cetuximab-related dermatitis, compared with those without (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Concomitant cetuximab resulted in a ∼10-fold increase in the rate of severe transient dermatitis compared with the use of concomitant cisplatin. We found a positive association between the incidence of Grade 3/4 dermatitis and the radiation dose delivered to the skin in patients receiving cetuximab.

  16. Boosting Learning Algorithm for Stock Price Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengzhang; Bai, Xiaoming

    2018-03-01

    To tackle complexity and uncertainty of stock market behavior, more studies have introduced machine learning algorithms to forecast stock price. ANN (artificial neural network) is one of the most successful and promising applications. We propose a boosting-ANN model in this paper to predict the stock close price. On the basis of boosting theory, multiple weak predicting machines, i.e. ANNs, are assembled to build a stronger predictor, i.e. boosting-ANN model. New error criteria of the weak studying machine and rules of weights updating are adopted in this study. We select technical factors from financial markets as forecasting input variables. Final results demonstrate the boosting-ANN model works better than other ones for stock price forecasting.

  17. Traditional grains boost nutrition in rural India

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    India, particularly among vulnerable women and children. The research ... This approach will improve the quality of life for farmers, and is part of a long-term solution to rural poverty in India. ... Traditional grains boost nutrition in rural India.

  18. Two-inductor boost and buck converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. L.; Muldoon, W. J.

    The derivation, analysis and design of a coupled inductor boost converter is presented. Aspects of the qualitative ac behavior of coupled inductor converters are discussed. Considerations for the design of the magnetics for such converters are addressed.

  19. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe January 2014 Print this issue Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells En español Send ... Disease When Blood Cells Bend Wise Choices Preventing Anemia To prevent or treat iron-deficiency anemia: Eat ...

  20. A two isocenter IMRT technique with a controlled junction dose for long volume targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, G G; Heaton, R K; Catton, C N; Chung, P W; O'Sullivan, B; Lau, M; Parent, A; Jaffray, D A

    2007-01-01

    Most IMRT techniques have been designed to treat targets smaller than the field size of conventional linac accelerators. In order to overcome the field size restrictions in applying IMRT, we developed a two isocenter IMRT technique to treat long volume targets. The technique exploits an extended dose gradient throughout a junction region of 4-6 cm to minimize the impact of field match errors on a junction dose and manipulates the inverse planning and IMRT segments to fill in the dose gradient and achieve dose uniformity. Techniques for abutting both conventional fields with IMRT ('Static + IMRT') and IMRT fields ('IMRT + IMRT') using two separate isocenters have been developed. Five long volume sarcoma cases have been planned in Pinnacle (Philips, Madison, USA) using Elekta Synergy and Varian 2100EX linacs; two of the cases were clinically treated with this technique. Advantages were demonstrated with well-controlled junction target uniformity and tolerance to setup uncertainties. The junction target dose heterogeneity was controlled at a level of ±5%; for 3 mm setup errors at the field edges, the junction target dose changed less than 5% and the dose sparing to organs at risk (OARs) was maintained. Film measurements confirmed the treatment planning results

  1. Reducing dose calculation time for accurate iterative IMRT planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Lauterbach, Marc; Tong, Shidong; Wu Qiuwen; Mohan, Radhe

    2002-01-01

    A time-consuming component of IMRT optimization is the dose computation required in each iteration for the evaluation of the objective function. Accurate superposition/convolution (SC) and Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations are currently considered too time-consuming for iterative IMRT dose calculation. Thus, fast, but less accurate algorithms such as pencil beam (PB) algorithms are typically used in most current IMRT systems. This paper describes two hybrid methods that utilize the speed of fast PB algorithms yet achieve the accuracy of optimizing based upon SC algorithms via the application of dose correction matrices. In one method, the ratio method, an infrequently computed voxel-by-voxel dose ratio matrix (R=D SC /D PB ) is applied for each beam to the dose distributions calculated with the PB method during the optimization. That is, D PB xR is used for the dose calculation during the optimization. The optimization proceeds until both the IMRT beam intensities and the dose correction ratio matrix converge. In the second method, the correction method, a periodically computed voxel-by-voxel correction matrix for each beam, defined to be the difference between the SC and PB dose computations, is used to correct PB dose distributions. To validate the methods, IMRT treatment plans developed with the hybrid methods are compared with those obtained when the SC algorithm is used for all optimization iterations and with those obtained when PB-based optimization is followed by SC-based optimization. In the 12 patient cases studied, no clinically significant differences exist in the final treatment plans developed with each of the dose computation methodologies. However, the number of time-consuming SC iterations is reduced from 6-32 for pure SC optimization to four or less for the ratio matrix method and five or less for the correction method. Because the PB algorithm is faster at computing dose, this reduces the inverse planning optimization time for our implementation

  2. Effect of beamlet step-size on IMRT plan quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guowei; Jiang Ziping; Shepard, David; Earl, Matt; Yu, Cedric

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the degree to which beamlet step-size impacts the quality of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans. Treatment planning for IMRT begins with the application of a grid that divides each beam's-eye-view of the target into a number of smaller beamlets (pencil beams) of radiation. The total dose is computed as a weighted sum of the dose delivered by the individual beamlets. The width of each beamlet is set to match the width of the corresponding leaf of the multileaf collimator (MLC). The length of each beamlet (beamlet step-size) is parallel to the direction of leaf travel. The beamlet step-size represents the minimum stepping distance of the leaves of the MLC and is typically predetermined by the treatment planning system. This selection imposes an artificial constraint because the leaves of the MLC and the jaws can both move continuously. Removing the constraint can potentially improve the IMRT plan quality. In this study, the optimized results were achieved using an aperture-based inverse planning technique called direct aperture optimization (DAO). We have tested the relationship between pencil beam step-size and plan quality using the American College of Radiology's IMRT test case. For this case, a series of IMRT treatment plans were produced using beamlet step-sizes of 1, 2, 5, and 10 mm. Continuous improvements were seen with each reduction in beamlet step size. The maximum dose to the planning target volume (PTV) was reduced from 134.7% to 121.5% and the mean dose to the organ at risk (OAR) was reduced from 38.5% to 28.2% as the beamlet step-size was reduced from 10 to 1 mm. The smaller pencil beam sizes also led to steeper dose gradients at the junction between the target and the critical structure with gradients of 6.0, 7.6, 8.7, and 9.1 dose%/mm achieved for beamlet step sizes of 10, 5, 2, and 1 mm, respectively

  3. Dosimetry investigation of MOSFET for clinical IMRT dose verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sudesh; Kumar, Rajesh; Ghadi, Yogesh; Neharu, R M; Kannan, V

    2013-06-01

    In IMRT, patient-specific dose verification is followed regularly at each centre. Simple and efficient dosimetry techniques play a very important role in routine clinical dosimetry QA. The MOSFET dosimeter offers several advantages over the conventional dosimeters such as its small detector size, immediate readout, immediate reuse, multiple point dose measurements. To use the MOSFET as routine clinical dosimetry system for pre-treatment dose verification in IMRT, a comprehensive set of experiments has been conducted, to investigate its linearity, reproducibility, dose rate effect and angular dependence for 6 MV x-ray beam. The MOSFETs shows a linear response with linearity coefficient of 0.992 for a dose range of 35 cGy to 427 cGy. The reproducibility of the MOSFET was measured by irradiating the MOSFET for ten consecutive irradiations in the dose range of 35 cGy to 427 cGy. The measured reproducibility of MOSFET was found to be within 4% up to 70 cGy and within 1.4% above 70 cGy. The dose rate effect on the MOSFET was investigated in the dose rate range 100 MU/min to 600 MU/min. The response of the MOSFET varies from -1.7% to 2.1%. The angular responses of the MOSFETs were measured at 10 degrees intervals from 90 to 270 degrees in an anticlockwise direction and normalized at gantry angle zero and it was found to be in the range of 0.98 ± 0.014 to 1.01 ± 0.014. The MOSFETs were calibrated in a phantom which was later used for IMRT verification. The measured calibration coefficients were found to be 1 mV/cGy and 2.995 mV/cGy in standard and high sensitivity mode respectively. The MOSFETs were used for pre-treatment dose verification in IMRT. Nine dosimeters were used for each patient to measure the dose in different plane. The average variation between calculated and measured dose at any location was within 3%. Dose verification using MOSFET and IMRT phantom was found to quick and efficient and well suited for a busy radiotherapy

  4. Propensity Score Matched Comparison of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy vs Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Survival Analysis from the National Cancer Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Ricco

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available PurposeNo direct comparisons between extreme hypofractionation and conventional fractionation have been reported in randomized trials for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. The goal of this study is to use a propensity score matched (PSM analysis with the National Cancer Database (NCDB for the comparison of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for organ confined prostate cancer.MethodsMen with localized prostate cancer treated with radiation dose ≥72 Gy for IMRT and ≥35 Gy for SBRT to the prostate only were abstracted from the NCDB. Men treated with previous surgery, brachytherapy, or proton therapy were excluded. Matching was performed to eliminate confounding variables via PSM. Simple 1–1 nearest neighbor matching resulted in a matched sample of 5,430 (2,715 in each group. Subset analyses of men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA > 10, GS = 7, and GS > 7 yielded matched samples of 1,020, 2,194, and 247, respectively.ResultsNo difference in survival was noted between IMRT and SBRT at 8 years (p = 0.65. Subset analyses of higher risk men with PSA > 10 or GS = 7 histology or GS > 7 histology revealed no difference in survival between IMRT and SBRT (p = 0.58, p = 0.68, and p = 0.62, respectively. Variables significant for survival for the matched group included: age (p < 0.0001, primary payor (p = 0.0001, Charlson/Deyo Score (p = 0.0002, PSA (p = 0.0013, Gleason score (p < 0.0001, and use of hormone therapy (p = 0.02.ConclusionUtilizing the NCDB, there is no difference in survival at 8 years comparing IMRT to SBRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Subset analysis confirmed no difference in survival even for intermediate- and high-risk patients based on Gleason Score and PSA.

  5. Internationalization of Boost Juice to Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Jane L. Menzies; Stuart C. Orr

    2014-01-01

    This case describes the process that the Australian juice retail chain, Boost Juice, has used to internationalize to Malaysia. The main objective of this case is to demonstrate good practice in regard to internationalization. The case provides the background of the juice bar industry in Malaysia and determines that it is an attractive market for new start-up juice bars. An analysis of Boost Juice's capability determined that the company utilized the skills of its staff, product innovations, b...

  6. Top reconstruction and boosted top experimental overview

    CERN Document Server

    Skinnari, Louise

    2015-01-01

    An overview of techniques used to reconstruct resolved and boosted top quarks is presented. Techniques for resolved top quark reconstruction include kinematic likelihood fitters and pseudo- top reconstruction. Many tools and methods are available for the reconstruction of boosted top quarks, such as jet grooming techniques, jet substructure variables, and dedicated top taggers. Different techniques as used by ATLAS and CMS analyses are described and the performance of different variables and top taggers are shown.

  7. IMRT QA: Selecting gamma criteria based on error detection sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steers, Jennifer M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California 90048 and Physics and Biology in Medicine IDP, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Fraass, Benedick A., E-mail: benedick.fraass@cshs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California 90048 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: The gamma comparison is widely used to evaluate the agreement between measurements and treatment planning system calculations in patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA). However, recent publications have raised concerns about the lack of sensitivity when employing commonly used gamma criteria. Understanding the actual sensitivity of a wide range of different gamma criteria may allow the definition of more meaningful gamma criteria and tolerance limits in IMRT QA. We present a method that allows the quantitative determination of gamma criteria sensitivity to induced errors which can be applied to any unique combination of device, delivery technique, and software utilized in a specific clinic. Methods: A total of 21 DMLC IMRT QA measurements (ArcCHECK®, Sun Nuclear) were compared to QA plan calculations with induced errors. Three scenarios were studied: MU errors, multi-leaf collimator (MLC) errors, and the sensitivity of the gamma comparison to changes in penumbra width. Gamma comparisons were performed between measurements and error-induced calculations using a wide range of gamma criteria, resulting in a total of over 20 000 gamma comparisons. Gamma passing rates for each error class and case were graphed against error magnitude to create error curves in order to represent the range of missed errors in routine IMRT QA using 36 different gamma criteria. Results: This study demonstrates that systematic errors and case-specific errors can be detected by the error curve analysis. Depending on the location of the error curve peak (e.g., not centered about zero), 3%/3 mm threshold = 10% at 90% pixels passing may miss errors as large as 15% MU errors and ±1 cm random MLC errors for some cases. As the dose threshold parameter was increased for a given %Diff/distance-to-agreement (DTA) setting, error sensitivity was increased by up to a factor of two for select cases. This increased sensitivity with increasing dose

  8. The accuracy of dose calculations by anisotropic analytical algorithms for stereotactic radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, M W K; Cheung, J Y C; Leung, L H T; Lau, B M F; Yu, P K N

    2011-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal tumors are commonly treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques. For photon dose calculations, problems related to loss of lateral electronic equilibrium exist when small fields are used. The anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) implemented in Varian Eclipse was developed to replace the pencil beam convolution (PBC) algorithm for more accurate dose prediction in an inhomogeneous medium. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the AAA for predicting interface doses for intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy boost of nasopharyngeal tumors. The central axis depth dose data and dose profiles of phantoms with rectangular air cavities for small fields were measured using a 6 MV beam. In addition, the air-tissue interface doses from six different intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy plans were measured in an anthropomorphic phantom. The nasopharyngeal region of the phantom was especially modified to simulate the air cavities of a typical patient. The measured data were compared to the data calculated by both the AAA and the PBC algorithm. When using single small fields in rectangular air cavity phantoms, both AAA and PBC overestimated the central axis dose at and beyond the first few millimeters of the air-water interface. Although the AAA performs better than the PBC algorithm, its calculated interface dose could still be more than three times that of the measured dose when a 2 x 2 cm 2 field was used. Testing of the algorithms using the anthropomorphic phantom showed that the maximum overestimation by the PBC algorithm was 20.7%, while that by the AAA was 8.3%. When multiple fields were used in a patient geometry, the dose prediction errors of the AAA would be substantially reduced compared with those from a single field. However, overestimation of more than 3% could still be found at some points at the air-tissue interface.

  9. A feasibility study of using conventional jaws to deliver complex IMRT plans for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, G; Xia, P

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that simple intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans can be produced with a series of rectangular segments formed by conventional jaws. This study investigates whether complex IMRT plans for head and neck cancer can be delivered with the conventional jaws efficiently. Six nasopharyngeal cancer patients, previously treated with multi-leaf collimator (MLC)-IMRT plans, were re-planned using conventional jaw delivery options. All IMRT plans were subject to the plan acceptance criteria of the RTOG-0225 protocol. For a selected patient, the maximum number of segments varied from five to nine per beam, and was tested for both jaws-only IMRT (JO-IMRT) plans and MLC-IMRT plans. Subsequently, JO-IMRT plans and MLC-IMRT on the same treatment planning system were attempted for all patients with identical beams. The dose distribution, dose volume histograms (DVH), the conformal index (COIN), the uniformity index and delivery efficiency were compared between the MLC-IMRT and JO-IMRT plans. All JO-IMRT plans met the RTOG-0225 criteria for tumor coverage and sensitive structures sparing. The corresponding MLC-IMRT and JO-IMRT plans show comparable conformality and uniformity, with average COINs of the planning gross tumor volume(pGTV) 37.7% ± 18.7% versus 37.9% ± 18.1%, and the average uniformity index 82.8% ± 2.5% versus 83.6% ± 3.1%, respectively. The average monitor unit for JO-IMRT plans was about twice that of MLC-IMRT plans. In conclusion, conventional jaws can be used solely to deliver complex IMRT plans for patients with nasopharyngeal cancer yet still within a practical delivery time.

  10. Parotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Preserved parotid function after IMRT on quantitative salivary scintigraphy, and comparison with historical data after conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiung, C.-Y.; Ting, H.-M.; Huang, H.-Y.; Lee, C.-H.; Huang, E.-Y.; Hsu, H.-C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the parotid function after parotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: From March 2003 to May 2004, 16 patients with nonmetastatic NPC underwent parotid-sparing IMRT. Eight of these patients had Stage III or IV NPC based on the 1997 American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system. The post-IMRT parotid function was evaluated by quantitative salivary scintigraphy and represented by the maximal excretion ratio (MER) of the parotid gland after sialogogue stimulation. The parotid function of 16 NPC patients who were previously treated with conventional radiotherapy was reviewed as the historical control. Results: In the parotid-sparing IMRT group, all 16 patients were alive and without cancer at the end of follow-up period (median, 24.2 months). The mean parotid MER was 53.5% before radiotherapy, 10.7% at 1 month post-IMRT, and 23.3% at 9 months post-IMRT. In the conventional radiotherapy group, the mean parotid MER was 0.6% at 6 to 12 months postradiotherapy. The difference was statistically significant (23.3% vs. 0.6%, p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney test). In the IMRT group, the mean parotid doses ranged from 33.2 Gy to 58.8 Gy (average, 43.9 Gy). The correlation between the mean parotid dose and the percentage decrease of parotid MER at 9 months post-IMRT (dMER) was statically significant (p = 0.008, Pearson correlation). Conclusions: Although the mean parotid doses are relatively high, the significant preservation of parotid function is achieved with IMRT for NPC patients. The significant correlation between mean parotid dose and parotid dMER demonstrates the dose-function relationship of the parotid gland

  11. SU-C-BRD-01: Multi-Centre Collaborative Quality Assurance Program for IMRT Planning and Delivery: Year 3 Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNiven, A; Jaffray, D; Letourneau, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A multi-centre quality assurance program was developed to enable quality improvement by coupling measurement of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning and delivery performance for site-specific planning exercises with diagnostic testing. The third year of the program specifically assessed the quality of spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) planning and delivery amongst the participating centres. Methods: A spine SBRT planning exercise (24 Gy in 2 fractions) was created and completed by participants prior to an on-site visit. The delivery portion of the on-site visit included spine SBRT plan delivery and diagnostic testing, which included portal image acquisition for quantification of phantom positioning error and multi-leaf collimator (MLC) calibration accuracy. The measured dose was compared to that calculated in the treatment planning system (TPS) using 3%/2mm composite analysis and 3%/3mm gamma analysis. Results: Fourteen institutions participated, creating 17 spine SBRT plans (15 VMAT and 2 IMRT). Three different TPS, two beam energies (6 MV and 6 MV FFF), and four MLC designs from two linac vendors were tested. Large variation in total monitor units (MU) per plan (2494–6462 MU) and dose-volume parameters was observed. The maximum point dose in the plans ranged from 116–149% and was dependent upon the TPS used. Pass rates for measured to planned dose comparison ranged from 89.4–100% and 97.3–100% for 3%/2mm and 3%/3mm criteria respectively. The largest measured MLC error did Result in one of the poorer pass rates. No direct correlation between phantom positioning error and pass rates overall. Conclusion: Significant differences were observed in the planning exercise for some plan and dose-volume parameters based on the TPS used. Standard evaluation criteria showed good agreement between planned and measured dose for all participants, however on an individual plan basis, diagnostic tests were able to identify contributing

  12. SU-C-BRD-01: Multi-Centre Collaborative Quality Assurance Program for IMRT Planning and Delivery: Year 3 Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNiven, A; Jaffray, D; Letourneau, D [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A multi-centre quality assurance program was developed to enable quality improvement by coupling measurement of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning and delivery performance for site-specific planning exercises with diagnostic testing. The third year of the program specifically assessed the quality of spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) planning and delivery amongst the participating centres. Methods: A spine SBRT planning exercise (24 Gy in 2 fractions) was created and completed by participants prior to an on-site visit. The delivery portion of the on-site visit included spine SBRT plan delivery and diagnostic testing, which included portal image acquisition for quantification of phantom positioning error and multi-leaf collimator (MLC) calibration accuracy. The measured dose was compared to that calculated in the treatment planning system (TPS) using 3%/2mm composite analysis and 3%/3mm gamma analysis. Results: Fourteen institutions participated, creating 17 spine SBRT plans (15 VMAT and 2 IMRT). Three different TPS, two beam energies (6 MV and 6 MV FFF), and four MLC designs from two linac vendors were tested. Large variation in total monitor units (MU) per plan (2494–6462 MU) and dose-volume parameters was observed. The maximum point dose in the plans ranged from 116–149% and was dependent upon the TPS used. Pass rates for measured to planned dose comparison ranged from 89.4–100% and 97.3–100% for 3%/2mm and 3%/3mm criteria respectively. The largest measured MLC error did Result in one of the poorer pass rates. No direct correlation between phantom positioning error and pass rates overall. Conclusion: Significant differences were observed in the planning exercise for some plan and dose-volume parameters based on the TPS used. Standard evaluation criteria showed good agreement between planned and measured dose for all participants, however on an individual plan basis, diagnostic tests were able to identify contributing

  13. Stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy: Two years of good neuropsychological outcomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malíková, H.; Krámská, L.; Vojtěch, Z.; Lukavský, Jiří; Liščák, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 3 (2013), s. 423-432 ISSN 0920-1211 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : temporal lobe epilepsy * stereotactic surgery * neuropsychology outcome Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 2.190, year: 2013

  14. Stereotactic Target point Verification in Actual Treatment Position of Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Hyong Geun; Lee, Hyun Koo

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : Authors tried to enhance the safety and accuracy of radiosurgery by verifying stereotactic target point in actual treatment position prior to irradiation. Materials and Methods : Before the actual treatment, several sections of anthropomorphic head phantom were used to create a condition of unknown coordinated of the target point. A film was sand witched between the phantom sections and punctured by sharp needle tip. The tip of the needle represented the target point. The head phantom was fixed to the stereotactic ring and CT scan was done with CT localizer attached to the ring. After the CT scanning, the stereotactic coordinates of the target point were determined. The head phantom was secured to accelerator's treatment couch and the movement of laser isocenter to the stereotactic coordinates determined by CT scanning was performed using target positioner. Accelerator's anteroposterior and lateral portal films were taken using angiographic localizers. The stereotactic coordinates determined by analysis of portal films were compared with the stereotactic coordinates previously determined by CT scanning. Following the correction of discrepancy, the head phantom was irradiated using a stereotactic technique of several arcs. After the irradiation, the film which was sand witched between the phantom sections was developed and the degree of coincidence between the center of the radiation distribution with the target point represented by the hole in the film was measured. In the treatment of actual patients, the way of determining the stereotactic coordinates with CT localizers and angiographic localizers between two sets of coordinates, we proceeded to the irradiation of the actual patient. Results : In the phantom study, the agreement between the center of the radiation distribution and the localized target point was very good. By measuring optical density profiles of the sand witched film along axes that intersected the target point, authors could confirm

  15. Effect of stereotactic body radiotherapy versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy in primary liver cancer patients with secondary malignant tumor of vertebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Jing

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the effect of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in primary liver cancer (PLC patients with secondary malignant tumor of vertebra. MethodsA total of 49 PLC patients with secondary metastatic tumor of vertebra, who were treated in our hospital from December 2011 to January 2014, were enrolled and divided into group A (20 patients treated with SBRT and group B (29 patients treated with IMRT. The prescribed dose was 35 Gy in 5 fractions in group A and 35 Gy in 10 fractions in group B. The time to pain relief, imaging findings, and survival analysis were used to evaluate pain-relieving effect, the condition of lesions, and survival time. The t-test was used to compare continuous data between groups, and the chi-square test was used to compare categorical data between groups. The K-M method was used to plot survival curves for both groups, and the log-rank test was used for survival difference analysis. ResultsThe proportion of patients who achieved complete or partial remission and stable disease shown by radiological examination after radiotherapy showed no significant difference between group A and group B (P=0.873. The pain relief rate also showed no significant difference between group A and group B (P=0.908. The time of pain relief showed a significant difference between group A and group B (t=-3.353, P<0.01. The overall survival showed no significant difference between the two groups (P=0.346. ConclusionRadiotherapy has a definite therapeutic effect in PLC patients with secondary malignant tumor of vertebra. SBRT and IMRT have similar pain-relieving effects. However, with the same prescribed dose, SBRT has a short time to pain relief and does not lead to serious intolerable acute or late toxic and side effects in surrounding fast-response tissues.

  16. Hepatic arterial phase and portal venous phase computed tomography for dose calculation of stereotactic body radiation therapy plans in liver cancer: a dosimetric comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Jianghong; Li, Yan; Jiang, Qingfeng; Sun, Lan; Henderson Jr, Fraser; Wang, Yongsheng; Jiang, Xiaoqin; Li, Guangjun; Chen, Nianyong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of computed tomography (CT) using hepatic arterial phase (HAP) and portal venous phase (PVP) contrast on dose calculation of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver cancer. Twenty-one patients with liver cancer were studied. HAP, PVP and non-enhanced CTs were performed on subjects scanned in identical positions under active breathing control (ABC). SBRT plans were generated using seven-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (7 F-3D-CRT), seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7 F-IMRT) and single-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) based on the PVP CT. Plans were copied to the HAP and non-enhanced CTs. Radiation doses calculated from the three phases of CTs were compared with respect to the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs at risk (OAR) using the Friedman test and the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. SBRT plans calculated from either PVP or HAP CT, including 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT plans, demonstrated significantly lower (p <0.05) minimum absorbed doses covering 98%, 95%, 50% and 2% of PTV (D98%, D95%, D50% and D2%) than those calculated from non-enhanced CT. The mean differences between PVP or HAP CT and non-enhanced CT were less than 2% and 1% respectively. All mean dose differences between the three phases of CTs for OARs were less than 2%. Our data indicate that though the differences in dose calculation between contrast phases are not clinically relevant, dose underestimation (IE, delivery of higher-than-intended doses) resulting from CT using PVP contrast is larger than that resulting from CT using HAP contrast when compared against doses based upon non-contrast CT in SBRT treatment of liver cancer using VMAT, IMRT or 3D-CRT

  17. Accuracy of marketing claims by providers of stereotactic radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Amol K; Lam, Edwin; Makary, Martin A; Deweese, Theodore L; Pawlik, Timothy M; Pronovost, Peter J; Herman, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer advertising by industry has been criticized for encouraging overuse of unproven therapies, but advertising by health care providers has not been as carefully scrutinized. Stereotactic radiation therapy is an emerging technology that has sparked controversy regarding the marketing campaigns of some manufacturers. Given that this technology is also being heavily advertised on the Web sites of health care providers, the accuracy of providers' marketing claims should be rigorously evaluated. We reviewed the Web sites of all U.S. hospitals and private practices that provide stereotactic radiation using two leading brands of stereotactic radiosurgery technology. Centers were identified by using data from the manufacturers. Centers without Web sites were excluded. The final study population consisted of 212 centers with online advertisements for stereotactic radiation. Web sites were evaluated for advertisements that were inconsistent with advertising guidelines provided by the American Medical Association. Most centers (76%) had individual pages dedicated to the marketing of their brand of stereotactic technology that frequently contained manufacturer-authored images (50%) or text (55%). Advertising for the treatment of tumors that have not been endorsed by professional societies was present on 66% of Web sites. Centers commonly claimed improved survival (22%), disease control (20%), quality of life (17%), and toxicity (43%) with stereotactic radiation. Although 40% of Web sites championed the center's regional expertise in delivering stereotactic treatments, only 15% of Web sites provided data to support their claims. Provider advertisements for stereotactic radiation were prominent and aggressive. Further investigation of provider advertising, its effects on quality of care, and potential oversight mechanisms is needed.

  18. Cerebral control and survival after stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Elmar Till

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective study, including 275 patients who underwent stereotactic radiotherapy due to brain metastases between 2003 and 2008, investigates influencing factors regarding cerebral control and survival, symptomatic effects and a potential benefit for patients older than 70 years. We were able to identify risk factors for remote brain failure which leads to a therapeutic recommendation. Furthermore we confirm a positive symptomatic effect and a benefit of stereotactic readiotherapy for patients over 70 years.

  19. A neurosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dedicated PACS for conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefkopoulos, D.; Bocquiault, P.; Levrier, M.; Merienne, L.; Schlienger, M.

    1995-01-01

    To realise conformal cerebral stereotactic irradiations we use a Neurosurgery/stereotactic dedicated PACS between two distant hospitals. It connects the stereotactic neurosurgery planification imaging system NEUROAXIS (Sopelem-Sofretec/Ste Anne Hospital) with the dosimetric TPS ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray (Tenon Hospital). NEUROAXIS is a computer aided stereotactic biopsies and stereo-electroencephalographies, used by surgeons in operating room. The system determines the precise location data for Talairach radiological equipment (X ray source at 5 meters from film) and the geometry of scanner and MRI stereotactical referentials. It provides a full set of features for lesion localization, geometrical computations, surgical planifications, picture archiving, stereotactic angiography, CT and MRI image processing and networking. It sends images through the French public digital network ISDN (NUMERIS/France Telecom : 2x64 Kbits/s) from Ste Anne to Tenon Hospital. Stereotactic angiographic and CT images are reformatted into the DOSIGRAY image processing environment where 3-D dose distributions, displays and DVHs are computed to determine the optimal treatment. ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray is a TPS for stereotactic radiotherapy devised by the Tenon Hospital for clinical methodology and 3D dose calculations, optimization software development and the Dosigray company for multimodality imaging, (2D(3D)) computer graphics for dose and anatomical representation and data networking. Communication within the radiation oncology department is provided by local area ETHERNET network, linking heterogeneous systems (Vaxstations-3200; Decstation (5000(240))) by means of different protocols. The works in progress are to send back via the same network the 3-D dose matrix to Neurosurgery department NEUROAXIS system. Our PACS is used since six months to treat patients. It has permitted to improve the treatment quality in comparison with our first version TPS ARTEMIS-3D

  20. Quality assurance for MR stereotactic imaging for three Siemens scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozubikova, P.; Novotny, J. Jr.; Kulhova, K.; Mihalova, P.; Tamasova, J.; Veselsk, T.

    2014-01-01

    Quality assurance of stereotactic imaging, especially with MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), is a complex issue. It can be divided in the basic verification and commissioning of a particular new scanner or a new scanning MRI protocol that is being implemented into a clinical practice and the routine quality assurance performed for each single radiosurgical case. The aim of this study was geometric distortion assessment in MRI with a special PTGR (Physikalisch-Technische Gesellschaft fuer Radiologie - GmbH, Tuebingen, Germany) target phantom. PTGR phantom consists of 21 three-dimensional cross-hairs filled with contrast medium. Cross hairs are positioned at known Leksell coordinates with a precision of better than 0.1 mm and covering the whole stereotactic space. The phantom can be fixed in the Leksell stereotactic frame and thus stereotactic imaging procedures can be reproduced following exactly the same steps as for a real patient, including also the stereotactic image definition in the Leksell GammaPlan. Since the geometric position (stereotactic coordinates) of each cross-hair is known based on the construction of the phantom, it can be compared with the actual measured Leksell coordinates based on the stereotactic MRI. Deviations between expected and actual coordinates provide information about the level of distortion. The measured distortions proved satisfactory accuracy precision for stereotactic localization at 1.5 T Siemens Magnetom Avanto scanner, Siemens Magnetom Symphony scanner and 3T Siemens Magnetom Skyra scanner (Na Homolce Hospital, Prague). The mean distortion for these MR scanners for standard imaging protocol (T1 weighted 3D images) were 0.8 mm, 1.1 mm and 1.1 mm and maximum distortions were 1.3 mm, 1.9 mm and 2.2 mm, respectively.There was detected dependence of the distortions on the slice orientation and the type of imaging protocol. Image distortions are also property of each particular scanner, the worst distortion were observed for 3T

  1. Multi-dimensional dosimetric verification of stereotactic radiotherapy for uveal melanoma using radiochromic EBT film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturtewagen, E.; Fuss, M.; Georg, D.; Paelinck, L.; Wagter, C. de

    2008-01-01

    Since 1997, linac based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of uveal melanoma has been continuously developed at the Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University Vienna. The aim of the present study was (i) to test a new type of radiochromic film (Gafchromic EBT) for dosimetric verification of class solutions for these treatments and (ii) to verify treatment plan acceptance criteria, which are based on gamma values statisitcs. An EPSON Expression 1680 Pro flat bed scanner was utilized for film reading. To establish a calibration curve, films were cut in squares of 2 x 2 cm 2 , positioned at 5 cm depth in a solid water phantom and were irradiated with different dose levels (0.5 and 5 Gy) in a 5 x 5 cm 2 field at 6 MV. A previously developed solid phantom (polystyrene) was used with overall dimensions corresponding to an average human head. EBT films were placed at four different depths (10, 20, 25 and 30 mm) and all films were irradiated simultaneously. Four different treatment plans were verified that resemble typical clinical situations. These plans differed in irradiation technique (conformal mMLC or circular arc SRT) and in tumour size (PTV of 1 or 2.5 cm 3 ). In-house developed software was applied to calculate gamma (γ) index values and to perform several statistical operations (e.g. γ-area histograms). At depths of 10 mm γ 1% (γ-value where 1% of the points have an equal or higher value in the region of interest) were between 1-3 and maximum γ > 1 (% of γ-values > 1 in the region of interest) areas were almost 30%. At larger depths, i.e. more close to the isocenter, γ 1% was > 1 areas were mostly < 5%. Average γ values were about 0.5. Besides the compromised accuracy in the buildup region, previously defined IMRT acceptance criteria [Stock et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 50 (2005) 399-411] could be applied as well to SRT. Radiochromic EBT films, in combination with a flat-bed scanner, were found to be an ideal multidimensional dosimetric tool for treatment

  2. Linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Lema, Leonor; Lopez-Garcia, Marisa; Maceira-Rozas, Maria; Munoz-Garzon, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is accepted as an alternative for patients with refractory trigeminal neuralgia, but existing evidence is fundamentally based on the Gamma Knife, which is a specific device for intracranial neurosurgery, available in few facilities. Over the last decade it has been shown that the use of linear accelerators can achieve similar diagnostic accuracy and equivalent dose distribution. To assess the effectiveness and safety of linear-accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of patients with refractory trigeminal neuralgia. We carried out a systematic search of the literature in the main electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, Cochrane, Biomed Central, IBECS, IME, CRD) and reviewed grey literature. All original studies on the subject published in Spanish, French, English, and Portuguese were eligible for inclusion. The selection and critical assessment was carried out by 2 independent reviewers based on pre-defined criteria. In view of the impossibility of carrying out a pooled analysis, data were analyzed in a qualitative way. Eleven case series were included. In these, satisfactory pain relief (BIN I-IIIb or reduction in pain = 50) was achieved in 75% to 95.7% of the patients treated. The mean time to relief from pain ranged from 8.5 days to 3.8 months. The percentage of patients who presented with recurrences after one year of follow-up ranged from 5% to 28.8%. Facial swelling or hypoesthesia, mostly of a mild-moderate grade appeared in 7.5% - 51.9% of the patients. Complete anaesthesia dolorosa was registered in only study (5.3%). Cases of hearing loss (2.5%), brainstem edema (5.8%), and neurotrophic keratoplasty (3.5%) were also isolated. The results suggest that stereotactic radiosurgery with linear accelerators could constitute an effective and safe therapeutic alternative for drug-resistant trigeminal neuralgia. However, existing studies leave important doubts as to optimal treatment doses or the

  3. Head-and-neck IMRT treatments assessed with a Monte Carlo dose calculation engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seco, J; Adams, E; Bidmead, M; Partridge, M; Verhaegen, F

    2005-01-01

    IMRT is frequently used in the head-and-neck region, which contains materials of widely differing densities (soft tissue, bone, air-cavities). Conventional methods of dose computation for these complex, inhomogeneous IMRT cases involve significant approximations. In the present work, a methodology for the development, commissioning and implementation of a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation engine for intensity modulated radiotherapy (MC-IMRT) is proposed which can be used by radiotherapy centres interested in developing MC-IMRT capabilities for research or clinical evaluations. The method proposes three levels for developing, commissioning and maintaining a MC-IMRT dose calculation engine: (a) development of a MC model of the linear accelerator, (b) validation of MC model for IMRT and (c) periodic quality assurance (QA) of the MC-IMRT system. The first step, level (a), in developing an MC-IMRT system is to build a model of the linac that correctly predicts standard open field measurements for percentage depth-dose and off-axis ratios. Validation of MC-IMRT, level (b), can be performed in a rando phantom and in a homogeneous water equivalent phantom. Ultimately, periodic quality assurance of the MC-IMRT system is needed to verify the MC-IMRT dose calculation system, level (c). Once the MC-IMRT dose calculation system is commissioned it can be applied to more complex clinical IMRT treatments. The MC-IMRT system implemented at the Royal Marsden Hospital was used for IMRT calculations for a patient undergoing treatment for primary disease with nodal involvement in the head-and-neck region (primary treated to 65 Gy and nodes to 54 Gy), while sparing the spinal cord, brain stem and parotid glands. Preliminary MC results predict a decrease of approximately 1-2 Gy in the median dose of both the primary tumour and nodal volumes (compared with both pencil beam and collapsed cone). This is possibly due to the large air-cavity (the larynx of the patient) situated in the centre

  4. Effective local control of vertebral metastases by simultaneous integrated boost radiotherapy. Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubgan, Dorota; Ziegaus, Anke; Semrau, Sabine; Lambrecht, Ulrike; Lettmaier, Sebastian; Fietkau, Rainer [Erlangen University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-11-14

    The primary endpoint was to improve local tumour control of patients with metastatic spinal tumours by stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and dose escalation by simultaneous, integrated boost (PTV-boost). We used a whole vertebral body (PTV-elective) contouring approach. Secondary endpoints were severity of acute and chronic adverse effects and overall survival. In all, 33 patients with metastases of the vertebral column were treated at Erlangen University Hospital. SBRT was given in 12 or 10 fractions. The metastatic lesion (PTV-boost) received 3.6 Gy (range 3.0-4.51 Gy) per fraction for a total of 42.0 Gy (24.36-48.0 Gy) and the whole vertebra (PTV-elective) received 2.85 Gy (range 1.8-3.6 Gy) per fraction for a total of 32.39 Gy (range 21.60-38.0 Gy). Patients were followed up every 3 months. Local control rate of all patients was 93 % at 12 and 24 months. The overall survival rate was 54 % at 12 months, 38 % at 24 months and 18 % at 36 months. No radiation myelopathy occurred. The most frequently observed adverse events in 3 cases was oesophagitis grade 2. SBRT with simultaneous, integrated boost was associated with excellent local control of 93 % after 24 months. This result shows the possibility of delivering escalated doses to the target while still keeping the incidence of side effects low. This study forms the basis for a future randomised controlled trial comparing conventional radiotherapy (10 fractions of 3 Gy) with hypofractionated dose intensified SBRT (12 fractions of 3 Gy + integrated boost 12 fractions of 4 Gy) for improvement of local tumour control and pain. (orig.) [German] Das primaere Ziel der Studie war die Verbesserung der lokalen Tumorkontrolle von Patienten mit Wirbelkoerpermetastasen mittels stereotaktischer Radiotherapie (SBRT) mit Dosiseskalation durch einen simultan integrierten Boost (PTV-Boost). Dabei wurde der ganze Wirbelkoerper konturiert (PTV-Elektive). Zu den sekundaeren Endpunkten der Studie gehoerten der Schweregrad von

  5. Comparison of doses received by the hippocampus in patients treated with single isocenter– vs multiple isocenter–based stereotactic radiation therapy to the brain for multiple brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algan, Ozer; Giem, Jared; Young, Julie; Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Hossain, Sabbir

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the doses received by the hippocampus and normal brain tissue during a course of stereotactic radiation therapy using a single isocenter (SI)–based or multiple isocenter (MI)–based treatment planning in patients with less than 4 brain metastases. In total, 10 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating 2-3 brain metastases were included in this retrospective study, and 2 sets of stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans (SI vs MI) were generated. The hippocampus was contoured on SPGR sequences, and doses received by the hippocampus and the brain were calculated and compared between the 2 treatment techniques. A total of 23 lesions in 10 patients were evaluated. The median tumor volume, the right hippocampus volume, and the left hippocampus volume were 3.15, 3.24, and 2.63 mL, respectively. In comparing the 2 treatment plans, there was no difference in the planning target volume (PTV) coverage except in the tail for the dose-volume histogram (DVH) curve. The only statistically significant dosimetric parameter was the V_1_0_0. All of the other measured dosimetric parameters including the V_9_5, V_9_9, and D_1_0_0 were not significantly different between the 2 treatment planning techniques. None of the dosimetric parameters evaluated for the hippocampus revealed any statistically significant difference between the MI and SI plans. The total brain doses were slightly higher in the SI plans, especially in the lower dose region, although this difference was not statistically different. The use of SI-based treatment plan resulted in a 35% reduction in beam-on time. The use of SI treatments for patients with up to 3 brain metastases produces similar PTV coverage and similar normal tissue doses to the hippocampus and the brain when compared with MI plans. SI treatment planning should be considered in patients with multiple brain metastases undergoing stereotactic treatment.

  6. Comparison of doses received by the hippocampus in patients treated with single isocenter- vs multiple isocenter-based stereotactic radiation therapy to the brain for multiple brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algan, Ozer; Giem, Jared; Young, Julie; Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Hossain, Sabbir

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the doses received by the hippocampus and normal brain tissue during a course of stereotactic radiation therapy using a single isocenter (SI)-based or multiple isocenter (MI)-based treatment planning in patients with less than 4 brain metastases. In total, 10 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating 2-3 brain metastases were included in this retrospective study, and 2 sets of stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans (SI vs MI) were generated. The hippocampus was contoured on SPGR sequences, and doses received by the hippocampus and the brain were calculated and compared between the 2 treatment techniques. A total of 23 lesions in 10 patients were evaluated. The median tumor volume, the right hippocampus volume, and the left hippocampus volume were 3.15, 3.24, and 2.63mL, respectively. In comparing the 2 treatment plans, there was no difference in the planning target volume (PTV) coverage except in the tail for the dose-volume histogram (DVH) curve. The only statistically significant dosimetric parameter was the V100. All of the other measured dosimetric parameters including the V95, V99, and D100 were not significantly different between the 2 treatment planning techniques. None of the dosimetric parameters evaluated for the hippocampus revealed any statistically significant difference between the MI and SI plans. The total brain doses were slightly higher in the SI plans, especially in the lower dose region, although this difference was not statistically different. The use of SI-based treatment plan resulted in a 35% reduction in beam-on time. The use of SI treatments for patients with up to 3 brain metastases produces similar PTV coverage and similar normal tissue doses to the hippocampus and the brain when compared with MI plans. SI treatment planning should be considered in patients with multiple brain metastases undergoing stereotactic treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Association of

  7. Comparison of doses received by the hippocampus in patients treated with single isocenter– vs multiple isocenter–based stereotactic radiation therapy to the brain for multiple brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algan, Ozer, E-mail: oalgan@ouhsc.edu; Giem, Jared; Young, Julie; Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Hossain, Sabbir

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the doses received by the hippocampus and normal brain tissue during a course of stereotactic radiation therapy using a single isocenter (SI)–based or multiple isocenter (MI)–based treatment planning in patients with less than 4 brain metastases. In total, 10 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating 2-3 brain metastases were included in this retrospective study, and 2 sets of stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans (SI vs MI) were generated. The hippocampus was contoured on SPGR sequences, and doses received by the hippocampus and the brain were calculated and compared between the 2 treatment techniques. A total of 23 lesions in 10 patients were evaluated. The median tumor volume, the right hippocampus volume, and the left hippocampus volume were 3.15, 3.24, and 2.63 mL, respectively. In comparing the 2 treatment plans, there was no difference in the planning target volume (PTV) coverage except in the tail for the dose-volume histogram (DVH) curve. The only statistically significant dosimetric parameter was the V{sub 100}. All of the other measured dosimetric parameters including the V{sub 95}, V{sub 99}, and D{sub 100} were not significantly different between the 2 treatment planning techniques. None of the dosimetric parameters evaluated for the hippocampus revealed any statistically significant difference between the MI and SI plans. The total brain doses were slightly higher in the SI plans, especially in the lower dose region, although this difference was not statistically different. The use of SI-based treatment plan resulted in a 35% reduction in beam-on time. The use of SI treatments for patients with up to 3 brain metastases produces similar PTV coverage and similar normal tissue doses to the hippocampus and the brain when compared with MI plans. SI treatment planning should be considered in patients with multiple brain metastases undergoing stereotactic treatment.

  8. Treatment of locally advanced carcinomas of head and neck with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in combination with cetuximab and chemotherapy: the REACH protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habl, Gregor; Münter, Marc W; Jensen, Alexandra D; Potthoff, Karin; Uhl, Matthias; Hof, Holger; Hajda, Jacek; Simon, Christian; Debus, Jürgen; Krempien, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Primary treatment of carcinoma of the oro-/hypopharynx or larynx may consist of combined platinum-containing chemoradiotherapy. In order to improve clinical outcome (i.e. local control/overall survival), combined therapy is intensified by the addition of the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab (Erbitux ® ). Radiation therapy (RT) is carried out as intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) to avoid higher grade acute and late toxicity by sparing of surrounding normal tissues. The REACH study is a prospective phase II study combining chemoradiotherapy with carboplatin/5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and the monoclonal epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGFR) antibody cetuximab (Erbitux ® ) as intensity-modulated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced squamous-cell carcinomas of oropharynx, hypopharynx or larynx. Patients receive weekly chemotherapy infusions in the 1 st and 5 th week of RT. Additionally, cetuximab is administered weekly throughout the treatment course. IMRT is delivered as in a classical concomitant boost concept (bid from fraction 16) to a total dose of 69,9 Gy. Primary endpoint of the trial is local-regional control (LRC). Disease-free survival, progression-free survival, overall survival, toxicity, proteomic and genomic analyses are secondary endpoints. The aim is to explore the efficacy as well as the safety and feasibility of this combined radioimmunchemotherapy in order to improve the outcome of patients with advanced head and neck cancer. ISRCTN87356938

  9. Treatment of locally advanced carcinomas of head and neck with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in combination with cetuximab and chemotherapy: the REACH protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Christian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary treatment of carcinoma of the oro-/hypopharynx or larynx may consist of combined platinum-containing chemoradiotherapy. In order to improve clinical outcome (i.e. local control/overall survival, combined therapy is intensified by the addition of the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab (Erbitux®. Radiation therapy (RT is carried out as intensity-modulated RT (IMRT to avoid higher grade acute and late toxicity by sparing of surrounding normal tissues. Methods/Design The REACH study is a prospective phase II study combining chemoradiotherapy with carboplatin/5-Fluorouracil (5-FU and the monoclonal epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGFR antibody cetuximab (Erbitux® as intensity-modulated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced squamous-cell carcinomas of oropharynx, hypopharynx or larynx. Patients receive weekly chemotherapy infusions in the 1st and 5th week of RT. Additionally, cetuximab is administered weekly throughout the treatment course. IMRT is delivered as in a classical concomitant boost concept (bid from fraction 16 to a total dose of 69,9 Gy. Discussion Primary endpoint of the trial is local-regional control (LRC. Disease-free survival, progression-free survival, overall survival, toxicity, proteomic and genomic analyses are secondary endpoints. The aim is to explore the efficacy as well as the safety and feasibility of this combined radioimmunchemotherapy in order to improve the outcome of patients with advanced head and neck cancer. Trial registration ISRCTN87356938

  10. Five-year Local Control in a Phase II Study of Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost for Early Stage Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, Gary M.; Anderson, Penny R.; Bleicher, Richard J.; Litwin, Samuel; Li Tianyu; Swaby, Ramona F.; Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie; Li Jinsheng; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Morrow, Monica; Goldstein, Lori J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy per day for early stage breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6-7 weeks. We report the 5-year results of a phase II study of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hypofractionation, and incorporated boost that shortened treatment time to 4 weeks. Methods and Materials: The study design was phase II with a planned accrual of 75 patients. Eligibility included patients aged ≥18 years, Tis-T2, stage 0-II, and breast conservation. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost was used, and the whole breast received 2.25 Gy per fraction for a total of 45 Gy, and the tumor bed received 2.8 Gy per fraction for a total of 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Patients were followed every 6 months for 5 years. Results: Seventy-five patients were treated from December 2003 to November 2005. The median follow-up was 69 months. Median age was 52 years (range, 31-81). Median tumor size was 1.4 cm (range, 0.1-3.5). Eighty percent of tumors were node negative; 93% of patients had negative margins, and 7% of patients had close (>0 and <2 mm) margins; 76% of cancers were invasive ductal type: 15% were ductal carcinoma in situ, 5% were lobular, and 4% were other histology types. Twenty-nine percent of patients 29% had grade 3 carcinoma, and 20% of patients had extensive in situ carcinoma; 11% of patients received chemotherapy, 36% received endocrine therapy, 33% received both, and 20% received neither. There were 3 instances of local recurrence for a 5-year actuarial rate of 2.7%. Conclusions: This 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation with incorporated boost was associated with excellent local control, comparable to historical results of 6-7 weeks of conventional whole-breast fractionation with sequential boost.

  11. Five-year Local Control in a Phase II Study of Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost for Early Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, Gary M., E-mail: Gary.Freedman@uphs.upenn.edu [Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bleicher, Richard J. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Litwin, Samuel; Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Swaby, Ramona F. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie; Li Jinsheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sigurdson, Elin R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Morrow, Monica [Department of Surgical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldstein, Lori J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Conventional radiation fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy per day for early stage breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6-7 weeks. We report the 5-year results of a phase II study of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hypofractionation, and incorporated boost that shortened treatment time to 4 weeks. Methods and Materials: The study design was phase II with a planned accrual of 75 patients. Eligibility included patients aged {>=}18 years, Tis-T2, stage 0-II, and breast conservation. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost was used, and the whole breast received 2.25 Gy per fraction for a total of 45 Gy, and the tumor bed received 2.8 Gy per fraction for a total of 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Patients were followed every 6 months for 5 years. Results: Seventy-five patients were treated from December 2003 to November 2005. The median follow-up was 69 months. Median age was 52 years (range, 31-81). Median tumor size was 1.4 cm (range, 0.1-3.5). Eighty percent of tumors were node negative; 93% of patients had negative margins, and 7% of patients had close (>0 and <2 mm) margins; 76% of cancers were invasive ductal type: 15% were ductal carcinoma in situ, 5% were lobular, and 4% were other histology types. Twenty-nine percent of patients 29% had grade 3 carcinoma, and 20% of patients had extensive in situ carcinoma; 11% of patients received chemotherapy, 36% received endocrine therapy, 33% received both, and 20% received neither. There were 3 instances of local recurrence for a 5-year actuarial rate of 2.7%. Conclusions: This 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation with incorporated boost was associated with excellent local control, comparable to historical results of 6-7 weeks of conventional whole-breast fractionation with sequential boost.

  12. Audiological assessment before and after fractionated stereotactic irradiation for vestibular schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Sato, N.; Inuyama, Y.; Shirato, H.; Kagei, K.; Fukuda, S.; Miyasaka, K.; Sawamura, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Takizawa, H.; Hokunan, K.; Isu, T.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To find the audiological outcome after LINAC-based fractionated stereotactic irradiation (STI). Materials and methods: Twenty-four patients with vestibular schwannoma treated by fractionated STI between 1991 and 1997 had measurable hearing before STI and were followed audiologically for more than 6 months. The pure tone average (PTA) was measured by averaging the air-conduction threshold for five main frequencies (250-4000 Hz) before and periodically after STI in the 24 patients. Several possible prognostic factors for hearing preservation (defined as a PTA change at the last follow-up of less than 10 dB) were investigated. The median follow-up time was 22 months, ranging from 5 to 69 months. The irradiation schedule was 36 Gy in 20 fractions in 5 weeks to 44 Gy in 22 fractions in 6 weeks followed by 4 Gy/1 fraction boost. Results: The pure tone average before STI was distributed from 7 to 73 dB. Fifty percent of patients showed a change in PTA of less than 10 dB, 79.2% of patients showed a change in PTA of less than 20 dB and 20.8% of patients showed a change in PTA of more than 21 dB at the last follow-up. Only one patient (4%) became deaf. Cases with a sudden loss of hearing were more likely to experience hearing preservation than those with gradual loss of hearing (P<0.05). The mean age was younger in patients whose hearing was preserved (P<0.05). Poor pretreatment PTA appeared to linearly correspond to the changes in PTA (regression coefficient 0.78). The size of the tumor was not related to the change in PTA. No relationship was observed between the maximum or peripheral dose and the PTA change. The real benefit of stereotactic boost after small-field fractionated irradiation was not certain. Conclusion: Fractionated STI produced a hearing preservation rate compatible with meticulously collimated multi-spots single fraction irradiation. Further follow-up is required to confirm the long-term benefits of fractionation. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier

  13. [Stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, D; Martinage, G; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T; Makhloufi, S; Faivre, J-C; Thureau, S; Lartigau, É

    2016-10-01

    After the liver and lungs, bones are the third most common sites of cancer metastasis. Palliative radiotherapy for secondary bone tumours helps relieve pain, improve the quality of life and reduce the risk of fractures. Stereotactic body radiotherapy can deliver high radiation doses with very tight margins, which has significant advantages when treating tumours close to the spinal cord. Strict quality control is essential as dose gradient at the edge of the spinal cord is important. Optimal schedule is not defined. A range of dose-fractionation schedules have been used. Pain relief and local control are seen in over 80%. Toxicity rates are low, although vertebral fracture may occur. Ongoing prospective studies will help clarify its role in the management of oligometastatic patients. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyuma, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Akimune; Kitamura, Tatsuo; Yamashita, Koosuke; Muranishi, Hisayuki; Hioki, Minoru [Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama (Japan)

    1992-07-01

    A basic and clinical study of radiosurgery using the linear accelerator (Linac) system for unremovable deep-seated brain tumors is reported. A Komai stereotactic ring was used to locate the target coordinates. The patient was laid on the Linac treatment table and held in the head fixation system. Irradiation was given in five positions. The dose profile by film dosimetry and Rando phantom was satisfactory. Seventeen tumors in 14 patients were treated. Clinical or histological diagnoses were nine metastases, one benign and two malignant gliomas, one meningioma, and one carcinopharyngioma. Tumor sizes were between 8 and 30 mm. Doses were between 12 and 30 Gy. Computed tomographic evaluation after 3 months of 12 tumors in 11 survivors showed one complete remission, three partial remission, six no change, and two partial deterioration. For progressive tumors, Linac radiosurgery results are excellent. (author).

  15. Trilogy Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntzinger, Calvin; Friedman, William; Bova, Frank; Fox, Timothy; Bouchet, Lionel; Boeh, Lester M.B.A.

    2007-01-01

    Full integration of advanced imaging, noninvasive immobilization, positioning, and motion-management methods into radiosurgery have resulted in fundamental changes in therapeutic strategies and approaches that are leading us to the treatment room of the future. With the introduction of image-guided radiosurgery (IGRS) systems, such as Trilogy TM , physicians have for the first time a practical means of routinely identifying and treating very small lesions throughout the body. Using new imaging processes such as positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans, clinics may be able to detect these lesions and then eradicate them with image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery treatments. Thus, there is promise that cancer could be turned into a chronic disease, managed through a series of checkups, and Trilogy treatments when metastatic lesions reappear

  16. Stereotactic radiosurgery. The role of charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.; Schulte, R.W.M.; Slater, J.D.; Miller, D.W.; Slater, J.M. [Loma Linda Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Medicine

    1999-08-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery using charged-particle beams has been the subject of biomedical research and clinical development for more than 50 years. Charged particles of proton mass or greater manifest unique physical properties that can be used to place a high dose of radiation preferentially within the boundaries of a deeply located intracranial target volume. Since 1954, nearly 10 000 patients have been treated using this technique. Treated disorders include pituitary tumors, vascular malformations, primary and metastatic brain tumors, and subfoveal neovascularization. Charged-particle radiosurgery is particularly advantageous for the conformal treatment of large and/or irregularly shaped lesions, or for the treatment of lesions located in front of or adjacent to sensitive brain structures. (orig.)

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery. The role of charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.P.; Schulte, R.W.M.; Slater, J.D.; Miller, D.W.; Slater, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery using charged-particle beams has been the subject of biomedical research and clinical development for more than 50 years. Charged particles of proton mass or greater manifest unique physical properties that can be used to place a high dose of radiation preferentially within the boundaries of a deeply located intracranial target volume. Since 1954, nearly 10 000 patients have been treated using this technique. Treated disorders include pituitary tumors, vascular malformations, primary and metastatic brain tumors, and subfoveal neovascularization. Charged-particle radiosurgery is particularly advantageous for the conformal treatment of large and/or irregularly shaped lesions, or for the treatment of lesions located in front of or adjacent to sensitive brain structures. (orig.)

  18. Investigation of effective decision criteria for multiobjective optimization in IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Clay; Stewart, Robert D; Kim, Minsun; Liao, Jay; Phillips, Mark H

    2011-06-01

    To investigate how using different sets of decision criteria impacts the quality of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans obtained by multiobjective optimization. A multiobjective optimization evolutionary algorithm (MOEA) was used to produce sets of IMRT plans. The MOEA consisted of two interacting algorithms: (i) a deterministic inverse planning optimization of beamlet intensities that minimizes a weighted sum of quadratic penalty objectives to generate IMRT plans and (ii) an evolutionary algorithm that selects the superior IMRT plans using decision criteria and uses those plans to determine the new weights and penalty objectives of each new plan. Plans resulting from the deterministic algorithm were evaluated by the evolutionary algorithm using a set of decision criteria for both targets and organs at risk (OARs). Decision criteria used included variation in the target dose distribution, mean dose, maximum dose, generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD), an equivalent uniform dose (EUD(alpha,beta) formula derived from the linear-quadratic survival model, and points on dose volume histograms (DVHs). In order to quantatively compare results from trials using different decision criteria, a neutral set of comparison metrics was used. For each set of decision criteria investigated, IMRT plans were calculated for four different cases: two simple prostate cases, one complex prostate Case, and one complex head and neck Case. When smaller numbers of decision criteria, more descriptive decision criteria, or less anti-correlated decision criteria were used to characterize plan quality during multiobjective optimization, dose to OARs and target dose variation were reduced in the final population of plans. Mean OAR dose and gEUD (a = 4) decision criteria were comparable. Using maximum dose decision criteria for OARs near targets resulted in inferior populations that focused solely on low target variance at the expense of high OAR dose. Target dose range, (D

  19. Emerging technologies in stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijun; Wang, Lei; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) stems from the initial developments of intra-cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Despite similarity in their names and clinical goals of delivering a sufficiently high tumoricidal dose, maximal sparing of the surrounding normal tissues and a short treatment course, SBRT technologies have transformed from the early days of body frame-based treatments with X-ray verification to primarily image-guided procedures with cone-beam CT or stereoscopic X-ray systems and non-rigid body immo-bilization. As a result of the incorporation of image-guidance systems and multi-leaf col-limators into mainstream linac systems, and treatment planning systems that have also evolved to allow for routine dose calculations to permit intensity modulated radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), SBRT has disseminated rapidly in the community to manage many disease sites that include oligometastases, spine lesions, lung, prostate, liver, renal cell, pelvic tumors, and head and neck tumors etc. In this article, we review the physical principles and paradigms that led to the widespread adoption of SBRT practice as well as technical caveats specific to individual SBRT technologies. From the perspective of treatment delivery, we categorically described (I) C-arm linac-based SBRT technologies; (II) robotically manipulated X-band CyberKnife® technology; and (III) emerging specialized systems for SBRT that include integrated MRI-linear accelerators and the imaged-guided Gamma Knife Perfexion Icon system with expanded multi-isocenter treatments of skull-based tumors, head-and-neck and cervical-spine lesions.

  20. Vagus nerve stimulation and stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Kensuke

    2005-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation and stereotactic radiosurgery represent novel and less invasive therapeutics for medically intractable epilepsy. Chronic stimulation of the left vagus nerve with implanted generator and electrodes inhibits seizure susceptibility of the cerebral cortices. While the underlying mechanisms of the effect remains to be further elucidated, the efficacy and safety of vagus nerve stimulation have been established by randomized clinical trials in the United States and European countries. It has been widely accepted as a treatment option for patients with medically intractable epilepsy and for whom brain surgery is not indicated. The primary indication of vagus nerve stimulation in the clinical trials was localization-related epilepsy in adult patients but efficacy in a wide range of patient groups such as generalized epilepsy and children has been reported. Improvements in daytime alertness, mood, higher cognitive functions and overall quality of life have been reported other than the effect on epileptic seizures. Since the devices are not approved for clinical use in Japan by the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry, there exist barriers to provide this treatment to patients at present. Stereotactic radiosurgery has been used for temporal lobe epilepsy and hypothalamic hamartoma, but it is still controversial whether the therapy is more effective and less invasive than brain surgery. Promising results of gamma knife radiosurgery for medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis have been reported essentially from one French center. Results from others were not as favorable. There seems to be an unignorable risk of brain edema and radiation necrosis when the delivered dose over the medial temporal structures is high enough to abolish epileptic seizures. A randomized clinical trial comparing different marginal doses is ongoing in the United States. Clinical trials like this, technical advancement and standardization

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of proton stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Byung Jun; Shin, Dong Ho; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Jeong, Hojin; Lee, Se Byeong

    2011-01-01

    Surgical excision, conventional external radiotherapy, and chemotherapy could prolong survival in patients with small intracranial tumors. However, surgical excision for meningiomas located in the region of the base of skull or re-resection is often difficult. Moreover, treatment is needed for patients with recurrent tumors or postoperative residual tumors. Conventional external radiotherapy is popular and has significantly increased for treating brain tumors. Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective alternative treatment technique to microsurgical resection such as benign brain tumor or vestibular Schwannomas. In general, the dose to OAR of 3D conformal plan is lower than that of conformal arc and dynamic conformal arc plans. However, any of OARs was not reached to tolerance dose. Although mean dose of the healthy brain tissue for 3D conformal plan was slightly higher than that of arc plans, the doses of the healthy brain tissue at V10 and V20 were significantly low for dynamic conformal arc plan. The dosimetric differences were the greatest at lower doses. In contrast, 3D conformal plan was better spare at higher doses. In this study, a dosimetric evaluation of proton stereotactic radiosurgery for brain lesion tumors was using fixed and arc beams. A brass block fitted to the PTV structure was modeled for dynamic conformal collimator. Although all treatment plans offer a very good coverage of the PTV, we found that proton arc plans had significantly better conformity to the PTV than static 3D conformal plan. The V20 dose of normal brain for dynamic conformal arc therapy is dramatically reduced compare to those for other therapy techniques.

  2. Soft-Rt: software for IMRT simulations based on MCNPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira F, T. C.; Campos, T.

    2015-10-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is an advanced treatment technique, widely used in external radiotherapy. This paper presents the Soft-Rt which allows the simulation of an entire IMRT treatment protocol. The Soft-Rt performs a full three-dimensional rendering of a set of patient images, including the definitions of region of interest with organs in risk, and the target tumor volume and margins (PTV). Thus, a more accurate analysis and planning can be performed, taking into account the features and orientation of the radiation beams. The exposed tissues as well as the amount of absorbed dose is depicted in healthy and/or cancerous tissues. As conclusion, Soft-Rt can predict dose on the PTV accurately, preserving the surrounding healthy tissues. Soft-Rt is coupled with SISCODES code. The SISCODES code is firstly applied to segment the set of CT or MRI patient images in distinct tissues pointing out its respective density and chemical compositions. Later, the voxel model is export to the Soft-Rt IMRT planning module in which a full treatment planning is created. All geometrical parameters are sent to the general purpose Monte Carlo transport code - MCNP - to simulate the interaction of each incident beam towards to the PTV avoiding organs in risk. The normalized dose results are exported to the Soft-Rt out-module, in which the three-dimensional model visualization is shown in a transparent glass procedure adopting gray scale for the dependence on the mass density of the correlated tissue; while, a color scale to depict dose values in a superimpose protocol. (Author)

  3. Influence of MLC leaf width on biologically adapted IMRT plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedal, Jan; Soevik, Aaste; Malinen, Eirik (Dept. of Medical Physics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway)), E-mail: jan.rodal@radiumhospitalet.no

    2010-10-15

    Introduction. High resolution beam delivery may be required for optimal biology-guided adaptive therapy. In this work, we have studied the influence of multi leaf collimator (MLC) leaf widths on the treatment outcome following adapted IMRT of a hypoxic tumour. Material and methods. Dynamic contrast enhanced MR images of a dog with a spontaneous tumour in the nasal region were used to create a tentative hypoxia map following a previously published procedure. The hypoxia map was used as a basis for generating compartmental gross tumour volumes, which were utilised as planning structures in biologically adapted IMRT. Three different MLCs were employed in inverse treatment planning, with leaf widths of 2.5 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm. The number of treatment beams and the degree of step-and-shoot beam modulation were varied. By optimising the tumour control probability (TCP) function, optimal compartmental doses were derived and used as target doses in the inverse planning. Resulting IMRT dose distributions and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were exported and analysed, giving estimates of TCP and compartmental equivalent uniform doses (EUDs). The impact of patient setup accuracy was simulated. Results. The MLC with the smallest leaf width (2.5 mm) consistently gave the highest TCPs and compartmental EUDs, assuming no setup error. The difference between this MLC and the 5 mm MLC was rather small, while the MLC with 10 mm leaf width gave considerably lower TCPs. When including random and systematic setup errors, errors larger than 5 mm gave only small differences between the MLC types. For setup errors larger than 7 mm no differences were found between non-uniform and uniform dose distributions. Conclusions. Biologically adapted radiotherapy may require MLCs with leaf widths smaller than 10 mm. However, for a high probability of cure it is crucial that accurate patient setup is ensured.

  4. Soft-Rt: software for IMRT simulations based on MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira F, T. C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Campos, T., E-mail: tcff01@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Programa de Pos Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is an advanced treatment technique, widely used in external radiotherapy. This paper presents the Soft-Rt which allows the simulation of an entire IMRT treatment protocol. The Soft-Rt performs a full three-dimensional rendering of a set of patient images, including the definitions of region of interest with organs in risk, and the target tumor volume and margins (PTV). Thus, a more accurate analysis and planning can be performed, taking into account the features and orientation of the radiation beams. The exposed tissues as well as the amount of absorbed dose is depicted in healthy and/or cancerous tissues. As conclusion, Soft-Rt can predict dose on the PTV accurately, preserving the surrounding healthy tissues. Soft-Rt is coupled with SISCODES code. The SISCODES code is firstly applied to segment the set of CT or MRI patient images in distinct tissues pointing out its respective density and chemical compositions. Later, the voxel model is export to the Soft-Rt IMRT planning module in which a full treatment planning is created. All geometrical parameters are sent to the general purpose Monte Carlo transport code - MCNP - to simulate the interaction of each incident beam towards to the PTV avoiding organs in risk. The normalized dose results are exported to the Soft-Rt out-module, in which the three-dimensional model visualization is shown in a transparent glass procedure adopting gray scale for the dependence on the mass density of the correlated tissue; while, a color scale to depict dose values in a superimpose protocol. (Author)

  5. IMRT treatment of anal cancer with a scrotal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hood, Rodney C.; Wu, Q. Jackie; McMahon, Ryan; Czito, Brian; Willett, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The risk of sterility in males undergoing radiotherapy in the pelvic region indicates the use of a shielding device, which offers protection to the testes for patients wishing to maintain fertility. The use of such devices in the realm of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the pelvic region can pose many obstacles during simulation, treatment planning, and delivery of radiotherapy. This work focuses on the development and execution of an IMRT plan for the treatment of anal cancer using a scrotal shielding device on a clinical patient. An IMRT plan was developed using Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), using a wide array of gantry angles as well as fixed jaw and fluence editing techniques. When possible, the entire target volume was encompassed by the treatment field. When the beam was incident on the scrotal shield, the jaw was fixed to avoid the device and the collimator rotation optimized to irradiate as much of the target as possible. This technique maximizes genital sparing and allows minimal irradiation of the gonads. When this fixed-jaw technique was found to compromise adequate coverage of the target, manual fluence editing techniques were used to avoid the shielding device. Special procedures for simulation, imaging, and treatment verification were also developed. In vivo dosimetry was used to verify and ensure acceptable dose to the gonads. The combination of these techniques resulted in a highly conformal plan that spares organs and risk and avoids the genitals as well as entrance of primary radiation onto the shielding device.

  6. IMRT treatment of anal cancer with a scrotal shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Rodney C; Wu, Q Jackie; McMahon, Ryan; Czito, Brian; Willett, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The risk of sterility in males undergoing radiotherapy in the pelvic region indicates the use of a shielding device, which offers protection to the testes for patients wishing to maintain fertility. The use of such devices in the realm of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the pelvic region can pose many obstacles during simulation, treatment planning, and delivery of radiotherapy. This work focuses on the development and execution of an IMRT plan for the treatment of anal cancer using a scrotal shielding device on a clinical patient. An IMRT plan was developed using Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), using a wide array of gantry angles as well as fixed jaw and fluence editing techniques. When possible, the entire target volume was encompassed by the treatment field. When the beam was incident on the scrotal shield, the jaw was fixed to avoid the device and the collimator rotation optimized to irradiate as much of the target as possible. This technique maximizes genital sparing and allows minimal irradiation of the gonads. When this fixed-jaw technique was found to compromise adequate coverage of the target, manual fluence editing techniques were used to avoid the shielding device. Special procedures for simulation, imaging, and treatment verification were also developed. In vivo dosimetry was used to verify and ensure acceptable dose to the gonads. The combination of these techniques resulted in a highly conformal plan that spares organs and risk and avoids the genitals as well as entrance of primary radiation onto the shielding device. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Verification of eye lens dose in IMRT by MOSFET measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuetao; Li, Guangjun; Zhao, Jianling; Song, Ying; Xiao, Jianghong; Bai, Sen

    2018-04-17

    The eye lens is recognized as one of the most radiosensitive structures in the human body. The widespread use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) complicates dose verification and necessitates high standards of dose computation. The purpose of this work was to assess the computed dose accuracy of eye lens through measurements using a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimetry system. Sixteen clinical IMRT plans of head and neck patients were copied to an anthropomorphic head phantom. Measurements were performed using the MOSFET dosimetry system based on the head phantom. Two MOSFET detectors were imbedded in the eyes of the head phantom as the left and the right lens, covered by approximately 5-mm-thick paraffin wax. The measurement results were compared with the calculated values with a dose grid size of 1 mm. Sixteen IMRT plans were delivered, and 32 measured lens doses were obtained for analysis. The MOSFET dosimetry system can be used to verify the lens dose, and our measurements showed that the treatment planning system used in our clinic can provide adequate dose assessment in eye lenses. The average discrepancy between measurement and calculation was 6.7 ± 3.4%, and the largest discrepancy was 14.3%, which met the acceptability criterion set by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 53 for external beam calculation for multileaf collimator-shaped fields in buildup regions. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. On the role of modeling parameters in IMRT plan optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, Michael; Scherrer, Alexander; Thieke, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The formulation of optimization problems in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning comprises the choice of various values such as function-specific parameters or constraint bounds. In current inverse planning programs that yield a single treatment plan for each optimization, it is often unclear how strongly these modeling parameters affect the resulting plan. This work investigates the mathematical concepts of elasticity and sensitivity to deal with this problem. An artificial planning case with a horse-shoe formed target with different opening angles surrounding a circular risk structure is studied. As evaluation functions the generalized equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and the average underdosage below and average overdosage beyond certain dose thresholds are used. A single IMRT plan is calculated for an exemplary parameter configuration. The elasticity and sensitivity of each parameter are then calculated without re-optimization, and the results are numerically verified. The results show the following. (1) elasticity can quantify the influence of a modeling parameter on the optimization result in terms of how strongly the objective function value varies under modifications of the parameter value. It also can describe how strongly the geometry of the involved planning structures affects the optimization result. (2) Based on the current parameter settings and corresponding treatment plan, sensitivity analysis can predict the optimization result for modified parameter values without re-optimization, and it can estimate the value intervals in which such predictions are valid. In conclusion, elasticity and sensitivity can provide helpful tools in inverse IMRT planning to identify the most critical parameters of an individual planning problem and to modify their values in an appropriate way

  9. Direct aperture optimization for IMRT using Monte Carlo generated beamlets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, Alanah M.; Bush, Karl; Milette, Marie-Pierre; Popescu, I. Antoniu; Otto, Karl; Duzenli, Cheryl

    2006-01-01

    This work introduces an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo (MC) beamlet does distribution matrix into a direct aperture optimization (DAO) algorithm for IMRT inverse planning. The technique is referred to as Monte Carlo-direct aperture optimization (MC-DAO). The goal is to assess if the combination of accurate Monte Carlo tissue inhomogeneity modeling and DAO inverse planning will improve the dose accuracy and treatment efficiency for treatment planning. Several authors have shown that the presence of small fields and/or inhomogeneous materials in IMRT treatment fields can cause dose calculation errors for algorithms that are unable to accurately model electronic disequilibrium. This issue may also affect the IMRT optimization process because the dose calculation algorithm may not properly model difficult geometries such as targets close to low-density regions (lung, air etc.). A clinical linear accelerator head is simulated using BEAMnrc (NRC, Canada). A novel in-house algorithm subdivides the resulting phase space into 2.5x5.0 mm 2 beamlets. Each beamlet is projected onto a patient-specific phantom. The beamlet dose contribution to each voxel in a structure-of-interest is calculated using DOSXYZnrc. The multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf positions are linked to the location of the beamlet does distributions. The MLC shapes are optimized using direct aperture optimization (DAO). A final Monte Carlo calculation with MLC modeling is used to compute the final dose distribution. Monte Carlo simulation can generate accurate beamlet dose distributions for traditionally difficult-to-calculate geometries, particularly for small fields crossing regions of tissue inhomogeneity. The introduction of DAO results in an additional improvement by increasing the treatment delivery efficiency. For the examples presented in this paper the reduction in the total number of monitor units to deliver is ∼33% compared to fluence-based optimization methods

  10. Six years of experience in the planning and verification of the IMRT dynamics with portal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Pardo Perez, E.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Castro Novais, J.; Diaz Gavela, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is the make a review of the method of verification of the IMRT throughout the 6 years of functioning of the service of-radiophysics and radiology protection, analyzing the parameters of each field evaluation to the 718 made IMRT during this period. (Author)

  11. Radiotherapy through intensity modulation (IMRT). A new modality in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besa de C, Pelayo; Venencia M, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the treatment and evaluate the advantages of IMRT in the treatment of head and neck cancer. Material and methods: Four years ago, at the Cancer Center of the Pontificia Universidad Catolica, the IMRT technique for the treatment of head and neck tumors was implemented. The IMRT technique is based on modifying the intensity of the radiation beam through a multisheet collimator in order to produce a more exact distribution in the radiation doses. The results are evaluated with dose/ volume histograms. The distributions of doses and toxicity for tridimensional con formed therapy (CRT-3D) and IMRT are compared. Results: The distribution of the dose in the dose/volume histograms showed a better coverage of the white volume (PTV), with IMRT. The doses received by the organs under risk: salivary glands, eyes, ears and brain diminish with IMRT. The spinal marrow is protected with IMRT without dividing the treatment area, preventing points with lower dosage that could reduce control of the tumor. Conclusions: IMRT achieves a better conformation of the dose obtaining a better coverage of the tumor and higher protection of the organs under risk

  12. Prostate Dose Escalation by a Innovative Inverse Planning-Driven IMRT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing, Lei

    2008-01-01

    ...) Developed a voxel-specific penalty scheme for TRV-based inverse planning; (iv) Established a cine-EPID image retrospective dose reconstruction in IMRT dose delivery for adaptive planning and IMRT dose verification. These works are both timely and important and should lead to widespread impact on prostate cancer management.

  13. Poster - Thur Eve - 29: Detecting changes in IMRT QA using statistical process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drever, L; Salomons, G

    2012-07-01

    Statistical process control (SPC) methods were used to analyze 239 measurement based individual IMRT QA events. The selected IMRT QA events were all head and neck (H&N) cases with 70Gy in 35 fractions, and all prostate cases with 76Gy in 38 fractions planned between March 2009 and 2012. The results were used to determine if the tolerance limits currently being used for IMRT QA were able to indicate if the process was under control. The SPC calculations were repeated for IMRT QA of the same type of cases that were planned after the treatment planning system was upgraded from Eclipse version 8.1.18 to version 10.0.39. The initial tolerance limits were found to be acceptable for two of the three metrics tested prior to the upgrade. After the upgrade to the treatment planning system the SPC analysis found that the a priori limits were no longer capable of indicating control for 2 of the 3 metrics analyzed. The changes in the IMRT QA results were clearly identified using SPC, indicating that it is a useful tool for finding changes in the IMRT QA process. Routine application of SPC to IMRT QA results would help to distinguish unintentional trends and changes from the random variation in the IMRT QA results for individual plans. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Validation of the implementation of IMRT with three dosimetric methods of independent verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortosa Oliver, R. A.; Chinillach ferrando, N.; Alonso Arrizabalaga, S.; Campayo Esteban, J. M.; Morales Marco, J. C.; Soler Catalan, P.; Andreu Martinez, F. J.

    2013-01-01

    The TG119 is a simple and clear framework to verify the implementation of IMRT technique in a radiotherapy service. Verifications of this document recommended tests conducted with the three dosimetric methods listed above, allow to affirm that our Center is within the margins of tolerance considered suitable in the TG119 for the clinical implementation of IMRT. (Author)

  15. GPU-Monte Carlo based fast IMRT plan optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbao Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT plan optimization needs pre-calculated beamlet dose distribution. Pencil-beam or superposition/convolution type algorithms are typically used because of high computation speed. However, inaccurate beamlet dose distributions, particularly in cases with high levels of inhomogeneity, may mislead optimization, hindering the resulting plan quality. It is desire to use Monte Carlo (MC methods for beamlet dose calculations. Yet, the long computational time from repeated dose calculations for a number of beamlets prevents this application. It is our objective to integrate a GPU-based MC dose engine in lung IMRT optimization using a novel two-steps workflow.Methods: A GPU-based MC code gDPM is used. Each particle is tagged with an index of a beamlet where the source particle is from. Deposit dose are stored separately for beamlets based on the index. Due to limited GPU memory size, a pyramid space is allocated for each beamlet, and dose outside the space is neglected. A two-steps optimization workflow is proposed for fast MC-based optimization. At first step, a rough dose calculation is conducted with only a few number of particle per beamlet. Plan optimization is followed to get an approximated fluence map. In the second step, more accurate beamlet doses are calculated, where sampled number of particles for a beamlet is proportional to the intensity determined previously. A second-round optimization is conducted, yielding the final result.Results: For a lung case with 5317 beamlets, 105 particles per beamlet in the first round, and 108 particles per beam in the second round are enough to get a good plan quality. The total simulation time is 96.4 sec.Conclusion: A fast GPU-based MC dose calculation method along with a novel two-step optimization workflow are developed. The high efficiency allows the use of MC for IMRT optimizations.--------------------------------Cite this article as: Li Y, Tian Z

  16. Monte Carlo investigation of collapsed versus rotated IMRT plan verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conneely, Elaine; Alexander, Andrew; Ruo, Russell; Chung, Eunah; Seuntjens, Jan; Foley, Mark J

    2014-05-08

    IMRT QA requires, among other tests, a time-consuming process of measuring the absorbed dose, at least to a point, in a high-dose, low-dose-gradient region. Some clinics use a technique of measuring this dose with all beams delivered at a single gantry angle (collapsed delivery), as opposed to the beams delivered at the planned gantry angle (rotated delivery). We examined, established, and optimized Monte Carlo simulations of the dosimetry for IMRT verification of treatment plans for these two different delivery modes (collapsed versus rotated). The results of the simulations were compared to the treatment planning system dose calculations for the two delivery modes, as well as to measurements taken. This was done in order to investigate the validity of the use of a collapsed delivery technique for IMRT QA. The BEAMnrc, DOSXYZnrc, and egs_chamber codes were utilized for the Monte Carlo simulations along with the MMCTP system. A number of different plan complexity metrics were also used in the analysis of the dose distributions in a bid to qualify why verification in a collapsed delivery may or may not be optimal for IMRT QA. Following the Alfonso et al. formalism, the kfclin,frefQclin,Q correction factor was calculated to correct the deviation of small fields from the reference conditions used for beam calibration. We report on the results obtained for a cohort of 20 patients. The plan complexity was investigated for each plan using the complexity metrics of homogeneity index, conformity index, modulation complexity score, and the fraction of beams from a particular plan that intersect the chamber when performing the QA. Rotated QA gives more consistent results than the collapsed QA technique. The kfclin,frefQclin,Qfactor deviates less from 1 for rotated QA than for collapsed QA. If the homogeneity index is less than 0.05 then the kfclin,frefQclin,Q factor does not deviate from unity by more than 1%. A value this low for the homogeneity index can only be obtained

  17. Prostate Dose Escalation by Innovative Inverse Planning-Driven IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    fLJ and at each step, we find the minimizer u,\\ of J’. The Euler-Lagrange equation for the regularized J’ functional is u- div ( 1 Vu )= f E S1,2A...GD, Agazaryan N, Solberg TD . 2003. The effects of tumor motion on planning and delivery of respiratory-gated IMRT. Med Phys 30:1052-1066. Jaffray DA...modulated) radiation therapy: a review. Phys Med Biol 51 :R403-425. Wink NM, McNitt-Gray MF, Solberg TD . 2005. Optimization of multi-slice helical

  18. Experimental IMRT breast dosimetry in a thorax phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimenta, Elsa B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.; Nogueira, Luciana B.; Lima, Andre C.S., E-mail: elsabpimenta@gmail.com, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: lucibn19@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: radioterapia.andre@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Centro de Tratamento em Radioterapia, Betim, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an essential therapeutic method. RT is often used as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of breast cancer. The dose-volume restrictions of the organs at risk limit the prescribed dose to the target volume and biological and clinical effects may influence the final treatment outcome. The breast RT provides large risks to the adjacent organs and consequently the recommended dosimetry to the prescribed dose volume (PTV) is 50 Gy, lower than the most prescribed dose in other treatments (70-85 Gy). Such values implies in less tumor control compared to other sites. The present research proposal aimed to measure absorbed dose in a thorax phantom with synthetic breasts provided by an Intensity-Modulate Radiation Therapy (IMRT) protocol in a RT center. On the methodology, IMRT protocol was selected following recommendations from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Radiochromic films and a thorax simulator were prepared by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI). Dosimeters were calibrated on a selected linear accelerator (LINAC). The comparison of the dosimetry from treatment planning system (TPS), Xio (Elekta) and from experimental data was performed. The spatial distribution of the breast internal dose and in the adjacent organs was depicted by the experimental data. In the film's calibration, the quadratic polynomial fit presented a satisfactory coefficient. Two-dimensional dose profiles were obtained in the breast suggesting that films can supply details and information that TPS does not provide. At the phantom's dosimetry, the internal mean doses taken at the synthetic breast presented usual values above the prescribed dose, besides overall values were within the dosimetric MSKCC criterion. The non full reproduction of the build-up region in the films had occurred due to the asymmetrical positioning of the films in the inner breast, in addition to their non constant distance from the skin. The hot regions were present may

  19. Experimental IMRT breast dosimetry in a thorax phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimenta, Elsa B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.; Nogueira, Luciana B.; Lima, Andre C.S.

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an essential therapeutic method. RT is often used as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of breast cancer. The dose-volume restrictions of the organs at risk limit the prescribed dose to the target volume and biological and clinical effects may influence the final treatment outcome. The breast RT provides large risks to the adjacent organs and consequently the re